Search Posts

nyheder2019oktober17

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

500+

Study reveals how collapse of protein processes is driver of aging and death

Cells undergo natural aging and death, processes that impact a multitude of cellular factors. A new Stony Brook University-led study, to be published in PNAS, provides a biophysical model that reveals how damage accumulates in the shapes of cellular proteins with age and is a trigger to death. The finding opens a door to a better understanding of the molecular origins of age-related neurodegenerat

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Photosynthesis Olympics: Can the best wheat varieties be even better?

Scientists have put elite wheat varieties through a sort of "Photosynthesis Olympics" to find which varieties have the best performing photosynthesis. This could ultimately help grain growers to get more yield for less inputs in the farm.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

27

Cats are not scared off by dingoes. We must find another way to protect Australian animals

Feral cats are wreaking havoc on our native wildlife, eating more than a billion animals across Australia every year. But managing feral cats and reducing their impacts on our threatened species is challenging, to say the least.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Structural protein essential for ciliary harmony in comb jellies

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba's Shimoda Marine Research Center and the Japanese National Institute for Basic Biology have identified a protein that keeps millions of tiny surface organelles moving in harmony to control the gliding locomotion of ctenophores.

28d

ScienceDaily

44

Mathematical modeling vital to tackling disease outbreaks

Predicting and controlling disease outbreaks would be easier and more reliable with the wider application of mathematical modelling, according to a new study.

28d

ScienceDaily

32

Information theory as a forensics tool for investigating climate mysteries

During Earth's last glacial period, temperatures on the planet periodically spiked dramatically and rapidly. A new article suggests that mathematics from information theory could offer a powerful tool for analyzing and understanding these mysterious events.

28d

ScienceDaily

200+

Ants inhibit at least 14 different plant diseases

New research shows that ants inhibit at least 14 different plant diseases. The small insects secrete antibiotics from glands in the body. On their legs and body, they also host colonies of bacteria that secrete antibiotics. It is probably these substances that inhibit a number of different diseases and researchers now hope to find biological pesticides that may conquer resistant plant diseases.

28d

ScienceDaily

46

Digital breast tomosynthesis increases cancer detection over full-field mammography

A new article compares cancer detection rates (CDR) for screening digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) versus full-field digital mammography (FFDM). Researchers found that DBT results in 'significantly increased CDR' — irrespective of tumor type, size, or grade of cancer.

28d

ScienceDaily

40

New augmented reality system lets smartphone users get hands-on with virtual objects

A new augmented reality system places virtual objects within real-world backgrounds on cell phone screens and lets people interact with those object by hand as if they were really there.

28d

ScienceDaily

32

Consumers trust influencers less when there is a variety of choices for a product

Consumers have been relying on opinion leader recommendations to make choices about product quality and purchases for a long time. It is even more prominent now with the prevalence of influencers on social media platforms. The problem is, when there is a wide variety of the same product, consumers question if a positive recommendation is based on quality or personal preferences.

28d

ScienceDaily

100+

A secret in saliva: Food and germs helped humans evolve into unique member of great apes

Researchers discovered that the human diet — a result of increased meat consumption, cooking and agriculture — has led to stark differences in the saliva of humans compared to that of other primates.

28d

New Scientist

100+

Technology's future isn't gleaming, it's dirty and biological

We've always thought of tech as conquering nature, but the climate crisis is changing everything – not least what future advances will look like, argues Annalee Newitz

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

SUTD's breakthrough research allows for 3D printed chocolate without temperature control

SUTD's new approach to the 3D printing of chocolate using cold extrusion instead of conventional hot-melt extrusion method eliminates the need for stringent temperature controls, offering wider potential for 3D printing temperature-sensitive food.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Faulty signalling pathway linked to congenital heart condition

Faulty signalling pathway causes the heart to develop unnaturally while in the embryo stage, according to Duke-NUS Medical School researchers.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

40

Photosynthesis olympics: can the best wheat varieties be even better?

Scientists have put elite wheat varieties through a sort of 'Photosynthesis Olympics' to find which varieties have the best performing photosynthesis. This could ultimately help grain growers to get more yield for less inputs in the farm.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Pitt study: Sexual selection alone could spark formation of new species

Because of imprinted preferences, strawberry poison frog females mate more with similar colored males, and less with differently colored males. Over time, the behavior could lead to two color types becoming separate species.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Federal proposals to limit Medicaid funding would hit community health centers hard

Most states that transition to block grant funding for Medicaid — in which the federal government provides a fixed annual sum — would see lower revenue for their community health centers that care for Medicaid beneficiaries and other residents. Under a block grant, total health center revenues generated by the Medicaid expansion population would drop 92% and 58% for traditional enrollees by 2024

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Deep water sites off the US northeast coast are suitable for offshore blue mussel farms

Offshore mussel farm sites need to have the right temperature, food availability, and the right currents. According to a study by researchers at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, several suitable locations can be found off the Northeastern US.

28d

Ingeniøren

29

Solcellebil bryder i brand under mesterskabsræs

Et mere end 3000 kilometer langt racerløb for solcellebiler endte med brændt gummi og mørk røg for bilen NunaX.

28d

Phys.org

87

Why white married women are more likely to vote for conservative parties

The polls were wrong in the last US and Australian federal elections. Hillary Clinton was favored to win at a margin of 85% to Donald Trump's 15%. And Bill Shorten was expected to defeat Scott Morrison.

28d

Phys.org

Cities can learn from how Los Angeles is starting to address homelessness

Los Angeles became ground zero for America's homelessness crisis after President Donald Trump visited the city on Sept. 17.

28d

Phys.org

73

A new approach to tackle superbugs

Scientists have uncovered a novel antibiotic-free approach that could help prevent and treat one of the most widespread bacterial pathogens, using nanocapsules made of natural ingredients.

28d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

40

New augmented reality system lets smartphone users get hands-on with virtual objects

A new augmented reality system places virtual objects within real-world backgrounds on cell phone screens and lets people interact with those object by hand as if they were really there.

28d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

28

Clingfish biology inspires better suction cup

A team of engineers and marine biologists built a better suction cup inspired by the mechanism that allows the clingfish to adhere to both smooth and rough surfaces. Researchers reverse engineered the clingfish's suction disk and developed devices that cling well to wet and dry objects both in an out of water. The devices can hold up to hundreds of times their own weight.

28d

Phys.org

Researchers develop biorenewable, biodegradable plastics

Researchers Haritz Sardón, Ainara Sangroniz and Agustin Etxeberria at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Chemistry, together with the researchers Eugene Y.-X. Chen, Jian-Bo Zhu and Xiaoyan Tang at Colorado State University (U.S.), have designed fully recyclable packaging materials that promote the circular economy for plastic packaging materials where design and production fully comply with requirements per

28d

Phys.org

Double aromatic rings stabilize multications

A redox active polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) composed of azulene and pyrroles was developed by a research team at Ehime University. This nitrogen-embedded PAH contains two kinds of aromatic rings in the dicationic state which can stabilize cations by delocalization based on global aromaticity. The findings were published on March 5, 2019 in Organic Letters.

28d

Phys.org

30

New technique enables the fast and cheap manufacturing of high-performance circuits

Researchers of Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV) and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) have developed a new methodology that makes it possible to manufacture high-performance circuits for telecommunications in a fast and cheap way. It integrates 3-D printing, which enables the use of metals and polymers. Furthermore, the researchers also suggest a technique that makes it possible

28d

Phys.org

82

Human medicines affect fish behavior

Human medicines that act on important signal systems in the brain make fish bolder, shows a new study on three-spined sticklebacks by researchers at Linköping University. The results reinforce that the signal substances serotonin and dopamine play important roles in behavioral differences between individuals. Further, it shows that drugs that end up in the natural environment may have consequences

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

82

Human medicines affect fish behavior

Human medicines that act on important signal systems in the brain make fish bolder, shows a new study on three-spined sticklebacks by researchers at Linköping University. The results reinforce that the signal substances serotonin and dopamine play important roles in behavioral differences between individuals. Further, it shows that drugs that end up in the natural environment may have consequences

28d

Wired

200+

The NFL's Helmet Tests Are Brainless

Opinion: Current testing on helmets ignores the kinds of impacts that cause most of the concussions. It's time for football to wise up.

28d

Wired

200+

How Meme Culture Changed the PSAT

The College Board is trying to stop the proliferation of test-related memes with … more memes.

28d

Phys.org

300+

SUPERB survey detects new slowly-spinning radio pulsar

Astronomers have detected a new slowly rotating radio pulsar as part of the SUrvey for Pulsars and Extragalactic Radio Bursts (SUPERB). The newly found object, designated PSR J2251−3711, turns out to be one of the slowest spinning radio pulsars known to date. The finding is detailed in a paper published October 9 on arXiv.org.

28d

Livescience.com

5K

Underwater Volcano Creates Bubbles More Than a Quarter-Mile Across

In the early 20th century, sailors near Alaska reported seeing black bubbles seeming to boil out from the sea. They weren't wrong.

28d

Science Magazine

Why skimping on sleep makes your brain crave sweets

The secret lies in the way your brain makes sense of scents

28d

The Atlantic

2K

There Is No Plan B for ISIS Prisoners

Updated at 3:19 p.m. ET. The prisoners were an emergency waiting to happen. For months, thousands of suspected Islamic State fighters from some 50 countries languished in makeshift jails in the desert; sometimes, a few broke out. But U.S.-backed Kurdish forces were, for the most part, keeping them locked up. Then President Donald Trump ordered U.S. forces to withdraw from outposts in northeastern

28d

Scientific American Content

300+

SpaceX's Starlink Constellation Could Swell by 30,000 More Satellites

The company's constellation could eventually consist of 42,000 spacecraft — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28d

Future(s) Studies

32

New Bill Promises an End to Our Privacy Nightmare, Jail Time to CEOs Who Lie: Giants like Facebook would also be required to analyze any algorithms that process consumer data—to more closely examine their impact on accuracy, fairness, bias, discrimination, privacy, and security.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

24-Hour Solar Energy: Molten Salt Makes It Possible, and Prices Are Falling Fast

submitted by /u/altbekannt [link] [comments]

28d

ScienceDaily

54

Recovering 'lost dimensions' of images and video

Researchers have developed a model that recovers valuable data lost from images and video that have been 'collapsed' into lower dimensions.

28d

ScienceDaily

37

Study helps pinpoint what makes species vulnerable to environmental change

Researchers have reported that a bird species' ability to adapt to seasonal temperature changes may be one factor in whether it can better withstand environmental disruption. The researchers studied 135 bird species in the Himalayas and found that species living in the seasonal western Himalayas adapted to the conversion of forests to agricultural land better than birds native to the tropical east

28d

ScienceDaily

1K

Scientists find early humans moved through Mediterranean earlier than believed

Scientists have unearthed new evidence in Greece proving that the island of Naxos was inhabited by Neanderthals and earlier humans at least 200,000 years ago, tens of thousands of years earlier than previously believed.

28d

ScienceDaily

41

Respiratory diseases linked with high blood pressure in lungs

Pulmonary hypertension is a type of high blood pressure that affects the lungs of both animals and people. When tiny vessels in the lungs become narrowed or blocked, it becomes harder for blood to flow through and can cause the heart to weaken or fail.

28d

ScienceDaily

100+

Huge dinosaurs evolved different cooling systems to combat heat stroke

Different dinosaur groups independently evolved gigantic body sizes, but they all faced the same problems of overheating and damaging their brains.

28d

Futurity.org

More wrong answers get quantum computers to find the right one

In quantum computers, generating more errors in a given operation may help reveal the right answer, according to new research. Unlike conventional computers, the processing in quantum-based machines is noisy, which produces error rates dramatically higher than those of silicon-based computers. So quantum operations repeat thousands of times to make the correct answer stand out statistically from

28d

Science-Based Medicine

300+

Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Injections: Lots of hype, no convincing evidence

Platelet-rich plasma injections are advertised as an expensive cure-all for sport injuries. The evidence, however, is consistently negative.

28d

Futurity.org

How being yellow messes up fruit fly sex lives

New research explains how a single gene mutation can alter both the color of a fruit fly's body and mess up its sex life. Studies performed in the laboratory of Thomas Hunt Morgan more than a century ago were the first to demonstrate that some behaviors have a genetic basis. Those fruit fly experiments also provided an early example of pleiotropy, a phenomenon in which a single gene has the abili

28d

ScienceDaily

33

Clingfish biology inspires better suction cup

A team of engineers and marine biologists built a better suction cup inspired by the mechanism that allows the clingfish to adhere to both smooth and rough surfaces. Researchers reverse engineered the clingfish's suction disk and developed devices that cling well to wet and dry objects both in an out of water. The devices can hold up to hundreds of times their own weight.

28d

ScienceDaily

29

Exercise guidelines for cancer survivors

For the rising number of cancer survivors worldwide, there's growing evidence that exercise is an important part of recovery. But how much, and what type of exercise, is needed?

28d

ScienceDaily

20

Failure of mitochondrial quality control causes heart disease

Mutations in the gene that encodes a protein called ANT cause a variety of conditions, such as heart disease, but the underlying mechanism of how these mutations trigger disease has been unclear. Researchers discovered that ANT is critical for a quality control process called mitophagy — which helps to ensure the integrity of the mitochondria network — and found that mutations that lead to a def

28d

ScienceDaily

28

Tackling inequality could save millions of children

An unprecedented study mapping child deaths over almost two decades finds that nearly half of the 5.4 million under-5 deaths in 2017 can be attributed to differences in child death rates within and across countries.

28d

ScienceDaily

32

Tiny particles lead to brighter clouds in the tropics

When clouds loft tropical air masses higher in the atmosphere, that air can carry up gases that form into tiny particles, starting a process that may end up brightening lower-level clouds, according to a new study. Clouds alter Earth's radiative balance, and ultimately climate, depending on how bright they are. The new paper describes a process that may occur over 40% of the Earth's surface.

28d

ScienceDaily

36

Smoke signals: Study shows path linking nicotine addiction to increased risk for diabetes

Researchers have discovered a circuit in rats that links cigarette smoking and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a new study.

28d

ScienceDaily

38

How human brain development diverged from that of great apes

Researchers present new insights into the development of the human brain and differences in this process compared to other great apes. The study reveals features of brain development that are unique to humans, and outlines how these processes have diverged from those in other primates.

28d

ScienceDaily

24

Beyond Mutation: Cause of drug resistance in a type of intestinal tumors

Researchers clarify mechanisms that allow hard-to-treat cancers to develop, and have identified strategies that could lead to new therapies.

28d

Ingeniøren

100+

Krydstogtskibe ruster sig til fem dages havsnød i Arktis – men det er ikke nødvendigvis nok

Ny rapport udfordrer beredskabsplanerne i nord. Krydstogstskibe skal ruste sig til fem dage alene i en nødsituation, men i praksis er det ikke altid nok.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

28

Drug treats inflammation associated with genetic heart disease

When young athletes experiences sudden cardiac death as they run down the playing field, it's usually due to arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), an inherited heart disease. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have shed new light on the role of the immune system in the progression of ACM and, in the process, discovered a new drug that might help prevent ACM disease symptoms and progression to heart fai

28d

forskning.se

Pensionering inget stort hot mot den psykiska hälsan ​​​​​​​

I sin avhandling undersökte Isabelle Hansson förändringar i livstillfredsställelse under åren före och efter pensioneringen. Syftet var att förstå vilka som hanterar pensionsövergången bra och vilka som upplever svårigheter. Resultaten visar att majoriteten hanterar övergången bra och rapporterar högre livstillfredsställelse de första åren efter att de lämnat arbetet. – De flesta är bra på att an

28d

The Atlantic

2K

John Kasich Is a Man Without a Party

For the moment, it seems, John Kasich isn't happy with pretty much anyone. Of the 16 Republican primary candidates Donald Trump vanquished on his way to the White House in 2016, the former Ohio governor is one of the few who has not since come around on the president. Kasich passed on a rematch in 2020 out of a recognition that the GOP is now Trump's party , but he has said he won't vote for the

28d

The Atlantic

36K

A Warning From a Doctor Who Has Done Thousands of Steroid Injections for Arthritis

After giving birth to a baby, a young woman told her nurses at Boston Medical Center that she was having pain in her hip. That happens sometimes after births, says Ali Guermazi, one of the doctors involved. As he recounts the case from a few years ago, he looked at X-rays and saw a small amount of extra fluid in the joint. Otherwise things looked normal. "We injected her hip with steroids, hoping

28d

Science News Daily

Samsung to deploy software patch after Galaxy S10 fingerprint flaw found

A flaw with Samsung's top-end Galaxy S10 fingerprint system that allows the smartphone to be opened by a third party will soon be fixed, the tech giant said Thursday.

28d

Science News Daily

Does praying burn calories? Here's the pope's $110 e-rosary

The Vatican continues to take great pains to bring Catholic faith into the modern era, and this week it's transforming the faithful rosary — adapting today's popular fitness tracker …

28d

ScienceDaily

33

Acaí berry extracts fight malaria in mice

Despite humanity's best efforts to eradicate malaria, the disease struck more than 200 million people in 2017, according to the World Health Organization. Worse yet, the parasite that causes malaria is developing resistance to many antimalarial drugs, including the mainstay, chloroquine. Researchers are actively searching for new treatments, and now, a group have found that acaí berry extracts can

28d

Science Magazine

Texas voters approve second life for state cancer funding agency

Supporters say CPRIT has been boon for research efforts and state economy

28d

BBC News – Science & Environment

3K

Why this woman hates to hear about 'big bad wolf'

The leashed beasts may look like large powerful dogs, but they still have the wild heart of a wolf.

28d

Wired

500+

The Plan to Boost Drone Batteries With a Teensy Jet Engine

A Florida aviation startup wants to supplement electric power with its watermelon-sized "microturbine."

28d

Wired

2K

What Is a Dimension? The Answer Will Bend Your Mind

Caltech physicist Sean Carroll explains dimensions in ways that even a 5-year-old can understand.

28d

The Scientist RSS

78

Image of the Day: Tau Aggregation

Endolysosome leakiness allows tau to build up in cells.

28d

Livescience.com

1K

The 15 Weirdest Galaxies in Our Universe

There are galaxies shaped like jellyfish, galaxies that consume other galaxies, and galaxies that seem to lack the dark matter that pervades the rest of the universe. Here are the strangest galaxies in the universe.

28d

NeuroLogica Blog

1K

Are We All Hypocrites?

Recently celebrity supporters of Extinction Rebellion, a protest group calling for aggressive action on climate change, signed a letter admitting to being hypocrites. They state: "Dear journalists who have called us hypocrites. You're right. We live high carbon lives and the industries that we are part of have huge carbon footprints." But they go on to say: "Like you, and everyone else, we are st

28d

Phys.org

78

Bio-circuitry mimics synapses and neurons in a step toward sensory computing

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee and Texas A&M University demonstrated bio-inspired devices that accelerate routes to neuromorphic, or brain-like, computing.

28d

Phys.org

21

Enzyme trigger that tells cells to move characterized for first time

Some cells have the ability to travel in the human body, and depending on the circumstances, this can be either very, very good or very, very bad.

28d

Phys.org

12K

Scientists discover fractal patterns in a quantum material

A fractal is any geometric pattern that occurs again and again, at different sizes and scales, within the same object. This "self-similarity" can be seen throughout nature, for example in a snowflake's edge, a river network, the splitting veins in a fern, and the crackling forks of lightning.

28d

Phys.org

Eye to eye with a 350-year-old cow

What may be the earliest surviving objects seen by microscope—specimens prepared and viewed by the early Dutch naturalist Antoni van Leeuwenhoek—have been reunited with one of his original microscopes for a state of the art photoshoot. This event allowed science historians to recapture the "look" of seventeenth century science, recording the moment in digital films and with stunning high-resolutio

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

21

Enzyme trigger that tells cells to move characterized for first time

Some cells have the ability to travel in the human body, and depending on the circumstances, this can be either very, very good or very, very bad.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Eye to eye with a 350-year-old cow

What may be the earliest surviving objects seen by microscope—specimens prepared and viewed by the early Dutch naturalist Antoni van Leeuwenhoek—have been reunited with one of his original microscopes for a state of the art photoshoot. This event allowed science historians to recapture the "look" of seventeenth century science, recording the moment in digital films and with stunning high-resolutio

28d

For Better Science

70

Dame Kay Davies, Commander of the Photoshop Empire

Oxford professor Dame Kay E Davies, DBE FRS FMedSci, edits the journal Human Molecular Genetics. If you are a scientist who likes Photoshop, but afraid to get caught, give Dame Kay a call!

28d

Nautilus

2K

Reason Won't Save Us – Issue 77: Underworlds

In wondering what can be done to steer civilization away from the abyss, I confess to being increasingly puzzled by the central enigma of contemporary cognitive psychology: To what degree are we consciously capable of changing our minds? I don't mean changing our minds as to who is the best NFL quarterback, but changing our convictions about major personal and social issues that should unite but

28d

Nautilus

100+

Why You Keep Dreaming About Being Naked – Issue 77: Underworlds

I was naked. So was Laura," begins one dream of the more than 20,000 collected in G. William Domhoff's DreamBank. "I was re-stringing an unvarnished electric bass, so I guess it was naked, too. At one point I put a screw in to secure a string, but then realized I wasn't holding the bass but Laura…" The dream is one of many "naked" entries in the database, and Domhoff says dreams about being naked

28d

Nautilus

43K

The Dreams of the Man Who Discovered Neurons – Issue 77: Underworlds

Santiago Ramón y Cajal, a Spanish histologist and anatomist known today as the father of modern neuroscience, was also a committed psychologist who believed psychoanalysis and Freudian dream theory were "collective lies." When Freud published The Interpretation of Dreams in 1900, the science world swooned over his theory of the unconscious. Dreams quickly became synonymous with repressed desire.

28d

Nautilus

100+

The Implant That Can Control Your Brain – Issue 77: Underworlds

Shaun Patel has such a tranquil voice that it's easy to see how he convinces patients to let him experiment in the depth of their brains. On the phone, in his office at Massachusetts General Hospital (he is also on faculty at Harvard Medical School), the neuroscientist spoke about gray matter almost as if he were guiding me in meditation. Or perhaps that was just the heady effect of him detailing

28d

Scientific American Blog Posts

99

Doctors Should Care for Patients and Social Justice

Medical students must be taught to address systemic problems that contribute to poor health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28d

Phys.org

500+

How human brain development diverged from great apes

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Ophthalmology Basel, and ETH Zurich, Switzerland, have presented new insights into the development of the human brain and differences in this process compared to other great apes. The study reveals features of brain development that are unique to humans, and outlines how

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

500+

How human brain development diverged from great apes

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Ophthalmology Basel, and ETH Zurich, Switzerland, have presented new insights into the development of the human brain and differences in this process compared to other great apes. The study reveals features of brain development that are unique to humans, and outlines how

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

1K

Researchers obtain the first mice born with hyper-long telomeres

A chance finding 10 years ago led to the creation by researchers of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) of the first mice born with much longer telomeres than normal in their species. Telomeres shorten throughout life, so older organisms have shorter telomeres. Given this relationship between telomeres and aging, the scientists launched a study generating mice in which 100 percent o

28d

Wired

100+

An Actual Debate Over the Internet's Favorite Legal Shield

Wednesday's congressional hearing on Section 230 may have been a bit unsettling for techies: a genuinely substantive look at the future of tech platforms.

28d

Wired

100+

How to Pick the Right Pixel 4 and Where to Preorder It

Buying an Pixel 4 or Pixel 4 XL? Here's how to choose between them—and find the best deal.

28d

Wired

7K

How Chaos Will Unfold if Trump Opens the Tongass to Logging

Tongass National Forest is a massive yet fragile treasure—logging and slicing roads into it will set off horrifying effects that will ripple through the ecosystem.

28d

Phys.org

500+

Researchers obtain the first mice born with hyper-long telomeres

A chance finding 10 years ago led to the creation by researchers of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) of the first mice born with much longer telomeres than normal in their species. Telomeres shorten throughout life, so older organisms have shorter telomeres. Given this relationship between telomeres and aging, the scientists launched a study generating mice in which 100 percent o

28d

Scientific American

21

The Color of Noise: What Do Hues Have to Do with Sound?

–> You have probably already heard, or at least heard of, white noise. Maybe you grew up when televisions were still analog. If so, you might remember the shhh that accompanied "snow"… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28d

Livescience.com

3K

Game Over: These Monkeys Just Crushed Humans on a Computer Game

While playing a game, monkeys switched strategies each round, while humans stuck to a set of inefficient rules.

28d

Livescience.com

500+

An Asteroid-Smashing Star Ground a Giant Rock to Bits and Covered Itself in the Remains

Good news for scientists. Bad news for any asteroid dwellers.

28d

Scientific American Content

100+

Doctors Should Care for Patients and Social Justice

Medical students must be taught to address systemic problems that contribute to poor health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28d

New on MIT Technology Review

300+

"Alexa, monitor my baby." A smart-speaker app can monitor an infant's breathing.

[no content]

28d

Scientific American: Mind & Brain

49

The Color of Noise: What Do Hues Have to Do with Sound?

–> You have probably already heard, or at least heard of, white noise. Maybe you grew up when televisions were still analog. If so, you might remember the shhh that accompanied "snow"… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28d

forskning.se

80

Biologisk mångfald ger större skördar

Under de senaste två decennierna har cirka 20 procent av jordens odlade ytor blivit mindre produktiva. Forskare har i en internationell studie undersökt två så kallade ekosystemtjänster som har stor betydelse för vår matproduktion. Det handlar om pollination av grödor samt om naturlig biologisk kontroll av skadegörare och hur dessa båda tjänster påverkas ifall det är en mångfald av arter som utfö

28d

New Scientist

400+

Archaeologists are racing to find a lost city before it's ransacked

Ancient tablets from the lost city of Iri-Sagrig are being recovered from smugglers. Now archaeologists are racing to trace it before it is completely ransacked

28d

Ingeniøren

Politiet modtager dagligt anmeldelser om CEO-fraud

På en daglig basis bliver organisationer i Danmark udsat for CEO-fraud.

28d

Scientific American Content

49

The Color of Noise: What Do Hues Have to Do with Sound?

–> You have probably already heard, or at least heard of, white noise. Maybe you grew up when televisions were still analog. If so, you might remember the shhh that accompanied "snow"… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28d

Future(s) Studies

Space-based data on polluters is improving—and Wall Street is taking notice. Cheap, global, real-time monitoring for anyone who wants it can give governments and advocacy groups a new way to target big polluters

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

Researchers invent device that generates light from the cold night sky – here's what it means for millions living off grid. The device, called a thermoelectric generator, uses temperature differences between two metal plates to generate electricity.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

NASA Introduces New Spacesuits for the Moon and Mars

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

28d

The Atlantic

20K

Trump's a Paper Tiger, and Everyone Knows It

The United States is, yet again, facing an unnecessary crisis of its own making. On October 6, Donald Trump decided, during a phone call with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, to withdraw U.S. military forces from northern Syria. And not for the first time. Erdoğan persuaded Trump to withdraw U.S. forces during a phone call back in mid-December 2018. In response, then–Secretary of Defense J

28d

The Atlantic

1K

What Elizabeth Warren Learned From Her Heroine

In a speech in New York City's Washington Square Park last month, Elizabeth Warren plucked from history a woman who knew injustice when she saw it. Labor secretary to Franklin D. Roosevelt for all 12 years of his presidency, Frances Perkins was the key force behind the most creative and enduring parts of the New Deal—from Social Security to the 40-hour workweek. But Perkins's career as a workers'

28d

Ingeniøren

I Norge skal flyveaske skal blive til brugbare salte

PLUS. Det norske affaldsselskab NOAH udvikler to nye teknologier til at behandle industriens restprodukter.

28d

The Atlantic

1K

Why the C-Section Rate Is So High

Every day, roughly 10,000 babies are born in the United States, and about a third of them are born via Cesarean section. This share has gone up significantly over time, and many in the scientific community believe that it's higher than is necessary. Increases in C-section rates have not translated to healthier moms or babies. Although it's impossible to know the "necessary" rate with real precisi

28d

The Atlantic

3K

The Experts Strike Back

Donald Trump came into the office without much experience in diplomacy—literal or figurative—but it doesn't take a career Foreign Service officer to realize that if you spend enough time saying someone is your enemy, that person might begin to feel the same way about you. From the start of his administration, the president demonized government employees, especially in foreign policy and intellige

28d

The Atlantic

1K

The Man Who Could Beat Justin Trudeau

In Toronto this spring, Andrew Scheer, the man seeking to replace Justin Trudeau as prime minister of Canada, made what is perhaps the most important speech of his career. While Scheer, the leader of the Conservative Party of Canada (CPC), is no Trudeau—he's younger, dorkier, and less foppish—his speech, about immigration, sounded at times like something Trudeau would say. Scheer spoke of Canada

28d

Dagens Medicin

Almen praksis har været inde i kampen længe

Vi er stadig et stykke fra, at være nok praktiserende læger til at alle visioner kan realiseres, men vi er stærkt på vej og man behøver være nervøs for, at vi ikke vil melde os ind i kampen.

28d

Dagens Medicin

Diabetesbus skal hjælpe sårbare diabetespatienter i Region Sjælland

Mobil screeningsenhed skal tilbyde de mest sårbare diabetespatienter i den sydlige del af Sjælland undersøgelser for diabeteskomplikationer.

28d

Dagens Medicin

#70 Vold som en folkesygdom

I Sydafrika er vold udbredt. Stetoskopet sætter fokus på, hvordan en voldsepidemi kan gribes an fra et sundhedsfagligt perspektiv.

28d

Ingeniøren

300+

Modelleringer bekræfter: Multirotorer øger elproduktionen fra vindmøller

Forskere har modelleret fluiddynamikken ved multirotor-vindmøller og hvordan disse interagerer i vindmølleparker. Resultatet viser klar fordel til møllemodel med fire rotorer.

28d

Wired

2K

The Delicate Ethics of Using Facial Recognition in Schools

A growing number of districts are deploying cameras and software to prevent attacks. But the systems are also used to monitor students—and adult critics.

28d

Wired

3K

Inside Olympic Destroyer, the Most Deceptive Hack in History

The untold story of how digital detectives unraveled the mystery of Olympic Destroyer—and why the next big cyberattack will be even harder to crack.

28d

Undark Magazine

2K

Concussion Research Has a Troubling Patriarchy Problem

Experts estimate that millions of women and people of marginalized genders have suffered from intimate partner violence and untreated concussions. The fact that concussions are viewed primarily as sports-related injuries doesn't just harm those survivors of abuse — it's also bad for science.

28d

Big Think

100

Political engagement online takes work, too. Here's why.

Groups with more resources, more organizational infrastructure, and more conservatives leanings tend to use the internet for political activism more so than their working class, left-leaning counterparts. Building a political movement with a strong online component takes a tremendous amount of work and expertise, such as understanding how to leverage algorithms on social media to better propagate

28d

Retraction Watch

50

Our database just reached a big milestone: 20,000 retractions. Will you help us with the next 20,000?

Nicolas Guéguen has a distinction, albeit even if it's one he probably wishes he didn't have: The retraction of his paper on whether high heels make women more attractive was the 20,000th retraction in our database. That's right: Earlier this month, the Retraction Watch database — retractionwatchdatabase.org — logged its 20,000th retraction. As our readers … Continue reading

28d

forskning.se

67

Mediciner förändrar fiskars beteende

Individer inom samma djurart uppvisar ofta olika personligheter, i form av konsekventa skillnader i beteende. Men vad det beror på är till stor del fortfarande en obesvarad fråga. Tidigare forskning har visat att det tycks finnas samband mellan variationen i individers beteende och olika signalämnen i hjärnan, som serotonin och dopamin. Dessa signalämnen har också en nyckelroll vid vissa sjukdoma

28d

forskning.se

Lärares eget lärande viktigt för elevers lärande

Sara Engvall, doktorand till Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik vid Umeå universitet, visar att lärarens lärprocess är en viktig faktor att ta hänsyn till när man ska utforma lärarfortbildning som skapar långsiktig förändring i lärarens undervisning. Det finns mycket forskning om vilka egenskaper som är viktiga för att en kompetensutveckling för lärare ska vara effekt

28d

Wired

1K

Russia's Cozy Bear Hackers Resurface With Clever New Tricks

Largely out of the spotlight since 2016, Cozy Bear hackers have been caught perpetrating a years-long campaign.

28d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Dual self-assembly of supramolecular peptide nanotubes to provide stabilisation in water

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12586-8 Reversibility of peptide hydrogen bonded supramolecular assemblies makes them tunable but highly dynamic and prone to disassembly at the low concentration. Here the authors show a secondary hydrophobic interaction, near the peptide core that stabilises the peptide bonds, without losing the solubility of the s

28d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

500+

Mice with hyper-long telomeres show less metabolic aging and longer lifespans

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12664-x Telomere shortening is associated with aging. Here the authors analyze mice with hyperlong telomeres and demonstrate that longer telomeres than normal have beneficial effects such as delayed metabolic aging, increased longevity and less incidence of cancer.

28d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Single-cell transcriptomics of human T cells reveals tissue and activation signatures in health and disease

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12464-3 Immune cells are shaped by the tissue environment, yet the states of healthy human T cells are mainly studied in the blood. Here, the authors perform single cell RNA-seq of T cells from tissues and blood of healthy donors and show its utility as a reference map for comparison of human T cell states in disease

28d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Transforming protein-polymer conjugate purification by tuning protein solubility

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12612-9 Therapeutic proteins are often conjugated with polymers, but separating the conjugate from unconjugated protein and free polymer is a major challenge. Here, the authors discover that proteins conjugated to charged or zwitterionic polymers maintain solubility in 100% ammonium sulfate, greatly simplifying purif

28d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

23

Histone H3K23-specific acetylation by MORF is coupled to H3K14 acylation

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12551-5 Acetylation of histone H3K23 has emerged as an essential posttranslational modification, yet this epigenetic mark remains poorly understood. Here, the authors identify the native MORF complex as a histone H3K23-specific acetyltransferase and show that interaction of the MORF subunit with acylated H3K14 promot

28d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

The evolution of parental care diversity in amphibians

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12608-5 Parental care can take many forms but how this diversity arises is not well understood. Here, the authors compile data for over 1300 amphibian species and show that different forms of care evolve at different rates, prolonged care can be easily reduced, and biparental care is evolutionarily unstable.

28d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Multi-strategic RNA-seq analysis reveals a high-resolution transcriptional landscape in cotton

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12575-x In-depth functional characterization of genomes relies on comprehensive transcriptome data. Here, the authors employ four complementary RNA sequencing technologies to explore the transcription landscape across 16 tissues or different organ types in diploid A genome cotton using a newly developed computational

28d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

UHRF1 suppresses retrotransposons and cooperates with PRMT5 and PIWI proteins in male germ cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12455-4 Retrotransposons are silenced by an epigenetic mechanism and piRNA pathway in the mammalian germline. Here, the authors report that UHRF1 suppresses retrotransposons by interacting with PRMT5 and PIWI proteins during spermatogenesis.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Young adults with PTSD may have a higher risk of stroke in middle age

Young adults who develop PTSD after a traumatic event (e.g., gun violence, sexual assault, military combat or natural disaster) may be more likely to experience a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or major stroke event by middle age.This nationwide study of more than 1.1 million adults showed that PTSD may be a potent risk factor for developing stroke at a young age.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

CNIO researchers obtain the first mice born with hyper-long telomeres

Mice with hyper-long telomeres live, on average, 13% longer and in better health, free from cancer and obesity The study has found for the first time ever a clear relationship between the length of telomeres and insulin and glucose metabolism, which are also crucial in ageing 'This finding opens the interesting hypothesis that genes are not the only thing to consider when it comes to determine spe

28d

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Robot lär sig Rubiks kub på egen hand

Det tar lite tid och rörelserna är lite klumpiga, men efter några minuter har robothanden lyckats få alla bitarna på plats i en Rubiks kub. Andra robotar har tidigare klarat det betydligt snabbare, men då har de varit specialbyggda för uppgiften. Den nya robothanden, som utvecklats av forskare vid det amerikanska företaget Open AI, kan genom träning lära sig att lösa olika uppgifter i en oförutsäg

28d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Decision-making criteria for damage control surgery in Japan

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51436-x

28d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Folding Free Energy Landscape of Ordered and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50825-6

28d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Differential mechanisms of tolerance to extreme environmental conditions in tardigrades

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51471-8

28d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

The vernalisation regulator FLOWERING LOCUS C is differentially expressed in biennial and annual Brassica napus

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51212-x

28d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Flavonoid-mediated immunomodulation of human macrophages involves key metabolites and metabolic pathways

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51113-z

28d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Identification of conserved and novel miRNAs responsive to heat stress in flowering Chinese cabbage using high-throughput sequencing

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51443-y

28d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Homogeneous nucleation of corundum nanocrystallites by rapid heating of aluminum formate hydroxide-based precursor powder

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51156-2

28d

Ingeniøren

30

Store flyttedag: Lige nu triller Rubjerg Knude Fyr 80 meter mod øst

PLUS. Netop nu rykker det 120 år gamle fyrtårn 80 meter længere fra havet. Fra den nye placering kan det fortælle historien om, hvordan hav og vind former landskabet omkring Lønstrup Klint.

28d

Phys.org

3K

Society's tendency to denigrate kids these days is a 'memory tic,' says cognitive scientist

They're leaders in important social, environmental and political movements, finding ways to tackle the most pressing issues of our time, from climate change to gun violence. One even stood up to the Taliban at 15 years old and received the Nobel Peace Prize at 17.

28d

Ingeniøren

100+

Jurist: Dataprofilering af langtidsledige med etnicitet er ulovlig

Et digitalt 'afklaringsværktøj', der skaber dataprofiler af arbejdsløse på baggrund af personoplysninger, er ifølge Institut for Menneskerettigheder i strid med lov om forskelsbehandling på arbejdsmarkedet. Instituttet stiller også spørgsmålstegn ved den påståede frivillighed omkring br…

28d

forskning.se

36

Varför minskar barnafödandet i Sverige?

Det minskande barnafödandet har länge diskuterats i Syd- och Östereuropa. Det har även märkts av tydligt i våra nordiska grannländer de senaste åren. I både Norge och Finland är frågan uppe på den politiska dagordningen och den norska statsministern Erna Solberg uppmanade nyligen befolkningen att skaffa fler barn. Men trots att det inte märkts av i debatten hittills, har situationen i Sverige nu

28d

Future(s) Studies

Jarhead author: Drones and robots won't make war easier—they'll make it worse

submitted by /u/futuredude [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

What makes a city great? A new way to look at urban data will give us clues.

submitted by /u/futuredude [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

Banning cars on SF's Market Street, once a radical idea, approved unanimously

submitted by /u/Barknuckle [link] [comments]

28d

New on MIT Technology Review

3K

Can you make AI fairer than a judge? Play our courtroom algorithm game

The US criminal legal system uses predictive algorithms to try to make the judicial process less biased. But there's a deeper problem.

28d

Phys.org

35

Virgin Galactic unveils commercial space suits

The date for the world's first commercial space flight is not even confirmed yet, but future passengers' Star Trek-like outfits are ready and waiting.

28d

Phys.org

Development dilemma as eastern Greenland eyes tourism boost

Kayaking past blue-white icebergs drifting along near a pristine harbour, wandering around colourful houses or trekking in the snow-capped wilderness: July and August are high season for tourists in eastern Greenland.

28d

Ingeniøren

Cityringen måtte ensrettes efter nedbrud – passagerer sad fast 15-20 minutter

Endnu er der ikke fuld klarhed over hvorfor et Metrotog torsdag morgen standsede mellem stationer. Toget er nu kørt på værksted og driften er normal.

28d

Phys.org

23

California earthquake alerts to become available statewide

Earthquake early warning alerts will become publicly available throughout California for the first time this week, potentially giving people time to protect themselves from harm, the Governor's Office of Emergency Services said Wednesday.

28d

Phys.org

21

Groups: Saving Mexican gray wolves requires new approach

Dozens of environmental groups and scientists are asking U.S. wildlife managers to rethink how they plan to ensure the survival of Mexican gray wolves in the American Southwest.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

21

Groups: Saving Mexican gray wolves requires new approach

Dozens of environmental groups and scientists have asked U.S. wildlife managers to rethink how they plan to ensure the survival of Mexican gray wolves in the Southwest.

28d

forskning.se

Storspelare minskade spelande efter samtal

Det visar psykolog Jakob Jonsson i sin avhandling Preventing problem gambling. Focus on overconsumption vid Psykologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet. Det övergripande syftet med avhandlingen var att undersöka vilken roll överkonsumtion av spel har för spelproblem samt att tillämpa fynden i en förebyggande åtgärd i form av en studie hos det norska spelbolaget Norsk Tipping (NT). –Resulta

28d

Phys.org

100+

Old friends and new enemies: How evolutionary history can predict insect invader impacts

About 450 nonnative, plant-eating insect species live in North American forests. Most of these critters are harmless, but a handful wreak havoc on their new environment, attacking trees and each year causing more than $70 billion in damage.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

Old friends and new enemies: How evolutionary history can predict insect invader impacts

About 450 nonnative, plant-eating insect species live in North American forests. Most of these critters are harmless, but a handful wreak havoc on their new environment, attacking trees and each year causing more than $70 billion in damage.

28d

Phys.org

100+

Information theory as a forensics tool for investigating climate mysteries

During Earth's last glacial period, temperatures on the planet periodically spiked dramatically and rapidly. Data in layers of ice of Greenland and Antarctica show that these warming events—called Dansgaard-Oeschger and Antarctic Isotope Maximum events—occurred at least 25 times. Each time, in a matter of decades, temperatures climbed 5-10 degrees Celsius, then cooled again, gradually. While there

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

1K

Mathematical modelling vital to tackling disease outbreaks

Predicting and controlling disease outbreaks would be easier and more reliable with the wider application of mathematical modelling, according to a new study.

28d

Phys.org

1K

Mathematical modelling vital to tackling disease outbreaks

Predicting and controlling disease outbreaks would be easier and more reliable with the wider application of mathematical modelling, according to a new study.

28d

The Atlantic

1K

Brexit Will Never Be Over

On Monday morning, the queen put on her crown and reading glasses to deliver an 11-page speech from the throne in the House of Lords. Scenes do not get more British than this: Horse Guards clopping down the avenues; diamonds glinting in the TV lights. Following customs that have been obsolete for decades, if not centuries, the prime minister and his cabinet stood, on foot, shoved into a corner to

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

32

Foreign leaders generate more emotional response from Dublin voters than Irish politicians on Brexit

Among the 11 elected leaders studied, Irish Foreign Minister Simon Coveney evoked the weakest emotional response from the audience with a 29.5 rating. The Fine Gael senator ranked just below Democratic Unionist Party Leader Arlene Foster from the province of Northern Ireland, who scored 30.1 as indexed by Shimmer Research's biometric scoring system. US President Donald Trump and European Council P

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Old friends and new enemies: How evolutionary history can predict insect invader impacts

A team led by the University of Washington has developed a model that could help foresters predict which nonnative insect invasions will be most problematic. This could help managers decide where to allocate resources to avoid widespread tree death.

28d

Science | The Guardian

66

Wearing glasses ruined my teens. But wearing them in middle age is worse | Adrian Chiles

My teens were ruined by wearing terrible glasses. And now bad eyesight has crept up on me again My Mum has got a blurred photograph of me crying. I'm 13 years old and wearing an England tracksuit of the Ron Greenwood at the 1982 World Cup in Spain vintage. I am crying because I have just been told that I am going to have to wear glasses. The photo was taken by my little brother, because he found

28d

Vetenskap och Hälsa

Patientspecifik diagnostik för svårbotad bröstcancer

Trippelnegativ bröstcancer är en aggressiv typ av cancer som står för cirka nio procent av alla bröstcancerfall i Sverige. Forskare har nu kartlagt i detalj de genetiska förändringarna i trippelnegativ bröstcancer. Det kan bidra till att förutsäga prognosen och erbjuda ledtrådar för att identifiera den mest effektiva behandlingen.

28d

ScienceAlert – Latest

1K

SpaceX Requests to Launch Another 30,000 Satellites For Controversial Starlink Network

On top of the 12,000 they're already planning.

28d

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

Here's The Truth Behind 'The Blob' – Paris Zoo's Latest Display That's Gone Viral

It's not mysterious, but it's still really cool.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New effective vaccines for Lyme disease are coming

There is no effective vaccine currently available to prevent Lyme disease in humans. Experts from academia, government, and industry convened at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory's Banbury Center to tackle this public health challenge. Now, a new paper published in the Oct. 17, 2019 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases highlights the conference discussions, reiterates the need to stop the infection,

28d

ScienceAlert – Latest

10K

Mathematicians Have Discovered an Entirely New Way to Multiply Large Numbers

Wait, what?

28d

Science | The Guardian

400+

Unnatural Selection: the eye-opening Netflix docuseries on gene editing

Film-makers Joe Egender and Leeor Kaufman talk about their revealing four-part series about major advances in genetics "Today, we are learning the language in which God created life," said then-president Bill Clinton, alongside the British prime minister, Tony Blair, in 2000. In the grainy archival clip, scientists and dignitaries had just mapped out the human genome, dissecting the complex scien

28d

Viden

Kan du nå at se den? Verdens hurtigste myre løber over 100 gange sin egen længde – på ét sekund

Myren er et bevis på, at du sagtens kan have kortere ben og alligevel være den hurtigste.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mathematical modelling vital to tackling disease outbreaks

Predicting and controlling disease outbreaks would be easier and more reliable with the wider application of mathematical modelling, according to a new study. The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Waterloo, University of Maryland and Yale's School of Public Health.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

400+

Ants fight plant diseases

New research from Aarhus University shows that ants inhibit at least 14 different plant diseases. The small insects secrete antibiotics from glands in the body. On their legs and body, they also host colonies of bacteria that secrete antibiotics. It is probably these substances that inhibit a number of different diseases and researchers now hope to find biological pesticides that may conquer resis

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Frequent drinking is greater risk factor for heart rhythm disorder than binge drinking

Drinking small amounts of alcohol frequently is linked with a higher likelihood of atrial fibrillation than binge drinking, according to research published today in EP Europace, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How do ketogenic diets affect skin inflammation?

Not all fats are equal in how they affect our skin, according to a new study in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, published by Elsevier. The investigators found that different ketogenic diets impacted skin inflammation differently in psoriasiform-like skin inflammation in mice. Ketogenic diets heavy in medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) such as coconut, especially in combination with omega-

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

300+

E-cigarettes may help more than 50,000 smokers to stop smoking in England each year

A new study published today by the scientific journal Addiction found a positive link between the number of people in England giving up smoking when using e-cigarettes to try and quit.

28d

Future(s) Studies

44

Exclusive: Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard talks about the sustainability myth, the problem with Amazon—and why it's not too late to save the planet

submitted by /u/-AMARYANA- [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

Exclusive: Oakland hydrogen station retailing at $12

submitted by /u/bluefirecorp [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

Science Created Factory Farming. Science Could End It: Alternative meat companies like Beyond Meat and Impossible Burger could upend conventional agriculture by out-innovating it

submitted by /u/The_Ebb_and_Flow [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

A House budget committee has likely killed the 2024 Moon landing: "I believe that it is better to use the original NASA schedule of 2028."

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

28d

Ingeniøren

72

Økologer er bekymrede: Have-kompost kan sprede pesticider på markerne

PLUS. Der kan være store mængder pesticidrester i kommunalt have-parkaffald, som blandt andre økologiske landmænd bruger til at gøde jorden. Brancheforening vil have undersøgelse.

28d

NPR

California To Unveil Earthquake Alert System Thursday

The system will detect the beginning of a quake and send out alerts warning residents that they have a few seconds to prepare for a possibly deadly temblor. (Image credit: George Nikitin/AP)

28d

ScienceAlert – Latest

1K

Japan Imports Ebola And Other Deadly Pathogens in The Lead-Up to Tokyo Olympics

What could go wrong?

28d

Inside Science

Quicksilver Ants Break Sprint Records

Saharan insects use breakneck speeds to beat the desert heat while finding food. ant_cropped.jpg Saharan silver ants on sand. Image credits: Pavel Krasensky/Shutterstock Creature Wednesday, October 16, 2019 – 18:00 Joshua Learn, Contributor (Inside Science) — The world's fasted known ant can reach speeds that would make even Usain Bolt appear sluggish, and they can do this in desert temperature

28d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

Duration of activity inestimable due to imprecision of the data [Letters (Online Only)]

Ledger et al. (1) report some exciting findings from the well-known site of L'Anse aux Meadows (LAM) in Newfoundland. However, their eye-catching conclusion that "Norse activity at LAM may have endured for a century" is misleading and arises from a misinterpretation of the outputs of their chronological model, constructed in…

28d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

Reply to Dee and Kuitems: Our model is an expression of the uncertainties inherent in the radiocarbon data [Letters (Online Only)]

We thank Dee and Kuitems (1) for their reply and welcome their criticism and the opportunity to elaborate on our analysis presented in Ledger et al. (2). We agree that estimating the duration of Norse activity at L'Anse aux Meadows (LAM) with any certainty is hindered by the imprecision of…

28d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

Ion exchange selectivity in clay is controlled by nanoscale chemical-mechanical coupling [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Ion exchange in nanoporous clay-rich media plays an integral role in water, nutrient, and contaminant storage and transport. In montmorillonite (MMT), a common clay mineral in soils, sediments, and muds, the swelling and collapse of clay particles through the addition or removal of discrete molecular layers of water alters cation…

28d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

CaM kinase II regulates cardiac hemoglobin expression through histone phosphorylation upon sympathetic activation [Medical Sciences]

Sympathetic activation of β-adrenoreceptors (β-AR) represents a hallmark in the development of heart failure (HF). However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of gene regulation. In human ventricular myocardium from patients with end-stage HF, we found high levels of phosphorylated histone 3 at serine-28 (H3S28p). H3S28p was increased by…

28d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

Proteostasis collapse is a driver of cell aging and death [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

What molecular processes drive cell aging and death? Here, we model how proteostasis—i.e., the folding, chaperoning, and maintenance of protein function—collapses with age from slowed translation and cumulative oxidative damage. Irreparably damaged proteins accumulate with age, increasingly distracting the chaperones from folding the healthy proteins the cell needs. The tipping…

28d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

Definitions, methods, and applications in interpretable machine learning [Statistics]

Machine-learning models have demonstrated great success in learning complex patterns that enable them to make predictions about unobserved data. In addition to using models for prediction, the ability to interpret what a model has learned is receiving an increasing amount of attention. However, this increased focus has led to considerable…

28d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

Are individual differences in human brain organization measured with functional MRI meaningful? [Commentaries]

In their 2017 paper entitled "Precision mapping of individual human brains" (1), Gordon et al. put forth the notion that descriptors of brain organization obtained with functional MRI (fMRI) may not achieve their full potential for understanding brain function, or for improving clinical care, "until very accurate, individual-level brain network…

28d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

30

Mechanosensing tensile solid stresses [Commentaries]

Experiments and modeling over the past decade have concluded that cells use sophisticated molecular "clutches" at focal adhesions to determine the stiffness of their supporting substrate (1). This mechanism has been shown to modulate a variety of cell functions, including differentiation and migration. In PNAS, Panzetta et al. (2) propose…

28d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

A relatively wide-bandgap and air-stable donor polymer for fabrication of efficient semitransparent and tandem organic photovoltaics [Chemistry]

Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) have attracted tremendous attention in the field of thin-film solar cells due to their wide range of applications, especially for semitransparent devices. Here, we synthesize a dithiaindacenone-thiophene-benzothiadiazole-thiophene alternating donor copolymer named poly{[2,7-(5,5-didecyl-5H-1,8-dithia-as-indacenone)]-alt-[5,5-(5′,6′-dioctyloxy-4′,7′-di-2-thienyl-2′,1′,3

28d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

Uniformly accurate machine learning-based hydrodynamic models for kinetic equations [Applied Mathematics]

A framework is introduced for constructing interpretable and truly reliable reduced models for multiscale problems in situations without scale separation. Hydrodynamic approximation to the kinetic equation is used as an example to illustrate the main steps and issues involved. To this end, a set of generalized moments are constructed first…

28d

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

Hubble Reveals a Striking New View of Mysterious Interstellar Comet Borisov

Hello there.

28d

Science News Daily

These Desert Ants Gallop at a Blistering 108 Body Lengths Per Second

Saharan silver ants. The insects can move at blistering speeds across fiery desert sands. (Credit: Pavel Krasensky/Shutterstock) Around noon each day in the Sahara Desert, silver ants emerge …

28d

NYT > Science

8K

Court Blocks Trump's Plan to Ease Bird Protections on Oil Lands

A federal judge has blocked the Trump administration's plans to ease protections on an iconic western bird's habitat — and open it to oil and gas exploration.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

C-sections affect children's health less than previously assumed

A new study suggests that potentially avoidable unplanned Cesarean sections increase the risk of asthma, but not the risk of other immune-mediated disorders previously associated with C-sections.

28d

Discover Magazine

These Desert Ants Gallop at a Blistering 108 Body Lengths Per Second

Saharan silver ants. The insects can move at blistering speeds across fiery desert sands. (Credit: Pavel Krasensky/Shutterstock) Around noon each day in the Sahara Desert, silver ants emerge from their underground nests. Despite this being the hottest part of the day, they come out to scavenge dead insects, which are most likely to drop dead when sand temperatures can reach 140 degrees Fahrenheit

28d

ScienceAlert – Latest

400+

Elon Musk Says There's a Potentially Major Flaw in SpaceX's Moon Base Plans

Will there be enough carbon?

28d

BBC News – Science & Environment

6K

Plastic pollution: how plastic bags could help save the planet

Family of inventor says they were designed to be reused to stop trees from being destroyed.

28d

Future(s) Studies

Robots were used to judge this year's World Artistic Gymnastics Championships – "the beginning of the new history of gymnastics," a much-needed change in an industry affected by corruption.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

This Startup Wants the Rights to Your Face in Perpetuity for $127,000 – London-based startup Geomiq is commissioning friendly faces for a mystery client's robot.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

US green economy's growth dwarfs the fossil fuel industry's – Renewables, environmental, and efficiency industries grew 3x faster than fossil fuels.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

A new study from Harvard Medical School, published in Nature, has for the first time pinpointed the role of neural activity in expanding or shortening how long an individual will live, uncovering a tantalizing possibility that might eventually allow us to slow the aging process.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

Dr. Woodie Flowers, Co-Developer of FIRST Robotics Competitions, Passes Away at the Age of 75

submitted by /u/SimonFaust [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

Americans aren't too excited about working with AI. Only 22% of American workers are "excited about AI," compared to about 60% of Indian workers and 56% of Chinese workers. Only 8% of French workers are excited about it.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

In a stroke of good news for aspiring pet owners, a Swiss company developed a vaccine for cats that reduces their likelihood of triggering an allergic response in humans. This decreases the odds that a cat would need to be rehomed or given to a shelter because of an immune reaction in its owner.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

In a First, Patient Controls Two Prosthetic Arms with His Thoughts: "to enable a person with quadriplegia to use a direct neural interface to simultaneously control two assistive devices and, at the same time, feel touch sensation when the devices make contact with objects in the environment"

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

Volvo to roll out a new electric vehicle every year through 2025

submitted by /u/Abscess2 [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

The most frugal electric cars travel three times further than petrol or diesel for the same amount of money, study claims. Taking fueling costs into account, monthly costs for internal combustion engine cars and electric vehicles are much closer than the gap in list price might suggest.

submitted by /u/everyEV [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

Scientists say these 11 major cities could become unlivable within 80 years

submitted by /u/tocreatewebsite [link] [comments]

28d

Wired

500+

Volvo's First Electric Car Kicks Off a Plan to Cut Emissions

The Swedish automaker introduced the XC40 Recharge, which can go from 0 to 60 mph in 4.9 seconds and reach about 200 miles on a charge.

28d

The Atlantic

24

The Atlantic Politics Daily: What Warren Won't Say

Today in Politics It's Thursday, October 16. Today, interrogating the 2020 Democratic front-runner. ¶ Plus, putting a price tag on Medicare for All. ¶ Finally, have you heard of Jon McNaughton ? You may have seen his art. (JOHN MINCHILLO / AP) What Warren Won't Say The latest Democratic primary debate lacked electricity. Overshadowing the wholly "disorienting evening," David Graham writes, is the

28d

New on MIT Technology Review

4K

Why France is eyeing nuclear power again

The nation asked its major utility to make plans for six huge reactors.

28d

New Scientist

1K

Desert ant runs so fast it covers 100 times its body length per second

Saharan silver ants only have 10 minutes a day to find food in the searing desert heat, so they have evolved to run at almost a metre per second

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Human medicines affect fish behavior

Human medicines that act on important signal systems in the brain make fish bolder, shows a new study on three-spined sticklebacks by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden. The results reinforce that the signal substances serotonin and dopamine play important roles in behavioral differences between individuals. Further, it shows that drugs that end up in the natural environment may have cons

28d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Comparison of Four Complete Chloroplast Genomes of Medicinal and Ornamental Meconopsis Species: Genome Organization and Species Discrimination

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51738-0

28d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Inhibition of casein kinase 1δ/εimproves cognitive-affective behavior and reduces amyloid load in the APP-PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51830-5

28d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Molecular marker assisted breeding and genome composition analysis of Zhengmai 7698, an elite winter wheat cultivar

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51826-1

28d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Fornix white matter glia damage causes hippocampal gray matter damage during age-dependent limbic decline

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51737-1

28d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Gate Tuning of Synaptic Functions Based on Oxygen Vacancy Distribution Control in Four-Terminal TiO2−x Memristive Devices

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51829-y Author Correction: Gate Tuning of Synaptic Functions Based on Oxygen Vacancy Distribution Control in Four-Terminal TiO 2−x Memristive Devices

28d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Effect of trans(NO, OH)-[RuFT(Cl)(OH)NO](PF6) ruthenium nitrosyl complex on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48222-0 Author Correction: Effect of trans (NO, OH)-[RuFT(Cl)(OH)NO](PF 6 ) ruthenium nitrosyl complex on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis

28d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: GBA and APOE ε4 associate with sporadic dementia with Lewy bodies in European genome wide association study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51827-0

28d

Science | The Guardian

400+

Footage shows world's fastest ants at top speed – video

New video footage reveals the world's fastest ants galloping across the scorching sand of the Sahara at speeds approaching one metre per second, which is the equivalent of a house cat tearing about at 120mph. Researchers have found that at full pelt the Saharan silver ants can travel 108 times their body length per second in gallops that brought all six legs off the ground at once Fastest ants in

28d

Science | The Guardian

2K

Fastest ants in world found in northern Sahara, researchers say

Silver ants travel 108 times their body length per second and have stride rate 10 times that of Usain Bolt The sand dunes of the northern Sahara are home to the fastest ants in the world, according to researchers who clocked the insects foraging for food in the blistering midday sun. Video footage reveals the ants galloping across the scorching sand at speeds approaching one metre per second, the

28d

Wired

300+

Why Solving a Rubik's Cube Does Not Signal Robot Supremacy

OpenAI demonstrated a robotic arm successfully completing the puzzle. It didn't show the machine dropping the cube—or the 10,000 years of simulated training.

28d

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

World's Fastest Ant Has Just Been Clocked at a Breathtaking 855 Millimetres Per Second

All 6 of their legs can leave the ground at once.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

1K

World's fastest ant hits recording breaking speed of 855mm/s

According to Noël Coward, mad dogs and Englishmen are the only creatures that go out in the midday sun, but Harald Wolf from the University of Ulm, Germany, would add another animal: Saharan silver ants (Cataglyphis bombycina). Venturing from their nests to scavenge the corpses of less-fortunate creatures at the peak of the day—when the sand can reach 60°C—these resilient ants had always fascinate

28d

Cosmos Magazine

55

Holy galloping ants

The Saharan silver ant clocks up record speeds over blistering hot sands. Natalie Parletta reports.

28d

Phys.org

1K

World's fastest ant hits recording breaking speed of 855mm/s

According to Noël Coward, mad dogs and Englishmen are the only creatures that go out in the midday sun, but Harald Wolf from the University of Ulm, Germany, would add another animal: Saharan silver ants (Cataglyphis bombycina). Venturing from their nests to scavenge the corpses of less-fortunate creatures at the peak of the day—when the sand can reach 60°C—these resilient ants had always fascinate

28d

Wired

200+

An App to Help Jet Lag, the World's Oldest Tupperware, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

28d

Big Think

500+

Mutation in 'junk DNA' behind several deadly cancers

Only about 2 percent of the human genome codes for proteins; the rest is called noncoding DNA. We used to think this portion of the genome served almost no purpose. Now, however, we have learned that it performs several important biological functions, though much of it is still unknown. This lack of insight is why it's sometimes referred to as the "dark matter" of the human genome. In two studies

28d

Livescience.com

200+

Why Did This Man's Taste Buds Disappear?

A man's missing taste buds would turn out to be a sign of an underlying blood condition.

28d

BBC News – Science & Environment

1K

Climate change: Boris Johnson to chair new committee

A committee is set up to push climate action but critics point to delay on environment policy.

28d

Wired

1K

NASA's New Space Suits Will Fit Men and Women Alike (for Once)

Seven months after a debacle in which the agency ran short on space suits for women, NASA is showing off a new, more flexible design.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Artificial pancreas system better controls blood glucose levels than current technology

Study based at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and other centers finds new system has safety, efficacy benefits for people with type 1 diabetes

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Artificial pancreas system better controls blood glucose levels than current technology

A multicenter randomized clinical trial evaluating a new artificial pancreas system — which automatically monitors and regulates blood glucose levels — has found that the new system was more effective than existing treatments at controlling blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes. The trial, based partly at the University of Virginia Center for Diabetes Technology, was primarily fund

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

27

Artificial pancreas system better controls blood glucose levels than current technology

A multicenter randomized clinical trial evaluating a new artificial pancreas system — which automatically monitors and regulates blood glucose levels — has found that the new system was more effective than existing treatments at controlling blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes. The trial was primarily funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (

28d

Science News Daily

Netflix's US subscriber growth slowing as competition looms

Netflix's subscriber growth is bogging down even before the leading video streaming service confronts high-powered threats from Apple and Walt Disney Co.

28d

Science Magazine

Want to put your dog on a raw meat diet? It could be dangerous for both of you

More than 70% of raw pet food found to contain "worrisome" levels of bacteria

28d

Wired

400+

How AI Battles Security Threats Without Humans

[no content]

28d

NYT > Science

7K

Despite Their Promises, Giant Energy Companies Burn Away Vast Amounts of Natural Gas

Exxon, Marathon, BP and others are flaring natural gas, a wasteful practice with consequences in the fight against climate change, at a record pace.

28d

NYT > Science

100+

Sutter Health to Settle Antitrust Lawsuit

The hospital group in California was accused of using its market dominance to demand higher prices for health care.

28d

Big Think

200+

Forgotten Nazi pesticide rediscovered — it was safer than DDT

DDT, or dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, was an extremely popular pesticide during World War II up until the '70s, when it was banned. DDT was believed to be extremely safe, but it turns out this was only due to enthusiasm for the pesticide drummed up by its efficacy during World War II. Researchers have uncovered a far more effective pesticide that Allied forces wound up ignoring, in part becaus

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists link hormone production in baby wallabies how some girls are born with 'male' genitalia

Study has made a connection between the way baby wallabies produce male hormones and how some human girls are born with genitalia that resemble those of a boy.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Preclinical research helps explain why fatty livers are more susceptible to cancer

Fatty liver disease is contributing to an increase in liver cancer and basic scientists at The University of Texas Health Science at Houston (UTHealth) have new insight as to why.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

22

New strategy to treat Parkinson's disease

Scientists have used patient-derived neurons to develop and test a new strategy to treat Parkinson's disease by mitigating the effects of harmful genetic mutations. Instead of trying to fix broken enzymes, the scientists amplified healthy ones, an approach that successfully alleviated symptoms of Parkinson's disease in human brain cells and in mouse models.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Information theory as a tool for extracting climate signals

During Earth's last glacial period, temperatures on the planet periodically spiked dramatically and rapidly. A new paper in the journal Chaos suggests that mathematics from information theory could offer a powerful tool for analyzing and understanding these mysterious events.

28d

Inside Science

89

Lab-Grown Mini-brains Show How Humans Differ From Monkeys and Chimpanzees

Tiny brainlike cell cultures called organoids offer clues about human evolution. brain-organoid_cropped.jpg Chimpanzee brain organoids in a petri dish. Image credits: Sabina Kanton Rights information: This image may only be reproduced with this Inside Science article. Human Wednesday, October 16, 2019 – 16:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — From our earliest days in the womb, our b

28d

Nature

51

Don't knock wood: an ordinary material goes high-tech

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03138-7 A wooden chip imprinted with microscopic patterns serves as a grid of lenses.

28d

Discover Magazine

20

Why We've Been Hating on 'Kids These Days' for Thousands of Years

Kids these days, amiright? (Credit: aastock/Shutterstock) Ugh. Kids these days. They've got no respect. They dress all weird. They're always on their phones. And don't get me started on their music! Versions of this argument have echoed through editorials, taverns, hair salons and Roman bathhouses for millennia. Kids these days just aren't what they used to be. To hear the various ills of youth, o

28d

Futurity.org

100+

Little kids are good at picking what to teach others

From an early age, children can make decisions about what kinds of information to teach other kids, according to new research. Humans are incredible learners, in part because they are also accomplished teachers. Even at a very early age, people are adept at instructing others. While a lot of research has focused on how people teach, much less has looked at how they decide what to teach in the fir

28d

Climate Central – News

200+

Illinois Solar Booms Under New Program, but Developers Fear Bust Ahead

Millennium Park skyscrapers on a sunny morning (Bex Walton / flickr ) This story was produced through a partnership between Energy News Network , which tracks energy issues through the Midwest and other U.S. regions, and Climate Central, a non-advocacy science and news group. By Jillian Melero (Climate Central) and Kari Lydersen (Energy News Network) Mapping by Priyanka Runwal (Climate Central) C

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study suggests why some US football players have higher cardiovascular risk

Research has shown that while elite athletes overall are at decreased risk of death from cardiovascular problems, a certain group of athletes — football linemen in the United States — actually have higher risk than the general population than other elite athletes.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Blood-collection device makes radiation testing quick and easy

Developed by a research team at the University of Arizona College of Medicine –Phoenix, the self-collection device quickly can evaluate radiation exposure and help triage emergency treatment in the event of a nuclear attack or accident.

28d

Phys.org

71

Hot again: Another month, another global heat record reached

Scientists say the globe sizzled to a record tying hot month in September, driven partly by a sweaty United States.

28d

Science News Daily

How big dinosaurs stopped their brains from baking

Huge dinosaurs evolved different cooling strategies to prevent heat stroke and keep their brains from overheating.

28d

Phys.org

Consumers trust influencers less when there is a variety of choices for a product

Consumers have been relying on opinion leader recommendations to make choices about product quality and purchases for a long time. It is even more prominent now with the prevalence of influencers on social media platforms. The problem is, when there is a wide variety of the same product, consumers question if a positive recommendation is based on quality or personal preferences.

29d

Science | The Guardian

1K

Nasa plans historic first all-female spacewalk in coming days

Christina Koch and Jessica Meir to make history after delay over suit sizes available at station Nasa is planning the first ever all-female spacewalk as early as Thursday, the space agency has announced. The walk, or float, will be conducted from the International Space Station by the astronauts Christina Koch and Jessica Meir, who have been living in space since March and September respectively.

29d

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

500+

A circular economy for salt that keeps rivers clean | Tina Arrowood

During the winter of 2018-2019, one million tons of salt were applied to icy roads in the state of Pennsylvania alone. The salt from industrial uses like this often ends up in freshwater rivers, making their water undrinkable and contributing to a growing global crisis. How can we better protect these precious natural resources? Physical organic chemist Tina Arrowood shares a three-step plan to ke

29d

The Scientist RSS

NPSR1 Variant Linked to Less Sleep in People: Study

"Short sleeper" mice engineered to have the same sequence in the gene sleep less but show the same performance on memory tests as animals that sleep a normal amount.

29d

Phys.org

52

How partisan hate leads people to believe falsehoods

Researchers now have a better idea of why people who rely on partisan news outlets are more likely to believe falsehoods about political opponents.

29d

Phys.org

21

NASA-NOAA satellite catches last burst before demise of Tropical Depression 17E

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Mexico and found two small areas of very strong thunderstorms near two different coastlines. One area was in Potential Tropical Cyclone 17E in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and the other was for another system developing in the western Gulf of Mexico.

29d

Phys.org

500+

A secret in saliva: Food and germs helped humans evolve into unique member of great apes

Two million years of eating meat and cooked food may have helped humans shift further from other great apes on the evolutionary tree. The evidence is in our saliva, according to new research from the University at Buffalo.

29d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

500+

A secret in saliva: Food and germs helped humans evolve into unique member of great apes

Two million years of eating meat and cooked food may have helped humans shift further from other great apes on the evolutionary tree. The evidence is in our saliva, according to new research from the University at Buffalo.

29d

Phys.org

24

Study helps pinpoint what makes species vulnerable to environmental change

The fabled use of canaries in coal mines as an early warning of carbon monoxide stemmed from the birds' extreme sensitivity to toxic conditions compared to humans.

29d

Science News Daily

XC40 Recharge: Volvo's First Electric Car, Under $48,000 After Credits

Volvo XC40 Recharge P8 AWD , here in Sage Green. Volvo's first EV offering under the Recharge sub-brand will be the subcompact XC40. It will be …

29d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

24

Study helps pinpoint what makes species vulnerable to environmental change

The fabled use of canaries in coal mines as an early warning of carbon monoxide stemmed from the birds' extreme sensitivity to toxic conditions compared to humans.

29d

New on MIT Technology Review

500+

Bitcoin surveillance helped feds take down a massive child abuse site

[no content]

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA-NOAA satellite catches last burst before demise of Tropical Depression 17E

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Mexico and found two small areas of very strong thunderstorms near two different coastlines. One area was in Potential Tropical Cyclone 17E in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and the other was for another system developing in the western Gulf of Mexico.

29d

Big Think

300+

The fast track to a life well lived is feeling grateful

For the Ancient Greeks, virtue wasn't a goal in and of itself, but rather a route to a life well lived. By being honest and generous, embodying diligence and fortitude, showing restraint and kindness, a person would flourish – coming to live a life filled with meaning and finding an enduring, as opposed to ephemeral, happiness. Today, that view hasn't much changed. While we hear plenty of stories

29d

The Scientist RSS

57

German Lab Faces Criminal Charges After Undercover Investigation

Video taken at the Laboratory of Pharmacology and Toxicology contract testing facility appears to show mistreatment of monkeys, dogs, and cats.

29d

Livescience.com

1K

The Man Who Found the Titanic Just Ended His Search for Amelia Earhart's Lost Plane

Two weeks and a multimillion-dollar search later, Robert Ballard said he has found no hint of it.

29d

The Atlantic

21K

The Eye-Popping Cost of Medicare for All

Senator Elizabeth Warren's refusal to answer repeated questions at last night's debate about how she would fund Medicare for All underscores the challenge she faces finding a politically acceptable means to meet the idea's huge price tag—a challenge that only intensified today with the release of an eye-popping new study . The Urban Institute, a center-left think tank highly respected among Democ

29d

Science News Daily

The FCC approves T-Mobile-Sprint deal in party-line vote

The Federal Communications Commission has approved the $26.5 billion combination of Sprint and T-Mobile on a 3-2 party-line vote.

29d

Futurity.org

300+

How did orcas and bats both evolve echolocation?

Scientists have uncovered genetic similarities among species that use echolocation. Evolutionary adaptations like echolocation that are shared by unrelated species arose in part due to identical, independently acquired genetic changes, according to the new study. Insect-eating bats navigate effortlessly in the dark and dolphins and killer whales gobble up prey in murky waters thanks in part to sp

29d

Scientific American

500+

Why Do Some People Need Less Sleep? It's in Their DNA

U.C.S.F. researchers find a gene for flourishing with less shut-eye — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Digital breast tomosynthesis increases cancer detection over full-field mammography

An ahead-of-print article forthcoming in the March 2020 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) comparing cancer detection rates (CDR) for screening digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) versus full-field digital mammography (FFDM) found that DBT results in 'significantly increased CDR' — irrespective of tumor type, size, or grade of cancer.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New augmented reality system lets smartphone users get hands-on with virtual objects

Developed at Brown University, a new augmented reality system places virtual objects within real-world backgrounds on cell phone screens and lets people interact with those object by hand as if they were really there.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study helps pinpoint what makes species vulnerable to environmental change

Researchers from Princeton University affiliated with PEI reported that a bird species' ability to adapt to seasonal temperature changes may be one factor in whether it can better withstand environmental disruption. The researchers studied 135 bird species in the Himalayas and found that species living in the seasonal western Himalayas adapted to the conversion of forests to agricultural land bett

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

28

How partisan hate leads people to believe falsehoods

Researchers now have a better idea of why people who rely on partisan news outlets are more likely to believe falsehoods about political opponents.

29d

New Scientist

1K

A second mutation that makes people need less sleep has been found

A genetic mutation that lets people feel fully rested with less than six hours sleep has been identified, months after a similar discovery

29d

New Scientist

4K

Mother's attention may shape baby's hormone system and temperament

Babies who are touched, talked to and paid more attention by caregivers develop more receptors for the "cuddle chemical" oxytocin over their first 18 months

29d

New Scientist

500+

Deadly frog fungus now thrives where we thought it couldn't survive

A notorious fungus that is devastating amphibian populations is far more common than first thought, leaving biologists wondering why only some infected animals die

29d

New Scientist

300+

Strange sand dunes on Titan could be made by cosmic rays hitting ice

Saturn's largest moon Titan has strange sand dunes that seem to be full of organic molecules, which may form when radiation from space hits ice on the ground

29d

Wired

1K

How a Bitcoin Trail Led to a Massive Dark Web Child-Porn Site Takedown

Federal investigators focused not on offensive hacking efforts or surveilling communications, but on the transactions using cryptocurrency.

29d

Phys.org

20

Respiratory diseases linked with high blood pressure in lungs

Pulmonary hypertension is a type of high blood pressure that affects the lungs of both animals and people. When tiny vessels in the lungs become narrowed or blocked, it becomes harder for blood to flow through and can cause the heart to weaken or fail.

29d

Futurity.org

DNA delivery into T cells may improve immunotherapy

A new method can deliver DNA into immune cells with minimal stress on these cells, which could solve a problem with a current immunotherapy technique, researchers report. Immunotherapy is a promising cancer treatment that uses genetically modified immune cells to fight cancer. It can be useful as primary treatment or in combination with other treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy to slow

29d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

25

Respiratory diseases linked with high blood pressure in lungs

Pulmonary hypertension is a type of high blood pressure that affects the lungs of both animals and people. When tiny vessels in the lungs become narrowed or blocked, it becomes harder for blood to flow through and can cause the heart to weaken or fail.

29d

Scientific American: Mind & Brain

500+

Why Do Some People Need Less Sleep? It's in Their DNA

U.C.S.F. researchers find a gene for flourishing with less shut-eye — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

29d

Futurity.org

36

Slinky-like patch may boost physical therapy after joint injury

A new sensor patch could bring the assessment of human joints into the 21st century, researchers report. The patch uses electronic sensors to understand the functional range of motion as opposed to today's static measurements. Kirigami, the Japanese art of creating 3D structures from cut paper, and the recovery of one of the creators after a cycling crash inspired the design of the sensor, which

29d

Scientific American News

400+

Why Do Some People Need Less Sleep? It's in Their DNA

U.C.S.F. researchers find a gene for flourishing with less shut-eye — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

29d

Scientific American Content

500+

Why Do Some People Need Less Sleep? It's in Their DNA

U.C.S.F. researchers find a gene for flourishing with less shut-eye — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Deaf infants' gaze behavior more advanced than that of hearing infants

Deaf infants who have been exposed to American Sign Language are better at following an adult's gaze than their hearing peers, supporting the idea that social-cognitive development is sensitive to different kinds of life experiences.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Clingfish biology inspires better suction cup

A team of engineers and marine biologists built a better suction cup inspired by the mechanism that allows the clingfish to adhere to both smooth and rough surfaces. Researchers reverse engineered the clingfish's suction disk and developed devices that cling well to wet and dry objects both in an out of water. The devices can hold up to hundreds of times their own weight.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Recovering 'lost dimensions' of images and video

MIT researchers have developed a model that recovers valuable data lost from images and video that have been 'collapsed' into lower dimensions.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

To better understand racial trauma, expert says we must also acknowledge skin tone

Antoinette Landor, assistant professor of human development and family science, and a leading expert on colorism, says discrimination based on skin tone plays a significant role in the lives of African Americans.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Respiratory diseases linked with high blood pressure in lungs

Pulmonary hypertension is a type of high blood pressure that affects the lungs of both animals and people. When tiny vessels in the lungs become narrowed or blocked, it becomes harder for blood to flow through and can cause the heart to weaken or fail.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rapamycin for longevity — Opinion article

The scientist discusses several reasons, including fear of the actual and fictional side effects of rapamycin, everolimus and other clinically-approved drugs, arguing that no real side effects preclude their use as anti-aging drugs today.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

EPFL is developing next-generation soft hearing implants

Working with clinicians from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School, a team of EPFL researchers has developed a conformable electrode implant that will allow people with a dysfunctional inner ear to hear again. This new device could replace existing auditory brainstem implants, which have a number of shortcomings.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

3K

Mothers' behavior influences bonding hormone oxytocin in babies

A new epigenetic study now suggests that mothers' behavior can also have a substantial impact on their children's developing oxytocin systems.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study focuses on repair and reversal of damage caused by Huntington's disease

A new study examining the role that star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes play in Huntington's disease has identified a potential strategy that may halt the disease and repair some of the damage it causes.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cultivating joy through mindfulness: An antidote to opioid misuse, the disease of despair

New research shows that a specific mind-body therapy, Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE), increases the brain's response to natural, healthy rewards while also decreasing the brain's response to opioid-related cues.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study unveils the intricate way two proteins interact to promote cell movement, metastasis

When cells in our bodies need to move — to attack an infection or heal a wound, for example — cellular proteins send and receive a cascade of signals that directs the cells to the right place at the right time. It's a process cancer cells can hijack to spread to new tissues and organs.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Short sleep' gene prevents memory deficits associated with sleep deprivation

The UCSF scientists who identified the two known human genes that promote 'natural short sleep' — nightly sleep that lasts just four to six hours but leaves people feeling well-rested — have now discovered a third, and it's also the first gene that's ever been shown to prevent the memory deficits that normally accompany sleep deprivation.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stanford study shows why even well-controlled epilepsy can disrupt thinking

A study by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators may help explain why even people benefiting from medications for their epilepsy often continue to experience bouts of difficulty thinking, perceiving and remembering clearly.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First widespread chytrid fungus infections in frogs of Peruvian Amazon rain forests

University of Michigan biologists have documented, for the first time, the widespread presence of the notorious chytrid fungus in 80 species of frogs from lowland rain forest sites in the Peruvian Amazon.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

65

Scientists find early humans moved through Mediterranean earlier than believed

An international research team led by scientists from McMaster University has unearthed new evidence in Greece proving that the island of Naxos was inhabited by Neanderthals and earlier humans at least 200,000 years ago, tens of thousands of years earlier than previously believed.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Listening to 'noisy knees' to diagnose osteoarthritis: The first human cohort study

A new way of diagnosing and assessing knee osteoarthritis (OA) has moved a step closer with a major study paving the way for its use in research and clinical practice.The technique involves attaching small microphones to knees, and detecting high frequency sounds from the joint components as people perform sitting standing movements. The signals, known as acoustic emissions, are computer-analysed

29d

Science Advances current issue

Kids these days: Why the youth of today seem lacking

In five preregistered studies, we assess people's tendency to believe "kids these days" are deficient relative to those of previous generations. Across three traits, American adults ( N = 3458; M age = 33 to 51 years) believe today's youth are in decline; however, these perceptions are associated with people's standing on those traits. Authoritarian people especially think youth are less respectf

29d

Science Advances current issue

DNA methylation reprogramming, TE derepression, and postzygotic isolation of nascent animal species

The genomic shock hypothesis stipulates that the stress associated with divergent genome admixture can cause transposable element (TE) derepression, which could act as a postzygotic isolation mechanism. TEs affect gene structure, expression patterns, and chromosome organization and may have deleterious consequences when released. For these reasons, they are silenced by heterochromatin formation,

29d

Science Advances current issue

Synthetic presentation of noncanonical Wnt5a motif promotes mechanosensing-dependent differentiation of stem cells and regeneration

Noncanonical Wnt signaling in stem cells is essential to numerous developmental events. However, no prior studies have capitalized on the osteoinductive potential of noncanonical Wnt ligands to functionalize biomaterials in enhancing the osteogenesis and associated skeleton formation. Here, we investigated the efficacy of the functionalization of biomaterials with a synthetic Wnt5a mimetic ligand

29d

Science Advances current issue

Low-temperature synthesis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Titans surface ices and on airless bodies

Titan's equatorial dunes represent the most monumental surface structures in our Solar System, but the chemical composition of their dark organics remains a fundamental, unsolved enigma, with solid acetylene detected near the dunes implicated as a key feedstock. Here, we reveal in laboratory simulation experiments that aromatics such as benzene, naphthalene, and phenanthrene—prospective building

29d

Science Advances current issue

Structure and genome ejection mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus phage P68

Phages infecting Staphylococcus aureus can be used as therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. However, there is limited information about the mechanism of genome delivery of phages that infect Gram-positive bacteria. Here, we present the structures of native S. aureus phage P68, genome ejection intermediate, and empty particle. The P68 head contains 72 subunits of inner co

29d

Science Advances current issue

Chain formation can enhance the vertical migration of phytoplankton through turbulence

Many species of motile phytoplankton can actively form long multicellular chains by remaining attached to one another after cell division. While chains swim more rapidly than single cells of the same species, chain formation also markedly reduces phytoplankton's ability to maintain their bearing. This suggests that turbulence, which acts to randomize swimming direction, could sharply attenuate a

29d

Science Advances current issue

PP2C{delta} inhibits p300-mediated p53 acetylation via ATM/BRCA1 pathway to impede DNA damage response in breast cancer

Although nuclear type 2C protein phosphatase (PP2C) has been demonstrated to be pro-oncogenic with an important role in tumorigenesis, the underlying mechanisms that link aberrant PP2C levels with cancer development remain elusive. Here, we found that aberrant PP2C activity decreases p53 acetylation and its transcriptional activity and suppresses doxorubicin-induced cell apoptosis. Mechanisticall

29d

Science Advances current issue

A global synthesis reveals biodiversity-mediated benefits for crop production

Human land use threatens global biodiversity and compromises multiple ecosystem functions critical to food production. Whether crop yield–related ecosystem services can be maintained by a few dominant species or rely on high richness remains unclear. Using a global database from 89 studies (with 1475 locations), we partition the relative importance of species richness, abundance, and dominance fo

29d

Science Advances current issue

Targeting CCR5 trafficking to inhibit HIV-1 infection

Using a cell-based assay monitoring differential protein transport in the secretory pathway coupled to high-content screening, we have identified three molecules that specifically reduce the delivery of the major co-receptor for HIV-1, CCR5, to the plasma membrane. They have no effect on the closely related receptors CCR1 and CXCR4. These molecules are also potent in primary macrophages as they m

29d

Science Advances current issue

Earliest occupation of the Central Aegean (Naxos), Greece: Implications for hominin and Homo sapiens behavior and dispersals

We present evidence of Middle Pleistocene activity in the central Aegean Basin at the chert extraction and reduction complex of Stelida (Naxos, Greece). Luminescence dating places ~9000 artifacts in a stratigraphic sequence from ~13 to 200 thousand years ago (ka ago). These artifacts include Mousterian products, which arguably provide first evidence for Neanderthals in the region. This dated mate

29d

Science Advances current issue

The treatment of cocaine use disorder

Cocaine use continues to be a serious worldwide public health problem. Cocaine abuse is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Cocaine overdose deaths are increasing in the United States and, in certain populations, outnumber heroin and opiate overdose deaths. Psychosocial treatments remain the treatments of choice for cocaine use disorder (CUD), with standard approaches including c

29d

Science Advances current issue

Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement remediates hedonic dysregulation in opioid users: Neural and affective evidence of target engagement

Addiction neuroscience models posit that recurrent drug use increases reactivity to drug-related cues and blunts responsiveness to natural rewards, propelling a cycle of hedonic dysregulation that drives addictive behavior. Here, we assessed whether a cognitive intervention for addiction, Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE), could restructure reward responsiveness from valuation of d

29d

Science Advances current issue

Controlled ploidy reduction of pluripotent 4n cells generates 2n cells during mouse embryo development

Cells with high ploidy content are common in mammalian extraembryonic and adult tissues. Cell-to-cell fusion generates polyploid cells during mammalian development and tissue regeneration. However, whether increased ploidy can be occasionally tolerated in embryonic lineages still remains largely unknown. Here, we show that pluripotent, fusion-derived tetraploid cells, when injected in a recipient

29d

Science Advances current issue

Bacterial production and direct functional screening of expanded molecular libraries for discovering inhibitors of protein aggregation

Protein misfolding and aggregation are associated with a many human disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Toward increasing the effectiveness of early-stage drug discovery for these conditions, we report a bacterial platform that enables the biosynthesis of molecular libraries with expanded diversities and their direct functional screening for discovering protein aggregation

29d

Science Advances current issue

Common architecture of Tc toxins from human and insect pathogenic bacteria

Tc toxins use a syringe-like mechanism to penetrate the membrane and translocate toxic enzymes into the host cytosol. They are composed of three components: TcA, TcB, and TcC. Low-resolution structures of TcAs from different bacteria suggest a considerable difference in their architecture and possibly in their mechanism of action. Here, we present high-resolution structures of five TcAs from inse

29d

Science Advances current issue

Cryo-electron microscopy structure and analysis of the P-Rex1-G{beta}{gamma} signaling scaffold

PIP 3 -dependent Rac exchanger 1 (P-Rex1) is activated downstream of G protein–coupled receptors to promote neutrophil migration and metastasis. The structure of more than half of the enzyme and its regulatory G protein binding site are unknown. Our 3.2 Å cryo-EM structure of the P-Rex1–Gβ complex reveals that the carboxyl-terminal half of P-Rex1 adopts a complex fold most similar to those of Leg

29d

Science Advances current issue

Epigenetic dynamics in infancy and the impact of maternal engagement

The contribution of nature versus nurture to the development of human behavior has been debated for centuries. Here, we offer a piece to this complex puzzle by identifying the human endogenous oxytocin system—known for its critical role in mammalian sociality—as a system sensitive to its early environment and subject to epigenetic change. Recent animal work suggests that early parental care is as

29d

Science Advances current issue

Current advances in research in treatment and recovery: Nicotine addiction

The health harms of combusted tobacco use are undeniable. With market and regulatory pressures to reduce the harms of nicotine delivery by combustion, the tobacco product landscape has diversified to include smokeless, heated, and electronic nicotine vaping products. Products of tobacco combustion are the main cause of smoking-induced disease, and nicotine addiction sustains tobacco use. An under

29d

Science Advances current issue

Advances in understanding addiction treatment and recovery

[no content]

29d

ScienceDaily

500+

In a first, scientists pinpoint neural activity's role in human longevity

Researchers discover that the activity of the nervous system might influence human longevity. Neural excitation linked to shorter life, while suppression of overactivity appears to extend life span. Protein REST, previously shown to protect aging brains from dementia and other diseases, emerges as a key player in molecular cascade related to aging. Findings suggest future avenues for intervention

29d

ScienceDaily

300+

Diabetes: A next-generation therapy soon available?

Insulin is normally produced by pancreatic beta cells. In many people with diabetes, pancreatic cells are not functional, causing a chronic and potentially fatal insulin deficiency that can only be controlled through daily insulin injections. However, this approach has serious adverse effects. In order to improve therapy, researchers have identified a protein called S100A9 which seems to act as a

29d

ScienceDaily

36

Family members' emotional attachment limits family firm growth

New research shows family-related considerations often trump a desire to grow and expand in family firms.

29d

ScienceDaily

100+

Use of social media is taking place both online and offline

Social media has changed how people interact. However, social media use is neither static or specifically linked to certain platforms. Emerging technical capabilities, changes in lifestyle and time management as well as the increasing possibilities to engage in online and offline interaction simultaneously affect our use of social media.

29d

ScienceDaily

28

Newly identified compounds could help give fire ants their sting

Native to South America, imported fire ants have now spread to parts of North America and elsewhere around the world. These invasive pests have painful stings that, in some cases, can cause serious medical problems, such as hypersensitivity reactions, infections and even kidney failure. Now, researchers have identified pyridine alkaloids that, along with other venom components, could contribute to

29d

ScienceDaily

24

Computational 'match game' identifies potential antibiotics

Computational biologists have devised a software tool that can play a high-speed 'Match Game' to identify bioactive molecules and the microbial genes that produce them so they can be evaluated as possible antibiotics and other therapeutic agents.

29d

Science and technology

86

To see off piranha this fish has strong armour

The mighty pirarucu's super-tough scales

29d

Scientific American Content

1K

Extreme Snows in Greenland Caused Ecosystem's "Reproductive Collapse"

Delayed plant flowering and nesting meant some Arctic animals' offspring likely did not survive the winter — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

29d

Big Think

300+

5 of history's strangest scientific theories

The line between science and strongly held belief was not always so clear-cut as it is today. In the past, many quacks, charlatans, or well-intentioned philosophers have developed theories that strike us as obviously untrue today. But hindsight is 20/20: People really had no idea how the world actually worked in the past. None For most of us, it's easy to distinguish between real science and pseu

29d

Wired

4K

A New Gene Helps Explain Why Some People Need Less Sleep

The lucky devils who thrive on just a few hours' sleep may be benefiting from a gene mutation that increases wakefulness and keeps memory intact.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A secret in saliva: Food and germs helped humans evolve into unique member of great apes

University at Buffalo researchers discovered that the human diet — a result of increased meat consumption, cooking and agriculture — has led to stark differences in the saliva of humans compared to that of other primates.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Consumers trust influencers less when there is a variety of choices for a product

Consumers have been relying on opinion leader recommendations to make choices about product quality and purchases for a long time. It is even more prominent now with the prevalence of influencers on social media platforms. The problem is, when there is a wide variety of the same product, consumers question if a positive recommendation is based on quality or personal preferences.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists identify genetic variation linked to severity of ALS

A discovery made several years ago in a lab researching asthma at Wake Forest School of Medicine may now have implications for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disease with no known cure and only two FDA-approved drugs to treat its progression and severity.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA's Terra satellite catches end of Atlantic Tropical Depression 15

Tropical Depression Fifteen or TD15, developed off the west coast of Africa on Oct. 14 by 5 p.m. EDT. The depression never strengthened into a tropical storm before it reached the end of its life. NASA's Terra satellite provided an image of TD15 after stretched out and ceased being a tropical cyclone.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Strong storms can generate earthquake-like seismic activity

Researchers have discovered a new geophysical phenomenon where a hurricane or other strong storm can produce vibrations in the nearby ocean floor as strong as a magnitude 3.5 earthquake.

29d

New Scientist

Extinction Rebellion protests should be embraced, not banned

The move to haul protesters off London's streets reflects a scientifically and economically illiterate political and media elite in denial about the climate

29d

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

100+

Study unveils the intricate way two proteins interact to promote cell movement, metastasis

When cells in our bodies need to move—to attack an infection or heal a wound, for example—cellular proteins send and receive a cascade of signals that directs the cells to the right place at the right time. It's a process cancer cells can hijack to spread to new tissues and organs.

29d

Phys.org

500+

New study shows huge dinosaurs evolved different cooling systems to combat heat stroke

Different dinosaur groups independently evolved gigantic body sizes, but they all faced the same problems of overheating and damaging their brains. Researchers from Ohio University's Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine show in a new article in the Anatomical Record that different giant dinosaurs solved the problem in different ways, evolving different cooling systems in different parts of the

29d

Phys.org

2K

First widespread chytrid fungus infections in frogs of Peruvian Amazon rain forests

University of Michigan biologists have documented, for the first time, the widespread presence of the notorious chytrid fungus in 80 species of frogs from lowland rain forest sites in the Peruvian Amazon.

29d

Phys.org

2K

Scientists find early humans moved through Mediterranean earlier than believed

An international research team led by scientists from McMaster University has unearthed new evidence in Greece proving that the island of Naxos was inhabited by Neanderthals and earlier humans at least 200,000 years ago, tens of thousands of years earlier than previously believed.

29d

Phys.org

100+

Study unveils the intricate way two proteins interact to promote cell movement, metastasis

When cells in our bodies need to move—to attack an infection or heal a wound, for example—cellular proteins send and receive a cascade of signals that directs the cells to the right place at the right time. It's a process cancer cells can hijack to spread to new tissues and organs.

29d

Phys.org

400+

Study: Biodiversity improves crop production

Ecologists and biologists compared data of about 1,500 agricultural fields around the world, including corn fields in the American plains, oilseed rape fields in southern Sweden, coffee plantations in India, mango plantations in South Africa and cereal crops in the Alps. They analyzed two ecosystem services (i.e., processes regulated by nature that are beneficial and free for humans): the pollinat

29d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

2K

First widespread chytrid fungus infections in frogs of Peruvian Amazon rain forests

University of Michigan biologists have documented, for the first time, the widespread presence of the notorious chytrid fungus in 80 species of frogs from lowland rain forest sites in the Peruvian Amazon.

29d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

400+

Study: Biodiversity improves crop production

Ecologists and biologists compared data of about 1,500 agricultural fields around the world, including corn fields in the American plains, oilseed rape fields in southern Sweden, coffee plantations in India, mango plantations in South Africa and cereal crops in the Alps. They analyzed two ecosystem services (i.e., processes regulated by nature that are beneficial and free for humans): the pollinat

29d

The Atlantic

2K

Et Tu, LeBron?

Less than two years ago, the Fox News host Laura Ingraham infamously said that LeBron James should "shut up and dribble," after the NBA superstar criticized President Donald Trump. Now everyone—especially on the right—is on the Los Angeles Lakers forward's case for disheartening comments he made about the explosive political situation between the NBA and China. Not even pro basketball's biggest s

29d

Phys.org

First genome of spotted lanternfly built from a single insect

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists, in cooperation with Pacific Biosciences and Penn State University, have published the first genome of the invasive Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) in the journal Gigascience and they did it from a single caught-in-the-wild specimen.

29d

Phys.org

NASA's Terra satellite catches end of Atlantic Tropical Depression 15

Tropical Depression Fifteen or TD15, developed off the west coast of Africa on Oct. 14 by 5 p.m. EDT. The depression never strengthened into a tropical storm before it reached the end of its life. NASA's Terra satellite provided an image of TD15 after stretched out and ceased being a tropical cyclone.

29d

Phys.org

Could young blood hold secrets to longer, healthier life?

In what sounds like a scene from a science fiction movie, researchers in 2005 stitched together old and young mice so they shared a circulatory system. Youthful blood seemingly rejuvenated many tissues of the elderly rodents, boosting their cognitive and physical performance. Now, scientists are examining whether certain molecules in young blood could help treat age-related diseases, according to

29d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

First genome of spotted lanternfly built from a single insect

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists, in cooperation with Pacific Biosciences and Penn State University, have published the first genome of the invasive Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) in the journal Gigascience and they did it from a single caught-in-the-wild specimen.

29d

Future(s) Studies

20

China's Social Credit System Proves That We're Living In A Dystopian Future

submitted by /u/OliAustin101 [link] [comments]

29d

Future(s) Studies

Volvo has just launched what they claim is one of the most ambitious plans in the industry, which would see them reduce their lifecycle carbon footprint per car by 40% between 2018 and 2025.

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

29d

Future(s) Studies

Philadelphia launches regional collaborative to tackle climate change, recycling, renewable energy. Organizers expected about 20 sign-ups before launch instead they got 39 business and local leaders who are willing to address the climate change issue

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

29d

Future(s) Studies

Twenty one bee species in Northern Ireland are at risk of extinction unless action is taken, according to a report. It blames loss of wildflower habitats, pesticides, pollution and climate change.

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

29d

Future(s) Studies

[AMA] I am a Professor whose research includes designing drone networks to deliver defibrillators. Ask me anything!

Hey everyone. My name is Justin J. Boutilier and I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. Broadly speaking, my research focuses on improving the quality, access, and delivery of healthcare. One component of my research agenda includes designing and optimizing drone networks to deliver defibrillators to cardiac ar

29d

Future(s) Studies

The US military wants super-soldiers to control drones with their minds – A new DARPA research program is developing brain-computer interfaces that could control "swarms of drones, operating at the speed of thought".

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

29d

ScienceDaily

400+

Scientists discover skin keeps time independent of the brain

A study has now found that a type of opsin known as neuropsin is expressed in the hair follicles of mice and synchronize the skin's circadian clock to the light-dark cycle, independent of the eyes or brain. Researchers now want to see if skin heals better if it's exposed to certain types of light.

29d

ScienceDaily

500+

Gas 'waterfalls' reveal infant planets around young star

For the first time, astronomers have witnessed 3D motions of gas in a planet-forming disk. At three locations in the disk around a young star called HD 163296, gas is flowing like a waterfall into gaps that are most likely caused by planets in formation. These gas flows have long been predicted and would directly influence the chemical composition of planet atmospheres.

29d

ScienceDaily

60

Scientists work toward a rapid point-of-care diagnostic test for Lyme disease

A study describes a new rapid assay for Lyme disease that could lead to a practical test for use by healthcare providers. The researchers found the assay, which uses several biomarkers to detect Lyme disease infection, was more sensitive than current laboratory-based tests when diagnosing Lyme disease early after suspected infection.

29d

ScienceDaily

46

New marker for tumor aggression in neurofibromatosis type 1

A new study of tumor samples from people with the rare genetic syndrome neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) has uncovered novel molecular clues about which tumors are most likely to be aggressive in those with NF1. According to the researchers, the clues could advance the search for more customized and relevant treatments that spare patients exposure to treatments unlikely to work.

29d

Livescience.com

7K

Watch Rare Footage of Whales Blowing 'Bubble Nets' to Capture Prey in a Vortex of Doom

Underwater and airborne cameras recently captured an astounding sight: feeding whales producing bubble nets to trap their prey.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First genome of spotted lanternfly built from a single insect

Agricultural Research Service scientists have published the first genome of the invasive spotted lanternfly (SLF) in the journal Gigascience and they did it from a single caught-in-the-wild specimen. Not only is it the first published genome for this pest, but no closely related species has had its genome sequenced, making the data even more important, according to entomologist Scott M. Geib with

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How does fathers' physical and mental health status impact their children?

A new study has shown that children of fathers with poor mental health had a 2.6 times greater risk of having poor mental health.

29d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

49

A rat's brain, on and off methamphetamine

Drug addiction is a vicious cycle of reward and withdrawal. Chronic users often relapse because of the unpleasant physical and psychological symptoms they experience when they stop taking the drug. Now, researchers report metabolic changes in the brains of rats during methamphetamine self-administration and withdrawal that could help identify biomarkers and treatments for addiction.

29d

Nature

100+

Working Scientist podcast: How to inspire young women to consider scientific careers

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03127-w Two projects aimed at boosting female representation in STEM have won the second Nature Research Awards for Inspiring Science and Innovating Science, in partnership with The Estée Lauder Companies.

29d

Futurity.org

52

PTSD nearly doubles risk for infections

Having PTSD nearly doubles a person's risk of infections, according to new research. The study find that PTSD affects infection risks for men and women differently, having, for example, more of an effect on a woman's risk of urinary tract infection and a man's risk of skin infection . "Our study adds to the growing evidence suggesting that PTSD and chronic severe stress are damaging for physical

29d

New Scientist

500+

Damping down brain cell activity may help us to live longer

Centenarians and other long-lived humans have higher levels of a protein in their brain that seems to reduce neural activity. The discovery could pave the way for longevity drugs

29d

New Scientist

500+

Humans evolved to think faster by slowing down brain development

Using stem cells to grow mini brains in a dish has let us compare the way brains develop in humans, chimpanzees and monkeys, and spot the differences

29d

Phys.org

Two decades of rain, snowfall from NASA's precipitation missions

NASA's Precipitation Measurement Missions (PMM) have collected rain and snowfall from space for nearly 20 years, and for the first time in 2019, scientists can access PMM's entire record as one data set.

29d

Phys.org

6K

Scientists discover skin keeps time independent of the brain

Squids, octopuses, cuttlefish, amphibians, and chameleon lizards are among the animals that can change the color of their skin in a blink of an eye. They have photoreceptors in their skin that operate independently of their brain. The photoreceptors are part of a family of proteins known as opsins.

29d

Big Think

500+

Are solar-powered airships the future of cargo delivery?

A solar-powered airship built by a U.K.-based company could be a groundbreaking way to freight cargo internationally with lower emissions, and a big step towards a 100 percent renewable world. Varialift's airship will use helium gas to lift off, which is a great deal safer than the hydrogen that airships of the past used. It's been estimated that the cost of the Varialift aircraft would be compar

29d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

4K

Scientists discover skin keeps time independent of the brain

Squids, octopuses, cuttlefish, amphibians, and chameleon lizards are among the animals that can change the color of their skin in a blink of an eye. They have photoreceptors in their skin that operate independently of their brain. The photoreceptors are part of a family of proteins known as opsins.

29d

ScienceDaily

32

Pioneering cell therapies for non-responders to current immunotherapies

New research signposts a new, less invasive approach to identify killer T lymphocytes in patients with gastrointestinal tumors with low mutational burden who are refractory to approved immune-based treatments.

29d

ScienceDaily

73

3-D printed coral could help endangered reefs

Threats to coral reefs are everywhere — rising water temperatures, ocean acidification, coral bleaching, fishing and other human activities. But new research shows that 3-D printed coral can provide a structural starter kit for reef organisms and can become part of the landscape as fish and coral build their homes around the artificial coral.

29d

ScienceDaily

100+

The moon determines when migratory birds head south

A new study shows that the presence or absence of moonlight has a considerable bearing on when migratory birds take flight in the autumn.

29d

ScienceDaily

100+

Surveying solar storms by ancient Assyrian astronomers

Researcher finds evidence of ancient solar magnetic storms based on cuneiform astrological records and carbon-14 dating. This work may help with our understanding of intense solar activity that can threaten modern electronics.

29d

ScienceDaily

46

Warmer nights prompt forest birds to lay eggs earlier in spring

Rising night-time temperatures are causing woodland birds to build nests and lay eggs earlier in springtime, research shows.

29d

Science Magazine

1K

'Outlandish' competition seeks the brain's source of consciousness

$20 million project puts competing ideas to the test

29d

Phys.org

1K

Hubble Telescope zooms in on interstellar visitor

The Hubble Space Telescope has captured the best pictures yet of our newest interstellar visitor.

29d

Phys.org

100+

SpaceX seeking many more satellites for space-based internet grid

SpaceX wants spectrum access for nearly four times as many satellites as originally planned for its high-speed internet constellation, the company and a UN agency confirmed Wednesday.

29d

Phys.org

74

Researchers find climate change increases risk of mercury contamination

As global temperatures continue to rise, the thawing of permafrost in Arctic areas is being accelerated and mercury that has been trapped in the frozen ground is now being released in various forms into surrounding waterways, soil and air. According to researchers at the University of New Hampshire, this process can result in the major transformation of the mercury into more mobile and potentially

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists discover skin keeps time independent of the brain

A study published Oct. 10 in Current Biology has now found that a type of opsin known as neuropsin is expressed in the hair follicles of mice and synchronize the skin's circadian clock to the light-dark cycle, independent of the eyes or brain. Researchers now want to see if skin heals better if it's exposed to certain types of light.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New international exercise guidelines for cancer survivors

For the rising number of cancer survivors worldwide, there's growing evidence that exercise is an important part of recovery. But how much, and what type of exercise, is needed?

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hubble observes new interstellar visitor

On 12 October 2019, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope provided astronomers with their best look yet at an interstellar visitor — Comet 2I/Borisov — which is believed to have arrived here from another planetary system elsewhere in our galaxy.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hubble observes 1st confirmed interstellar comet

Hubble has given astronomers their best look yet at an interstellar visitor — comet 2I/Borisov — whose speed and trajectory indicate it has come from beyond our solar system. Comet 2I/Borisov is only the second such interstellar object known to have passed through the solar system.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Pioneering cell therapies for non-responders to current immunotherapies

Research led by VHIO's Alena Gros signposts a new, less invasive approach to identify killer T lymphocytes in patients with gastrointestinal tumors with low mutational burden who are refractory to approved immune-based treatments.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cause of drug resistance in a type of intestinal tumors identified

Researchers clarify mechanisms that allow hard-to-treat cancers to develop, and have identified strategies that could lead to new therapies.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How human brain development diverged from great apes

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Ophthalmology Basel, and ETH Zurich, Switzerland, present new insights into the development of the human brain and differences in this process compared to other great apes. The study reveals features of brain development that are unique to humans, and outlines how these

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Smoke signals: Study shows path linking nicotine addiction to increased risk for diabetes

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered a circuit in rats that links cigarette smoking and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study featured on the cover of the Oct. 17 issue of Nature.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nicotine addiction linked to diabetes through a DNA-regulating gene in animal models

Researchers have discovered a mechanism in rats that links cigarette smoking and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tiny particles lead to brighter clouds in the tropics

When clouds loft tropical air masses higher in the atmosphere, that air can carry up gases that form into tiny particles, starting a process that may end up brightening lower-level clouds, according to a CIRES-led study published today in Nature. Clouds alter Earth's radiative balance, and ultimately climate, depending on how bright they are. The new paper describes a process that may occur over 4

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tackling inequality could save millions of children

An unprecedented study mapping child deaths over almost two decades finds that nearly half of the 5.4 million under-5 deaths in 2017 can be attributed to differences in child death rates within and across countries.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gas 'waterfalls' reveal infant planets around young star

For the first time, astronomers using ALMA have witnessed 3D motions of gas in a planet-forming disk. At three locations in the disk around a young star called HD 163296, gas is flowing like a waterfall into gaps that are most likely caused by planets in formation. These gas flows have long been predicted and would directly influence the chemical composition of planet atmospheres. This research is

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Failure of mitochondrial quality control causes heart disease

Mutations in the gene that encodes a protein called ANT cause a variety of conditions, such as heart disease, but the underlying mechanism of how these mutations trigger disease has been unclear. Researchers at Penn Medicine discovered that ANT is critical for a quality control process called mitophagy — which helps to ensure the integrity of the mitochondria network — and found that mutations t

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

55

In a first, scientists pinpoint neural activity's role in human longevity

Researchers discover that the activity of the nervous system might influence human longevity. Neural excitation linked to shorter life, while suppression of overactivity appears to extend life span. Protein REST, previously shown to protect aging brains from dementia and other diseases, emerges as a key player in molecular cascade related to aging. Findings suggest future avenues for intervention

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cascades of gas around young star indicate early stages of planet formation

What does a gestating baby planet look like? New research in Nature by a team including Carnegie's Jaehan Bae investigated the effects of three planets in the process of forming around a young star, revealing the source of their atmospheres.

29d

Science News Daily

Bitcoin surveillance helped feds take down a massive child porn site

[no content]

29d

Science News Daily

EU moves against chipmaker Broadcom in latest US tech salvo

The EU's powerful anti-trust authority on Wednesday ordered US chipmaker Broadcom to immediately halt uncompetitive sales practices, using an unprecedented weapon against US big tech.

29d

Phys.org

35

Study reveals how age affects perception of white LED light

Although LEDs are increasingly used in low-energy lighting and displays, consumers sometimes find their light harsh or unpleasant. Findings from a new study point to the need to take age-related perception differences into account when designing white LED lighting that is more pleasing to the eye.

29d

The Atlantic

500+

A 'Modern' Depression Is Creeping Into Japanese Workplaces

The city-government worker was just getting the hang of his job when a new hire upended everything. She became his mentee, and she asked him if he could put together a manual on how to do her work. He told her okay, but begrudgingly. The manual was a good idea in theory, but he was busy, and he wished she could just learn through observation, as he had. Over the next months, as he dealt with more

29d

Science | The Guardian

300+

Women break prize drought by winning five 2019 prime minister's science awards

Mathematician Cheryl Praeger takes top gong and is praised for 'outstanding contribution to mathematics' A record number of women have received prime minister's science awards, with mathematician Cheryl Praeger taking out the top gong. On Wednesday evening Praeger, whose expertise in group theory and combinatorial mathematics has underpinned advances in algebra research and computer cryptography,

29d

Science | The Guardian

500+

Sawfish numbers in global stronghold are dropping, prompting calls for fishing protection

Monitoring trip returns from 'stronghold' for species without finding a single sawfish Numbers of endangered sawfish in one of their most globally important strongholds are dropping, with conservationists calling for rules that will cut the numbers of animals being caught in commercial fishing nets in north Queensland. In September, a two-week private expedition to monitor and tag sawfish in the

29d

ScienceDaily

71

Oxygen in hyperbaric chamber provides relief after radiotherapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) can relieve self-reported symptoms and side-effects of radiotherapy against cancer in the pelvic region, a study shows. After 30-40 sessions in a hyperbaric chamber, many patients experienced reductions in bleeding, urinary incontinence, and pain alike.

29d

ScienceDaily

56

How age affects perception of white LED light

Although LEDs are increasingly used in low-energy lighting and displays, consumers sometimes find their light harsh or unpleasant. Findings from a new study point to the need to take age-related perception differences into account when designing white LED lighting that is more pleasing to the eye.

29d

ScienceDaily

20

New paper-based technology allows reliable, low-cost sensing of iron levels in fortified foods

Researchers have developed an affordable, reliable paper-based sensor that works with a cellphone app to detect levels of iron in fortified food products.

29d

ScienceDaily

81

Assembler robots make large structures from little pieces

Systems of tiny robots may someday build high-performance structures, from airplanes to space settlements.

29d

ScienceDaily

100+

Climate change increases risk of mercury contamination

As global temperatures continue to rise, the thawing of permafrost is accelerated and mercury trapped in the frozen ground is now being released. The mercury is transforming into more mobile and potentially toxic forms that can lead to environmental and health concerns for wildlife, the fishing industry and people in the Arctic and beyond.

29d

ScienceDaily

49

A rat's brain, on and off methamphetamine

Drug addiction is a vicious cycle of reward and withdrawal. Chronic users often relapse because of the unpleasant physical and psychological symptoms they experience when they stop taking the drug. Now, researchers report metabolic changes in the brains of rats during methamphetamine self-administration and withdrawal that could help identify biomarkers and treatments for addiction.

29d

ScienceDaily

44

Brands are resilient against 'fake news' on social media

'Fake news' stories targeting corporations may be obnoxious, but a new study finds that they likely pose little threat to well-established brands.

29d

ScienceDaily

69

Scientists develop test for uncommon brain diseases

Scientists have developed an ultrasensitive new test to detect abnormal forms of the protein tau associated with uncommon types of neurodegenerative diseases called tauopathies. This advance gives them hope of using cerebrospinal fluid, or CSF — an accessible patient sample — to diagnose these and perhaps other, more common neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.

29d

ScienceDaily

28

X marks the spot: Recombination in structurally distinct chromosomes

A recent study has revealed more details about how the synaptonemal complex performs its job, including some surprising subtleties in function.

29d

ScienceDaily

50

Galapagos study highlights importance of biodiversity in the face of climate change

Study of wave turbulence suggests that highly mobile species and more diverse ecological communities may be more resilient to the effects of changing environmental conditions.

29d

ScienceDaily

28

Computer models show clear advantages in new types of wind turbines

Researchers have modeled the fluid dynamics of multi-rotor wind turbines via high-resolution numerical simulations. The simulations demonstrate a clear advantage for a turbine model with four rotors. The researchers found, that the wind turbine wake recovers much faster with multi-rotor turbines, that multi-rotor turbines produce slightly more energy than single-rotor turbines, and that a turbine

29d

Viden

1K

Den snu ræv lister sig ind på murmeldyret: Her er 11 af årets bedste billeder af verdens vilde dyr

En jaguar fanget af et grænsehegn og myrer med sans for arkitektur er også blandt vinderne.

29d

Nature

Crosslinking ionic oligomers as conformable precursors to calcium carbonate

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1645-x The crosslinking of oligomeric precursors, controlled by a capping agent, enables the production of moulded crystalline calcium carbonate with continuous structures.

29d

Nature

Reply to: Reversion after replacement of mitochondrial DNA

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1624-2

29d

Nature

Altered chromosomal topology drives oncogenic programs in SDH-deficient GIST

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1668-3

29d

Nature

100+

Sounds of a supersolid detected in dipolar atomic gases for the first time

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03045-x Ultracold gases of dipolar atoms can exhibit fluid and crystalline oscillations at the same time, illuminating the ways in which different kinds of sound propagate in the quantum state of matter known as a supersolid.

29d

Nature

Subducting carbon

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1643-z The processes that control the movement of carbon from microfossils on the seafloor to erupting volcanoes and deep diamonds, in a cycle driven by plate tectonics, are reviewed.

29d

Nature

Podcast: Mapping childhood mortality, and evolving 'de novo' genes

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03144-9 Listen to the latest from the world of science, with Benjamin Thompson and Shamini Bundell.

29d

Nature

Protect the census

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03116-z The humble census risks becoming a casualty of the rush to embrace big data. But it has the potential to save lives.

29d

Nature

200+

Regulation of lifespan by neural excitation and REST

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1647-8 Studies of humans, mice and nematodes reveal a conserved role of neural activity and the transcription factor REST in extended longevity.

29d

Nature

1K

Moderation of neural excitation promotes longevity

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02958-x Signals emanating from the nervous system are potent modulators of longevity. It now seems that overall neural excitation is also a key determinant of lifespan.

29d

Nature

Organoid single-cell genomic atlas uncovers human-specific features of brain development

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1654-9 Species comparisons using single-cell transcriptomics and accessible chromatin profiling in stem cell-derived cerebral organoids are used to map dynamic gene-regulatory changes that are unique to humans.

29d

Nature

22

Habenular TCF7L2 links nicotine addiction to diabetes

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1653-x The transcription factor TCF7L2 mediates two important responses to nicotine in the medial habenula region of the rodent brain: aversion to nicotine, and regulation of blood sugar levels through a polysynaptic habenula–pancreas circuit.

29d

Nature

500+

Mapping 123 million neonatal, infant and child deaths between 2000 and 2017

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1545-0 A high-resolution, global atlas of mortality of children under five years of age between 2000 and 2017 highlights subnational geographical inequalities in the distribution, rates and absolute counts of child deaths by age.

29d

Nature

HP1 reshapes nucleosome core to promote heterochromatin phase separation

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1669-2

29d

Nature

A large source of cloud condensation nuclei from new particle formation in the tropics

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1638-9 Widespread formation of new particles from condensable vapours observed in the tropical upper troposphere is an important source of cloud condensation nuclei in the lower troposphere, affecting cloud properties.

29d

Nature

100+

Data on child deaths are a call for justice

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03058-6 To save young lives, governments must support families, respect women and tackle inequality, says Michelle Bachelet.

29d

Nature

300+

Brain-to-pancreas signalling axis links nicotine and diabetes

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02975-w The discovery of a signalling axis that connects nicotine responses in the brain with glucose metabolism by the pancreas sheds light on why cigarette smoking increases the risk of diabetes.

29d

Nature

Reversion after replacement of mitochondrial DNA

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1623-3

29d

Nature

Meridional flows in the disk around a young star

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1642-0 Three-dimensional gas velocities in the gapped disk around the young star HD 163296 show meridional flows from the surface of the disk towards its midplane at gap locations.

29d

Nature

Concise asymmetric synthesis of (−)-bilobalide

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1690-5

29d

Nature

98

The ADP/ATP translocase drives mitophagy independent of nucleotide exchange

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1667-4 A CRISPR–Cas9 genetic screen shows that the adenine nucleotide translocator is required for mitophagy and that this role is independent of its nucleotide translocase activity.

29d

BBC News – Science & Environment

500+

Human 'mini-brains' slow at developing among primates

Researchers grow brains in a lab and discover that human neurons develop more slowly than those of other primates.

29d

The Scientist RSS

Increased Neuronal Activity Shortens Lifespan in Animals

Suppressing the natural age-related increase in neuronal excitation lengthens the lives of worms, and there are indications that the same may be true for mice and humans.

29d

The Scientist RSS

2K

Hundreds of Scientists Declare Support for Extinction Rebellion

Signatories of the declaration say the need for governments to act on human-driven climate change is too urgent to stay silent.

29d

The Scientist RSS

TrueVIEW™ Autofluorescence Quenching Kit – See True Signal

Improve signal-to-noise ratio with the Vector® TrueVIEW™ Autofluorescence Quenching Kit

29d

Cosmos Magazine

53

Brain activity linked to longevity

Long-lived individuals have less excitable neurons. Paul Biegler reports.

29d

Cosmos Magazine

Star gas reveals more clues about early planet formation

It could be the source of their atmospheres. Richard A Lovett reports.

29d

Cosmos Magazine

500+

Bunny bone bonanza shows Neanderthals skinned rabbits

The clues lie in missing paws from an ancient rock shelter. Dyani Lewis reports.

29d

Science Magazine

Unprecedented drought in an artificial ecosystem may reveal how rainforests will cope with climate change

Researchers at Biosphere 2 are tracing carbon through trees and soils to monitor effects of water stress

29d

Phys.org

500+

Gas 'waterfalls' reveal infant planets around young star

The birthplaces of planets are disks made out of gas and dust. Astronomers study these so-called protoplanetary disks to understand the processes of planet formation. Beautiful images of disks made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) how distinct gaps and ring features in dust, which may be caused by infant planets.

29d

Phys.org

300+

Tiny particles lead to brighter clouds in the tropics

When clouds loft tropical air masses higher in the atmosphere, that air can carry up gases that form into tiny particles, starting a process that may end up brightening lower-level clouds, according to a CIRES-led study published today in Nature. Clouds alter Earth's radiative balance, and ultimately climate, depending on how bright they are. And the new paper describes a process that may occur ov

29d

Phys.org

21

Germany calls crisis meet over Shell North Sea platforms

Germany said Wednesday it had called a special meeting of international partners this week to pressure Royal Dutch Shell to remove old rigs containing crude oil in the North Sea.

29d

Phys.org

21

Urban SUVs driving huge growth in CO2 emissions: IEA

The undying popularity of sport-utility vehicles has made them the second-biggest contributor to the growth of global CO2 emissions in recent years, just behind the power sector, the head of the International Energy Agency said Wednesday.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists work toward a rapid point-of-care diagnostic test for Lyme disease

A study published in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology describes a new rapid assay for Lyme disease that could lead to a practical test for use by healthcare providers. The researchers found the assay, which uses several biomarkers to detect Lyme disease infection, was more sensitive than current laboratory-based tests when diagnosing Lyme disease early after suspected infection. The research w

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

AI system more accurately identifies collapsed lungs using chest X-rays

New assistive technology can diagnose collapsed lungs from chest X-rays with a higher degree of accuracy than radiologists.The system, developed at the University of Waterloo, uses artificial intelligence (AI) software to search a huge database of X-ray images with known diagnoses for comparison to X-rays of new patients with unknown conditions.

29d

Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Repossessing a Faulty Learjet! | Airplane Repo (Full Episode)

Three adrenaline-seeking repo men push themselves, and the law, to the edge to capture multi-million-dollar luxury jets. Thrill-seeker and ace pilot Mike Kennedy scours the Florida night in search of a Learjet that might just crash and burn. Family man Ken Cage and tattooed partner, Danny Thompson, chase an elusive Baron 58 aircraft across the rugged Arizona desert. Wily cowboy, Kevin Lacey, purs

29d

Cosmos Magazine

64

Nobels 2019

With the last of the year's Nobel winners – for Economic Sciences – announced on Tuesday, we review this year's science prize winners.

29d

Cosmos Magazine

57

Lighting up the centre of our galaxy

It's a busy place, where millions of moving stars hang out.

29d

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

45

Aҫaí berry extracts fight malaria in mice

Despite humanity's best efforts to eradicate malaria, the disease struck more than 200 million people in 2017, according to the World Health Organization. Worse yet, the parasite that causes malaria is developing resistance to many antimalarial drugs, including the mainstay, chloroquine. Researchers are actively searching for new treatments, and now, a group reporting in ACS Omega have found that

29d

Phys.org

43

Aҫaí berry extracts fight malaria in mice

Despite humanity's best efforts to eradicate malaria, the disease struck more than 200 million people in 2017, according to the World Health Organization. Worse yet, the parasite that causes malaria is developing resistance to many antimalarial drugs, including the mainstay, chloroquine. Researchers are actively searching for new treatments, and now, a group reporting in ACS Omega have found that

29d

Science News Daily

Fat Pikachu and other giant Pokemon revealed for Sword and Shield – CNET

Pokemon is showing off its Gigantamax monsters and their new moves.

29d

Science News Daily

UK scraps plan to enforce age checks on pornography websites

The UK government has dropped plans to introduce age verification measures designed to prevent children from accessing pornography online, which had sparked concerns about privacy

29d

Phys.org

New paper-based technology allows reliable, low-cost sensing of iron levels in fortified foods

Many low-income countries have turned to mass food fortification programs to address nutrient deficiencies in their populations. But many of these programs lack the resources needed to determine if the appropriate amount of nutrients is consistently present in those food products.

29d

Scientific American Blog Posts

200+

September 2019: Earth's Warmest September on Record

This year is virtually certain to end up among the top five warmest in Earth's history — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

3D-printed coral could help endangered reefs

Threats to coral reefs are everywhere — rising water temperatures, ocean acidification, coral bleaching, fishing and other human activities. But new research from the University of Delaware shows that 3D-printed coral can provide a structural starter kit for reef organisms and can become part of the landscape as fish and coral build their homes around the artificial coral.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New marker for tumor aggression in neurofibromatosis type 1

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report that their study of tumor samples from people with the rare genetic syndrome neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) has uncovered novel molecular clues about which tumors are most likely to be aggressive in those with NF1. According to the researchers, the clues could advance the search for more customized and relevant treatments that spare pati

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

59

UNH researchers find climate change increases risk of mercury contamination

As global temperatures continue to rise, the thawing of permafrost is accelerated and mercury trapped in the frozen ground is now being released. According to Researchers at the University of New Hampshire, the mercury is transforming into more mobile and potentially toxic forms that can lead to environmental and health concerns for wildlife, the fishing industry and people in the Arctic and beyon

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Aҫaí berry extracts fight malaria in mice

Despite humanity's best efforts to eradicate malaria, the disease struck more than 200 million people in 2017, according to the World Health Organization. Worse yet, the parasite that causes malaria is developing resistance to many antimalarial drugs, including the mainstay, chloroquine. Researchers are actively searching for new treatments, and now, a group reporting in ACS Omega have found that

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'The ethics of human genome editing' special issue published in The CRISPR Journal

The Ethics of Human Genome Editing is the subject of intensive discussion and debate in a special issue of The CRISPR Journal, a new peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Exploring the link between daily stress, depression, and Facebook addiction disorder

Researchers have demonstrated a close positive association between daily stress, depression symptoms, and Facebook addiction disorder.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study reveals how age affects perception of white LED light

Although LEDs are increasingly used in low-energy lighting and displays, consumers sometimes find their light harsh or unpleasant. Findings from a new study point to the need to take age-related perception differences into account when designing white LED lighting that is more pleasing to the eye.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ultrafast particle interactions could help make quantum information devices feasible

Research presents the detection of energy transfer from excited electrons to the crystal lattice on the femtosecond timescale. Knowledge could contribute to the development of materials that prolong the coherence time.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Assembler robots make large structures from little pieces

Systems of tiny robots may someday build high-performance structures, from airplanes to space settlements.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

NIH scientists develop test for uncommon brain diseases

National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists have developed an ultrasensitive new test to detect abnormal forms of the protein tau associated with uncommon types of neurodegenerative diseases called tauopathies. As they describe in Acta Neuropathologica, this advance gives them hope of using cerebrospinal fluid, or CSF — an accessible patient sample — to diagnose these and perhaps other, more

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New paper-based technology allows reliable, low-cost sensing of iron levels in fortified foods

A team of University of Illinois researchers has developed an affordable, reliable paper-based sensor that works with a cellphone app — also developed at U of I — to detect levels of iron in fortified food products.

29d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

22

Galapagos study highlights importance of biodiversity in the face of climate change

As the world's climate continues to change, biologically diverse communities may be most capable of adapting to environmental challenges.

29d

60-Second Science

100+

Tardigrade Protein Protects DNA from Chemical Attack

The Dsup protein protects DNA under conditions that create caustic free radical chemicals.

29d

Phys.org

Galapagos study highlights importance of biodiversity in the face of climate change

As the world's climate continues to change, biologically diverse communities may be most capable of adapting to environmental challenges.

29d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

X marks the spot: recombination in structurally distinct chromosomes

Two years ago, scientists from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research reported the 3-D structure of the synaptonemal complex in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. This large protein complex is a critical player in the segregation of chromosomes during meiosis, a process of cell division that gives rise to reproductive cells. The synaptonemal complex functions in humans and sexually reprodu

29d

Phys.org

X marks the spot: recombination in structurally distinct chromosomes

Two years ago, scientists from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research reported the 3-D structure of the synaptonemal complex in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. This large protein complex is a critical player in the segregation of chromosomes during meiosis, a process of cell division that gives rise to reproductive cells. The synaptonemal complex functions in humans and sexually reprodu

29d

Phys.org

31

A rat's brain, on and off methamphetamine

Drug addiction is a vicious cycle of reward and withdrawal. Chronic users often relapse because of the unpleasant physical and psychological symptoms they experience when they stop taking the drug. Now, researchers report in the Journal of Proteome Research metabolic changes in the brains of rats during methamphetamine self-administration and withdrawal that could help identify biomarkers and trea

29d

Phys.org

Making reservations on the economic hype: Pro sports have little effect on tourism dollars

Government and tourism officials love to tout the economic boon that professional sports bring to their cities.

29d

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

32

A rat's brain, on and off methamphetamine

Drug addiction is a vicious cycle of reward and withdrawal. Chronic users often relapse because of the unpleasant physical and psychological symptoms they experience when they stop taking the drug. Now, researchers report in the Journal of Proteome Research metabolic changes in the brains of rats during methamphetamine self-administration and withdrawal that could help identify biomarkers and trea

29d

Futurity.org

100+

'Exercise prescriptions' benefit cancer patients

Doctors should give "exercise prescriptions" to people living with and beyond cancer in the same way they prescribe medications, researchers leading a new initiative argue. It's well known that exercise is good for preventing and treating many forms of heart disease, but many people may know less about the benefits of physical activity for cancer patients. Researchers hope that the new initiative

29d

Phys.org

35

Are we underestimating the benefits of investing in renewable energy?

As policymakers seek to reduce carbon dioxide and other pollutants through increases in renewable energy, improving energy efficiency or electrifying transportation, a key question arises: Which interventions provide the largest benefits to avoid the negative health effects of air pollution?

29d

Phys.org

Family members' emotional attachment limits family firm growth

While non-active family members as major shareholders and non-family members on boards and in top management teams will push for profit and encourage growth through their entrepreneurial drive, there is less risk-taking from active family members. This is especially true when there are multiple generations of the same family involved in senior roles.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Galapagos study highlights importance of biodiversity in the face of climate change

Study of wave turbulence suggests that highly mobile species and more diverse ecological communities may be more resilient to the effects of changing environmental conditions.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

X marks the spot: recombination in structurally distinct chromosomes

A recent study from the laboratory of Stowers Investigator Scott Hawley, PhD, has revealed more details about how the synaptonemal complex performs its job, including some surprising subtleties in function.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A rat's brain, on and off methamphetamine

Drug addiction is a vicious cycle of reward and withdrawal. Chronic users often relapse because of the unpleasant physical and psychological symptoms they experience when they stop taking the drug. Now, researchers report in the Journal of Proteome Research metabolic changes in the brains of rats during methamphetamine self-administration and withdrawal that could help identify biomarkers and trea

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mathematicians find gold in data

Russian mathematicians and geophysicists have made a standard technique for ore prospecting several times more effective.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds brands are resilient against 'fake news' on social media

'Fake news' stories targeting corporations may be obnoxious, but a new study finds that they likely pose little threat to well-established brands.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Competitive people are more prone to drug consumption

A Psychology research team at the University of Cordoba (Spain) studied how personality influences substance abuse among young people.

29d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Making reservations on the economic hype: Pro sports have little effect on tourism dollars

Pro sports do not translate to increased tourism dollars in terms of hotel demand, based on recent findings by West Virginia University researchers who analyzed 15 years' worth of data from hotels near the Staples Center in Los Angeles.

29d

Nature

Daily briefing: How pandemics shaped society

Nature, Published online: 16 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03149-4 Infectious diseases have shaped social evolution, the secret battles between your cells and why the science Nobel prizes fail at diversity.

29d

Science

100+

There are solutions to the global drug price problem

We should override patent protection on some medicines and change how R&D is funded

29d

BBC News – Science & Environment

3K

Bloodhound diary: South African trials get under way

The team behind the Bloodhound supersonic car is in Northern Cape to start running the vehicle.

29d

Phys.org

Newly identified compounds could help give fire ants their sting

Native to South America, imported fire ants have now spread to parts of North America and elsewhere around the world. These invasive pests have painful stings that, in some cases, can cause serious medical problems, such as hypersensitivity reactions, infections and even kidney failure. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have identified pyridine alkaloids

29d

Big Think

300+

Amazon set to be next big U.S. defense contractor — critics urge for 'effective oversight'

The U.S. Department of Defense is choosing between Amazon and Microsoft as the winner of the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure (JEDI) contract. JEDI is a massive cloud-computing deal reportedly worth $10 billion. Amazon appears to be the favorite. But it remains unclear how such a partnership between industry and government would affects concerns over privacy and the storage of sensitive mi

29d

The Atlantic

Julie Beck Named Family Editor at The Atlantic

Julie Beck has been promoted to editor of The Atlantic's Family section, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg and executive editor Adrienne LaFrance announced in a note to staff. Beck has been both an editor and writer at The Atlantic since 2013; most recently, she has been a senior editor for The Atlantic's coverage of family and education since 2018. Goldberg and LaFrance wrote: "Julie is deeply cr

29d

ScienceDaily

90

Distribution of highly radioactive microparticles in Fukushima revealed

New method allows scientists to create a quantitative map of radioactive cesium-rich microparticle distribution in soils collected around the damaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). This could help inform clean-up efforts in Fuksuhima region.

29d

Scientific American: Mind & Brain

1K

Happier Babies Have an Edge

They're more likely to have higher childhood IQs and to graduate college — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

29d

NPR

Trees That Survived California Drought May Hold Clue To Climate Resilience

When it comes to surviving the warming climate, scientists are finding that some plants and animals have an edge. The hope is that these "super adapters" can help preserve their species. (Image credit: Lauren Sommer/KQED)

29d

Phys.org

32

Bolivian forager-farmers with amazing heart health are split over what makes a good life

A small Bolivian society of indigenous forager-farmers, known for astonishingly healthy cardiovascular systems, is seeing a split in beliefs about what makes a good life. Some are holding more to the traditional—more family ties, hunting and knowledge of forest medicine—but others are starting to favor material wealth, a Baylor University study finds.

29d

Phys.org

100+

Rice blast fungus discovery will drive crop innovation

A secret weapon used by the killer rice blast fungus to infect host plants has been discovered in new research.

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply