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nyheder2019oktober14

Watch Live: Google's Pixel 4 Hardware Event

New Pixel phones are on the way, and possibly some other hardware surprises. Tune into the live video stream.

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Faced With a Drug Shortfall, Doctors Scramble to Treat Children With Cancer

A critical chemotherapy medication is in short supply, and physicians say there is no appropriate substitute.

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Study finds topsoil is key harbinger of lead exposure risks for children

Tracking lead levels in soil over time is critical for cities to determine lead contamination risks for their youngest and most vulnerable residents, according to a new study.

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The power of unbroken bonds

Sticking with the same mate pays evolutionary dividends.

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Investing in love and affection pays off for species that mate for life

A new study by biologists explains how sexual cooperation and bonding evolves in bird species that form pair bonds.

30min

Non-pharmacologic treatments may be more effective for psychiatric symptoms of dementia

A systematic review and meta-analysis suggests outdoor activities were more clinically effective than anti-psychotic medication for treating physical aggression in patients with dementia. For patients with physical agitation, massage and touch therapy were more efficacious than usual care or caregiver support.

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Women have substantially less influence on Twitter than men in academic medicine

Women who are health policy or health services researchers face a significant disparity in social media influence compared to their male peers, according to a new study. Although the average number of tweets among all researchers tend to be consistent, women trail behind men in follower counts, regardless of how active they are on Twitter.

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Sleep apnea linked to blinding eye disease in people with diabetes

New research from Taiwan shows that severe sleep apnea is a risk factor for developing diabetic macular edema, a complication of diabetes that can cause vision loss or blindness.

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Rumbling 'Marsquakes' on the Red Planet are Mystifying and Exciting Scientists

NASA's InSight lander has its seismic instrument tucked under a shield to protect it from wind and extreme temperatures. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech) NASA’s Mars InSight spacecraft landed on the Red Planet in November 2018. Scientists equipped the mission with a seismometer so they could learn how Mars releases seismic energy — that is, to get a feel for how the Red Planet rumbles. So far, InSight h

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Astronomers Zoom in on a Galaxy 9 Billion Light-years Away Thanks to Gravitational Lensing

(Credit: MIT/Image courtesy of the researchers) When even the most powerful telescopes can’t capture the views you want, it helps to have natural magnifying glasses to rely on. In a paper published Monday in Nature Astronomy, researchers describe how they zoomed in to capture a young, star-forming galaxy roughly nine billion light-years away in X-ray light. To study such a distant galaxy, they use

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Author Correction: Multimodal imaging analyses in patients with genetic and sporadic forms of small vessel disease

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51400-9

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Author Correction: Parasite transmission between trophic levels stabilizes predator–prey interaction

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49487-1

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Author Correction: Ras hyperactivation versus overexpression: Lessons from Ras dynamics in Candida albicans

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43265-9

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Author Correction: Reprogramming Escherichia coli for the production of prenylated indole diketopiperazine alkaloids

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51404-5

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Common drug could prevent thousands of head injury deaths

Researchers say tranexamic acid treatment has potential to save tens of thousands of lives A cheap and widely available drug could reduce the risk of death from common head injuries and save tens of thousands of lives each year, researchers say. Tranexamic acid slows down the breakdown of blood clots, and is already used to control heavy bleeding in people who have experienced trauma elsewhere in

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Controversial AI expert admits to plagiarism, blames hectic schedule

People scrolling through Siraj Raval’s Twitter feed, or watching his videos or paying money to hear his insights on “data literacy” likely expect that what they’re hearing are original pearls from an AI expert. Apparently, they shouldn’t. Raval has admitted to stealing large amounts of text in a recently published paper on “neural qubit,” which … Continue reading

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MacOS 10.15 Catalina Review: More Mobile, More Security, no More iTunes

Apple's new desktop operating system makes your iPad into a second monitor, puts mobile apps on your Mac, and kills iTunes.

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Robot Rocket Printers, 'Fornite' Disappears, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Non-pharmacologic treatments may be more effective for psychiatric symptoms of dementia

A systematic review and meta-analysis, led by St. Michael's Hospital of Unity Health Toronto and the University of Calgary, suggests outdoor activities were more clinically effective than anti-psychotic medication for treating physical aggression in patients with dementia. For patients with physical agitation, massage and touch therapy were more efficacious than usual care or caregiver support.

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Aggressive and agitated behaviors in dementia are better treated without medications

Nonpharmacologic treatments, such as massage and touch therapy, seemed to be more effective than pharmacologic treatments for reducing aggression and agitation in adults with dementia. Findings from a systematic review and meta-analysis are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Uber lays off 350 employees in Eats, autonomous vehicles

Uber is laying off 350 employees from its food delivery, autonomous vehicles, safety, insurance and other teams.

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Ford Patents Drone That Pops Out of a Car’s Trunk

Ford’s Focus The spare tire stashed in your car’s trunk for emergencies might soon be joined by a drone. On Thursday, the U.S. Patent and Trademark’s office published a patent application submitted by Ford Motor Company subsidiary Ford Global Technologies. It seems the American automaker is developing a system that would allow drivers to deploy and control a drone stored in their car’s trunk. Saf

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The most undervalued skill? Lateral thinking.

Lateral thinking is a way of approaching problems. It deliberately forgoes obvious approaches in favor of oblique or unexpected ones. Deliberately ignoring perfectly good but straightforward solutions enables us to find hidden innovations we would otherwise miss. Edward de Bono, who developed the concept of lateral thinking, lays out 4 specific lateral thinking techniques: awareness, random stimu

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Amazon clearing boosts malaria cases – to a point

Researchers discover a feedback loop that renders people too sick to cut down trees. Barry Keily reports.

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Dementia patients do better without drugs

Meta-analysis finds non-pharmacological interventions are more effective for easing behavioural symptoms.Paul Biegler reports.

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New insights into habitability of Venus

Study finds lava flow didn’t contain water as previously thought. Richard A Lovett reports.

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The power of unbroken bonds

Sticking with the same mate pays evolutionary dividends.

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Being stressed and pregnant doesn't bode well for babies

Study underscores the importance of social support for expecting mums. Natalie Parletta reports.

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From chaos, sticky order

Researchers used nanomanufacturing to create a substance that will stick to just about anything.

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Breast cancer vaccine could be available in 8 years, says Mayo Clinic

Clinical trials of an immunotherapy treatment for breast cancer showed positive signs, and the researchers hope to move to larger trials in coming years. Immunotherapies train the body's immune system to find and kill cancer cells without harming healthy cells. Recent trials of immunotherapies for other cancers have also showed positive signs. None A vaccine that prevents the recurrence and devel

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How Eliud Kipchoge Pulled Off His Epic, Sub-2-Hour Marathon

Sports physiologist Michael Joyner breaks down what it takes to run a marathon in less than two hours—and how it could happen again.

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Elon Musk: Tesla Is Making An “Armored Personnel Carrier”

Cybertruck Mercurial Tesla CEO Elon Musk issued a rare update on the company’s in-development pickup truck Sunday night, tweeting that the forthcoming vehicle will be “closer to an armored personnel carrier from the future” than any images we’ve seen publicly. Musk also gave the truck, a new name: the “Cybertruck.” Cybertruck doesn’t look like anything I’ve seen bouncing around the Internet. It’s

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Rx for Doctors: Stop With the Urine Tests

The tests often are positive in people without symptoms, particularly older patients. The result: overtreatment with antibiotics.

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Google Buries the Hatchet With Yubico, Brings Physical Security Keys With USB-C

After launching its Titan Key last year, Google has returned with a new version of its two-factor security dongle featuring USB-C. Read more…

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The Cosmos' Most Powerful Magnets May Form When Stars Collide

These snapshots of two merging stars in action show the overall strength of the magnetic field in color (yellow is more magnetic), as well as the magnetic field lines (hatching). The stars on the left, which don't have very strong magnetic fields, are just about to merge into a more massive and magnetic star (right). According to new research, such mergers can dramatically bolster the strength of

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Mindfulness may benefit people on methadone

Mindfulness techniques and methadone may reduce cravings and pain among people experiencing opioid addiction and chronic pain, research finds. The study, published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence , involved 30 patients. The findings showed that those who received methadone and a mindfulness training-based intervention were 1.3 times better at controlling their cravings and had signific

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Canada Gets its First Smilodon

Fossils found near Medicine Hat, Alberta expand the sabercat's range by over 600 miles. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Microsoft Xbox Introduces Content Filters to Help Purge Your Life of Toxic Trolls

Just over a year after Microsoft started cracking down on toxicity on Xbox, the company will now help users crackdown on the toxic interactions that are just considered par for the course when …

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Renewables overtake hydrocarbons in UK electricity generation: study

Renewable sources generated more of Britain's electricity than fossil fuels for the first time last quarter, according to analysis by specialist website "Carbon Brief" published Monday.

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Faraday Future founder files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

Faraday Future founder Jia Yueting has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in a bid to settle his exorbitant personal debts. The move is part of a larger recovery plan, and it's meant, …

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Fortnite: Chapter 2 Season 1 update revealed with brand new map and features after trailer is leaked

A huge new Fortnite update has seemingly been revealed in a leaked trailer.

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Airline Unveils Robot Avatars It Hopes Will Replace Flying

Commercial air travel is something of a necessary evil. Want to spend Christmas with your parents on the opposite coast? You’ll need to spend hours in line at the airport first. Or maybe visiting the pyramids is on your bucket list? Might as well add “spend 15 hours squished between two strangers” to the list before you settle into your tiny middle seat. And those scenarios don’t even take into a

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A New Project Is Helping Map Every Cell in the Human Body

Every day, tens of trillions of cells in your body work in unison to keep you alive. Now, an ambitious new project coordinated by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has set out to help map each of those cells and to track how they cooperate to keep the human body running. The workings of the human body are a tightly coordinated concert of cellular activity. While we know much about the ways

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Stress during pregnancy may affect baby's sex, risk of preterm birth

A new study has identified markers of maternal stress — both physical and psychological — that may influence a baby's sex and the likelihood of preterm birth.

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Study finds topsoil is key harbinger of lead exposure risks for children

Tracking lead levels in soil over time is critical for cities to determine lead contamination risks for their youngest and most vulnerable residents, according to a new Tulane University study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Estuarine waters hold promise in global pain-relief hunt

The worldwide search for an opioid alternative has made a leap forward — with a scientific discovery in an Australian fungus indicating effective pain relief and the potential for a safer less addictive drug, helping address the opioid epidemic of deaths by overdose.

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Investing in love and affection pays off for species that mate for life

A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by biologists at the University of Chicago and the University of North Carolina explains how sexual cooperation and bonding evolves in bird species that form pair bonds.

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Aerogel Mars

A novel idea for local terraforming of Mars raises interesting possibilities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How a Tiny Pit Decides a Pine Tree's Fate

Live fast, die young, and leave a good lookin’ stump — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Could micro-organisms revolutionise our food?

Entrepreneurs seek alternative sources of protein to meet growing demand

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Brief overview of new IPCC report on oceans and ice risks

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections On the heels of its August special report on climate and land , the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in late September published another special report, this one focused on oceans and ice . This latest report was authored by 104 climate scientists from 36 countries and reflecting findings in 6,981 studies. It contains a wealth of inf

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Walking speed at 45 may indicate accelerated aging

The walking speed of 45-year-olds, particularly their fastest walking speed without running, may indicate the aging of their brains and bodies, according to a new study in New Zealand. The findings show that slower walkers have “accelerated aging” on a 19-measure scale—and their lungs, teeth, and immune systems tend to be in worse shape than the people who walked faster. “The thing that’s really

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People and clams have a more complex history than you might think

Human-mollusk relationships span millennia

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UCB Cuts 2.1 Billion Deal to Acquire Ra Pharma

The move will allow the Belgium-headquartered biopharmaceutical giant to boost its work on treatments for rare diseases.

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Study finds topsoil is key harbinger of lead exposure risks for children

Tracking lead levels in soil over time is critical for cities to determine lead contamination risks for their youngest and most vulnerable residents, according to a new Tulane University study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Investing in love and affection pays off for species that mate for life

The males of species that form long-lasting pair-bonds, like many birds, often continue to make elaborate displays of plumage, colors and dances after they mate with a female. While their time and energy might be better spent taking care of their offspring, these displays also encourage the female to invest more of their energy into the brood.

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Investing in love and affection pays off for species that mate for life

The males of species that form long-lasting pair-bonds, like many birds, often continue to make elaborate displays of plumage, colors and dances after they mate with a female. While their time and energy might be better spent taking care of their offspring, these displays also encourage the female to invest more of their energy into the brood.

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Student of the stars: How do you become an astronomer?

What's the difference between an astronomer and an astrophysicist? NASA's Michelle Thaller explains that these terms are used interchangeably: both are physicists who study objects and phenomena in the sky. How can you become an astronomer? There is a defined path to take: Do an undergrad degree in astrophysics, physics, mathematics or computer science, then complete a doctorate in astrophysics.

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Portland Company Builds First Of Its Kind Renewable Wave Energy Device

submitted by /u/MinutePhrase [link] [comments]

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Easy Graphene Sheets Laminator & Graphite

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

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Lakes worldwide are experiencing more severe algal blooms

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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Agility Robotics Unveils Upgraded Digit Walking Robot

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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Watch: World's first hydrogen-powered boat docks in London

submitted by /u/sn0r [link] [comments]

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NASA Engineer Says New Thruster Could Reach 99% Speed of Light

Thruster Buster New Scientist is reporting that NASA engineer David Burns is making some bold claims about a conceptual new spaceship thruster he calls the “helical engine” — a concept the magazine admits “may violate the laws of physics.” “The engine itself would be able to get to 99 per cent the speed of light if you had enough time and power,” Burns told New Scientist . Light Speed The engine,

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Barn med reumatism prövar låginflammatorisk kost

Traditionellt behandlas barn och tonåringar med läkemedel för att dämpa smärta och inflammation, men även med träning av rörlighet och styrka. – Förhoppningen är att barn och tonåringar ska få antiinflammatorisk hjälp av kosten, som ett komplement till annan behandling eller som enda behandling av sin ledsjukdom. Det skulle kunna innebära ett mindre behov av långverkande antireumatisk läkemedelsb

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How designers are fighting the rise of facial recognition technology

To combat the rise of facial-recognition technology, designers have created clothing and accessories that helps to conceal people's identities from A.I. Although some of these inventions appear to be effective, their main point seems to be to raise awareness about facial-recognition technology. In the U.S., surveys suggests that most Americans would oppose strictly limiting the government's abili

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5G: Läs experternas svar på era frågor

Med anledning av programmet ”5G – supertekniken som skrämmer” som sändes i Vetenskapens Värld måndagen den 14 oktober anordnade vi en chatt. Läs frågorna och experternas svar här nedanför.

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Life sciences hit by ‘lost decade’ as investment falls

Think-tank says urgent action needed if sector is to help sustain economy after Brexit

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Unlocking the biochemical treasure chest within microbes

An international team of scientists has developed a genetic engineering tool that makes producing and analyzing microbial secondary metabolites — the basis for many important agricultural, industrial, and medical products — easier than ever before, and could even lead to breakthroughs in biomanufacturing.

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Lakes worldwide are experiencing more severe algal blooms

The intensity of summer algal blooms has increased over the past three decades, according to a first-ever global survey of dozens of large, freshwater lakes. Researchers used 30 years of data from the Landsat 5 near-Earth satellite and created a partnership with Google Earth Engine to reveal long-term trends in summer algal blooms in 71 large lakes in 33 countries on six continents.

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How to control friction in topological insulators

Topological insulators are innovative materials that conduct electricity on the surface, but act as insulators on the inside. Physicists have begun investigating how they react to friction. Their experiment shows that the heat generated through friction is significantly lower than in conventional materials. This is due to a new quantum mechanism, the researchers report.

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Scientists pinpoint cause of harmful dendrites and whiskers in lithium batteries

Scientists have uncovered a root cause of the growth of needle-like structures — known as dendrites and whiskers — that plague lithium batteries, sometimes causing a short circuit, failure, or even a fire. Such defects are a major factor holding back the batteries from even more widespread use and further improvement.

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Unlocking the biochemical treasure chest within microbes

An international team of scientists has developed a genetic engineering tool that makes producing and analyzing microbial secondary metabolites — the basis for many important agricultural, industrial, and medical products — easier than ever before, and could even lead to breakthroughs in biomanufacturing.

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This Interstellar Space Rock Looks a Lot Like Our Own Solar System's Comets

The Gemini Observatory in Hawaii caught this first-ever color image of the interstellar comet Borisov and its faint tail. (Credit:Composite image by Travis Rector. Credit: Gemini Observatory/NSF/AURA) Asteroids, comets and other rocky objects litter the solar system, left over from when the planets formed. Scientists study these space rocks to learn about what the early solar system was like. Now,

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Some cases of SIDS may have this genetic cause

New research links a genetic anomaly and some forms of SIDS, or sudden infant death syndrome, which claims the lives of more than 3,000 infants a year. The research, published in Nature Communications , focuses on mitochondrial tri-functional protein deficiency, a potentially fatal cardiac metabolic disorder caused by a genetic mutation in the gene HADHA. Newborns with this genetic anomaly can’t

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Could cricket and worm burgers help save the planet?

Insects are being touted as an eco-friendly protein source, but do bug burgers pass the taste test?

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Prestigious journal rejects paper about chemical attack in Syria after backlash

Science and Global Security editors decide not to publish study that cast doubt on Syrian government's responsibility

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Not cross bunnies: can a pet rabbit ever be happy?

A study of more than 6,000 rabbits treated by vets has found that many lead sad lives. Here’s how to make sure they stay healthy and avoid loneliness There are thought to be more than 1.5m pet rabbits in the UK, and a large proportion of them could be leading very sad lives. A study of more than 6,000 rabbits treated by vets found alarming health conditions such as overgrown nails and teeth, dige

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Sensory and motor brain plasticity is not limited by location

The new function of unused cortical regions is not necessarily determined by the function of nearby cortical regions, according to new research in adults born without one hand, published in JNeurosci.

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Saturns 20 nye måner mangler navne: Du kan være med til at bestemme dem

Det er en fordel at kende en masse til nordisk mytologi, hvis du vil sætte et præg på navnene.

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Safari in iOS 13 was sending browsing data to Chinese tech giant Tencent

Most may not be aware of it, but Apple's web browser has been sending data to Google Safe Browsing for years. This is done to protect users against phishing scams, by using an interstitial screen …

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Netgear Orbi Dual-Band Mesh Wi-Fi Router Rocks Chic Redesign And Value Pricing

Netgear’s Orbi family of mesh Wi-Fi routers took the market by storm a few years ago, providing excellent coverage for larger homes, built-in GbE ports for connected wired devices, and a dedicated …

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Study Retracted: Edits Won’t Doom CRISPR Babies to Early Death

In November 2018, Chinese scientist He Jiankui announced that he’d gene-edited human embryos, resulting in the births of the first CRISPR babies. As if that wasn’t shocking enough , the experiment seemingly got even more disturbing roughly six months later. That’s when a team of scientists from UC Berkeley published a study in the journal Nature Medicine claiming that He’s edits increased the lik

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New Chinese Military Aircraft Looks Exactly Like a Flying Saucer

Flying Saucer Images from an aviation expo in China show a new Chinese military aircraft that looks strikingly like a flying saucer out of a vintage UFO movie . Last week, photos started circulating online of a craft with an alien-looking outer shell and a central cockpit. By Friday, the state-run Chinese newspaper Global Times had seemingly confirmed that the vehicle is an experimental attack he

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The comet that came in from interstellar space

Nature, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03102-5 The short-tailed 2I/Borisov is only the second known visitor to the Solar System from another star system.

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Violent spoof video of Trump killing his critics shows how memes have reshaped politics

The video's airing at a conservative event — and its mass sharing afterward — revealed how the once-fringe movements of online trolling and meme-making have helped reshape mainstream politics …

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Scientists help immune system find hidden cancer cells

Cancer cells are masters at avoiding detection, but a new system can make them stand out from the crowd and help the immune system spot and eliminate tumors that other forms of immunotherapies might miss.

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Researchers explore spinal discs' early response to injury and ways to improve it

Researchers showed in animal models that the default injury response of spinal discs can be temporarily stopped to allow for better treatment.

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Reading the past like an open book: Researchers use text to measure 200 years of happiness

Using innovative new methods researchers have built a new index that uses data from books and newspaper to track levels of national happiness from 1820. Their research could help governments to make better decisions about policy priorities.

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New genetic-based epilepsy risk scores

An international team of researchers has developed new genetic-based epilepsy risk scores which may lay the foundation for a more personalized method of epilepsy diagnosis and treatment. This analysis is the largest study of epilepsy genetics to date, as well as the largest study of epilepsy using human samples.

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Not enough sleep throws your circadian rhythm, leading to potential cognitive problems

Two new studies indicate what happens when your natural circadian rhythm is disrupted by not enough sleep. The production of essential proteins is disrupted by a lack of sleep, which could result in cognitive decline. From dementia to an uptick in obesity, sleep deprivation wreaks havoc in your physiology. None As sleep science continues to discover the necessary benefits of a good night's rest,

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2021 Moon Rover Will Have Legs Instead of Wheels

Space Legs The United Kingdom plans to send its first lunar rover to the Moon in 2021 — and the robot is unlike any that came before it. Not only will the rover created UK-based space startup SpaceBit be the smallest one in history, but it will also have legs rather than wheels — a design innovation that could allow it to explore previously unreachable areas of the Moon. Small Package SpaceBit un

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The Mystery of the Melanistic Manta Rays

Scientists are trying to work out why some manta rays have black blotches on their skin, which is uncommon in the oceans.

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Astronomer Royal: We're destroying the book of life before reading it

In a talk on energy policy, artificial intelligence and space exploration Astronomer Royal Martin Rees called for urgent action at a crucial turning point for humanity

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Astronomers use giant galaxy cluster as X-ray magnifying lens

Astronomers have used a massive cluster of galaxies as an X-ray magnifying glass to peer back in time, to nearly 9.4 billion years ago. In the process, they spotted a tiny dwarf galaxy in its very first, high-energy stages of star formation.

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Cheaper catalyst can generate hydrogen in a commercial device

Researchers have shown for the first time that a cheap catalyst can split water and generate hydrogen gas for hours on end in the harsh environment of a commercial electrolyzer — a step toward clean, large-scale hydrogen production for fuel, fertilizer and industry.

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Scientists reveal mechanism of electron charge exchange in molecules

Through a new scanning transmission electron microscopy method, researchers are able to observe electron distribution between atoms and molecules and uncover clues to the origins of ferroelectricity, the capacity of certain crystals to possess spontaneous electric polarization that can be switched by the application of an electric field. The research also revealed the mechanism of charge transfer

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Boosting NAD+ Levels May Be the Key to Effective Anti-Aging Treatments, Study Finds

Human beings have been searching for the fountain of youth since the dawn of time, whether we’re talking about a literal fountain , or a figurative one. Unfortunately, as you probably know, no such fountain exists. We simply cannot stop aging—not with a pill, not with a cream, not with a serum, not even with an elixir. But here’s a big fat however for you. Though we cannot actually stop aging, th

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Unique sticky particles formed by harnessing chaos

New research shows that unique materials with distinct properties akin to those of gecko feet – the ability to stick to just about any surface — can be created by harnessing liquid-driven chaos to produce soft polymer microparticles with hierarchical branching on the micro- and nanoscale.

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Living with Disease-Carrying Mosquitoes

Thailand’s is trying to communicate the risk through museum exhibitions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study shows a much cheaper catalyst can generate hydrogen in a commercial device

Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have shown for the first time that a cheap catalyst can split water and generate hydrogen …

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Air pollution linked to 'missed' miscarriages in China: study

Exposure to airborne pollutants increases the risk of "missed" miscarriages in which a fetus dies without a pregnant woman experiencing any noticeable symptoms, researchers said Monday.

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Daily briefing: Negative result deepens vaping sickness mystery

Nature, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03128-9 Researchers are struggling to even categorize the chemicals contained in e-cigarettes, three ‘randomistas’ have won the economics Nobel prize and why Gandhi’s commitment to sustainable science might be more relevant than ever.

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Kelp Elevator Could Give Biofuels a Lift

An experiment off the coast of California may bolster efforts to make biocrude from "the Sequoia of the sea." Kelp_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Maurice Roper, USC Wrigley Institute Technology Monday, October 14, 2019 – 11:45 Katharine Gammon, Contributor Inside Science — Catalina Island, 25 miles off the coast of Los Angeles, is known for pristine coastlines, epic snorkeling, and panoramic vie

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The nano-guitar string that plays itself

Scientists have created a nano-electronic circuit which vibrates without any external force. Just as a guitar string vibrates when plucked, the wire — 100,000 times thinner than a guitar string — vibrates when forced into motion by an oscillating voltage. The surprise came when they repeated the experiment without the forcing voltage. Under the right conditions, the wire oscillated of its own ac

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Dementia spreads via connected brain networks

Scientists used maps of brain connections to predict how brain atrophy would spread in individual patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), adding to growing evidence that the loss of brain cells associated with dementia spreads via the synaptic connections between established brain networks.

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Shipment tracking for 'fat parcels' in the body

Without fat, nothing works in the body: These substances serve as energy suppliers and important building blocks — including for the envelopes of living cells. Numerous diseases are related to disorders in the fat metabolism, such as obesity or cancer. Researchers are now demonstrating how the fat metabolism can be monitored down to the individual liver cell of a mouse with the greatest sensitivi

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Evolutionary history of oaks

Oaks have a complex evolutionary history that has long eluded scientists. New research, however, provides the most detailed account to date of the evolution of oaks, recovering the 56-million-year history that has made the oaks one of the most diverse, abundant and important woody plant groups to the ecology and economy of the northern hemisphere.

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Unique sticky particles formed by harnessing chaos

New research shows that unique materials with distinct properties akin to those of gecko feet – the ability to stick to just about any surface — can be created by harnessing liquid-driven chaos to produce soft polymer microparticles with hierarchical branching on the micro- and nanoscale.

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Living with Disease-Carrying Mosquitoes

Thailand’s is trying to communicate the risk through museum exhibitions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Postdocs More Important to Grad Students’ Skills than PIs Are

According to a new study, active participation in lab discussions from more senior lab members is positively linked to grad students’ abilities.

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Snapchat users can share Reddit posts directly with their friends

Snapchat is rolling out an easy way for you to share the best things you find on Reddit with your friends. You'll see Snapchat among the options when you tap the share button on …

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'Fortnite' Disappeared Over the Weekend

The massively popular game concluded its tenth season by going offline, and leaving a string of numbers, 'Lost'-style, in its place.

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New environment laws in Queen's speech

Crime and health take centre stage, but opposition parties dismiss the programme as "election manifesto".

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Microbleeds may worsen outcome after head injury

Using advanced imaging, researchers have uncovered new information regarding traumatic microbleeds, which appear as small, dark lesions on MRI scans after head injury but are typically too small to be detected on CT scans. The findings published in Brain suggest that traumatic microbleeds are a form of injury to brain blood vessels and may predict worse outcomes. The study was conducted in part by

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How mucus tames microbes

New research reveals that glycans — branched sugar molecules found in mucus — can prevent bacteria from communicating with each other and forming infectious biofilms, effectively rendering the microbes harmless.

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Study reveals how mucus tames microbes

More than 200 square meters of our bodies—including the digestive tract, lungs, and urinary tract—are lined with mucus. In recent years, scientists have found some evidence that mucus is not …

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One Amino Acid Can Be Enough

You know, we’re all mutants. No, not just those of us reading (or writing!) this web site, I mean all of us. We all have regions of our genome that are highly variable , of course – the sequences (often based on number of repeat markers) that are used in forensic DNA analysis or the mitochondrial regions used in paternity tests, for example – but we also have variations in all sorts of common DNA

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Air Pollution Is Linked to Miscarriages in China, Study Finds

A new study published on Monday adds to growing evidence of the negative health effects of air pollution on pregnant women and their fetuses.

7h

You’re Swabbing a Dead Gorilla for Ebola. Then It Gets Worse.

Carrion flies inside your hood. Sweat turns your gloves into water balloons. This is tough work, but it could predict disease outbreaks.

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Why Season 2 of Succession Was So Extraordinary

This article contains spoilers through the finale of Succession Season 2 . Water is never a good omen on Succession . In the Season 1 episode “Austerlitz,” the ill-fated infinity pool in the New Mexico desert led to a tweedy psychotherapist losing his front teeth; at the close of the episode, as Logan Roy (played by Brian Cox) swam a few laps, viewers were able to see for a moment the scars that

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High levels of air pollution seem to be linked to early miscarriages

Pregnant women who live and work in places with a lot of air pollution appear to be more likely to experience missed miscarriages

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Real-space charge-density imaging with sub-ångstrom resolution by four-dimensional electron microscopy

Nature, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1649-6

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Widespread global increase in intense lake phytoplankton blooms since the 1980s

Nature, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1648-7

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Interstellar Comet with a Familiar Look

A new comet discovered by amateur astronomer Gennady Borisov is an outcast from another star system, yet its properties determined so far are surprisingly familiar — a new study led by JU researchers shows. The team's findings are being published in Nature Astronomy on 14 October 2019.

7h

Unique sticky particles formed by harnessing chaos

New research from North Carolina State University shows that unique materials with distinct properties akin to those of gecko feet – the ability to stick to just about any surface — can be created by harnessing liquid-driven chaos to produce soft polymer microparticles with hierarchical branching on the micro- and nanoscale.

7h

Study shows a much cheaper catalyst can generate hydrogen in a commercial device

SLAC and Stanford researchers have shown for the first time that a cheap catalyst can split water and generate hydrogen gas for hours on end in the harsh environment of a commercial electrolyzer — a step toward clean, large-scale hydrogen production for fuel, fertilizer and industry.

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Scientists pinpoint cause of harmful dendrites and whiskers in lithium batteries

Scientists have uncovered a root cause of the growth of needle-like structures — known as dendrites and whiskers — that plague lithium batteries, sometimes causing a short circuit, failure, or even a fire. Such defects are a major factor holding back the batteries from even more widespread use and further improvement.

7h

Shipment tracking for 'fat parcels' in the body

Without fat, nothing works in the body: These substances serve as energy suppliers and important building blocks — including for the envelopes of living cells. Numerous diseases are related to disorders in the fat metabolism, such as obesity or cancer. Researchers from the University of Bonn are now demonstrating how the fat metabolism can be monitored down to the individual liver cell of a mouse

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UCI scientists reveal mechanism of electron charge exchange in molecules

Through a new scanning transmission electron microscopy method, researchers at the University of California, Irvine are able to observe electron distribution between atoms and molecules and uncover clues to the origins of ferroelectricity, the capacity of certain crystals to possess spontaneous electric polarization that can be switched by the application of an electric field. The research, which

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Dementia spreads via connected brain networks

In a new study, UC San Francisco scientists used maps of brain connections to predict how brain atrophy would spread in individual patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), adding to growing evidence that the loss of brain cells associated with dementia spreads via the synaptic connections between established brain networks.

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The nano-guitar string that plays itself

Scientists have created a nano-electronic circuit which vibrates without any external force. Just as a guitar string vibrates when plucked, the wire — 100,000 times thinner than a guitar string — vibrates when forced into motion by an oscillating voltage. The surprise came when they repeated the experiment without the forcing voltage. Under the right conditions, the wire oscillated of its own ac

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Reading the past like an open book: Researchers use text to measure 200 years of happiness

Using innovative new methods researchers at the University of Warwick, University of Glasgow Adam Smith Business School and The Alan Turing Institute in London have built a new index that uses data from books and newspaper to track levels of national happiness from 1820. Their research could help governments to make better decisions about policy priorities.

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Lakes worldwide are experiencing more severe algal blooms

The intensity of summer algal blooms has increased over the past three decades, according to a first-ever global survey of dozens of large, freshwater lakes, which was conducted by Carnegie's Jeff Ho and Anna Michalak and NASA's Nima Pahlevan. They used 30 years of data from the Landsat 5 near-Earth satellite and created a partnership with Google Earth Engine to reveal long-term trends in summer a

7h

Researchers explore spinal discs' early response to injury and ways to improve it

Researchers showed in animal models that the default injury response of spinal discs can be temporarily stopped to allow for better treatment.

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How to control friction in topological insulators

Topological insulators are innovative materials that conduct electricity on the surface, but act as insulators on the inside. Physicists at the University of Basel and the Istanbul Technical University have begun investigating how they react to friction. Their experiment shows that the heat generated through friction is significantly lower than in conventional materials. This is due to a new quant

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Unlocking the biochemical treasure chest within microbes

An international team of scientists lead by the Joint Genome Institute has developed a genetic engineering tool that makes producing and analyzing microbial secondary metabolites — the basis for many important agricultural, industrial, and medical products — easier than ever before, and could even lead to breakthroughs in biomanufacturing.

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Is bipolar disorder associated with increased risk of Parkinson's disease?

This study, called a systematic review and meta-analysis, combined the results of seven studies with 4.3 million participants to examine a potential association between bipolar disorder with a later diagnosis of Parkinson's disease of unknown cause.

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Emerging increase in electronic cigarette use by young adults between 2017-2018

This research letter uses updated national survey data for 2018 to estimate how common electronic cigarette use is among adults 18 and older in the United States. The analysis included about 153,000 survey participants, of whom 55% were women. The authors report that while current e-cigarette use decreased from 3.7% in 2014 to 2.8% in 2017, it increased again in 2018 to 3.2%.

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Clinical trial tests varenicline to help adolescents, young adults quit smoking

Many adult cigarette smokers start before they turn 21 and this randomized clinical trial of volunteer participants tested how effective the smoking-cessation medication varenicline was in helping adolescents and young adults to quit. The 157 volunteers seeking treatment to quit ranged in age from 14 to 21; 77 participants received a 12-week course of varenicline and 80 received placebo but both g

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Breastfeeding disparities among us children by race/ethnicity

Overall rates of breastfeeding increased from 2009 to 2015 but they varied by race/ethnicity in this observational study that used national survey data for nearly 168,000 infants in the United States.

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Astronomers use giant galaxy cluster as X-ray magnifying lens

Astronomers at MIT and elsewhere have used a massive cluster of galaxies as an X-ray magnifying glass to peer back in time, to nearly 9.4 billion years ago. In the process, they spotted a tiny dwarf galaxy in its very first, high-energy stages of star formation.

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Women have substantially less influence on Twitter than men in academic medicine

Women who are health policy or health services researchers face a significant disparity in social media influence compared to their male peers, according to a new study. Although the average number of tweets among all researchers tend to be consistent, women trail behind men in follower counts, regardless of how active they are on Twitter.

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Yale scientists help immune system find hidden cancer cells

Cancer cells are masters at avoiding detection, but a new system developed by Yale scientists can make them stand out from the crowd and help the immune system spot and eliminate tumors that other forms of immunotherapies might miss, researchers report Oct. 14, 2019 in the journal Nature Immunology.

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Study reveals how mucus tames microbes

A study from MIT reveals glycans, branched sugar molecules found in mucus, can prevent bacteria from communicating with each other and forming infectious biofilms, effectively rendering the microbes harmless.

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Funding for child gun death research is 30X too low

Firearm injuries kill 2,500 American children each year, and send another 12,000 to the emergency department. Research funding isn’t keeping up, research shows. A new study finds that the nation spends far less on studying what leads to these injuries and what might prevent and treat them, than it spends on other, less-common causes of death in children between the ages of 1 and 18 years. In fact

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Interstellar comet just like ones from our solar system – astronomers

Scientists tracking 2I/Borisov say some formation processes may be common between stars The first interstellar comet to be tracked by astronomers as it hurtles through the solar system is unremarkable in every way apart from where it comes from, researchers have said. Scientists reached the conclusion after observing 2I/Borisov with two of the most powerful telescopes on Earth. They decided that

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Shipment tracking for 'fat parcels' in the body

Without fat, nothing works in the body: Fats serve as energy suppliers and important building blocks, including for the envelopes of living cells. Numerous diseases are related to disorders in fat metabolism such as obesity and cancer. Researchers from the LIMES Institute at the University of Bonn are now demonstrating how fat metabolism can be monitored down to the individual liver cell of a mous

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Unlocking the biochemical treasure chest within microbes

Secondary metabolites—the compounds produced by microbes to mediate internal and external messaging, self-defense, and chemical warfare—are the basis for hundreds of invaluable agricultural, industrial, and medical products. And given the increasing pace of discovery of new, potentially valuable secondary metabolites, it's clear that microbes have a great deal more to offer.

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Study reveals how mucus tames microbes

More than 200 square meters of our bodies—including the digestive tract, lungs, and urinary tract—are lined with mucus. In recent years, scientists have found some evidence that mucus is not just a physical barrier that traps bacteria and viruses, but it can also disarm pathogens and prevent them from causing infections.

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The cosmic war between monotony and creativity | David Deutsch

Theoretical physicist David Deutsch delivers a mind-bending meditation on the "great monotony" — the idea that nothing novel has appeared in the universe for billions of years — and shows how humanity's capacity to create explanatory knowledge could be the thing that bucks this trend. "Humans are not playthings of cosmic forces," he says. "We are users of cosmic forces."

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Underwater volcano belched explosive bubbles larger than a stadium

Secrets of Bogoslof’s long 2017 eruption teased out through low-frequency sound

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New wrinkle on origami turns designing folding structures into child’s play

Puzzle approach provides new way of designing folding robots and other devices

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Listen to an Underwater Volcano Burp 750-Foot Bubbles

Microphones catch a submarine vent firing uberbubbles that floated to the surface and formed massive water domes.

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Shipment tracking for 'fat parcels' in the body

Without fat, nothing works in the body: Fats serve as energy suppliers and important building blocks, including for the envelopes of living cells. Numerous diseases are related to disorders in fat metabolism such as obesity and cancer. Researchers from the LIMES Institute at the University of Bonn are now demonstrating how fat metabolism can be monitored down to the individual liver cell of a mous

8h

Lakes worldwide are experiencing more severe algal blooms

The intensity of summer algal blooms has increased over the past three decades, according to a first-ever global survey of dozens of large, freshwater lakes, which was conducted by Carnegie's Jeff Ho and Anna Michalak and NASA's Nima Pahlevan and published by Nature.

8h

Unique sticky particles formed by harnessing chaos

New research from North Carolina State University shows that unique materials with distinct properties akin to those of gecko feet—the ability to stick to just about any surface—can be created by harnessing liquid-driven chaos to produce soft polymer microparticles with hierarchical branching on the micro- and nanoscale.

8h

2I/Borisov: Interstellar comet with a familiar look

A new comet discovered by amateur astronomer Gennady Borisov is an outcast from another star system, yet its properties are surprisingly familiar, a new study led by Jagiellonian University researchers shows. The team's findings are being published in Nature Astronomy on 14 October 2019.

8h

Unlocking the biochemical treasure chest within microbes

Secondary metabolites—the compounds produced by microbes to mediate internal and external messaging, self-defense, and chemical warfare—are the basis for hundreds of invaluable agricultural, industrial, and medical products. And given the increasing pace of discovery of new, potentially valuable secondary metabolites, it's clear that microbes have a great deal more to offer.

8h

Study reveals how mucus tames microbes

More than 200 square meters of our bodies—including the digestive tract, lungs, and urinary tract—are lined with mucus. In recent years, scientists have found some evidence that mucus is not just a physical barrier that traps bacteria and viruses, but it can also disarm pathogens and prevent them from causing infections.

8h

Study shows a much cheaper catalyst can generate hydrogen in a commercial device

Researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have shown for the first time that a cheap catalyst can split water and generate hydrogen gas for hours on end in the harsh environment of a commercial device.

8h

How to control friction in topological insulators

Topological insulators are innovative materials that conduct electricity on the surface, but act as insulators on the inside. Physicists at the University of Basel and the Istanbul Technical University have begun investigating how they react to friction. Their experiment shows that the heat generated through friction is significantly lower than in conventional materials. This is due to a new quant

8h

Scientists pinpoint cause of harmful dendrites and whiskers in lithium batteries

Scientists have uncovered a root cause of the growth of needle-like structures—known as dendrites and whiskers—that plague lithium batteries, sometimes causing a short circuit, failure, or even a fire.

8h

The nano-guitar string that plays itself

Scientists at Lancaster University and the University of Oxford have created a nano-electronic circuit which vibrates without any external force.

8h

Astronomers use giant galaxy cluster as X-ray magnifying lens

Astronomers at MIT and elsewhere have used a massive cluster of galaxies as an X-ray magnifying glass to peer back in time, to nearly 9.4 billion years ago. In the process, they spotted a tiny dwarf galaxy in its very first, high-energy stages of star formation.

8h

Scientists reveal mechanism of electron charge exchange in molecules

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a new scanning transmission electron microscopy method that enables visualization of the electric charge density of materials at sub-angstrom resolution.

8h

Alphabet of 140 puzzle pieces programs origami

How can a single origami crease pattern be folded into two precisely defined target shapes? Researchers at AMOLF and Leiden University have created an "alphabet" of 140 origami "puzzle pieces" that allows them to do just that, as described today in Nature Physics. This discovery could help in the construction of origami robots and toward designing smart programmable materials.

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Efter den mystiske 'rum-cigar': Nyt interstellart objekt overrasker ved ikke at være overraskende

Det første interstellare objekt var helt anderledes end noget, vi ser blandt Solsystemets hjemmefødninge. Det andet interstellare objekt, som blev opdaget for mindre end to måneder siden, er til gengæld næsten ikke til at skelne fra Solsystemets kometer.

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Ellens ejere følger norsk hybridfærge-brand nøje: »Det her bliver fantastisk værdifuldt«

Den danske el-færge skal selv kunne håndtere alle tænkelige brandscenarier i sit batterirum. Men med eksplosionen i Norge er teori blevet virkelighed.

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Dear Therapist: My Fiancé Believes Spanking Is Good Parenting

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My fiancé and I met four years ago and have an incredible relationship. We both have an admiration, respect, and love for each other that I have never felt in any of my past relationships. He proposed to me ea

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Ocean info fills gaps in Earth’s ‘methane budget’

New research uses data science to determine how much methane goes from the ocean and into the atmosphere each year. To predict the impacts of human emissions, researchers need a complete picture of the atmosphere’s methane cycle. They need to know the size of the inputs—both natural and human—as well as the outputs. They also need to know how long methane resides in the atmosphere. The results, p

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Alterations to the circadian clock make brain tumours vulnerable

Nature, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03042-0 The body’s circadian clock ensures the rhythmic expression of some genes across the day. The catalogue of genes under circadian control changes in an aggressive brain cancer — a discovery that might open up a new avenue for treatment.

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Uniti launches tiny EV that costs under $19,000

Designed by Swedish brand Uniti and engineered in the UK, the Uniti One features a one-plus-two seating configuration where the driver sits alone in the front while two passengers can fit in …

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Researchers map the evolutionary history of oaks

How oaks are related has long posed a challenge to scientists. Dr. Andrew Hipp, senior scientist at The Morton Arboretum, led an international team of 24 scientists to unravel the history of …

8h

Researchers map the evolutionary history of oaks

How oaks are related has long posed a challenge to scientists. Dr. Andrew Hipp, senior scientist at The Morton Arboretum, led an international team of 24 scientists to unravel the history of global oak diversity for the first time using DNA sequencing of 260 oak species, combined with genomic mapping and fossil data.

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Researchers design new material using artificial intelligence

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Is Artificial Intelligence good?

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Researchers map the evolutionary history of oaks

How oaks are related has long posed a challenge to scientists. Dr. Andrew Hipp, senior scientist at The Morton Arboretum, led an international team of 24 scientists to unravel the history of global oak diversity for the first time using DNA sequencing of 260 oak species, combined with genomic mapping and fossil data.

8h

The Russian who could have been first to Moon

Alexei Leonov, who died on Friday, could have been the first human to land on the Moon.

8h

Does the World Need a More Powerful Supercollider?

Culture A next-generation atom smasher would cost billions of dollars. Europe and China both plan to build one, but scientists are debating if it's worth it. 10/11/2019 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer To read more…

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Researchers map the evolutionary history of oaks

Oaks have a complex evolutionary history that has long eluded scientists. New research, however, provides the most detailed account to date of the evolution of oaks, recovering the 56-million-year history that has made the oaks one of the most diverse, abundant and important woody plant groups to the ecology and economy of the northern hemisphere.

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Commentary: As a birder, I see the effects of climate change every day. Now, Audubon has quantified the threat

For serious birders who regularly observe birds in the wild, ignoring climate change isn't possible. We have been seeing and documenting the effects of a warming climate since at least the 1950s.

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Commentary: As a birder, I see the effects of climate change every day. Now, Audubon has quantified the threat

For serious birders who regularly observe birds in the wild, ignoring climate change isn't possible. We have been seeing and documenting the effects of a warming climate since at least the 1950s.

9h

Dyson Dumps Its EV Project After Spending $3.2B, Blames Commercial Viability

Dyson, a British company best known for its business in hand dryers and vacuums, has announced that it will terminate its EV project. According to the company, it had developed a ‘fantastic car,’ but saw no path to commercial viability for the vehicle. Its efforts to find a buyer have been unsuccessful according to a letter published on the company website. Dyson claims to have invested £2.5 bill

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NASA Finally Launches Delayed ICON Mission to Study the Ionosphere

NASA is talking a lot about long-term missions like new trips to the moon and the possibility of human voyages to Mars, but its latest mission is a bit closer to home. The Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) spacecraft is finally in orbit after years of delays. This probe orbits lower than many satellites because it’s analyzing the ionosphere, a part of the atmosphere that is both fascinating

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Pumping Oxygen In A Lake To Try To Save Fish Facing Climate Change

As the climate warms, many U.S. lakes are seeing more algal blooms, low oxygen levels and stressed out fish species. One team in Oregon hopes that pumping oxygen into the water can help. (Image credit: Jes Burns/OPB)

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Investment in Quantum Computing Is Booming—But Will a Quantum Winter Follow?

Quantum computing is red hot right now, not least after Google’s recent announcement that it had achieved quantum supremacy. An analysis by Nature shows the quantum hype is translating into a massive investment boost in the technology, but it might be a double-edged sword. Quantum supremacy refers to the point at which a quantum computer can perform calculations beyond the most powerful classical

9h

Eliud Kipchoge's sub-two hour marathon may herald even faster times

Eliud Kipchoge has completed a marathon in under 2 hours, a feat that shows just how far sports science has come. Other elite runners may now go even faster

9h

After Poland, No Democracy Is Safe

Democracy was on the ballot yesterday in Poland. It suffered a stinging defeat that will have consequences far beyond the country’s borders. For decades, political scientists regarded Poland as the great success story of the transition from communism to democracy. In no other large country in Central or Eastern Europe had democratic institutions taken such a deep hold, was there such a raucous pr

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Converting absorbed photons by 2-oxocarboxylic acids into highly reactive singlet oxygen

Researchers at the University of Kentucky found that when aqueous solutions with pyruvic acid, a 2-oxocarboxylic acid, were exposed to light, the generated triplet excited state could efficiently convert dissolved molecular oxygen into highly singlet oxygen. This finding is expected to contribute to areas such as environmental, life, and medical sciences in the future.

9h

Men are harder competitors: study

In competition situations, men invest more resources than women in reducing the performance of competitors. Men overestimate sabotage against them and respond accordingly, while women assess the sabotage efforts of competitors realistically, according to a laboratory experiment carried out at KIT. A work environment that creates transparency and reduces uncertainty about the sabotage level of comp

9h

Clay minerals call the shots with carbon

Clay minerals suspended in seawater binds sedimentary organic carbon to their mineral surfaces. But the quantity of carbon that is bound and the source of that carbon very much depends on the clay mineral in question. A research team from ETH Zurich and Tongji University have shown this by studying sediments in the South China Sea.

9h

Vodafone error sees customers hit by thousands in charges

Glitch sees customers abroad hit with thousands of pounds of charges and unable to use their phones.

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Researchers design new material using artificial intelligence

Researchers at TU Delft have developed a new supercompressible but strong material without conducting any experimental tests at all, using only artificial intelligence (AI). "AI gives you a treasure map, and the scientist needs to find the treasure," says Miguel Bessa, first author of a publication on this subject in Advanced Materials on 14 October.

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How Randomness Can Arise From Determinism

Is nature inherently random? According to some interpretations of quantum mechanics, it is, explaining why we can’t precisely predict the motions of single particles. In the famous double-slit experiment (which, as Richard Feynman declared, “has in it the heart of quantum mechanics”), we cannot predict where exactly an individual photon passing through two slits will land on the photo-sensitive w

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Death Toll Climbs After Typhoon Hits Japan

More than 50 people are dead in the aftermath of Typhoon Hagibis, which dropped extreme amounts of rain over the weekend and caused catastrophic flooding in residential areas. (Image credit: Jae C. Hong/AP)

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3-D integrated metasurfaces stacking up for impressive holography

Physicists and materials scientists have developed a compact optical device containing vertically stacked metasurfaces that can generate microscopic text and full-color holograms for encrypted data storage and color displays. Yueqiang Hu and a research team in Advanced Design and Manufacturing for Vehicle Body in the College of Mechanical and Vehicle Engineering in China implemented a 3-D integrat

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US, critics split on whether tech made nuke shipments safer

The plutonium core for the first atomic weapon detonated in 1945 was taken from Los Alamos National Laboratory to a test site in the New Mexico desert in the backseat of a U.S. Army sedan.

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The Poland Model—Promoting ‘Family Values’ With Cash Handouts

This story was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting and the Fuller Project for International Reporting. SOBOLEW, Poland—Andrzej and Izabela Gromuł have a lot going on, with three boys ranging from 5 to 12, and a daughter on the way. On the warm Saturday afternoon that we spoke, the grassy backyard of their home in this small town was filled with toys, bicycles, and

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Da solskinsøen var kul-ø: H.C. Ørsted borede i Bornholm

PLUS. Efter Napoleonskrigene havde Danmark tabt Norge, og staten var gået fallit. Så sendte kongen H.C. Ørsted til Bornholm for at finde kul og mineraler.

9h

Should You Eat Red Meat?

Over the past few years, studies have indicated eating red is bad for your health, but a new study seems to reverse that. So what should you do?

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Protein-folded DNA nanostructures offer a new building material for biotechnology

By using proteins that naturally bind and arrange DNA inside cells, a KAUST-led team has devised a plug-and-play strategy for building stable, custom-designed nanostructures.

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Taking 2-D materials to the MAX

Discovered by researchers at Drexel University as electrodes for energy applications, MXenes have become a research focus for KAUST. Husam Alshareef and his team specialize in creating nanomaterials for electronic and energy applications. They turn them into devices, such as supercapacitors, batteries and sensors. The chemically active surface and highly conducting core of MXenes make them an idea

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Super light dampers for low tones

A team of Empa acoustic researchers has built macroscopic crystal structures that use internal rotation to attenuate the propagation of waves. The method makes it possible to build very light and stiff materials that can also "swallow" low frequencies very well, as they report in the journal Nature Communications.

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Alfalfa and potassium: It's complicated

Has anyone ever told you to eat a banana when you have a muscle cramp or eye twitch? That's because bananas have potassium. Potassium is an important nutrient for humans, and an even more important nutrient when it comes to alfalfa.

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The trouble with psych tests that say ‘answer without thinking’

Asking people to answer a question quickly and without thinking doesn’t get honest responses, especially if the quick response isn’t the most socially desirable, research finds. There’s a longstanding belief in the field of psychology that limiting the time subjects have to respond to questions will result in more honest answers. Certainly, many of us who have participated in personality tests ha

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Alfalfa and potassium: It's complicated

Has anyone ever told you to eat a banana when you have a muscle cramp or eye twitch? That's because bananas have potassium. Potassium is an important nutrient for humans, and an even more important nutrient when it comes to alfalfa.

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Marshall Islands, low-lying US ally and nuclear testing site, declares a climate crisis

The Marshall Islands, a low-lying chain of atolls and key U.S. ally in the Central Pacific, has declared a national climate crisis because of the mounting risk of sea-level rise, the nation's president announced this week.

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Astrophysicist suggests light might be a problem for life on a planet orbiting a black hole

Jeremy Schnittman, an astrophysicist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has taken what he describes as a tongue-in-cheek look at the issues that might stand in the way of life existing on a planet orbiting a black hole. He has written a paper outlining his thoughts on the idea posted on the arXiv preprint server.

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Hubble snaps spiral's profile

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope sees galaxies of all shapes, sizes, luminosities and orientations in the cosmos. Sometimes, the telescope gazes at a galaxy oriented sideways—as shown here. The spiral galaxy featured in this Hubble image is called NGC 3717, and it is located about 60 million light-years away in the constellation of Hydra (the Sea Serpent).

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The Traditional Apex of Britain’s Untraditional Moment

A grand carriage procession , a royal “ hostage ,” a ceremonial sword . Britain’s State Opening of Parliament, and the Queen’s Speech that accompanies it, is nothing if not extravagant—an event more so than any other in British politics that is beholden to ritual and tradition. For a ceremony replete with colorful customs, however, this year’s Queen’s Speech couldn’t have come at a more untraditi

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Razer's Blade 15 Advanced gets an optical mechanical keyboard

We've seen gaming laptops with mechanical keyboards before, but Razer is taking things to a new level with the latest Blade 15 Advanced. It's the first notebook to feature …

10h

What a Koala Virus Tells Us About the Human Genome

A study illuminates how genes defend against viral invasions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Veterinarians—beset by stress, death and debt—are dying by suicide at high rates

Even after 16 years as a veterinarian, 13 of them as a veterinary oncologist, there are cases that still haunt Jennifer Kim.

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Veterinarians—beset by stress, death and debt—are dying by suicide at high rates

Even after 16 years as a veterinarian, 13 of them as a veterinary oncologist, there are cases that still haunt Jennifer Kim.

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Loons likely to disappear from Minnesota due to climate change, new report warns

Minnesota could lose its beloved state bird in coming decades if humans don't stall climate change and prevent the common loon from shifting north.

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‘Randomistas’ who used controlled trials to fight poverty win economics Nobel

Nature, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03125-y Abhijit Banerjee, Esther Duflo and Michael Kremer have been awarded the prize for their experimental approach to alleviating poverty.

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Edison and the shadow side of artificial light

Nature, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03049-7 David E. Nye examines two volumes on the complex history of lighting technologies.

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Brilliant Midnight Fireball Lights Up Sky Over Northeast China

What appears to be a dazzling meteor lit up the sky over northeast China on Friday (Oct. 11), appearing as a brilliant fireball in surveillance video of the event.

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Devin Nunes and the Power of Keyword Signaling

Opinion: From “crisis actor” to “collusion hoax,” conservatives use SEO terms gamed by right-wing media outlets, propelling a polarized internet.

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Loons likely to disappear from Minnesota due to climate change, new report warns

Minnesota could lose its beloved state bird in coming decades if humans don't stall climate change and prevent the common loon from shifting north.

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Test for mild cognitive impairment according to sex?

Scoring memory tests according to sex would possibly result in more women and fewer men getting a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment, research finds. Using sex-specific scores on the tests could also change the diagnosis for 20% of those currently diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), according to the study in Neurology . Coauthor Anat Biegon, director of the Center on Gender, Hormo

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Open cluster ASCC 123 investigated in detail

Using the Galileo National Telescope, astronomers have conducted a high-resolution spectroscopic study of the open cluster ASCC 123 as part of the Stellar Population Astrophysics (SPA) project. Results of the new research, presented in a paper published October 4 on arXiv.org, provide important information about fundamental parameters of 17 candidate members of ASCC 123, shedding more light on the

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What a Koala Virus Tells Us About the Human Genome

A study illuminates how genes defend against viral invasions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Aalborg-forskning i blockchain kan øge sikkerheden af trådløse netværk

Blockchain kan være nøglen til sikker, effektiv og pålidelig datakommunikation i trådløse netværk som smart grid og IoT. Det viser nye forskningsresultater fra Aalborg Universitet.

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Humans Will Never Live on Another Planet, Nobel Laureate Says. Here's Why.

Here's the reality: We're messing up the Earth and any far-out ideas of colonizing another orb when we're done with our own are wishful thinking.

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Här är ekonomipristagarna

Varje år delas ett ekonomipris ut, till minne av Alfred Nobel. I år vann tre personer – men vilka är de och vad har de egentligen gjort? SVT:s ekonomireporter Alexander Norén ger dig en snabbguide genom ekonomipriset.

10h

Extending the life of geosynchronous satellites

Space Logistics LLC, a subsidiary of Northrop Grumman, has launched a satellite that can extend the life of other satellites. The satellite is called MEV-1, or Mission Extension Vehicle-1. MEV-1 is the first of its kind.

10h

Why Are Some Places Snubbing Columbus Day?

More and more towns and cities across the country are electing to celebrate Indigenous Peoples' Day as an alternative to — or in addition to — Columbus Day.

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Australia could see fewer cyclones, but more heat and fire risk in coming months

Northern Australia is likely to see fewer cyclones than usual this season, but hot, dry weather will increase the risk of fire and heatwaves across eastern and southern Australia.

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Ret op på fejl og mangler i lovforslag om ankenævn

Ankenævnet for visse tilsynssager er kommet tættere på og det er godt, men lovforslaget trænger til en opstramning.

10h

Group behind Facebook's Libra coin push meet in Geneva

The Libra Association, created by Facebook to launch its new cryptocurrency, kicked off its first council meeting in Geneva on Monday, despite defections by previous supporters like Visa and …

10h

Daily briefing: Negative result deepens vaping sickness mystery

Nature, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03128-9Researchers are struggling to even categorize the chemicals contained in e-cigarettes, three ‘randomistas’ …

10h

Japan searches for survivors as Typhoon Hagibis death toll hits 56

Tens of thousands of rescuers worked into the night Monday to find survivors of a powerful typhoon in Japan that killed at least 56 people, as fresh rain threatened to hamper their efforts.

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Under the sea: Study reveals secret building blocks of northern algae

New research from U of T 's Mississauga and Scarborough campuses reveals fascinating secrets about the complex structure of a marine organism found around the globe. The data provides important new insights about a molecular mineralization process creates the unique structure of a marine plant.

10h

Ethnic identity and voting are timely focus of new book

"Elections are the Super Bowl for political scientists," says Randy Besco, an assistant professor, tenure stream of political science at UTM and author of the recently published book, Identities and Interests: Race, Ethnicity, and Affinity Voting (UBC Press).

10h

Därför blir mötena på jobbet allt fler

Den ökade graden av demokratisering tar sig bland annat i uttryck i att chefens roll har förändrats och att förankringsarbetet med medarbetare inför exempelvis ett beslut har blivit viktigare. Vilket genererar fler möten. Tidigare var arbetslivet mer hierarkiskt och chefen kunde i högre grad ensam fatta beslut och delegera arbetsuppgifter, enligt Malin Åkerström. Hon är professor i sociologi vid

11h

Under the sea: Study reveals secret building blocks of northern algae

New research from U of T 's Mississauga and Scarborough campuses reveals fascinating secrets about the complex structure of a marine organism found around the globe. The data provides important new insights about a molecular mineralization process creates the unique structure of a marine plant.

11h

Survey identifies a growing need to hire data analysts for government jobs

As public agencies across the nation increasingly rely on data to improve operations, the market for careers in the field of data analytics is expected to expand in federal, state, and local governments over the next two years, according to a new survey conducted by Johns Hopkins University and two partners, REI Systems and ACT-IAC.

11h

Ny plan for Esbjerg-fjernvarme: Borgerne skal varme sig ved havvand og træflis

PLUS. Et 50 MW varmepumpe-anlæg til havvand og 60 MW fliskedel er Din Forsynings forslag til første fase i en ny fremtidssikret fjernvarme-forsyning til Esbjergs borgere, når Esbjergværket lukker.

11h

Recycling Nuclear Fuel

Evaluating the risks and benefits of nuclear fission is a bit of a moving target as the technology develops. Even with established nuclear power plant designs and management technology, I think the benefits outweigh the risks when you compare it to the alternatives and factor global warming into the mix. ( I discussed this before and won’t go over all the points again here.) However, we are not s

11h

Four-day working week movement gathers momentum

A four-day working week continues to gain favor, says Head of Work and Pay at the New Economics Foundation think tank in the UK, Alice Martin, speaking ahead of her appearance at Swinburne's Society 4.0 Conference.

11h

Esther Duflo: French specialist in combatting poverty

Esther Duflo, one of three people awarded the Nobel Economics Prize on Monday, is a high-profile academic feted in the United States and her home country France for her hands-on approach to studying how people can escape the poverty trap.

11h

9 Best iPhone 11 Cases (And One Very Good Bike Mount)

I tested out 30 different iPhone 11 cases for the past month. These are my favorites.

11h

Trio win Nobel Economics Prize for work on poverty

A trio of Americans on Monday won the Nobel Economics Prize for their work in the fight against poverty, including Esther Duflo, the youngest-ever economics laureate and only the second woman to win the prize.

11h

Scientists have first 3-D view of life's processes in liquid

A new liquid-cell technology allows scientists to see living biological materials and systems in three dimensions under an electron microscope, according to researchers at Penn State, Virginia Tech and Protochips Inc.

11h

Image of the Day: Eel Compass

Glass eels form a magnetic memory of their estuaries’ currents in order to migrate.

11h

Best way to protect ocean fisheries? Let nations profit from them

Overfishing is a major problem for the world's oceans, but a strategy adopted nearly 50 years ago has helped protect fisheries: giving nations exclusive rights to waters 200 miles offshore and letting them police their own fish stocks.

11h

Best way to protect ocean fisheries? Let nations profit from them

Overfishing is a major problem for the world's oceans, but a strategy adopted nearly 50 years ago has helped protect fisheries: giving nations exclusive rights to waters 200 miles offshore and letting them police their own fish stocks.

11h

When it comes to teaching science, culture and language matter

For years, one of the highest-rated comedy series on television was The Big Bang Theory, a show whose central characters portray "old, tired images of the science community, sending a resounding message about who belongs in science," says Bryan A. Brown, an associate professor of science education at Stanford Graduate School of Education. "These stereotypes have been reinforced for generations. We

11h

The nature of obscured active galactic nuclei

Most galaxies host a supermassive black hole (SMBH) at their nucleus, one whose mass exceeds a million solar-masses. When material actively accretes onto the SMBH, associated processes can produce an active galactic nucleus (AGN) with a hot torus and dramatic bipolar jets of rapidly moving charged particles. The most luminous known AGN emit over ten trillion solar-luminosities. Astronomers are try

11h

Controlling the charge state of organic molecule quantum dots in a 2-D nanoarray

A Monash University experimental study has fabricated a self-assembled, carbon-based nanofilm where the charge state (ie, electronically neutral or positive) can be controlled at the level of individual molecules, on a length scale of around one nanometer.

11h

New design strategy can help improve layered superconducting materials

Scientists from Tokyo Metropolitan University have created a new layered superconducting material with a conducting layer made of bismuth, silver, tin, sulfur and selenium. The conducting layer features four distinct sublayers; by introducing more elements, they were able to achieve unparalleled customizability and a higher "critical temperature" below which superconductivity is observed, a key ob

11h

The 5 best Amazon deals you can get this Saturday

Saturday serves up solid Amazon deals on DNA kits, faux fur rugs, Instant Pots, and more.

11h

Microsoft Acknowledges Windows 10 1903 Cumulative Update Once Again Breaks Start Menu

Redmond, we have a problem…again. For the third time in a month, Windows 10 users are reporting a recent update is messing with the functionality of the Start menu. This time it is KB4517389 …

11h

Norsk batterifærge eksploderet fredag: Fortsat brandfare ombord

Det begyndte at brænde i hybridfærgen MF Ytterøyningens batterirum torsdag, og trods at ilden blev slukket, skete der en gaseksplosion dagen efter.

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Keiser Report: Debt is Money We Owe to Our (Future) Selves (E1448)

submitted by /u/TheCrunk1 [link] [comments]

11h

Economics Nobel awarded for research to reduce global poverty

Researchers brought randomized trials to global development work

11h

Cleveland Clinic-led research team develops new genetic-based epilepsy risk scores

An international team of researchers led by Cleveland Clinic has developed new genetic-based epilepsy risk scores which may lay the foundation for a more personalized method of epilepsy diagnosis and treatment. This analysis, published in the journal Brain and led by Dennis Lal, Ph.D., a researcher in Cleveland Clinic's Genomic Medicine Institute, is the largest study of epilepsy genetics to date,

11h

Trump’s Defiance Is Destroying Congress’s Power

More than once since the Democrats captured the House of Representatives in the midterm elections of 2018, President Donald Trump has taken to Twitter to express his irritation at “ presidential harassment !” Undoubtedly, he is not the first occupant of the Oval Office to feel that way, but his response has been different. The Trump administration has tended to adopt a posture of maximal presiden

12h

Google Doodle Honors Joseph Plateau, Whose Invention Led to Cinema

Google celebrates Belgian physicist Joseph Plateau, whose research on visual perception inspired him to invent the phénakistiscope, which led to the birth of cinema …

12h

Genetic light bulbs illuminate the brain

Nature, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03064-8 Genetically encoded voltage indicators change colour in real time when neurons transmit electrical information, offering unprecedented insight into neural activity.

12h

To Go Green, the Energy Industry Goes Open Source

Challenges around renewables are prompting players in the “traditional” sector to collaborate on software they can modify to address their changing needs.

12h

Massive, AI-Powered Robots Are 3D-Printing Entire Rockets

Relativity Space may have the biggest metal 3D printers in the world, and they're cranking out parts to reinvent the rocket industry here—and on Mars.

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The Darkest Side of Fossil Fuel Extraction

It leads to violence against and trafficking of Native women — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

The Darkest Side of Fossil Fuel Extraction

It leads to violence against and trafficking of Native women — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Death Valley’s Park Service Wants Them Gone. But Are Wild Donkeys Really the Enemy?

Wild burros have long flourished in Death Valley National Park, and officials are now seeking to remove them because of their destructive impact on scarce water and vegetation resources. But new research suggests that they may actually have created a novel ecosystem that benefits native species.

12h

Nye metoder til bekæmpelse af fattigdom belønnes med en Nobelpris

700 millioner lever i fattigdom verden over. Årets nobelprismodtagere har udviklet metoder, der identificerer de bedste måder at hjælpe disse mennesker på.

12h

The Amelia Earhart Mystery Stays Down in the Deep

Robert Ballard’s expedition to a remote island in the South Pacific found no evidence of the vanished aviator’s plane. But the explorer and his crew haven’t given up.

12h

Cell identity reprogrammed

Nature, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02834-8 The discovery that cell differentiation can be reversed challenged theories of how cell identity is determined, laying the foundations for modern methods of reprogramming cell identity and promising new regenerative therapies.

12h

Why Japan imported Ebola ahead of the 2020 Olympics

Nature, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03103-4 The deadly virus is one of five that have been brought to a secure laboratory.

12h

Chinese app on Xi’s ideology allows data access to 100 million users’ phones, report says

The propaganda app — mandatory in some workplaces — can give the Communist Party a powerful new surveillance tool.

12h

Sådan blev Københavns Havn én stor swimmingpool

PLUS. Hovedstadens badevandskvalitet tager kegler hos udenlandske besøgende ved arrangementer som sidste uges C40-topmøde. Men hvem fandt dog på at forvandle en ildelugtende havn til et badested?

13h

ISIS Is Gloating

Yesterday saw multiple reports of jailbreaks from Kurdish-operated prisons and camps that contained ISIS supporters. The Kurds, now battered by the full force of a Turkish invasion approved by Donald Trump, have allocated resources away from prisons and to their own survival, which is threatened more acutely by the Turkish military than by the Islamic State. Kurds have fled, prisons have been lef

13h

The NCAA Will Never Fix Itself

If anyone can understand what’s wrong with college sports—and why Congress should step in and help—it’s a former college athlete who’s now serving in the U.S. Senate. Long before he started running for the Democratic presidential nomination, or any public office at all, Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey was a former high-school all-American who played tight end on the Stanford football team. “I s

13h

Meet the wounded veteran who got a penis transplant

He nearly lost it all to an IED blast in Afghanistan. But a pioneering procedure changed everything.

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Robotic inspectors developed to fix wind farms

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

13h

Let's turn this thread into a startup in less than 24 hours

I'm a stern believer in communities coming together to formulate and discuss the birth of new ideas or to build upon existing concepts, evolving them into problem-solving initiatives. For a while now, I've been trying to go at it alone – I've wanted to start a successful company for a number of years, lacking in one crucial area – I haven't really engaged the startup community at all! With this s

13h

From bomb to Moon: a Nobel laureate of principles

Nature, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03052-y Angela N. H. Creager is inspired by the life of the Nobel laureate who discovered deuterium.

13h

Tro på personers förmåga att arbeta

För personer med psykisk ohälsa kan vägen till ett fungerande arbetsliv vara lång och krokig. En ny avhandling från Lunds universitet ringar in vad som krävs för att göra arbetslivet möjligt för personer med psykisk ohälsa: Hopp och tro på personens förmåga att arbeta.

13h

Are experiments on how animals think ever justified?

As research reveals ever more similarities between the human experience and that of many animals, it becomes harder to defend the pursuit of such knowledge

13h

Abhijit Banerjee, Esther Duflo och Michael Kremer tilldelas ekonomipriset

Den så kallade Nobelveckan går mot sitt slut. Under måndagen är det dags att presentera det sista priset, Sveriges Riksbanks pris i ekonomisk vetenskap till Alfred Nobels minne. Kungliga Vetenskapsakademien meddelande under måndagsförmiddagen att det är Abhijit Banerjee, Esther Duflo och Michael Kremer som blir 2019 års mottagare av Riksbankens pris i ekonomisk vetenskap till Alfred Nobels minne.

13h

Detecting changes at the leading edge of an interface between oceanic water layers

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12621-8 The marginal interaction zones of oceans are understudied. Here, the authors analyse seismic observations of temporal changes at the interface between thermocline layers in the Panama Basin, that reveal a critical mixing state in which turbulent diffusion is gradually replaced by double-diffusion as the domin

13h

Thermodynamics and kinetics guided probe design for uniformly sensitive and specific DNA hybridization without optimization

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12593-9 Optimisation of nucleic acid probes and blocker strands can be laborious. Here the authors construct a theoretical model of competitive DNA hybridisation to design DNA probes for optimisation-free mutation detection.

13h

IRF2 is a master regulator of human keratinocyte stem cell fate

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12559-x Epidermal homeostasis requires long term stem cell function. Here, the authors apply transcriptional circuitry analysis based on integrated epigenomic profiling of primary human keratinocytes with high and low stem cell function to identify IRF2 as a negative regulator of stemness.

13h

Evaluation of integrin αvβ6 cystine knot PET tracers to detect cancer and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11863-w Knottin is a cystine knot peptide. Here, the authors develop a knottin-based tracer for positron emission tomography and demonstrate its ability to detect cancer and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis through selective binding to integrin αvβ6.

13h

Origin of two-band chorus in the radiation belt of Earth

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12561-3 Chorus waves are crucial on radiation belt dynamics in the space of magnetized planets. Here, the authors show that initially excited single-band chorus waves can quickly accelerate medium energy electrons, and divide the anisotropic electrons into low and high energy components, which subsequently excite two

13h

Author Correction: Blunting neuroinflammation with resolvin D1 prevents early pathology in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12538-2

13h

Quantifying the impacts of defaunation on natural forest regeneration in a global meta-analysis

Nature Communications, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12539-1 The defaunation of vertebrates may disrupt forest functioning through the loss of plant-animal interactions, but impacts on forests remain unquantified. Here the authors show that seed dispersal is a key interaction and defaunation of primates and birds negatively impacts forest regeneration.

13h

The Blue Wave Faces Its First Test After 2018

RICHMOND, Va.—It’s a bit too on the nose: The prettiest street in Virginia’s capital city happens to be the one with all the monuments to men who fought for slavery, a boulevard lined with mansions on either side and, in the middle, towering tributes to the likes of Confederate leaders Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis, and Stonewall Jackson. The Lee statue is centered in a traffic circle, which mea

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New perspectives on Solid Earth Geology from Seismic Texture to Cooperative Inversion

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50109-z

14h

The effect of being watched on facial EMG and autonomic activity in response to another individual’s facial expressions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51368-6

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Application of spherical substrate to observe bacterial motility machineries by Quick-Freeze-Replica Electron Microscopy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51283-w

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The link between yeast cell wall porosity and plasma membrane permeability after PEF treatment

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51184-y

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Progress in loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for detection of Schistosoma mansoni DNA: towards a ready-to-use test

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51342-2

14h

The behavior of ozone on different iron oxides surface sites in water

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50910-w

14h

Digital dystopia: how algorithms punish the poor

In an exclusive global series, the Guardian lays bare the revolution and the wreckage that is engulfing the welfare state worldwideAll around the world, from small-town Illinois in the US to …

14h

Apple’s iPhone SE 2 will start at $399, Ming-Chi Kuo predicts

Photo by Chris Welch / The Verge In a new research report, noted Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo predicts that prices for the rumored iPhone SE 2 will start at $399, MacRumors reports. …

14h

Five Reasons the Diet Soda Myth Won’t Die

Repeated studies on a health bogeyman help explain wider problems with food research.

14h

It-folk: Kæmpe problem at cybersikkerhed skal løses af militæret

Det er problematisk, at CFCS, der skal hjælpe private aktører, strukturelt er en del af militæret. Det fritager dem fra loven og gør det muligt at holde meget hemmeligt, lyder kritikken.

14h

Cancelled for sadfishing: the top 10 words of 2019

From people becoming a proper noun to woke’s use as an insult, we pick our key words of the year The year 2019 might still have some surprises in store for us – Donald Trump is yet to ask the Queen if she has any dirt on Joe Biden – but we know the general shape of it: global chaos, lies and Love Island. We also know many of its words. We are approaching the moment when the great dictionaries pic

14h

»Vi skal give kernekunderne bedre betingelser«

Jesper Gyllenborg tiltrådte 1. september som ny lægefaglig vicedirektør på Sjællands Universitetshospital. En af de første opgaver, han vil tage fat på, er at styrke tilbudene til ‘kernekunderne’, den store gruppe af kronikere.

14h

Hver anden arbejdsmiljørepræsentant: »Mine kolleger bliver ramt af stress«

For meget arbejde og for højt tempo præger hovedparten af ingeniørarbejdspladserne, som også mangler god ledelse, viser undersøgelse blandt IDAs arbejdsmiljørepræsentanter. Hver anden af dem har oplevet en kollega blive sygemeldt med stress det seneste år.

14h

Sambos lever längre

Vi lever längre och längre liv både i Sverige och världen. Men ökningen sker i olika takt – och det är stora skillnader mellan olika grupper. Män som lever som gifta eller sambos lever till exempel sju år längre än ensamstående män. Kvinnor som lever sammanboende blir fyra år äldre än ensamstående, enligt nya siffror från SCB.

14h

Dna-analys avslöjar var stridsyxekulturen kom ifrån

Under konstruktionen av en rondell i Linköping 1953 påträffades en betydelsefull grav från stridsyxekulturen (även kallad båtyxekulturen). För 4 500 år sedan begravdes där en kvinna, en man och ett barn tillsammans med en hund och en rik uppsättning gravgåvor, inklusive en yxa av den typ som gett namn till denna arkeologiska kultur. – Jag har varit nyfiken på den här graven, som vi idag kallar ”B

15h

Bill Bryson's Latest Is A Different Kind Of Journey — Into 'The Body'

Bryson is beloved for his travel writing, but in his new book he's undertaking an interior journey, looking at everything from medical oddities to the amazing way your body fights off most cancers. (Image credit: Doubleday)

15h

Guam avoids severe coral bleaching predicted for this year

Official say vulnerable coral reefs on Guam have not experienced severe bleaching that was predicted for this year.

15h

Southern California blazes show signs of slowing

Wildfires raging across southern California showed signs of slowing Sunday, as firefighters contained nearly half of the biggest blaze.

15h

Video captures whale bubble-net feeding

University of Hawai'i at Mānoa's Marine Mammal Research Program (MMRP) researchers and key collaborators captured amazing whale's-point-of-view and aerial drone video of humpback whale bubble-net feeding. It's one component of a project investigating causes of a possible decline in humpback whale numbers

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Video captures whale bubble-net feeding

University of Hawai'i at Mānoa's Marine Mammal Research Program (MMRP) researchers and key collaborators captured amazing whale's-point-of-view and aerial drone video of humpback whale bubble-net feeding. It's one component of a project investigating causes of a possible decline in humpback whale numbers

15h

Nobel awards season comes to an end with economics prize

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences will announce the last Nobel winner later Monday, when it awards its prestigious economics prize.

15h

Woo versus Wikipedia

Love it or hate it, Wikipedia is a main go-to rough and ready source of information for millions of people. Although I've had my problems with Wikipedia and used to ask whether it could provide reliable information on medicine and, in particular, alternative medicine and vaccines, given that anyone can edit it, I now conclude that Wikipedia must be doing OK, at least in these areas. After all, som

15h

Nyt studie: Stop behandling med antidepressiva på moderat til svær depression

Effekten af antidepressiva på moderat til svær depression er så lille, og skadesvirkningerne så betydelige, at læger bør undlade den, siger forskere efter gennemgang af reviews på feltet. Professor i psykiatri Poul Videbech er svært kritisk over for studiet.

15h

Porsche unveils the Taycan 4S, a much cheaper variant of its sporty EV

The Taycan 4S is available with two distinct battery packs offering different levels of performance. The entry-level model features a 79.2 kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery powering the two …

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Sheep meat price surges as swine fever forces China to pay for protein

African swine fever has depleted China's pig herd, creating a protein shortage that is benefitting Australian sheep farmers.

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Video captures whale bubble-net feeding

University of Hawai'i at M?noa's Marine Mammal Research Program (MMRP) researchers and key collaborators captured amazing whale's-point-of-view and aerial drone video of humpback whale bubble-net …

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Study: Self-reported suicide attempts rising in black teens as other groups decline

New study in the journal Pediatrics uncovered rise in self-reported suicide attempts in black teenagers, as well as an accelerating rate in black female teenagers.

17h

Lehigh to present research, new programs at BMES 2019

Faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates in Lehigh University's Department of Bioengineering are presenting 26 poster and lecture sessions at the annual meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), Oct. 16-19, 2019, in Philadelphia. Oral presentations include 'Spatial Organization of Biochemical Cues in 3D-Printed Scaffolds for Osteochondral Regeneration' and 'Red-light Optogenetic

18h

For low-risk thyroid cancer patients, less may be more for post-surgery surveillance

Patient self-advocacy is important, and although a maximizing preference may be advantageous in many situations, new research led by the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center shows that, in the case of long-term surveillance of treated, low-risk thyroid cancer, health care "maximizers" consume more health care resources — such as doctor visits and diagnostic imaging tests — which drive up c

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Air Force scientists discover unique stretchable conductor

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

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Ghana launches second drone delivery base at Mampong

submitted by /u/MichaelTen [link] [comments]

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Voldsom kritik af KMD fra kommuner i sag om persondata på hacket server

Data Protection Officer for flere kommuner fremsætter barsk kritik af leverandør, i sagen om kopiering af persondata fra produktionssystem til udviklingsserver, der blev hacket. Ballerup ønsker ekstern revision.

19h

Geneticists retract study suggesting first CRISPR babies might die early

Nature, Published online: 14 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03032-2 Researchers rapidly corrected finding through discussions on social media and preprints.

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Forsker om metrostøj: Miljøstyrelsens regnemetode giver ingen mening

PLUS. Det er uhensigtsmæssigt at regne med et gennemsnit, når 10 sekunders støj flere gange i timen vækker folk, siger forsker ved Aalborg Universitet.

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If you avoid phone calls, you're missing out. Here's why | Melanie Tait

Culturally, we’re moving away from phone conversations – but they’re often the best part of my day I’ve taken to switching my phone’s ringer on between 8.30pm and 10.30pm on a week night. It feels like a dangerous act, for someone who used to be part of the “no phone calls allowed” brigade. There are lots of things to panic about with a phone call, chief among them being: what if we run out of th

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Microbleeds may worsen outcome after head injury

Using advanced imaging, researchers have uncovered new information regarding traumatic microbleeds, which appear as small, dark lesions on MRI scans after head injury but are typically too small to be detected on CT scans. The findings published in Brain suggest that traumatic microbleeds are a form of injury to brain blood vessels and may predict worse outcomes. The study was conducted in part by

22h

New brain research could change how concussions are treated

Researchers looked at postmortem tissues of patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in high-resolution and found greater signs of blood vessel damage than nerve damage. The findings could influence the treatment of and development of new drugs for TBI.

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Fortnite goes offline after asteroid blows up virtual world

Internet gaming phenomenon Fortnite has temporarily gone offline, leaving millions of addicted gamers wondering what to do with themselves, after a massive asteroid brought the latest season …

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Renewables overtook fossil fuels in UK electricity mix for first time

Windfarms, solar panels and biomass have outcompeted gas and coal power stations for the first time ever over a whole quarter, in a significant milestone

23h

SoftBank reportedly preps a package to take control of WeWork parent company

SoftBank Group, the multi-billion dollar Japanese technology conglomerate and investment firm, has put together a bid that would save WeWork parent company We Co., just weeks before the co-working …

23h

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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