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nyheder2019oktober20

24d

ScienceDaily

24

Novel method turns any 3D object into a cubic style

Computer scientists have developed a computational method to quantify an abstract cubic style. Additionally, their method also enables users to create new shapes that resemble the input shape and exhibit the cubic style.

24d

Science | The Guardian

400+

The Guardian view on Extinction Rebellion: numbers alone won't create change | Editorial

People being in the streets isn't effective without a strategy, and XR needs a clearer one for what could be years of non-violent struggle The speed and size of the Extinction Rebellion (XR) protests over the past year add weight to the idea that people in this decade were in revolt before they had any clear idea what form a revolution might take. Politically it has long looked like a whole genera

24d

BBC News – Science & Environment

3K

Climate change: Widespread drying of European peatlands

Scientists call for urgent action to prevent peatlands drying out and releasing vast stores of carbon.

24d

Livescience.com

100+

The 1st Human on Mars May Be a Woman, NASA Chief Says

It won't be long before we see the first woman on Mars, and she just might beat the first man there, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said Friday (Oct. 18).

24d

The Scientist RSS

How single cell proteomics data can drive CAR-Treg-based therapies—an interview with Leonardo Ferreira

Leonardo Ferreira, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco, discusses the application of single cell proteomics data to understanding the function and therapeutic potential of genetically engineered regulatory T cells.

24d

ScienceDaily

40

A tiny cavity leads to a strong interaction between light and matter

Researchers have succeeded in creating an efficient quantum-mechanical light-matter interface using a microscopic cavity. Within this cavity, a single photon is emitted and absorbed up to 10 times by an artificial atom. This opens up new prospects for quantum technology.

24d

ScienceDaily

24

Model system for distribution of more accurate time signals

Physicists have demonstrated the first next-generation 'time scale' — a system that incorporates data from multiple atomic clocks to produce a single highly accurate timekeeping signal for distribution. The new time scale outperforms the best existing hubs for disseminating official time worldwide and offers the possibility of providing more accurate time to millions of customers such as financia

24d

ScienceDaily

47

New CRISPR genome editing system offers a wide range of versatility in human cells

A team has developed a new CRISPR genome-editing approach by combining two of the most important proteins in molecular biology — CRISPR-Cas9 and a reverse transcriptase — into a single machine.

24d

ScienceDaily

50

How the mouse X and Y chromosomes compete with each other to control offspring

New research presents the first demonstration of a specific difference in sperm function associated with sex ratio skewing.

24d

ScienceDaily

32

Unique brain changes in people with Huntington's disease

The part of the brain that selectively degenerates in people with Huntington's disease (HD), called the striatum, is almost entirely destroyed in the late stages of the disease. Brain samples from mutant HD gene positive individuals who had not yet developed symptoms by time of death are extremely rare. As a consequence, very little is known about the active disease process that causes the devasta

24d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

28

New CRISPR genome editing system offers a wide range of versatility in human cells

A team has developed a new CRISPR genome-editing approach by combining two of the most important proteins in molecular biology — CRISPR-Cas9 and a reverse transcriptase — into a single machine.

24d

Futurism

200+

Scientists Made Mice Live 12% Longer by Hacking Their Telomeres

A team of researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center have managed to extend the average lifespan of lab mice by more than 12 percent by cultivating embryonic cells in a special way, according to Science Alert — no genetic modification required. They looked at a natural process that's linked to aging: the strands of nucleotide sequences at the end of each chromosome, called telomer

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antarctic ice cliffs may not contribute to sea-level rise as much as predicted

In a paper published in Geophysical Research Letters, researchers report that in order for a 90-meter ice cliff to collapse entirely, the ice shelves supporting the cliff would have to break apart extremely quickly, within a matter of hours — a rate of ice loss that has not been observed in the modern record.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Large-scale afforestation of African savannas will destroy valuable ecosystems

In a technical comment, published in Science, a group of 46 scientists from around the world argue that the suggested afforestation of large areas of Africa to mitigate climate change will destroy valuable ecological, agricultural, and tourist areas, while doing little to reduce global CO2 levels. The technical comment is a critique of another recent paper in Science, led by Jean-Francois Bastin a

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Pinpointing biomolecules with nanometer accuracy

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) demonstrate a new approach in fluorescence microscopy that can be used to locate individual biomolecules in 3D space with nanometer-scale precision.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Resistance to last resort drug arose in patient over 3 weeks

French investigators have described development of resistance to one of the last resort therapies used to treat extremely drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. That resistance arose in a single patient over a scant 22 days. They subsequently identified the single nucleotide mutation in P. aeruginosa that caused the resistance.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

46

The brain's favorite type of music

People prefer songs with only a moderate amount of uncertainty and unpredictability, according to research recently published in JNeurosci.

24d

Science News Daily

Steam's Remote Play Together Now Available In Beta

Earlier this month, Valve teased an upcoming new feature for Steam in the form of Remote Play Together. If you were excited by the feature, you'll be pleased to learn that Valve has since …

24d

Science News Daily

Computer science classes break down cultural barriers, study shows

In a Kenyan refugee camp, a teenaged Burundian boy, a Somali boy and two girls from the Dinka ethnic group in South Sudan worked together to create a rudimentary video game about malaria.

24d

Viden

Google og Amazon godkender apps, der lytter til dig i smug

Techgiganterne har lukket hullet, der gjorde, at smarte højtalere kunne lytte med og snyde sig til dit kodeord.

24d

The Atlantic

1K

Trump's Journey From Double Down to Flip-Flop

Donald Trump's administration has beat a hasty retreat from the mountains of " Get over it " to the deserts of "Never mind." Saturday night, two days after Acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney announced that the administration would host the Group of Seven summit at the president's Trump National Doral resort, the eponymous hotelier abruptly reversed that decision and said he would find a new site

24d

ScienceDaily

54

Computer science classes break down cultural barriers, study shows

Computational education can break down and expose cultural barriers in unexpected ways, a new study has found.

24d

ScienceDaily

100+

Plant physiology will be major contributor to future river flooding

Researchers describe the emerging role of ecophysiology in riparian flooding. As an adaptation to an overabundance of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, trees, plants and grasses constrict their stomatal pores to regulate the amount of the gas they consume, a mechanism that limits the release of water from leaves through evaporation. This saturates soils and causes more efficient run off and river

24d

The Scientist RSS

500+

New "Prime Editing" Method Makes Only Single-Stranded DNA Cuts

In demonstrations in cell lines, the technique has a similar efficacy to CRISPR-Cas9, but fewer off-target effects.

24d

Phys.org

20

Computer science classes break down cultural barriers, study shows

In a Kenyan refugee camp, a teenaged Burundian boy, a Somali boy and two girls from the Dinka ethnic group in South Sudan worked together to create a rudimentary video game about malaria.

24d

Futurism

1K

Dunkin' Donuts Is Rolling out Fake Meat at More Spots Than Any Other Chain

Beyond Breakfast In July, Dunkin' Donuts began offering customers in Manhattan a breakfast sandwich featuring a Beyond Meat sausage patty made from plant-based protein. Soon after, Dunkin' scheduled a nationwide rollout of the Beyond Sausage Sandwich for January. But customers must really be digging the sammie, because the chain has now announced it's accelerating the launch by two months — a mov

24d

Scientific American Content

1K

Rollback of California Car Rules Will Cause Emissions to Spike

Lower fuel economy standards and fewer electric vehicles in the state would threaten global climate targets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

500+

New CRISPR genome editing system offers a wide range of versatility in human cells

A team from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has developed a new CRISPR genome-editing approach by combining two of the most important proteins in molecular biology—CRISPR-Cas9 and a reverse transcriptase—into a single machine.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

How the mouse X and Y chromosomes compete with each other to control offspring

The molecular function of genes in mice has a major influence on the sex of their offspring, according to a new discovery that reveals more about the impact of genes on animal fertility.

24d

Phys.org

500+

New CRISPR genome editing system offers a wide range of versatility in human cells

A team from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has developed a new CRISPR genome-editing approach by combining two of the most important proteins in molecular biology—CRISPR-Cas9 and a reverse transcriptase—into a single machine.

24d

Phys.org

How the mouse X and Y chromosomes compete with each other to control offspring

The molecular function of genes in mice has a major influence on the sex of their offspring, according to a new discovery that reveals more about the impact of genes on animal fertility.

24d

Science News Daily

Preventing cyber security attacks lies in strategic, third-party investments, study finds

Companies interested in protecting themselves and their customers from cyber-attacks need to invest in themselves and the vendors that handle their data, according to new research from American …

24d

Futurism

1K

Scientists Grew Living Mouse Embryos Using Only Stem Cells

For the first time, scientists grew an embryo in a lab using only stem cells — no sperm or eggs required. The mouse embryos weren't perfect, according to OneZero , and none of them developed into living, breathing, lab-grown mice. But the embryo-like blobs of stem cells that were implanted into a mouse's womb did start to develop along the lines of how a typical fetus might. The lab-grown embryos

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA finds Typhoon Bualoi rapidly intensified

Typhoon Bualoi rapidly intensified over 24 hours and quickly developed an eye and powerful thunderstorms.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dartmouth lab introduces the next wave of interactive technology

The next-generation technology from Dartmouth's XDiscovery Lab brings humans even closer to the devices that they rely on for everyday work and play.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lead poisoning reduced with safer mining practices

We report on an extremely successful and novel project to reduce lead poisoning among artisanal gold miners in Nigeria. This report highlights the success of OK International in partnership with Doctors Without Borders to introduce safer mining practices in an area where thousands are severely lead poisoned and where hundreds of deaths have been recorded from acute poisoning. This ongoing tragedy

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Computer science classes break down cultural barriers, study shows

Computational education can break down and expose cultural barriers in unexpected ways, a new study from Cornell University researchers has found.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How the mouse X and Y chromosomes compete with each other to control offspring

New research presents the first demonstration of a specific difference in sperm function associated with sex ratio skewing.

24d

Phys.org

Defining the centromere

The division of cells is a highly-regulated and complex process which requires the organised collaboration of a multitude of different cellular components. Although the basic principles are known, many components and their workings are still unidentified. Scientists from the project group "Kinetochore Biology" at the IPK in Gatersleben are shedding light on the diverse landscape of kinetochores. K

24d

Phys.org

200+

Listening in to how proteins talk and learning their language

Synthetic biologists have taken evolution of proteins into their own hands by changing some that occur in nature or even by synthesizing them from scratch. Such engineered proteins are used as highly efficacious drugs, components of synthetic gene circuits that sense biological signals, or in the production of high-value chemicals in ways that are more effective and sustainable than petroleum-base

24d

Phys.org

42

JILA team demonstrates model system for distribution of more accurate time signals

JILA physicists and collaborators have demonstrated the first next-generation "time scale"—a system that incorporates data from multiple atomic clocks to produce a single highly accurate timekeeping signal for distribution. The JILA time scale outperforms the best existing hubs for disseminating official time worldwide and offers the possibility of providing more accurate time to millions of custo

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Defining the centromere

The division of cells is a highly-regulated and complex process which requires the organised collaboration of a multitude of different cellular components. Although the basic principles are known, many components and their workings are still unidentified. Scientists from the project group "Kinetochore Biology" at the IPK in Gatersleben are shedding light on the diverse landscape of kinetochores. K

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

200+

Listening in to how proteins talk and learning their language

Synthetic biologists have taken evolution of proteins into their own hands by changing some that occur in nature or even by synthesizing them from scratch. Such engineered proteins are used as highly efficacious drugs, components of synthetic gene circuits that sense biological signals, or in the production of high-value chemicals in ways that are more effective and sustainable than petroleum-base

24d

Nature

Daily briefing: Lemur is the first six-fingered primate

Nature, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03203-1 The aye-aye's thumb, the most successful citizen-scientist initiative in the world and how Californians will be warned seconds ahead of an earthquake.

24d

Futurity.org

Candidates of color boost political donations from voters of color

If more candidates of color ran for office, political donations from individuals of color would likely increase as well, according to a new study. In American politics, the question of "Who donates?" is closely linked to the crucial question of "Who governs?" By far, most campaign donations historically have come from white voters. Jake Grumbach, assistant professor of political science at the Un

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

A complex marriage arrangement: New insights and unanswered questions in plant heterostyly

The study of plant reproductive systems provides crucial insights into ecological interactions and the process of evolutionary change. Reproductive success is closely allied to overall fitness, and understanding the mechanisms and drivers of reproductive fitness can help us understand the causes and consequences of the remarkable diversity of plant reproductive strategies.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Insects share the same signaling pathway to form their three-dimensional body

A signalling pathway controlling morphogenesis, the formation of the three-dimensional body shape in the fruit fly Drosophila, also has pivotal functions for early embryonic development in other insects like beetles, crickets and bugs. In these insects, the pathway is even required for the formation of the primary cell layer of the embryo. The discovery of this early function in phylogenetically d

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

200+

Bacteria must be 'stressed out' to divide

A new study from EPFL scientists has found that bacteria use mechanical forces to divide, along with biological factors. The research, led by the groups of John McKinney and Georg Fantner at EPFL, came after recent studies suggested that bacterial division is not only governed by biology, but also by physics. However, this interplay is poorly understood.

24d

Phys.org

A complex marriage arrangement: New insights and unanswered questions in plant heterostyly

The study of plant reproductive systems provides crucial insights into ecological interactions and the process of evolutionary change. Reproductive success is closely allied to overall fitness, and understanding the mechanisms and drivers of reproductive fitness can help us understand the causes and consequences of the remarkable diversity of plant reproductive strategies.

24d

Phys.org

Toll roads are good for the environment, scientists confirm

A team of researchers from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) developed a method to calculate the number of stops trucks make along their routes. The method confirms that toll roads are good for the environment. This will help reduce the volume of harmful emissions as well as transportation costs. The results of the study were published in the E3S Web of Conferences jour

24d

Phys.org

International research community calls for recognition of forests' role in human prosperity

World leaders convened for the UN Climate Summit in September amid dire projections of climate instability. The problem is multifaceted, of course, but a recent IPCC report identifies deforestation as the main driver of land-based greenhouse gas emissions, which comprise almost a quarter of all human contributions to climate change. What if more people around the world could be paid to keep forest

24d

Phys.org

64

Hemp testing lab launched in response to industry need

In response to a rapidly expanding commercial hemp industry driven by interest in products with CBD oil, the University of Connecticut recently opened a laboratory where the plant can be tested for a variety of compounds.

24d

Phys.org

Insects share the same signaling pathway to form their three-dimensional body

A signalling pathway controlling morphogenesis, the formation of the three-dimensional body shape in the fruit fly Drosophila, also has pivotal functions for early embryonic development in other insects like beetles, crickets and bugs. In these insects, the pathway is even required for the formation of the primary cell layer of the embryo. The discovery of this early function in phylogenetically d

24d

Phys.org

Consumers: Online restaurant reviews are not all equal

People searching online restaurant reviews give less value to those written on mobile devices than on other platforms, according to new research in the published journal Marketing Science.

24d

Phys.org

200+

Bacteria must be 'stressed out' to divide

A new study from EPFL scientists has found that bacteria use mechanical forces to divide, along with biological factors. The research, led by the groups of John McKinney and Georg Fantner at EPFL, came after recent studies suggested that bacterial division is not only governed by biology, but also by physics. However, this interplay is poorly understood.

24d

Science | Smithsonian

500+

A New Gene Editing Tool Could Make CRISPR More Precise

Prime editing offers a new way to make changes to DNA while avoiding some of the drawbacks and clunkiness of traditional CRISPR

24d

Discover Magazine

This New Gene-Editing Tool Can 'Search-and-Replace' Genes Without Breaking DNA

The popular gene-editing tool CRISPR works by cutting out genes. A new genetic tool instead works by searching for and replacing targeted genes, without breaking DNA. (Credit: Steven McDowell/Shutterstock) Snip, snip. If you've been paying attention to the hubbub about gene editing, the first image that pops into your head might be of a pair of scissors. Today, when scientists use the popular gene

24d

Futurity.org

77

DEET 'invisibility cloak' may keep mosquitoes away

DEET may chemically "cloak" humans from malaria-carrying mosquitoes, rather than repel them, researchers report. Since its invention during the Second World War for soldiers stationed in countries with high malaria transmission rates, researchers have worked to pinpoint precisely how DEET actually affects mosquitoes. Past studies have analyzed the chemical structure of the repellent, studied the

24d

Futurity.org

65

7 questions parents should ask before kids go on playdates

Nearly half of parents in a new national poll say they've declined a playdate because they didn't feel comfortable leaving their child in the other parent's care. Despite concerns, just 1 in 4 parents polled have gotten questions about safety issues from another parent before a playdate, according to the CS Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health . "Playdates are a normal and

24d

Phys.org

21

Plant physiology will be major contributor to future river flooding, study finds

he next time a river overflows its banks, don't just blame the rain clouds. Earth system scientists from the University of California, Irvine have identified another culprit: leafy plants.

24d

BBC News – Science & Environment

50K

Prime editing: DNA tool could correct 89% of genetic defects

New technology – called prime editing – is like a "genetic word processor" able to re-write DNA.

24d

Science | The Guardian

5K

Scores more heart attacks and strokes on high pollution days, figures show

Data reveals acute impact on people's health and the strain it puts on emergency services Scores of children and adults are being rushed to hospital for emergency treatment on days of high pollution in cities across England, figures show. Each year emergency services see more than 120 additional cardiac arrests, more than 230 additional strokes and nearly 200 more people with asthma requiring hos

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Listening in to how proteins talk and learning their language

A research team led by George Church, Ph.D. at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has created a third approach to engineering proteins that uses deep learning to distill the fundamental features of proteins directly from their amino acid sequence without the need for additional information.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Vaginal tearing: Why are episiotomies down despite some benefits?

In Canada, the rate of episiotomy during childbirth has declined in recent years, but when it comes to births assisted by forceps or vacuum, this downward trend warrants a closer look, suggests new UBC research.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Protein in blood protects against neuronal damage after brain hemorrhage

Patients who survive a cerebral hemorrhage may suffer delayed severe brain damage caused by free hemoglobin, which comes from red blood cells and damages neurons. Researchers at the University of Zurich and the UniversityHospital Zurich have now discovered a protective protein in the body called haptoglobin, which prevents this effect.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

New CRISPR genome editing system offers a wide range of versatility in human cells

A team from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has developed a new CRISPR genome-editing approach by combining two of the most important proteins in molecular biology — CRISPR-Cas9 and a reverse transcriptase — into a single machine.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Twin study shows what's good for the heart is good for the brain

Emory University researchers are giving us double the reasons to pay attention to our cardiovascular health – showing in a recently published study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease that good heart health can equal good brain health.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

JILA team demonstrates model system for distribution of more accurate time signals

JILA physicists and collaborators have demonstrated the first next-generation 'time scale' — a system that incorporates data from multiple atomic clocks to produce a single highly accurate timekeeping signal for distribution. The JILA time scale outperforms the best existing hubs for disseminating official time worldwide and offers the possibility of providing more accurate time to millions of cu

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Latest issue of Alzheimer's & Dementia

10 to 20 minutes per day of physical activity related to better cognition.Hearing loss in women linked to concerns about memory loss.Walking patterns as a potential diagnostic tool for dementia.

24d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

32

Bacteria must be 'stressed out' to divide

Bacterial cell division is controlled by both enzymatic activity and mechanical forces, which work together to control its timing and location.

24d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

1K

'Artificial leaf' successfully produces clean gas

A widely-used gas that is currently produced from fossil fuels can instead be made by an 'artificial leaf' that uses only sunlight, carbon dioxide and water, and which could eventually be used to develop a sustainable liquid fuel alternative to gasoline.

24d

Phys.org

DNA-reeling bacteria yield new insight on how superbugs acquire drug-resistance

A new study from Indiana University has revealed a previously unknown role a protein plays in helping bacteria reel in DNA in their environment—like a fisherman pulling up a catch from the ocean.

24d

Phys.org

Male deer stain their bellies according to their competitive context

When it is time for mating season, the period when red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) are in heat, the male deer bring out their best weapons in order to maintain their harem—that is to say, in order to win over the greatest number of females they can.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

DNA-reeling bacteria yield new insight on how superbugs acquire drug-resistance

A new study from Indiana University has revealed a previously unknown role a protein plays in helping bacteria reel in DNA in their environment—like a fisherman pulling up a catch from the ocean.

24d

Science News Daily

Hackers steal secret crypto keys for NordVPN. Here's what we know so far

Breach happened 19 months ago. Popular VPN service is only disclosing it now.

24d

ScienceDaily

49

DNA-reeling bacteria yield new insight on how superbugs acquire drug-resistance

A study has revealed a protein's role in helping bacteria 'reel in' DNA from their environment to acquire new traits, such as antibiotic resistance.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Male deer stain their bellies according to their competitive context

When it is time for mating season, the period when red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) are in heat, the male deer bring out their best weapons in order to maintain their harem—that is to say, in order to win over the greatest number of females they can.

24d

Retraction Watch

Reminder: We're phasing out one of our email alerts. Here's how to keep up with Retraction Watch.

As some Retraction Watch readers have known, we've had off-and-on technological issues with the site. At least in some cases, those problems seem to have been due to DDOS attacks. We've been taking steps to ensure the site's reliability, and we're taking another one. Since our inception in 2010, we've offered a way to receive … Continue reading

24d

Future(s) Studies

AKQA launches free "Code of Conscience" software to help protect the Amazon. The software uses open-source mapping and GPS to cripple heavy-duty vehicles in protected land areas. The software would need to be installed on the vehicle(s).

submitted by /u/CouldOfBeenGreat [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

American scientists are about to start shooting plasma guns in a bid to achieve controlled nuclear fusion

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Lab Grown Meat: Scientists grew rabbit and cow muscles cells on edible gelatin scaffolds that mimic the texture and consistency of meat, demonstrating that realistic meat products may eventually be produced without the need to raise and slaughter animals.

submitted by /u/-AMARYANA- [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

With These 4 Breakthroughs, We'll Be Able to Write Whole Genomes From Scratch

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Inventor lands deal to manufacture 'swappable' aluminium-air battery that can power electric cars for 1,500 miles

submitted by /u/Surf_Kid [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Biofuels could be made from bacteria that grow in seawater rather than from crude oil

submitted by /u/temporvicis [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

New research shows that psilocybin might be an effective treatment for diseases such as depression and addiction. While the work is still in its early stages, there are signs that psilocybin might help addicts shake the habit by causing the brain to talk with itself in different ways.

submitted by /u/SirT6 [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Russian biologist has successfully used CRISPR to edit a deafness-causing gene in human eggs. The research has not led to the birth of gene-edited babies — yet.

submitted by /u/SirT6 [link] [comments]

24d

Scientific American Blog Posts

100+

What Do Machine Learning and Hunter-Gatherer Children Have in Common?

They acquire knowledge in remarkably similar ways — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

24d

Nature

Humans are drying out Europe's ancient peat bogs

Nature, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03156-5 Climate change and peat cutting are altering ecosystems, some of them centuries old.

24d

Nature

4K

Super-precise new CRISPR tool could tackle a plethora of genetic diseases

Nature, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03164-5 The system allows researchers more control over DNA changes, potentially opening up conditions that have challenged gene-editors.

24d

Nature

100+

The promise and peril of the new science of social genomics

Nature, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03171-6 Researchers are finding links between people's genes and complex attributes such as socio-economic status and the time spent in school. The worry is that their results will be misconstrued.

24d

NPR

Keeping Your Blood Sugar In Check Could Lower Your Alzheimer's Risk

Diabetes can double a person's chances of developing Alzheimer's. Now researchers are beginning to understand the role of brain metabolism in the development of the disease. (Image credit: Science Source)

24d

Science | The Guardian

24

Did you solve it? The four points, two distances problem

The solution to today's dot-to-dot puzzle Earlier today I set you the following puzzle: Find all the ways to arrange four points so that only two distances occur between any two points. Continue reading…

24d

Ingeniøren

100+

Amerikansk hær indgår forskningssamarbejde med ufo-jægere

En mystisk ufo-jæger-firma, der hævder at eje materialer, der ikke er skabt på Jorden, har indgået et forskningssamarbejde med den amerikanske hær.

24d

ScienceDaily

32

Preventing cyber security attacks lies in strategic, third-party investments

Companies interested in protecting themselves and their customers from cyber-attacks need to invest in themselves and the vendors that handle their data, according to new research.

24d

ScienceDaily

400+

The night gardeners: Immune cells rewire, repair brain while we sleep

Science tells us that a lot of good things happen in our brains while we sleep — learning and memories are consolidated and waste is removed, among other things. New research shows for the first time that important immune cells called microglia — which play an important role in reorganizing the connections between nerve cells, fighting infections, and repairing damage — are also primarily activ

24d

ScienceDaily

100+

Your healthcare provider's expectations on whether a treatment works may impact its effectiveness

If a doctor expects a treatment to be successful, a patient may experience less pain and have better outcomes, according to a new study. The findings reveal how social interactions between hypothetical healthcare providers and patients have the power to influence how patients perceive the effectiveness of a treatment, even when it is a placebo.

24d

ScienceDaily

2K

'Artificial leaf' successfully produces clean gas

A widely-used gas that is currently produced from fossil fuels can instead be made by an 'artificial leaf' that uses only sunlight, carbon dioxide and water, and which could eventually be used to develop a sustainable liquid fuel alternative to gasoline.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Plant physiology will be major contributor to future river flooding, UCI study finds

In a study published today in Nature Climate Change, Universithy fo California, Irvine researchers describe the emerging role of ecophysiology in riparian flooding. As an adaptation to an overabundance of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, trees, plants and grasses constrict their stomatal pores to regulate the amount of the gas they consume, a mechanism that limits the release of water from leaves

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stem cell research leads to insights into how Huntington's disease develops

Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal hereditary disease for which there is no cure. A novel study from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, using pluripotent stem cells advances understanding of how the disease develops and may help pave the way for identifying pathways for future treatments. Results are published in the Journal of Huntington's Disease

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New framework makes AI systems more transparent without sacrificing performance

Researchers are proposing a framework that would allow users to understand the rationale behind artificial intelligence (AI) decisions. The work is significant, given the push move away from 'black box' AI systems — particularly in sectors, such as military and law enforcement, where there is a need to justify decisions.

24d

Futurism

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Startup: We'll Pay You $125,000 to Turn Your Face Into Robot Skin

Face Swap A mysterious robotics company has an unusual proposition: it wants to pay someone $125,000 in exchange for the rights to use their face on its new line of humanoid robotics. Working on behalf of the company is London-based machining startup called Geomiq, which Popular Mechanics reports will select one person and plaster their face on thousands of humanoid robots meant to serve as virtu

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Scientific American Content

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What Do Machine Learning and Hunter-Gatherer Children Have in Common?

They acquire knowledge in remarkably similar ways — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Smart speakers can be hijacked by apps that spy on users

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The Atlantic

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Watchmen Is a Blistering Modern Allegory

HBO's Watchmen is the strangest show to come to TV in a minute: the kind of fictional world where FBI agents carry locked briefcases that contain giant blue dildos, police interrogations incorporate Grant Wood's American Gothic , and a brazen set piece of a shoot-out between superheroes and white supremacists relies heavily (and explosively) on cows. Damon Lindelof's new series, a long-anticipate

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A CBD Vape Called "Yolo!" Contained a Psychosis-Inducing Drug

Vapers got more than they bargained for in Utah, according to a new investigation by the Associated Press . By the end of 2018, 50 Salt Lake City-based users of an e-cigarette product called Yolo! — short for " you only live once " — that was advertised to contain CBD, the non-psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, experienced "an intense high of hallucinations and even seizures," the AP reported.

24d

Science News Daily

Facebook's Libra may look to multiple digital coins based on national currencies – CNET

David Marcus, Facebook's blockchain boss, reportedly says the main goal is creating a more efficient payments system.

24d

Futurism

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Watch a Real-Life Invisibility Cloak Designed for Military Use

Invisibility Cloak Canada's Hyperstealth Biotechnology already manufactures camouflage uniforms for militaries across the globe. But now, the company has patented a new "Quantum Stealth" material that disguises a military's soldiers — or even its tanks, aircraft, and ships — by making anything behind it seem invisible. Light Bender Earlier in October, Hyperstealth filed a patent for the material,

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

International research community calls for recognition of forests' role in human prosperity

What if more people around the world could be paid to keep forests healthy and intact? And what if doing so would not only curb the climate crisis, but also help people move out of poverty and toward broader prosperity?A new special issue of World Development examines this and many other ways forests serve to alleviate poverty around the world.

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Preventing cyber security attacks lies in strategic, third-party investments, study finds

Companies interested in protecting themselves and their customers from cyber-attacks need to invest in themselves and the vendors that handle their data, according to new research from American University.

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Studies of autism spectrum disorder reveal new avenues of neuroscience research

Advances in the study of cognitive disorders, including Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), may pave the way for future treatments. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2019, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health.

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Novel method turns any 3D object into a cubic style

Computer scientists from the University of Toronto have developed a computational method to quantify an abstract cubic style. Additionally, their method also enables users to create new shapes that resemble the input shape and exhibit the cubic style. The researchers, Hsueh-Ti Derek Liu and Alec Jacobson of University of Toronto, are set to present their work at ACM SIGGRAPH Asia, held Nov. 17 to

24d

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47

Defining the centromere

Centromeres are the chromosomal domains at which the kinetochore, a protein complex required for the correct separation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis, is assembled. The incorporation of the histone variant CenH3 into centromeric nucleosomes is a prerequisite for the proper assembly and function of the kinetochore.A new study by the IPK project group 'Kinetochore Biology' describes the

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BU researchers identify unique brain changes in people with Huntington's disease

The part of the brain that selectively degenerates in people with Huntington's disease (HD), called the striatum, is almost entirely destroyed in the late stages of the disease. Brain samples from mutant HD gene positive individuals who had not yet developed symptoms by time of death are extremely rare. As a consequence, very little is known about the active disease process that causes the devasta

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DNA-reeling bacteria yield new insight on how superbugs acquire drug-resistance

A study from Indiana University has revealed a protein's role in helping bacteria 'reel in' DNA from their environment to acquire new traits, such as antibiotic resistance.

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Futurism

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Scientists Worried That Human Brains Grown in Lab May Be Sentient

It's Alive! Some neuroscientists working with lab-grown human "mini brains" worry they could be experiencing an endless horror, with a conscious existence with no body. At least, that's the warning that a group of Green Neuroscience Lab researchers plan to deliver during a national meeting for the Society for Neuroscience on Monday, according to The Guardian . While it's never been demonstrated t

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NYT > Science

2K

Carl Safina Is Certain Your Dog Loves You

Animals have rich emotional lives, the ecologist argues. The evidence is "right in front of your eyes."

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Science | The Guardian

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New gene editing tool could fix most harmful DNA mutations

'Prime editing' more precise than Crispr-Cas9, but still needs time before use on humans Scientists have raised fresh hopes for treating people with genetic disorders by inventing a powerful new molecular tool that, in principle, can correct the vast majority of mutations that cause human genetic diseases. The procedure, named "prime editing", can mend about 89% of the 75,000 or so harmful mutati

24d

ScienceDaily

24

Clay minerals call the shots with carbon

Clay minerals suspended in seawater binds sedimentary organic carbon to their mineral surfaces. But the quantity of carbon that is bound and the source of that carbon very much depends on the clay mineral in question. A research team has shown this by studying sediments in the South China Sea.

24d

ScienceDaily

28

Composite metal foam outperforms aluminum for use in aircraft wings

The leading edges of aircraft wings have to meet a very demanding set of characteristics. New research shows that a combination of steel composite metal foam and epoxy resin has more desirable characteristics for use as a leading-edge material than the aluminum currently in widespread use.

24d

ScienceDaily

40

Consumers: Online restaurant reviews are not all equal

Mobile reviews were associated with 10 to 40% fewer likes than the reviews generated on laptop or desktop computers.

24d

ScienceDaily

100+

Exploring the effect of fasting on age-related diseases

There are many indications that fasting promotes longevity. In recent years, much attention has been devoted to so-called caloric restriction mimetics (CMRs), substances that simulate the health-promoting effects of fasting without the need of life-style change. A study reports the identification of a novel candidate CRM. The substance may prove useful in the further research for the treatment of

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ScienceDaily

32

Bacteria must be 'stressed out' to divide

Bacterial cell division is controlled by both enzymatic activity and mechanical forces, which work together to control its timing and location.

24d

The Atlantic

2K

Photographing the Microscopic: Winners of Nikon Small World 2019

Nikon has announced the winners of the 2019 Small World Photomicrography Competition , and has once more shared some of the winning and honored images with us. The contest invites photographers and scientists to submit images of all things visible under a microscope. This year, first place was awarded to Teresa Zgoda and Teresa Kugler for their painstakingly prepared photo of a turtle embryo, usi

24d

Nature

100+

A powerful cell-protection system prevents cell death by ferroptosis

Nature, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03145-8 The discovery of a mechanism that guards against a type of cell death celled ferroptosis reveals a system that regenerates a ubiquitous protective component of biological membranes, and might offer a target for anticancer drugs.

24d

The Scientist RSS

300+

Opinion: The Nature of Social Inequalities in Great Britain

Regional differences in wealth in the UK are tied to genetic variants related to education–and migration is only widening the gap.

24d

Phys.org

100+

Climate change: Steep warming curve for Europe

Climate is changing: Droughts, floods, and extreme weather events influence agriculture, economies, and society. Improved adaptability of industry and society to the future climate, however, requires reliable statements on medium-term climate development, in particular for certain regions. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and partners in the MiKlip project have now developed

24d

forskning.se

Konsumenter reagerar negativt på ordet "bioteknik"

Vår aptit på fisk har inneburit ett hårt tryck på världens fiskevatten och en fortsatt ökande efterfrågan innebär att fiskodlingarna måste leverera större volymer för att förhindra utfiskning av de naturliga bestånden. Inom biotekniken finns flera verktyg och tillämpningar för att öka volymerna odlad fisk. Redan 2015 godkände den amerikanska livsmedelsmyndigheten FDA en genmodifierad snabbväxande

24d

Science Magazine

Watch the world's loudest bird scream for a mate

White bellbirds shatter the record for noisiest call—and maybe their mates' eardrums

24d

Science News Daily

World's loudest bird has a mating call above the human pain threshold

The male white bellbird's mating call reaches peak decibel levels above the human pain threshold, with the noise exposing potential mates to a sound louder than …

24d

Science News Daily

Turning sunlight into syngas

British researchers report a new benchmark in the field of solar fuels.

24d

Science News Daily

Meet the cunning toad viper

Researchers believe a central African amphibian is impersonating a reptilian predator.

24d

Science News Daily

Fungus plus evolution equals a better brew

Genomic analysis finds rapid hybridisation drove European beer diversity. Barry Keily reports.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Why don't evergreens change color and drop their leaves every fall?

It's autumn in the Northern Hemisphere—otherwise known as leaf-peeping season. Now is when people head outside to soak up the annual display of orange, red and yellow foliage painted across the landscape.

24d

Phys.org

Why don't evergreens change color and drop their leaves every fall?

It's autumn in the Northern Hemisphere—otherwise known as leaf-peeping season. Now is when people head outside to soak up the annual display of orange, red and yellow foliage painted across the landscape.

24d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Identification and characterization of Cardiac Glycosides as senolytic compounds

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12888-x Senolytic compounds have the ability to eliminate senescent cells from tissues and have been shown to be beneficial in various animal models of age-related diseases. Here the authors show that cardiac glycosides commonly used for heart diseases have senolytic properties in humanized mouse models of tumorigene

24d

ScienceDaily

28

Ceramic industry should use carbon reducing cold sintering process says new research

A new techno-economic analysis shows that the energy intensive ceramic industry would gain both financial and environmental benefits if it moved to free the cold sintering process from languishing in labs to actual use in manufacturing everything from high tech to domestic ceramics.

24d

ScienceDaily

24

Researchers watch quantum knots untie

A quantum gas can be tied into knots using magnetic fields. The same researchers who were the first to produce these knots have now studied how the knots behave over time. The surprising result is that the knots untie themselves over a short period of time, before turning into a vortex.

24d

ScienceDaily

100+

HPV immunization program cuts pre-cancer rates by more than half

A school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization program in British Columbia, Canada, is dramatically reducing rates of cervical pre-cancer in B.C. women, according to a new study.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Clay minerals call the shots with carbon

Clay minerals suspended in seawater binds sedimentary organic carbon to their mineral surfaces. But the quantity of carbon that is bound and the source of that carbon very much depends on the clay mineral in question. A research team from ETH Zurich and Tongji University have shown this by studying sediments in the South China Sea.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Composite metal foam outperforms aluminum for use in aircraft wings

The leading edges of aircraft wings have to meet a very demanding set of characteristics. New research shows that a combination of steel composite metal foam and epoxy resin has more desirable characteristics for use as a leading-edge material than the aluminum currently in widespread use.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Exploring the effect of fasting on age-related diseases

There are many indications that fasting promotes longevity. In recent years, much attention has been devoted to so-called caloric restriction mimetics (CMRs), substances that simulate the health-promoting effects of fasting without the need of life-style change. A study published in EMBO Molecular Medicine reports the identification of a novel candidate CRM. The substance may prove useful in the f

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Consumers: Online restaurant reviews are not all equal

Mobile reviews were associated with 10 to 40% less likes than the reviews generated on laptop or desktop computers.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Insects share the same signaling pathway to form their 3-dimensional body

Zoologist shows that beetles, bugs and crickets control their body shape through Fog signalling / publication in 'eLife'.

24d

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Bacteria must be 'stressed out' to divide

Bacterial cell division is controlled by both enzymatic activity and mechanical forces, which work together to control its timing and location, a new study from EPFL finds.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The night gardeners: Immune cells rewire, repair brain while we sleep

Science tells us that a lot of good things happen in our brains while we sleep — learning and memories are consolidated and waste is removed, among other things. New research shows for the first time that important immune cells called microglia — which play an important role in reorganizing the connections between nerve cells, fighting infections, and repairing damage — are also primarily activ

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers identify a new way to target treatment-resistant cancers

An international team of researchers has found a different way cancer becomes resistant to chemotherapy, suggesting a new target for drugs.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gene variants influence size of brainstem, other structures

Three-hundred researchers from 3 large consortiums, including researchers from UT Health San Antonio, identified 48 common genetic variants that are associated with the size of the brainstem and other subcortical structures deep within the brain. This is the first step toward understanding how to devise treatments for disorders affecting these structures.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Porous polymer coatings dynamically control light and heat

Columbia Engineers have developed dynamic porous polymer coatings that enable inexpensive and scalable ways to control light and heat in buildings. They took advantage of the optical switchability of PPCs in the solar wavelengths to regulate solar heating and daylighting, and extended the concept to thermal infrared wavelengths to modulate heat radiated by objects.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Argonne multidisciplinary team develops probe for battery research: Strength in numbers

An Argonne team has developed a powerful technique for probing in three dimensions the nanostructure for cathode materials of next-generation batteries. Such batteries could one day revolutionize energy storage for both transportation and the electric grid.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Your healthcare provider's expectations on whether a treatment works may impact its effectiveness

If a doctor expects a treatment to be successful, a patient may experience less pain and have better outcomes, according to a new Dartmouth study published in Nature Human Behaviour. The findings reveal how social interactions between hypothetical healthcare providers and patients have the power to influence how patients perceive the effectiveness of a treatment, even when it is a placebo.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Northern peatlands may contain twice as much carbon as previously thought

Northern peatlands may hold twice as much carbon as scientists previously suspected, according to a study published today in Nature Geoscience. The findings suggest that these boggy areas play a more important role in climate change and the carbon cycle than they're typically given credit for.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Repurposing heart drugs to target cancer cells

This study has highlighted a novel senolytic drug – drug that eliminates senescent cells — that are currently being used to treat heart conditions that could be repurposed to target cancer cells, and a range of other conditions.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research reveals how migration affects DNA patterns in the UK

A major new study reveals how socio-economic migration within the UK has affected the geographic distribution of human DNA linked to traits such as education levels and health. Researchers suggest that regional differences in educational attainment genes are the result of more recent selective migration within the country, possibly driven by the modern economy with people moving to seek work or fo

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A cavity leads to a strong interaction between light and matter

Researchers have succeeded in creating an efficient quantum-mechanical light-matter interface using a microscopic cavity. Within this cavity, a single photon is emitted and absorbed up to 10 times by an artificial atom. This opens up new prospects for quantum technology, report physicists at the University of Basel and Ruhr-University Bochum in the journal Nature.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cell stiffness may indicate whether tumors will invade

Engineers at MIT and elsewhere have tracked the evolution of individual cells within an initially benign tumor, showing how the physical properties of those cells drive the tumor to become invasive, or metastatic.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Artificial leaf' successfully produces clean gas

A widely-used gas that is currently produced from fossil fuels can instead be made by an 'artificial leaf' that uses only sunlight, carbon dioxide and water, and which could eventually be used to develop a sustainable liquid fuel alternative to petrol.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Widespread drying of European peatlands in recent centuries

Researchers led by the University of Leeds examined 31 peatlands across Britain, Ireland, Scandinavia and continental Europe to assess changes in peatland surface wetness during the last 2,000 years.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Is cigarette type associated with lung cancer outcomes?

An association between lung cancer outcomes and the filter status of cigarettes, their tar level and menthol flavor was examined using data from more than 14,000 participants in a lung screening trial who completed detailed questionnaires about smoking.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Analysis of US pharmacy closures

This research letter reports on pharmacy closures in the United States and risk factors associated with closure.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Clinical trial in Japan focuses on avoiding cow's milk formula to supplement breastfeeding

A randomized clinical trial in Japan with about 300 newborns looked at whether avoiding cow's milk formula to supplement breastfeeding would decrease risks of sensitization to cow's milk protein or food allergy, including cow's milk allergy.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Amazon's white bellbirds set new record for loudest bird call

Biologist Jeff Podos at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with Mario Cohn-Haft at the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Brazil, report that they have recorded the loudest bird calls ever documented, made by dove-sized male white bellbirds as part of their mating rituals in the mountains of the northern Amazon. Details are in the latest Current Biology.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Deepest look yet at brewer's yeasts reveals the diversity harnessed by humans

In the deepest look yet at the diversity of these yeasts, scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison reveal the dizzying complexity found in bottles of beer, wine and cider. By sequencing the genomes of more than 100 hybrid yeasts, the researchers discovered seven distinct combinations of yeast species, many of them tied to unique fermented beverages.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Closures affect 1 in 8 pharmacies in the US

Despite an overall increase in the number of pharmacies in the U.S. from 2009 to 2015, one in eight pharmacies, or 9,654, had closed during this period. Independent pharmacies in both urban and rural areas were three times more likely to close than chain pharmacies.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

It takes two — a two-atom catalyst, that is — to make oxygen from water

The search for sustainable approaches to generating new fuels has brought scientists back to one of the most abundant materials on Earth — reddish iron oxide in the form of hematite, also known as rust.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The secret of classic Belgian beers? Medieval super yeasts!

An international team of scientists, led by Prof. Kevin Verstrepen (VIB-KU-Leuven) and Prof. Steven Maere (VIB-UGent), has discovered that some of the most renowned classic Belgian beers, including Gueuze and Trappist ales, are fermented with a rare and unusual form of hybrid yeasts. These yeasts combine DNA of the traditional ale yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with that of more stress-resistant

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Missing' virus detected in dozens of children paralyzed by polio-like illness

A UCSF-led research team has detected the immunological remnants of a common seasonal virus in spinal fluid from dozens of patients diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) — a polio-like illness that causes permanent, sometimes life-threatening paralysis in young children. The findings provide the clearest evidence to date that AFM is caused by an enterovirus (EV) that invades and impairs the

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Images offer most detailed glimpse yet into how skin senses temperature

Columbia University researchers have captured new images of a temperature-sensing molecule in its open, intermediate, and closed states.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New therapeutic strategy may help reverse autism behavioral abnormalities

Mutations in specific genes, such as PTEN, can explain many autism cases. While children with mutations in PTEN exhibit autism, macrocephaly (an abnormally large skull), intellectual disability and epilepsy, there are currently no effective treatment options for children affected by this condition. But a new study by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine offers a potential new approach to ther

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How the brain dials up the volume to hear someone in a crowd

Our brains have a remarkable ability to pick out one voice from among many. Now, a team of Columbia University neuroengineers has uncovered the steps that take place in the brain to make this feat possible. Today's discovery helps to solve a long-standing scientific question as to how the brain's listening center can decode and amplify one voice over others. It also stands to spur development of h

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

White bellbirds in Amazon shatter record for loudest bird call ever measured

Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on Oct. 21 have captured the loudest bird calls yet documented. The calls are the mating songs of male white bellbirds, which live atop mountains in the Amazon region of northern Brazil.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

300+

How rat-eating monkeys help keep palm oil plants alive

Found as an ingredient in many processed and packaged foods, palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Oct. 21 have discovered an unlikely ally for palm oil production: pig-tailed macaques.

24d

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

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How we're using dogs to sniff out malaria | James Logan

What if we could diagnose some of the world's deadliest diseases by the smells our bodies give off? In a fascinating talk and live demo, biologist James Logan introduces Freya, a malaria-sniffing dog, to show how we can harness the awesome powers of animal scent to detect chemical signatures associated with infection — and change the way we diagnose disease.

24d

New Scientist

1K

CRISPR upgrade could make genome editing better and safer

A new variant of CRISPR, dubbed prime editing, should make it even better at correcting disease-causing mutations

24d

New Scientist

8K

Thawing permafrost has turned the Arctic into a carbon emitter

Some sites in the Arctic had already flipped from carbon sinks into sources of emissions, but new research shows the phenomenon has happened across the region as a whole

24d

New Scientist

6K

World's loudest male bird bellows at females sitting right next to it

The loudest song of the white bellbird hits an average of 116 decibels, putting it on a par with a pile-driver and beating all previously documented birds

24d

Science Magazine

Evidence links poliolike disease in children to a common type of virus

Antibodies in spinal fluid suggest enteroviruses causes paralysis in rare cases

24d

Science Magazine

New 'prime' genome editor could surpass CRISPR

A more precise, flexible variation of the revolutionary DNA modifier makes its debut

24d

Science Magazine

Global impacts of thawing Arctic permafrost may be imminent

Seasonal carbon emissions seen outpacing absorption

24d

Phys.org

Your political views can predict how you pronounce certain words

Politics can predict the TV shows we watch, the shops we frequent and the places we live.

24d

Phys.org

95

Waste plastic converted into filtration membranes

In a world that seems to be drowning in plastic bottles, recycling this waste into useful materials would help to reduce its environmental impact. KAUST researchers have now invented a way to turn plastic bottles into porous membranes that could be used as molecular filters in the chemical industry.

24d

BBC News – Science & Environment

14K

Dementia in football: Ex-players three and a half times more likely to die of condition

Former professional footballers are three and a half times more likely to die of dementia than people of the same age range in the general population, according to new research.

24d

NYT > Science

1K

What Causes a Mysterious Paralysis in Children? Researchers Find Viral Clues

In one study, nearly 70 percent of children with the disease had antibodies to common enteroviruses that usually produce mild effects but can sometimes cause neurological problems.

24d

Nature

Imaging work and dissipation in the quantum Hall state in graphene

Nature, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1704-3

24d

Nature

A gated quantum dot strongly coupled to an optical microcavity

Nature, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1709-y

24d

Nature

200+

Search-and-replace genome editing without double-strand breaks or donor DNA

Nature, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1711-4

24d

Nature

FSP1 is a glutathione-independent ferroptosis suppressor

Nature, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1707-0

24d

Nature

62

The CoQ oxidoreductase FSP1 acts parallel to GPX4 to inhibit ferroptosis

Nature, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1705-2

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Science | The Guardian

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Farming could be absorber of carbon by 2050, says report

Veganism and trees could help stop agriculture contributing to global heating, study says If one in five people in richer countries went near-vegan , and threw away a third less food than they currently do , while poor countries were assisted to preserve their forests and restore degraded land, the world's agricultural systems could be absorbing carbon dioxide by 2050 instead of adding massively

24d

Cosmos Magazine

47

Placebo effect can be a social thing

Doctors' beliefs influence patients' pain, study finds. Paul Biegler reports.

24d

Cosmos Magazine

20

Fungus plus evolution equals a better brew

Genomic analysis finds rapid hybridisation drove European beer diversity. Barry Keily reports.

24d

Cosmos Magazine

100+

Meet the cunning toad viper

Researchers believe a central African amphibian is impersonating a reptilian predator.

24d

Cosmos Magazine

300+

It was the asteroid, not volcanoes

Evidence of ocean acidification provides new insights into the last mass extinction. Natalie Parletta reports.

24d

Cosmos Magazine

43

Turning sunlight into syngas

British researchers report a new benchmark in the field of solar fuels.

24d

Cosmos Magazine

Meet the loudest bird in the world

In the Amazon, the amps are turned up to 11.

24d

New on MIT Technology Review

2K

The newest gene editor radically improves on CRISPR

Researchers have developed "prime editing," a true search-and-replace function for DNA.

24d

ScienceDaily

42

No place like home: Species are on the move, but many have nowhere to go

Since the 1970s, insects in the warmer half of Britain have been flying, hopping and crawling northwards at an average rate of around five metres per day. However, a new study has analysed 25 million recorded sightings of 300 different insect species and found there is huge variation in the rates at which they are moving and that not all species are able to keep pace with the warming conditions.

24d

ScienceDaily

32

Immune reaction causes malaria organ damage

Immune cells can be the body's defenders and foes at the same time.

24d

ScienceDaily

29

Atomic images reveal unusually many neighbors for some oxygen atoms

The identification of new chemical bonds is crucial for the design of new material structures. A team has found unexpected new configurations of oxygen and nitrogen in graphene.

24d

ScienceDaily

49

Bioprinting: Living cells in a 3D printer

A high-resolution bioprinting process has been developed: Cells can now be embedded in a 3D matrix printed with micrometer precision — at a printing speed of one meter per second, orders of magnitude faster than previously possible. Tissue growth and the behavior of cells can be controlled and investigated particularly well by embedding the cells in a delicate 3D framework. This is achieved using

24d

ScienceDaily

33

Breaking the stroma barrier: Study shows a new way to hit cancer with radiation

Chemotherapy and radiation therapy are commonly used to treat cancer, but are not always effective and can have toxic side effects. Researchers tested a new radiotherapy technique that sends alpha-emitting particles to stroma cells in pancreatic tumors. The method slowed tumor growth in mice with minimal side effects, pointing to a new potential treatment option in the future for patients with pan

24d

ScienceDaily

31

Biodiversity of insects modeled from space satellite data

With freely available radar data from satellites, biodiversity in forests can be analysed very well. Researchers now report that biodiversity even of tiny insects can be reliably modeled from space.

24d

ScienceDaily

32

The art of cancer caregiving: How art therapies benefits those caring for cancer patients

A recent study showed coloring and open-studio art therapy benefits stressed caregivers of cancer patients.

24d

ScienceDaily

Toad disguises itself as deadly viper to avoid attack

The first study of a toad mimicking a venomous snake reveals that it likely imitates one of Africa's largest vipers in both appearance and behavior.

24d

Wired

400+

Microsoft's Secured-Core PC Feature Protects Critical Code

The "secured-core PC" feature for Windows looks to head off firmware hacks.

24d

Wired

59K

A New Crispr Technique Could Fix Almost All Genetic Diseases

A less error-prone DNA editing method could correct many more harmful mutations than was previously possible.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A complex marriage arrangement: New insights and unanswered questions in plant heterostyly

This special issue of New Phytologist explores the ecology, evolution and genetics of plant reproductive systems, an area of research championed and developed by Prof. Spencer Barrett. The collection includes 35 articles integrating the theory, ecology, natural history, evolution, genetics and genomics of plant reproductive systems. It also features a new Tansley review by Prof. Barrett that explo

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Toll roads are good for the environment, Russian scientists confirm

A team of researchers from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) developed a method to calculate the number of stops trucks make along their routes. The method confirms that toll roads are good for the environment. This will help reduce the volume of harmful emissions as well as transportation costs.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New lightweight, portable robotic suit to increase running and walking performance

A new study presenting a revolutionary robotic mobility-assistance suit was published in the journal Science this August. This study showcases a portable 'exosuit' that can assist users during walking and running, providing significant energy savings in terms of metabolic activity. This robotic suit has important applications for people with a wide range of restricted mobility, particularly those

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers watch quantum knots untie

After first reporting the existence of quantum knots, Aalto University & Amherst College researchers now report how the knots behave.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Immune reaction causes malaria organ damage

Immune cells can be the body's defenders and foes at the same time

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

No place like home: Species are on the move, but many have nowhere to go

Since the 1970s, insects in the warmer half of Britain have been flying, hopping and crawling northwards at an average rate of around five metres per day. However, a new study has analysed 25 million recorded sightings of 300 different insect species and found there is huge variation in the rates at which they are moving and that not all species are able to keep pace with the warming conditions.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

How rat-eating monkeys help keep palm oil plants alive

Found as an ingredient in many processed and packaged foods, palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on October 21 have discovered an unlikely ally for palm oil production: pig-tailed macaques.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

The secret of classic Belgian beers? Medieval super-yeasts

An international team of scientists led by Prof. Kevin Verstrepen (VIB-KU-Leuven) and Prof. Steven Maere (VIB-UGent) has discovered that some of the most renowned classic Belgian beers, including Gueuze and Trappist ales, are fermented with a rare and unusual form of hybrid yeasts. These yeasts combine DNA of the traditional ale yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with that of more stress-resistant f

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

300+

Deepest look yet at brewer's yeasts reveals the diversity harnessed by humans

Thousands of years ago, as humans tamed wild animals and plants into livestock and crops, their penchant for intoxication also led them to unwittingly domesticate a hidden workhorse of civilization: yeast.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

Images offer most detailed glimpse yet into how skin senses temperature

Columbia University researchers have captured new detailed images of a temperature-sensing molecule in its open, intermediate, and closed states. The findings will help us understand the mechanics of hot, warm, cool, and cold sensation and accelerate the development of drugs for variety of conditions, including inflammatory skin disease, itch, and pain.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

500+

Amazon's white bellbirds set new record for loudest bird call

Biologist Jeff Podos at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with Mario Cohn-Haft at the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Brazil, report that they have recorded the loudest bird calls ever documented, made by dove-sized male white bellbirds as part of their mating rituals in the mountains of the northern Amazon. Details are in the latest Current Biology.

24d

Ingeniøren

55

Hovedparten af Københavns bycykler ødelægges af hærværk

Drengestreger: Næsten to tredjedele af de kommunale bycykler i Københavns Kommune og på Frederiksberg er på værksted.

24d

Phys.org

100+

How rat-eating monkeys help keep palm oil plants alive

Found as an ingredient in many processed and packaged foods, palm oil is the most widely consumed vegetable oil. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on October 21 have discovered an unlikely ally for palm oil production: pig-tailed macaques.

24d

Phys.org

Bans on rebuilding in disaster-prone areas ignore homeowners preferences—raising costs works better

As California's wildfire season intensifies, a growing number of residents in the state want to ban people from building in areas at greatest risk.

24d

Phys.org

500+

Infrasound from underwater volcano erupting shows formation of gigantic bubbles

A team of researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Alaska has found that they could estimate the size of bubbles that form from underwater volcanoes by listening to infrasound produced by bubble formation. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the group describes their study of the infrasound that was produced by an undersea volcano eruption near an Al

24d

Phys.org

100+

The secret of classic Belgian beers? Medieval super-yeasts

An international team of scientists led by Prof. Kevin Verstrepen (VIB-KU-Leuven) and Prof. Steven Maere (VIB-UGent) has discovered that some of the most renowned classic Belgian beers, including Gueuze and Trappist ales, are fermented with a rare and unusual form of hybrid yeasts. These yeasts combine DNA of the traditional ale yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with that of more stress-resistant f

24d

Phys.org

200+

Porous polymer coatings dynamically control light and heat

Buildings devote more than 30% of their energy use to heating, cooling, and lighting systems. Passive designs such as cool roof paints have gone a long way toward reducing this usage, and its impact on the environment and climate, but they have one key limitation—they are usually static, and thus not responsive to daily or seasonal changes.

24d

Phys.org

1K

It takes two—a two-atom catalyst, that is—to make oxygen from water

The search for sustainable approaches to generating new fuels has brought scientists back to one of the most abundant materials on Earth—reddish iron oxide in the form of hematite, also known as rust.

24d

Phys.org

300+

Deepest look yet at brewer's yeasts reveals the diversity harnessed by humans

Thousands of years ago, as humans tamed wild animals and plants into livestock and crops, their penchant for intoxication also led them to unwittingly domesticate a hidden workhorse of civilization: yeast.

24d

Phys.org

300+

Northern peatlands may contain twice as much carbon as previously thought

Northern peatlands may hold twice as much carbon as scientists previously suspected, according to a study published today in Nature Geoscience. The findings suggest that these boggy areas play a more important role in climate change and the carbon cycle than they're typically given credit for.

24d

Phys.org

300+

A cavity leads to a strong interaction between light and matter

Researchers have succeeded in creating an efficient quantum-mechanical light-matter interface using a microscopic cavity. Within this cavity, a single photon is emitted and absorbed up to 10 times by an artificial atom. This opens up new prospects for quantum technology, report physicists at the University of Basel and Ruhr-University Bochum in the journal Nature.

24d

Phys.org

100+

Images offer most detailed glimpse yet into how skin senses temperature

Columbia University researchers have captured new detailed images of a temperature-sensing molecule in its open, intermediate, and closed states. The findings will help us understand the mechanics of hot, warm, cool, and cold sensation and accelerate the development of drugs for variety of conditions, including inflammatory skin disease, itch, and pain.

24d

Phys.org

Widespread drying of European peatlands in recent centuries

Researchers led by the University of Leeds examined 31 peatlands across Britain, Ireland, Scandinavia and continental Europe to assess changes in peatland surface wetness during the last 2,000 years.

24d

Phys.org

21

Research team develops probe for battery research

Argonne team develops a powerful technique for probing in three dimensions the crystalline structure of cathode materials at the nanoscale.

24d

Phys.org

29

Research reveals how migration affects DNA patterns in the UK

A major new study reveals how socio-economic migration within the UK has affected the geographic distribution of human DNA linked to traits such as education levels and health.

24d

Phys.org

42

Cell stiffness may indicate whether tumors will invade

Engineers at MIT and elsewhere have tracked the evolution of individual cells within an initially benign tumor, showing how the physical properties of those cells drive the tumor to become invasive, or metastatic.

24d

Phys.org

500+

Amazon's white bellbirds set new record for loudest bird call

Biologist Jeff Podos at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with Mario Cohn-Haft at the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia, Brazil, report that they have recorded the loudest bird calls ever documented, made by dove-sized male white bellbirds as part of their mating rituals in the mountains of the northern Amazon. Details are in the latest Current Biology.

24d

Phys.org

13K

Scientists reveal how the fossil fuel industry misled the public about climate change

An international group of scientists show that fossil fuel corporations have, for decades, denied the public's right to be accurately informed about climate change by funding efforts to deceive people about the dangers of their product. A report illustrating how the industry "polluted the information landscape," and how the damage could be undone is published today [Monday 21 October].

24d

Phys.org

Cities with more black residents rely more on traffic tickets and fines for revenue

I've been thinking a lot lately about the last time I got a speeding ticket. It was nearly a decade ago and it's a pretty unremarkable story: I was on my way back to Columbus, Ohio, from a friend's wedding and was going something like 15 mph over the speed limit. An officer pulled me over, asked me if I knew why he did, walked back to his squad car and returned with a ticket for US$90.

24d

Phys.org

35

Armoring satellites to survive and operate through attacks

Satellites do a lot of things—they help people navigate from one place to another, they deliver television programming, they search for new stars and exo-planets and they enable the U.S. nuclear deterrence strategy. But until recently, one thing they haven't done—or needed to do—is defend themselves.

24d

Science News Daily

Can we reverse antibiotic resistance?

In the battle against antibiotic resistance, some scientists are trying a new approach: re-sensitising bacteria to drugs they no longer respond to so that existing antibiotics can hit their …

24d

Science News Daily

Bringing the carbon-reducing cold sintering process out of labs and into ceramics manufacturing

A new techno-economic analysis, by a team led by a researcher from WMG at the University of Warwick, shows that the energy intensive ceramic industry would gain both financial and environmental …

24d

Science News Daily

SciLifeLab and AstraZeneca use cryo-EM to advance biomedicine

A study published in Science Advances reveals the mechanism by which the receptor tyrosine kinase RET can increase neuronal survival in degenerative diseases. To understand the mechanism of …

24d

Science News Daily

Symbol of change for AI development

A mathematical framework that bridges the gap between high-level human-readable knowledge and statistical data has been developed by a KAUST team and is expected to improve machine learning.

24d

Phys.org

Composite metal foam outperforms aluminum for use in aircraft wings

The leading edges of aircraft wings have to meet a very demanding set of characteristics. New research shows that a combination of steel composite metal foam (CMF) and epoxy resin has more desirable characteristics for use as a leading-edge material than the aluminum currently in widespread use.

24d

Phys.org

Technology's double-bind for working women

Smartphones and other mobile devices amplify the patriarchal values that are part of our culture, according to new research by a Massey University expert in organizational communication and gender.

24d

Phys.org

54

New study could revolutionize the way we recycle

Researchers from the University of Surrey together with colleagues from Germany, Spain and France are set to start work on a novel technique to tackle plastic waste, potentially revolutionizing the way we recycle. Engineered microbial communities will be created by the team to digest two types of plastic polymers, polyethylene terephalate (PET) and polyurethane (PU), and transform them into molecu

24d

Phys.org

Edible grasshoppers can be modified for better fatty acid composition

It is possible to modify the fatty acid composition of edible grasshoppers by adding essential fatty acids in their feed, new research from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The study focused on the long-horned grasshopper Ruspolia differens, an economically and nutritionally important insect species that is common and widespread in Africa.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Edible grasshoppers can be modified for better fatty acid composition

It is possible to modify the fatty acid composition of edible grasshoppers by adding essential fatty acids in their feed, new research from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The study focused on the long-horned grasshopper Ruspolia differens, an economically and nutritionally important insect species that is common and widespread in Africa.

24d

Phys.org

Assessing the benefits and risks of land-based greenhouse gas removal

IIASA researchers collaborated with colleagues at a number of international institutions to assess the benefits and risks associated with six different land-based greenhouse gas removal options in light of their potential impacts on ecosystems services and the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

24d

Phys.org

Schools of molecular 'fish' could improve display screens

Take a dive into what may be the world's smallest coral reef. Scientists at the University of Colorado Boulder are using a type of material called liquid crystals to create incredibly small, swirling schools of "fish," according to a study published recently in the journal Nature Communications.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Symbol of change for AI development

Bridging the knowledge gap in artificial intelligence requires an embedding function that helps step between different types of 'thinking.'

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ceramic industry should use carbon reducing cold sintering process says new research

A new techno-economic analysis, by a team led by a researcher from WMG at the University of Warwick, shows that the energy intensive ceramic industry would gain both financial and environmental benefits if it moved to free the cold sintering process from languishing in labs to actual use in manufacturing everything from high tech to domestic ceramics.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Waste plastic converted into filtration membranes

Discarded PET bottles could find a new life in the chemical industry.

24d

Phys.org

28

To fight climate change, science must be mobilized like it was in World War II

We've all but won the argument on climate change. The facts are now unequivocal and climate denialists are facing a losing battle. Concern has risen up the political agenda, and major economic institutions such as the World Trade Organisation and the Bank of England highlight the increasingly extreme climate as a central risk to human prosperity and well-being.

24d

Phys.org

Mapping millet genetics

In the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa, conditions can be difficult for crops. Plants need to have short growing seasons, survive on poor soils and tolerate environmental stresses.

24d

Wired

2K

*Joker* Could Become the Biggest R-Rated Movie of All Time

Also, production on Netflix's *Cowboy Bebop* has been delayed due to an injury on set.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Mapping millet genetics

In the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa, conditions can be difficult for crops. Plants need to have short growing seasons, survive on poor soils and tolerate environmental stresses.

24d

Futurity.org

Patterned dish reveals new info about early embryo

In a new system, all of the major cell types of ectoderm form in a culture dish in a pattern similar to that seen in embryos. During embryonic development, the entire nervous system, the skin, and the sensory organs emerge from a single sheet of cells called the ectoderm. While there have been extensive studies of how this sheet forms all these derivatives, it hasn't been possible to study the pr

24d

Futurism

500+

Scientists Wrapped a Phone in Fake Human Skin

Flesh App We're pretty used to swiping, tapping, and typing on touch screens and touchpads — but what if we swapped them out something more biological? A team of researchers from France and the United Kingdom have developed a human-inspired artificial skin called "Project Skin-On" that claims to be able to "augment" interactive devices, including smartphones and wearables. They've wrapped the epi

24d

Nature

33

The giant toad that impersonates a deadly viper to fool predators

Nature, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03155-6 Is it a harmless Congolese giant toad? Or a lethal snake?

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

If your health care provider is nice, you'll feel less pain

Study finds courtesy during blood draws provides nearly 400% benefit

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Atomic images reveal unusually many neighbors for some oxygen atoms

The identification of new chemical bonds is crucial for the design of new material structures. A team led by Jani Kotakoski at the University of Vienna and Jannik Meyer at the University of Tübingen has found unexpected new configurations of oxygen and nitrogen in graphene. Direct images of the actual atoms and the analysis of the findings were published in the renowned journal Nature Communicatio

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Male deer stain their bellies according to their competitive context

The Fish and Game Resources Research Unit at the University of Cordoba connects different chemicals on deer's "dark bellies" to the level of competition among the population

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Breaking the stroma barrier: Study shows a new way to hit cancer with radiation

Chemotherapy and radiation therapy are commonly used to treat cancer, but are not always effective and can have toxic side effects. Researchers at Osaka University, in collaboration with the University of Heidelberg, tested a new radiotherapy technique that sends alpha-emitting particles to stroma cells in pancreatic tumors. The method slowed tumor growth in mice with minimal side effects, pointin

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mayo Clinic researchers find dairy products associated with higher risk of prostate cancer

The researchers reviewed 47 studies published since 2006, comprising more than 1,000,000 total participants, to better understand the risks of prostate cancer associated with plant- and animal-based foods. While patterns of association emerged, Dr. Shin says more investigation is needed to understand the nature and strength of those associations.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

New knowledge of the muscular system important for future treatment of diseases

When a muscle is activated, it is the proteins myosin and actin that go to work. Myosin molecules take hold of actin molecules and pull, like rope pulling, in a process that gets energy from the use of the cellular fuel ATP. In his dissertation, Mohammad Ashikur Rahman has conducted extensive studies of the mechanical actin and myosin process at the molecular level. These studies have provided new

24d

Phys.org

26

A climate model provides long-term predictions of 'El Niño' events

Although a number of operational climate models are capable of predicting El Niño events, they cannot perform long-term forecasts more than half a year in advance. Now, a team from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by "la Caixa," has developed a new statistical climate model able for the first time to predict El Niño episodes up to two-and-a-half years

24d

Phys.org

New knowledge of the muscular system important for future treatment of diseases

When a muscle is activated, it is the proteins myosin and actin that go to work. Myosin molecules take hold of actin molecules and pull, like rope pulling, in a process that gets energy from the use of the cellular fuel ATP. In his dissertation, Mohammad Ashikur Rahman has conducted extensive studies of the mechanical actin and myosin process at the molecular level. These studies have provided new

24d

Phys.org

New technique can show link between prey and microplastics

Scientists have developed a new method to investigate links between top predator diets and the amount of microplastic they consume through their prey.

24d

Phys.org

No place like home: Species are on the move, but many have nowhere to go

Many insects moving north in response to climate change find they have nowhere to go in Britain's intensively managed landscapes, according to new research.

24d

Phys.org

Living cells integrated into fine structures created in a 3-D printer

Tissue growth and the behavior of cells can be controlled and investigated particularly well by embedding the cells in a delicate 3-D framework. This is achieved using additive 3-D printing methods—so called "bioprinting" techniques. However, this involves a number of challenges: Some methods are very imprecise or only allow a very short time window in which the cells can be processed without bein

24d

Phys.org

SciLifeLab and AstraZeneca use cryo-EM to advance biomedicine

A study published in Science Advances reveals the mechanism by which the receptor tyrosine kinase RET can increase neuronal survival in degenerative diseases. To understand the mechanism of this signalling complex, the study researchers examined the cryo-EM structure in its extracellular region, employing a new approach for data collection.

24d

Phys.org

Bringing the carbon-reducing cold sintering process out of labs and into ceramics manufacturing

A new techno-economic analysis, by a team led by a researcher from WMG at the University of Warwick, shows that the energy intensive ceramic industry would gain both financial and environmental benefits if it moved to free the cold sintering process from languishing in labs to actual use in manufacturing everything from high tech to domestic ceramics.

24d

Phys.org

From biomedicine to buzz pollination: why we need a plan 'bee'

With Extinction Rebellion's mass bee-themed 'die ins' hitting the international news, we're reminded again that our bees are facing many threats—from climate change and loss of native plants to food fights with honey bees.

24d

Phys.org

400+

Researchers watch quantum knots untie

A quantum gas can be tied into knots using magnetic fields. Our researchers were the first to produce these knots as part of a collaboration between Aalto University and Amherst College, U.S., and they have now studied how the knots behave over time. The surprising result is that the knots untie themselves over a short period of time, before turning into a vortex.

24d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

66

'Instant liver, just add water'? Not quite, but a better way to grow multiple organs

Pluripotent stem cells can be used to make experimental models of organ systems, but current techniques often produce models that bear limited resemblance to true organs. Researchers developed an improved method to make a sophisticated three-dimensional organoid model of the liver, pancreas, and bile ducts. The model may help researchers understand how these organs form and how genetic mutations c

24d

ScienceDaily

52

'Instant liver, just add water'? Not quite, but a better way to grow multiple organs

Pluripotent stem cells can be used to make experimental models of organ systems, but current techniques often produce models that bear limited resemblance to true organs. Researchers developed an improved method to make a sophisticated three-dimensional organoid model of the liver, pancreas, and bile ducts. The model may help researchers understand how these organs form and how genetic mutations c

24d

Discover Magazine

Hubble Reveals New Evidence for Controversial Galaxies Without Dark Matter

This new and incredibly deep image from Hubble shows the dim and diffuse galaxy NGC 1052-DF4. New research presents the strongest evidence yet that this strange galaxy is basically devoid of dark matter. (Credit: NASA/ESA/STScI/S. Danieli et al.) stronomers have all but confirmed the universe has at least one galaxy that's woefully deficient in dark matter. The new finding not only indicates that

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

No place like home: Species are on the move, but many have nowhere to go

Many insects moving north in response to climate change find they have nowhere to go in Britain's intensively managed landscapes, according to new research.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

SciLifeLab and AstraZeneca use cryo-EM to advance biomedicine

A study published in Science Advances reveals the mechanism by which the receptor tyrosine kinase RET can increase neuronal survival in degenerative diseases. To understand the mechanism of this signalling complex, the study researchers examined the cryo-EM structure in its extracellular region, employing a new approach for data collection.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

From biomedicine to buzz pollination: why we need a plan 'bee'

With Extinction Rebellion's mass bee-themed 'die ins' hitting the international news, we're reminded again that our bees are facing many threats—from climate change and loss of native plants to food fights with honey bees.

24d

New Scientist

2K

Stressed about climate change? Eight tips for managing eco-anxiety

People are increasingly reporting anxiety about climate change. Psychotherapists met on Saturday to discuss how best to manage the dread over our impact on the planet

24d

Sciencemag

Tiny Proteins

Here's another for the "things we just didn't realize" file. This article is a nice look at "miniproteins" (also known as micropeptides ), small but extremely important species that we've mostly missed out on due to both our equipment and our own biases in looking at the data. Other recent overviews are here , here , and here. I should note that the literature on this topic is rather shaggy – it'

24d

Phys.org

26

Solar orbiter ready to depart Europe

ESA's Solar Orbiter mission has completed its test campaign in Europe and is now being packed ready for its journey to Cape Canaveral at the end of this month, ahead of launch in February 2020.

24d

The Scientist RSS

100

Image of the Day: Puma Genome Sequencing

The big cats show signs of inbreeding despite conservation efforts to diversify their populations.

24d

Futurity.org

45

New lithium-ion battery won't catch fire

A flexible lithium-ion battery built to operate under extreme conditions—including cutting, submersion, and simulated ballistic impact—can now add incombustible to its résumé, researchers say. Current Li-ion batteries are susceptible to catastrophic fire and explosion incidents—most of which arrive without any discernible warning—because they are built with flammable and combustible materials. Ai

24d

ScienceDaily

46

Assessing the benefits and risks of land-based greenhouse gas removal

Researchers have assessed the benefits and risks associated with six different land-based greenhouse gas removal options in light of their potential impacts on ecosystems services and the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

24d

ScienceDaily

100+

Schools of molecular 'fish' could improve display screens

Researchers are using liquid crystals to create incredibly small, swirling schools of 'fish.' The fish in this case are minute disruptions in the orientations of the molecules that make up solutions of liquid crystals.

24d

ScienceDaily

75

Make some noise: How background noise affects brain activity

Have you ever found it difficult to focus on a task due to background noise? Scientists are studying just how these sounds impact our brain activity — and what that impact means for designing neurotechnology.

24d

ScienceDaily

24

GAS7 protein allows cells to eat

Phagocytosis can be viewed as a primitive immune system used by all cells. When a pathogen is near the cell, the cell membrane will deform to engulf the pathogen and dispose of it. Researchers have found that a two-dimensional sheet formed by the protein GAS7 is critical for this process, identifying through crystallography and microscopy two key hydrophilic loops in the protein.

24d

Singularity Hub

72

With These 4 Breakthroughs, We'll Be Able to Write Whole Genomes From Scratch

The ability to read genomes has transformed our understanding of biology. Being able to write them would give us unprecedented control over the fabric of life. Rapid advances in DNA sequencing and gene editing technology mean we are now truly in the age of genomics. For a few hundred dollars, gene tic testing companies will give you a detailed rundown of your ancestry and susceptibility to a host

24d

Phys.org

100+

Astronomers investigate IRAS 09002-473 cluster, find hundreds of probable member stars

Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers from Pennsylvania State University (PSU) and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have investigated IRAS 09002-473, an embedded cluster of stars in the Vela Molecular Ridge. The study, presented in a paper published October 10 on arXiv.org, reveals more insights into the nature of this poorly studied cluster and identifies hundreds of

24d

Ingeniøren

Etisk dilemma: Hvordan ved vi, om fremdyrket hjerne føler smerte?

PLUS. Hjernevæv, dyrket af stamceller, giver hjerneforskerne nye etiske dilemmaer. For hvornår begynder hjernestykker at få bevidsthed?

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

99

Bioprinting: Living cells in a 3D printer

A high-resolution bioprinting process has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna): Cells can now be embedded in a 3D matrix printed with micrometer precision — at a printing speed of one meter per second, orders of magnitude faster than previously possible. Tissue growth and the behavior of cells can be controlled and investigated particularly well by embedding the cells in a delicate 3D framework. Th

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A technology to transform 2D planes into 3D soft and flexible structures

DGIST Professor Sohee Kim's Team developed a technology to produce 3D soft and flexible devices by blowing balloons made of polymeric thin films. Can be made in various 3D shapes… Expected to have diverse medical and biomedical applications.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Silencing RNA nanotherapy shows promise against pancreatic cancer

Despite advances in cancer survival, more than 90% of people with pancreatic cancer die within five years. Now a preclinical study by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, Fla., has demonstrated that specially designed peptide-based nanoparticles can suppress pancreatic cancer growth without the toxic side eff

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Forests on the radar

With freely available radar data from satellites, biodiversity in forests can be analysed very well. In Nature Communications, researchers report that biodiversity even of tiny insects can be reliably modelled from space.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A climate model developed by ISGlobal provides long-term predictions of 'El Niño' events

For the first time, a tool can predict episodes up to two-and-a-half years in advance.

24d

Futurism

These All-Natural Plant-Based Drinks Will Help You Sleep and Help You Wake

If you're constantly in a foggy funk because you're just not getting enough rest, it might not only be due to a lack of quality sleep . Researchers have found that the quality sleep you're after actually occurs when you get into a good sleep routine. What does this mean? There's actually a lot of surprising benefits for going to sleep and waking up at the same time each day. One study even found

24d

The Atlantic

200+

A River of Words in Pittsburgh

As we've traveled around the country with our American Futures and Our Towns projects since 2013, my husband, Jim, and I have evolved from being skeptics to evangelists about the impact of public arts on communities. We have seen how towns' self-image, their presentation to visitors, their marking of history or current experience, their civic engagement and quality of everyday life and interactio

24d

Science News Daily

Smart speakers can be hijacked by apps that spy on users

[no content]

24d

Phys.org

37

We need to understand the culture of whales so we can save them

We often think of culture as solely human. We think of our music, our clothes, our food, our languages. However, culture stretches far beyond Homo sapiens. As evidence of the existence of culture in other animal groups emerges (from insects, rats, fish to land mammals, primates and dolphins), humans need to rethink what it means to have culture. We must accept that what we have long considered our

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

47

We need to understand the culture of whales so we can save them

We often think of culture as solely human. We think of our music, our clothes, our food, our languages. However, culture stretches far beyond Homo sapiens. As evidence of the existence of culture in other animal groups emerges (from insects, rats, fish to land mammals, primates and dolphins), humans need to rethink what it means to have culture. We must accept that what we have long considered our

24d

Futurity.org

44

Long-fingered aye-ayes have secret 'thumbs'

Aye-ayes, the world's weirdest little primates, have small "pseudothumbs," complete with their own fingerprints, report researchers. The tiny extra digits, the first accessory digits ever found in a primate, may help aye-ayes grip objects and branches as they move through trees. "…it looks like a strange lemur walking on spiders." The extremely rare lemurs are known for their constantly growing i

24d

Quanta Magazine

500+

Mathematicians Begin to Tame Wild 'Sunflower' Problem

A team of mathematicians and computer scientists has finally made progress on a seemingly simple problem that has bedeviled researchers for nearly six decades. Posed by the mathematicians Paul Erdős and Richard Rado in 1960, the problem concerns how often you would expect to find patterns resembling sunflowers in large collections of objects, such as a large scattering of points in the plane. Whi

24d

Phys.org

100+

How Antarctic krill fertilize the oceans and even store carbon

Krill are best known as whale food. But few people realize that these small, shrimp-like creatures are also important to the health of the ocean and the atmosphere. In fact, Antarctic krill can fertilize the oceans, ultimately supporting marine life from tiny plankton through to massive whales and, through their feces, they can increase the store of carbon in the deep ocean.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

How Antarctic krill fertilize the oceans and even store carbon

Krill are best known as whale food. But few people realize that these small, shrimp-like creatures are also important to the health of the ocean and the atmosphere. In fact, Antarctic krill can fertilize the oceans, ultimately supporting marine life from tiny plankton through to massive whales and, through their feces, they can increase the store of carbon in the deep ocean.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The art of cancer caregiving: How art therapies benefits those caring for cancer patients

A recent Drexel University study showed coloring and open-studio art therapy benefits stressed caregivers of cancer patients.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Women with anemia twice as likely to need transfusion after cesarean delivery

Pregnant women with anemia are twice as likely to need blood transfusions after a cesarean delivery, as those without the condition, according to a study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting. Yet most pregnant women aren't screened early in their pregnancy for iron deficiency, which can lead to anemia.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Advances in transcriptomics give single cell views of brain development and disease

Advances in high-throughput RNA sequencing technologies are opening windows into how normal and pathological brain processes develop at the single cell level. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2019, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

SciLifeLab and AstraZeneca use cryo-EM to advance biomedicine

The receptor tyrosine kinase RET is a signalling complex of the enteric nervous system. The research shows how monomers dimerise, explaining why the assembly is required for proper placement of the transmembrane helices, which is prerequisite for intracellular autophosphorylation. Cryo-EM data proposes how the selectivity between RET ligands is achieved, and a potential to trigger different signal

24d

Phys.org

Colorful Tennessee fish protected as endangered

n response to a petition and lawsuit from the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protected the Barrens topminnow today under the Endangered Species Act. The small, colorful fish is found only in central Tennessee in clear, spring-fed streams on the Barrens Plateau in Cannon, Coffee and Warren counties.

24d

Futurity.org

24

For plane wings, metal foam may beat aluminum

A combination of steel composite metal foam and epoxy resin could be a better leading-edge material in airplane wings than aluminum, tests show. "We call our hybrid material 'infused CMF,'" says corresponding author Afsaneh Rabiei, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at North Carolina State University. "And while infused CMF is about the same weight as aluminum, it is tougher and

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Colorful Tennessee fish protected as endangered

n response to a petition and lawsuit from the Center for Biological Diversity, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protected the Barrens topminnow today under the Endangered Species Act. The small, colorful fish is found only in central Tennessee in clear, spring-fed streams on the Barrens Plateau in Cannon, Coffee and Warren counties.

24d

Phys.org

21

A technology to transform 2-D planes into 3-D soft and flexible structures by engineering adhesion between thin-films

Professor Sohee Kim's research team in the Department of Robotics Engineering has developed a technology to produce flexible 3-D medical devices. It could be used in devices with embedded electrical functionality or soft robots.

24d

Phys.org

400+

Space may soon become a war zone – here's how that would work

At an upcoming summit in early December, NATO is expected to declare space as a "warfighting domain," partly in response to new developments in technology.

24d

Phys.org

500+

The DUNE experiment could lead to new discoveries about solar neutrinos

The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is an international research collaboration aimed at exploring topics related to neutrinos and proton decay, which should start collecting data around 2025. In a recent study featured in Physical Review Letters, a team of researchers at Ohio State University have showed that DUNE has the potential to deliver groundbreaking results and insight about so

24d

Science | Smithsonian

500+

Extra Thumb Discovered on Aye-Aye Lemurs, Giving These Primates Six Fingers

Used for gripping limbs, a "pseudo-thumb" makes the hands of these bizarre primates even creepier

24d

Futurism

300+

NASA's Considering Giant Inflatable Tents for Moon Habitats

Home Away From Home NASA knows it wants to send astronauts to live both on the Moon and in its orbit in the next decade, but it isn't sure what sort of home those astronauts would live in. To help it decide, the agency has given five different companies millions of dollars, and tasked each with building some mockup Moon habitats — and one of the designs is a giant inflatable tent that looks like

24d

Nature

100+

Early cancer detection is goal of transatlantic research alliance

Nature, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03181-4 The collaborators will take advantage of recent advances in cancer genetics and imaging.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Assessing the benefits and risks of land-based greenhouse gas removal

IIASA researchers collaborated with colleagues at a number of international institutions to assess the benefits and risks associated with six different land-based greenhouse gas removal options in light of their potential impacts on ecosystems services and the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Find FH® machine learning model flags individuals with FH for first time at national level

The FH Foundation announced that a machine learning algorithm effectively identified individuals with probable familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) for the first time at a national scale through its FIND FH initiative. The FIND (Flag, Identify, Network, Deliver) FH model's effectiveness was validated in the FH Foundation's study published online in The Lancet Digital Health and simultaneously presen

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

44

Stanford researchers create new catalyst that can turn carbon dioxide into fuels

A new process shows promise in turning the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide back into usable fuels, and yields 4 times as much fuel as previous approaches.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Schools of molecular 'fish' could improve display screens

Researchers are using a type of material called liquid crystals to create incredibly small, swirling schools of 'fish.'

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

HPV immunization program cuts pre-cancer rates by more than half

A school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization program in British Columbia, Canada, is dramatically reducing rates of cervical pre-cancer in B.C. women, according to a new study.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Space and place in alcohol research

A new article by scientists at the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation and colleagues at the University of Pittsburgh, Columbia, and Ohio State tackles the problems researchers must address to fully understand the effects of physical and social environments on drinking patterns and problems.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

GAS7 protein allows cells to eat

Phagocytosis can be viewed as a primitive immune system used by all cells. When a pathogen is near the cell, the cell membrane will deform to engulf the pathogen and dispose of it. Japanese researchers have found that a two-dimensional sheet formed by the protein GAS7 is critical for this process, identifying through crystallography and microscopy two key hydrophilic loops in the protein.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Instant liver, just add water'? Not quite, but a better way to grow multiple organs

Pluripotent stem cells can be used to make experimental models of organ systems, but current techniques often produce models that bear limited resemblance to true organs. Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and Tokyo Medical and Dental University(TMDU) developed an improved method to make a sophisticated three-dimensional organoid model of the liver, pancreas, and

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Make some noise: How background noise affects brain activity

Have you ever found it difficult to focus on a task due to background noise? Scientists at the University of Alberta are studying just how these sounds impact our brain activity –and what that impact means for designing neurotechnology.

24d

Science News Daily

Microsoft Surface Laptop 3 15-inch review: it's a bigger Surface Laptop

The new 15-inch Surface Laptop is a familiar package with new dimensions Continue reading…

24d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

After Decades, the Air Force Retires 8-Inch Floppies From Missile Control Systems

After over 40 years, the Strategic Automated Command and Control system (SACCS) no longer runs on venerable 8-inch floppy drives from circa 1972. As of this past June, the entire system has moved to a "highly-secure solid-state digital storage solution." That's according to Lt. Col. Jason Rossi, commander of the Air Force's 595th Strategic Communications Squadron. The federal government, for obvi

24d

ScienceDaily

300+

Gimme six! Researchers discover aye-aye's extra finger

The world's weirdest little primate has gotten even weirder, thanks to the discovery of a tiny extra digit. Aye-ayes possess small 'pseudothumbs' — complete with their own fingerprints — that may help them grip objects and branches as they move through trees. This is the first accessory digit ever found in a primate.

24d

ScienceDaily

72

Real texture for lab-grown meat

Researchers have grown rabbit and cow muscles cells on edible gelatin scaffolds that mimic the texture and consistency of meat, demonstrating that realistic meat products may eventually be produced without the need to raise and slaughter animals.

24d

ScienceDaily

76

Fathers are 'cautionary tales' about health for some adults

Some adults see their mothers and fathers as still influencing their own health — but in very different ways, according to a new study.

24d

ScienceDaily

1K

No link found between youth contact sports and cognitive, mental health problems

Adolescents who play contact sports, including football, are no more likely to experience cognitive impairment, depression or suicidal thoughts in early adulthood than their peers, suggests a new study of nearly 11,000 youth followed for 14 years.

24d

ScienceDaily

100+

Archaeologists uncover 2,000-year-old street in Jerusalem built by Pontius Pilate

An ancient walkway most likely used by pilgrims as they made their way to worship at the Temple Mount has been uncovered in the 'City of David' in the Jerusalem Walls National Park.

24d

Nature

29

A fresh mechanism for how buckyballs form in space

Nature, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03139-6 The spectroscopic fingerprints of buckyballs have been observed in space, but questions remain about how these large molecules form. Laboratory experiments have revealed a possible mechanism.

24d

Phys.org

1K

What was the first color in the universe?

The universe bathes in a sea of light, from the blue-white flickering of young stars to the deep red glow of hydrogen clouds. Beyond the colors seen by human eyes, there are flashes of X-rays and gamma rays, powerful bursts of radio, and the faint, ever-present glow of the cosmic microwave background. The cosmos is filled with colors seen and unseen, ancient and new. But of all these, there was on

24d

Phys.org

200+

Atomic images reveal many neighbors for some oxygen atoms

The identification of new chemical bonds is crucial for the design of new material structures. A team led by Jani Kotakoski at the University of Vienna and Jannik Meyer at the University of Tübingen has found unexpected new configurations of oxygen and nitrogen in graphene. Direct images of the actual atoms and the analysis of the findings were published in the renowned journal Nature Communicatio

24d

Wired

300+

Star Wars News: 'The Rise of Skywalker' Will Address the Toxic Rey-Kylo Relationship

Also, "Jedi" is now in the Oxford English Dictionary, and more 'Star Wars' rumors and news.

24d

Wired

6K

Andrew Yang Wants a Thorium Reactor by 2027. Good Luck, Buddy

The presidential candidate backs a type of reactor that promises cleaner, safer nuclear energy. But it may not be the best way to ditch fossil fuels.

24d

Phys.org

30

Forests on the radar

With freely available radar data from satellites, biodiversity in forests can be analysed very well. In Nature Communications, researchers report that biodiversity even of tiny insects can be reliably modeled from space.

24d

Phys.org

Enabling selective carbon-carbon bond formation at the inherently inert position of enol silyl ethers

Nagoya University researchers have discovered a new way to modify reactants that have been widely studied and utilized for over 50 years, enabling more efficient production of some complex organic molecules used in medical drugs. The work was published in Nature Communications.

24d

Phys.org

45

How cells protect themselves from mitochondrial defects

Cells need powerhouses known as mitochondria to utilize the energy stored in our food. Most of the proteins required for this powerhouse function are encoded in the nucleus and transported into the mitochondria after they have been synthesized in the cytosol. Signal sequences are needed to allow the protein to enter the mitochondria. Once the protein has arrived there, the signal sequences are, ho

24d

Phys.org

Getting revegetation right with genetics

Eucalypts, wattles, banksias, grevilleas and other Australian native plants are some of the most fascinating and unique flora on Earth.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

26

Forests on the radar

With freely available radar data from satellites, biodiversity in forests can be analysed very well. In Nature Communications, researchers report that biodiversity even of tiny insects can be reliably modeled from space.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

37

How cells protect themselves from mitochondrial defects

Cells need powerhouses known as mitochondria to utilize the energy stored in our food. Most of the proteins required for this powerhouse function are encoded in the nucleus and transported into the mitochondria after they have been synthesized in the cytosol. Signal sequences are needed to allow the protein to enter the mitochondria. Once the protein has arrived there, the signal sequences are, ho

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Getting revegetation right with genetics

Eucalypts, wattles, banksias, grevilleas and other Australian native plants are some of the most fascinating and unique flora on Earth.

24d

ScienceDaily

500+

California's crashing kelp forest

First the sea stars wasted to nothing. Then purple urchins took over, eating and eating until the bull kelp forests were gone. The red abalone starved. Their fishery closed. Red sea urchins starved. Their fishery collapsed. And the ocean kept warming. This ecological horror story movie took place between 2013-2017, with lasting impacts. This study chronicles the catastrophic shift in 2014 from a r

24d

ScienceDaily

49

Prevention better than cure at preventing young users from getting involved in cybercrime

Highly-targeted messaging campaigns from law enforcement can be surprisingly effective at dissuading young gamers from getting involved in cybercrime, a new study has suggested.

24d

Scientific American Content

400+

Molecular Trap Locks Away CO2

New images reveal carbon dioxide ensnared in metal-organic frameworks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

24d

forskning.se

Titta in i flugans huvud – eller i flygplansdelen

Med hjälp av en upphittad död fluga visar Amir Reza Zekavat, doktor vid Institutionen för naturvetenskap och teknik vid Örebro universitet, hur lätt det är att se små detaljer med hjälp av datortomografi, skiktröntgen. Både på ytan och inuti. På datorskärmen syns det tydligt att det är en fluga. Men i den enorma förstoringen går det också att se minsta skada på flugan – och ta en titt in i flugan

24d

The Atlantic

45K

All the Pregnancies I Couldn't Talk About

The first time I felt the sharp twinge in my belly was during an important client meeting. Seated around the table were senior executives from a multinational information-technology company. We were developing the company's long-term strategy when the twinge hit me again, this time followed by a familiar dampness in my underwear and then a slippery fluid sliding through me. I quickly handed the m

24d

Science News Daily

$260 million deal averts 1st federal trial on opioid crisis

The nation's three biggest drug distributors and a major drugmaker reached an 11th-hour, $260 million settlement over the toll of the opioids in two Ohio counties, averting what would have been …

24d

Phys.org

More than half of LGBT+ graduates think inclusivity programs in the workplace are important

LGBT+ graduates value inclusivity programs and say they are a vital factor in wellbeing at work, new research has revealed.

24d

Phys.org

Microscopic spines connect worm neurons

Dendritic "spines"—small protrusions on the receiving side of the connection (synapse) between two nerve cells—are recognized as key functional components of neuronal circuits in mammals. The shapes and numbers of spines are regulated by neuronal activity and correlate with learning and memory.

24d

Phys.org

35

Migratory birds arriving earlier, but they're not keeping pace with flowering, leaf-out

An Aroostook County man's nature-based journal notes written in the mid-1900s are shedding light on ecological effects of climate change in understudied northern Maine.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Microscopic spines connect worm neurons

Dendritic "spines"—small protrusions on the receiving side of the connection (synapse) between two nerve cells—are recognized as key functional components of neuronal circuits in mammals. The shapes and numbers of spines are regulated by neuronal activity and correlate with learning and memory.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

35

Migratory birds arriving earlier, but they're not keeping pace with flowering, leaf-out

An Aroostook County man's nature-based journal notes written in the mid-1900s are shedding light on ecological effects of climate change in understudied northern Maine.

24d

NYT > Science

5K

$260 Million Opioid Settlement Reached at Last Minute With Big Drug Companies

The deal involves large pharmaceutical distributors and Teva, resolving cases that sought redress from the devastation caused by two decades of opioid abuse.

24d

Future(s) Studies

HTC launches smartphone with Bitcoin full node capabilities – The Block

submitted by /u/TheCrunk1 [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

37

Campaign to stop 'killer robots' takes peace mascot to UN: The robot will demand that robots not guided by human remote control, which could accidentally start wars or cause mass atrocities, should be outlawed by the same type of international treaty that bans chemical weapons.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

"3.61 Million Views & Nothing To Show" — A look into China's fake social media scene.

submitted by /u/SobeyHarker [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

U.S. takes step to require asylum-seekers' DNA – The new policy would allow the government to amass a trove of biometric data on hundreds of thousands of migrants, raising major privacy concerns

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

US hydrogen industry could become more than a $130b industry by 2050. "could result in lowering greenhouse gas emissions by 20 or 120 million metric tons of carbon emissions equivalent each year."

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Global wind fleet to grow 62% by 2024

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

The UK Just Got More Power From Renewables Than Fossil Fuels, a First Since 1882

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Rocket Lab plans to send payloads to the Moon

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Guardian Media Group becomes first major news organisation to become a B Corporation and pledges to reach net zero emissions by 2030

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

How UK's disused mine shafts plan to store renewable energy

submitted by /u/hello_squire [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Real texture for lab grown meat: Scientists have grown rabbit and cow muscle cells on edible gelatin scaffolds that mimic the texture and consistency of meat, demonstrating that realistic meat products may eventually be produced without the need to raise and slaughter animals.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

24d

Big Think

200+

New capsule can orally deliver drugs that usually have to be injected

Many drugs, especially those made of proteins, cannot be taken orally because they are broken down in the gastrointestinal tract before they can take effect. One example is insulin, which patients with diabetes have to inject daily or even more frequently. In hopes of coming up with an alternative to those injections, MIT engineers, working with scientists from Novo Nordisk, have designed a new d

24d

Livescience.com

500+

'Cursed' Primate Weirdos Have Extra Thumbs. Scientists Didn't Know About Them Until Now.

The discovery of a previously unknown mini-thumb makes weird aye-ayes even weirder.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gimme six! Researchers discover aye-aye's extra finger

The world's weirdest little primate has gotten even weirder, thanks to the discovery of a tiny extra digit. Aye-ayes possess small 'pseudothumbs' — complete with their own fingerprints — that may help them grip objects and branches as they move through trees. This is the first accessory digit ever found in a primate.

24d

Science News Daily

EU contracts with Microsoft raising "serious" data concerns, says watchdog

Europe's chief data protection watchdog has raised concerns over contractual arrangements between Microsoft and the European Union institutions which are making use of its software products …

24d

Science News Daily

Aye-ayes just got weirder with the discovery of a tiny, sixth 'finger'

Aye-ayes have a sixth "finger," or pseudothumb, that may compensate for other, overspecialized fingers by helping the lemurs grip things.

24d

ScienceAlert – Latest

400+

Aye-Ayes Have More Digits Than Any Other Primate, And It's Just Too Weird

Who wouldn't want an extra thumb?

24d

NeuroLogica Blog

1K

Aluminum Air Batteries

An article about a new battery is making the rounds and I am getting a lot of questions about it – Ex-Navy officer turned inventor signs a multi-million deal to produce his electric car battery that will take drivers 1,500 miles without needing to charge . As stated, that sounds like a significant advance, about a 5 fold improvement over the current lithium-ion batteries powering a Tesla, for exa

24d

New Scientist

100+

AI could help work out how many people are in large crowds

How many people really attend gatherings or protests, such as the recent Brexit march? Artificial intelligence may be able to figure it out

24d

Wired

500+

The Bizarre Aye-Aye Isn't Giving Us the Finger After All

The primate uses its long middle finger to fish for grubs. But scientists just discovered its "pseudothumb," meaning it's got six digits, not five.

24d

NYT > Science

500+

Add 'Pseudo Thumb' to the Aye-Aye Lemur's Bizarre Anatomy

Hiding in the weird creature's palm was something that scientists had missed.

24d

Ingeniøren

Sådan optrevlede myndigheder internationalt børnepornonetværk

En slet skjult IP-adresse og bitcoins skjulte ikke manden bag et børnepornonetværk så godt, som han måske selv forventede.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

Gimme six! Researchers discover aye-aye's extra finger

The world's weirdest little primate has gotten even weirder, thanks to the discovery of a tiny extra digit. A study led by researchers from North Carolina State University has found that aye-ayes possess small "pseudothumbs"—complete with their own fingerprints—that may help them grip objects and branches as they move through trees. This is the first accessory digit ever found in a primate.

24d

Phys.org

100+

Gimme six! Researchers discover aye-aye's extra finger

The world's weirdest little primate has gotten even weirder, thanks to the discovery of a tiny extra digit. A study led by researchers from North Carolina State University has found that aye-ayes possess small "pseudothumbs"—complete with their own fingerprints—that may help them grip objects and branches as they move through trees. This is the first accessory digit ever found in a primate.

24d

forskning.se

100+

En global elit flyger tusen gånger mer än genomsnittet

Känslan av flygskam har mer eller mindre spritt sig till stora delar av befolkningen, i alla fall i Sverige. En ny studie visar dock att internationellt kända, köpstarka personer knappast har ändrat sin livsstil. Åtminstone inte de tio mer eller mindre slumpvalda personer, från fyra kategorier, vars flygresande en grupp forskare från Lunds universitet noggrant kartlagt under ett års tid, år 2017.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

93

Coral discovery equips researchers with new environmental monitoring method

A rare element discovered in Great Barrier Reef coral skeletons will help scientists understand the environmental history of nearby regions.

24d

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Antidepressiva bedöms vara långsiktigt säkra

Det saknas evidens för att antidepressiva läkemedel har långsiktiga negativa effekter, exempelvis ökad självmordsrisk. Det slår en internationell grupp forskare fast i en omfattande översikt av 45 metastudier, publicerad i tidskriften JAMA Psychology.

24d

Phys.org

91

Coral discovery equips researchers with new environmental monitoring method

A rare element discovered in Great Barrier Reef coral skeletons will help scientists understand the environmental history of nearby regions.

24d

Phys.org

200+

The rotation of Venus

Venus is covered in a thick layer of clouds, one reason that it appears so bright in the sky. Ancient astronomers had a good idea of what (since Copernicus) we know as its orbital period; the modern measurement is that Venus takes 224.65 days to complete one revolution around the Sun, a Venusian year. Because of the clouds, however, it has been difficult to measure the length of the Venusian day s

24d

For Better Science

58

Nasty Jasti Rao, or what's wrong with US biomedicine

Brain cancer professor Jasti Rao enjoyed the American dream of gigantic salary, political support and lavish research grants, in Texas and in Illinois. Did he ever perform any research, in-between casino gambling and terrorizing his lab employees? 109 fraudulent papers on PubPeer suggest otherwise.

24d

Ingeniøren

75

Spørg Fagfolket: Er det overhovedet fysisk muligt at have en alkoholpromille på 0?

En læser vil gerne vide, om man overhovedet kan have en alkoholfri krop. Næ, det kan man ikke, fortæller retsmediciner.

24d

Ingeniøren

34

Det amerikanske luftvåben dropper endeligt 8-tommers disketten

2019 blev året, hvor det amerikanske luftvåben var klar til at udskifte sine gamle 8-tommers disketter til fordel for et nyere system. De gamle computere bliver dog gemt, hvis det nye driller.

24d

Ingeniøren

Batterier vil hæve den laveste elpris mere, end de skærer af toppen

PLUS. Norske NVE forventer en halvering af prisen på batterier i nettet på blot ti år.

24d

Livescience.com

1K

Ancient City of 'Mahendraparvata' Hidden Beneath Cambodian Jungle

Archaeologists have mapped the ancient city of Mahendraparvata, hidden beneath thick vegetation on a Cambodian mountain not far from the temple of Angkor Wat.

24d

Phys.org

1K

Antarctic ice cliffs may not contribute to sea-level rise as much as predicted

Antarctica's ice sheet spans close to twice the area of the contiguous United States, and its land boundary is buttressed by massive, floating ice shelves extending hundreds of miles out over the frigid waters of the Southern Ocean. When these ice shelves collapse into the ocean, they expose towering cliffs of ice along Antarctica's edge.

24d

Phys.org

100+

NASA map reveals a new landslide risk factor

In the deadly 2018 earthquake in the Indonesian city of Palu, intense shaking changed solid ground into a landslide of flowing mud, multiplying the death toll and economic impact. A new paper shows that this disastrous effect was triggered by a previously unknown risk factor: flooding rice fields for farming.

24d

Phys.org

34

Emerging cracks in the Pine Island Glacier

The Copernicus Sentinel-1 and Sentinel-2 satellites have revealed new cracks, or rifts, in the Pine Island Glacier—one of the primary ice arteries in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The two large rifts were first spotted in early 2019 and have each rapidly grown to approximately 20 km in length.

24d

forskning.se

42

Enzymer kan minska farliga utsläpp från textilindustrin

Ett problem som textilindustrin dras med är att de mest effektiva processerna vid färgning av textilier i dag kräver stora mängder vatten, energi och kemikalier. I ett försök att lösa detta problem används enzymer för att få igång en nedbrytningsprocess av färgämnen och andra kemikalier. För att åstadkomma detta behöver enzymerna fästas på ytan av ett stödmaterial för att de ska verka maximalt. I

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fathers are 'cautionary tales' about health for some adults

Some adults see their mothers and fathers as still influencing their own health — but in very different ways, according to a new study.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

33

Volcanic ash sparks a new discovery

Imagine you're getting ready to fly to your favorite vacation destination when suddenly a volcano erupts, sending massive amounts of volcanic ash into the atmosphere, and forcing the cancellation of your flight. That's exactly what happened in April 2010 when Eyjafjallajokull, a volcano in Iceland, erupted and disrupted air travel in Europe for 6 days. Scientists are now using plasma physics to pr

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Impact: 60 years of shock wave research at Sandia National Laboratories

Sandia National Laboratories physicists Mark Boslough and Dave Crawford predicted the Hubble Space Telescope would see a rising vapor plume as the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet crashed into the far side of Jupiter in 1994. And sure enough, the plume produced by the impact matched Sandia's computational analysis.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Taking a new tangent to control pesky waves in fusion plasmas

Fusion combines light elements in the form of plasma — the hot, charged state of matter composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei — to generate massive amounts of energy. One of the ways that scientists help heat the plasma is by injecting beams of energetic particles into tokamaks to provide enough energy for plasma particles to overcome mutual repulsion and fuse together.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Making connections: Bringing astrophysical processes down to Earth

Magnetic reconnection, a process in which magnetic field lines tear and come back together, releasing large amounts of kinetic energy, occurs throughout the universe. The process gives rise to auroras, solar flares and geomagnetic storms that can disrupt cell phone service and electric grids on Earth. A major challenge in the study of magnetic reconnection, however, is bridging the gap between the

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Island retreat: Fuel injection helps reduce magnetic island instabilities

Fusion is a non-carbon-based process for energy production, where lighter atoms fuse into heavier ones. Fusion reactors operate by confining a 'soup' of charged particles, known as a plasma, within powerful magnetic fields. But these magnetic fields must contain the plasma long enough that it can be heated to extreme temperatures — hotter than the sun — where fusion reactions can occur.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Taking new angle to enable more efficient, compact fusion power plants

Researchers at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in San Diego have demonstrated a new approach for injecting microwaves into a fusion plasma that doubles the efficiency of a critical technique that could have major implications for future fusion reactors. The results show that launching the microwaves into the plasma via a novel geometry delivers substantial improvements in the plasma current dr

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

World record acceleration: Zero to 7.8 billion electron volts in 8 inches

To understand the fundamental nature of our universe, scientists would like to build particle colliders that accelerate electrons and their antimatter counterparts (positrons) to extreme energies (up to tera electron volts, or TeV). With conventional technology, however, this requires a machine that is enormously big and expensive (think 20 miles long). To shrink the size and cost of these machine

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New insights could help tame speedy ions in fusion plasmas

To create a practical fusion energy reactor, researchers need to control particles known as fast ions. These speedy ions, which are electrically charged hydrogen atoms, provide much of the self-heating ability of the reactor as they collide with other ions. But they can also quickly escape the powerful magnetic fields used to confine them and overheat the walls of the containment vessel, causing d

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A star is born: Using lasers to study how star stuff is made

On a typical day at the world's biggest laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in Livermore, California, you can find scientists casually making star-like conditions using 192 high-powered lasers. Stars in the universe are formed through a process called nucleosynthesis, which fuses lighter atoms to create new heavier atomic nuclei. Natural elements found here on Earth, such as helium and alu

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

49

Gravity crystals: A new method for exploring the physics of white dwarf stars

Grab a mixing bowl from your kitchen, throw in a handful of aluminum balls, apply some high voltage, and watch an elegant dance unfold where particles re-arrange themselves into a distinct 'crystal' pattern. This curious behavior belongs to the phenomenon known as Wigner crystallization, where particles with the same electrical charge repel one another to form an ordered structure.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Magneto-inertial fusion experiment nears completion

The Plasma Liner Experiment will soon test the potential for a novel plasma fusion concept, while offering insights into the physics of colliding plasma jets.

24d

Livescience.com

4K

Archaeologists Identify 'Lost' Jerusalem Street Built by Pontius Pilate — the Man Who Condemned Jesus to Death

Archaeologists have identified a grand street in Jerusalem that was built by Pontius Pilate, the Roman prefect of Judea who is famous for overseeing the trial and crucifixion of Jesus.

24d

Livescience.com

1K

This Brainless 'Blob' Could Take Over the Paris Zoo, If You Give It Enough Oatmeal

The Paris Zoological Park is debuting a new exhibit on 'the blob' — a brainless, single-cell slime mold with incredible problem-solving potential.

24d

Dagens Medicin

Heitmann om ulovlige fastholdelser: »Fuldstændigt uacceptabelt«

Formand for Folketingets sundheds- og ældreudvalg Jane Heitmann (V) finder det dybt bekymrende og fuldstændigt uacceptabelt, at der i psykiatrien fortsat sker timelange fastholdelser, når der ikke er lovhjemmel til det. Hun har bedt ministeren om at se på sagen.

24d

The Atlantic

500+

Dear Therapist: My Girlfriend Had an Affair With My Co-worker

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, Five months ago, my long-term girlfriend cheated on me. Our relationship had broken down due to poor communication, working too much, resentment, etc. While I was the one cheated on, I now fully acknowledge th

24d

Wired

400+

This Week's Cartoons: Roombas, Slides, and Calculus

Modernist mathematics.

24d

Scientific American Blog Posts

20

A High-Tech Solution for Rooting Out Counterfeit Goods

Mobile optical scanners can check the authenticity of an object with unprecedented speed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

24d

New on MIT Technology Review

2K

Military artificial intelligence can be easily and dangerously fooled

AI warfare is beginning to dominate military strategy in the US and China, but is the technology ready?

24d

Phys.org

New insights could help tame speedy ions in fusion plasmas

To create a practical fusion energy reactor, researchers need to control particles known as fast ions. These speedy ions, which are electrically charged hydrogen atoms, provide much of the self-heating ability of the reactor as they collide with other ions. But they can also quickly escape the powerful magnetic fields used to confine them and overheat the walls of the containment vessel, causing d

24d

Phys.org

Sandia scientists tell the remarkable story of shock wave physics in post-World War II America

Sandia National Laboratories physicists Mark Boslough and Dave Crawford predicted the Hubble Space Telescope would see a rising vapor plume as the Shoemaker-Levy 9 comet crashed into the far side of Jupiter (Figure 1) in 1994. And sure enough, the plume produced by the impact matched Sandia's computational analysis (Figure 2). A member of the Hubble team told Boslough that the images of the plume'

24d

Phys.org

500+

World record acceleration: Zero to 7.8 billion electron volts in 8 inches

To understand the fundamental nature of our universe, scientists would like to build particle colliders that accelerate electrons and their antimatter counterparts (positrons) to extreme energies (up to tera electron volts, or TeV). With conventional technology, however, this requires a machine that is enormously big and expensive (think 20 miles (32 km) long). To shrink the size and cost of these

24d

Phys.org

44

Volcanic ash modifies the height, width and lifetime of a standing shock wave that can occur during volcanic eruptions

Imagine you're getting ready to fly to your favorite vacation destination when suddenly a volcano erupts, sending massive amounts of volcanic ash into the atmosphere, and forcing the cancellation of your flight. That's exactly what happened in April 2010 when Eyjafjallajokull, a volcano in Iceland, erupted and disrupted air travel in Europe for six days. Scientists are now using plasma physics to

24d

Phys.org

100+

Taking new angle to enable more efficient, compact fusion power plants

Researchers at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in San Diego have demonstrated a new approach for injecting microwaves into a fusion plasma that doubles the efficiency of a critical technique that could have major implications for future fusion reactors. The results show that launching the microwaves into the plasma via a novel geometry delivers substantial improvements in the plasma current dr

24d

Phys.org

200+

Gravity crystals: A new method for exploring the physics of white dwarf stars

Grab a mixing bowl from your kitchen, throw in a handful of aluminum balls, apply some high voltage, and watch an elegant dance unfold where particles re-arrange themselves into a distinct "crystal" pattern. This curious behavior belongs to the phenomenon known as Wigner crystallization, where particles with the same electrical charge repel one another to form an ordered structure.

24d

Phys.org

100+

New supercomputer simulations explore magnetic reconnection and make a surprising discovery

Magnetic reconnection, a process in which magnetic field lines tear and come back together, releasing large amounts of kinetic energy, occurs throughout the universe. The process gives rise to auroras, solar flares and geomagnetic storms that can disrupt cell phone service and electric grids on Earth. A major challenge in the study of magnetic reconnection, however, is bridging the gap between the

24d

Phys.org

Taking a new tangent to control pesky waves in fusion plasmas

Fusion combines light elements in the form of plasma—"the hot, charged state of matter composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei—"to generate massive amounts of energy. One of the ways that scientists help heat the plasma is by injecting beams of energetic particles into tokamaks to provide enough energy for plasma particles to overcome mutual repulsion and fuse together. The injected particles

24d

Phys.org

500+

A star is born: Using lasers to study how star stuff is made

On a typical day at the world's biggest laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in Livermore, California, you can find scientists casually making star-like conditions using 192 high-powered lasers. Stars in the universe are formed through a process called nucleosynthesis, which fuses lighter atoms to create new heavier atomic nuclei. Natural elements found here on Earth, such as helium and alu

24d

Phys.org

34

Fuel injection helps reduce magnetic island instabilities

Fusion is a non-carbon-based process for energy production, where lighter atoms fuse into heavier ones. Fusion reactors operate by confining a "soup" of charged particles, known as a plasma, within powerful magnetic fields. But these magnetic fields must contain the plasma long enough that it can be heated to extreme temperatures—hotter than the sun—where fusion reactions can occur.

24d

Phys.org

7K

Magneto-inertial fusion experiment nears completion

Assembly of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is well underway with the installation of 18 of 36 plasma guns in an ambitious approach to achieving controlled nuclear fusion (Figure 1). The plasma guns are mounted on a spherical chamber, and fire supersonic jets of ionized gas inward to compress and heat a central gas target that serves as fusion fuel. In the meant

24d

Ingeniøren

300+

Sær sygdom ramte amerikaner: Fuld i årevis uden at drikke alkohol

Forskere har fundet en mulig årsag til en yderst sjælden sygdom, som får kroppen til selv at producere alkohol. Opdagelsen gav en 46-årig amerikaner sit liv tilbage.

24d

Scientific American Content

20

A High-Tech Solution for Rooting Out Counterfeit Goods

Mobile optical scanners can check the authenticity of an object with unprecedented speed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

24d

Scientific American News

500+

Congressional Ignorance Leaves the U.S. Vulnerable to Cyberthreats

Security experts say that lawmakers' bills fall short of needed protections — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

24d

Scientific American Content

1K

Congressional Ignorance Leaves the U.S. Vulnerable to Cyberthreats

Security experts say that lawmakers' bills fall short of needed protections — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

24d

Undark Magazine

400+

The Problem With Labeling Gut Troubles 'Dysbiosis'

As the concept of microbial balance has reached the public — in part through direct-to-consumer testing kits — it has contributed to an untold number of people attempting to give themselves fecal transplants, which researchers say is a potentially dangerous action with little basis in science.

24d

Science News Daily

HTC now has an entry-level blockchain phone

Image: HTC HTC has announced a new entry-level phone aimed at cryptocurrency users called the HTC Exodus 1S, a followup to the $699 Exodus 1 that was originally released last year. …

24d

The Atlantic

108K

Nothing Will Persuade White Evangelicals to Support Impeachment

President Donald Trump famously once said that he wouldn't lose support even if he shot someone on Fifth Avenue in New York City . As his presidency enters its most dramatic phase yet, just one year ahead of the 2020 election, he might be right. In mid-September, 94 percent of Republicans opposed impeachment. A month later—after the news about Trump's fateful phone call with Ukrainian President V

24d

The Atlantic

1K

$350,000 a Year, and Just Getting By

The hypothetical couple were making $350,000 a year and just getting by, their income " barely " qualifying them as middle-class. Their budget, posted in September, showed how they "survived" in a city like San Francisco, spending more than $50,000 a year on child care and preschool, nearly $50,000 a year on their mortgage, and hefty amounts on vacations, entertainment, and a weekly date night—ev

24d

The Atlantic

100+

Only Cowards Don't Get Ratioed

Students throughout the ages have suffered long nights of the soul as they revisit their exams. The answer was B , they think, breaking out into a cold sweat, not C! Most writers are well beyond the stage when they have nightmares about school. Instead, they now startle awake at night fearing that the tweet they sent before going to bed will be "ratioed" by the morning. The term ratio will puzzle

24d

The Atlantic

200+

The False Alarms That Get Kids Arrested

On August 15, Keegan Jarrett was sitting in the back seat of his friend's car, feeling excited about an outfit he was planning to wear to school the next day. So he posted a selfie to Snapchat with the caption "You arent even prepared for tomorrow" followed by a smiling emoji with sunglasses. Within an hour, Jarrett says, friends started texting him to warn that people might take his post the wro

24d

BBC News – Science & Environment

2K

Are electric cars as 'green' as you think?

The lithium powering electric vehicles is found deep beneath the salt flats of Argentina

24d

Wired

500+

Inside Apple's High-Flying Bid to Become a Streaming Giant

With Ron Moore's space-race drama "For All Mankind", Apple is betting on marquee names and lush production to get its TV+ service off the ground. Can it achieve orbit?

24d

Wired

400+

These Startups Are Building Tools to Keep an Eye on AI

The software can help developers constrain their creations so they don't make bad decisions.

24d

Science | The Guardian

1K

Four big drug firms agree to $260m opioid payout hours before trial set to begin

Teva and three drug distributors in last-minute settlement Firms were to be accused of profiting from addiction and death Four major pharmaceutical companies agreed to a multimillion-dollar payout over the US opioid epidemic on Monday, hours before a landmark federal trial in which they were facing accusations of a conspiracy to profit from addiction and death. Related: Why were millions of opioi

24d

Future(s) Studies

Scientists 'may have crossed ethical line' in growing human brains

submitted by /u/sorryDontUnderstand [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

The father of the yield curve indicator says now is the time to prepare for a recession. The yield for the 3-month Treasury has been above the 10-year since May, a condition known as an inverted yield curve that has predicted the past seven recessions.

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

The South Korean teens so addicted to phones they're going into detox

submitted by /u/Vorbitor [link] [comments]

24d

Ingeniøren

Techtopia #128: Læringsteknologi som udviklingsbistand

En mobiltelefon med internetforbindelse kan give børn i afrikanske landsbyskoler og flygtningelejre adgang til fjernundervisning og undervisningsmateriale med teknologier som virtual reality og blockchain.

24d

Ingeniøren

500+

Fransk regering bestiller planlægning af seks nye atomkraftreaktorer

Den franske regering har bedt energiselskabet EDF om at planlægge seks nye EPR-reaktorer fordelt på tre lokationer.

24d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

A human immune dysregulation syndrome characterized by severe hyperinflammation with a homozygous nonsense Roquin-1 mutation

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12704-6 Roquin-1 is a posttranscriptional regulator that controls the expression of many immune-related genes such as ICOS and TNFA. Here, the authors report a homozygous R688* loss of function mutation in Roquin-1 in a patient with syndromic uncontrolled hyperinflammation associated with immune cell activation and h

24d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Predicted climate shifts within terrestrial protected areas worldwide

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12603-w Protected areas are important refugia for wildlife, so if climate conditions within them change, wildlife could lose critical suitable habitat. Here the authors calculate the projected gain and loss of climate conditions within terrestrial protected areas worldwide.

24d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Photonic crystal for graphene plasmons

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12778-2 Traditional photonic crystals consist of periodic media with a pre-defined optical response. Here, the authors combine nanostructured back-gate insulators with a continuous layer of graphene to demonstrate an electrically tunable two-dimensional photonic crystal suitable for controlling the propagation of sur

24d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Mapping the global design space of nanophotonic components using machine learning pattern recognition

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12698-1 Machine learning is increasingly used in nanophotonics for designing novel classes of complex devices but the general parameter behavior is often neglected. Here, the authors report a new methodology to discover and visualize optimal design spaces with respect to multiple performance objectives.

24d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Molecular features of the UNC-45 chaperone critical for binding and folding muscle myosin

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12667-8 Myosin, a motor protein essential for intracellular transport to muscle contraction, requires a chaperone UNC-45 for folding and assembly. Here authors use in vitro reconstitution and structural biology to characterize the interplay between UNC-45 and muscle myosin MHC-B.

24d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Enantiomeric glycosylated cationic block co-beta-peptides eradicate Staphylococcus aureus biofilms and antibiotic-tolerant persisters

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12702-8 The authors report the synthesis of an enantiomeric block co-beta-peptide that kills methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, including biofilm and persister bacterial cells, and disperses biofilms. The copolymer displays antibacterial activity in human ex vivo and mouse in vivo infection models without t

24d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: A glomerulus-on-a-chip to recapitulate the human glomerular filtration barrier

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12177-7

24d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Dielectric multi-momentum meta-transformer in the visible

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12637-0 Here, the authors demonstrate a multi-momentum transformation metasurface. The orbital angular momentum meta-transformer reconstructs different vortex beams into on-axis distinct patterns, and the linear momentum meta-transformer converts red, green and blue beams to vivid color images.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

California's crashing kelp forest

First the sea stars wasted to nothing. Then purple urchins took over, eating and eating until the bull kelp forests were gone. The red abalone starved. Their fishery closed. Red sea urchins starved. Their fishery collapsed. And the ocean kept warming.This ecological horror story movie took place between 2013-2017, with lasting impacts. This study chronicles the catastrophic shift in 2014 from a ro

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Real texture for lab-grown meat

Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have grown rabbit and cow muscles cells on edible gelatin scaffolds that mimic the texture and consistency of meat, demonstrating that realistic meat products may eventually be produced without the need to raise and slaughter animals.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

American Indians may have a higher risk for irregular heartbeat

Atrial fibrillation, also known as irregular heartbeat, occurred more often among American Indians than among other racial and ethnic groups, according to new research.The higher frequency of atrial fibrillation in American Indians persisted after controlling for other factors such as age, sex, income and cardiovascular and other diseases.

24d

NYT > Science

1K

Be Humble, and Proudly, Psychologists Say

Humility is not the boldest of personality traits, but it's an important one, studies find. And it's hard to fake.

24d

NYT > Science

2K

Quantum Computing Is Coming, Bit by Qubit

With transmons and entanglement, scientists strive to put subatomic weirdness to work on the human scale.

24d

NYT > Science

13K

Steps to Prevent Dementia May Mean Taking Actual Steps

Brain-training apps can't match the several ways that exercise benefits the mind, research shows.

24d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

NMR-based metabolomics in pediatric drug resistant epilepsy – preliminary results

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51337-z

24d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Nitrogen-doped Carbon with Modulated Surface Chemistry and Porous Structure by a Stepwise Biomass Activation Process towards Enhanced Electrochemical Lithium-Ion Storage

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50330-w

24d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Prematurely ruptured dominant follicles often retain competent oocytes in infertile women

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51551-9

24d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Selection of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies in myxosporean (Myxozoa, Cnidaria) parasites

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51479-0

24d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

The Alteration Mechanism of Copper-bearing Biotite and Leachable Property of Copper-bearing Minerals in Mulyashy Copper Mine, Zambia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50519-z

24d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

49

The Effect of Surface Roughness on the Contact Line and Splashing Dynamics of Impacting Droplets

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51490-5

24d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

28

A new method for biological synthesis of agriculturally relevant nanohydroxyapatite with elucidated effects on soil bacteria

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51514-0

24d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Seasonal distribution and population dynamics of limnic microalgae and their association with physico-chemical parameters of river Noyyal through multivariate statistical analysis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51542-w

24d

New Scientist

200+

Giant toad looks and acts like a venomous snake to scare off predators

The Congolese giant toad looks like the head of a Gaboon viper, and it even hisses like a snake when approached – all to scare off potential predators

24d

The Atlantic

300+

How to Protect America After the Syria Withdrawal

We warned two weeks ago about the danger of abandoning America's Kurdish-led partner force in Syria, even as thousands of suspected ISIS fighters remain in detention and ISIS attacks steadily increase. This week, with a U.S. withdrawal from northern Syria well under way, and after days of a Turkish assault on the region that's now supposedly paused despite reports of serious cease-fire violations

24d

NPR

Get Your Flu Shot Now, Doctors Advise, Especially If You're Pregnant

Pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease are particularly vulnerable to flu complications yet lag the elderly in getting vaccinated. (Image credit: BSIP/Getty Images)

24d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Wetting transitions in droplet drying on soft materials

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12093-w It has been shown previously that substrate viscoelasticity affects surface wettability. Here the authors observe a wetting transition during drying of droplets on such substrates and elucidate it with high resolution force field measurements thereby determining its dependence on substrate properties.

24d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

24

Transcriptional programming using engineered systems of transcription factors and genetic architectures

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12706-4 Successful approaches for controlling gene expression modulate mRNA synthesis by coupling it to inducible transcription effectors. Here the authors design 27 non-natural and non-synonymous transcription factors.

24d

RealClimate

Do you want to share your views on climate change and reading blogs?

A survey is conducted by researchers of Cambridge University and Wageningen University. They have asked us to post information about it. Please share your views on climate change and reading blogs by filling out this survey. The data will be used to get a better understanding of climate change blog audiences' views on climate change and their blog reading behavior. What's in it for you? You have

24d

Phys.org

2K

Lab-grown meat: Researchers grow muscle cells on edible fibers

Lab-grown or cultured meat could revolutionize food production, providing a greener, more sustainable, more ethical alternative to large-scale meat production. But getting lab-grown meat from the petri dish to the dinner plate requires solving several major problems, including how to make large amounts of it and how to make it feel and taste more like real meat.

24d

Phys.org

2K

California's crashing kelp forest

First the sea stars wasted to nothing. Then the purple urchins took over, eating and eating until the bull kelp forests were gone. The red abalone starved. Their fishery closed. Red sea urchins starved. Their fishery collapsed. And the ocean kept warming.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

2K

Lab-grown meat: Researchers grow muscle cells on edible fibers

Lab-grown or cultured meat could revolutionize food production, providing a greener, more sustainable, more ethical alternative to large-scale meat production. But getting lab-grown meat from the petri dish to the dinner plate requires solving several major problems, including how to make large amounts of it and how to make it feel and taste more like real meat.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

2K

California's crashing kelp forest

First the sea stars wasted to nothing. Then the purple urchins took over, eating and eating until the bull kelp forests were gone. The red abalone starved. Their fishery closed. Red sea urchins starved. Their fishery collapsed. And the ocean kept warming.

24d

Science News Daily

GSK to sell two vaccines in $1.1 billion deal to focus on newer treatments

GlaxoSmithKline will sell two travel vaccines to Bavarian Nordic for up to 955 million euros ($1.1 billion), the British firm said on Monday, as it looks to bolster its push into the lucrative …

24d

Dagens Medicin

Nyt behandlingsråd skal også vurdere teknologi

Ja, det er sket, at robotter er indkøbt uden eksakt viden om nytteværdien. Men det kommende behandlingsråd vil så vidt muligt også sikre, at vi får vished for effekten af ny teknologi.

24d

Dagens Medicin

100+

Manglen på ikke-kommercielle kliniske forsøg er et krisetegn

Det er ikke nok at satse på lægemiddelindustriens finansiering af kliniske forsøg i Danmark. Der er brug for at 'gå på to ben og samtidig satse på flere afprøvninger af behandlinger og lægemidler, der er afkoblet kommercielle hensyn.

24d

New on MIT Technology Review

2K

How frozen atoms could help us learn more from gravitational waves

We've seen ripples in spacetime only when the universe's biggest events occur. Now there might be a way to spot them ahead of time.

24d

Vetenskap och Hälsa

Räddningsplankan för nyblivna föräldrar med trassliga relationer i bagaget

När vi kliver in i föräldrarollen påverkas barnets anknytning till oss av hur vi knöt an till våra föräldrar. Men för den med mindre optimala anknytningserfarenheter tycks finnas hjälp på oväntat nära håll, visar ny forskning som studerat ett relativt nytt fält inom psykologin: partnerns, eller medförälderns, inflytande.

24d

Future(s) Studies

Renewable energy to expand by 50% in next five years. The International Energy Agency (IEA) found that solar, wind and hydropower projects are rolling out at their fastest rate in four years.

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

California's Emission Rates Down Compared To The Rest of the Country

submitted by /u/loomislockman [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Microbes not humans should be send to Mars first -Microbes should be considered as assets rather than 'serendipitous accidents' when it comes to colonizing the red planet. Scientists suggest a significant revision in space exploration philosophy

submitted by /u/bebesiege [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Coming soon: a market garden on Mars

submitted by /u/Real_Carl_Ramirez [link] [comments]

24d

Phys.org

1K

Record-number of over 200,000 galaxies confirm: Galaxy mergers ignite star bursts

When two galaxies merge, there are brief periods of stellar baby booms. A group of astronomers led by Lingyu Wang (SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research) has now used a sample of over 200,000 galaxies to confirm that galaxy mergers are the driving force behind star bursts. It is the first time that scientists have used artificial intelligence in a galaxy merger study. The results are publi

24d

Phys.org

49

Maritime industry seeks solutions to limit pollution

Shipowners say they are trying to cut their heavy-polluting industry's impact on the environment by using cleaner energy—but some have stalled over limiting the speed of ships.

24d

Science

67

Smith & Nephew chief Nawana to step down after pay row

Executive has been at the helm of medical devices group for only a year and a half

24d

Science-Based Medicine

2K

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. hosts a trainwreck of an antivaccine forum in Harlem

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. reached out to the African-American Community in Harlem with his antivaccine message. It didn't go so well. First, Rev. Al Sharpton, whose National Action Committee was going to host it, bailed due to negative publicity. Then RFK Jr. was kicked out of his venue during his speech because the event went way over time. RFK Jr.'s efforts do, however, show how white antivaxers ar

24d

Science News Daily

Watch: Dark mode can add 30% to your OLED phone's battery life

The experiment was carried out by PhoneBuff over the weekend. Using two iPhone XS devices—one in light mode and one in dark mode—and some robotic arms, the test involved running identical tasks, …

24d

Science News Daily

Gojek CEO quits ride-hailing startup for Indonesian government job

The CEO at one of Asia's biggest ride-hailing firms is calling it quits for a government gig.

24d

Science News Daily

Prevention better than cure at preventing young users from getting involved in cybercrime

Highly-targeted messaging campaigns from law enforcement can be surprisingly effective at dissuading young gamers from getting involved in cybercrime, a new study has suggested.

24d

Science News Daily

Archaeologists uncover 2,000-year-old street in Jerusalem built by Pontius Pilate

An ancient walkway most likely used by pilgrims as they made their way to worship at the Temple Mount has been uncovered in the "City of David" in the Jerusalem Walls National Park.

24d

Phys.org

4K

Archaeologists uncover 2,000-year-old street in Jerusalem built by Pontius Pilate

An ancient walkway most likely used by pilgrims as they made their way to worship at the Temple Mount has been uncovered in the "City of David" in the Jerusalem Walls National Park.

24d

BBC News – Science & Environment

1K

Black hole scientist Dr Katie Bouman on trolling and teamwork

Dr Katie Bouman's photo of the moment she saw her first black hole image went viral – but it wasn't all good.

24d

ScienceAlert – Latest

2K

Strange New Virus Could Represent 'Entirely New System of Viral Evolution'

Scientists can't yet explain how this thing works.

24d

Science | The Guardian

200+

Can you solve it? The four points, two distances problem

A dot-to-dot puzzle with a difference UPDATE: Solution now available here. Today's question is probably the shortest I have ever set: Find all the ways to arrange four points so that only two distances occur between any two points. Continue reading…

24d

Phys.org

100+

Data mining applied to scholarly publications to finally reveal Earth's biodiversity

At a time when a million species are at risk of extinction, according to a recent UN report, ironically, we don't know how many species there are on Earth, nor have we noted down all those that we have come to know on a single list. In fact, we don't even know how many species we would have put on such a list.

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

Data mining applied to scholarly publications to finally reveal Earth's biodiversity

At a time when a million species are at risk of extinction, according to a recent UN report, ironically, we don't know how many species there are on Earth, nor have we noted down all those that we have come to know on a single list. In fact, we don't even know how many species we would have put on such a list.

24d

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

4 Simple Tips For How You Can Actually Talk With Vaccine Skeptics

Pick your battles wisely.

24d

ScienceAlert – Latest

1K

Hubble Catches Incredible 'Photobomb' of an Asteroid Streaking Past Crab Nebula

Surprise!

24d

Science News Daily

Hacking the hackers: Russian group hijacked Iranian spying operation, officials say

Russian hackers piggy-backed on an Iranian cyber-espionage operation to attack government and industry organizations in dozens of countries while masquerading as attackers from the Islamic Republic, …

24d

Future(s) Studies

Humanoid Robot Has Joints That Inspire

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Are We Heading for Another AI Winter Soon?

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

24d

ScienceAlert – Latest

5K

We Could Be The Only Intelligent Life in The Universe, According to Evolution

Here's why.

24d

The Atlantic

1K

The 'Messy and Angry' Prospect of Ireland Reunifying

DUBLIN—Few people were talking about Irish reunification in the spring of 2016: Most assumed that the Good Friday Agreement had put the issue on ice for the foreseeable future. Northern Ireland's mainly Protestant pro-British majority and the Catholic minority, which traditionally favored reuniting with the Republic of Ireland, had been living in peace after decades of sectarian violence. Where w

24d

Science | The Guardian

400+

Campaign to stop 'killer robots' takes peace mascot to UN

Robot Wars survivor David Wreckham has found new purpose as the face of the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots An international campaign takes its battle to outlaw "killer robots" to the UN this week with a new ally – a "peace robot". Created by an inventor from the BBC programme Robot Wars, the droid, known as David Wreckham, has been recruited to deliver a message to world leaders in New York on Mo

24d

Science | The Guardian

2K

How UK's disused mine shafts could be used to store renewable energy

Gravitricity develops winch and hoist system to store energy at half the cost of lithium-ion batteries Britain's cheapest "virtual battery" could be created by hoisting and dropping 12,000-tonne weights – half the weight of the Statue of Liberty – down disused mine shafts, according to Imperial College London. The surprising new source of " gravity energy " is being developed by Gravitricity, an

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

24

Study finds no link between youth contact sports and cognitive, mental health problems

Adolescents who play contact sports, including football, are no more likely to experience cognitive impairment, depression or suicidal thoughts in early adulthood than their peers, suggests a new University of Colorado Boulder study of nearly 11,000 youth followed for 14 years.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

National poll: Half of parents have declined kids' play date invites

Parents' top concerns about playdates include children being unsupervised, hearing inappropriate language, getting into medications and harmful substances, and getting injured.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

Exercise capacity may affect cognitive health of survivors of childhood leukemia

A new study found a link between reduced exercise capacity and neurocognitive problems in survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood cancer. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mayo Clinic study: 20% of patients are prescribed opioids after cardiac device implantation surgery

One in five patients is prescribed opioids after having a pacemaker or similar device implanted, according to a large US study conducted at Mayo Clinic published in HeartRhythm. Eighty percent of patients who were prescribed opioids had never taken them before. Investigators stress the importance of improving postoperative pain management following cardiac device procedures to reduce use of prescr

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Episiotomy may be beneficial in reducing severe perineal tears among forceps and vacuum deliveries

The use of episiotomy during childbirth has declined in Canada, although its benefit in births assisted by forceps or vacuum merits reconsideration of this practice, according to a large study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

24d

Ingeniøren

31

Pensionsselskab: Vi anvender ikke profilering i afgørelser om pensionsydelser

I forbindelse med en principiel sag melder Juristernes og Økonomernes Pensionskasse ud om, hvorvidt pensionsselskabet anvender profilering eller scoring i sager om udbetaling af ydelser.

24d

ScienceAlert – Latest

9K

A Man's Gut Made Him Extremely Drunk by Brewing Alcohol When He Ate Carbs

For years, nobody believed him.

24d

Future(s) Studies

Kampachi Farms moving forward with macroalgae project in waters off Kona Coast…will study technologies and tools for growing offshore four native or endemic Hawaiian limu species on an array suspended about 30 feet below the ocean surface using only natural energy.

submitted by /u/honolulu_oahu_mod [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

"Impossible!" Chemists Said – But They Had Discovered New Stable Form of Plutonium

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

New haptic arm places robotics within easy reach

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

24d

Science News Daily

Instagram Wants To Help You Decide Who To Unfollow

If you're an avid Instagram user, chances are that you might end up following hundreds, if not thousands, of people. Eventually, you start to forget who you are following and probably …

24d

ScienceAlert – Latest

4K

Scientists Dramatically Extend The Lifespans of Mice in a Genius New Telomere Study

The animals aged slower, too.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Prevention better than cure at preventing young users from getting involved in cybercrime

Highly-targeted messaging campaigns from law enforcement can be surprisingly effective at dissuading young gamers from getting involved in cybercrime, a new study has suggested.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

61

Toad disguises itself as deadly viper to avoid attack — world-first study reports

The first study of a toad mimicking a venomous snake reveals that it likely imitates one of Africa's largest vipers in both appearance and behaviour, according to results published in the Journal of Natural History.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

80

Archaeologists uncover 2,000-year-old street in Jerusalem built by Pontius Pilate

An ancient walkway most likely used by pilgrims as they made their way to worship at the Temple Mount has been uncovered in the 'City of David' in the Jerusalem Walls National Park.

24d

Science Magazine

One of these is a deadly viper. The other is a harmless toad. Can you tell the difference?

Congolese giant toad is a near-perfect match for the Gaboon viper

24d

ScienceAlert – Latest

5K

A California Fault Line Has Started 'Creeping', And We Don't Know What to Expect

"It's best to simply assume the Big One could arrive any minute."

24d

Science | The Guardian

18K

Scientists 'may have crossed ethical line' in growing human brains

Debate needed over research with 'potential for something to suffer', neuroscientists say Neuroscientists may have crossed an "ethical rubicon" by growing lumps of human brain in the lab, and in some cases transplanting the tissue into animals, researchers warn. The creation of mini-brains or brain "organoids" has become one of the hottest fields in modern neuroscience. The blobs of tissue are ma

24d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

1K

Toad disguises itself as deadly viper to avoid attack

The first study of a toad mimicking a venomous snake reveals that it likely imitates one of Africa's largest vipers in both appearance and behavior, according to results published in the Journal of Natural History.

24d

Phys.org

1K

Toad disguises itself as deadly viper to avoid attack

The first study of a toad mimicking a venomous snake reveals that it likely imitates one of Africa's largest vipers in both appearance and behavior, according to results published in the Journal of Natural History.

24d

Future(s) Studies

Tobacco and Oil Industries Used Same Researchers to Sway Public [July, 2016]

submitted by /u/MayonaiseRemover [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Combination of AI & radiologists more accurately identified breast cancer, finds a new study, identifying breast cancer with approximately 90 percent accuracy. AI detected pixel-level changes in tissue invisible to the human eye, while humans used forms of reasoning not available to AI.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Understanding extinction — humanity has destroyed half the life on Earth | CBC Radio

submitted by /u/Chispy [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

How tobacco shills inspired climate denial

submitted by /u/MayonaiseRemover [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Author Karl Ove Knausgaard to become 6th contributor to Future Library. It collects works by contemporary authors and will remain unread until 2114. Library currently consists of 1,000 trees planted in forest in 2014, and will be cut down and made into paper in 2114 for printing of the manuscripts.

submitted by /u/Molire [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Researchers from Australia and Japan have developed a nanomesh capable of delivering drug treatments, using gold nanoparticles. It is hoped that effective antibiotic delivery via the nanomesh will be a major step forward in the fight against global antibiotic resistance.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

24d

Future(s) Studies

Automation might be cool, but don't you feel we may, eventually, fuck it up?

I get that automation + basic income may feel like a good thing, but I fear it may eventually turn bad. My main concern is that we may end up automating the things that people like doing : Creative things, for example, these are things that people enjoy doing – what would happen if these were automated? I'm sure that may would say we could do it anyways but… wouldn't we want to share our work w

24d

Science

US-UK study aims to find cancer at earliest stage

Cancer Research UK launches £55m programme with UK and US universities

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

200+

Plant-based foods and Mediterranean diet associated with healthy gut microbiome

The results identified 61 individual food items associated with microbial populations and 49 correlations between food patterns and microbial groups.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

FMT is effective in IBS, but having a 'super-donor' is essential, new study finds

The study reported today, which involved a large cohort of patients with various subtypes of IBS, used several enhanced methodologies, and highlighted the importance of donor selection for optimizing the effectiveness of FMT as a treatment for IBS.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

Resistance to antibiotics doubles in 20 years, new study finds

The study analyzed 1,232 patients from 18 countries across Europe and investigated resistance to antibiotics regularly taken for H. pylori infection.

24d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

IBD prevalence three times higher than estimates and expected to rise, new study reveals

The new evidence demonstrates that IBD prevalence is three times higher than previously reported, with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's Disease prevalence increasing by 55% and 83% respectively between 2000 and 2017.

24d

Big Think

300+

Sex study explores 'bad' orgasms

A new study finds that reaching an orgasm doesn't always indicate the sexual encounter was pleasurable. A variety of reasons were reported by participants for "bad" orgasms. Communication is key to improving sexual experiences, maintain the scientists. None The psychology of human sexual behavior is often not what you'd expect. Even if sex is consensual and leads to an orgasm, that experience can

24d

Science News Daily

Twitch "Watch Parties" Let Me Stream Movies to the Viewers I Don't Have

Ever since Amazon bought Twitch for a cool $970 million back in 2014, it seemed inevitable that eventually its catalog of movies and shows would make their way onto the streaming platform for …

24d

Science News Daily

Check your bank account! Former MoviePass users say discontinued service is still charging them

People on Twitter say that MoviePass is charging them even though the service shut down in September.

24d

Science | The Guardian

42

Starwatch: Sirius, the dog star, rises to brighten winter nights

The brightest star returns this week, twinkling and sparkling unmistakably in the southern sky There's a treat in store all week for early risers. Sirius , the brightest star in the night sky, will be glittering in the southern sky in the pre-dawn hours. Having been absent from view for several months, the star is now rising shortly after midnight. Located just 8.6 light years away, Sirius is abo

24d

Science News Daily

Neural-digital interface advances raise ethical and social issues

Human-machine interfaces raise important ethical and social issues. These technological innovations have the potential to restore, alter, or enhance cognitive or physical function in humans, …

24d

Phys.org

300+

Researchers find second warship from WWII Battle of Midway

A crew of deep-sea explorers and historians looking for lost World War II warships have found a second Japanese aircraft carrier that went down in the historic Battle of Midway.

25d

Biology / Biochemistry News From Medical News Today

400+

Gut microbiota may 'prevent and cure' rotavirus

Scientists have found gut bacteria in mice that could cure rotavirus infections, which cause the death of hundreds of thousands of children each year.

25d

Ingeniøren

51

Bekymrende overraskelse: Ufarlige byggematerialer bliver til giftig cocktail

PLUS. Sunde byggematerialer, som skulle afgive færre skadelige kemiske stoffer til omgivelserne, medfører markant afgasning, når de kombineres, viser nyt projekt. Fagfolk efterlyser nu mere viden om cocktaileffekter i byggematerialer.

25d

Scientific American Content

100+

Hilbert Walked so the Clay Mathematics Institute Could Run

The problems shaping modern mathematics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

25d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Realizing the potential of gene therapy for neurological disorders

Promising findings from preclinical animal studies and postmortem human brain data show the potential of gene therapy for treating currently incurable neurological disorders. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2019, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health.

25d

Future(s) Studies

AI in 2019: A Year in Review

submitted by /u/speckz [link] [comments]

25d

Future(s) Studies

Algorithms are grading student essays across the country. Can it really teach kids how to write better? The AI algorithms grading student essays are a black box.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

25d

Future(s) Studies

Space Companies Are Investing Big in 5G Technology

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

25d

Future(s) Studies

The World in 50 Years: We asked some of the boldest thinkers what the world will be like in 50 years. Here's what their answers tell us about the future.

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

25d

Future(s) Studies

How These Self-Aware Robots Are Redefining Consciousness

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

25d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

One-third of children having tonsillectomies benefitted from opioid-free surgery and recovery

Nearly one-third of children who had surgery to remove their tonsils did not need opioids to get adequate pain relief during and after surgery, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2019 annual meeting.

25d

Viden

Plantefars hitter – men hvorfor skal vegetarmad ligne kød?

Biologi og madkultur spiller ind på valget af kødfri mad, siger forskere.

25d

The Atlantic

3K

The Window for Brexit May Already Have Closed

The British people have changed their mind about Brexit. Beginning in the summer of 2017, and accelerating in the summer of 2018 by an ever wider margin, British people have told pollsters that they voted wrong in the Brexit referendum of June 2016. Over that same period, however, Britain's Conservative Party has become more and more committed to Brexit. Sixty-three percent of Conservative Party

25d

Scientific American Content

55

How Harold Bloom, the Late Literary Critic, Helped Me Write The End of Science

Bloom's book The Anxiety of Influence helped a science writer understand the plight of modern scientists trying to surpass their predecessors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

25d

The Atlantic

4K

The Best Thing to Happen to Bernie Sanders's Campaign

NEW YORK, N.Y. —Bernie Sanders's heart attack may have been the best thing to happen to his campaign. "Imagine," the top adviser Jeff Weaver joked to me ahead of the senator's rally in Queens yesterday, "Bernie with full blood flow." What that looked like: a speech that stretched for nearly an hour, with only a few croaks of his voice, coupled with a deeply personal endorsement from Representativ

25d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

Metabolic disturbance in the brain exacerbates, may forewarn Alzheimer's pathology

A better understanding of the metabolic processes in the brain — specifically disturbances resulting from neurodegenerative diseases — has important implications for potential treatments. The research was presented at Neuroscience 2019, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health.

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