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nyheder2019oktober18

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Flamenco dancing' molecule could lead to better-protecting sunscreen

A molecule that protects plants from overexposure to harmful sunlight thanks to its flamenco-style twist could form the basis for a new longer-lasting sunscreen, chemists at the University of Warwick have found, in collaboration with colleagues in France and Spain.

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

Newly discovered virus infects bald eagles across America

Researchers have discovered a previously unknown virus infecting nearly a third of America's bald eagle population. Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USGS and the Wisconsin DNR found the virus while searching for the cause of Wisconsin River Eagle Syndrome, an enigmatic disease endemic to bald eagles near the Lower Wisconsin River. The newly identified bald eagle hepacivirus, or B

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Energy flow in the nano range

It is crucial for photovoltaics and other technical applications, how efficiently energy spreads in a small volume. With new methods, the path of energy in the nanometer range can now be followed precisely.

27d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Sialic acid mediated mechanical activation of β2 adrenergic receptors by bacterial pili

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12685-6 Meningococcus utilizes β-arrestin selective activation of endothelial cell β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) to cause meningitis in humans. Here authors report that Meningococcus triggers β2AR signaling by exerting forces on β2AR glycans that terminally expose N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (sialic acid, Neu5Ac) residu

27d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Radar vision in the mapping of forest biodiversity from space

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12737-x Satellite-borne radar systems are promising tools to obtain spatial habitat data with complete geographic coverage. Here the authors show that freely available Sentinel-1 radar data perform as well as standard airborne laser scanning data for mapping biodiversity of 12 taxa across temperate forests in Germany

27d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Super-enhancer-guided mapping of regulatory networks controlling mouse trophoblast stem cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12720-6 Trophectoderm lineage development is essential for implantation, placentation, and healthy pregnancy. Here the authors map super-enhancers (SEs) in trophoblast stem cells and find both TE-specific master regulators and 150 previous uncharacterised transcription factors that are SE-associated, providing insigh

27d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

B-1a cells acquire their unique characteristics by bypassing the pre-BCR selection stage

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12824-z B-1a B cells are innate-like cells with biased reactivity to bacteria and self-antigens. Here the authors show that reduced interleukin-7 in developing fetal liver-derived pro-B cells induces premature immunoglobulin κ rearrangement, alleviating the requirement for a pre-BCR selection stage and allowing the g

27d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Spin transport in insulators without exchange stiffness

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12749-7 Long-range spin transport is essential for spintronics applications, but so far has only been achieved in magnets below their Curie temperature. Here, the authors report on efficient spin transport in paramagnetic insulator Gd3Ga5O12 exposed to a moderate magnetic field exhibiting a spin diffusion length of 1

27d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Green oxidation of indoles using halide catalysis

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12768-4 Indole oxidation represents a fundamental organic transformation delivering valuable nitrogen compounds. Here, the authors report a general halide catalysis protocol applied to three classes of oxidation reactions of indoles with oxone as a sustainable terminal oxidant.

27d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Schools of skyrmions with electrically tunable elastic interactions

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12723-3 While flocking and schooling are more often associated with birds and fish, these types of behaviour can also be observed in inanimate systems. Here the authors demonstrate schooling of topological solitons in a liquid crystal system powered by oscillating electric fields.

27d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

26

Hydrogen bonding structure of confined water templated by a metal-organic framework with open metal sites

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12751-z The properties of water under confinement are significantly altered with respect to the bulk phase. Here the authors use infrared spectroscopy and many-body molecular dynamics simulations to show the structure and dynamics of confined water as a function of relative humidity within a metal-organic framework.

27d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Relationship between Vision-Related Quality of Life and Central 10° of the Binocular Integrated Visual Field in Advanced Glaucoma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50677-0

27d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Specific effects of antitumor active norspermidine on the structure and function of DNA

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50943-1

27d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Changes in motor behavior, neuropathology, and gut microbiota of a Batten disease mouse model following administration of acidified drinking water

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51488-z

27d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Variations in growth, water consumption and economic benefit of transplanted cotton after winter wheat harvest subjected to different irrigation methods

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51391-7

27d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

X-ray phase contrast imaging of Vitis spp. buds shows freezing pattern and correlation between volume and cold hardiness

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51415-2

27d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Extensive vegetation browning and drying in forests of India's Tiger Reserves

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51118-8

27d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Storage media and not extraction method has the biggest impact on recovery of bacteria from the oral microbiome

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51448-7

27d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Higher temporal evapotranspiration estimation with improved SEBS model from geostationary meteorological satellite data

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50724-w

27d

Ingeniøren

100+

Norge kasserer vindmølleplaner efter kritik fra kommuner

Efter stor modstand fra både befolkning og kommuner dropper Norge en national rammeplan for udbygning af vindenergi på land.

27d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Publisher Correction: Novel multiplex PCR-SSP method for centromeric KIR allele discrimination

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43449-3

27d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Illumina sequencing of clinical samples for virus detection in a public health laboratory

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50827-4

27d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Antibiotic drug-resistance as a complex system driven by socio-economic growth and antibiotic misuse

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50846-1

27d

Science News Daily

The return of the Razr: Motorola set to reveal its iconic foldable smartphone next month

Motorola is set to unveiled a reinvented version of its iconic foldable phone on November 13th claiming it is 'an original unlike any other' – the smartphone is also said to come with a $1,500 …

27d

Ingeniøren

50

SpaceX vil bruge ny raket til lynhurtig godstransport rundt om Jorden

SpaceX og U.S. Army har tilsyneladende diskuteret, om SpaceX' kommende Starship-raket ville kunne hjælpe forsvaret med lynhurtig transport.

27d

Science

Human Compatible — can we rein in a superintelligence?

Stuart Russell's book sidesteps sci-fi hype with its serious overview of the AI challenge

27d

Dagens Medicin

Diabetescenter vil have enklere behandlingsforløb

Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen styrker samarbejdet mellem endokrinologer og nefrologer, for at give diabetespatienter med nyresygdom enklere og mere overskuelige behandlingsforløb.

27d

Nature

2K

Russian 'CRISPR-baby' scientist has started editing genes in human eggs with goal of altering deaf gene

Nature, Published online: 18 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03018-0 Denis Rebrikov also told Nature that he does not plan to implant gene-edited embryos until he gets regulatory approval.

27d

Dagens Medicin

48

Timelange fastholdelser er ulovlige

Der er stadig fastholdelser af psykaitriske patienter af flere timers varighed, viser nye tal. Men psykiatriloven giver slet ikke lov til de lange fastholdelser, vurderer juridisk ekspert, der foreslår lovændringer. Psykiatrisk selskab bakker op.

27d

Dagens Medicin

Mangelfulde instrukser i fastholdelse fører til arbejdsskader

Personalet på landets psykiatriske afdelinger bruger fastholdelser som tvangsforanstaltning uden en konkret vejledning i at gøre det. Region Hovedstaden er den eneste region, der har en ny instruks på trapperne. Det sker efter et påbud fra Arbejdstilsynet i 2016 efter voldsom episode.

27d

Dagens Medicin

1K

Tvang: »Fastholdelser er ikke den måde, vi vil behandle på«

Regeringens mål om at halvere bæltefikseringer inden 2020 har i stedet fået psykiatrien til at fastholde mere og længere. Psykiatrisk Center Amager har dog normaliseret brugen af fastholdelser, bl.a. ved at ansætte en tværgående person til at forebygge opkørte situationer. Dagens Medicin fulgte i hælene på Josef Bech på en usædvanlig travl vagt.

27d

Future(s) Studies

India is trying to build the world's biggest facial recognition system

submitted by /u/Captain-Blitzed [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

Heat-seeking drone finds missing 6-year-old Minnesota boy in cornfield

submitted by /u/ElectronGuru [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

UK researchers are using X-ray beams & digital imaging to unveil the contents of the Herculaneum scrolls, carbonized in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius 2,000 years ago.

submitted by /u/angushervey [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

SpaceX may want to launch 42,000 internet satellites — about 5 times more spacecraft than humanity has ever flown

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

Aerial video shows SpaceX beginning construction of another Starship rocket in Florida: Starship is a massive rocket designed to be fully reusable so SpaceX can launch and land it multiple times, like a commercial airplane. SpaceX is building three of the rockets simultaneously.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

27d

Science | The Guardian

400+

Brain hack: the quest for new treatments for eating disorders

A project using rTMS, a form of brain stimulation therapy, has shown encouraging early results In a dark, nondescript room tucked away in the depths of a London research centre, Lucy Gallop is demonstrating how we might treat eating disorders in future. Improbably, she presses on a pedal under a desk, like a driver pulling away in first gear. Magnetic pulses pass through an electromagnetic coil w

27d

ScienceAlert – Latest

25K

For The First Time Ever, Scientists Discover Fractal Patterns in a Quantum Material

This is weird.

27d

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

Biologists Get Morbidly Excited Over Discovering a Rare 'Whale Fall'

A feast for the dark.

27d

Phys.org

32

Deep-sea explorers seek out sunken World War II ships

MIDWAY ATOLL, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (AP)—Deep-sea explorers scouring the world's oceans for sunken World War II ships are honing in on debris fields deep in the Pacific, in an area where one of the most decisive battles of the time took place.

27d

Phys.org

29

Trial set in New York on Exxon's climate statements

Charges that Exxon Mobil misled investors on the financial risks of climate change will be heard in court this month after a New York judge gave the green light for a trial.

27d

Phys.org

A new approach to reconstructing protein evolution

There are an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 proteins at work in cells, where they carry out numerable functions, says computational molecular biologist Roman Sloutsky at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. "One of the central questions in all of biochemistry and molecular biology," he adds, is how their precisely-tuned functions are determined.

27d

Phys.org

36

Cod or haddock? Study looks at 'name bias' and fisheries sustainability

Could you taste the difference between cod and other whitefish, such as haddock or hake, if you didn't know what you were eating? The answer may have implications for supporting local fisheries and food sustainability in New England, says UMass Amherst environmental conservation graduate student Amanda Davis.

27d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

A new approach to reconstructing protein evolution

There are an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 proteins at work in cells, where they carry out numerable functions, says computational molecular biologist Roman Sloutsky at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. "One of the central questions in all of biochemistry and molecular biology," he adds, is how their precisely-tuned functions are determined.

27d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

36

Cod or haddock? Study looks at 'name bias' and fisheries sustainability

Could you taste the difference between cod and other whitefish, such as haddock or hake, if you didn't know what you were eating? The answer may have implications for supporting local fisheries and food sustainability in New England, says UMass Amherst environmental conservation graduate student Amanda Davis.

27d

Viden

400+

Dit password er elendigt: Her får du hjælp til at lave et nyt

Center for Cybersikkerhed advarer mod dansk password-sjusk. Se her, hvordan du laver et stærkt kodeord.

27d

Phys.org

400+

New study uncovers 'magnetic' memory of European glass eels

A new study led by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and at the Institute of Marine Research in Norway found that European glass eels use their magnetic sense to "imprint" a memory of the direction of water currents in the estuary where they become juveniles. This is the first direct evidence that a species of fish uses its internal mag

27d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

500+

New study uncovers 'magnetic' memory of European glass eels

A new study led by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and at the Institute of Marine Research in Norway found that European glass eels use their magnetic sense to "imprint" a memory of the direction of water currents in the estuary where they become juveniles. This is the first direct evidence that a species of fish uses its internal mag

27d

Phys.org

100+

Researcher invents an easy-to-use technique to measure the hydrophobicity of micro- and nanoparticle

The scientific and industrial communities who work with micro- and nanoparticles continue to labor with the challenge of effective particle dispersion. Most particles that disperse in liquids aggregate rapidly, and eventually precipitate, thereby separating from the liquid phase. While it is commonly accepted that the hydrophobicity of particles— how quickly water repels off a surface—determines t

27d

Dagens Medicin

Kvalitetskrav kan gøre op med forskelle i kommunale diabetestilbud

Kommunerne mangler ensartede rehabiliteringstilbud og hjælpemidler på diabetesområdet. Politisk chef for Diabetesforeningen og formand for diabetessygeplejerskerne ser gerne kvalitetskrav til kommunerne.

27d

The Atlantic

100+

The Improbable Triumph of Boris Johnson

BRUSSELS —As the Syria conflict entered a new chapter, with Vice President Mike Pence gripping hands with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan in Ankara and Russia's Vladimir Putin basking in the glory of his apparent victory lap in the Middle East, Europe's leaders assembled here for yet another summit fixated on themselves. None more so than Britain, still wrangling with how to leave a bloc i

27d

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

This Incredible Image Looks Biological But Is Actually a Strange, Exploded Star

The mystery of the lumpy supernova.

27d

ScienceAlert – Latest

12K

Antarctica's "Sudden Stratospheric Warming" Has Started Impacting Australia

Eastern Australia is burning.

27d

ScienceAlert – Latest

200+

Antarctic Ice Sheets Are Still Leaking Radioactive Chlorine From 1950s Nuclear Weapons Tests

Oh, good news.

27d

The Atlantic

100+

Photos of the Week: Swirling Embers, Solar Challenge, Manhattan Moonrise

A weeping Sophora Japonica tree in Versailles, the Zhangye danxia landform in China, a hitchhiking cat in Turkey, continuing pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong, baseball's National League Championship Series in Washington, D.C., anti-government unrest in Haiti, a flamingo mother and chick in Colombia, an elevated railway in Kenya, chopsticks manufacturing in China, the Los Angeles Comic-Con, and

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

54

Increase health benefits of exercise by working out before breakfast — new research

Exercising before eating breakfast burns more fat, improves how the body responds to insulin and lowers people's risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

27d

NYT > Science

13K

Why NASA's First All-Women Spacewalk Made History

Two women on Earth, Jessica Bennett and Mary Robinette Kowal, had a chat about two women astronauts in medium-sized spacesuits.

27d

Science | The Guardian

100+

Stuart Russell on why now is the time to start thinking about superintelligent AI – Science Weekly podcast

Prof Stuart Russell wrote the book on artificial intelligence. Literally. But that was back in 1995, when the next few decades of AI were uncertain, and, according to him, distinctly less threatening. Sitting down with Ian Sample , Russell talks about his latest book, Human Compatible , which warns of a dystopian future in which humans are outsmarted by machines. But how did we get here? And what

27d

ScienceAlert – Latest

2K

Gender-Specific Brain Cells Have Just Been Discovered Inside The Brains of Mice

Here's what that means.

27d

Science Weekly

Stuart Russell on why now is the time to start thinking about superintelligent AI – Science Weekly podcast

Prof Stuart Russell wrote the book on artificial intelligence. Literally. But that was back in 1995, when the next few decades of AI were uncertain, and, according to him, distinctly less threatening. Sitting down with Ian Sample, Russell talks about his latest book, Human Compatible, which warns of a dystopian future in which humans are outsmarted by machines. But how did we get here? And what ca

27d

Ingeniøren

92

Leder: Voldsbekæmpelse med øget tv-overvågning er et politisk og frihedsskadeligt suttebolsje

[no content]

27d

60-Second Science

94

Your Skull Shapes Your Hearing

The resonant properties of your skull can amplify some frequencies and dampen others—and, in some cases, affect your hearing. Christopher Intagliata reports.

27d

Ingeniøren

100+

Analyse: To spørgsmål presser sig på efter en af årets værste forureninger

PLUS. Politiet gransker, hvem der skal stilles til ansvar for at sende en forbudt insektgift ud i to åer ved Slagelse. Vi andre må samtidig granske, om tillid er tilstrækkeligt, når det gælder håndtering af stærkt forurenet spildevand.

27d

Ingeniøren

46

Efter gentagne fadæser: Nu overvejer teleselskaber helt at droppe udleverering af simkort i fysiske butikker

Telebranchen overvejer nu helt at stoppe med udlevering af simkort i fysiske butikker efter Version2 og Ingeniøren flere gange har påvist problemer med sikkerheden ved denne praksis.

27d

Scientific American: Mind & Brain

200+

Your Skull Shapes Your Hearing

The resonant properties of your skull can amplify some frequencies and dampen others—and, in some cases, affect your hearing. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

27d

Scientific American Content

100+

Your Skull Shapes Your Hearing

The resonant properties of your skull can amplify some frequencies and dampen others—and, in some cases, affect your hearing. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

27d

Future(s) Studies

According to UCL study, the US green economy is worth $1.3 trillion per year – The green economy – broadly defined as an economy that is low carbon, resource efficient and socially inclusive – is a major source of jobs in the US, employing an estimated 9.5 million people.

submitted by /u/tocreatewebsite [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

New BYD ADL Enviro200EV electric buses for London

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

Solar-plus-storage projects spreading across the U.S. Roughly 40 such systems were in operation in the U.S. as of late September, combining about 533 MW of storage with 1,242 MW of solar capacity. Meanwhile, companies are developing at least another 85 co-located solar and storage projects…

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

The future of commuter infrastructure. 12,000 bicycles in the space of 300 cars.

submitted by /u/tingtings [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

Yuval Noah Harari & Steven Pinker in conversation

submitted by /u/laboredthought [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

The Internet as a Society

We all know that the internet is a very large place. So much different types of content and content creators and services etc. My question is If the internet was a society and each user had specific rights when online, what do you think the constitution of the internet would be? or what would it be called… just curious. submitted by /u/Thatoneguy1721 [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

Elon Musk's brain-machine interface company Neuralink has doubled in size since August – the company has been active hiring new people as it inches toward a "crazy plan to put chips in people's brains".

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

27d

ScienceDaily

52

New clinical research offers possibility of future rehabilitation for patients in minimally conscious or vegetative state

Non-invasive brain stimulation is to be trialled for the first time alongside advanced brain imaging techniques in patients who are minimally conscious or in a vegetative state.

27d

ScienceDaily

24

Big data technique reveals previously unknown capabilities of common materials

Researchers have found a new way to optimize nickel by unlocking properties that could enable numerous applications, from biosensors to quantum computing.

27d

ScienceDaily

42

Region, age, and sex decide who gets arthritis-linked 'fabella' knee bone

The once-rare 'fabella' bone has made a dramatic resurgence in human knees, but who's likely to have a fabella or two — and why?

27d

ScienceDaily

36

Variation in transplant centers' use of less-than-ideal organs

In 2010-2016, many US transplant centers commonly accepted deceased donor kidneys with less desirable characteristics. The use of these organs varied widely across transplant centers, however, and differences were not fully explained by the size of waitlists or the availability of donor organs.

27d

ScienceDaily

38

Health care intervention: Treating high-need, high-cost patients

Patients with complex needs — serious mental and physical health problems and substance use disorders — flock to emergency rooms costing the health care system billions every year. A new study suggests a nontraditional approach to these patients can significantly improve their daily functioning and health outcomes.

27d

ScienceDaily

100+

New study uncovers 'magnetic' memory of European glass eels

A new study has found that European glass eels use their magnetic sense to 'imprint' a memory of the direction of water currents in the estuary where they become juveniles.

27d

ScienceAlert – Latest

10K

'Excessive' Brain Activity Has Been Linked to a Shorter Life

The result is… counterintuitive.

27d

ScienceDaily

Easy-to-use technique to measure the hydrophobicity of micro- and nanoparticle

The technique may have a far-reaching implication for many scientific and industrial applications and disciplines that involve particulate matter.

27d

ScienceDaily

28

Blanket of light may give better quantum computers

Researchers describe how — by simple means — they have created a 'carpet' of thousands of quantum-mechanically entangled light pulses. The discovery has the potential to pave the way for more powerful quantum computers.

27d

ScienceDaily

37

Targeted therapy to help children with deadly nerve cancer

Researchers have identified a targeted therapy for adolescent patients with neuroblastoma, a deadly pediatric nerve cancer, who would otherwise have no treatment options, according to a new study.

27d

ScienceDaily

34

Highest throughput 3D printer is the future of manufacturing

Researchers have developed a new, futuristic 3D printer that is so big and so fast it can print an object the size of an adult human in just a couple of hours.

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists recalculate the optimum binding energy for heterogeneous catalysis

In a discovery that could lead to the development of novel catalysts that do not rely on expensive rare metals, scientists from the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science have shown that the optimal binding energy can deviate from traditional calculations, which are based on equilibrium thermodynamics, at high reaction rates. This means that reconsidering the design of catalysts using the n

27d

ScienceAlert – Latest

1K

Peas, Quinoa And 7 Other Crops Grown Successfully in Soil Equivalent to Moon And Mars

Baby steps…

27d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

Topological analysis of the gp41 MPER on lipid bilayers relevant to the metastable HIV-1 envelope prefusion state [Biochemistry]

The membrane proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp) 41 is an attractive vaccine target for elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) by vaccination. However, current details regarding the quaternary structural organization of the MPER within the native prefusion trimer [(gp120/41)3] are elusive and even contradictory, hindering rational…

27d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

Living myofibroblast-silicon composites for probing electrical coupling in cardiac systems [Engineering]

Traditional bioelectronics, primarily comprised of nonliving synthetic materials, lack cellular behaviors such as adaptability and motility. This shortcoming results in mechanically invasive devices and nonnatural signal transduction across cells and tissues. Moreover, resolving heterocellular electrical communication in vivo is extremely limited due to the invasiveness of traditional interconnect

27d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

Structural and functional studies of TBC1D23 C-terminal domain provide a link between endosomal trafficking and PCH [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) is a group of neurological disorders that affect the development of the brain, in particular, the pons and cerebellum. Homozygous mutations of TBC1D23 have been found recently to lead to PCH; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show that the crystal structure of the…

27d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

Biological embedding of experience: A primer on epigenetics [Perspectives]

Biological embedding occurs when life experience alters biological processes to affect later life health and well-being. Although extensive correlative data exist supporting the notion that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation underlie biological embedding, causal data are lacking. We describe specific epigenetic mechanisms and their potential roles in the biological…

27d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

Whole-exome sequencing of cervical carcinomas identifies activating ERBB2 and PIK3CA mutations as targets for combination therapy [Medical Sciences]

The prognosis of advanced/recurrent cervical cancer patients remains poor. We analyzed 54 fresh-frozen and 15 primary cervical cancer cell lines, along with matched-normal DNA, by whole-exome sequencing (WES), most of which harboring Human-Papillomavirus-type-16/18. We found recurrent somatic missense mutations in 22 genes (including PIK3CA, ERBB2, and GNAS) and a widespread…

27d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

Watching a virus grow [Commentaries]

One of the most powerful molecular motors discovered, to date, belongs to a phage, a type of virus that infects bacteria (1). The motor serves to package stiff, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) into a preassembled, proteinaceous polyhedral container called the procapsid. The DNA is about 50 times longer than the size…

27d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

Universal behavior of cascading failures in interdependent networks [Applied Physical Sciences]

Catastrophic and major disasters in real-world systems, such as blackouts in power grids or global failures in critical infrastructures, are often triggered by minor events which originate a cascading failure in interdependent graphs. We present here a self-consistent theory enabling the systematic analysis of cascading failures in such networks and…

27d

Phys.org

44

Scientists recalculate the optimum binding energy for heterogeneous catalysis

Determining the optimal binding energies for heterogeneous chemical reactions—usually meaning that the reactant is in the gas or liquid phase while the catalyst is a solid—is critical for many aspects of modern society, as we rely on such reactions for processes as diverse as the production of fertilizers and plastics. There is an optimal binding energy—meaning the degree of interaction between th

27d

ScienceAlert – Latest

7K

More Than 20 Ancient Egyptian Coffins in Pristine Condition Have Just Been Uncovered

They're intact and still sealed.

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New clinical research offers possibility of future rehabilitation for patients in minimally conscious or vegetative state

Non-invasive brain stimulation is to be trialled for the first time alongside advanced brain imaging techniques in patients who are minimally conscious or in a vegetative state.

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Big data technique reveals previously unknown capabilities of common materials

According to research published today by Nature Journal NPG Asia Materials, a group of researchers — led by Edwin Fohtung, an associate professor of materials science and engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute — have found a new way to optimize nickel by unlocking properties that could enable numerous applications, from biosensors to quantum computing.

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Region, age, and sex decide who gets arthritis-linked 'fabella' knee bone

The once-rare 'fabella' bone has made a dramatic resurgence in human knees, but who's likely to have a fabella or two — and why?

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

Study provides first evidence that fat accumulates in the lungs of overweight and obese people

Researchers have shown for the first time that fatty tissue accumulates in the airway walls, particularly in people who are overweight or obese.

27d

BBC News – Science & Environment

1K

Satellites to monitor whale strandings from space

Scientists are developing the techniques to spot mass stranding events from orbit.

27d

Phys.org

1K

Big data technique reveals previously unknown capabilities of common materials

When scientists and engineers discover new ways to optimize existing materials, it paves the way for innovations that make everything from our phones and computers to our medical equipment smaller, faster, and more efficient.

27d

Discover Magazine

Adults Are Getting More Food Allergies. Scientists Still Aren't Sure Why

Food allergies, including those to seafood, are becoming more common. (Credit: Alexander Raths/Shutterstock) All your life, you've delighted in the subtle, sweet taste of fresh shrimp. Until one day, when you bite into it and find yourself beset by itching hives and a swollen throat. An unexpected food allergy seems to be a common experience for some adults in America, according to a recent study.

27d

NYT > Science

400+

Una olvidada versión nazi del DDT podría ayudar a combatir la malaria

Científicos han redescubierto un compuesto desarrollado por investigadores alemanes durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial. Parece ser más efectivo y quizás más seguro que el DDT.

27d

Wired

500+

Juul, Under Heavy Fire, Pulls Fruit-Flavored Pods From US

Vaping opponents criticize plan to continue selling the popular mint and menthol flavors.

27d

Science News Daily

Latest Google Maps Update Further Cannibalizes Waze Reporting Features

Google acquired Waze, a GPS navigation software app, way back in 2013. Google and Waze work mostly independently from one another, but Google has recently incorporated a few features that were …

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mount Sinai researchers bring us one step closer to universal influenza vaccine

The scourge of the influenza virus devastates health and claims many lives worldwide each year. It is especially daunting because vaccines are only protective when they are well matched to the strains circulating in the population. But now, a team led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai is getting closer to a universal flu vaccine using a novel approach they've developed

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

51

The Lancet Haematology: First global estimates suggest around 100 million more blood units are needed in countries with low supplies each year

In the first analysis to estimate the gap between global supply and demand of blood, scientists have found that many countries are critically short of blood, according to a modelling study published in The Lancet Haematology journal.

27d

Wired

300+

LeBron Will LeBron, but NBA Will Always Put Business First

In the past few weeks, the basketball star has faced criticism for his responses to the protests in Hong Kong.

27d

Wired

100+

DNC Hackers Resurface, Zuckerberg Talks Free Speech, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

27d

Science | The Guardian

100+

Genetic testing kits 'may wrongly reassure those at risk of cancer'

Consumer testing kits fail to pick up majority of DNA mutations, say researchers Consumer genetic tests could be giving false reassurance to those at heightened risk of cancers, according to findings presented at an international conference this week. The study, by clinical genetic testing company Invitae, revealed that tests for breast and bowel cancer risk by direct-to-consumer companies such a

27d

ScienceDaily

67

Mapping global biodiversity change

A new study which focuses on mapping biodiversity change in marine and land ecosystems shows that loss of biodiversity is most prevalent in the tropic, with changes in marine ecosystems outpacing those on land.

27d

ScienceDaily

28

Analysis of recent Ridgecrest, California earthquake sequence reveals complex, damaging fault systems

Geophysicists complete their analysis of a well-documented seismic event that held many surprises.

27d

ScienceDaily

Newly discovered microbes band together, 'flip out'

Scientists have found a new species of choanoflagellate. This close relative of animals forms sheets of cells that 'flip' inside-out in response to light, alternating between a cup-shaped feeding form and a ball-like swimming form. The organism could offer clues about animals' early evolution.

27d

NYT > Science

7K

Parents Should Limit Sports Participation for Children, Trainers Say

Young athletes are practicing too hard in just one sport, increasing the risk of injuries and burnout. New guidelines urge parents to reduce the intensity.

27d

NYT > Science

2K

Lee Botts, Champion of the Great Lakes, Is Dead at 91

Her environmental work touched practically every drop of water and every mile of shoreline in the Great Lakes basin and educated numerous people in its ecology.

27d

Future(s) Studies

36

Why We Must Ban Facial Recognition Software Now The benefits do not come close to outweighing the risks.

submitted by /u/evanFFTF [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

U.S. regulators allow genetically modified cotton as human food source

submitted by /u/rogue_ger [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

In New Zealand, a solar boat produces enough extra energy to power three homes. Essentially a floating microgrid or power plant, such a vessel could be used to bring additional power assets to islands that have historically been powered by diesel generators.

submitted by /u/everyEV [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

About 40% of Californians who own EVs also have rooftop solar systems installed. Even if the grid shuts down, they can charge their cars when the sun is shining, and store the power in their batteries for later use. "The electric vehicle is one way to make the grid more reliable."

submitted by /u/everyEV [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

Reddit-born engineering group buys leftovers of failed hyperloop startup Arrivo – rLoop quietly bought the startup's IP earlier this year

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

For the first time, artificial embryos made without sperm or eggs have started to form live fetuses after being implanted in female mice. The artificial mouse embryos were made from scratch using special stem cells called extended pluripotent stem cells. The research is published in Cell.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

A quantum computer with a processor made out of laser lights offers extreme scalability, reports new study in Science. The processor is a cluster state, a collection of entangled quantum components, the first that is big enough to face real-world problems, and has the correct entanglement structure.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

Scientists Want to Make a 3D Map of the Entire World Before Climate Change Ruins It

submitted by /u/Synesthesia108 [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

Reality futurology: Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes, once a self-made billionaire, accused of not paying lawyers

submitted by /u/moon-worshiper [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

Bank Regulators Present a Dire Warning of Financial Risks From Climate Change. The collection of 18 papers by outside experts amounts to one of the most specific and dire accountings of the dangers posed to businesses and communities in the United States

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

Most VR Is Total B*****t: How tech companies turned an instrument of human potential into one of exploitation (Douglas Rushkoff )

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

Madison Tech becomes first class to host course in Virtual Reality

submitted by /u/jeebus224 [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

The rise and rise of service robots

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

Nanotechnology And The Future Of Medicine

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

27d

Future(s) Studies

UPCOMING AMA Friday 18th October: John Danaher, author of "Automation and Utopia: Human Flourishing in a World without Work"

Here's John's About page from his website Who am I? I like to imagine, navigate and analyse the future of humanity. I am currently an academic and lecturer at the National University of Ireland (NUI), Galway. I teach in the School of Law. I am also an affiliate scholar at the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies. My research deals primarily with the ethical, social and legal implication

27d

ScienceDaily

48

Research gauges neurodegeneration tied to FXTAS by measuring motor behavior

Researchers used a grip-force test to analyze sensorimotor function in people with the FMR1 premutation, with the aim of determining FXTAS risk and severity.

27d

ScienceDaily

400+

Ancient stars shed light on Earth's similarities to other planets

Earth-like planets may be common in the universe, a new study implies. The team of astrophysicists and geochemists presents new evidence that the Earth is not unique.

27d

ScienceDaily

32

First scientific description of elusive bird illuminates plight of Borneo's forests

Scientists surveying the birdlife of Borneo have discovered a startling surprise: an undescribed species of bird, which has been named the spectacled flowerpecker. While scientists and birdwatchers have previously glimpsed the small, gray bird in lowland forests around the island, the Smithsonian team is the first to capture and study it, resulting in its formal scientific description as a new spe

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study examines variation in transplant centers' use of less-than-ideal organs

In 2010-2016, many US transplant centers commonly accepted deceased donor kidneys with less desirable characteristics. The use of these organs varied widely across transplant centers, however, and differences were not fully explained by the size of waitlists or the availability of donor organs.

27d

Scientific American Blog Posts

Hilbert Walked so the Clay Mathematics Institute Could Run

The problems shaping modern mathematics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

27d

ScienceAlert – Latest

300+

Astronomers Find Remarkable Evidence The Guts of Some Exoplanets Are Similar to Earth's

This is so cool.

27d

ScienceAlert – Latest

300+

World-First Discovery Hints Why Brain Studies in Mice Don't Always Translate to Humans

Entire groups of brain cells in human brain development are unique.

27d

Livescience.com

87

What Is Activated Charcoal?

You might want to reconsider including activated charcoal in your food, beverages or cosmetics.

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Health care intervention: Treating high-need, high-cost patients

Patients with complex needs — serious mental and physical health problems and substance use disorders — flock to emergency rooms costing the health care system billions every year. A new study led by Dr. Dave Buck of the University of Houston College of Medicine suggests a nontraditional approach to these patients can significantly improve their daily functioning and health outcomes.

27d

ScienceDaily

72

When added to gene therapy, plant-based compound may enable faster, more effective treatments

Today's standard process for administering gene therapy is expensive and time-consuming — a result of the many steps required to deliver the healthy genes into the patients' blood stem cells to correct a genetic problem. Scientists believe they have found a way to sidestep some of the current difficulties, resulting in a more efficient gene delivery method that would save money and improve treatm

27d

ScienceDaily

33

Weaving quantum processors out of laser light

Researchers open a new avenue to quantum computing with a breakthrough experiment: a large-scale quantum processor made entirely of light.

27d

Science | Smithsonian

300+

Massive Citizen Science Effort Seeks to Survey the Entire Great Barrier Reef

Only about 1,000 of 3,000 individual reefs have been documented, but the Great Reef Census hopes to fill in the gaps

27d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

63

A simpler way to make some medicines

Organic chemists have figured out how to synthesize the most common molecule arrangement in medicine, a scientific discovery that could change the way a number of drugs — including one most commonly used to treat ovarian cancer — are produced. Their discovery, published today in the journal Chem, gives drug makers a crucial building block for creating medicines that, so far, are made with comple

27d

The Scientist RSS

100+

Scientists Seek to Kill Genetic Test for Same-Sex Attraction

Direct-to-consumer "How Gay Are You?" app sold by GenePlaza has been criticized for being misleading and irresponsible.

27d

Livescience.com

500+

Vaping Outbreak Death Toll Reaches 33

Nearly three dozen people have died from vaping-related lung illnesses as the nationwide outbreak that continues to grow.

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Is there evidence of the 'immigrant health paradox' among Arab Americans?

In a study published in the Journal of American Public Health, researchers find little evidence of the 'immigrant health paradox' among Arab American immigrants living in California. Lead author Nadia Abuelezam of Boston College says there is a need to intentionally collect ethnicity and racial data on Arab immigrants in order to better understand their health.

27d

Science | The Guardian

94

Spacewatch: UK's first moon rover poised for 2021 touchdown

Space exploration vehicle designed to be Britain's first lunar payload to reach lunar surface The UK is preparing to send its first rover to the moon, courtesy of the private company Space bit . The space exploration vehicle, which resembles a four-legged robot spider, will walk rather than roll across the lunar surface. Continue reading…

27d

Discover Magazine

NASA Reveals New Spacesuits Designed to Fit Men and Women

These two new spacesuits will help the space agency put astronauts back on the surface of the Moon, enhance their mobility, and keep them safe along the way. (Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky) NASA revealed two new spacesuits this week that may be worn by astronauts on future missions to the Moon. The suits feature a number of improvements from the Apollo era spacesuits used on the last Moon missions 50

27d

Discover Magazine

From 440 to 25,000: One Humpback Whale Population's Amazing Recovery

Humpback whale populations have recovered since whaling was banned, some from near extinction. (Credit: Tomas Kotouc/Shutterstock) In the late 1950s, only 440 humpback whales — or 1.6 percent of their onetime number — were swimming around the southwestern Atlantic Ocean. Thanks to whaling restrictions, these school bus-sized aquatic mammals have started to come back. Now, a new paper estimates tha

27d

Wired

500+

Zuckerberg Doubles Down on Free Speech—the Facebook Way

The Facebook CEO didn't announce new initiatives in a highly promoted speech, but reaffirmed his view that the company makes the world a better place.

27d

Wired

500+

Apple's Good Intentions on Privacy Stop at China's Borders

As pro-democracy protests continue in Hong Kong, the tech giant's troubling relationship with an authoritarian regime has come into focus.

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researcher invents an easy-to-use technique to measure the hydrophobicity of micro- and nanoparticle

The technique may have a far-reaching implication for many scientific and industrial applications and disciplines that involve particulate matter.

27d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Online abortion medication demand highest in states with restrictive abortion policies

Demand for abortion medication through online telemedicine in the United States varies by state policy context, according to new peer-reviewed research from the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin published in the American Journal of Public Health. Requests came from all 50 states, but states with restrictive abortion policy environments tended to have higher volumes

27d

ScienceDaily

61

A simpler way to make some medicines

Organic chemists have figured out how to synthesize the most common molecule arrangement in medicine, a scientific discovery that could change the way a number of drugs — including one most commonly used to treat ovarian cancer — are produced. Their discovery, published today in the journal Chem, gives drug makers a crucial building block for creating medicines that, so far, are made with comple

27d

NYT > Science

1K

In Oregon Wine Country, One Farmer's Battle to Save the Soil

Agriculture can play a leading role in combating climate change and reversing ecological damage. Mimi Casteel is showing one way to get it done.

27d

Science News Daily

The Technology 202: Mark Zuckerberg says Facebook is taking a long view on free speech as critics attack company's policies

He is also heading to Capitol Hill again next week.

27d

Science Magazine

Scientific integrity bill advances in U.S. House with bipartisan support

Democrats drop some provisions to gain Republican backing and improve chances of final passage

28d

Inside Science

Scientists Detect the Sounds of Undersea Volcanoes Belching Giant Bubbles

Some bubbles grow to be more than a quarter-mile across. volcano-bubble_cropped.jpg A plume of steam flows upward from Bogoslof volcano, a partially submerged volcano that created giant underwater bubbles when it erupted in 2017. Image credits: Dave Withrow, Alaska Volcano Observatory Rights information: Image courtesy of the photographer. Please cite the photographer when using this image. Eart

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When added to gene therapy, plant-based compound may enable faster, more effective treatments

Today's standard process for administering gene therapy is expensive and time-consuming–a result of the many steps required to deliver the healthy genes into the patients' blood stem cells to correct a genetic problem. In a discovery that appears in the journal Blood, scientists at Scripps Research believe they have found a way to sidestep some of the current difficulties, resulting in a more eff

28d

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

Half a Billion Years Ago, Trilobites Died in Strange, Orderly Lines. Now We May Know Why

Silent conga lines of doomed trilobites.

28d

Big Think

500+

Why America's Christian foundation is a myth

A new book by attorney Andrew Seidel, 'The Founding Myth: Why Christian nationalism Is Un-American', takes on the myth of America's Christian founding. Christian nationalism is the belief that the United States was founded as a Christian nation on Christian principles, and that the nation has strayed from that original foundation. Judeo-Christian principles are fundamentally opposed to the princi

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

300+

Study: First evidence of immune response targeting brain cells in autism

Post-mortem analysis of brains of people with autism revealed cellular features not previously linked to autism.These cellular characteristics are consistent with an immune response targeting on the brain cells that comprise a protective barrier between brain tissues and cerebral spinal fluid.The findings lend new insight to autism's origins and suggest potential means of improved diagnosis and ca

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A new approach to reconstructing protein evolution

One angle scientists have taken to explore how protein functions arise is to trace family evolution and relatedness, which is difficult. In eLife, Roman Sloutsky of UMass Amherst and his former advisor Kristen Naegle, now at UVA, propose an unusual, new and more accurate way to trace how proteins diverged over time. "It can yield powerful insights into the relationship between protein sequence, st

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study uncovers 'magnetic' memory of European glass eels

A new study led by researchers at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and at the Institute of Marine Research in Norway found that European glass eels use their magnetic sense to 'imprint' a memory of the direction of water currents in the estuary where they become juveniles.

28d

Biology / Biochemistry News From Medical News Today

58

Scientists liken mitochondria to Tesla battery packs

Using high resolution microscopy, scientists show that mitochondria comprise many bioelectric units rather than a single one, as they previously thought.

28d

Biology / Biochemistry News From Medical News Today

100+

Could a unique new fungus offer an opioid alternative?

A new discovery in the estuarine waters of Tasmania may lead to the development of a safe and effective alternative to opioids, scientists reveal.

28d

Livescience.com

5K

This 'Doomsday' Plane Was Designed to Survive a Nuclear Attack. A Bird Just Took It Down.

This Navy craft is meant to communicate with nuclear forces in the event of a nuclear war. And a bird strike just grounded it.

28d

Science News Daily

Pictures and specs of two new Nvidia Shield TVs leak – CNET

The Nvidia Shield TV and Shield TV Pro were reportedly posted for sale online.

28d

The Atlantic

86K

Trump's Most Shameless Act of Profiteering

The Trump administration has a lot to grapple with at the moment— Turkey's disastrous incursion into Syria , a strong likelihood of impeachment , a tough reelection campaign—but there's always time for the president to profiteer from his job. White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney announced today that the United States will host the 2020 Group of Seven summit at Trump National Doral, the presid

28d

Phys.org

500+

Male and female mice have different brain cells

Caltech researchers have discovered rare brain cell types that are unique to male mice and other types that are unique to female mice. These sex-specific cells were found in a region of the brain that governs both aggression and mating behaviors.

28d

cognitive science

Can You Trust Your Memories? Psychological Test / Personality Test Quiz

submitted by /u/Reflection_Line [link] [comments]

28d

ScienceDaily

200+

Male and female mice have different brain cells

Scientists discover that a brain region known to control sex and violence contains rare cell types that differ in male versus female mice.

28d

ScienceDaily

20

Phylogenetic analysis forces rethink of termite evolution

Despite their important ecological role as decomposers, termites are often overlooked in research. Evolutionary biologists have constructed a new family tree for this unassuming insect brood, shedding unexpected light on its evolutionary history.

28d

ScienceDaily

65

Stem cell study offers new way to study early development and pregnancy

For the first time, researchers have created mouse blastocyst-like structures, or 'blastoids,' from a single cultured cell. The work could help advance research into development as well as inform issues around pregnancy, infertility, or health problems later in the offspring's life.

28d

ScienceDaily

44

BARseq builds a better brain map

A brain mapping technique called BARseq is capable of mapping thousands of neurons in a single mouse, at single neuron resolution, while also detailing which neuron expresses what genes. It could be a game-changer for how neuroscientists look at brains.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

66

Reforesting is a good idea, but it is necessary to know where and how

An international group of ecologists contests an article published in "Science," which among other cardinal errors proposed "reforestation" of the Cerrado, Brazil's savanna biome.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

500+

Male and female mice have different brain cells

Caltech researchers have discovered rare brain cell types that are unique to male mice and other types that are unique to female mice. These sex-specific cells were found in a region of the brain that governs both aggression and mating behaviors.

28d

NYT > Science

500+

Juul Suspends Online Sales of Flavored E-Cigarettes

Facing multiple inquiries into its marketing practices and its role in the rise of teenage vaping, the company suspended internet access to mango, cucumber and other pods.

28d

Phys.org

1K

Chemists find new way of creating the building blocks of many drugs

Organic chemists at The Ohio State University have figured out how to synthesize the most common molecule arrangement in medicine, a scientific discovery that could change the way a number of drugs—including one most commonly used to treat ovarian cancer—are produced.

28d

Phys.org

Next-generation sequencing used to identify cotton blue disease in the United States

Cotton blue disease, caused by Cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV), was first reported in 1949 in the Central African Republic and then not again until 2005, when it was reported from Brazil. In 2017, cotton blue disease was identified in Alabama, marking the first report in the United States.

28d

Phys.org

First report of cotton blue disease in the United States

In August 2017, Kathy S. Lawrence, a plant pathologist at Auburn University, received a call from Drew Schrimsher of Agri-AFC, who had discovered foliar distortion and leaf curling and rolling on approximately 50,000 acres of cotton in southeastern Alabama. After ruling out herbicide damage, Schrimsher contacted Lawrence, and she visited the fields 2 days later.

28d

Science News Daily

Some of the UK's phone number infrastructure relies on Yahoo Groups, which is shutting down

Image: Yahoo Yahoo Groups is about to shut down, and it's taking a lot of the old web with it. All content that had been posted there will be deleted by mid-December, and although …

28d

Science News Daily

Giving robots a faster grasp

If you're at a desk with a pen or pencil handy, try this move: Grab the pen by one end with your thumb and index finger, and push the other end against the desk. Slide your fingers down the …

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Next-generation sequencing used to identify cotton blue disease in the United States

Cotton blue disease, caused by Cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV), was first reported in 1949 in the Central African Republic and then not again until 2005, when it was reported from Brazil. In 2017, cotton blue disease was identified in Alabama, marking the first report in the United States.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

First report of cotton blue disease in the United States

In August 2017, Kathy S. Lawrence, a plant pathologist at Auburn University, received a call from Drew Schrimsher of Agri-AFC, who had discovered foliar distortion and leaf curling and rolling on approximately 50,000 acres of cotton in southeastern Alabama. After ruling out herbicide damage, Schrimsher contacted Lawrence, and she visited the fields 2 days later.

28d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

MIT Helps Robots Adjust Grip With New Algorithms

You might not notice how easily you can shift your grip while picking up an object, but robotics engineers think about that a lot. Even the most sophisticated mechanized graspers sometimes can't grab the right part of an object, and shifting it around is a computationally complex maneuver. Researchers at MIT have developed a new algorithm that could help robots nudge items into chosen arrangement

28d

Phys.org

100+

Mars InSight's 'mole' is moving again

NASA's InSight spacecraft has used its robotic arm to help its heat probe, known as "the mole," dig nearly 2 centimeters (3/4 of an inch) over the past week. While modest, the movement is significant: Designed to dig as much as 16 feet (5 meters) underground to gauge the heat escaping from the planet's interior, the mole has only managed to partially bury itself since it started hammering in Febru

28d

Phys.org

1K

The clumpy and lumpy death of a star

In 1572, Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe was among those who noticed a new bright object in the constellation Cassiopeia. Adding fuel to the intellectual fire that Copernicus started, Tycho showed this "new star" was far beyond the Moon, and that it was possible for the Universe beyond the Sun and planets to change.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First report of cotton blue disease in the United States

Reported from six counties in coastal Alabama in 2017, cotton blue disease affected approximately 25% of the state's cotton crop and caused a 4% yield loss. The disease was reported again in 2018, affecting 3-100% of cotton fields in Alabama but causing only a 1% yield loss. Symptoms, which include slowed plant growth, loss of chlorophyll, and dwarfing of infected leaves, usually do not appear unt

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Next-generation sequencing used to identify cotton blue disease in the United States

Cotton blue disease, caused by Cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV), was first reported in 1949 in the Central African Republic and then not again until 2005, when it was reported from Brazil. In 2017, cotton blue disease was identified in Alabama, marking the first report in the United States.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A simpler way to make some medicines

Organic chemists have figured out how to synthesize the most common molecule arrangement in medicine, a scientific discovery that could change the way a number of drugs — including one most commonly used to treat ovarian cancer — are produced.Their discovery, published today in the journal Chem, gives drug makers a crucial building block for creating medicines that, so far, are made with complex

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Parasite paralysis: A new way to fight schistosomiasis?

Scientists at the Morgridge Institute for Research have characterized a natural chemical that paralyzes the parasite that causes schistosomiasis, offering a potential new pathway to fight the neglected tropical disease.

28d

NeuWrite San Diego

30,000 neuroscientists walk into a conference center

Each year, approximately 30,000 neuroscientists descend on one U.S. city for 5 days, flying in from all over the world to attend the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) conference. Some come to present posters, while some have been selected to give talks (which range in length from 10 minutes to an hour, and range in attendance […]

28d

New Scientist

8K

Long strand of DNA from Neanderthals found in people from Melanesia

Most humans have small snippets of DNA inherited from ancient hominins like Neanderthals. Now the first study shows some people have long stretches of it

28d

Science Magazine

200+

Now retired, top U.S. environmental scientist feels free to speak her mind

Linda Birnbaum held the top slot at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences for 1 decade

28d

Livescience.com

1K

Japan Just Imported Ebola to Prep for Possible Olympic Outbreak

Japan imported Ebola and other lethal viruses to prepare diagnostic test kits for the 2020 Olympics.

28d

NPR

'Geography of Risk' Calculates Who Pays When A Storm Comes To Shore

Journalist Gilbert Gaul says federal subsidies encourage developers to keep building on the coasts — despite accelerating and increasing risks from climate change.

28d

ScienceDaily

100+

Stranded whales detected from space

A new technique for analysing satellite images may help scientists detect and count stranded whales from space. Researchers tested a new detection method using Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite images of the biggest mass stranding of baleen whales yet recorded. It is hoped that in the future the technique will lead to real-time information as stranding events happen.

28d

ScienceDaily

92

Fundamental insight into how memory changes with age

New research could help explain why memory in old age is much less flexible than in young adulthood. Through experiments in mice the researchers discovered that there were dramatic differences in how memories were stored in old age, compared to young adulthood.

28d

ScienceDaily

48

Parasite paralysis: A new way to fight schistosomiasis?

Scientists have isolated a natural chemical that acts as a potent kryptonite against parasitic worms that burrow through human skin and cause devastating health problems. Researchers now describe the successful characterization of this chemical, which could help in finding new ways to fight the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis.

28d

ScienceDaily

28

Cystic fibrosis carriers at increased risk of digestive symptoms

Researchers have found that carriers of the most common genetic variant that causes cystic fibrosis experience some symptoms similar to those of people with cystic fibrosis. These findings were enabled by large-scale genomic data made available just a few years ago.

28d

ScienceDaily

21

An evolution in the understanding of evolution

An engineering professor and her former Ph.D. student share a new, more accurate method for modeling evolutionary change.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Male and female mice have different brain cells

Scientists discover that a brain region known to control sex and violence contains rare cell types that differ in male versus female mice.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research gauges neurodegeneration tied to FXTAS by measuring motor behavior

Research published in Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience by a team headquartered at the University of Kansas' Life Span Institute used a grip-force test to analyze sensorimotor function in people with the FMR1 premutation, with the aim of determining FXTAS risk and severity.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Parasite paralysis: A new way to fight schistosomiasis?

Scientists have isolated a natural chemical that acts as a potent kryptonite against parasitic worms that burrow through human skin and cause devastating health problems. In a paper publishing October 17, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, a research team led by Phillip Newmark at the Morgridge Institute for Research describe the successful characterization of this chemical, which could

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mapping global biodiversity change

A new study, published in Science, which focuses on mapping biodiversity change in marine and land ecosystems shows that loss of biodiversity is most prevalent in the tropic, with changes in marine ecosystems outpacing those on land. The research, led by scientists from the University of St Andrews, in collaboration with leading universities across Europe, the USA and Canada, including McGill, aim

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Blanket of light may give better quantum computers

Researchers from DTU Physics describe in an article in Science, how–by simple means — they have created a 'carpet' of thousands of quantum-mechanically entangled light pulses. The discovery has the potential to pave the way for more powerful quantum computers.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stranded whales detected from space

A new technique for analysing satellite images may help scientists detect and count stranded whales from space. Researchers tested a new detection method using Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite images from Maxar Technologies of the biggest mass stranding of baleen whales yet recorded. It is hoped that in the future the technique will lead to real-time information as stranding events happen.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

73

Highest throughput 3D printer is the future of manufacturing

Northwestern University researchers have developed a new, futuristic 3D printer that is so big and so fast it can print an object the size of an adult human in just a couple of hours.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Weaving quantum processors out of laser light

Researchers open a new avenue to quantum computing with a breakthrough experiment: a large-scale quantum processor made entirely of light.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Newly discovered microbes band together, 'flip out'

Scientists have found a new species of choanoflagellate. This close relative of animals forms sheets of cells that 'flip' inside-out in response to light, alternating between a cup-shaped feeding form and a ball-like swimming form. The organism could offer clues about animals' early evolution.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Modern Melanesians harbor beneficial DNA from archaic hominins

Modern Melanesians harbor beneficial genetic variants that they inherited from archaic Neanderthal and Denisovan hominins, according to a new study.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

HARP eclipses CLIP in continuous, rapid and large-scale SLA 3D printing

Objects can be continuously printed from a vat of photocurable resin at rates exceeding 430 millimeters per hour, thanks to a new approach to rapid and large-scale stereolithographic 3d printing (SLA).

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Exoplanet interiors have Earth-like geochemistry

The interiors of some exoplanets have Earth-like geochemistry, according to a new study, which finds that extrasolar rocks share similar levels of oxidation, or oxygen fugacity, to those in the solar system.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Global biodiversity crisis is a large-scale reorganization, with greatest loss in tropical oceans

Local biodiversity of species — the scale on which humans feel contributions from biodiversity — is being rapidly reorganized, according to a new global analysis of biodiversity data from more than 200 studies, together representing all major biomes.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ancient stars shed light on Earth's similarities to other planets

Earth-like planets may be common in the universe, a new UCLA study implies. The team of astrophysicists and geochemists presents new evidence that the Earth is not unique. The study was published in the journal Science on Oct. 18, 2019.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The composition of species is changing in ecosystems across the globe

While the identities of species in local assemblages are undergoing significant changes, their average number is relatively constant. Thus, changes in local assemblages do not always reflect species losses at the global scale. Scientists from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research, the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg and the University of St Andrews found greater changes

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

Lessons from Ridgecrest

Geophysicists complete their analysis of a well-documented seismic event that held many surprises.

28d

Phys.org

51

Museums put ancient DNA to work for wildlife

Scientists who are trying to save species at the brink of extinction are finding help in an unexpected place.

28d

Phys.org

81

NASA sounding rocket technology could enable simultaneous, multi-point measurements—first-ever capability

NASA engineers plan to test a new avionics technology—distributed payload communications—that would give scientists a never-before-offered capability in sounding rocket-based research.

28d

Science Magazine

Fast new 3D printing method creates objects as big as an adult human

Printer could revolutionize car and aircraft manufacturing

28d

Discover Magazine

Gas Flows Like a 'Waterfall' Onto a Young Planet, Hinting at Where Atmospheres Come From

Gas "waterfalls" cascade onto a forming planet in this artist's illustration. (Credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF, S. Dagnello) Stars and their planetary systems are born from clouds of gas and dust that collapse into swirling disks. Astronomers can't directly see planets forming in these disks because they're hidden in all the debris. But in the past few years, new kinds of telescopes have started to reveal ga

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

51

Museums put ancient DNA to work for wildlife

Scientists who are trying to save species at the brink of extinction are finding help in an unexpected place.

28d

NPR

300+

Who Has The Right To Be Forgotten?

EU citizens have the right to be forgotten. Why don't Americans? (Image credit: PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

28d

Livescience.com

1K

Scorching Hot Take: September Was North America's Warmest Ever

September tied the record for the warmest average global temperatures during that month, according to a new NOAA report.

28d

Discover Magazine

Beta-amyloid and Tau: What Do These Proteins Have to do With Alzheimer's?

Two common proteins begin to spread through the brains of those with Alzheimer's. Despite decades of study, scientists still don't understand why they become so dangerous. (Credit: SpeedKingz/Shutterstock) If you look at the brain of an Alzheimer's patient, you'll see clear and undeniable damage. Clusters of dead nerve cells. Hard plaques cemented between cells and thick tangles of proteins twiste

28d

Phys.org

Assigning workers to new networks boosts sustainability

Organizations looking to lead quests for sustainability can train troops within their ranks, but the traditional boundaries like experience, seniority and departments aren't where the payoffs lie.

28d

Phys.org

32

Scientists unwind mystery behind DNA replication

The molecules of life are twisted. But how those familiar strands in DNA's double helix manage to replicate without being tangled up has been hard to decipher. A new perspective from Cornell physicists is helping unravel the mystery.

28d

Phys.org

100+

How aerosols affect our climate

For many, the word "aerosol" might conjure thoughts of hairspray or spray paint. More accurately, though, aerosols are simply particles found in the atmosphere. They can be human-made, like from car exhaust or biomass burning, or naturally occurring, from sources such as volcanic eruptions or sea spray.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

28

Scientists unwind mystery behind DNA replication

The molecules of life are twisted. But how those familiar strands in DNA's double helix manage to replicate without being tangled up has been hard to decipher. A new perspective from Cornell physicists is helping unravel the mystery.

28d

Futurity.org

21

We blame robots for work accidents when they're autonomous

People are likely to blame robots for workplace accidents, but only if they believe the robots are autonomous, according to a new study. "Robots are an increasingly common feature in the workplace , and it's important for us to understand how people view robots in that context—including how people view robots when accidents occur at work," says corresponding author Doug Gillan, a professor of psy

28d

Futurity.org

95

Why even well-controlled epilepsy may disrupt thinking

For people with epilepsy, transient bursts of high-frequency electrical activity in epileptic brain tissue can impair thinking even when no seizure is occurring, a new study shows. The pathological buzz of electrical brain activity interferes with the brain's normal activity, but researchers say improving certain medications or implantable devices could help alleviate these cognitive deficits. Th

28d

Scientific American Content

300+

Olympic Marathon Moved out of Tokyo over Heat Concerns

Longer and hotter summer heat waves in the city pushed organizers to move the race to a cooler region of Japan — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28d

Scientific American Blog Posts

Jim Peebles Richly Deserved His Nobel Prize

Even though, according to Alfred Nobel, he didn't technically qualify — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28d

Science twis

Peering inside extrasolar rocky bodies

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Origins of collective contraction

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Large-scale, continuous 3D printing

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Many ruptures across many scales

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Generating large-scale cluster states

[no content]

28d

Science twis

A statistical model to find disease genes

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Need for sleep

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Sequencing in the matrix

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Mediating systemic health

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Adaptive archaic hominin genes

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Retinal neurons play musical chairs

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Charging through the looking glass

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Spatial structure of species change

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Special moments at cortical quiet states

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Down and down the energy cascade

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Inspecting S states in photosynthesis

[no content]

28d

Science twis

Mobilizing T cells

[no content]

28d

Science twis

How GABA makes the switch

[no content]

28d

Science twis

MORE model to fight against addiction

[no content]

28d

New on MIT Technology Review

100+

The secret to why Untitled Goose Game is such a hit is… you

Turns out there's more to the game than just being an annoying goose.

28d

Futurity.org

25

Racial achievement gap tracks with school discipline gap

An increase in the discipline gap or the academic achievement gap between black and white students in the US predicts a jump in the other, a new study shows. Similarly, as one gap narrows, so does the other. Students of color are suspended at disproportionately higher rates than white students and, on average, perform more poorly on standardized tests. But no peer-reviewed nationwide research has

28d

Science current issue

72

Comment on "The global tree restoration potential"

Bastin et al . (Reports, 5 July 2019, p. 76) state that the restoration potential of new forests globally is 205 gigatonnes of carbon, conclude that "global tree restoration is our most effective climate change solution to date," and state that climate change will drive the loss of 450 million hectares of existing tropical forest by 2050. Here we show that these three statements are incorrect.

28d

Science current issue

300+

Adaptive archaic introgression of copy number variants and the discovery of previously unknown human genes

Copy number variants (CNVs) are subject to stronger selective pressure than single-nucleotide variants, but their roles in archaic introgression and adaptation have not been systematically investigated. We show that stratified CNVs are significantly associated with signatures of positive selection in Melanesians and provide evidence for adaptive introgression of large CNVs at chromosomes 16p11.2

28d

Science current issue

Coordination between stochastic and deterministic specification in the Drosophila visual system

Sensory systems use stochastic fate specification to increase their repertoire of neuronal types. How these stochastic decisions are coordinated with the development of their targets is unknown. In the Drosophila retina, two subtypes of ultraviolet-sensitive R7 photoreceptors are stochastically specified. In contrast, their targets in the brain are specified through a deterministic program. We id

28d

Science current issue

1K

Comment on "The global tree restoration potential"

Bastin et al .'s estimate (Reports, 5 July 2019, p. 76) that tree planting for climate change mitigation could sequester 205 gigatonnes of carbon is approximately five times too large. Their analysis inflated soil organic carbon gains, failed to safeguard against warming from trees at high latitudes and elevations, and considered afforestation of savannas, grasslands, and shrublands to be restora

28d

Science current issue

Comment on "The global tree restoration potential"

Bastin et al . (Reports, 5 July 2019, p. 76) claim that global tree restoration is the most effective climate change solution to date, with a reported carbon storage potential of 205 gigatonnes of carbon. However, this estimate and its implications for climate mitigation are inconsistent with the dynamics of the global carbon cycle and its response to anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions.

28d

Science current issue

Response to Comments on "The global tree restoration potential"

Our study quantified the global tree restoration potential and its associated carbon storage potential under existing climate conditions. We received multiple technical comments, both supporting and disputing our findings. We recognize that several issues raised in these comments are worthy of discussion. We therefore provide a detailed common answer where we show that our original estimations ar

28d

Science current issue

Comment on "The global tree restoration potential"

Bastin et al . (Reports, 5 July 2019, p. 76) neglect considerable research into forest-based climate change mitigation during the 1980s and 1990s. This research supports some of their findings on the area of land technically suitable for expanding tree cover, and can be used to extend their analysis to include the area of actually available land and operational feasibility.

28d

Science current issue

100+

Scientists and politics?

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

News at a glance

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

44

Drought test begins in Biosphere 2 rainforest

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

NIH 'high risk, high reward awardees skew male–again

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

100+

Sauropods get a new diet and a new look

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

39

Lithium-ion battery development takes Nobel

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

500+

Rival theories face off over brain's source of consciousness

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Texas cancer agency seeks new vote of approval

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Outsize impact

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Evolutionary history of tissue bending

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

21

Mobilizing unconventional T cells

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Photocatalytic deracemization fixes the mix

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Photosystem II, poised for O2 formation

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Spikes in the sleeping brain

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Rapid reorganization of global biodiversity

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

94

Technological challenges and milestones for writing genomes

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

The work of words in the Anthropocene

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

The stories that make us spend (and save)

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

100+

Forest restoration: Overlooked constraints

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Forest restoration: Expanding agriculture

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Forest restoration: Transformative trees

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Forest restoration: Transformative trees–Response

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Peering inside extrasolar rocky bodies

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Origins of collective contraction

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Large-scale, continuous 3D printing

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Many ruptures across many scales

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Generating large-scale cluster states

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

A statistical model to find disease genes

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Need for sleep

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Sequencing in the matrix

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Mediating systemic health

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Adaptive archaic hominin genes

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Retinal neurons play musical chairs

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Charging through the looking glass

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Spatial structure of species change

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Special moments at cortical quiet states

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Down and down the energy cascade

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Inspecting S states in photosynthesis

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Mobilizing T cells

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

How GABA makes the switch

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

MORE model to fight against addiction

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

The United States regulates, the European Union benefits

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Ultra-low-temperature aqueous batteries

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Predicting offspring life span

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Gallstones–a force of NETure?

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Community-based policing

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Globetrotting conjugal hitchhiker

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Cooperating to control cadmium

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

55

Light-regulated collective contractility in a multicellular choanoflagellate

Collective cell contractions that generate global tissue deformations are a signature feature of animal movement and morphogenesis. However, the origin of collective contractility in animals remains unclear. While surveying the Caribbean island of Curacao for choanoflagellates, the closest living relatives of animals, we isolated a previously undescribed species (here named Choanoeca flexa sp. no

28d

Science current issue

An oxyl/oxo mechanism for oxygen-oxygen coupling in PSII revealed by an x-ray free-electron laser

Photosynthetic water oxidation is catalyzed by the Mn 4 CaO 5 cluster of photosystem II (PSII) with linear progression through five S-state intermediates (S 0 to S 4 ). To reveal the mechanism of water oxidation, we analyzed structures of PSII in the S 1 , S 2 , and S 3 states by x-ray free-electron laser serial crystallography. No insertion of water was found in S 2 , but flipping of D1 Glu 189

28d

Science current issue

500+

The geography of biodiversity change in marine and terrestrial assemblages

Human activities are fundamentally altering biodiversity. Projections of declines at the global scale are contrasted by highly variable trends at local scales, suggesting that biodiversity change may be spatially structured. Here, we examined spatial variation in species richness and composition change using more than 50,000 biodiversity time series from 239 studies and found clear geographic var

28d

Science current issue

200+

Hierarchical interlocked orthogonal faulting in the 2019 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence

A nearly 20-year hiatus in major seismic activity in southern California ended on 4 July 2019 with a sequence of intersecting earthquakes near the city of Ridgecrest, California. This sequence included a foreshock with a moment magnitude ( M w ) of 6.4 followed by a M w 7.1 mainshock nearly 34 hours later. Geodetic, seismic, and seismicity data provided an integrative view of this sequence, which

28d

Science current issue

Genetic regulatory variation in populations informs transcriptome analysis in rare disease

Transcriptome data can facilitate the interpretation of the effects of rare genetic variants. Here, we introduce ANEVA (analysis of expression variation) to quantify genetic variation in gene dosage from allelic expression (AE) data in a population. Application of ANEVA to the Genotype-Tissues Expression (GTEx) data showed that this variance estimate is robust and correlated with selective constr

28d

Science current issue

72

Oxygen fugacities of extrasolar rocks: Evidence for an Earth-like geochemistry of exoplanets

Oxygen fugacity is a measure of rock oxidation that influences planetary structure and evolution. Most rocky bodies in the Solar System formed at oxygen fugacities approximately five orders of magnitude higher than a hydrogen-rich gas of solar composition. It is unclear whether this oxidation of rocks in the Solar System is typical among other planetary systems. We exploit the elemental abundance

28d

Science current issue

200+

Rapid, large-volume, thermally controlled 3D printing using a mobile liquid interface

We report a stereolithographic three-dimensional printing approach for polymeric components that uses a mobile liquid interface (a fluorinated oil) to reduce the adhesive forces between the interface and the printed object, thereby allowing for a continuous and rapid print process, regardless of polymeric precursor. The bed area is not size-restricted by thermal limitations because the flowing oi

28d

Science current issue

Light-driven deracemization enabled by excited-state electron transfer

Deracemization is an attractive strategy for asymmetric synthesis, but intrinsic energetic challenges have limited its development. Here, we report a deracemization method in which amine derivatives undergo spontaneous optical enrichment upon exposure to visible light in the presence of three distinct molecular catalysts. Initiated by an excited-state iridium chromophore, this reaction proceeds t

28d

Science current issue

27

Deterministic generation of a two-dimensional cluster state

Measurement-based quantum computation offers exponential computational speed-up through simple measurements on a large entangled cluster state. We propose and demonstrate a scalable scheme for the generation of photonic cluster states suitable for universal measurement-based quantum computation. We exploit temporal multiplexing of squeezed light modes, delay loops, and beam-splitter transformatio

28d

Science current issue

100+

Generation of time-domain-multiplexed two-dimensional cluster state

Entanglement is the key resource for measurement-based quantum computing. It is stored in quantum states known as cluster states, which are prepared offline and enable quantum computing by means of purely local measurements. Universal quantum computing requires cluster states that are both large and possess (at least) a two-dimensional topology. Continuous-variable cluster states—based on bosonic

28d

Science current issue

100+

Isolated cortical computations during delta waves support memory consolidation

Delta waves have been described as periods of generalized silence across the cortex, and their alternation with periods of endogenous activity results in the slow oscillation of slow-wave sleep. Despite evidence that delta waves are instrumental for memory consolidation, their specific role in reshaping cortical functional circuits remains puzzling. In a rat model, we found that delta waves are n

28d

Science current issue

Synthetic dissipation and cascade fluxes in a turbulent quantum gas

Scale-invariant fluxes are the defining property of turbulent cascades, but their direct measurement is a challenging experimental problem. Here we perform such a measurement for a direct energy cascade in a turbulent quantum gas. Using a time-periodic force, we inject energy at a large length scale and generate a cascade in a uniformly trapped three-dimensional Bose gas. The adjustable trap dept

28d

Science current issue

New Products

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

22

Escaping 'The Waiting Place

[no content]

28d

Science current issue

Sphingosine 1-phosphate: Lipid signaling in pathology and therapy

Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a metabolic product of cell membrane sphingolipids, is bound to extracellular chaperones, is enriched in circulatory fluids, and binds to G protein–coupled S1P receptors (S1PRs) to regulate embryonic development, postnatal organ function, and disease. S1PRs regulate essential processes such as adaptive immune cell trafficking, vascular development, and homeostasis.

28d

Cosmos Magazine

200+

Distant exoplanets not so different to Earth

Analysis finds terrestrial geochemistry and geophysics is far from unique. Barry Keily reports.

28d

Cosmos Magazine

200+

Huge genomic changes an afterglow of archaic human pairings

Melanesian genomes have held onto Neanderthal and Denisovan sequences. Dyani Lewis reports.

28d

Cosmos Magazine

49

Evolution holds clue to destruction by insect invaders

The revelation could prevent costly damage and protect ecosystems. Natalie Parletta reports.

28d

Cosmos Magazine

Ancient arthropod collective

How long ago did organisms start behaving for the common good?

28d

Cosmos Magazine

Galactic cosmic rays could have produced Titan's sand dunes

Challenging conventional wisdom, study suggests the dunes formed through centuries of slow irradiation. Richard A Lovett reports.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Stranded whales detected from space

A new technique for analysing satellite images may help scientists detect and count stranded whales from space. Researchers tested a new detection method using Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite images from Maxar Technologies of the biggest mass stranding of baleen whales yet recorded. It is hoped that in the future the technique will lead to real-time information as stranding events happen.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

400+

Newly discovered microbes band together, 'flip out'

When researchers in Nicole King's lab looked through a microscope at the strange organisms they had collected in Curaçao, they saw sheets of cells clustered together in a pattern that resembled skin. That was unusual enough, since these unicellular organisms are normally loners. But then they did something really bizarre: The sheets "flipped" from a shallow cup shape into little ball-like structur

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

75

Mapping global biodiversity change

A new study, published in Science, which focuses on mapping biodiversity change in marine and land ecosystems shows that loss of biodiversity is most prevalent in the tropic, with changes in marine ecosystems outpacing those on land. The research, led by scientists from the University of St Andrews, in collaboration with leading universities across Europe, the USA and Canada, including McGill, aim

28d

Science Magazine

500+

New universe of miniproteins is upending cell biology and genetics

Tiny proteins help power muscles and provide the toxic punch to many venoms

28d

The Scientist RSS

300+

Researchers Find Flaws in High-Profile Study on Trees and Climate

Four independent groups say the work overestimates the carbon-absorbing benefits of global forest restoration, but the authors insist their original estimates are accurate.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

An evolution in the understanding of evolution

In an open-source research paper, a UVA Engineering professor and her former Ph.D. student share a new, more accurate method for modeling evolutionary change.

28d

Phys.org

100+

Blanket of light may give better quantum computers

Quantum mechanics is one of the most successful theories of natural science, and although its predictions are often counterintuitive, not a single experiment has been conducted to date of which the theory has not been able to give an adequate description.

28d

Phys.org

Stranded whales detected from space

A new technique for analysing satellite images may help scientists detect and count stranded whales from space. Researchers tested a new detection method using Very High Resolution (VHR) satellite images from Maxar Technologies of the biggest mass stranding of baleen whales yet recorded. It is hoped that in the future the technique will lead to real-time information as stranding events happen.

28d

Phys.org

1K

Ancient stars shed light on Earth's similarities to other planets

Earth-like planets may be common in the universe, a new UCLA study implies. The team of astrophysicists and geochemists presents new evidence that the Earth is not unique. The study was published in the journal Science on Oct. 18.

28d

Phys.org

400+

Newly discovered microbes band together, 'flip out'

When researchers in Nicole King's lab looked through a microscope at the strange organisms they had collected in Curaçao, they saw sheets of cells clustered together in a pattern that resembled skin. That was unusual enough, since these unicellular organisms are normally loners. But then they did something really bizarre: The sheets "flipped" from a shallow cup shape into little ball-like structur

28d

Phys.org

100+

Lessons from Ridgecrest earthquake sequence

The largest earthquake sequence in Southern California in two decades has taught scientists that large earthquakes can occur in a more complex fashion than commonly assumed. The sequence also loaded up strain on a nearby major fault, according to a new study.

28d

Phys.org

4K

Weaving quantum processors out of laser light

An international team of scientists from Australia, Japan and the United States has produced a prototype of a large-scale quantum processor made of laser light.

28d

Phys.org

82

Mapping global biodiversity change

A new study, published in Science, which focuses on mapping biodiversity change in marine and land ecosystems shows that loss of biodiversity is most prevalent in the tropic, with changes in marine ecosystems outpacing those on land. The research, led by scientists from the University of St Andrews, in collaboration with leading universities across Europe, the USA and Canada, including McGill, aim

28d

The Atlantic

Nominate a Nonprofit in 5th Annual The Renewal Awards, from The Atlantic and Allstate

Nominations are open for the fifth annual Renewal Awards , a project from The Atlantic and Allstate that recognizes local organizations who are finding creative solutions to deep community challenges—and helps them make an even bigger impact. This spring, five winners will be announced and will each receive a two-year grant of $40,000 from The Atlantic and Allstate. To nominate a nonprofit, pleas

28d

Scientific American Content

Jim Peebles Richly Deserved His Nobel Prize

Even though, according to Alfred Nobel, he didn't technically qualify — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28d

ScienceDaily

20

Museums put ancient DNA to work for wildlife

Scientists who are trying to save species at the brink of extinction are finding help in an unexpected place. Researchers increasingly are embracing the power of ancient DNA from old museum specimens to answer questions about climate change, habitat loss and other stresses on surviving populations.

28d

ScienceDaily

24

Industrial melanism linked to same gene in 3 moth species

The rise of dark forms of many species of moth in heavily polluted areas of 19th and 20th century Britain, known as industrial melanism, was a highly visible response to environmental change. But did the different species rely on the same gene to adapt? New research by the University of Liverpool reveals that three species of moth, including the famous peppered moth, indeed did.

28d

ScienceDaily

40

Assigning workers to new networks boosts sustainability

Innovation comes from people in different units who have new knowledge, and a new study about conservation organizations suggests encouraging employees to think and act outside network boxes from time to time.

28d

ScienceDaily

28

Scientists unwind mystery behind DNA replication

The molecules of life are twisted. But how those familiar strands in DNA's double helix manage to replicate without being tangled up has been hard to decipher. A new perspective from physicists is helping unravel the mystery.

28d

Cosmos Magazine

29

More than a pretty picture

Scientists hope snaps taken from the International Space Station will help tackle light pollution.

28d

Science News Daily

Studio Ghibli films finally coming to streaming with HBO Max – CNET

Spirited Away fans, you might not need that DVD player anymore — if you're willing to take on another monthly fee.

28d

Viden

Forskere retter skarp kritik af artikel om klimavenligt oksekød: 'Det er decideret møghamrende forkert'

Forskere går i rette med artikel, som hævder, at CO2 kan blive trukket ud af atmosfæren med en bestemt type græsning

28d

The Atlantic

100+

Jojo Rabbit Is a Fraught Tonal Experiment

Is Hitler funny? Yes, that Hitler, the one who presided over an empire of mass murder, whose name is essentially a byword for evil . Taika Waititi, the director of charming tales of adolescence such as Boy and Hunt for the Wilderpeople , thinks he can be—in fact, the filmmaker is so convinced of that notion, he's cast himself as Hitler in a new coming-of-age comedy set in Nazi Germany. Waititi is

28d

NYT > Science

9K

Bank Regulators Present a Dire Warning of Financial Risks From Climate Change

The San Francisco Fed warned that banks, communities and homeowners face significant financial risk from climate change and offered proposals for banks to do more to help.

28d

ScienceDaily

32

New insights into the structure and function of Cdc34, a target for cancer therapeutics

Researchers report they have obtained 3D structural snapshots of Cdc34 in action. Cdc34 is an enzyme important for cell cycle regulation and a target for therapeutic intervention in cancer. These structures, along with studies in human cells, have revealed key features of this enzyme important for its regulation of cell growth and activity. These unique features could present opportunities for rat

28d

ScienceDaily

200+

Evidence of behavioral, biological similarities between compulsive overeating and addiction

Does yo-yo dieting drive compulsive eating? There may be a connection. According to researchers the chronic cyclic pattern of overeating followed by undereating, reduces the brain's ability to feel reward and may drive compulsive eating. This finding suggests that future research into treatment of compulsive eating behavior should focus on rebalancing the mesolimbic dopamine system — the part of

28d

ScienceDaily

28

Fingerprints of Earth's original building blocks discovered in diamond-bearing rocks

Scientists have detected primordial chemical signatures preserved within modern kimberlites, according to new research. The results provide critical insight for understanding the formation of Earth.

28d

ScienceDaily

43

Paleontologists discover complete Saurornitholestes langstoni specimen

The discovery of a nearly complete dromaeosaurid Saurornitholestes langstoni specimen is providing critical information for the evolution of theropod dinosaurs, according to new research.

28d

ScienceDaily

21

Scientists discover new species of wasp-mimicking praying mantis

Biologists have described a new species of praying mantis that displays the first documented example of conspicuous mimicking of a wasp among praying mantises.

28d

ScienceDaily

28

Embryo's early development revealed in a dish

Bioscientists develop a method to observe patterns of early embryonic development, during which ectodermal cells diverge toward their fates as skin, organs and the nervous system.

28d

New Scientist

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Google gets green light to access five years of NHS patient data

A freedom of information request by New Scientist shows that Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust will grant Google five years of historical data on patients

28d

Livescience.com

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Virgin Galactic Unveils New Line of Under Armour 'Spacewear' for Space Tourists

Virgin Galactic and partner Under Armour unveiled a new line of "spacewear" spacesuits for future passengers on SpaceShipTwo.

28d

Big Think

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Microplastics in the soil point to another potential ecosystem collapse

New research from Anglia Ruskin University states that microplastics in soil are causing earthworms to lose weight. Soil affected by microplastics produces less crop yield due to less productive earthworms and lower pH levels. If this trend continues, our entire agricultural system could be compromised. None In the last installment of "How Plastic is Destroying Us," we discussed the billions of m

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Science | Smithsonian

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The Spectacled Flowerpecker Is Now Known to Science

First spotted a decade ago, this elusive bird hangs out in the canopy of Borneo's lowland forests

28d

The Atlantic

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Fall Is in the Air: Images of the Season

Autumn truly is the best season. The autumnal equinox took place a few weeks ago, marking the end of summer and the start of fall across the Northern Hemisphere. Now it is the season of harvests, festivals, migrations, winter preparations, and, of course, spectacular foliage. Across the North, people are beginning to feel a crisp chill in the evening air, leaves are splashing mountainsides with b

28d

Ingeniøren

At folde et papir er et overmåde svært problem

PLUS. Origami er ikke kun en æstetisk japansk foldekunst, det har også sine anvendelser inden for ingeniørmæssige konstruktioner. Men det er svært at vide, om et givet mønster kan foldes, uden at papiret krøller eller revner. Ny puslespilslignende teknik kan være en hjælp.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Museums put ancient DNA to work for wildlife

Scientists who are trying to save species at the brink of extinction are finding help in an unexpected place. Researchers increasingly are embracing the power of ancient DNA from old museum specimens to answer questions about climate change, habitat loss and other stresses on surviving populations.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists unwind mystery behind DNA replication

The molecules of life are twisted. But how those familiar strands in DNA's double helix manage to replicate without being tangled up has been hard to decipher. A new perspective from Cornell physicists is helping unravel the mystery.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Combination of AI & radiologists more accurately identified breast cancer

An artificial intelligence (AI) tool accurately identified breast cancer when combined with analysis by radiologists.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How aerosols affect our climate

Greenhouse gases may get more attention, but aerosols — from car exhaust to volcanic eruptions — also have a major impact on the Earth's climate. Using a massive NASA dataset, Yale researchers have created a framework that helps explain just how sensitive local temperatures are to aerosols.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Assigning workers to new networks boosts sustainability

Innovation comes from people in different units who have new knowledge, and a new study about conservation organizations suggests encouraging employees to think and act outside network boxes from time to time.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Industrial melanism linked to same gene in 3 moth species

The rise of dark forms of many species of moth in heavily polluted areas of 19th and 20th century Britain, known as industrial melanism, was a highly visible response to environmental change. But did the different species rely on the same gene to adapt?New research by the University of Liverpool reveals that three species of moth, including the famous peppered moth, indeed did.

28d

High-risk patients benefit from undergoing surgery at teaching hospitals

EurekAlert! – Breaking News 28d

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Patients with a high risk of dying after surgery, including those with multiple chronic diseases, benefit from undergoing general or vascular procedures at a major teaching hospital as opposed to a non-teaching hospital, according to a study from researchers at Penn Medicine and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cystic fibrosis carriers at increased risk of digestive symptoms

Researchers have found that carriers of the most common genetic variant that causes cystic fibrosis experience some symptoms similar to those of people with cystic fibrosis. These findings were enabled by large-scale genomic data made available just a few years ago. Yu-Chung (Jerry) Lin, BA, MSc, a graduate student at the University of Toronto, presented the research at the American Society of Hum

28d

Phys.org

Weather Service winter forecast: A bit warmer, but chaotic

Expect big swings in weather this winter, government forecasters say.

28d

Nature

30

Daily briefing: Raw meat dog food can be bad for both canines and humans

Nature, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03159-2 Rampant bacterial contamination in raw pet food, how evolution builds brand new genes from scratch and how space scientists in California ran a NASA mission without power.

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Nature

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Earth scientists push ambitious project to map Canada's geology

Nature, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03030-4 A fleet of geophysical observatories would probe everything from the inner Earth to the upper atmosphere.

28d

Viden

Gigantisk 3D-printer bygger otte meter lang båd og slår tre verdensrekorder

Kun 72 timer tog det at printe en hel båd i ét stykke.

28d

Phys.org

100+

Space station's 2 women prep for 1st all-female spacewalk

Men have floated out the hatch on all 420 spacewalks conducted over the past half-century.

28d

Phys.org

How roots grow hair

The roots of plants can do a lot of things: They grow in length to reach water, they can bend to circumvent stones, and they form fine root hairs enabling them to absorb more nutrients from the soil. A team of researchers led by scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now identified an important regulator of this process.

28d

Science Magazine

Indian government tightens rules on academic collaboration with China

Ministries seek control over agreements amid growing rivalry between the two nations

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

24

How roots grow hair

The roots of plants can do a lot of things: They grow in length to reach water, they can bend to circumvent stones, and they form fine root hairs enabling them to absorb more nutrients from the soil. A team of researchers led by scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now identified an important regulator of this process.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

28

Scientists discover new species of wasp-mimicking praying mantis

Cleveland Museum of Natural History Director of Research & Collections and Curator of Invertebrate Zoology Dr. Gavin Svenson and former Case Western Reserve University graduate student, Henrique Rodrigues, have discovered a new species of praying mantis, described as the first known mantis species to conspicuously mimic a wasp. In addition, the new species joins one previously described species wi

28d

ScienceDaily

97

Darn you, R2! When can we blame robots?

A recent study finds that people are likely to blame robots for workplace accidents, but only if they believe the robots are autonomous.

28d

ScienceDaily

28

Near misses on slot machines may not encourage continued gambling

For nearly 70 years, researchers believed that near-miss events like these would encourage you to continue gambling. But new research suggests that the near-miss effect may not exist at all.

28d

Phys.org

28

Scientists discover new species of wasp-mimicking praying mantis

Cleveland Museum of Natural History Director of Research & Collections and Curator of Invertebrate Zoology Dr. Gavin Svenson and former Case Western Reserve University graduate student, Henrique Rodrigues, have discovered a new species of praying mantis, described as the first known mantis species to conspicuously mimic a wasp. In addition, the new species joins one previously described species wi

28d

Phys.org

1K

Paleontologists discover complete Saurornitholestes langstoni specimen

The discovery of a nearly complete dromaeosaurid Saurornitholestes langstoni specimen is providing critical information for the evolution of theropod dinosaurs, according to new research by a University of Alberta paleontologist.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

41

New insights into the structure and function of Cdc34, a target for cancer therapeutics

Medical University of South Carolina researchers report in Nature Communications they have obtained 3D structural snapshots of Cdc34 in action. Cdc34 is an enzyme important for cell cycle regulation and a target for therapeutic intervention in cancer. These structures, along with studies in human cells, have revealed key features of this enzyme important for its regulation of cell growth and activ

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Embryo's early development revealed in a dish

Rice University bioscientists develop a method to observe patterns of early embryonic development, during which ectodermal cells diverge toward their fates as skin, organs and the nervous system.

28d

The Atlantic

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Elijah Cummings, Reluctant Partisan Warrior

The image many Americans likely had of Representative Elijah Cummings, who died this morning at the age of 68 , was of a Democrat perpetually sparring with his Republican counterparts at high-profile congressional hearings. There was Cummings in 2015, going at it with Representative Trey Gowdy of South Carolina while a bemused Hillary Clinton sat waiting to testify about the Benghazi attack. Two

28d

Futurity.org

Uncertainty can actually boost trust in climate science

The more specific climate scientists are about the uncertainties of global warming, the more the American public trusts their predictions, according to new research. But scientists may want to tread carefully when talking about their predictions, the researchers say, because that trust falters when scientists acknowledge that other unknown factors could come into play. In a new study in Nature Cl

28d

New on MIT Technology Review

500+

The Russian hackers who hit the 2016 election have been very busy since

New tools, tactics, and techniques show Russian hackers famous for targeting Americans have been active around the world.

28d

NPR

Most U.S. Dairy Cows Are Descended From Just 2 Bulls. That's Not Good

The drive to make more milk has had an unsavory side effect: Cows have become more genetically similar and less fertile. Scientists are trying to recover valuable genetic variation that was lost. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)

28d

ScienceDaily

26

How plant roots grow hair

The roots of plants can do a lot of things: They grow in length to reach water, they can bend to circumvent stones, and they form fine root hairs enabling them to absorb more nutrients from the soil. A team of researchers has now identified an important regulator of this process.

28d

ScienceDaily

40

Bad break-ups may not trigger weight gain from emotional eating

That pint of ice cream after a nasty breakup may not do as much damage as you think. Despite the emotional turmoil, people on average do not report gaining weight after a relationship dissolution, according to new research.

28d

ScienceDaily

100+

Adults with undiagnosed Celiac disease have lower bone density

New research has found lower bone density in adults who are likely to have undiagnosed celiac disease, an autoimmune disease triggered by consuming gluten, despite this group consuming more calcium and phosphorous than the control group.

28d

ScienceDaily

64

Giving robots a faster grasp

Engineers have found a way to significantly speed up the planning process required for a robot to adjust its grasp on an object by pushing that object against a stationary surface. Whereas traditional algorithms would require tens of minutes for planning out a sequence of motions, the new team's approach shaves this planning process down to less than a second.

28d

ScienceDaily

71

Bio-circuitry mimics synapses and neurons in a step toward sensory computing

Researchers have demonstrated bio-inspired devices that accelerate routes to neuromorphic, or brain-like, computing. Their discovery could support the emergence of computing networks modeled on biology for a sensory approach to machine learning.

28d

ScienceDaily

Double layer of graphene helps to control spin currents

In order to make transistors that operate using the spin of electrons, rather than their charge, it is necessary to find a way of switching spin currents on and off. Furthermore, the lifetime of the spins should at least be equal to the time taken for these electrons to travel through a circuit. Scientists have now taken an important step forward by creating a device that meets both of these requi

28d

Science Magazine

Sauropods grew big by munching 'superfoods' with sturdy beaks

Studies help show how these dinosaurs became the largest animals ever to walk Earth

28d

Futurity.org

60

AR system lets users reach out and grab virtual stuff

With a new software system, users can view augmented reality objects through their phones and use their hands to manipulate those objects as if they were real. The developers hope their software, called Portal-ble, could be a tool for artists, designers, game developers, and others to experiment with augmented reality (AR). "AR is going to be a great new mode of interaction," says Jeff Huang, an

28d

Livescience.com

2K

Dead Elephant Found Lying on Top of a Squashed Crocodile. What Happened?

An elephant's seemingly final act after it was attacked by a crocodile was to collapse on top of the reptile, crushing the would-be predator.

28d

Phys.org

63

Spiral arms in a young accretion disk around a baby star

An international research team, led by Chin-Fei Lee at the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA, Taiwan), has detected a pair of spiral arms in an accretion disk around a protostar (baby star), using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Interestingly, these spiral density enhancements make the disk appear like a "space whirlpool." The finding not only

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists discover new species of wasp-mimicking praying mantis

Cleveland Museum of Natural History Director of Research and Collections Dr. Gavin Svenson has described a new species of praying mantis that displays the first documented example of conspicuous mimicking of a wasp among praying mantises.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Paleontologists discover complete Saurornitholestes langstoni specimen

The discovery of a nearly complete dromaeosaurid Saurornitholestes langstoni specimen is providing critical information for the evolution of theropod dinosaurs, according to new research by a University of Alberta paleontologist.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fingerprints of Earth's original building blocks discovered in diamond-bearing rocks

Scientists have detected primordial chemical signatures preserved within modern kimberlites, according to new research by a multi-national team involving a University of Alberta scientist. The results provide critical insight for understanding the formation of Earth.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Near misses on slot machines may not encourage continued gambling

For nearly 70 years, researchers believed that near-miss events like these would encourage you to continue gambling. But new research from University of Alberta scientists suggests that the near-miss effect may not exist at all.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Evidence of behavioral, biological similarities between compulsive overeating and addiction

Does yo-yo dieting drive compulsive eating? There may be a connection. According to Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers the chronic cyclic pattern of overeating followed by undereating, reduces the brain's ability to feel reward and may drive compulsive eating. This finding suggests that future research into treatment of compulsive eating behavior should focus on rebalancing th

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Darn you, R2! When can we blame robots?

A recent study finds that people are likely to blame robots for workplace accidents, but only if they believe the robots are autonomous.

28d

ScienceDaily

24

Stormy cluster weather could unleash black hole power and explain lack of cosmic cooling

'Weather' in clusters of galaxies may explain a longstanding puzzle. Scientists have now used sophisticated simulations to show how powerful jets from supermassive black holes are disrupted by the motion of hot gas and galaxies, preventing gas from cooling, which could otherwise form stars.

28d

Quanta Magazine

2K

Machines Beat Humans on a Reading Test. But Do They Understand?

In the fall of 2017, Sam Bowman , a computational linguist at New York University, figured that computers still weren't very good at understanding the written word. Sure, they had become decent at simulating that understanding in certain narrow domains, like automatic translation or sentiment analysis (for example, determining if a sentence sounds "mean or nice," he said). But Bowman wanted measu

28d

New on MIT Technology Review

200+

Watch interstellar comet 2I/Borisov hurtle through space in this Hubble time-lapse

[no content]

28d

Phys.org

100+

Embryo's early development revealed in a dish

During embryonic development, the entire nervous system, the skin and the sensory organs emerge from a single sheet of cells known as the ectoderm. While there have been extensive studies of how this sheet forms all these derivatives, it hasn't been possible to study the process in humans – until now.

28d

Phys.org

39

Near-Earth asteroids spectroscopic survey at the Isaac Newton telescope

The study of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) is driven by both scientific and practical reasons. Because of their proximity to our planet, they can provide key information regarding the delivery of water and organic-rich material to the early Earth, and the subsequent emergence of life. On the other hand, these small bodies of the Solar System have non-negligible long-term probabilities of colliding w

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

Embryo's early development revealed in a dish

During embryonic development, the entire nervous system, the skin and the sensory organs emerge from a single sheet of cells known as the ectoderm. While there have been extensive studies of how this sheet forms all these derivatives, it hasn't been possible to study the process in humans – until now.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Giving robots a faster grasp

MIT engineers have found a way to significantly speed up the planning process required for a robot to adjust its grasp on an object by pushing that object against a stationary surface. Whereas traditional algorithms would require tens of minutes for planning out a sequence of motions, the new team's approach shaves this preplanning process down to less than a second.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Adults with undiagnosed Celiac disease have lower bone density, says first study on topic

Research by George Mason University College of Health and Human Services found lower bone density in adults who are likely to have undiagnosed celiac disease, an autoimmune disease triggered by consuming gluten, despite this group consuming more calcium and phosphorous than the control group.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bad break-ups may not trigger weight gain from emotional eating

That pint of ice cream after a nasty breakup may not do as much damage as you think. Despite the emotional turmoil, people on average do not report gaining weight after a relationship dissolution, according to new research.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from domestic cats

Researchers have reported for the first time producing feline induced pluripotent stem cells (fiPSCs) from adult cells of domestic cats.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

First scientific description of elusive bird illuminates plight of Borneo's forests

Scientists with the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and collaborators surveying the birdlife of Borneo have discovered a startling surprise: an undescribed species of bird, which has been named the spectacled flowerpecker. While scientists and birdwatchers have previously glimpsed the small, gray bird in lowland forests around the island, the Smithsonian team is the first to captu

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds racial disparities in treatment of multiple myeloma patients

Among patients with multiple myeloma, African-Americans and Hispanics start treatment with a novel therapy significantly later than white patients, according to a new study published today in Blood Advances. The study found that on average it took about three months for white patients to start novel therapy after diagnosis, while for both African-Americans and Hispanics it took about five months.

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Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

45

Physicists develop fast and sensitive mechanical tool to measure light

Physicists have developed a fast and sensitive mechanical tool to measure light. The graphene nanomechanical bolometer is the fastest and most sensitive in its class. It is poised to detect nearly every color of light at high speeds and obtain measurements at and far above room-temperature.

28d

Big Think

500+

Spending more time on your hobbies can boost confidence at work — even if they are sufficiently different from your job

None of us enjoys having our job cut into our leisure time. So the next time your boss asks you to work late and miss your band rehearsal or board game night, point them to a new study in the Journal of Vocational Behavior . Researchers have found that spending more time on a hobby can boost people's confidence in their ability to perform their job well. But watch out — if your hobby is too simil

28d

Scientific American (uploads) on YouTube

Can Noise Have Color?

It turns out that it can. But it does have a color that you can see, just that you can hear. What does that mean? Watch this. From: Scientific American

28d

Phys.org

64

What happens under the Yellowstone volcano?

Yellowstone National Park in the USA, with its geysers and hot springs, is a major attraction for tourists. However, especially in times of little news, the media often focuses on the Yellowstone supervolcano, which last erupted about 630,000 years ago. Inevitably then, the question of the underlying geological structures will be posed.

28d

ScienceDaily

28

Arthropods formed orderly lines 480 million years ago

Researchers studied fossilized Moroccan Ampyx trilobites, which lived 480 million years ago and showed that the trilobites had probably been buried in their positions — all oriented in the same direction. Scientists deduced that these Ampyx processions may illustrate a kind of collective behavior adopted in response to cyclic environmental disturbances.

28d

ScienceDaily

24

Nature-based solutions can help protect us from climate-related natural hazards

Solutions found in nature should be our first line of defense against the increasing number of climate change-related natural disasters, say experts.

28d

ScienceDaily

32

What happens under the Yellowstone Volcano?

A recent study helps to better explain the processes in the Earth's interior beneath the Yellowstone supervolcano.

28d

ScienceDaily

44

Physicists develop fast and sensitive mechanical tool to measure light

Physicists have developed a fast and sensitive mechanical tool to measure light. The graphene nanomechanical bolometer is the fastest and most sensitive in its class. It is poised to detect nearly every color of light at high speeds and obtain measurements at and far above room-temperature.

28d

Phys.org

1K

Dark matter tugs the most massive spiral galaxies to breakneck speeds

When it comes to galaxies, how fast is fast? The Milky Way, an average spiral galaxy, spins at a speed of 130 miles per second (210 km/sec) in our Sun's neighborhood. New research has found that the most massive spiral galaxies spin faster than expected. These "super spirals," the largest of which weigh about 20 times more than our Milky Way, spin at a rate of up to 350 miles per second (570 km/se

28d

Scientific American Blog Posts

16K

We Have No Reason to Believe 5G Is Safe

The technology is coming, but contrary to what some people say, there could be health risks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28d

Future(s) Studies

Paris zoo unveils "the blob", an organism with no brain but 720 sexes: "We know for sure it is not a plant but we don't really if it's an animal or a fungus"

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

The Government Is Testing Mass Surveillance on the Border Before Turning It on Americans: Almost every technology developed at the border in the last two decades now exists in local police departments

submitted by /u/maxwellhill [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

Marc Benioff: We need to monitor A.I. to ensure it is a force for good

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

Algorithms Are Designed to Addict Us, and the Consequences Go Beyond Wasted Time

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

Nature Communications. CNIO researchers obtain the first mice born with hyper-long telomeres and show that it is possible to extend life without any genetic modification

submitted by /u/hadapurpura [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

Emergent Egalitarianism as a New Technology for Resolving Poverty

If we design our society to support, protect, and reward the productivity of the poorest in society, we won't necessarily need massive welfare states to deal with things. Currently, one of the latest waves in psuedotechnological abuse of the poor is found in "accidental" austerity via the willful deployment of technologically inadequate new solutions to analyzing poverty. If we fix these analysis

28d

Future(s) Studies

Tractebel claims to have made renewable hydrogen production breakthrough.

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

State attorneys general prepare to fight for clean energy rights – A new report, "State Attorneys General: Empowering the Clean Energy Future," confirms that state attorneys general have an essential role in advancing the vision of a clean energy future.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

Ford announces launch of largest electric vehicle charging network in the US

submitted by /u/leonerdo_ [link] [comments]

28d

Future(s) Studies

Australia may aim as high as 700 percent in renewable power goal. The private researchers say that if Australia were to generate 200 percent of its energy needs through renewable power sources, the surplus could be stored and more focus could be placed on the hydrogen economy, which remains in its

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

28d

Phys.org

47

First scientific description of elusive bird illuminates plight of Borneo's forests

Scientists with the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and collaborators surveying the birdlife of Borneo have discovered a startling surprise: an undescribed species of bird, which has been named the Spectacled Flowerpecker. While scientists and birdwatchers have previously glimpsed the small, gray bird in lowland forests around the island, the Smithsonian team is the first to captu

28d

Phys.org

29

Future flash drought will increase over humid regions

Flash drought is a new phenomenon with increasing prominence due to global warming. Drought develops rapidly without sufficient early warning, and has stricken the world with severe impacts during recent years, such as the droughts over central USA in 2012 that caused billions of dollars of economic losses; southern China in 2013 that affected 2 million hectares of crops in Guizhou and Hunan provi

28d

Phys.org

57

Double layer of graphene helps to control spin currents

In order to make transistors that operate using the spin of electrons rather than their charge, it is necessary to find a way of switching spin currents on and off. Furthermore, the lifetime of the spins should at least be equal to the time taken for these electrons to travel through a circuit. University of Groningen scientists have now taken an important step forward by creating a device that me

28d

Phys.org

58

Deet gives humans an 'invisibilty cloak' to fend off mosquito bites

Since its invention during the Second World War for soldiers stationed in countries where malaria transmission rates were high, researchers have worked to pinpoint precisely how DEET actually affects mosquitos. Past studies have analyzed the chemical structure of the repellent, studied the response in easier insects to work with, such as fruit flies, and experimented with genetically engineered mo

28d

BBC News – Science & Environment

8K

Why a brainless yellow 'blob' that can learn is mystifying scientists

A yellow organism, which looks like fungus but acts like an animal, has gone on display at a Paris zoo.

28d

Scientific American Content

16K

We Have No Reason to Believe 5G Is Safe

The technology is coming, but contrary to what some people say, there could be health risks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

48

First scientific description of elusive bird illuminates plight of Borneo's forests

Scientists with the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and collaborators surveying the birdlife of Borneo have discovered a startling surprise: an undescribed species of bird, which has been named the Spectacled Flowerpecker. While scientists and birdwatchers have previously glimpsed the small, gray bird in lowland forests around the island, the Smithsonian team is the first to captu

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

58

Deet gives humans an 'invisibilty cloak' to fend off mosquito bites

Since its invention during the Second World War for soldiers stationed in countries where malaria transmission rates were high, researchers have worked to pinpoint precisely how DEET actually affects mosquitos. Past studies have analyzed the chemical structure of the repellent, studied the response in easier insects to work with, such as fruit flies, and experimented with genetically engineered mo

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How roots grow hair

The roots of plants can do a lot of things: They grow in length to reach water, they can bend to circumvent stones, and they form fine root hairs enabling them to absorb more nutrients from the soil. A team of researchers led by scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now identified an important regulator of this process.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bio-circuitry mimics synapses and neurons in a step toward sensory computing

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of Tennessee and Texas A&M University demonstrated bio-inspired devices that accelerate routes to neuromorphic, or brain-like, computing. Their discovery could support the emergence of computing networks modeled on biology for a sensory approach to machine learning.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bone regrowth using ceramic substitute and E. coli-derived growth factors

Synthetic bone substitutes are promising materials for bone defect repair, but their efficacy can be substantially improved by bioactive agents such as growth factors.

28d

New Scientist

1K

SpaceX plans to put more than 40,000 satellites in space

Documents show Elon Musk's firm SpaceX wants to launch another 30,000 satellites – more than triple the total amount humans have ever launched

28d

Discover Magazine

34

Collective Behavior: A 480-Million-Year-Old Conga Line

Nearly half a billion years ago, trilobites may have been capable of some kinds of collective behavior associated with modern animals. (Credit: Vannier et al 2019, https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-51012-3) Chains of trilobite fossils unearthed in Morocco suggest that these early arthropods were capable of a collective behavior seen in many of today's species — only these trilobites had the conga

28d

BBC News – Science & Environment

57K

Extinction Rebellion protesters dragged from Tube train roof

Extinction Rebellion says it will "take stock" of the reaction to the action for future protests.

28d

Science News Daily

Startup headed by ex-Apple engineer aims to eliminate smartphone buttons

Sentons, a startup led by chip industry veterans, on Thursday began marketing technology that aims to do away with gadget buttons and said it is working with two smartphone makers in addition …

28d

Science News Daily

Ancient arthropod collective

How long ago did organisms start behaving for the common good?

28d

Discover Magazine

This Gene Helps Explain Why Some People Can Get By on Little Sleep

Natural short sleepers seem to have won the genetic lottery, which allows them to thrive on very little sleep. (Credit: Shutterstock) Your sleep needs are probably influenced by your genes.It's a new way of thinking about sleep that's gaining steam, thanks to a rare group of people known as natural short sleepers, or those who can function normally on less than six hours of sleep a night. And now,

28d

ScienceDaily

36

Image analysis to automatically quantify gender bias in movies

Many commercial films worldwide continue to express womanhood in a stereotypical manner, a recent study using image analysis showed. A research team developed a novel image analysis method for automatically quantifying the degree of gender bias in in films.

28d

ScienceDaily

36

First demonstration of one petabit per second network node

Computer scientists have demonstrated the first large-scale optical switching testbed capable of handling 1 Petabit per second optical signals. This demonstration made use of state-of-the-art large-scale and low-loss optical switches based on MEMS technology, three types of next-generation spatial-division multiplexing fibers, and included data rates from 10 Terabit per second to 1 Petabit per sec

28d

ScienceDaily

28

A new approach to tackle superbugs

Scientists have uncovered a novel antibiotic-free approach that could help prevent and treat one of the most widespread bacterial pathogens, using nanocapsules made of natural ingredients.

28d

ScienceDaily

500+

Mothers' behavior influences bonding hormone oxytocin in babies

A new epigenetic study now suggests that mothers' behavior can also have a substantial impact on their children's developing oxytocin systems.

28d

ScienceDaily

52

Cultivating joy through mindfulness: An antidote to opioid misuse, the disease of despair

New research shows that a specific mind-body therapy, Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE), increases the brain's response to natural, healthy rewards while also decreasing the brain's response to opioid-related cues.

28d

ScienceDaily

20

First widespread chytrid fungus infections in frogs of Peruvian Amazon rain forests

Biologists have documented, for the first time, the widespread presence of the notorious chytrid fungus in 80 species of frogs from lowland rain forest sites in the Peruvian Amazon.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Future flash drought will increase over humid regions

proposed a new definition of flash drought based on rapid decline rate of soil moisture and the dry persistency. They also find that anthropogenic climate change has changed the traditional arid areas, and more attention should be paid to deal with the flash drought risks in humid and semi-humid areas.

28d

Nature

69

Award recognizes efforts to inspire girls to pursue science careers

Nature, Published online: 17 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03153-8 Nature Research and The Estée Lauder Companies honour two initiatives to encourage girls and young women in the United States, Ghana, Nigeria and Pakistan.

28d

The Atlantic

12K

Why Turkey Treated Trump's Letter as Trash

When Fox News' Trish Regan first reported President Donald Trump's October 9 letter to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, some journalists and pundits wondered whether it was a joke or a hoax. But the White House confirmed: It was genuine. "History will look upon you favorably if you get this done the right and humane way. It will look upon you forever as the devil if good things don't happe

28d

NYT > Science

2K

A Nazi Version of DDT Was Forgotten. Could It Help Fight Malaria?

Scientists have rediscovered a compound developed by German researchers during World War II. It appears to be more effective and perhaps safer than DDT.

28d

ScienceDaily

32

DEET gives humans an 'invisibilty cloak' to fend off mosquito bites

Since its invention during the Second World War for soldiers stationed in countries where malaria transmission rates were high, researchers have worked to pinpoint precisely how DEET actually affects mosquitoes.

28d

ScienceDaily

28

Faulty signalling pathway linked to congenital heart condition

Faulty signalling pathway causes the heart to develop unnaturally while in the embryo stage, according to Duke-NUS Medical School researchers.

28d

ScienceDaily

57

Financial hardship in cancer: The role of health insurance literacy

A new study links health insurance literacy with medical financial hardship as well as non-medical financial sacrifices among adult cancer survivors in the United States.

28d

ScienceDaily

2K

Daily exposure to blue light may accelerate aging, even if it doesn't reach your eyes

Prolonged exposure to blue light, such as that which emanates from your phone, computer and household fixtures, could be affecting your longevity, even if it's not shining in your eyes. New research suggests that the blue wavelengths produced by light-emitting diodes damage cells in the brain as well as retinas, according to a new study in a model organism.

28d

Livescience.com

7K

Ancient 'Cockroaches of the Sea' Fossilized While Playing 'Follow the Leader'

Trilobites fossilized in Morocco seem to have been buried by a storm as they marched in an orderly queue.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Figuring out Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's disease and the accompanying personality breakdown frighten many of us. Unfortunately, the drugs currently available are ineffective. Thanks to the work of a team headed by Dr. Piotr Pieta of the IPC PAS, it may be possible to develop new and more effective pharmaceuticals to fight this disease. The scientists have shown how the size of beta-amyloid molecules affects the way they inter

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Double layer of graphene helps to control spin currents

In order to make transistors that operate using the spin of electrons, rather than their charge, it is necessary to find a way of switching spin currents on and off. Furthermore, the lifetime of the spins should at least be equal to the time taken for these electrons to travel through a circuit. University of Groningen scientists have now taken an important step forward by creating a device that m

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stormy cluster weather could unleash black hole power and explain lack of cosmic cooling

'Weather' in clusters of galaxies may explain a longstanding puzzle, according to a team of researchers at the University of Cambridge. The scientists used sophisticated simulations to show how powerful jets from supermassive black holes are disrupted by the motion of hot gas and galaxies, preventing gas from cooling, which could otherwise form stars. The team publish their work in the journal Mon

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

300+

Deet gives humans an 'invisibilty cloak' to fend off mosquito bites

Since its invention during the Second World War for soldiers stationed in countries where malaria transmission rates were high, researchers have worked to pinpoint precisely how DEET actually affects mosquitos.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Aspirin use after biliary tract cancer diagnosis

Researchers in this observational study examined if aspirin use after a diagnosis of a biliary tract cancer, which includes gallbladder cancer, was associated with reduced risk of death among nearly 3,000 patients.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Examining depression, postoperative regret after major head/neck surgery

Researchers investigated whether frail or elderly patients with head and neck cancer have worse depression or higher rates of regret after surgery.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Exposure to secondhand smoke associated with eye differences among children

About 1,400 young children in Hong Kong had eye exams to see if those exposed to secondhand smoke at home had differences in choroidal thickness, a layer of the eye that contains blood vessels and connective tissue, compared to children not exposed to smoke.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study reveals fundamental insight into how memory changes with age

New research from King's College London and The Open University could help explain why memory in old age is much less flexible than in young adulthood. Through experiments in mice the researchers discovered that there were dramatic differences in how memories were stored in old age, compared to young adulthood.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers discover how left-right information is integrated to correct organ positioning

Scientists from the Instituto de Neurociencias CSIC-UMH in Alicante, Spain, under the supervision of Professor Angela Nieto, have discovered the molecular mechanism that ensures the right equilibrium needed in left-right signaling cascade during development for the correct leftward positioning of the heart.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

BARseq builds a better brain map

A brain mapping technique called BARseq is capable of mapping thousands of neurons in a single mouse, at single neuron resolution, while also detailing which neuron expresses what genes. It could be a game-changer for how neuroscientists look at brains.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stem cell study offers new way to study early development and pregnancy

For the first time, researchers at the Salk Institute and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have created mouse blastocyst-like structures, or 'blastoids,' from a single cultured cell. The work could help advance research into development as well as inform issues around pregnancy, infertility, or health problems later in the offspring's life.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Collective behavior 480 million years ago

Researchers studied fossilized Moroccan Ampyx trilobites, which lived 480 million years ago and showed that the trilobites had probably been buried in their positions — all oriented in the same direction. Scientists deduced that these Ampyx processions may illustrate a kind of collective behavior adopted in response to cyclic environmental disturbances.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Paleontology: 480-million-year-old arthropods formed orderly queues

Fossils of ancient arthropods discovered in linear formation may indicate a collective behavior either in response to environmental cues or as part of seasonal reproductive migration. The findings, which are being published in Scientific Reports this week, suggest that group behaviors comparable to those of modern animals existed as early as 480 million years ago.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Phylogenetic analysis forces rethink of termite evolution

Despite their important ecological role as decomposers, termites are often overlooked in research. Evolutionary biologists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have constructed a new family tree for this unassuming insect brood, shedding unexpected light on its evolutionary history.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers identify targeted therapy that can help children with deadly nerve cancer

Mount Sinai researchers have identified a targeted therapy for adolescent patients with neuroblastoma, a deadly pediatric nerve cancer, who would otherwise have no treatment options, according to a study published in October in Cancer Cell.

28d

The Atlantic

300+

A Hidden World of Strange Starfish-Like Creatures in the Abyss

Earlier this year, a Belgian company planned to drop a giant underwater Roomba from the side of a ship, in search of treasure. The 27-ton machine was to be deployed into the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ), where the miles-deep seafloor is spotted with dark, fist-size nodules of manganese and other valuable metals. There, the machine would sweep across the sand and, luck willing, suck up nodules, i

28d

Science News Daily

Ford partners with Volkswagen, Amazon to build charging network for cars

Ford Motor Co said on Thursday it was teaming up with Volkswagen AG and Amazon.com to give its future electric car customers a range of charging options from highways to homes.

28d

Science News Daily

Meet 'le blob' Paris zoo's new star attraction

The Paris zoo's latest attraction is a brainless, eyeless, single-celled organism with no limbs or stomach but more than 700 genders.

28d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

30

Efficient synthesis of ginkgo compound could lead to new drugs, 'green' insecticides

Chemists have invented an efficient method for making a synthetic version of the plant compound bilobalide, which is naturally produced by gingko trees. It's a significant feat because bilobalide — and closely related compounds — hold potential commercial value as medicines and 'green' insecticides.

28d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

43

Breaking water molecules apart to generate clean fuel: Investigating a promising material

Scientists investigated a material that uses sunlight for splitting water molecules (H2O) to obtain dihydrogen (H2). Since dihydrogen can be used as clean fuel, this study provides relevant insight for researchers dealing with clean energy generation.

28d

New Scientist

1K

Early mouse fetuses generated without sperm or eggs for first time

For the first time, artificial mouse embryos have started growing into early fetuses, but we are still a long way off making babies without sperm or eggs

28d

Phys.org

Ending poverty will take greater focus on people living with it, researcher finds

Poverty-focused groups including government agencies trying to help people living in poverty need to make a systemic cultural change to connect more meaningfully with them and develop better policies, according to a University of Alberta master's student.

28d

NYT > Science

500+

Trilobite Fossils Show Conga Line Frozen for 480 Million Years

The orderly collection of ancient arthropods suggests that complex social behavior goes way back in the history of life on Earth.

28d

NYT > Science

6K

Taking Ayahuasca When You're a Senior Citizen

Some older adults are dabbling in this powerful psychedelic, which is mostly illegal in the United States.

28d

Science Magazine

480-million-year-old trilobite 'traffic jams' may reveal ancient migratory behavior

The ancient arthropods give new meaning to the phrase "pick-up line"

28d

Science and technology

500+

How to make use of all of a tree

A giant Finnish timber mill explores sustainable forestry

28d

Science and technology

300+

How to reveal a country's sense, over the years, of its own well-being

Read its books. By computer

28d

Science and technology

500+

Trilobites marched across the seabed in single file

They used long spines to stay in contact

28d

Science and technology

1K

In rats, cannabis during pregnancy rewires the brains of offspring

Human mothers take note

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What happens under the Yellowstone Volcano

A recent study by Bernhard Steinberger of the German GeoForschungsZentrum and colleagues in the USA helps to better understand the processes in the Earth's interior beneath the Yellowstone supervolcano. The paper will soon appear in the journal 'Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems' published by the American Geophysical Union. It is based on modelling the Earth's mantle.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nature-based solutions can help protect us from climate-related natural hazards

Solutions found in nature should be our first line of defense against the increasing number of climate change-related natural disasters, say experts from the University of Surrey.

28d

ScienceDaily

Sexual selection alone could spark formation of new species

Because of imprinted preferences, strawberry poison frog females mate more with similar colored males, and less with differently colored males. Over time, the behavior could lead to two color types becoming separate species.

28d

ScienceDaily

24

3D printed chocolate without temperature control

A new approach to the 3D printing of chocolate using cold extrusion instead of conventional hot-melt extrusion method eliminates the need for stringent temperature controls, offering wider potential for 3D printing temperature-sensitive food.

28d

ScienceDaily

200+

Treatment of metabolic dysfunction could be a potential therapy for Alzheimer's disease

A team of researchers has found evidence that metabolic dysfunction is a primary cause of Alzheimer's disease.

28d

ScienceDaily

Always on beat: Ultrashort flashes of light under optical control

Ultrashort laser pulses have enabled scientists and physicians to carry out high-precision material analyses and medical procedures. Physicists have now discovered a new method for adjusting the extremely short time intervals between laser flashes with exceptional speed and precision. The intervals can be increased or decreased as needed, all at the push of a button. Potential applications range f

28d

ScienceDaily

Deep water sites off the US northeast coast are suitable for offshore blue mussel farms

Offshore mussel farm sites need to have the right temperature, food availability, and the right currents. According to a study, several suitable locations can be found off the Northeastern US.

28d

ScienceDaily

20

Photosynthesis Olympics: Can the best wheat varieties be even better?

Scientists have put elite wheat varieties through a sort of 'Photosynthesis Olympics' to find which varieties have the best performing photosynthesis. This could ultimately help grain growers to get more yield for less inputs in the farm.

28d

ScienceDaily

26

Efficient synthesis of ginkgo compound could lead to new drugs, 'green' insecticides

Chemists have invented an efficient method for making a synthetic version of the plant compound bilobalide, which is naturally produced by gingko trees. It's a significant feat because bilobalide — and closely related compounds — hold potential commercial value as medicines and 'green' insecticides.

28d

ScienceDaily

32

Breaking water molecules apart to generate clean fuel: Investigating a promising material

Scientists investigated a material that uses sunlight for splitting water molecules (H2O) to obtain dihydrogen (H2). Since dihydrogen can be used as clean fuel, this study provides relevant insight for researchers dealing with clean energy generation.

28d

ScienceDaily

57

Hubble observes first confirmed interstellar comet

Hubble has given astronomers their best look yet at an interstellar visitor — comet 2I/Borisov — whose speed and trajectory indicate it has come from beyond our solar system. Comet 2I/Borisov is only the second such interstellar object known to have passed through the solar system.

28d

Futurity.org

85

Our spit reflects cooking, farming, and not licking each other

Eating meat and cooked food for two million years may have helped humans shift further from our great ape relatives. The evidence is in our saliva, according to new research. The research shows that the human diet—a result of increased meat consumption, cooking, and agriculture—has led to stark differences in the saliva of humans compared to that of other primates. Human saliva is unique in that

28d

Phys.org

Researchers discover how left-right information is integrated to correct organ positioning

Scientists from the Instituto de Neurociencias CSIC-UMH in Alicante, Spain, under the supervision of Professor Angela Nieto, have discovered the molecular mechanism that ensures equilibrium in left-right signaling cascades during development for the correct leftward positioning of the heart.

28d

Phys.org

21

Phylogenetic analysis forces rethink of termite evolution

Despite their important ecological role as decomposers, termites are often overlooked in research. Evolutionary biologists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have constructed a new family tree for this unassuming insect brood, shedding unexpected light on its evolutionary history.

28d

Phys.org

13K

Queuing for eternity: Fossils show lining up is primal urge

Ever felt like you've been queuing forever?

28d

Phys.org

1K

Meet 'le blob' Paris zoo's new star attraction

The Paris zoo's latest attraction is a brainless, eyeless, single-celled organism with no limbs or stomach but more than 700 genders.

28d

The Scientist RSS

1K

Proposed Deep-Sea Mining Zone Harbors Previously Unknown Species

The discovery of ancient clades of brittle stars at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean adds to concerns that commercial exploitation of the area could destroy numerous taxa before they've even been identified.

28d

The Scientist RSS

100+

Early Embryo Models Generated from Mouse Stem Cells

Extended pluripotent stem cells from mice can self-organize to form blastocyst-like structures called blastoids that enable a closer look at early mammalian development.

28d

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

3K

How a handful of fishing villages sparked a marine conservation revolution | Alasdair Harris

We need a radically new approach to ocean conservation, says marine biologist and TED Fellow Alasdair Harris. In a visionary talk, he lays out a surprising solution to the problem of overfishing that could both revive marine life and rebuild local fisheries — all by taking less from the ocean. "When we design it right, marine conservation reaps dividends that go far beyond protecting nature," he

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Researchers discover how left-right information is integrated to correct organ positioning

Scientists from the Instituto de Neurociencias CSIC-UMH in Alicante, Spain, under the supervision of Professor Angela Nieto, have discovered the molecular mechanism that ensures equilibrium in left-right signaling cascades during development for the correct leftward positioning of the heart.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

23

Phylogenetic analysis forces rethink of termite evolution

Despite their important ecological role as decomposers, termites are often overlooked in research. Evolutionary biologists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have constructed a new family tree for this unassuming insect brood, shedding unexpected light on its evolutionary history.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

1K

Meet 'le blob' Paris zoo's new star attraction

The Paris zoo's latest attraction is a brainless, eyeless, single-celled organism with no limbs or stomach but more than 700 genders.

28d

Phys.org

Bosses face more discrimination if they are women – from employees of any gender

Imagine that your boss Ethan calls you into his office. He expresses disappointment in your recent performance and lack of commitment. How would you react? Accept the feedback and put in more effort? Would you pout in your office and start looking for a new job?

28d

Phys.org

22

Controlling ion recognition in reactive host-guest systems

Sometimes a molecule can only undergo a particular chemical reaction if it forms a so-called host-guest complex together with another molecule—the two molecules are then bound together not by covalent bonds but by intermolecular forces. What happens is that first, the host recognizes the guest, after which it can chemically react and become another molecule.

28d

Phys.org

Deep water sites off the US northeast coast are suitable for offshore blue mussel farms

Offshore mussel farm sites need to have the right temperature, food availability, and the right currents. According to a study by researchers at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, several suitable locations can be found off the Northeastern U.S.

28d

Phys.org

38

Efficient synthesis of ginkgo compound could lead to new drugs, 'green' insecticides

Chemists at Scripps Research have invented an efficient method for making a synthetic version of the plant compound bilobalide, which is naturally produced by gingko trees. It's a significant feat because bilobalide—and closely related compounds—hold potential commercial value as medicines and "green" insecticides.

28d

Phys.org

Changes in photochemical reflectance index can be used to monitor crop condition

Currently, agriculture remains one of the most labor-intensive and vital sectors of human activity. For Lobachevsky University scientists, increasing its efficiency is one of their research priorities that requires the development of new methods and approaches, including methods for remote monitoring of the crops.

28d

Phys.org

39

Breaking water molecules apart to generate clean fuel: Investigating a promising material

In line with the increasing global concerns about the state of our planet, perfecting the technology for alternative energy generation has become a hot topic among researchers worldwide. Among the many techniques being investigated to generate clean energy, water splitting is a very promising one. In particular, water (H2O) can be split to obtain dihydrogen (H2) by using solar energy; this is know

28d

Phys.org

300+

Discovery leads to ultrasensistive way to measure light

A team of UO physicists has drummed up a new way of measuring light: using microscopic drums to hear light.

28d

Phys.org

21

Chasing nanoplastics

How dangerous are micro- and nanoplastics? Do they affect the environment? What harm can they do to our bodies? Questions that we can now finally answer because of Fazel Abdolahpur Monikh. Together with his colleagues, he developed a method to detect and quantify nano-sized plastics. Their paper has been published in the journal Environmental Pollution.

28d

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

38

Efficient synthesis of ginkgo compound could lead to new drugs, 'green' insecticides

Chemists at Scripps Research have invented an efficient method for making a synthetic version of the plant compound bilobalide, which is naturally produced by gingko trees. It's a significant feat because bilobalide—and closely related compounds—hold potential commercial value as medicines and "green" insecticides.

28d

Wired

100+

Showtime Is Making a Limited Series About Uber

Also, Zoë Kravitz is going to play Catwoman, and there's a new trailer for the final season of 'The Man in the High Castle'.

28d

ScienceDaily

44

Drug treats inflammation associated with genetic heart disease

When young athletes experiences sudden cardiac death as they run down the playing field, it's usually due to arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), an inherited heart disease. Now, researchers have shed new light on the role of the immune system in the progression of ACM and, in the process, discovered a new drug that might help prevent ACM disease symptoms and progression to heart failure in some p

28d

ScienceDaily

20

Old friends and new enemies: How evolutionary history can predict insect invader impacts

Scientists have developed a model that could help foresters predict which nonnative insect invasions will be most problematic. This could help managers decide where to allocate resources to avoid widespread tree death.

28d

ScienceDaily

28

Why some US football players have higher cardiovascular risk

Research has shown that while elite athletes overall are at decreased risk of death from cardiovascular problems, a certain group of athletes — football linemen in the United States — actually have higher risk than the general population than other elite athletes.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Deep water sites off the US northeast coast are suitable for offshore blue mussel farms

Offshore mussel farm sites need to have the right temperature, food availability, and the right currents. According to a study by researchers at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, several suitable locations can be found off the Northeastern U.S.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Changes in photochemical reflectance index can be used to monitor crop condition

Currently, agriculture remains one of the most labor-intensive and vital sectors of human activity. For Lobachevsky University scientists, increasing its efficiency is one of their research priorities that requires the development of new methods and approaches, including methods for remote monitoring of the crops.

28d

Phys.org

First method to differentiate the four egg types

In the European Union, hen eggs are labeled with a code starting with numerals 0, 1, 2 or 3, depending on whether the hens are organically produced, free-range, floor-raised or caged, respectively. Now, researchers at the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain) have developed a technique to distinguish them with 100 percent accuracy by analysing the lipids of the yolk to detect fraud.

28d

Phys.org

Nature-based solutions should be first line of defense against weather- and climate-related natural hazards

Solutions found in nature should be our first line of defence against the increasing number of climate change-related natural disasters, say experts from the University of Surrey.

28d

Phys.org

68

Study: Racism shortens lives and hurts health of blacks by promoting genes that lead to inflammation and illness

Negative social attitudes, such as racism and discrimination, damage the health of those who are targeted by triggering a cascade of aberrant biological responses, including abnormal gene activity. It is not surprising that reports documenting lifespan and causes of mortality have demonstrated a clear pattern: African Americans die sooner and bear a heavier burden of many diseases, including hyper

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First demonstration of a 1 petabit per second network node

The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) has demonstrated the first large-scale optical switching testbed capable of handling 1 Petabit per second optical signals. This demonstration made use of state-of-the-art large-scale and low-loss optical switches based on MEMS technology, three types of next-generation spatial-division multiplexing fibers, and included data

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A new approach to tackle superbugs

Scientists have uncovered a novel antibiotic-free approach that could help prevent and treat one of the most widespread bacterial pathogens, using nanocapsules made of natural ingredients.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Three research papers published in Nature series journals

Department of Applied Physics of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) contributed 3 research papers that were recently published in the Nature series journals, which are among the most authoritative and recognized scientific journals in the world that publish high-quality research in all fields of science and technology.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Green areas in cities promote wellbeing

Green areas in the inner city can directly improve the wellbeing of urban citizens. This is the result of an interdisciplinary study, in which Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) was involved. According to the study, people with a reduced brain capacity to self-regulate negative feelings benefit most from the green areas. The study combining epidemiology, psychology, neural imaging, and geo in

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dementia and eating disorders: it is a problem of (semantic) memory

Eating disorders shown by patients with dementia are characterised by a vast range of behaviours that span from preference for sugary foods, binges, increase in appetite, to changes in table manners or in food preferences. This new study confirms the hypothesis that sudden changes in preferences and habits, depend, at least in part, on degeneration of semantic memory, opening up interesting perspe

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Physicists develop fast and sensitive mechanical tool to measure light

Physicists at the University of Oregon developed a fast and sensitive mechanical tool to measure light, which is the subject of an Oct. 17 paper published in Nature Communications. The graphene nanomechanical bolometer is the fastest and most sensitive in its class. It is poised to detect nearly every color of light at high speeds and obtain measurements at and far above room-temperature.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Image analysis to automatically quantify gender bias in movies

Many commercial films worldwide continue to express womanhood in a stereotypical manner, a recent study using image analysis showed. A KAIST research team developed a novel image analysis method for automatically quantifying the degree of gender bias in in films.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

First method to differentiate the four egg types

In the European Union, hen eggs are labeled with a code starting with numerals 0, 1, 2 or 3, depending on whether the hens are organically produced, free-range, floor-raised or caged, respectively. Now, researchers at the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain) have developed a technique to distinguish them with 100 percent accuracy by analysing the lipids of the yolk to detect fraud.

28d

The Atlantic

500+

Why Is America So Obsessed With Ivy League Schools?

We know that elite colleges aren't the only pathway to elite careers. Yet many parents will stop at nothing to gain their children admission to these highly selective institutions. In a new episode of The Idea File , the Atlantic staff writer Adam Harris investigates the American fixation on Ivy League colleges that led to the Varsity Blues college-admissions scandal. Harris also reveals who real

28d

ScienceDaily

37

New effective vaccines for Lyme disease are coming

There is no effective vaccine currently available to prevent Lyme disease in humans. Experts from academia, government, and industry recently convened to tackle this public health challenge. Now, a new article reiterates the need to stop the infection, and defines a strategy for developing effective vaccines.

28d

ScienceDaily

100+

How do ketogenic diets affect skin inflammation?

Not all fats are equal in how they affect our skin, according to a new study. The investigators found that different ketogenic diets impacted skin inflammation differently in psoriasiform-like skin inflammation in mice. Ketogenic diets heavy in medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) such as coconut, especially in combination with omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil and plant sources like nuts and seeds,

28d

ScienceDaily

79

Frequent drinking is greater risk factor for heart rhythm disorder than binge drinking

Drinking small amounts of alcohol frequently is linked with a higher likelihood of atrial fibrillation than binge drinking, according to new research.

28d

Ingeniøren

Tre smalbåndsnetværk dækker nu hele Danmark

PLUS. Danmark har på få år fået tre forskellige landsdækkende og langtrækkende IoT-netværk, der kører på hver sin transmissionsteknologi. Senest har Cibicom indgået et partnerskab med SEAS-NVE om fælles Lorawan-netværk.

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Science News Daily

Newly proposed privacy bill means Big Tech executives could go to jail if their companies break the law

When Mark Zuckerberg publicly asked governments to regulate tech firms, he probably didn't have personal accountability in mind. For all the talk about a more privacy-focused Facebook, the CEO …

28d

The Atlantic

300+

The Washington Nationals' Persistence Paid Off

The Washington Nationals took the fast track to ignominy. Baseball lore favors longer-cultivated curses: the Boston Red Sox's 86 years between World Series championships, the Chicago Cubs' 108. But the Nationals, established in 2005 when the Montreal Expos moved to D.C. (the team stretches back to 1969 in technical terms only), have stuffed their 15 seasons with heartbreak. Early promise, via the

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Controlling ion recognition in reactive host-guest systems

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society that in reactive host-guest systems, both the molecular recognition and the chemical reaction can happen first. Moreover, it is possible to make the order dependent on the guest ion, a discovery that may be relevant for drug-delivery applications.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Always on beat: ultrashort flashes of light under optical control

Ultrashort laser pulses have enabled scientists and physicians to carry out high-precision material analyses and medical procedures. Physicists from the Universities of Bayreuth and Göttingen have now discovered a new method for adjusting the extremely short time intervals between laser flashes with exceptional speed and precision. The intervals can be increased or decreased as needed, all at the

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

38

Daily exposure to blue light may accelerate aging, even if it doesn't reach your eyes

Prolonged exposure to blue light, such as that which emanates from your phone, computer and household fixtures, could be affecting your longevity, even if it's not shining in your eyes.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Financial hardship in cancer: The role of health insurance literacy

A new American Cancer Society study links health insurance literacy with medical financial hardship as well as non-medical financial sacrifices among adult cancer survivors in the United States.

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Phys.org

29

Biofuels that could be made from seawater

Researchers from the University of Manchester are using synthetic biology to explore a more efficient way to produce the next generation of biobased jet fuels—partly made from seawater.

28d

Phys.org

Data milestone achieved in variable star repository

Compiling together multiple pieces of information for each of a million-plus objects is no easy or quick task, but that is exactly what Sebastián Otero, Patrick Wils, Patrick Schmeer, and Klaus Bernhard did. Due to this skilled team providing tremendous amounts of time, patience, and attention to detail, data and updated information on 1,391,103 variable stars (and counting) are now entered into t

28d

Phys.org

29

Ants fight plant diseases

New research from Aarhus University shows that ants inhibit at least 14 plant diseases. Ants secrete antibiotics from glands in the body. On their legs and body, they also host colonies of bacteria that secrete antibiotics. It is probably these substances that inhibit a number of diseases, and researchers now hope to find biological pesticides that may conquer resistant plant diseases.

28d

Phys.org

Research networks can help BRICS countries combat invasive species

BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) should establish more networks of researchers dedicated to invasion science if they wish to curb the spread of invasive species within and outside of their borders. This is one of the major recommendations of an international study published in the Journal PLoS Biology recently.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

25

Biofuels that could be made from seawater

Researchers from the University of Manchester are using synthetic biology to explore a more efficient way to produce the next generation of biobased jet fuels—partly made from seawater.

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

29

Ants fight plant diseases

New research from Aarhus University shows that ants inhibit at least 14 plant diseases. Ants secrete antibiotics from glands in the body. On their legs and body, they also host colonies of bacteria that secrete antibiotics. It is probably these substances that inhibit a number of diseases, and researchers now hope to find biological pesticides that may conquer resistant plant diseases.

28d

Wired

1K

The Quest to Get Photos of the USSR's First Space Shuttle

French photographer Jonk snuck into Baikonur spaceport in Kazakhstan to capture images of the Buran shuttle.

28d

Phys.org

Reducing open-circuit voltage loss in organic solar cells

Researchers at Institute for Molecular Science in Japan report that organic solar cells (OSCs) with high mobility and highly crystalline donor (D) and acceptor (A) materials were able to reduce an open-circuit voltage (VOC) loss. The origin of the high VOC was that the highly crystalline D/A interface reduced the energy loss related to charge recombination. The results demonstrate that careful des

28d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Research networks can help BRICS countries combat invasive species

BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) should establish more networks of researchers dedicated to invasion science if they wish to curb the spread of invasive species within and outside of their borders. This is one of the major recommendations of an international study published in the Journal PLoS Biology recently.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Changes in photochemical reflectance index can be used to monitor crop condition

Currently, agriculture remains one of the most labor-intensive and vital sectors of human activity. For Lobachevsky University scientists, increasing its efficiency is one of their research priorities that requires the development of new methods and approaches, including methods for remote monitoring of the crops.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

Treatment of metabolic dysfunction could be a potential therapy for Alzheimer's disease

A team of researchers led by Yale-NUS College has found evidence that metabolic dysfunction is a primary cause of Alzheimer's disease.

28d

Singularity Hub

300+

Algorithms Are Designed to Addict Us, and the Consequences Go Beyond Wasted Time

Goethe's The Sorcerer's Apprentice is a classic example of many stories in a similar theme. The young apprentice enchants a broom to mop the floor, avoiding some work in the process. But the enchantment quickly spirals out of control: the broom, mono-maniacally focused on its task but unconscious of the consequences, ends up flooding the room. The classic fear surrounding hypothetical, superintel

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Scientific American Content

1K

NASA Just Unveiled the Space Suit to be Worn by the First Woman on the Moon

Meet the xEMU spacesuit—and a new suit for the Orion spacecraft, too — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28d

Futurity.org

58

4 ways to support people dealing with colorism

Discrimination based on skin-tone, or colorism, can take a toll on the health and relationships of African Americans, research suggests. "For a long time, colorism has been considered a 'dirty little secret,'" says Antoinette Landor, assistant professor of human development and family science at the University of Missouri. "Our recent research illustrates the need to unmask skin-tone wounds and p

28d

Futurity.org

System aims to alert you about drug-drug interactions

A machine learning system may be able to warn doctors and patients about possible negative side effects from drug-drug interactions. The more medications a patient takes, the greater the likelihood that interactions between those drugs could trigger negative side effects, including long-term organ damage or even death. For the study, researchers designed an algorithm that analyzes data on drug-dr

28d

Phys.org

200+

HiRISE views NASA's InSight and Curiosity on Mars

The HiRISE camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter recently sent home eye-catching views of the agency's InSight lander and its Curiosity rover.

28d

Phys.org

Gold exploration with 3-D controlled-source electromagnetic method

Russian mathematicians and geophysicists have made a standard technique for ore prospecting several times more effective. Their findings are reported in Geophysical Journal International.

28d

Phys.org

21

A highly alkaline-stable Co3O4@Co-MOF composite for high-performance electrochemical energy storage

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are formed via self-assembly of metal ions and organic linkers. Due to their superior properties, such as their large surface area, high porosity and structure tunability, MOFs have recently emerged as one type of important porous materials and have attracted intense interest in many fields, such as gas storage and separation, catalysis, and energy storage. Neverthe

28d

Phys.org

33

Ultrafast particle interactions could make quantum information devices feasible

Energy is information. Lengthening the time during which a system is capable of retaining energy before losing it to the local environment is a key goal for the development of quantum information. This interval is called the "coherence time." Several studies have been performed with the aim of retarding decoherence.

28d

Science | Smithsonian

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What It Was Like to Become the First Woman to Pilot and Command a Space Shuttle

Eileen Collins talked to Smithsonian about her career in the Air Force and NASA, women in aerospace and more

28d

Phys.org

Researchers observe metal to metal oxide progression

A catalyst's utility is influenced by its surface charge and how that charge is transferred. Until recently, studying charge transfer has relied on complex imaging techniques that are both expensive and time-consuming. Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) report an approach for studying charge transfer that does not rely on complicated equipment—

28d

Phys.org

31

Computer models show clear advantages in new types of wind turbines

Researchers have modeled the fluid dynamics of multi-rotor wind turbines, and how they interact in wind farms. The research demonstrates a clear advantage for a turbine model with four rotors.

28d

Phys.org

Tailings dumped into Portman Bay continue to release metals into the sea 25 years later

Twenty-five years after the cessation of local mining activity, the waters of the Mediterranean Sea are still contaminated with dissolved metals from mining waste deposited in Portmán Bay (Murcia). A study by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB), in collaboration with UB researchers, shows that the sea continues

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Efficient synthesis of ginkgo compound could lead to new drugs, 'green' insecticides

Chemists at Scripps Research have invented an efficient method for making a synthetic version of the plant compound bilobalide, which is naturally produced by gingko trees. It's a significant feat because bilobalide — and closely related compounds — hold potential commercial value as medicines and 'green' insecticides.

28d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Breaking water molecules apart to generate clean fuel: Investigating a promising material

Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) investigated a material that uses sunlight for splitting water molecules (H2O) to obtain dihydrogen (H2). Since dihydrogen can be used as clean fuel, this study provides relevant insight for researchers dealing with clean energy generation.

28d

Phys.org

Is healthcare the new 'manufacturing' when it comes to good jobs?

A new study from the University of Minnesota and Villanova University examined "good jobs" (i.e., decent wages, access to health benefits, regular hours and job security) for low- and middle-skill workers across industries, with a focus on health care sector jobs, which are on the rise and female-dominated, and manufacturing jobs, which are on the decline and male-dominated.

28d

The Atlantic

1K

Johnson Promised Brexit—But May Deliver Engxit

LONDON —Just before lunchtime on October 17, 2019, Britain and the European Union announced a deal on a smooth British exit from the EU. This is the second such deal in less than a year. The previous deal was rejected by Parliament and capsized the career of former Prime Minister Theresa May. Will this new deal come to a happier conclusion? And what is happiness in this context anyway? The new ag

28d

Inside Science

Mysterious Star's Flickering May Be Masked by Dust and Gas from Disintegrating Moons

Researchers find plausible, alien-free explanation for observations of star KIC 8462852. 1280px-PIA22081-KIC8462852-TabbysStar-UnevenDustRing-Illustration-20171004_cropped.jpg An artist's conception of KIC 8462852 surrounded by a ring of dust. Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech Rights information: public domain Space Thursday, October 17, 2019 – 09:30 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) –

28d

Phys.org

We must go beyond singular responses in the fight against child poverty

Two-thirds of children in sub-Saharan Africa face all manners of hardship. These include poor living conditions, low educational outcomes, high levels of malnutrition and often high risks of exposure to different forms of violence. One in five children in sub-Saharan Africa are estimated to grow up in extreme "monetary" poverty, meaning they live in families without adequate incomes to make basic

28d

Phys.org

100+

Research group suggests major changes for UK to reach net zero carbon emissions by 2050

A group of researchers at Imperial College, selected by Britain's Committee on Climate Change (CCC), has submitted its report, according to the BBC. The group was tasked with looking into what the U.K. must do to reach its goal of cutting carbon emissions to net zero by 2050. In accepting the report and giving the BBC a look at it, members of the CCC noted the report did not necessarily reflect th

28d

Phys.org

200+

A new theory to explain how the dunes on Titan formed

A trio of researchers with the University of Hawaii has developed a new theory to explain how the dunes on Saturn's largest moon, Titan, may have formed. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Matthew Abplanalp, Robert Frigge and Ralf Kaiser suggest that rather than forming from rainfall, the dunes have formed on the moon's surface.

28d

Scientific American Content

100+

The U.S. Should Tighten Vaccination Mandates

Existing religious and philosophical exemptions endanger public health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28d

Sciencemag

The Return of Kekulene

Kekulene! This is one of those molecules that someone who's learning organic chemistry might sketch out on a whiteboard, wondering if it really exists. It does, but it's not like we have a lot of recent information about it. There was a preparation of it in 1978 (from the Staab group at the Max-Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg), but that one-off is it for experimental data. As

28d

Scientific American Blog Posts

94

How Can We Curb the Spread of Scientific Racism?

A new book examines the insidious effects of scientific investigations into race — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

28d

Phys.org

500+

Study reveals how collapse of protein processes is driver of aging and death

Cells undergo natural aging and death, processes that impact a multitude of cellular factors. A new Stony Brook University-led study, to be published in PNAS, provides a biophysical model that reveals how damage accumulates in the shapes of cellular proteins with age and is a trigger to death. The finding opens a door to a better understanding of the molecular origins of age-related neurodegenerat

28d

Phys.org

Bosses who think only about the bottom line may invite unethical behavior

Doing business with a tunnel-vision focus on the bottom line can lead to dysfunction and unethical conduct in the workplace, but a research study co-authored by Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations Professor Rebecca Greenbaum reveals why some CEO's and organizations are willing to take the chance: sometimes it pays off.

28d

Phys.org

20

Parental gender attitudes associated with Japanese girls' reduced university participation

A group of University of Tokyo researchers and their colleagues suggest that stereotypical gender role attitudes and negative images of STEM fields of Japanese parents may be associated with girls' reduced university participation. Providing more information to parents about potential career paths in certain fields after university may be one way to overcome this hurdle.

28d

Phys.org

The 2016 election did not increase political polarization

You'd be hard-pressed to find someone who would disagree that American politics are highly partisan. Partisanship has been on the rise since the 1970s, and the consensus among the media seems to be that political polarization has skyrocketed since the beginning of the campaign season for the 2016 presidential election.

28d

Phys.org

400+

Stormy cluster weather could unleash black hole power and explain lack of cosmic cooling

"Weather" in clusters of galaxies may explain a longstanding puzzle, according to a team of researchers at the University of Cambridge. The scientists used sophisticated simulations to show how powerful jets from supermassive black holes are disrupted by the motion of hot gas and galaxies, preventing gas from cooling, which could otherwise form stars. The team publish their work in the journal Mon

28d

Phys.org

Photosynthesis Olympics: Can the best wheat varieties be even better?

Scientists have put elite wheat varieties through a sort of "Photosynthesis Olympics" to find which varieties have the best performing photosynthesis. This could ultimately help grain growers to get more yield for less inputs in the farm.

28d

Phys.org

Cats are not scared off by dingoes. We must find another way to protect Australian animals

Feral cats are wreaking havoc on our native wildlife, eating more than a billion animals across Australia every year. But managing feral cats and reducing their impacts on our threatened species is challenging, to say the least.

28d

Phys.org

Structural protein essential for ciliary harmony in comb jellies

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba's Shimoda Marine Research Center and the Japanese National Institute for Basic Biology have identified a protein that keeps millions of tiny surface organelles moving in harmony to control the gliding locomotion of ctenophores.

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