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nyheder2019oktober23

20d

Dagens Medicin

Medlem af Erik Juhl-udvalget ­fastholder krav

Sundhedsøkonomen Kjeld Møller Pedersen var medlem af Erik Juhl-udvalget og fastholder det rimelige i kravene om effektiviseringer. Han understreger, at kravene er sat ud fra vurderinger, ikke videnskab.

20d

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Mer hjärnlik AI ska spara energi

En av AI:s största triumfer på senare år var när Googles dator Alpha Go slog världsmästaren i ett av världens mest komplexa spel, det urgamla brädspelet go. Men om de båda motståndarna fått använda lika mycket energi hade datorn inte haft en chans. Medan go-mästarens hjärna använde cirka 20 watt behövde Alpha go uppskattningsvis 5 000 watt.

20d

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

This Simple Process Can Turn Water Into an Environmentally Friendly Disinfectant

So many communities could use this.

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ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

Here's Why Thousands of Rubber Bands Turned Up on a Bird Sanctuary Island in The UK

It wasn't a shipwreck.

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ScienceAlert – Latest

5K

Turns Out Pumpkins Are Primarily Grown to End Up as Landfill Waste After Halloween

Um, guys, they're edible.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

21

Study finds risk factors tied to drowning-related hospitalizations and death

Approximately 1 in 10 children admitted for injuries related to drowning end up dying despite comprehensive medical care after being admitted to a hospital, according to new research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition. An abstract of the study, 'Predictors of In Hospital Mortality in Drowning and Submersion in Children and Adolescents

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Science | The Guardian

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Sepsis myths create 'unhealthy climate of fear', say experts

Researchers say figures are often inflated and rush for antibiotics may fuel resistance The public is being misled by scare stories about sepsis, say experts, warning that hype and misunderstandings about the so-called "hidden killer" have generated "an unhealthy climate of fear and retribution" in the UK and the US. The health secretary, Matt Hancock, has contributed to the mythology, they say i

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Science | The Guardian

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Inside the mind of the bullshitter: Science Weekly podcast

In 1986, philosopher Harry G Frankfurt wrote: "One of the most salient features of our culture is that there is so much bullshit." This was the opening line of his seminal essay (later a book ), On Bullshit , in which Frankfurt put forward his theory on the subject. Three decades later, psychologists are finally getting to grips with what might be going on in the minds of those who dabble in the

20d

Science Weekly

Inside the mind of the bullshitter: Science Weekly podcast

In 1986, philosopher Harry G Frankfurt wrote: "One of the most salient features of our culture is that there is so much bullshit." This was the opening line of his seminal essay (later a book), On Bullshit, in which Frankfurt put forward his theory on the subject. Three decades later, psychologists are finally getting to grips with what might be going on in the minds of those who dabble in the dar

20d

Ingeniøren

26

Leder: Skats svigt handler om dårlig ledelse – ikke teknik

[no content]

20d

The Atlantic

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A Disunited Kingdom Falls Apart

The 2016 Brexit referendum has largely been framed as the United Kingdom's voting to return sovereignty from Brussels to London. But in answering one nationalist call, the country has unleashed yet more nationalist forces that threaten to fracture its union. The United Kingdom is made up of four nations: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. In the three years since the vote to leave th

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ScienceAlert – Latest

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Here's How We Might Find a Wormhole, if They Existed

First, take a black hole…

20d

The Atlantic

100+

Photos of the Week: Angry Boy, Big Bird, Great Wall

Cuddly foxes in Shanghai, the enthronement ceremony of Japan's new emperor, a memorial for U.S. Representative Elijah Cummings, a Kansas sunset, wildfires in California, protests in Bolivia and Chile, a guitar-shaped hotel in Florida, a sky deck 100 floors above Manhattan, Parliament Hill in Ontario, a bee preservationist in California, and much more

20d

Viden

Psykisk syge i Danmark dør op til 10 år for tidligt

Tidlige dødsfald blandt psykisk syge skyldes blandt andet selvmord og usund livsstil.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

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Researchers uncover novel amyloidosis

A collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, has discovered a novel amyloid protein that induces amyloidosis in rats. This new amyloid protein is known to be the lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and accumulated very frequently in the mammary gland of aged rats. The results of this research are useful for predicting the future occurrence

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds youth suicide rates rise with community poverty levels

Research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition shows that US children living in counties with the highest poverty level are more than one-third more likely to die by suicide than those living in the least impoverished counties. The association is most pronounced for suicide by firearms.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

40

Study shows trampoline injuries have increased over the past decade

Between 2008 and 2017, the incidence of trampoline-related fractures increased by an average of 3.85% in the US, and the driver behind those increases are trampoline injuries outside of the home at places of recreation or sport , according to new research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Swimmer's shoulder,' common in more than three-quarters of swimmers

The painful overuse injury called swimmer's shoulder, common in competitive swimmers, may be caused by excessive swimming distance during training along with a culture in competitive swimming that sublimates pain, according to new research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Skiing, snowboarding injuries more serious — skull and face fractures — in younger children

Winter sports like skiing and snowboarding are a great way to keep kids active in the winter, but they are also linked to injuries and for younger children those injuries are more likely to involve fractures to the head or face, according to new research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Only half of US children get enough sleep during the week

Only 48% of school age children in the United States get 9 hours of sleep most weeknights, according to new research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition in New Orleans. Those who do, the study suggests, are significantly more likely to show a positive outlook toward school and other signs of 'childhood flourishing,' a measure of behavio

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study highlights power of family resilience to protect children from bullying

Studies show that children exposed to childhood trauma known as adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are at increased risk of being bullied or bullying others. New research being presented at the American American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition suggests that family resilience — the ability to work together to overcome problems, for example — reduces this risk.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Children's race may play role in treatment for acute gastroenteritis in emergency departments

New research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics 2019 National Conference & Exhibition suggests that the treatment children receive in US emergency departments for acute gastroenteritis with dehydration, a common childhood illness, may differ based on their race.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study identifies challenges to neonatal resuscitation outside of hospitals

With about 62,000 babies born outside of hospitals each year, and 1 in 10 newborns needing help to start breathing, emergency medical services (EMS) responders must be ready to give expert newborn resuscitation care. However, new research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition found many responders lack recent training in resuscitation tec

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

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Injuries related to lawn mowers affect young children in rural areas most severely

Each year, more than 9,000 children in the United States are treated in emergency departments for lawn mower-related injuries. New research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition in New Orleans found that these injuries are more frequent and severe in rural areas, affecting younger children than in urban regions.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

At what age is it considered child neglect to leave a child home alone?

A majority of social workers surveyed believe children should be at least 12 before being left home alone four hours or longer, and they are more likely to consider a home-alone scenario as neglect if a child is injured while left unsupervised, according to research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research tests speed of drones in responding to medical emergency scenarios

Could drones be used someday to deliver life-saving medications or interventions in the case of a child's emergency, a drug overdose or in response to a mass casualty scene? According to new research presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics 2019 National Conference & Exhibition, it's an idea worth exploring.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bariatric surgery is a safe option for young adolescents with morbid obesity

Bariatric surgery is safe for teens with morbid obesity and is beneficial for young patients who would otherwise face potential lifelong risks of death associated with obesity, according to new research.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Informal sharing of breast milk gains popularity among women, despite safety risks

Women who are unable to produce enough breast milk for their children are increasingly turning to 'mother-to-mother' informal milk-sharing, a potentially unsafe practice that is discouraged by the pediatric medical community, according to new research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Heightened risk of adverse financial changes before Alzheimer's diagnosis

Prior to an Alzheimer's diagnosis, a person in the early stages of the disease faces a heightened risk of adverse financial outcomes — a likely consequence of compromised decision making when managing money, in addition to exploitation and fraud by others.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antihistamine use for anaphylaxis symptoms linked with delay seeking emergency treatment

New research suggests that giving antihistamine medicine to a child experiencing anaphylaxis — a sudden and severe allergic reaction that can quickly be fatal — usually does more harm than good by delaying emergency treatment.

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Dagens Medicin

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Myten om de 8 procent

Hvorfor skal det nye hospital i Aarhus effektivisere 8 pct., andre 6, og andre igen 4 eller ingenting? Statens krav blev formuleret af fem eksperter, der lod sig inspirere af et norsk hospital, som ikke er blevet bygget. Og af en ny fløj i Aalborg, der angiveligt skulle have effektiviseret hele 15 pct. Det genkender de bare ikke i Aalborg.

20d

Dagens Medicin

Hårdt tiltrængt at diskutere prioritering

Mange ansatte oplever den aktuelle prioriteringspraksis som tilfældig og uigennemtænkt, skriver Else Smith, tidligere lægefaglig vicedirektør på Hvidovre og Amager Hospital.

20d

Dagens Medicin

Ministeren vil ikke svare på spørgsmål

Sundheds- og ældreminister Magnus Heunicke (S) undgår at svare på spørgsmål om det effektive norske sygehus, som ingen kender til.

20d

Future(s) Studies

A user-friendly approach for active reward learning in robots

submitted by /u/chicompj [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

google has claim that it has made the quantum computer, making the calculation of tradition computer which cost 10K yrs to 3.5 min, IBM say that it is fake and it needs only 2.5 days to do it by using traditional computer

i think that 2.5 days minus to 3.5 min is still very useful submitted by /u/SarEngland [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

What will replace motion picture? (video essay)

submitted by /u/Catsblackapples [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Cracking the mystery of nature's toughest material

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

SpaceX intends to offer Starlink satellite broadband service starting in 2020

submitted by /u/Barknuckle [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

New Biomaterial Developed That Could Be a Treatment for Spinal Cord Injuries

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

NASA Experiments with Force Fields for Moving Matter

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Google T5 scores 88.9 on SuperGLUE Benchmark, compared to 89.8 human baseline

submitted by /u/maxtility [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Google researchers taught an AI to recognize smells – Their algorithms can identify odors based on their molecular structures.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

20d

Ingeniøren

37

Efter GDPR: Norske bilisters færden bliver lagret i fem år

Lovgivningen volder det norske datatilsyn hovedbrud.

20d

Ingeniøren

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Mønsteranlæg i Aalborg kan heller ikke redde plasten: Sorteret plastaffald går op i røg

PLUS. Affaldsselskaber fejler, når de beder borgerne om at sortere alt plast­affald i stedet for at høste de lavthængende frugter, mener forskere. Det meste bliver alligevel brændt af, viser Ingeniørens opgørelse.

20d

ScienceAlert – Latest

1K

The Most Advanced Space Telescope Ever Just Passed a Series of Crucial Tests

So far, so good.

20d

Science News Daily

Google To Replace Bricked Home, Home Mini Devices Affected By Firmware Update

Earlier this week, we reported that in a firmware update that was pushed out to the Google Home and Home Mini devices, some users ended up with bricked devices where in some cases, there was …

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BBC News – Science & Environment

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'World-class' surf lake opens near Bristol

The creators of the complex say it is powered 100% by renewable energy.

20d

NYT > Science

300+

Cash for Carbon: Schumer Climate Plan Would Help Consumers Buy Electric Cars

A $450 billion climate change proposal from Senator Chuck Schumer would give consumers vouchers to buy American-made electric and hybrid cars and trucks.

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ScienceAlert – Latest

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Here's Why Ants Are Practically Immune to Traffic Jams, Even on Crowded Roads

See what a little cooperation gets you, people?

20d

BBC News – Science & Environment

7K

Invasive species: MPs call for a million people's help

Train citizens to stop "outbreaks" of non-native species in the UK, a committee urges ministers.

20d

BBC News – Science & Environment

22K

Images reveal Iceland's glacier melt

A photography project has highlighted the extent of ice loss from Iceland's largest glaciers.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Years of education may impact drinking behavior and risk of alcohol dependence

Higher educational attainment — spending more years in education — may impact people's drinking behavior and reduce their risk of alcohol dependence, according to a study published in Molecular Psychiatry.

20d

ScienceAlert – Latest

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Qatar Is Now Air Conditioning Outdoor Spaces to Battle 'Unbearable' Heat

Madness.

20d

Wired

6K

Kincade Fire: The Age of Flames Is Consuming California

Yet another massive wildfire is ravaging Northern California. Welcome to the Pyrocene—think of it like the Ice Age, but with fire.

20d

ScienceAlert – Latest

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'Stunning' Fossil Discovery Reveals How Mammals Flourished After The Dinosaurs Died

They're beautiful.

20d

Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Da Rejsekortet igen kom til kort…

[no content]

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Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Vingerne skal brække af

[no content]

20d

Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Rettelse – man kan godt selv frankere et Quick-brev

[no content]

20d

Ingeniøren

Tænkeboks: Astronauten landede på planeten Venus

Her får du løsningen på opgaven fra uge 41!

20d

Wired

100+

Tesla Profits, Health Care Algorithm Bias, and More News

Tesla Elon Musk SR

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

20d

NYT > Science

1K

Some Lab Chimps May Never Retire to a Sanctuary

A panel of veterinarians has determined that 44 chimpanzees at a New Mexico facility are too ill to be moved to a new home.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study shows shoppers reject offers made under time pressure

Giving consumers short time limits on offers means they are less likely to take them up, according to new research. The authors conclude that risk aversion is the main factor behind consumers' tendency to accept time-limited offers.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Athletes suspend morality to pursue sporting success — study

Ruthless sportspeople often suspend their sense of right and wrong when they step onto the field of play — viewing sport as a different world where they jettison responsibility to act in a moral way, according to a new study.

20d

Scientific American Blog Posts

NOVA's Killer Floods Caused Me Unnecessary Pain and Suffering

What could have been an excellent documentary is marred by several glaring problems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20d

The Atlantic

61

The Atlantic Politics Daily: All About That Base—Again

Today in Politics It's Thursday, October 24. Today , what the changing demographics in swing states could mean for Trump in 2020. Plus , the White House fumbles on its impeachment narrative. Finally , on the "human scum" attack line. (Andrew Harnik / AP) Donald Trump's 2020 strategy is looking a lot like his 2016 strategy. He's eschewed courting independents and is ginning up his most ardent supp

20d

Wired

400+

Quantum Computing Is Here\! But Also Not Really

Google shows off its Sycamore chip that it says reached "quantum supremacy," but it will still be years before quantum computing is useful.

20d

Future(s) Studies

Researchers have used the gene-editing technique CRISPR to delete a segment of DNA associated with autism and schizophrenia from mouse brain cells.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

USA Today editorial: "Andrew Yang is right" about solving climate change with thorium power

submitted by /u/LordBrackets [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

We could stop greenhouse gases from rising for up to 20 years if we restored around five billion acres of degraded land, according to UN climate scientists. That would cost around $300 billion, which is less than what China is investing in renewable energy.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

Volvo Cars and Uber present production vehicle ready for self driving

submitted by /u/selfdrivingcars360 [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

Lab-grown meat also creates an unexpected benefit: Ethical zebra burgers – "What are the odds that these animals contain the tastiest, most nutritionally rich food offerings?"

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

Delft-based Hardt Hyperloop raises multi-million euro round to develop high-speed, zero emissions transportation | EU-Startups

submitted by /u/futuredude [link] [comments]

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Most prescribed blood pressure drugs may be less effective than others

A new study of nearly 5 million patients shows the most-popular first-line treatment for hypertension is less effective and causes more side effects than thiazide diuretics.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New research shows lower rates of cancer screening in women with diabetes

Cancer screening rates are up to a quarter lower in women with diabetes, varying by type of cancer, and putting them at risk of poorer cancer outcomes, concludes new research in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]).

20d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Extracellular vesicles protect glucuronidase model enzymes during freeze-drying

Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48221-1

20d

Science | Smithsonian

51

Was Jakob Brodbeck First in Flight? And More Questions From Our Readers

You've got questions, we've got experts

20d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

Astronomers Find Massive Dust-Cloaked Galaxy From the Early Universe

One of the major unanswered questions in astronomy is how our modern system of galaxies evolved into its present-day configuration in the first place. Now, researchers have found evidence of a massive galaxy that formed when the universe was far younger than it today, with a very different configuration than the galaxies we see in the modern era. Astronomer Christina Williams, who authored the st

20d

NeuWrite San Diego

71

Is Addiction a Disease?

While it may not seem obvious, this question carries a great deal of emotional weight to sufferers of addiction, as well as their families and friends. The answer to one question – Is addiction a disease? – seems to hold the answer to yet another question: Are many of the hurtful things I've done […]

20d

Science Magazine

Some of NIH's chimpanzees will not retire to a sanctuary as planned

Agency says at least 44 animals are too sick and frail to move

20d

Discover Magazine

How a Heat Wave and Mysterious Disease Crashed California's Kelp Forest

California bull kelp. (Credit: Peggy Foreman, NOAA Fisheries) Every year, a forest of bull kelp springs up from the ocean floor along 200 miles of California coast, fostering a regenerated, thriving ecosystem each time it appears. But starting in 2013, this kelp forest suffered hits from several disasters. First, a mysterious and lethal disease cropped up among starfish in the area. Then, a massiv

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NYT > Science

23K

A Forecast for a Warming World: Learn to Live With Fire

The Kincade fire is burning more than 10,000 acres in California. Other areas of the country are experiencing drought so understanding fire is becoming ever more important.

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NYT > Science

1K

Woodie Flowers, Who Made Science a Competitive Sport, Dies at 75

His hands-on methods of teaching mechanical engineering at M.I.T. made him a star on campus (and on PBS) and led to student contests on a global scale.

20d

BBC News – Science & Environment

7K

Inside America's Aladdin's cave of dead animals

There are millions of creatures, flora and fauna stored at the National Wildlife Property Repository in Colorado

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Not all plants are good for you

A new scientific review highlights a significant global health issue related to plants that sicken or kill undernourished people around the world, including those who depend upon these plants for sustenance. Some of these plants become even more toxic due to climate change.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Political affiliation may help drive and shape a person's morals

While it may seem intuitive that a person's beliefs or moral compass may steer them toward one political party over another, a new Penn State study suggests it may be the other way around.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cancer treatment: A researcher makes breakthrough immunotherapy discovery

Dr Christopher E. Rudd has discovered a new cell therapy approach that boosts the immune response of T lymphocytes to malignant tumors.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lupus study illustrates the importance of diversity in genetic research

Scientists at the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology have pinpointed epigenetic differences in the way lupus affects black women compared to other lupus patients, revealing important mechanics of the puzzling disease.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Kidney replacement therapy rates have remained higher in men vs. women for decades

Rates for all types of kidney replacement therapy in European countries were consistently higher in men than women from 1965 to 2015. Male-to-female ratios increased with age, showing consistency over decades and for individual countries, despite changes in the causes of kidney disease. The male-to-female ratio was higher for kidney transplantation in diabetic patients.

20d

Futurism

6K

Qatar Is Air Conditioning the Outdoors to Battle 120-Degree Heat

It's hot in the Middle Eastern nation of Qatar. Like, really hot. On summer nights, temperatures rarely dip below 32 degrees Celsius (that's 90 degrees Fahrenheit), and during the day they can soar upwards of 48 degrees Celsius (120 degrees Fahrenheit). In response, the nation has done something that sounds absurd: it's started to air condition its outdoor spaces — a "solution" which, ultimately,

20d

Science Magazine

Screening embryos for IQ and other complex traits is premature, study concludes

Study of virtual embryos and real offspring suggests increasingly popular polygenic risk scores are poorly predictive

20d

Big Think

500+

Chemicals in consumer products linked to lower IQs in children

Researchers find a link between the use of chemicals by pregnant women and lower IQs in children by age 7. The scientists looked at chemical exposure in women in the first trimester of pregnancy. The issue particularly affects boys. None Researchers found that exposure to certain chemicals in consumer products during the first trimester of pregnancy is linked to lower IQ in children by age 7. Amo

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Phys.org

1K

Fossil trove shows life's fast recovery after big extinction

A remarkable trove of fossils from Colorado has revealed details of how mammals grew larger and plants evolved after the cataclysm that killed the dinosaurs.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Starvation halts brain development, but hungry cells jump-start growth when food becomes available

In tadpole research that holds potential for prenatal health and brain injury, Scripps Research scientists identify cellular workings that stop and restart early brain development.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What's driving tropical deforestation? Scientists map 45 years of satellite images

Tropical forests are under increasing pressure from human activity such as agriculture. However, in order to put effective conservation measures in place, local decision-makers must be able to precisely identify which areas of forest are most vulnerable. A new analysis method spearheaded by researchers from the French Agricultural Research Centre for International Development (CIRAD), the Internat

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Warming waters, local differences in oceanography affect Gulf of Maine lobster population

Two new studies point to the role of a warming ocean and local differences in oceanography in the rise and fall of lobster populations southern New England to Atlantic Canada.

20d

Phys.org

100+

Amazon river dolphins threatened by mercury pollution

Amazon river dolphins are showing alarming levels of contamination mainly because of illegal panning for gold, conservationists say.

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Phys.org

1K

With NASA telescope on board, search for intelligent aliens 'more credible'

Astronomers dedicated to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) have announced a new collaboration with scientists working on a NASA telescope.

20d

Futurism

2K

Scientists Say They Finally Figured Out How to Spot Wormholes

Thinking With Portals Scientists think they've come up with a way to detect traversable wormholes, assuming they exist. There's never been any sort of evidence that traversable wormholes — portals between two distant parts of the universe, or two universes within a theoretical multiverse — are real. But if they are, a team of scientists think they know what that evidence might look like , breathi

20d

Wired

200+

Zuckerberg in Twilight

The Facebook CEO's latest trip to Washington, where he was grilled by a skeptical Congress, is captured perfectly in this one photograph.

20d

Phys.org

48

Cooking up a new theory for better accelerators

While particle accelerators may be on the cutting edge of science, the building and preparation of some particle accelerator components has long been more of an art form, dependent on recipes born of trial and error. Now, Ari Deibert Palczewski hopes to change that. A staff scientist at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Palczewski has been awarded a DOE Ear

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Futurism

100+

These High Tech Steel Toe Shoes Are Cleverly Disguised as Normal Sneakers

Fashion has changed a lot over the last 50 years, especially when it comes to sneakers . It used to be that you only wore sneakers to exercise. If you wore them outside the gym, people might think you belonged to a 1950s New York City street gang . Today, however, sneakers are the default shoe of modern life. You wear them to the gym. You wear them to work. You wear them out on the weekends. In f

20d

Phys.org

Satellite analysis reveals and asymmetric Typhoon Bualoi

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite and NASA's Aqua satellite both passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and both used infrared light to obtain temperature data and shape information on Typhoon Bualoi.

20d

Phys.org

56

US corn yields get boost from a global warming 'hole'

The global average temperature has increased 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit over the last 100 years. In contrast, the Corn Belt of the U.S., one of the most agriculturally productive regions of the world, has experienced a decrease in temperatures in the summer during the growing season. Known as the "U.S. warming hole," this anomalous cooling phenomenon, which occurred in tandem with increasing rainfall,

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ScienceDaily

100+

US corn yields get boost from a global warming 'hole'

The global average temperature has increased 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit over the last 100 years. In contrast, the Corn Belt of the U.S., one of the most agriculturally productive regions of the world, has experienced a decrease in temperatures in the summer during the growing season. Known as the 'US warming hole,' this anomalous cooling phenomenon, which occurred in tandem with increasing rainfall, w

20d

ScienceDaily

100+

Deformed wing virus genetic diversity in US honey bees complicates search for remedies

Deformed Wing Virus (DWV), one of the leading causes of honey bee colony losses, is much more genetically diverse in the United States than previously thought. The diverse lineages of this virus are all equally bad for bees, and they make it more complicated to develop antiviral therapeutics, which could be the basis for developing a vaccine for the virus.

20d

ScienceDaily

78

Schizophrenia risk gene linked to cognitive deficits in mice

Researchers have discovered in mice how one of the few genes definitively linked to schizophrenia, called SETD1A, likely confers risk for the illness. Mice genetically engineered to lack a functioning version of the enzyme-coding gene showed abnormalities in working memory, mimicking those commonly seen in patients. Restoring the gene's function corrected the working memory deficit and counteracti

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Satellite analysis reveals and asymmetric Typhoon Bualoi

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite and NASA's Aqua satellite both passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and both used infrared light to obtain temperature data and shape information on Typhoon Bualoi.

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

40

Deformed wing virus genetic diversity in US honey bees complicates search for remedies

Deformed Wing Virus (DWV), one of the leading causes of honey bee colony losses, is much more genetically diverse in the United States than previously thought, according to a study published by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in PLoS Biology.

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Phys.org

40

Deformed wing virus genetic diversity in US honey bees complicates search for remedies

Deformed Wing Virus (DWV), one of the leading causes of honey bee colony losses, is much more genetically diverse in the United States than previously thought, according to a study published by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in PLoS Biology.

20d

Scientific American Content

100+

8 Ways to Get More Movement into Your Day

The evidence is all around us—we can't offset or undo several hours of stillness with a single hour of exercise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20d

Big Think

Internet activism: How are political movements shaped online?

When it comes to developing an effective online campaign, it's important to build a team of members who understand their audience and who have a clear understanding of their team's division of labor. Successful campaigns understand the pros and cons of various social media platforms — their respective architectures are important when it comes to strategically propagating a message. Having someone

20d

Big Think

2K

Google's Sycamore beats top supercomputer to achieve 'quantum supremacy'

Sycamore is a quantum computer that Google has spent years developing. Like traditional computers, quantum computers produce binary code, but they do so while utilizing unique phenomena of quantum mechanics. It will likely be years before quantum computing has applications in everyday technology, but the recent achievement is an important proof of concept. None A quantum computer developed by Goo

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Contrast-enhanced ultrasound predicts nodule transformation to hepatocellular carcinoma

An article published ahead-of-print in the January 2020 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology has identified sonographic biomarkers that can predict eventual malignant transformation of pathologically confirmed cirrhotic nodules for patients at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These additional imaging features may have the potential to be adopted as ancillary or even major feature

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gap in care found for patients with chronic kidney disease: study

Millions of Canadians living with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be going without critical testing from their primary care practitioners that would give them a good idea of the severity of the disease so they could intervene earlier with more appropriate care, according to a new study.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Subgroups of breast and ovarian cancers exhibit the same unique drug sensitivity

Although cancers are commonly classified and named by site of origin, and effective drugs are FDA-approved accordingly, a research team at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center has found that multiple organ sites share some of the same genetic features associated with vulnerability to drug therapies. This strategy could open new opportunities for developing novel therapies that can target multip

20d

Livescience.com

1K

In a Distant Galaxy, Colliding Exoplanets Are Upending What We Knew About Solar System Formation

Two Earth-like exoplanets appear to have smashed into each other in a distant solar system, and the cosmic carnage is only getting worse.

20d

Futurity.org

25

This biopsy has no benefit for women with 'stage 0' breast cancer

Older women with very early, non-invasive "stage 0" breast cancer gain no long-term benefit from undergoing a sentinel lymph node biopsy to see if the cancer has spread, new research shows. The study, believed to be the first to examine the long-term impact of sentinel lymph node biopsies on thousands of older women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), found that the procedure: Does not reduce t

20d

The Atlantic

68K

I'm Proud to Be Called Human Scum

Apparently, I'm human scum. Though that is normally a characterization that would cause me grave concern, in this case I wear it as a badge of honor. The other day, President Donald Trump tweeted : "The Never Trumper Republicans, though on respirators with not many left, are in certain ways worse and more dangerous for our Country than the Do Nothing Democrats. Watch out for them, they are human

20d

The Scientist RSS

The Role of Ultrapure Water for HPLC Analysis

Download this application note to learn about the benefits of using ultrapure water as a mobile phase for HPLC!

20d

Wired

2K

Big's Backyard Ultra and the Rise of Women Endurance Stars

Maggie Guterl is the first woman to win the Big's Backyard Ultra, an endurance running race so twisted and extreme it's in a class of its own.

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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

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How you can help transform the internet into a place of trust | Claire Wardle

How can we stop the spread of misleading, sometimes dangerous content while maintaining an internet with freedom of expression at its core? Misinformation expert Claire Wardle explores the new challenges of our polluted online environment and maps out a plan to transform the internet into a place of trust — with the help everyday users. "Together, let's rebuild our information commons," she says.

20d

ScienceDaily

100+

Vision scientists disprove 60-year-old perception theory

Vision researchers have disproved a long-standing theory of how the human vision system processes images, using computational models and human experiments. The findings could have implications for the understanding of human vision and diagnosis of vision anomalies.

20d

ScienceDaily

100+

Obesity exacerbates many causes of death, but risks are different for men and women

People who carry around unhealthy amounts of weight don't just have heart disease and diabetes to worry about. Obesity is implicated in two thirds of the leading causes of death from non-communicable diseases worldwide and the risk of certain diseases differs for men and women.

20d

Futurism

200+

This Is What a Space War Would Look Like, According to Experts

Space Wars A future space war won't look like "Star Wars." Instead, according to a new essay in The Conversation by a pair of British physics and space researchers, it'll be almost imperceptible on the planet's surface — yet potentially deadly to Earth-based infrastructure. "Any observers on the surface would be unlikely to directly see any effects from space warfare, unless a kinetic kill actual

20d

Scientific American News

83

Racial Bias Found in a Major Health Care Risk Algorithm

Black patients lose out on critical care when systems equate health needs with costs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

Scientific American Content

200+

Racial Bias Found in a Major Health Care Risk Algorithm

Black patients lose out on critical care when systems equate health needs with costs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

forskning.se

Här kallar män hellre andra män på arbetsintervju

Inom yrken med jämn könsfördelning, är män mer benägna att kontakta andra män för en första arbetsintervju än att kontakta kvinnor. Det visar en ny studie vid Stockholms universitet. Studien i sociologi, gjord av Anni Erlandsson, gjordes genom att skicka in fiktiva arbetsansökningar till 1 643 verkliga jobbannonser inom 18 olika yrken på den svenska arbetsmarknaden. Jobben representerar många av

21d

Biology / Biochemistry News From Medical News Today

100+

Brain immune cells may protect against OCD, anxiety

In a new study in mice, scientists have linked a subset of brain immune cells with a defined genetic lineage to obsessive compulsion and anxiety.

21d

New on MIT Technology Review

200+

It's not just Congress—China's tech giants are scared of Facebook's Libra too

[no content]

21d

Big Think

500+

Your political views can predict how you pronounce certain words

Politics can predict the TV shows we watch , the shops we frequent and the places we live . But what about the way we speak? In a recent study, I was able to show how your political orientation can influence how you pronounce certain words. How members of America's two parties view the country – and its place in the world – might explain this phenomenon. A tale of two presidents You may have noti

21d

Futurism

400+

Two Exoplanets Collided, Leaving a Trail of Planetary Gore

Planet Guts 300 light-years away, two exoplanets recently crashed into each other, obliterating both and leaving a giant trail of dust and debris — or, in other words, planet guts. The universe is a violent place , and space stuff collides with other space stuff pretty frequently. But usually these collisions happen in the earlier years of a solar system or galaxy — CNN reports that these shatter

21d

Inside Science

80

Colorado Fossils Show How Mammals Rebounded After the Dinosaur Age Ended

Corral Bluffs location contains fossils from a critical time in the evolution of mammals. skulls.jpg An overhead view of fossil skulls and jaw pieces found at the study site in Colorado. Image credits: HHMI Tangled Bank Studios Creature Thursday, October 24, 2019 – 15:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Scientists now have the best picture yet of how life on land recovered in the

21d

New on MIT Technology Review

100+

Employees say Google is trying to spy on them. That'll be hard to prove.

What does spying mean when workplace surveillance is the norm?

21d

Big Think

500+

Why more play is the key to creativity and productivity

Play is one of the primary ways that children learn. As we get older, however, we begin to worry more about the opinions of others. Gradually, we stop playing quite so much. This could be a grave mistake. Research has shown that adults who make time for play reap the benefits in terms of greater productivity, more creativity, and greater health and happiness. None Some adults with high-powered jo

21d

Livescience.com

22K

A Man Kept Getting Drunk Without Using Alcohol. It Turns Out, His Gut Brews Its Own Booze.

A man with auto-brewery syndrome would become drunk after eating carbs.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Schizophrenia risk gene linked to cognitive deficits in mice

Researchers have discovered in mice how one of the few genes definitively linked to schizophrenia, called SETD1A, likely confers risk for the illness. Mice genetically engineered to lack a functioning version of the enzyme-coding gene showed abnormalities in working memory, mimicking those commonly seen in patients. Restoring the gene's function corrected the working memory deficit and counteracti

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists uncover the process behind protein mutations that impact gut health

A new study led by researchers at St. Michael's Hospital and the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Canada and Zhejiang University School of Medicine in China has uncovered why a protein mutation that causes inflammatory bowel diseases is dysfunctional.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

Deformed wing virus genetic diversity in US honey bees complicates search for remedies

Deformed Wing Virus (DWV), one of the leading causes of honey bee colony losses, is much more genetically diverse in the United States than previously thought. The diverse lineages of this virus are all equally bad for bees, and they make it more complicated to develop antiviral therapeutics, which could be the basis for developing a vaccine for the virus.

21d

The Atlantic

1K

As the Strike Approached in Chicago, Teachers Taught Labor

As the strike vote got closer, Anna Lane realized that she was going to have to throw out her lesson plan. Lane, a history and civics teacher at Kelly High School, in Chicago's Brighton Park neighborhood, was in the middle of teaching a unit about how the city funds public-education initiatives. But as labor negotiations between the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) and Chicago Public Schools (CPS) st

21d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

28

Researchers design tunable, self-recovering dyes for use in next-generation smart devices

Researchers are working to better control how the chemicals respond to treatment, as well as how to reverse the chemicals back to their original state with little to no interference. A team of researchers has achieved such results with a specific compound that can emit light and has potential applications in the next generation of smart devices such as wearable devices and anti-counterfeiting pain

21d

Science | Smithsonian

1K

Fossil Site Reveals How Mammals Thrived After the Death of the Dinosaurs

Recent discoveries highlight how mammals lived before and after the asteroid impact that triggered the world's fifth mass extinction

21d

Scientific American Blog Posts

1K

Sexual Harassment Is Still the Norm in Health Care

If you can't think of a high-profile doctor who got "taken down" by the #MeToo movement, it's not for a lack of perpetrators — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

60-Second Science

26

Odd Bird Migrates Twice to Breed

The phainopepla migrates from southern California to the desert Southwest to breed in the spring before flying to California coastal woodlands to do so again in summer.

21d

NPR

U.S. Travel Ban Disrupts The World's Largest Brain Science Meeting

Scientists from nations including Iran, Mexico, and India were refused visas to attend this year's Society for Neuroscience meeting in Chicago. Some researchers got stand-ins to present their work. (Image credit: Rob Piercy/Allen Institute)

21d

Future(s) Studies

The UN has put a number on how much it would cost to stop climate change

submitted by /u/rtorrance [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

A man died in a burning Tesla because its futuristic doors wouldn't open, lawsuit alleges

submitted by /u/bluefirecorp [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Andrew Yang's plan to use space mirrors to combat climate change

submitted by /u/FreedomBoners [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Here's what over a million dollars worth of 3D Printers being installed looks like (time lapse)

submitted by /u/twelve-zero [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Quantum Computing Is Poised to Change Everything – It is truly rare that an advancement comes along that changes every aspect of society; quantum computing is poised to do just that in the 2020s.

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Dinosaur-Killing Meteorite Caused Acidification That Led to Mass Extinction – The lowering of ocean pH linked to the Chicxulub impact is similar to what could happen if modern carbon dioxide emissions continue

submitted by /u/Boofing_with_Squee [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

There is a widespread belief that organic farming reduces greenhouse gas emissions, is better for the planet, and ultimately for humans too. However, a new study by researchers at Cranfield University in the U.K. has unveiled that this type of farming, in fact, increases greenhouse gas emissions

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

A Hypersonic Spaceplane Jet Engine Passed a Crucial Test. British company Reaction Engines has tested its groundbreaking precooler in airflow temperature conditions and has verified that it can withstand Mach 5 — the equivalent of 5 times the speed of sound

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Elon Musk: Tesla Full Self-Driving in early access this year, without supervision next year

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

OpenAI Plays Hide and Seek…and Breaks The Game! 🤖

submitted by /u/dat303 [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

US confirms leaving Paris climate accord; allegedly to reduce the cost of producing gas, oil and coal.

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Tesla stuns with surprise profit and faster progress on new model and factory

submitted by /u/roku44 [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

We Have the Tools and Technology to Work Less and Live Better

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

How liquid air could help keep the lights on. The UK will build the first ever liquid air energy storage plant, based on an idea from a backyard inventor.

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

U.S. Military Could Collapse Within 20 Years Due to Climate Change, Report Commissioned By Pentagon Says. The report says a combination of global starvation, war, disease, drought, and a fragile power grid could have cascading, devastating effects.

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Four in five EU coal plants are unprofitable

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

21d

ScienceDaily

31

Higher local earthworm diversity in temperate regions than in the tropics

In any single location, there are typically more earthworms and more earthworm species found in temperate regions than in the tropics. Global climate change could lead to significant shifts in earthworm communities worldwide, threatening the many functions they provide.

21d

ScienceDaily

28

How Ebola virus disables the body's immune defenses

A new study uncovered new information on why the Ebola virus can exert such catastrophic effects on the infected person. They've described for the first time how the virus disables T cells, an important line of immune defense, thus rendering the infected person less able to combat the infection.

21d

ScienceDaily

27

GIS-based analysis of fault zone geometry and hazard in an urban environment

Typical geologic investigations of active earthquake fault zones require that the fault can be observed at or near the Earth's surface. However, in urban areas, where faults present a direct hazard to dense populations, the surface expression of a fault is often hidden by development of buildings and infrastructure. This is the case in San Diego, California, where the Rose Canyon fault zone trends

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

US corn yields get boost from a global warming 'hole'

The global average temperature has increased 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit over the last 100 years. In contrast, the Corn Belt of the U.S., one of the most agriculturally productive regions of the world, has experienced a decrease in temperatures in the summer during the growing season. Known as the 'US warming hole,' this anomalous cooling phenomenon, which occurred in tandem with increasing rainfall, w

21d

The Atlantic

400+

Photos: Anti-Government Protests in Lebanon

For more than a week now, hundreds of thousands of Lebanese people have taken to the streets to voice their anger toward their government, after decades of economic crisis. The movement was sparked last week by a proposed tax on messaging apps like WhatsApp, but has grown amid a wider set of anti-government grievances, following years of corruption, mismanagement, and growing inequality, and diss

21d

Scientific American Content

1K

Sexual Harassment Is Still the Norm in Health Care

If you can't think of a high-profile doctor who got "taken down" by the #MeToo movement, it's not for a lack of perpetrators — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

Scientific American

26

Odd Bird Migrates Twice to Breed

The phainopepla migrates from southern California to the desert Southwest to breed in the spring before flying to California coastal woodlands to do so again in summer. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Novel approach identifies factors linked to poor treatment outcomes in ALL

Profiling the metabolites produced in the bone marrow at the time of diagnosis enabled researchers to identify high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

61

Controlling the immune system's brakes to treat cancer, autoimmune disorders

Researchers at St. Jude have revealed the mechanism underlying the activation of regulatory T cells, which could spark new drug development.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Obesity exacerbates many causes of death, but risks are different for men and women

People who carry around unhealthy amounts of weight don't just have heart disease and diabetes to worry about. Obesity is implicated in two thirds of the leading causes of death from non-communicable diseases worldwide and the risk of certain diseases differs for men and women. Cecilia Lindgren of the University of Oxford and colleagues report these findings in a new study published Oct. 24 in PLO

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

York University vision scientists disprove 60-year-old perception theory

Vision researchers at York University have disproved a long-standing theory of how the human vision system processes images, using computational models and human experiments. The findings could have implications for the understanding of human vision and diagnosis of vision anomalies.

21d

Futurism

500+

These Startups Want to Feed You Lab-Grown Giraffe, Elephant Meat

Meat Market Most of the non-fish meat the world eats comes from three sources: cows, chickens, and pigs. But now that scientists are starting to figure out how to grow meat from stem cells in the lab — no killing of animals required — startups are looking forward to the day when they can serve up all sorts of currently taboo meats, from giraffe and elephant to dinosaur and even human . Noah's Nom

21d

Scientific American Content

32

Odd Bird Migrates Twice to Breed

The phainopepla migrates from southern California to the desert Southwest to breed in the spring before flying to California coastal woodlands to do so again in summer. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

New Scientist

500+

Extraordinary fossils show how mammals rose from the dinosaurs' ashes

Thousands of newly discovered fossils show how plants and animals rebounded in the first million years after the asteroid collision that killed the dinosaurs

21d

New Scientist

2K

A biased algorithm is delaying healthcare for black people in the US

A healthcare algorithm widely used in the US typically recommends prioritising the needs of healthier white people over those of sicker black people

21d

New on MIT Technology Review

400+

The limits of Chinese military power

The US military is without peer in its ability to project power around the world, and that's not about to change.

21d

ScienceDaily

52

Possible approach to block medulloblastoma growth

Researchers have identified a potential approach to stop the growth of the most common type of brain tumor in children.

21d

ScienceDaily

79

Deep inside the brain: Unraveling the dense networks in the cerebral cortex

Mammalian brains, with their unmatched number of nerve cells and density of communication, are the most complex networks known. While methods to analyze neuronal networks sparsely have been available for decades, the dense mapping of neuronal circuits is a major scientific challenge. Researchers have now succeeded in the dense connectomic mapping of brain tissue from the cerebral cortex, and quant

21d

ScienceDaily

51

Genetic risk factor for laryngeal paralysis in miniature bull terriers identified

Laryngeal paralysis is a serious and sometimes deadly disease in some dog breeds that prevents proper opening of the larynx for breathing. Specialists in canine head and neck surgery and geneticists have identify a mutation responsible for laryngeal paralysis in Miniature Bull Terriers, enabling the development of a genetic test for the disease.

21d

ScienceDaily

80

Artificial pancreas system better controls blood glucose levels than current technology

A multicenter randomized clinical trial evaluating a new artificial pancreas system — which automatically monitors and regulates blood glucose levels — has found that the new system was more effective than existing treatments at controlling blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes.

21d

ScienceDaily

47

Scientists identify new signposts in blood and urine to reflect what we eat and drink

Researchers have identified several chemical signatures, detectable in blood and urine, that can accurately measure dietary intake, potentially offering a new tool for physicians, dieticians and researchers to assess eating habits, measure the value of fad diets and develop health policies.

21d

ScienceDaily

85

Genetic variations linked to oxygen drops during sleep

Researchers have identified 57 genetic variations of a gene strongly associated with declines in blood oxygen levels during sleep. Low oxygen levels during sleep are a clinical indicator of the severity of sleep apnea, a disorder that increases the risk of heart disease, dementia, and death.

21d

ScienceDaily

24

New survey shows link between comprehensive antibiotic stewardship programs and infection preventionist certification

Nearly half of all nursing homes do not have adequately trained infection prevention staff and their efforts to combat the over prescription of antibiotics are suffering as a result, according to a new study.

21d

ScienceDaily

52

Baby formula improved by ingredient often removed during homogenization

A clinical trial shows infants who consume formula containing milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) score higher in cognitive, language and motor development than infants consuming a milk-based formula that didn't contain MFGM.

21d

ScienceDaily

21

The shelf life of pyrite

What exactly triggers the increase in carbon dioxide concentrations that causes the transition from a glacial stage to a warm stage is not fully understood. Scientists have developed a new model in which the weathering of pyrite, a common mineral containing sulfur, plays a key role.

21d

ScienceDaily

28

Researchers design tunable, self-recovering dyes for use in next-generation smart devices

Researchers are working to better control how the chemicals respond to treatment, as well as how to reverse the chemicals back to their original state with little to no interference. A team of researchers has achieved such results with a specific compound that can emit light and has potential applications in the next generation of smart devices such as wearable devices and anti-counterfeiting pain

21d

ScienceDaily

28

Global Health Security Index finds gaps in preparedness for epidemics and pandemics

A new Global Health Security Index released today, the first comprehensive assessment and benchmarking of health security and related capabilities across 195 countries, suggests that not a single country in the world is fully prepared to handle an epidemic or pandemic.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers identify possible approach to block medulloblastoma growth

University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have identified a potential approach to stop the growth of the most common type of brain tumor in children.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

Deep inside the brain: Unraveling the dense networks in the cerebral cortex

Mammalian brains, with their unmatched number of nerve cells and density of communication, are the most complex networks known. While methods to analyze neuronal networks sparsely have been available for decades, the dense mapping of neuronal circuits is a major scientific challenge. Researchers from the MPI for Brain Research have now succeeded in the dense connectomic mapping of brain tissue fro

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Widely used health care prediction algorithm found to be biased against blacks

A new study finds that a type of software program that determines who gets access to high-risk heath care management programs routinely lets healthier whites into the programs ahead of blacks who are less healthy. Fixing this bias in the algorithm could more than double the number of black patients automatically admitted to these programs, the study revealed.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Flu antibody protects against numerous and wide-ranging strains

A human antibody that protects mice against a wide range of lethal flu viruses could be the key to a universal vaccine and better treatments for severe flu disease, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, and Scripps Research in La Jolla, Calif.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A new drought-protective small molecule 'drug' for crops

Using a structure-guided approach to small molecule discovery and design, researchers have developed a drought-protective 'drug' for crops, according to a new study.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Global earthworm biodiversity patterns influenced by climate

Earthworm communities in soils worldwide — and the critical ecosystem functions they provide — could be substantially impacted by continued climate change, according to a new report that evaluated data from nearly 7,000 sampled sites in 57 countries across the globe.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New Colorado fossil record documents life's rebound after Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction

Nearly 66 million years ago, the reign of dinosaurs ended and the ascendency of mammals on Earth began.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Widely used health algorithm found to be racially biased; remedying in progress

A nationally deployed healthcare algorithm — one of the largest commercial tools used by health insurers to inform health care decisions for millions of people each year — shows significant racial bias in its predictions of the health risks of black patients, researchers report.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Higher local earthworm diversity in temperate regions than in the tropics

In any single location, there are typically more earthworms and more earthworm species found in temperate regions than in the tropics. Global climate change could lead to significant shifts in earthworm communities worldwide, threatening the many functions they provide. These are the two main results of a new study published in Science. The research was led by scientists from the German Centre for

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers learn how Ebola virus disables the body's immune defenses

A new study by researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston uncovered new information on why the Ebola virus can exert such catastrophic effects on the infected person. They've described for the first time how the virus disables T cells, an important line of immune defense, thus rendering the infected person less able to combat the infection.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genetic risk factor for laryngeal paralysis in miniature bull terriers identified

Laryngeal paralysis is a serious and sometimes deadly disease in some dog breeds that prevents proper opening of the larynx for breathing. In a new study published Oct. 24 in PLOS Genetics, a team of German specialists in canine head and neck surgery and geneticists from the University of Bern identify a mutation responsible for laryngeal paralysis in Miniature Bull Terriers, enabling the developm

21d

BBC News – Science & Environment

2K

Earthworms' place on Earth mapped

The first global atlas of earthworms has been compiled to help protect the fauna beneath our feet.

21d

Science News Daily

Trove of Fossils Shows Mammal Evolution after Dino Extinction

The site, Coral Bluffs in Colorado, also reveals how plants evolved and how ecosystems rebounded after the asteroid impact.

21d

Nature

4K

Millions of black people affected by racial bias in health-care algorithms

Nature, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03228-6 Study reveals rampant racism in decision-making software used by US hospitals — and highlights ways to correct it.

21d

Nature

100+

Scientists struggle to access Africa's historical climate data

Nature, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03202-2 Better climate predictions require Africa's weather agencies to open their archives. But commercial concerns and a lack of trust are holding them back .

21d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

BMW M2 X35i SUV Review: The 2002 tii Reimagined for Modern Times

The BMW X2 M35i is a wicked-fast small SUV that retains a measure of practicality — meaning room for four not-overweight people, and their clothing tightly packed in soft-sided luggage. The X2 M exists for the swooping, twisty roads of the Blue Ridge Mountains, and similar back roads across America and Canada. Even if it's an SUV coupe, this vehicle is what BMW's famous 2002 tii would be half a c

21d

Science Magazine

Hospital 'risk scores' prioritize white patients

New study suggests a simple tweak could dramatically reduce racial bias

21d

Scientific American News

1K

Hands-On with Google's Quantum Computer

Staking its claim for "quantum supremacy," the company pulls back the curtain on its landmark Sycamore chip — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

Scientific American Content

2K

Hands-On with Google's Quantum Computer

Staking its claim for "quantum supremacy," the company pulls back the curtain on its landmark Sycamore chip — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

ScienceDaily

44

For better research results, let mice be mice

Animal models can serve as gateways for understanding many human communication disorders, but a new study suggests that the established practice of socially isolating mice for such purposes might actually make them poor research models for humans, and a simple shift to a more realistic social environment could greatly improve the utility of the future studies.

21d

ScienceDaily

36

E-cigarette flavors decrease perception of harm among youth

As more and more youth use electronic cigarettes, combined with research showing the health consequences of vaping — including nicotine addiction — researchers found that non-menthol flavors attract youth and adults to use e-cigarettes and that the use of flavored e-cigarettes contributes to multiple pathways linked to higher e-cigarette use among youth.

21d

ScienceDaily

28

Schools have critical role to play in supporting adolescents fleeing armed conflict

Education is known to be highly important for migrant children, yet relatively little is known about the diversity of associated school-based programs and their likely value in supporting the mental health of children. A scoping review was conducted of 20 school-based programs aimed at improving the mental health of adolescent forced migrants in high-income countries. Findings showed school-based

21d

ScienceDaily

100+

Young moms more likely to have kids with ADHD

Young mothers have a greater chance of having a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) according to new research. Exploring the genetic relationship between female reproductive traits and key psychiatric disorders, it found that the genetic risk of ADHD in children was strongly associated with early maternal age at first birth, particular for women younger than 20.

21d

ScienceDaily

37

A win-win for forests and small-holder dairy farming in East Africa

The native Napier grass could hold the key to improving diets, boosting farming yields and reducing greenhouse gas emissions in East Africa. Growing and using Napier as a nutrient rich animal fodder on the farm, could also reduce pressure on forests, according to new research.

21d

ScienceDaily

100+

Artificial intelligence system gives fashion advice

A computer science team has developed an artificial intelligence system that can look at a photo of an outfit and suggest helpful tips to make it more fashionable.

21d

ScienceDaily

28

Women CEOs judged more harshly than men for corporate ethical failures

People are less likely to support an organization after an ethical failure if the business is led by a woman, according to a new study. However, organizations led by women endure less negative backlash for competence failures than those headed by men.

21d

NYT > Science

1K

Colorado Fossils Show How Mammals Raced to Fill Dinosaurs' Void

An unusually rich trove found in Colorado reveals the world in which our mammalian forebears evolved into larger creatures.

21d

Science current issue

65

Broadly protective human antibodies that target the active site of influenza virus neuraminidase

Better vaccines against influenza virus are urgently needed to provide broader protection against diverse strains, subtypes, and types. Such efforts are assisted by the identification of novel broadly neutralizing epitopes targeted by protective antibodies. Influenza vaccine development has largely focused on the hemagglutinin, but the other major surface antigen, the neuraminidase, has reemerged

21d

Science current issue

Cryo-EM structures of the human cation-chloride cotransporter KCC1

Cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs) mediate the coupled, electroneutral symport of cations with chloride across the plasma membrane and are vital for cell volume regulation, salt reabsorption in the kidney, and -aminobutyric acid (GABA)–mediated modulation in neurons. Here we present cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of human potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC1 in potassium chlori

21d

Science current issue

Coherent spin manipulation of individual atoms on a surface

Achieving time-domain control of quantum states with atomic-scale spatial resolution in nanostructures is a long-term goal in quantum nanoscience and spintronics. Here, we demonstrate coherent spin rotations of individual atoms on a surface at the nanosecond time scale, using an all-electric scheme in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). By modulating the atomically confined magnetic interactio

21d

Science current issue

AAAS 2020 Annual Meeting Program

[no content]

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Science current issue

New Products

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Science current issue

200+

Our unexpected ride

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

30

Grand challenges in the science of wind energy

Harvested by advanced technical systems honed over decades of research and development, wind energy has become a mainstream energy resource. However, continued innovation is needed to realize the potential of wind to serve the global demand for clean energy. Here, we outline three interdependent, cross-disciplinary grand challenges underpinning this research endeavor. The first is the need for a

21d

Science current issue

200+

MAIT cells are imprinted by the microbiota in early life and promote tissue repair

How early-life colonization and subsequent exposure to the microbiota affect long-term tissue immunity remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the development of mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells relies on a specific temporal window, after which MAIT cell development is permanently impaired. This imprinting depends on early-life exposure to defined microbes that synthesize ribofla

21d

Science current issue

200+

Dynamic control of plant water use using designed ABA receptor agonists

Drought causes crop losses worldwide, and its impact is expected to increase as the world warms. This has motivated the development of small-molecule tools for mitigating the effects of drought on agriculture. We show here that current leads are limited by poor bioactivity in wheat, a widely grown staple crop, and in tomato. To address this limitation, we combined virtual screening, x-ray crystal

21d

Science current issue

5K

Vulnerability of the industrialized microbiota

The human body is an ecosystem that is home to a complex array of microbes known as the microbiome or microbiota. This ecosystem plays an important role in human health, but as a result of recent lifestyle changes occurring around the planet, whole populations are seeing a major shift in their gut microbiota. Measures meant to kill or limit exposure to pathogenic microbes, such as antibiotics and

21d

Science current issue

53

On privilege

[no content]

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Science current issue

News at a glance

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

Obscure Cold War nerve agents set to be banned

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

50

Screening embryos for complex genetic traits called premature

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

200+

Prime editing promises to be a cut above CRISPR

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

New drugs target growing threat of fatal fungi

[no content]

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Science current issue

Codes of conduct aim to curb harassment at field sites

[no content]

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Science current issue

200+

How life blossomed after the dinosaurs died

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

Europe dreams big for future space missions

[no content]

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Science current issue

Growing pains

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

Plant hydraulics and agrichemical genomics

[no content]

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Science current issue

40

The treacheries of adaptation

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

Immune cells for microbiota surveillance

[no content]

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Science current issue

400+

Assessing risk, automating racism

[no content]

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Science current issue

500+

The coming electric vehicle transformation

[no content]

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Science current issue

Earthworms' place on Earth

[no content]

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Science current issue

How lithium dendrites form in liquid batteries

[no content]

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Science current issue

72

Predict science to improve science

[no content]

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Science current issue

37

Stepping out of the dinosaurian shadow

[no content]

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Science current issue

Science meets a metaphor

[no content]

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Science current issue

Dr Space Junk vs The Universe: Archaeology and the Future

[no content]

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Science current issue

Editor's note

[no content]

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Science current issue

Trophy hunting: Role of consequentialism

[no content]

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Science current issue

Trophy hunting: Values inform policy

[no content]

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Science current issue

100+

Trophy hunting: Broaden the debate

[no content]

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Science current issue

300+

Trophy hunting: Bans create opening for change

[no content]

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Science current issue

Trophy hunting: Insufficient evidence

[no content]

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Science current issue

Trophy hunting: A moral imperative for bans

[no content]

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Science current issue

AAAS's "How We Respond" report captures U.S. ingenuity

[no content]

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Science current issue

61

Women innovators become STEM ambassadors for girls

[no content]

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Science current issue

Close-up of human cerebellar development

[no content]

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Science current issue

Alternative influenza target

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

Measuring street protest events

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

Tea for type 1 and type 2 diabetes

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

Racial bias in health algorithms

[no content]

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Science current issue

Milling corundum nanoparticles

[no content]

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Science current issue

Earthworm distribution in global soils

[no content]

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Science current issue

Flexible ferroelectrics

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

A multifaceted future for wind power

[no content]

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Science current issue

One world, one health

[no content]

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Science current issue

Commensals rule the MAITrix

[no content]

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Science current issue

Plant thirst quenched without water

[no content]

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Science current issue

NODs require S-palmitoylation to signal

[no content]

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Science current issue

Complex regulation

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

Genetic background affects variation

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

Coupled transport

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

Interior tumor views

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

Metabolic quiescence for B cell maturity

[no content]

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Science current issue

Coherent surface spin manipulation

[no content]

21d

Science current issue

Dogs' brains and behaviors

[no content]

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Science current issue

Network rewiring in cancer

[no content]

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Science current issue

Adding dynamics to x-ray microscopy

[no content]

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Science current issue

The thermal adaptation of the proteome

[no content]

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Science current issue

Broadening microbiota transplants

[no content]

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Science current issue

Worldwide river sediment flux

[no content]

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Science current issue

Parallel profiling of an enzyme family

[no content]

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Science current issue

1K

Dissecting racial bias in an algorithm used to manage the health of populations

Health systems rely on commercial prediction algorithms to identify and help patients with complex health needs. We show that a widely used algorithm, typical of this industry-wide approach and affecting millions of patients, exhibits significant racial bias: At a given risk score, Black patients are considerably sicker than White patients, as evidenced by signs of uncontrolled illnesses. Remedyi

21d

Science current issue

Spatiotemporal expansion of primary progenitor zones in the developing human cerebellum

We present histological and molecular analyses of the developing human cerebellum from 30 days after conception to 9 months after birth. Differences in developmental patterns between humans and mice include spatiotemporal expansion of both ventricular and rhombic lip primary progenitor zones to include subventricular zones containing basal progenitors. The human rhombic lip persists longer throug

21d

Science current issue

Palmitoylation of NOD1 and NOD2 is required for bacterial sensing

The nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)–like receptors 1 and 2 (NOD1/2) are intracellular pattern-recognition proteins that activate immune signaling pathways in response to peptidoglycans associated with microorganisms. Recruitment to bacteria-containing endosomes and other intracellular membranes is required for NOD1/2 signaling, and NOD1/2 mutations that disrupt membrane localization are a

21d

Science current issue

Structural basis for the docking of mTORC1 on the lysosomal surface

The mTORC1 (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1) protein kinase regulates growth in response to nutrients and growth factors. Nutrients promote its translocation to the lysosomal surface, where its Raptor subunit interacts with the Rag guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase)–Ragulator complex. Nutrients switch the heterodimeric Rag GTPases among four different nucleotide-binding states, only one

21d

Science current issue

56

Super-elastic ferroelectric single-crystal membrane with continuous electric dipole rotation

Ferroelectrics are usually inflexible oxides that undergo brittle deformation. We synthesized freestanding single-crystalline ferroelectric barium titanate (BaTiO 3 ) membranes with a damage-free lifting-off process. Our BaTiO 3 membranes can undergo a ~180° folding during an in situ bending test, demonstrating a super-elasticity and ultraflexibility. We found that the origin of the super-elastic

21d

Science current issue

1K

Global distribution of earthworm diversity

Soil organisms, including earthworms, are a key component of terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known about their diversity, their distribution, and the threats affecting them. We compiled a global dataset of sampled earthworm communities from 6928 sites in 57 countries as a basis for predicting patterns in earthworm diversity, abundance, and biomass. We found that local species richness

21d

Science current issue

High-surface-area corundum by mechanochemically induced phase transformation of boehmite

In its nanoparticulate form, corundum (α-Al 2 O 3 ) could lead to several applications. However, its production into nanoparticles (NPs) is greatly hampered by the high activation energy barrier for its formation from cubic close-packed oxides and the sporadic nature of its nucleation. We report a simple synthesis of nanometer-sized α-Al 2 O 3 (particle diameter ~13 nm, surface areas ~140 m 2 g –

21d

Science current issue

Higher-fitness yeast genotypes are less robust to deleterious mutations

Natural selection drives populations toward higher fitness, but second-order selection for adaptability and mutational robustness can also influence evolution. In many microbial systems, diminishing-returns epistasis contributes to a tendency for more-fit genotypes to be less adaptable, but no analogous patterns for robustness are known. To understand how robustness varies across genotypes, we me

21d

Science current issue

Microbial metabolites control the thymic development of mucosal-associated invariant T cells

How the microbiota modulate immune functions remains poorly understood. Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are implicated in mucosal homeostasis and absent in germ-free mice. Here, we show that commensal bacteria govern murine MAIT intrathymic development, as MAIT cells did not recirculate to the thymus. MAIT development required RibD expression in bacteria, indicating that production of

21d

Scientific American Blog Posts

61

An Ode to Parrotfish in a Climate-Challenged World

As the oceans warm and acidify because of fossil-fuel burning, the coral reefs these fish depend on are already in decline — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

Science twis

Close-up of human cerebellar development

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Alternative influenza target

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Measuring street protest events

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Tea for type 1 and type 2 diabetes

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Racial bias in health algorithms

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Milling corundum nanoparticles

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Earthworm distribution in global soils

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Flexible ferroelectrics

[no content]

21d

Science twis

A multifaceted future for wind power

[no content]

21d

Science twis

One world, one health

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Commensals rule the MAITrix

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Plant thirst quenched without water

[no content]

21d

Science twis

NODs require S-palmitoylation to signal

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Complex regulation

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Genetic background affects variation

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Coupled transport

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Interior tumor views

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Metabolic quiescence for B cell maturity

[no content]

21d

Science twis

Coherent surface spin manipulation

[no content]

21d

Viden

Resistente bakterier er mere end fordoblet i Europa de sidste 20 år

Hvor lande som Grækenland og Italien har flest resistente bakterier, er Danmark klassens duks.

21d

Wired

2K

A Health Care Algorithm Offered Less Care to Black Patients

A study shows the risks of making decisions using data that reflects inequities in American society.

21d

Cosmos Magazine

300+

How mammals inherited the Earth

Scientists map out first million years of life after the dinosaurs.

21d

Cosmos Magazine

31

Thin edge of the (ice) wedge

Eastern Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves have been losing mass for centuries, study finds.

21d

Cosmos Magazine

25

Birds wing it in many ways

Their movement, not shape, determines flight behaviour, study shows.

21d

Cosmos Magazine

35

Ice ice baby? Perhaps not

Martian images suggest another explanation for ridges on landslides.

21d

Cosmos Magazine

67

New blood test may improve TB diagnosis

Researchers move a step closer to point-of-care diagnosis.

21d

Phys.org

Genetic risk factor for laryngeal paralysis in miniature bull terriers identified

Laryngeal paralysis is a serious and sometimes deadly disease in some dog breeds that prevents proper opening of the larynx for breathing. In a new study published 24th October in PLOS Genetics, a team of German specialists in canine head and neck surgery and geneticists from the University of Bern identify a mutation responsible for laryngeal paralysis in Miniature Bull Terriers, enabling the dev

21d

Phys.org

80

Higher local earthworm diversity in temperate regions than in the tropics

In any single location, there are typically more earthworms and more earthworm species found in temperate regions than in the tropics. Global climate change could lead to significant shifts in earthworm communities worldwide, threatening the many functions they provide. These are the two main results of a new study published in Science. The research was led by scientists from the German Centre for

21d

The Scientist RSS

51

Drug Helps Plants Resist Drought: Study

The small molecule is effective in tomato and wheat in laboratory trials, but its scalability and applicability to real-world agriculture remains to be seen.

21d

Scientific American Content

93

An Ode to Parrotfish in a Climate-Challenged World

As the oceans warm and acidify because of fossil-fuel burning, the coral reefs these fish depend on are already in decline — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

Science Magazine

100+

Catchy findings have propelled this young ecologist to fame—and enraged his critics

Thomas Crowther's work with big data has won huge grants and headlines

21d

Science Magazine

How life blossomed after the dinosaurs died

Plants and mammals diversified together, blow-by-blow record shows

21d

Science Magazine

First global map of earthworms reveals which places are chock-full of them—and why

Temperate soils host 30 times as many earthworms as tropical ones

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Genetic risk factor for laryngeal paralysis in miniature bull terriers identified

Laryngeal paralysis is a serious and sometimes deadly disease in some dog breeds that prevents proper opening of the larynx for breathing. In a new study published 24th October in PLOS Genetics, a team of German specialists in canine head and neck surgery and geneticists from the University of Bern identify a mutation responsible for laryngeal paralysis in Miniature Bull Terriers, enabling the dev

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

82

Higher local earthworm diversity in temperate regions than in the tropics

In any single location, there are typically more earthworms and more earthworm species found in temperate regions than in the tropics. Global climate change could lead to significant shifts in earthworm communities worldwide, threatening the many functions they provide. These are the two main results of a new study published in Science. The research was led by scientists from the German Centre for

21d

The Atlantic

200+

The Ongoing Horror of #MeToo

Updated at 11:07 a.m. ET on October 25, 2019. Horror is often a matter of architecture. The crowded cabins of Friday the 13th , the cramped spaceship of Alien , the mansion of Get Out —they are spaces that have ways of trapping people inside . At every turn, the vulnerable characters, who are proxies for the audience, find themselves prevented from escaping the monster, from finding relief from t

21d

Cosmos Magazine

44

When bad plastic turns good

Catalytic method allows for 'upcycling', researchers suggest.

21d

Futurism

500+

Astronomers Find Evidence of A "Monster Galaxy" Like No Other

Astronomers have long suspected that the early universe was home to some massive galaxies, but mysteries lingered about these ancient cosmic giants. For one, based on theoretical predictions, these giant old-school galaxies shouldn't have been as big as they were given how young the universe was at the time. Then there was the fact that astronomers could never seem to spot a monster galaxy during

21d

Science News Daily

Volkswagen unveils next-gen Golf and its hybrid variants

After months of teasing, the eighth generation of the Volkswagen Golf has been unveiled. The sleeker design doesn't stray too far from the vehicle's core look. But like our …

21d

Science News Daily

The Last Of Us 2 Has Been Delayed To May 2020

Back in September, after years of teasing, Sony has confirmed that The Last of Us 2 will be released on the 21st of February, 2020. However, it seems that according to Naughty Dog, the game's …

21d

Scientific American Content

500+

Cities Are Behind in Gauging Their Climate Risk

More cities are reporting climate hazards, such as heat waves, but lag in developing plans to deal with those changes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

Futurity.org

Many older adults return to the hospital with same infection

A disproportionately high number of older adults who return to the hospital within a month of discharge do so because of the same infection presumably treated during the first stay or one that's linked, researchers report. The study also shows that patients discharged home or to home care were more likely to return with a linked infection than those discharged to skilled nursing homes. "We found

21d

cognitive science

5 Facial Recognition Trends and Market Predictions 2019

submitted by /u/ankur_bansal123 [link] [comments]

21d

Science News Daily

Samsung's Exynos 990 SoC is up to 20% faster than its current generation

On Wednesday, Samsung unveiled its next smartphone SoC — the Exynos 990. The company claims the chipset is 20 percent faster when processing regular- and graphics-related tasks. Moreover, apps …

21d

The Atlantic

2K

How Trump Lost the Impeachment Narrative

Catchphrases have always defined Donald Trump's presidency. In the same way that "no collusion, no obstruction" went hand in hand with the Mueller report, Democrats have managed to turn "quid pro quo" into the tagline for the current impeachment inquiry. It's perhaps the first time since Trump entered office that Democrats have managed to wrangle the first word on a presidential scandal—which put

21d

Futurity.org

39

If wormholes exist, this is how we might find one

A new study outlines a method for detecting wormholes, which form a passage between two separate regions of spacetime. The speculative phenomenon that has long captured the imagination of sci-fi fans. Such pathways could connect one area of our universe to a different time and/or place within our universe, or to a different universe altogether. Whether wormholes exist is up for debate, but in a p

21d

Wired

2K

Now the Machines Are Learning How to Smell

Google researchers are training neural networks with a new technique to predict how a molecule smells based on its chemical structure.

21d

Phys.org

Researchers design tunable, self-recovering dyes for use in next-generation smart devices

The building blocks of rationally designed chemicals are simple elements: carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and so on. These elements can be combined in myriad ways to accomplish a variety of chemicals with different characteristics. Even the same chemical can be treated differently—with pressure or heat, for example—to show drastically different properties. A simpler version is to think of how water can b

21d

Phys.org

34

The shelf life of pyrite

The last 2.6 million years are characterized by glacial cycles, a regular alternation of cold and warm periods. It is widely accepted that changes in the concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere were largely responsible for these natural fluctuations of cold and warm periods. What exactly triggers the increase in carbon dioxide concentrations that causes the tr

21d

Phys.org

33

NASA taps telecommunications technology to develop more capable, miniaturized spectrometer

A technology that has enabled ever-faster delivery of voice and data over the Internet and other telecommunications platforms could play a front-and-center role in NASA's quest to develop a super-small instrument for gathering unprecedented details about extraterrestrial planets, moons, comets, and asteroids.

21d

Phys.org

Researchers test-drive Lamborghini's carbon fiber materials in space

Houston Methodist researchers are studying Italian sports car maker Automobili Lamborghini's carbon fiber materials in space.

21d

Ingeniøren

Rotation ud af ingenting

PLUS. Ikke alene kan det tomme rum udøve en kraft, det kan også skabe rotation. Nu er denne mikroskopiske effekt eftervist eksperimentelt.

21d

Futurism

9K

Pentagon Report Predicts Collapse of US Military Within 20 Years

Death Grips Faced with the challenges of global climate change as well as the refugee crisis and armed conflicts it will create, the U.S. military may very well collapse. That's the dire conclusion of a Pentagon-commissioned report about the future of the military, first published online in August with little fanfare and recently surfaced by Motherboard . The takeaway is clear: if humanity contin

21d

Science | The Guardian

85

An existential approach to cancer | Letter

Online you can find miracle cures, writes Aliya Hasan , but only existentialism resonates It is breast cancer awareness month. As someone with secondary breast cancer I am aware of the disease every day. Since I was diagnosed last August I've been in a muddle about how to square it mentally and emotionally. Although my treatment is working, nobody knows how long for. Stage IV, secondary, advanced,

21d

Phys.org

GIS-based analysis of fault zone geometry and hazard in an urban environment

Typical geologic investigations of active earthquake fault zones require that the fault can be observed at or near the Earth's surface. However, in urban areas, where faults present a direct hazard to dense populations, the surface expression of a fault is often hidden by development of buildings and infrastructure. This is the case in San Diego, California, where the Rose Canyon fault zone trends

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

81% of tuna catch comes from stocks at healthy levels, 15% require stronger management

Of the total commercial tuna catch worldwide, 81% came from stocks at "healthy" levels of abundance, according to the October 2019 International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF) Status of the Stocks report. In addition, 15% of the total tuna catch was from overfished stocks, and 4% was from stocks at an intermediate level of abundance.

21d

Livescience.com

11K

Google's Quantum Computer Just Aced an 'Impossible' Test

For the first time, a quantum computer has solved a task that Google says would be impossible for the most advanced supercomputers in the world.

21d

Phys.org

81% of tuna catch comes from stocks at healthy levels, 15% require stronger management

Of the total commercial tuna catch worldwide, 81% came from stocks at "healthy" levels of abundance, according to the October 2019 International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF) Status of the Stocks report. In addition, 15% of the total tuna catch was from overfished stocks, and 4% was from stocks at an intermediate level of abundance.

21d

Science News Daily

Pixel 4 teardown finds two surprise chips, Soli radar system

Is the "Pixel Neural Core" a single chip or two chips?

21d

Science News Daily

Disney+ Will Let You Keep Downloaded Content Even After It Leaves the Platform

Disney+ is making a more compelling case for itself seemingly by the day as it nears its release date. In yet another impressive reveal about the service, Walt Disney Company chief Bob Iger …

21d

Science News Daily

US senators call for security probe of TikTok

Two senior US senators called for the government to study national security risks possibly posed by Chinese-owned video app TikTok, saying it could leave American users vulnerable to Beijing's …

21d

Nature

Daily briefing: Get the best microscopy into the hands of biologists

Nature, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03244-6 How to bring big advances to everyone, dazzling details of early mammals and the gut's contribution to controlling fear.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

GIS-based analysis of fault zone geometry and hazard in an urban environment

Typical geologic investigations of active earthquake fault zones require that the fault can be observed at or near the Earth's surface. However, in urban areas, where faults present a direct hazard to dense populations, the surface expression of a fault is often hidden by development of buildings and infrastructure. This is the case in San Diego, California, where the Rose Canyon fault zone trends

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists identify new signposts in blood and urine to reflect what we eat and drink

Researchers at McMaster University have identified several chemical signatures, detectable in blood and urine, that can accurately measure dietary intake, potentially offering a new tool for physicians, dieticians and researchers to assess eating habits, measure the value of fad diets and develop health policies.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Artificial pancreas system better controls blood glucose levels than current technology

A multicenter randomized clinical trial evaluating a new artificial pancreas system — which automatically monitors and regulates blood glucose levels — has found that the new system was more effective than existing treatments at controlling blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes. The trial, based partly at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, was primarily funded by t

21d

Livescience.com

400+

Legendary 'Yeti' Galaxy Finally Discovered Behind a Shroud of Cosmic Dust

Researchers recently captured the first images of a hidden "monster galaxy" as elusive as the mythical, monstrous yeti.

21d

Phys.org

37

Your next phone case could have the feel of human skin

In many ways, our phones and smartwatches have become extensions of the human body, allowing us to conquer more ground than we ever could before.

21d

Futurism

19K

NASA's Collaborating With Caterpillar on Moon Mining Machines

Space Prospector Iconic construction vehicle company Caterpillar is working with NASA to build machines that could excavate and mine the lunar surface. The goal is to determine whether it makes sense to send autonomous or remote-controlled construction equipment to the Moon, according to CNBC , to gather rocks, dust, and water that NASA could use as raw materials for its planned lunar outpost . S

21d

Science News Daily

Employees say Google is trying to spy on them. That'll be hard to prove.

What does spying mean when workplace surveillance is the norm?

21d

Science News Daily

Cloud computing gains drive up profit for Microsoft

Microsoft reported Wednesday that quarterly profits rose on the back of its thriving cloud computing business which has become a core focus for the US technology giant.

21d

Phys.org

41

Entrepreneurs: Get the trademark to succeed, research says

Startups and entrepreneurs should spend the effort and money to obtain trademarks, because trademarks help them succeed in both product and financial markets, researchers say.

21d

Phys.org

Schools have critical role to play in supporting adolescents fleeing armed conflict

Communities in high income countries around the world continue to receive record-setting numbers of newcomers fleeing armed conflict. Although education is known to be highly important for refugee and migrant children, relatively little is known about the diversity of associated school-based programs and their likely value in supporting the mental health and psychosocial well-being of the children

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

For better research results, let mice be mice

Animal models can serve as gateways for understanding many human communication disorders, but a new study from the University at Buffalo suggests that the established practice of socially isolating mice for such purposes might actually make them poor research models for humans, and a simple shift to a more realistic social environment could greatly improve the utility of the future studies.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

81% of tuna catch comes from stocks at healthy levels, 15% require stronger management

Of the total commercial tuna catch worldwide, 81% came from stocks at 'healthy' levels of abundance, according to the October 2019 International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF) Status of the Stocks report. In addition, 15% of the total tuna catch was from overfished stocks, and 4% was from stocks at an intermediate level of abundance.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers design tunable, self-recovering dyes for use in next-generation smart devices

Researchers are working to better control how the chemicals respond to treatment, as well as how to reverse the chemicals back to their original state with little to no interference. A team of researchers at Yokohama National University has achieved such results with a specific compound that can emit light and has potential applications in the next generation of smart devices such as wearable devi

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The shelf life of pyrite

What exactly triggers the increase in carbon dioxide concentrations that causes the transition from a glacial stage to a warm stage is not fully understood. Together with colleagues, Dr. Martin Kölling from the MARUM – Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen, has developed a new model in which the weathering of pyrite, a common mineral containing sulfur, plays a key ro

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Baby formula improved by ingredient often removed during homogenization

A clinical trial published today in the Journal of Pediatrics shows infants who consume formula containing milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) score higher in cognitive, language and motor development than infants consuming a milk-based formula that didn't contain MFGM.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New survey shows link between comprehensive antibiotic stewardship programs and infection preventionist certification

Nearly half of all nursing homes do not have adequately trained infection prevention staff and their efforts to combat the over prescription of antibiotics are suffering as a result, according to a new study in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, published by Elsevier.

21d

New Scientist

100+

Genetic privacy attack could reveal DNA secrets from genealogy sites

Researchers say they have serious concerns about the genetic privacy of users of genetic genealogy services including MyHeritage, GEDMatch and FamilyTreeDNA

21d

New Scientist

500+

Blood transfer from active mice gives lazy ones benefits of exercise

Sedentary mice given blood plasma from active mice see the brain benefits of exercise, including improvements in memory and the birth of new brain cells

21d

The Atlantic

39

Radio Atlantic: Reporting in 'Forgotten America'

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher ( How to Listen ) James Fallows has reported on national politics for The Atlantic since the 1970s, when he served as the chief speechwriter for President Jimmy Carter. In the past four years, though, he's traveled the parts of the country that rarely show up in the national conversation: Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Holland, Michiga

21d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

58

Imperfect diamonds paved road to historic Deep Earth discoveries

Researchers have explored how carbon moves between Earth's interior, surface and atmosphere; how much deep carbon exists, in what forms (including vast microbial life); where carbon came from; and how life began.

21d

Wired

200+

Can License Plate Readers Really Reduce Crime?

Flock Safety boasts that its cameras caused a dramatic drop in crime in one Georgia county, but experts say it's not so simple.

21d

ScienceDaily

28

Structural protein essential for ciliary harmony in comb jellies

Researchers have identified a structural protein that is essential for the coordinated beating of millions of tiny cilia on the surface of comb jellies. When the protein was eliminated, the cilia began beating out of formation, stalling the locomotion of the jellies. These findings will help uncover how various organisms have adapted to life in different aquatic environments.

21d

ScienceDaily

40

Spotting cutting-edge topics in scientific research using keyword analysis

Researchers have conducted a quantitative keyword analysis of 30 million articles in the life sciences over a nearly fifty-year period (1970-2017) and found that 75% of total emerging keywords, at 1-year prior to becoming identified as emerging, co-appeared with other emerging keywords in the same article.

21d

ScienceDaily

36

Deleting a liver enzyme lowers the health risk of sweet treats (at least in mice)

Hepatic insulin resistance, caused by diets high in sugar and fat, can lead to type 2 diabetes. Researchers found that the Elovl6 gene plays a key role in hepatic insulin resistance. Deleting Elov6 in liver cells causes a rise in a specific ceramide lipid that protects mice from hepatic insulin resistance due to excessive dietary sugar. The findings could help efforts to find a targeted treatment

21d

Phys.org

Iron availability in seawater, key to explaining the amount and distribution of fish

People tend to pay more attention to how much food they are eating than to how rich their diet is in essential micronutrients like iron. However, if we do not get enough iron, we can become anemic, which leaves us sluggish and can impair growth and development. In the same way, biologists do not usually consider insufficient iron supply as being an important factor for the nutrition of wild animal

21d

Futurism

4K

Tesla: Autopilot Is Nearly 9 Times Safer Than the Average Driver

Safer System On Wednesday, Tesla released its third quarter 2019 update , and the good news wasn't limited to the company's buoyant financials . According to Tesla, cars with Autopilot engaged were involved in one accident for every 4.34 million miles driven during the quarter. The average for human drivers in the United States is one accident for every half million miles — making Autopilot nine

21d

Scientific American Blog Posts

How to Outsmart Superbugs

We know what to do but must get better at applying what we know — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

Wired

200+

'Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker' Is Lagging Behind 'Avengers: Endgame'

The movie failed to eclipse the Marvel film's first-day sales on Atom Tickets.

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Iron availability in seawater, key to explaining the amount and distribution of fish

People tend to pay more attention to how much food they are eating than to how rich their diet is in essential micronutrients like iron. However, if we do not get enough iron, we can become anemic, which leaves us sluggish and can impair growth and development. In the same way, biologists do not usually consider insufficient iron supply as being an important factor for the nutrition of wild animal

21d

The Atlantic

45K

The Greatest White Privilege Is Life Itself

I had a 30-minute ride to the train station. I nestled into my seat, opened my phone, and saw that Representative Elijah Cummings had passed away. I gasped and covered my mouth. The driver peeked at me in his rear-view mirror. He saw me shaking my head and whispering what many Americans whispered last Thursday: He was only 68 . My mind turned to my father, whom I had just left at a hotel in Princ

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers identify genetic variations linked to oxygen drops during sleep

Researchers have identified 57 genetic variations of a gene strongly associated with declines in blood oxygen levels during sleep. Low oxygen levels during sleep are a clinical indicator of the severity of sleep apnea, a disorder that increases the risk of heart disease, dementia, and death. The study, published today in the American Journal of Human Genetics, was funded by the National Heart, Lun

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

22

E-cigarette flavors decrease perception of harm among youth

As more and more youth use electronic cigarettes, combined with research showing the health consequences of vaping — including nicotine addiction — researchers at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill found that non-menthol flavors attract youth and adults to use e-cigarettes and that the use of flavored e-cigarettes contributes to multiple pathways linked to higher e-cigarette use among

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Entrepreneurs: Get the trademark to succeed, research says

Startups and entrepreneurs should spend the effort and money to obtain trademarks, because trademarks help them succeed in both product and financial markets, researchers say. Their paper, 'Trademarks in Entrepreneurial Finance,' is the first to study the role of trademarks for entrepreneurial firms, as most existing studies have focused on the role of patents. Trademarks help firms attract financ

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Schools have critical role to play in supporting adolescents fleeing armed conflict

Education is known to be highly important for migrant children, yet relatively little is known about the diversity of associated school-based programs and their likely value in supporting the mental health of children. A scoping review was conducted of 20 school-based programs aimed at improving the mental health of adolescent forced migrants in high-income countries. Findings showed school-based

21d

Scientific American Content

50

How to Outsmart Superbugs

We know what to do but must get better at applying what we know — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

3K

120-year-old extinct lizard specimen revealed by mitochondrial DNA

Together with a Ukrainian colleague, Senckenberg researchers examined the 120-year-old specimen of a "Crimean lizard." Until now, these animals had been considered a species of green lizard restricted to the Crimean Peninsula. Based on the complete mitochondrial genome, the team was able to show that these reptiles actually represent a species introduced from Italy. The results emphasize the impor

21d

Phys.org

500+

Extracting hidden quantum information from a light source

Current super-resolution microscopes or microarray laser scanning technologies are known for their high sensitivities and very good resolutions. However, they implement high light power to study samples, samples that can be light sensitive and thus become damaged or perturbed when illuminated by these devices.

21d

Phys.org

A win-win for forests and small-holder dairy farming in East Africa

The study, "Intensification of dairy production can increase the GHG mitigation potential of the land use sector in East Africa," modelled the impact on greenhouse gas emissions and efficiency of three scenarios for feeding nutrient-rich diets to dairy cows in Kenya.

21d

Phys.org

3K

120-year-old extinct lizard specimen revealed by mitochondrial DNA

Together with a Ukrainian colleague, Senckenberg researchers examined the 120-year-old specimen of a "Crimean lizard." Until now, these animals had been considered a species of green lizard restricted to the Crimean Peninsula. Based on the complete mitochondrial genome, the team was able to show that these reptiles actually represent a species introduced from Italy. The results emphasize the impor

21d

ScienceDaily

24

The pectin is protectin': Study uncovers a plant barrier against toxic aluminum

Aluminum toxicity is a major contributor to poor crop growth, especially in regions with acidic soils. How aluminum enters at the growing root tips of plants is not well understood. Researchers have found that pectin, a chemical component of the plant cell wall, may play a key role as a barrier to prevent aluminum from entering rice plants. The study sheds light on how rice plants may resist alumi

21d

ScienceDaily

42

Four new strains of human adenovirus

Large-scale study to identify human adenovirus genotypes in Singapore leads to discovery of four new adenovirus strains and increase in strains linked to severe diseases. Researchers suggest use of antiviral therapies and adenovirus vaccines, and routine monitoring of adenovirus strains.

21d

ScienceDaily

76

Imperfect diamonds paved road to historic Deep Earth discoveries

Researchers have explored how carbon moves between Earth's interior, surface and atmosphere; how much deep carbon exists, in what forms (including vast microbial life); where carbon came from; and how life began.

21d

ScienceDaily

41

Massive fangs and a death crush: How a 370 million year old tetrapod hunted and killed

The habits of a needle-toothed tetrapod which lived more than 370 million years ago have filled in a piece of the evolutionary puzzle after an international team of palaeontologists pieced together fossilized skeletons and found unusual characteristics such as a crocodile-like skull with high positioned eyes would have been used to 'keep an eye' on prey before it used its slender needle-like teeth

21d

ScienceDaily

40

Breakthrough in understanding rare genetic skin condition

A breakthrough has been made in understanding a rare genetic skin disease that causes progressively enlarging skin tumors over the scalp, face and body.

21d

ScienceDaily

400+

Chemicals in consumer products during early pregnancy related to lower IQ, especially in boys

Exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy to mixtures of suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals found in consumer products is related to lower IQ in children by age 7, according to a new study. This study is among the first to look at prenatal suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical mixtures in relation to neurodevelopment.

21d

ScienceDaily

32

Strong winter dust storms may have caused the collapse of the Akkadian Empire

Fossil coral records provide new evidence that frequent winter shamals, or dust storms, and a prolonged cold winter season contributed to the collapse of the ancient Akkadian Empire in Mesopotamia.

21d

Science Magazine

Fleets of flying telescopes and returning samples from Venus among Europe's space hopes

Scientists debate themes vying for billion-euro mission slots in Voyage 2050 program

21d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

Catalysis that neutralizes air-polluting NOx from power plant emissions

New research describes the mechanism behind catalysis that neutralizes air-polluting NOx from power plant emissions. Researchers used a High Field (HF) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometer in conjunction with reaction studies to test three theories around titania-supported vanadium oxide. They found that tungsten oxide changes the structure of vanadium oxide from a less active form to a h

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Global Health Security Index finds gaps in preparedness for epidemics and pandemics

A new Global Health Security Index released today, the first comprehensive assessment and benchmarking of health security and related capabilities across 195 countries, suggests that not a single country in the world is fully prepared to handle an epidemic or pandemic.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Saturday, Oct. 26: UVA Children's home monitoring experts present at AAP Conference

Two UVA Children's experts will make presentations Saturday at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition on a breakthrough home monitoring program for children with complex health needs using an iPad app.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Artificial intelligence system gives fashion advice

A University of Texas at Austin-led computer science team has developed an artificial intelligence system that can look at a photo of an outfit and suggest helpful tips to make it more fashionable.

21d

The Atlantic

200+

When Music's Sad Boys Chase Happiness

In the recent anthology It's Not OK to Feel Blue (And Other Lies): Inspirational People Open Up About Their Mental Health , the musician James Blake wrote about the particular feeling of being straight, white, male, and sad. His point, he wrote, was "not to make anyone feel sorry for me, but to show how a privileged, relatively rich-and-famous-enough-for-zero-pity white man could become depressed

21d

Science | Smithsonian

1K

Saving This Rare Whale Skeleton Was a Dirty Job

The Smithsonian welcomes a rare whale skeleton that was found dead on an island in the Florida Everglades

21d

Science | Smithsonian

Was Jakob Broadbeck First in Flight? and More Questions From Our Readers

You've got questions, we've got experts

21d

Futurism

500+

The Air Force Just Got a Brutal New Laser Cannon

Pew Pew The U.S. Air Force finally has its hands on the laser cannon that military tech contractor Raytheon built for it. The laser weapon, which can be mounted onto the back of a vehicle, is designed to help the Air Force take down hostile drones, Engadget reports . While the military will spend another year testing the cannon, the delivery represents an escalation in the arms race as more count

21d

Futurity.org

22

What's the sex of that skeleton? Check the elbow

An elbow can help determine the sex of a skeleton, according to a new study. In an effort to help identify skeletal remains of Thai descent, researchers found that examining the distal humerus ( elbow ) is superior to previous techniques developed for identifying sex in a non-Asian population. Forensic anthropologists estimate the biological profile (sex, ancestry, age, and stature of skeletonize

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Iron availability in seawater, key to explaining the amount and distribution of fish

A new paper led by ICTA-UAB researchers Eric Galbraith and Priscilla Le Mézo and published in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science proposes that the available iron supply in large areas of the ocean is insufficient for most fish, and that — as a result — there are fewer fish in the ocean than there would be if iron were more plentiful.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Extracting hidden quantum information from a light source

Researchers report on a technique to extract the quantum information hidden in an image that carries both classical and quantum information. This technique opens a new pathway for quantum enhance microscopes that aim to observe ultra-sensitive samples.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Parents' behavior influences bonding hormone oxytocin in babies

A new epigenetic study suggests that mothers' behavior can also have a substantial impact on their children's developing oxytocin systems.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A win-win for forests and small-holder dairy farming in East Africa

The native Napier grass could hold the key to improving diets, boosting farming yields and reducing greenhouse gas emissions in East Africa. Growing and using Napier as a nutrient rich animal fodder on the farm, could also reduce pressure on forests, according to new research.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Xyphos and Gladstone Institutes publish data demonstrating reduction of HIV reservoir

Xyphos Biosciences and Gladstone Institutes today announced the publication of key preclinical data demonstrating that convertibleCAR® cells attack and significantly reduce latent reservoirs of diverse HIV strains. These latent reservoirs persist even in patients taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) and are a major barrier to a cure for HIV/AIDS. The publication, 'Attacking Latent HIV with converti

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gladstone and Xyphos Partners adapt CAR-T immunotherapy to target the HIV latent reservoir

A team of Gladstone scientists and their partners at Xyphos Biosciences, Inc. describe a new way of attacking cells infected by HIV in this week's issue of the journal Cell. The work showcases a novel version of CAR-T, the technology known for its recent successes in fighting blood cancers.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

24

Using artificial intelligence to predict risk of thyroid cancer on ultrasound

New study uses machine learning on ultrasound images of thyroid nodules to predict risk of malignancy.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Evolution is resetting the annual clock in migratory birds

The timing of spring migration is vital for birds. Returning too late comes at a cost. In 1981, German ornithologist Eberhard Gwinner demonstrated how an internal circannual clock is responsible for the correct timing of flycatchers' migration. Replicating this experiment more than twenty years later, Barbara Helm, University of Groningen Associate Professor of Biological Rhythms of Natural Organi

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Climate science: 300-year thinning may have predisposed Antarctic ice shelves to collapse

Ice shelves in the eastern Antarctic Peninsula may have been predisposed to collapse by hundreds years of thinning according to a study in Scientific Reports.

21d

ScienceDaily

40

Why are bald eagles such great gliders? It's all in the wrist

Birds come in an astounding array of shapes and colors. New research helps explain why bird species with similar flight styles or body sizes don't have consistent wing shapes. Bird species tend to reshape the range of motion of their wings — rather than wing shape or size itself — as they evolve new ways of flying.

21d

ScienceDaily

28

A tale of two cities: Impact of reducing teens' access to flavored tobacco products

Restricting youth access to flavored tobacco products holds the promise of reducing their overall tobacco use, according to a new study.

21d

ScienceDaily

40

Electrical stimulation aids in spinal fusion

Spine surgeons in the U.S. perform more than 400,000 spinal fusions each year as a way to ease back pain and prevent vertebrae in the spine from wiggling around and doing more damage. However, reports estimate that on average some 30% of these surgeries fail to weld these vertebrae into a single bone, causing continued back pain.

21d

ScienceDaily

100+

Babies understand counting years earlier than believed

Babies who are years away from being able to say 'one,' 'two,' and 'three' actually already have a sense of what counting means, researchers have discovered. The findings reveal that very early on, years earlier than previously believed, babies who hear counting realize that it's about quantity.

21d

ScienceDaily

68

Fungi could reduce reliance on fertilizers

Introducing fungi to wheat boosted their uptake of key nutrients and could lead to new, 'climate smart' varieties of crops, according to a new study.

21d

ScienceDaily

43

Original location of Bayeux Tapestry finally solved

Study provides new insights into how the Tapestry was made to be displayed, how this affected its design, and the artwork's significance ahead of its loan to the UK.

21d

ScienceDaily

28

Catalysis that neutralizes air-polluting NOx from power plant emissions

New research describes the mechanism behind catalysis that neutralizes air-polluting NOx from power plant emissions. Researchers used a High Field (HF) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrometer in conjunction with reaction studies to test three theories around titania-supported vanadium oxide. They found that tungsten oxide changes the structure of vanadium oxide from a less active form to a h

21d

ScienceDaily

34

Rare diseases: Over 300 million patients affected worldwide

Rare diseases represent a global problem. Until now, the lack of data made it difficult to estimate their prevalence. The Orphanet database, which contains the largest amount of epidemiological data on these diseases taken from the scientific literature, has made it possible to obtain a global estimate.

21d

New Scientist

2K

Collapse of Antarctic ice may have been centuries in the making

The ice shelves in eastern Antarctic peninsula seem to have been thinning since around 1700, leaving ice shelves such as Larsen B vulnerable to their recent break-up as human-caused climate change took hold

21d

NYT > Science

9K

After This Fungus Turns Ants Into Zombies, Their Bodies Explode

The life cycle of Ophiocordyceps is like something from a sci-fi movie: "You think, where the hell did that come from?"

21d

Phys.org

Women CEOs judged more harshly than men for corporate ethical failures

People are less likely to support an organization after an ethical failure if the business is led by a woman, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association. However, organizations led by women endure less negative backlash for competence failures than those headed by men.

21d

Science News Daily

AT&T Still Battling Weeks-Long Voicemail Outage And Customer Outrage With No End In Sight

If you are an AT&T customer that has been experiencing annoying problems with your voicemail lately, you're not alone. The second-place U.S. wireless carrier says that it has identified an …

21d

Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

28

Rick's Strong Start to the Season | Gold Rush

Rick and team weigh their first gold of the season! Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://www.insta

21d

The Economist

33

Politics this week

[no content]

21d

The Economist

20

Business this week

[no content]

21d

The Economist

100+

KAL's cartoon

[no content]

21d

The Economist

35

Politics this week

[no content]

21d

The Economist

24

Business this week

[no content]

21d

The Economist

79

KAL's cartoon

[no content]

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

29

Australian honey abuzz with high-value antibacterial activity

Australia has at least seven Leptospermum species that produce honey with exceptionally high levels of antibacterial activity, providing the scientific basis to facilitate the entry of Australian honey producers into premium medicinal markets.

21d

Phys.org

40

Australian honey abuzz with high-value antibacterial activity

Australia has at least seven Leptospermum species that produce honey with exceptionally high levels of antibacterial activity, providing the scientific basis to facilitate the entry of Australian honey producers into premium medicinal markets.

21d

Phys.org

57

Wildfire roars through California wine country

A fast-moving wildfire roared through California wine country early Thursday, as authorities warned of the imminent danger of more fires across much of the Golden State.

21d

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

22

Researchers make neural networks successfully detect DNA damage caused by UV radiation

Researchers at Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the University of Chemistry and Technology (Prague) conducted a series of experiments which proved that artificial neural networks can accurately identify DNA damage caused by UV radiation. In the future, this approach can be used in modern medical diagnostics. An article, dedicated to those studies, was published in the Biosensors and Bioel

21d

ScienceDaily

44

Martian landslides not conclusive evidence of ice

Giant ridges on the surface of landslides on Mars could have formed without ice, challenging their use by some as unequivocal evidence of past ice on the red planet, finds a new study using state-of-the-art satellite data.

21d

Phys.org

Researchers make neural networks successfully detect DNA damage caused by UV radiation

Researchers at Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the University of Chemistry and Technology (Prague) conducted a series of experiments which proved that artificial neural networks can accurately identify DNA damage caused by UV radiation. In the future, this approach can be used in modern medical diagnostics. An article, dedicated to those studies, was published in the Biosensors and Bioel

21d

Quanta Magazine

1K

Dueling Brain Waves Anchor or Erase Learning During Sleep

The brain collects far more memories than it can keep. We absorb new information throughout the day, but retain only some overnight and beyond. Sleep seems crucial to this balance of learning and forgetting, solidifying some memories and eroding others through the brain's patterns of electrical signaling, but the mechanisms at work have been unclear. Research reported earlier this month , however

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers discover 4 new strains of human adenovirus

Large-scale study to identify human adenovirus genotypes in Singapore leads to discovery of four new adenovirus strains and increase in strains linked to severe diseases. Researchers suggest use of antiviral therapies and adenovirus vaccines, and routine monitoring of adenovirus strains.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The pectin is protectin': Study uncovers a plant barrier against toxic aluminum

Aluminum toxicity is a major contributor to poor crop growth, especially in regions with acidic soils. How aluminum enters at the growing root tips of plants is not well understood. Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have found that pectin, a chemical component of the plant cell wall, may play a key role as a barrier to prevent aluminum from entering rice plants. The study sheds light on how

21d

Phys.org

85

300-year thinning may have predisposed Antarctic ice shelves to collapse

Ice shelves in the eastern Antarctic Peninsula may have been predisposed to collapse by hundreds years of thinning according to a study in Scientific Reports.

21d

Phys.org

200+

Plant microbes suppress costly root immune responses to boost plant growth

Beneficial microbes are considered a major promise for sustainable crop production. Utrecht researchers discovered that beneficial microbes on plant roots suppress host immunity to fully colonize and benefit their host plant, just like their disease-causing pathogenic counterparts. Their findings were published October 24 in Current Biology.

21d

Phys.org

100+

Evolution is resetting the annual clock in migratory birds

The timing of spring migration is vital for birds. Returning too late comes at a cost. In 1981, German ornithologist Eberhard Gwinner demonstrated how an internal circannual clock is responsible for the correct timing of flycatchers' migration. Replicating this experiment more than twenty years later, Barbara Helm, University of Groningen Associate Professor of Biological Rhythms of Natural Organi

21d

Science and technology

8K

Lithuanians are using software to fight back against fake news

The country is besieged by Russian propaganda

21d

Science and technology

1K

Plantation owners profit by not persecuting primates

Monkeys act as pest controllers who take their fees in fruit

21d

Science and technology

500+

Claims about a treatment for Alzheimer's should be met with caution

More trials would be a good idea

21d

Science and technology

500+

Why museums' animal collections favour males

They are showier, and more easily caught

21d

Futurity.org

100+

Ocean waves spew ancient organic molecules into the air

Ocean waves inject tiny particles called aerosols into the air—and those aerosols carry organic molecules more than 5,000 years old. This discovery, published in Science Advances helps to solve a long-standing mystery as to what happens to these ancient marine molecules. Decades of measurements have revealed that nearly all of the organic matter dissolved in the oceans is surprisingly old—up to s

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

200+

Plant microbes suppress costly root immune responses to boost plant growth

Beneficial microbes are considered a major promise for sustainable crop production. Utrecht researchers discovered that beneficial microbes on plant roots suppress host immunity to fully colonize and benefit their host plant, just like their disease-causing pathogenic counterparts. Their findings were published October 24 in Current Biology.

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

200+

Evolution is resetting the annual clock in migratory birds

The timing of spring migration is vital for birds. Returning too late comes at a cost. In 1981, German ornithologist Eberhard Gwinner demonstrated how an internal circannual clock is responsible for the correct timing of flycatchers' migration. Replicating this experiment more than twenty years later, Barbara Helm, University of Groningen Associate Professor of Biological Rhythms of Natural Organi

21d

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

1K

The link between fishing cats and mangrove forest conservation | Ashwin Naidu

Mangrove forests are crucial to the health of the planet, gobbling up CO2 from the atmosphere and providing a home for a diverse array of species. But these rich habitats are under continual threat from deforestation and industry. In an empowering talk, conservationist and TED Fellow Ashwin Naidu shares how community-driven efforts in South and Southeast Asia are working to protect mangroves — al

21d

Futurism

300+

This Rocky World With Three Suns May Have an Atmosphere

Three Suns A team of Harvard astronomers have spotted a rocky planet with three suns using data from NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite — and, tantalizingly, they think it could have an atmosphere. It could give us a glimpse of the conditions on interstellar planets which, like Earth, have their own atmospheres. But unfortunately, this super-Earth is simply too hot to contain the ingred

21d

Science News Daily

Hey, Apple TV app, welcome to Amazon's Fire TV – CNET

You can now add Fire TV streamers and TVs to the list of places you'll be able to watch Apple TV Plus and iTunes TV shows and movies.

21d

Science News Daily

Warren and Wyden call for FTC investigation on Amazon over Capital One breach – CNET

The senators want the agency to determine if Amazon was negligent and failed to secure cloud servers it hosted for the major bank.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

24

Metacognitive therapy holds promise for treating depression

Fewer patients relapse after metacognitive therapy for depression, new research shows.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Deleting a liver enzyme lowers the health risk of sweet treats (at least in mice)

Hepatic insulin resistance, caused by diets high in sugar and fat, can lead to type 2 diabetes. Researchers at the University of Tsukuba found that the Elovl6 gene plays a key role in hepatic insulin resistance. Deleting Elov6 in liver cells causes a rise in a specific ceramide lipid that protects mice from hepatic insulin resistance due to excessive dietary sugar. The findings could help efforts

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Through the FUBImethod, children engage in designing full-body interactive experiences

Developed by the team of Narcís Parés, a member of the Cognitive Media Technologies research group, with the participation of the University of Aarhus (Denmark), it describes the details of the project in an article published in the advanced online edition of International Journal of Human-Computer Studies.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Massive fangs and a death crush: How a 370 million year old tetrapod hunted and killed

The habits of a needle-toothed tetrapod which lived more than 370 million years ago have filled in a piece of the evolutionary puzzle after an international team of palaeontologists pieced together fossilised skeletons and found unusual characteristics such as a crocodile-like skull with high positioned eyes would have been used to 'keep an eye' on prey before it used its slender needle-like teeth

21d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

Magnets sustainably separate mixtures of rare earth metals

A new study describes a novel approach for purifying rare earth metals, crucial components of technology that require environmentally-damaging mining procedures. By relying on the metal's magnetic fields during the crystallization process, researchers were able to efficiently and selectively separate mixtures of rare earth metals.

21d

Futurity.org

51

Antiviral drug really works at fighting flu virus

A new antiviral drug that induces mutations in the genetic material of influenza virus is highly effective in treating infection in animals and human airway tissue, a new study shows. The antiviral drug blocks RNA polymerase, the enzyme that plays a central role in replicating the genome of influenza virus, causing mutations in the viral genome. If enough mutations occur, the genome becomes nonfu

21d

Phys.org

An evapotranspiration deficit drought index to detect drought impacts on ecosystems

Ecosystems have increasingly been subject to the stress of heavy drought under global warming. To quantify its impacts, a drought index that can sensitively depict the reaction of vegetation to drought evolution is necessary at a biological time scale. The difference between actual and potential evapotranspiration, technically termed a standardized evapotranspiration deficit drought index (SEDI),

21d

Phys.org

The benefits that carnivorous animals bring to society are under-studied

Carnivores deliver important benefits for society, but it is their conflicts with humans that account for the majority of academic research publications, according to an international study led by the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), in which a researcher from the University of Granada (UGR) is participating.

21d

Phys.org

Study uncovers a plant barrier against toxic aluminum

Aluminum toxicity has long been known to damage plant cells and inhibit the growth of plants. Aluminum is widely found in soils that are too acidic, and as human activities have increased soil acidity across the globe, aluminum toxicity has become a leading cause of low crop yield worldwide. While the effect of aluminum on plants is widely known, precisely how aluminum enters plant cells and cause

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

The benefits that carnivorous animals bring to society are under-studied

Carnivores deliver important benefits for society, but it is their conflicts with humans that account for the majority of academic research publications, according to an international study led by the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), in which a researcher from the University of Granada (UGR) is participating.

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Study uncovers a plant barrier against toxic aluminum

Aluminum toxicity has long been known to damage plant cells and inhibit the growth of plants. Aluminum is widely found in soils that are too acidic, and as human activities have increased soil acidity across the globe, aluminum toxicity has become a leading cause of low crop yield worldwide. While the effect of aluminum on plants is widely known, precisely how aluminum enters plant cells and cause

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

34

Imperfect diamonds paved road to historic Deep Earth discoveries

Hundreds of scientists will celebrate in Washington, D.C., the many historic results of the 10-year, $300 million Deep Carbon Observatory, one of the largest-ever global Earth sciences research projects. 1,200 researchers from 55 nations explored how carbon moves between Earth's interior, surface and atmosphere; how much deep carbon exists, in what forms (including vast microbial life); where carb

21d

Futurity.org

100+

Coerced sterilization of Native women occurred in the 70s

In the 1970s, doctors in the United States performed sterilizations on an estimated 25 to 42% of Native American women of childbearing age, some as young as 15. Even the lower estimate—one quarter of Native women—is a whopping statistic. The federal government subsidized the sterilizations, which often took place without consent or under great duress. The procedures marked the culmination of a lo

21d

Ingeniøren

Data over lyd: Nu skal billetter og passwords sendes over højttaleren

PLUS. Flere virksomheder bruger lyd i stedet for radiobølger til at sende data over kortere afstande, eksempelvis til trådløse betalinger, konfiguration af nye netværk og billetter til store begivenheder.

21d

Futurism

400+

Facebook: Misleading Political Ads Are Important "Discourse"

The Discourse Facebook's chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg, says that dishonest advertisements political candidates put on Facebook should stay there because they represent important discourse. "We're not doing this for the money," Sandberg said during a Vanity Fair summit on Tuesday, according to Gizmodo . "We take political ads because we really believe they are part of political discour

21d

forskning.se

27

Bara BMI räcker inte för att hitta övervikt hos barn

Traditionellt har förhållandet mellan längd och vikt – så kallat BMI – använts för att identifiera vilka barn som har övervikt eller fetma. Studier vid Högskolan i Halmstad visar att vartannat barn vid fem års ålder med förhöjt midjemått riskerar att missas när endast BMI används som mått. Dessa barn går dock att identifiera om måttet WHtR (midjemått-längd-kvot) används som komplement. Övervikt o

21d

forskning.se

Separata avrinningsrör viktigt i städers skydd mot översvämningar

För att undvika översvämningar satsar allt fler städer på öppna, så kallade blågröna, dagvattensystem. Forskning visar att systemen kan fungera väl om de införs på ett genomtänkt sätt – annars finns risken för att problemen i stället förvärras. Ett nytt verktyg kan göra det enklare att bygga rätt. I takt med att städerna förtätas och skyfallen tilltar ökar risken för översvämningar. Forskare blir

21d

Science News Daily

Bollinger's rugged electric trucks will cost $125,000

Image: Bollinger Michigan-based electric truck startup Bollinger Motors has finally announced the price of its rugged electric trucks, the Jeep-like B1 and the B2 pickup. Both …

21d

Science News Daily

How to (Ethically) Hack the Hotel Bedside Robots

I'm not advising anyone to commandeer bedside hotel robots in order to spy on unwitting guests and curse the night with supernatural televisual activity. But if you wanted to, it would be really, …

21d

Science News Daily

By tweeting from a SCIF, House lawmakers put national security at risk

If you thought storming into a highly secured government facility with your electronics but without permission was a smart idea, you'd be wrong. But that didn't stop Rep. Matt Gaetz …

21d

The Atlantic

1K

Trump Has No Room for Error in 2020

The risk in Donald Trump's base-first electoral strategy is only rising—because the size of his base is shrinking. Working-class whites are on track to continue declining as a share of eligible voters in 2020, according to a study released today by the liberal think tank Center for American Progress . In turn, two groups much more resistant to Trump will keep growing: Nonwhite voters will swell s

21d

Phys.org

37

Should New York build a storm surge barrier?

It's been seven years since Superstorm Sandy brought the city that never sleeps to a grinding halt. High tide and storm surge—the pile of water that built up in front of Sandy as she moved up the coast—combined to bury lower Manhattan under 13 feet of water. Across the five boroughs, subways, highways, and parking garages flooded; homes and businesses were destroyed, and 53 people died. It is esti

21d

ScienceDaily

32

Magnets sustainably separate mixtures of rare earth metals

A new study describes a novel approach for purifying rare earth metals, crucial components of technology that require environmentally-damaging mining procedures. By relying on the metal's magnetic fields during the crystallization process, researchers were able to efficiently and selectively separate mixtures of rare earth metals.

21d

ScienceDaily

24

Newly discovered protein is the permit to the powerhouse of cells

Researchers report the discovery of a protein, P17/PERMIT, that is key to recycling aging and damaged mitochondria. Defective mitochondria are characteristic of a number of age-related diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer's. The MUSC team showed P17/PERMIT transports the machinery that produces ceramide, a molecule that signals old mitochondria for destruction, to the mitochondria. There, it c

21d

Futurism

200+

New Microsoft Tech Lets You Use VR While Walking Outside

Road Less Traveled Walking the same path to school or work every day can get boring. To mix things up, you could switch up your route — or you can make your current route look new using DreamWalker, a virtual reality technology developed by Microsoft researchers. Scenery Swap DreamWalker works by looking at the path you plan to travel in the real world, and then creating a comparable path in VR.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Structural protein essential for ciliary harmony in comb jellies

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba and the Japanese National Institute for Basic Biology identified a structural protein that is essential for the coordinated beating of millions of tiny cilia on the surface of comb jellies. When the protein was eliminated, the cilia began beating out of formation, stalling the locomotion of the jellies. These findings will help uncover how various organis

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Breakthrough in understanding rare genetic skin condition

A breakthrough has been made in understanding a rare genetic skin disease that causes progressively enlarging skin tumours over the scalp, face and body.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The benefits that carnivorous animals bring to society are under-studied

For a period of 17 years, the scientific studies conducted around the world on the relationships between humans and carnivores focused excessively on the conflicts between them, overlooking the benefits that carnivores bring to society. This is just one of the conclusions of an international study in which the University of Granada is participating, which also identifies other research deficiencie

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Spotting cutting-edge topics in scientific research using keyword analysis

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba conducted a quantitative keyword analysis of 30 million articles in the life sciences over a nearly fifty-year period (1970-2017) and found that 75% of total emerging keywords, at 1-year prior to becoming identified as emerging, co-appeared with other emerging keywords in the same article.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lassa fever: Vaccine set to be trialed

There is currently no vaccine for the Lassa arenavirus, which causes Lassa fever. This hemorrhagic fever, endemic in West Africa, infects up to 300,000 people each year. Given the urgency of the situation, scientists at the Institut Pasteur identified a vaccine candidate as being effective to enter clinical testing in humans as soon as possible. This raises hopes in the fight against a disease tha

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Young mums more likely to have kids with ADHD

Young mothers have a greater chance of having a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) according to new research from the University of South Australia. Exploring the genetic relationship between female reproductive traits and key psychiatric disorders, it found that the genetic risk of ADHD in children was strongly associated with early maternal age at first birth, particular

21d

Phys.org

US ambassador returns to Italy a statue stolen in 1968

The U.S. ambassador to Italy has returned to Italian officials the head of a statue stolen from an archaeological site in Rome in 1968.

21d

Phys.org

As the climate changes, architects and engineers need to design buildings differently

In the past seven years, four major disasters have caused serious disruptions in the Northeast and Midwest United States. Hurricane Sandy slammed into New York City in 2012, inflicting nearly US$11 billion in damage to buildings. In 2014, a storm dubbed "Snowvember" dropped more than seven feet of snow in western New York. Three years later, historic flooding along Lake Ontario inundated numerous

21d

Phys.org

100+

Breaking waves propel ancient molecules into the air

A discovery that helps explain how organic matter produced by life thousands of years ago is ultimately removed from the sea has been published in Science Advances by Steven Beaupré of Stony Brook University's School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) and a national team of scientists.

21d

Phys.org

31

Plastic nanoparticles make larval zebrafish hyperactive

Nanoplastics influence the behaviour of larval zebrafish, says new research by the Institute of Biology Leiden (IBL) and the Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML). The researchers observed that a certain type of nanoparticles leads to stress reactions in the sugar balance, resulting in hyperactivity in the fish larvae. The study was published on 18 October in Nature Communications Biology.

21d

Phys.org

The future of the US workforce will rely on AI, but don't count human workers out just yet

Artificial intelligence has replaced many skills in recent years – including the skills needed to do some human jobs.

21d

Phys.org

How daylight saving time can mess with financial markets

A number of studies show that daylight savings time harms people's decision making processes due to the disturbance it has on their circadian rhythm or body clock. For example, research finds that people experience more pronounced mood swings shortly after daylight saving time ends. After daylight saving time is introduced there are more car accidents and more people tend to experience health comp

21d

Singularity Hub

300+

We Have the Tools and Technology to Work Less and Live Better

In 1930, a year into the Great Depression, John Maynard Keynes sat down to write about the economic possibilities of his grandchildren. Despite widespread gloom as the global economic order fell to its knees, the British economist remained upbeat, saying that the 'prevailing world depression … blind[s] us to what is going on under the surface'. In his essay, he predicted that in 100 years' time,

21d

Sciencemag

Chiral Reactions With Chiral Electrons

Here's a weird one for the Strange Things to Do With Chirality file. A multi-center team (Hebrew Univ., Weizmann Inst., Univ. Modena, and Pitt) report that electron spin , of all things, can be a chiral reagent. Some readers will sit up at that phrase, and others will (understandably) wonder what I'm talking about. Perhaps that happens most mornings around here, but I'm pretty sure about this ins

21d

ScienceDaily

300+

Gut instincts: Researchers discover first clues on how gut health influences brain health

New cellular and molecular processes underlying communication between gut microbes and brain cells have been described for the first time.

21d

Futurity.org

37

Babies get counting words way before we thought

Babies who are years away from being able to say "one," "two," and "three" actually already have a sense of what counting means, according to new research. The findings reveal that very early on—years earlier than previously believed, in fact—babies who hear counting realize that counting indicates quantity. "…babies actually have a pretty sophisticated understanding of the world…" "Although they

21d

Futurism

500+

Here's Why Quantum Supremacy Matters

After weeks of speculation, megacorporation Google is claiming to have achieved "quantum supremacy" in a paper published in the prestigious journal Nature . Why should you care? And what is quantum supremacy in the first place? Let's take a couple steps back. In the paper published today, the team of Google AI scientists claimed their quantum computer — called "Sycamore" — was capable of completi

21d

forskning.se

300+

Kemikaliecocktail i vardagen kopplas till kognitiv nedsättning hos barn

Exponering för blandningar av kemikalier under graviditeten kopplas till lägre kognitiv förmåga hos barn vid sju års ålder. De handlar om om kemiska ämnen från vanliga hushållsartiklar, plaster, bekämpningsmedel och mat. Flera av de identifierade kemikalierna bedöms vara endokrinstörande, det vill säga ämnen som påverkar hormonsystemet och kan därigenom ge negativa effekter, enligt en studie gjor

21d

New Scientist

500+

Graffiti on bus shelters saves birds from fatal collisions

A study of bus shelters in Poland has found that glass screens can be fatal to birds, but graffiti or dirt prevents collisions

21d

New Scientist

1K

Brexit ideas of UK food self-sufficiency are just pipe dreams

In principle, it is a great idea for the UK to grow more of its food – but simple matters of geography, climate and population mean it is a no-go, says James Wong

21d

Science News Daily

Could AI beat radiologists at spotting bleeds in the brain?

Computer-driven artificial intelligence (AI) can help protect human brains from the damage wrought by stroke, a new report suggests.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists reveal novel oncogenic driver gene in human gastrointestinal stromal tumors

A team led by Prof. WANG Yuexiang of the Shanghai Institute of Nutrition and Health (SINH) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with Prof. Jonathan Fletcher from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, described a novel druggable driver gene in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs).

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Strong winter dust storms may have caused the collapse of the Akkadian Empire

Fossil coral records provide new evidence that frequent winter shamals, or dust storms, and a prolonged cold winter season contributed to the collapse of the ancient Akkadian Empire in Mesopotamia.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers make neural networks successfully detect DNA damage caused by UV radiation

Researchers of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the University of Chemistry and Technology (Prague) conducted a series of experiments, which proved that artificial neural networks can accurately identify DNA damages caused by UV radiation. In the future, this approach can be used in modern medical diagnostics. An article, dedicated to those studies, was published in the Biosensors and Bio

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

An evapotranspiration deficit drought index to detect drought impacts on ecosystems

The difference between actual and potential evapotranspiration, technically termed a standardized evapotranspiration deficit drought index (SEDI), can more sensitively capture the biological changes of ecosystems in response to the dynamics of drought intensity, compared with indices based on precipitation and temperature.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mayo Clinic studies patient privacy in MRI research

Though identifying data typically are removed from medical image files before they are shared for research, a Mayo Clinic study finds that this may not be enough to protect patient privacy.

21d

Futurity.org

100+

What you can do to keep your kids safe from pesticides

Who's most at risk for pesticide exposure and how can you keep your kids safe? One expert has some answers. Studies show that exposure to pesticides—specifically those containing chlorpyrifos, which attack an insect's nervous system—can harm a child's physical and mental development. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey detected chlorpy

21d

Ingeniøren

22

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan er kærnemælk fremstillet?

En læser forsøger sig med at lave kærnemælk, men det bliver til tykmælk i stedet. Hvad er det for et trick, mejerierne benytter sig af? Det svarer Mejeriforeningen på.

21d

Phys.org

1K

Evidence that mercury from volcanoes contributed to end-Triassic mass extinction

An international team of researchers has found evidence that mercury from volcanic eruptions played a role in the end-Triassic mass extinction. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the researchers describe their study of plant fossils from 200 million years ago, and what they found.

21d

Phys.org

Environmental stress is already causing death: This chaos map shows where

Over 12 days at the start of October 2019 eight people were killed, more than 1,300 injured and nearly 1,200 arrested after demonstrations became violent in Ecuador. The demonstrations focused on reversing the ending of fuel subsidies, which had been brought in as part of austerity measures backed by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). The protests only ended when president Lenín Moreno agreed

21d

Phys.org

Investment in child care yields countless social and economic returns

Children are born with a desire to learn about the world around them. Infants learn and develop by exploring their environments with their senses. In the first few years of life, a baby's brain makes one million neural connections per second.

21d

Phys.org

Stop shaming and start empowering: Advertisers must rethink their plastic waste message

Discussion of the environment is embedded in our culture as public awareness over issues such as climate change and plastic pollution has grown. Advertisers are not shy about tapping into this concern for their own benefit.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Women CEOs judged more harshly than men for corporate ethical failures

People are less likely to support an organization after an ethical failure if the business is led by a woman, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association. However, organizations led by women endure less negative backlash for competence failures than those headed by men.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Australian honey abuzz with high-value antibacterial activity

Australia has at least seven Leptospermum species that produce honey with exceptionally high levels of antibacterial activity, providing the scientific basis to facilitate the entry of Australian honey producers into premium medicinal markets.

21d

Futurism

200+

Lawsuit Blames Tesla's Retracting Door Handles for Fiery Death

Fiery Crash An anesthesiologist named Omar Awan died in a fiery wreck last winter when first responders were unable to open the futuristic retracting door handles on his Tesla Model S after it slammed into a palm tree in South Florida. Now, a wrongful death lawsuit alleges that Awan's death was directly caused by Tesla's iconic door handle design, Bloomberg reports . "Fire engulfed the car and bu

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Dried-out tardigrades could point way to drug preservation, resilient crops

New insights into how tardigrades survive extremely dry environments could reveal new ways of preserving drugs, boosting crops' tolerance to drought or fighting disease, but so far there is no simple answer to how these tiny creatures endure desiccation.

21d

Science News Daily

Google Rolls Out Chrome 78 With Dark Mode and Password Checker

Chrome 78 is rolling out today for Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, and Android., and it brings a few changes you're likely to notice. There are also some new features …

21d

Science News Daily

More Americans are using Apple Pay than any other mobile-payment app

Apple, which has focused on its services business as a major source of its future revenue growth, can now claim a new title for its Apple Pay digital payment service.

21d

Science News Daily

Several states wary of $48 billion opioid settlement proposal

Several U.S. states that have been ravaged by the opioid epidemic are pushing back on a proposed $48 billion settlement framework that would resolve thousands of lawsuits against five drug companies …

21d

Phys.org

97

Strong winter dust storms may have caused the collapse of the Akkadian Empire

Fossil coral records provide new evidence that frequent winter shamals, or dust storms, and a prolonged cold winter season contributed to the collapse of the ancient Akkadian Empire in Mesopotamia.

21d

Phys.org

Dried-out tardigrades could point way to drug preservation, resilient crops

New insights into how tardigrades survive extremely dry environments could reveal new ways of preserving drugs, boosting crops' tolerance to drought or fighting disease, but so far there is no simple answer to how these tiny creatures endure desiccation.

21d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

Most complete exploration of fly landing maneuvers to advance future robots

To inspire advanced robotic technology, researchers have published the most complete description of how flying insects land upside-down.

21d

Future(s) Studies

AI allows paralyzed person to 'handwrite' with his mind

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Dutch team develop swarm of tiny 33 gram drones that can explore unknown environments

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Panel: U.S. Military Artificial Intelligence Effort Underfunded, Understaffed – USNI News

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

U.S. companies facing worker shortage race to automate

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

300+

AI allows paralyzed person to 'handwrite' with his mind – A volunteer paralyzed from the neck down imagined moving his arm to write each letter of the alphabet. The computer could read out the volunteer's imagined sentences with roughly 95% accuracy at a speed of about 66 characters per minute.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

First 100% electric black cab for 120 years launches in London

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Los Angeles is testing "plastic asphalt" that makes it possible to recycle roads

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

21d

Phys.org

1K

Beyond Jupiter, researchers discover a 'cradle of comets'

Comets are known to have a temper. As they swoop in from the outer edges of our solar system, these icy bodies begin spewing gas and dust as they venture closer to the sun. Their luminous outbursts can result in spectacular sights that grace the night sky for days, weeks or even months.

21d

Phys.org

100+

Multifrequency observations shed more light on the nature of radio galaxy MRC 2011-298

Using Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA), astronomers have performed multifrequency radio observations of the radio galaxy MRC 2011-298. Results of these observations, described in a paper published October 15 on arXiv.org, provide crucial information about the morphology and properties of MRC 2011-298, shedding more light on the nature of this galaxy.

21d

Phys.org

21

Don't blame the teacher: Student results are (mostly) out of their hands

Teachers have very little to do with why some kids are better at school than others, our research shows. This contradicts the popular view that teachers matter most (after genes) when it comes to academic achievement.

21d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

Google Formally Claims to Have Achieved Quantum Supremacy

Last month, the quantum computing world lit up with the news that Google might have achieved quantum supremacy. A draft version of a paper surfaced on NASA's website claiming this but was quickly yanked offline. Now, the final version of the same paper has run in Nature , making a formal claim to what had previously been implied by the quick appearance and disappearance of the draft. Google argue

21d

ScienceDaily

36

Bio-inspired nano-catalyst guides chiral reactions

Many medicines are twisted molecules with two mirror image versions, but the body uses only one. Inspired by photosynthetic bacteria, a team built a catalyst that guides chemical reactions toward the right version of twisted molecules. It could lead to more efficient production of some medicines.

21d

ScienceDaily

40

Consensus report shows burnout prevalent in health care community

Clinician burnout is affecting between one-third and one-half of all of US nurses and physicians, and 45 to 60% of medical students and residents, according to a new report.

21d

ScienceDaily

24

Zeroing in on how a tumor suppressor protein is cast away

Researchers have uncovered new details about several proteins implicated in tumor growth and metastasis, opening a potential avenue for the development of treatments for diseases such as breast cancer.

21d

ScienceDaily

24

By cutting out one gene, researchers remove a tadpole's ability to regenerate

Tadpoles that can typically regrow amputated tails or limbs lost their ability to regenerate after researchers blocked the expression of a newly identified gene that is one of the drivers for this regrowth. Furthermore, scientists hypothesize that the loss of appendage regeneration in warm-blooded animals might have been caused by the gain or loss of this gene, dubbed c-Answer, in an ancestor's ge

21d

Phys.org

100+

Why a rocky planet with three suns has astronomers' attention

Planets that are even a little like Earth are hard to find. That's why when astronomers like Jennifer G. Winters come across a body that may be solid, rocky, and possibly have its own atmosphere, they get excited. And especially so in a case like this: For although it is statistically unlikely to host life, finding one with three suns raises the likelihood that studying the planet may offer valuab

21d

Phys.org

Recommendations for creating a Department of Sustainability and Climate Change in NYC

In our second semester as graduate students in the Environmental Science and Policy program, we had the opportunity to explore a proposed bill that sets out to create a Department of Sustainability and Climate Change within New York City. The bill would mandate that a commissioner, advisory board, and interagency green team be established within the department, and address all facets of sustainabi

21d

Phys.org

200+

Migrant strawberry pickers in Greece face deadly conditions

Each growing season, from October to May, as many as 12,000 undocumented Bangladeshi migrant men work in the agrarian labor market in Greece.

21d

Scientific American

The Outsize Role of Tiny Mosquitoes in Human History

A new book tells the tale of the greatest predator of human beings in history — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

35

Gray wolves are protected in Washington. So why does the state keep killing them?

Somewhere near this tiny farming town last month, a Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife hunter conducted what officials call a lethal removal, killing a gray wolf, a member of a species that the state considers endangered.

21d

Wired

2K

'Joker Stairs' and the Problem With Meme Tourism

Instagrammers flocking to the Bronx to take one picture defeats the purpose of globe-spanning cultural moments.

21d

Wired

300+

The Best Jobs Are in Government. No, Really

Brett Goldstein learned a few things as a cop and in Chicago's City Hall. Now he's bringing that civic expertise to the Pentagon.

21d

Phys.org

34

Freshwater reserves under the sea

Research at Flinders University is investigating and locating vital freshwater hidden beneath the sea.

21d

Phys.org

36

Gray wolves are protected in Washington. So why does the state keep killing them?

Somewhere near this tiny farming town last month, a Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife hunter conducted what officials call a lethal removal, killing a gray wolf, a member of a species that the state considers endangered.

21d

Scientific American Content

The Outsize Role of Tiny Mosquitoes in Human History

A new book tells the tale of the greatest predator of human beings in history — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

Science News Daily

BBC fights censorship by launching news site on the dark web

Government censorship of the internet is an issue in many countries, with officials blocking websites for hosting content which is critical of administrations or that includes unflattering …

21d

Science News Daily

Twitter slides on disappointing growth report

Twitter shares skidded Thursday as a quarterly update showed weaker-than-expected growth for the messaging platform.

21d

ScienceDaily

61

Biomedical sciences researchers demonstrate that new antiviral drug effectively treats influenza

A new antiviral drug that induces mutations in the genetic material of influenza virus is highly effective in treating influenza infection in animals and human airway tissue and could be a groundbreaking advance in influenza therapy.

21d

ScienceDaily

98

Swarm of tiny drones explores unknown environments

Researchers have presented a swarm of tiny drones that can explore unknown environments completely by themselves. This work forms a significant step in the field of swarm robotics.

21d

ScienceDaily

44

Women scientists author fewer invited commentaries in medical journals than men

Women scientists were 21% less likely to author invited commentaries in medical journals during a five-year period than men with similar scientific expertise, seniority, and publication metrics.

21d

Futurism

3K

UN Scientists: We Could Pause Global Warming With $300 Billion

Big Investment We could stop greenhouse gas emissions from rising for 15 to 20 years — if we're willing to spend $300 billion . That's how much United Nations climate scientists told Bloomberg it would cost to restore five billion acres of land degraded by mostly human factors, such as overgrazing and deforestation. Big Reward The land could be used for pasture, food crops, or trees — whatever ma

21d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

100+

Kvantdatorn fungerade trots att den var trasig

Några av världens smartaste människor har byggt en kvantdator som sopar banan med dagens superdatorer. Berättelsen om hur det gick till innehåller förvånansvärt mycket av både tur och klantighet.

21d

New on MIT Technology Review

500+

Critics say Facebook's Libra threatens America's power. Zuck says they've got it all wrong.

[no content]

21d

NYT > Science

23K

Government Loophole Gave Oil Companies $18 Billion Windfall

A 1990s effort to encourage drilling in the Gulf of Mexico has cost the government $18 billion in lost revenue from oil royalties, according to a new report.

21d

Futurity.org

31

How flies stick a landing upside down could inspire new robots

The most complete description of how flying insects land upside down could inspire new robotic technology, researchers report. "Through this work, we sought to understand how a fly executes the maneuvers of landing upside down in the blink of an eye," says Bo Cheng, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Penn State and lead author of a new paper in Science Advances . It's arguably the m

21d

ScienceDaily

32

Most complete exploration of fly landing maneuvers to advance future robots

To inspire advanced robotic technology, researchers have published the most complete description of how flying insects land upside-down.

21d

ScienceDaily

20

Earliest well-preserved tetrapod may never have left the water

Superbly preserved fossils from Russia cast new and surprising light on one of the earliest tetrapods — the group of animals that made the evolutionary transition from water to land and ultimately became the ancestors not just of amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, but of ourselves.

21d

ScienceDaily

200+

High-salt diet promotes cognitive impairment through the Alzheimer-linked protein tau

Investigators sought to understand the series of events that occur between salt consumption and poor cognition and concluded that lowering salt intake and maintaining healthy blood vessels in the brain may 'stave off' dementia. Accumulation of tau deposits has been implicated in the development of Alzheimer's disease in humans.

21d

ScienceDaily

Creating a nanospace like no other

Researchers have built a self-assembled nanocage with a very unusual nanospace: Its walls are made of antiaromatic molecules, which are generally considered too unstable to work with. By overturning assumptions about the limits of nano-chemical engineering, the study creates an entirely new nanospace for scientists to explore. Nanometer-sized cavities are already finding a range of useful applicat

21d

ScienceDaily

51

Why, sometimes, we don't see what we actually saw

Neuroscientists say they have identified how people can have a 'crash in visual processing' — a bottleneck of feed-forward and feedback signals that can cause us not to be consciously aware of stimuli that our brain recognized.

21d

ScienceDaily

Zebrafish discovery throws new light on human hearing disorders

A study of the genetic make-up of zebrafish has provided brand new insights into the cause of congenital hearing disorders in humans.

21d

ScienceDaily

Anti-arthritis drug also stops tuberculosis bacillus from multiplying in blood stem cells

Immunologists have shown that a drug used to fight arthritis also stops the process that allows the tuberculosis bacillus to infect and hijack blood stem cells.

21d

Science | The Guardian

200+

Victoria Braithwaite obituary

Biologist who demonstrated that fish feel pain and caused a revolution in animal welfare research Until the early 2000s everyone knew that fish do not feel pain. The biologist Victoria Braithwaite, who has died aged 52 from cancer, showed that everyone who thought that was wrong. Her demonstration that fish do feel pain caused a revolution in animal welfare research, resulted in changes to Home Of

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Electrical stimulation aids in spinal fusion

Spine surgeons in the U.S. perform more than 400,000 spinal fusions each year as a way to ease back pain and prevent vertebrae in the spine from wiggling around and doing more damage. However, reports estimate that on average some 30% of these surgeries fail to weld these vertebrae into a single bone, causing continued back pain.

21d

Ingeniøren

33

Raketbyggere dømt for ulovlig opbevaring af tonsvis af kemikalier

Jysk raketforening er nu idømt en bøde på 15.000 kroner og har fået beslaglagt over to ton kemikalier, efter at en fire år lang sag nu er afsluttet.

21d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

Revealing the nanostructure of wood could help raise height limits for wooden skyscrapers

Researchers have captured the visible nanostructure of living wood for the first time using an advanced low-temperature scanning electron microscope.

21d

Science | Smithsonian

200+

In Pursuit of Better Baby Formula

Replicating human milk is no easy feat—nor is separating the science from the hype

21d

NeuroLogica Blog

400+

Another Damning Organic Study

A recent study looks at the carbon emission impact if England and Wales switched entirely over to organic farming. They found: We predict major shortfalls in production of most agricultural products against a conventional baseline. Direct GHG emissions are reduced with organic farming, but when increased overseas land use to compensate for shortfalls in domestic supply are factored in, net emissi

21d

Wired

1K

The Internet Is for Everyone, Right? Not With a Screen Reader

Blind users have been fighting for a more inclusive web for over 20 years. Are lawsuits like the one against Domino's going to make a difference?

21d

Wired

500+

American Roads Are Getting Safer—Unless You're Walking

A government report finds that vehicle-related deaths fell 2.4% last year. But pedestrian deaths are up 50% in the past decade, and no one knows why.

21d

The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Nanoscale Optical Probes

New nanoprobes allow researchers to study large-scale electrical activity of cells with greater precision.

21d

Futurity.org

30

Gold and other heavy elements come from the stars

Researchers have found the unequivocal evidence of where the heaviest elements in our universe come from. For the first time, the researchers have detected an element heavier than iron in the collision of two neutron stars, resolving one of the fundamental questions about the history of the universe. "You could say that this is the last piece of the puzzle of the formation of the elements." Since

21d

Nautilus

500+

The Necessity of Musical Hallucinations – Issue 77: Underworlds

During the last months of my mother's life, as she ventured further from lucidity, she was visited by music. In collusion with her dementia, her hearing loss filled her consciousness with musical hallucinations. Sometimes welcome, more often not, her musical visitations were vivid, yet segmented and tattered. She would occasionally comment on the singers. On rare occasions she would identify the

21d

Nautilus

100+

Rock Solid Evidence for Other Earths – Issue 77: Underworlds

Is our planet unique? The chances are slim. There are trillions of other galaxies, each of which has billions of suns. In a recent interview, Ed Young, a professor of geochemistry and cosmochemistry at the University of California, Los Angeles, tells me it may be a toss up whether a sun has a rocky planet orbiting it. But astronomers have now identified, according to NASA, more than 4,000 exoplan

21d

Phys.org

200+

Rescuing the world's endangered river dolphins takes cutting edge science and community

River dolphins in the Amazon and Orinoco are under ever increasing pressure from the impact of hydropower dams and mercury contamination from small-scale gold mining, according to results from the first ever river dolphin satellite tagging program released today to mark World River Dolphin Day.

21d

Phys.org

36

Report: Empower men to resist violence

A report has confirmed the value of a reflective approach for working with men who use violence against women and children, that encourages men to explore their core values and relationship ideals.

21d

Phys.org

500+

Stepping up the science of street protests

A surge in street protests since the election of President Donald Trump nearly three years ago has scholars struggling to find new methods to study this form of social activism, according to a new paper co-authored by UConn political scientist Jeremy Pressman.

21d

cognitive science

A scan of my brain. They found some type of marks/spots. Any idea on what it might be?

submitted by /u/Shizuzeru [link] [comments]

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

500+

Rescuing the world's endangered river dolphins takes cutting edge science and community

River dolphins in the Amazon and Orinoco are under ever increasing pressure from the impact of hydropower dams and mercury contamination from small-scale gold mining, according to results from the first ever river dolphin satellite tagging program released today to mark World River Dolphin Day.

21d

Phys.org

25

Photos taken century apart show stark Mont Blanc glacier melt

In 1919 a pioneering aviator took iconic photos of the Mont Blanc glaciers. A century later, a team of experts has recreated the images to highlight the drastic ice melt caused by rising temperatures.

21d

BBC News – Science & Environment

101K

Rats taught to drive tiny cars to lower their stress levels

Researchers taught rats to drive tiny "ratmobiles" in exchange for food, which helped the rats relax.

21d

NYT > Science

300+

Happy as a Crab That Just Finished a Maze

Crustaceans experienced in running a labyrinth made it to the finish line — and their prize — without wrong turns.

21d

Phys.org

62

Mapping nonlinear research impact pathways

Universities have always performed work that benefits the broader community. But in recent years there has been much more emphasis on demonstrating and measuring the impact that this work has outside academia, with impact assessment now embedded in many national and international research rating systems, which in turn feed into funding.

21d

Phys.org

400+

New process could make hydrogen peroxide available in remote places

Hydrogen peroxide, a useful all-purpose disinfectant, is found in most medicine cabinets in the developed world. But in remote villages in developing countries, where it could play an important role in health and sanitation, it can be hard to come by.

21d

The Atlantic

2K

The Pre-wedding Parties Where Couples Charge Admission

Kyle Reid and Tessa Bailey heard from friends and family members that their party this summer was a blast. Some 400 people attended, and there was a spread of homemade and catered food—pulled pork, lasagna, meatballs, salad—as well as a DJ, games, and a raffle. The last guests didn't leave until 2 a.m. Reid and Bailey, who are in their 20s and live in Binbrook, a town in Ontario, Canada, were cel

21d

forskning.se

27

Extremväder och naturkatastrofer ytterligare hot mot pollinatörerna

Extrema värmeböljor, utdragen torka, skogsbränder, översvämningar, orkaner, vulkanutbrott och tsunamier kan påverka världens pollinatörer på drastiskt vis. Det är dags att tänka på de hot mot pollinatörerna, som förväntas bli vanligare när klimatet förändras, menar två forskare som granskat den litteratur som finns inom området. – Idag finns en växande medvetenhet om att pollinatörer hotas av ofö

21d

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Rösta om namnet på Sveriges egen planet

2010 upptäcktes en av de över 4000 kända planeterna utanför solsystemet, 400 ljusår bort, i stjärnbilden Karlavagnen. Planeten är en så kallad het Jupiter, en jätteplanet som kretsar mycket nära sin stjärna. Stjärnan och planeten går under de opersonliga katalogbeteckningarna HD 102956 och HD 102956b, men Sverige har fått i uppdrag av Internationella astronomiska unionen IAU att ge planeten och de

21d

Phys.org

25

Flexible, transparent and cost-effective lasers

The interest in plastic electronics and photonics has experienced a significant increase in the last decades due to the exceptional optical, semiconducting and mechanical properties of these materials. Plastic electronics, based on conjugated polymers, combine the benefits of cost-effective processability compatible with large-area deposition for designing laser geometries of virtually any shape.

21d

Phys.org

1K

Scientists bake gluten-free bread using a revolutionary technology

Electric shocks are used to heat gluten-free bread from the inside, saving energy and time compared to conventional baking applying heat from the outside. A recent study from the Institute of Food Technology of the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU), Vienna, was just published in Food and Bioprocess Technology. The researchers used a technology called Ohmic heating and adapte

21d

New on MIT Technology Review

200+

Why America isn't equipped for the new rules of war

"They're all doing it: Russia, China, Iran … They're all fighting these things called shadow wars, and they're very effective," says an ex-paratrooper and academic.

21d

New on MIT Technology Review

1K

Why explosives detectors still can't beat a dog's nose

The oldest technology for detecting trace amounts of materials remains the best.

21d

New on MIT Technology Review

100+

We are finally getting better at predicting organized conflict

New techniques have made predictions more useful, and we used one to look at violence in Ethiopia since the election of Abiy Ahmed, the new Nobel Peace Prize winner.

21d

New on MIT Technology Review

24

Editor's letter: The case against—and for—tech in war

An introduction to our special issue on war and peace

21d

New on MIT Technology Review

1K

Can you really "deradicalize" a terrorist?

After years of effort to prevent and reverse radicalization, the jury's still out on whether it works.

21d

New on MIT Technology Review

Looking back at the future of warfare

Our war coverage through the years has emphasized how technology might change the way wars are fought—or how it could help us avoid conflict in the first place.

21d

New on MIT Technology Review

200+

Imagine the US was just hit with a cyberattack. What happens next?

An oral history of a devastating strike that hasn't happened yet.

21d

New on MIT Technology Review

21

AN41

A futuristic fiction story about war, people, and robots

21d

New on MIT Technology Review

1K

A brief history of the US Navy's dolphins

Dolphin echolocation can find underwater mines more effectively than the best sonar.

21d

New on MIT Technology Review

500+

How memes got weaponized: A short history

Memes come off as a joke, but some people are starting to see them as the serious threat they are.

21d

Scientific American Blog Posts

79

Don't Kill Innovation with Excessive Regulation

California's new law forcing ride-sharing companies to treat their drivers as employees could harm or kill an important new business model — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

Wired

200+

Samsung Galaxy Fold Review: The Future Won't Fit in Your Pants

The folding smartphone is entirely unique, but also a heavy, awkward pain in the hand—and in the pocket.

21d

Wired

500+

YouTubers Must Unionize, No Matter What Google Says

Video creators are organizing in pockets all over the world—led, in part, by a slingshot maker in Germany.

21d

Wired

400+

We Should Just Build Giant Telescopes … in Space

Launching a huge observatory poses big risks, so scientists are plotting a new approach: Send it up in pieces, then have robots put it together.

21d

Scientific American Content

80

Don't Kill Innovation with Excessive Regulation

California's new law forcing ride-sharing companies to treat their drivers as employees could harm or kill an important new business model — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

Phys.org

200+

Special cells contribute to regenerate the heart in zebrafish

It is already known that zebrafish can flexibly regenerate their hearts after injury. An international research group led by Prof. Nadia Mercader of the University of Bern now shows that certain heart muscle cells play a central role in this process. The insights gained could be used to initiate a similar repair process in the human heart.

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

200+

Special cells contribute to regenerate the heart in zebrafish

It is already known that zebrafish can flexibly regenerate their hearts after injury. An international research group led by Prof. Nadia Mercader of the University of Bern now shows that certain heart muscle cells play a central role in this process. The insights gained could be used to initiate a similar repair process in the human heart.

21d

Livescience.com

2K

Medieval Scottish Man Who Died 600 Years Ago Was Short and Balding, with Bad Teeth and Back Problems

Archaeologists have reconstructed the weathered face of a middle-age man who died more than 600 years ago and was buried in Aberdeen, Scotland.

21d

Ingeniøren

67

T-foil og ny hurtigfærge på vej til Bornholm

Færgeturen til Bornholm har jævnligt været en ubehagelig oplevelse for passagererne, fordi Molslinjens færger vipper voldsomt i Østersøens bølger. Nu bestiller rederiet stabiliserende T-foils og en ny hurtigfærge.

21d

Scientific American Content

300+

This Video Watches You Back

Stealing Ur Feelings sounds an alarm about how companies could use emotion-recognition technology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

Scientific American News

300+

This Video Watches You Back

Stealing Ur Feelings sounds an alarm about how companies could use emotion-recognition technology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21d

The Atlantic

400+

Brexit Is a Cultural Revolution

T he Brexit saga has now been going on for so long that, despite the daily twists and turns, it is starting to feel as though nothing ever changes. As one expert recently quipped , in the year 2192 the British prime minister might still make annual visits to Brussels "to ask for an extension of the Brexit deadline. No one remembers where this tradition originated, but every year it attracts many

21d

Livescience.com

2K

Missing-Link Atoms Turn Up in Aftermath of Neutron-Star Collision

Two neutron stars smashed together and shook the universe, spitting a "kilonova" of ultradense, ultrahot material into space. Now, astronomers have discovered firm evidence of a metal with a mysterious history in the aftermath.

21d

Livescience.com

200+

What Is a Neutron Star?

A wealth of energy crammed into a tiny, spinning package.

21d

The Atlantic

8K

Trump's Character Betrays Him

In the spring and again the summer of 2016, a large chunk of the Republican foreign-policy and national-security establishment publicly denounced then-candidate Donald Trump as unfit to serve as president. In the months and years that followed, those of us who took that stand have attracted a fair amount of reproach: We were a gang of unrepentant neocons; we were simply wrong about how much dange

21d

The Atlantic

7K

Minneapolis Saw That NIMBYism Has Victims

Tomorrow the Minneapolis City Council is slated to do something long considered impossible in American politics: end single-family zoning in an entire city. The council provided preliminary approval to the plan in December by a 12–1 vote. If the policy is approved, as expected, it could mark a major turning point nationwide. Social scientists broadly agree that bans on multifamily housing are bad

21d

The Atlantic

500+

Don't Trust Facebook

A revolutionary technology innovator is tackling one of the best-known and least tractable problems in financial inclusion, for the benefit of the global poor. A rapacious business monopoly with a history of offering dangerous products is creating an exotic financial instrument that falls in a loosely regulated and systemically important space. The former narrative is the one Mark Zuckerberg pres

21d

The Atlantic

300+

A Texas Prosecutor Fights for Reform

In April 2019, John Creuzot, the district attorney of Dallas County, Texas, announced that his office would not prosecute theft of "necessary items," such as diapers or baby formula, with a value less than $750. Part of a package of sentencing reforms, including a mass dismissal of more than 1,000 marijuana-possession cases, this fulfilled a major campaign promise and cheered his supporters: Four

21d

The Atlantic

500+

Don't Use the Word Emolument

Why would English speakers use the word emolument , anyway? All human societies have a formal way of using language, learned after the casual language one absorbs on Mommy's or Daddy's knee. Formal language serves many uses; at certain times one needs special precision or gravity to communicate with a certain distance, if the messiness of the personal and subjective would interfere with the proce

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

99

Babies understand counting years earlier than believed

Babies who are years away from being able to say 'one,' 'two,' and 'three' actually already have a sense of what counting means, Johns Hopkins University researchers have discovered.The findings reveal that very early on, years earlier than previously believed, babies who hear counting realize that it's about quantity.

21d

Retraction Watch

72

Hepatitis expert out at Chicago university following misconduct finding

A researcher who is now up to six retractions has left his faculty position at the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science following a finding of research misconduct, Retraction Watch has learned. Gulam Waris, who studies hepatitis, has reused images across multiple papers, according to a retraction notice published this week in the Journal … Continue reading

21d

BBC News – Science & Environment

211K

Paris Agreement: Trump confirms US will leave climate accord

Donald Trump says Paris deal would "punish the American people" as he hails US fossil fuel boom.

21d

BBC News – Science & Environment

11K

Scientist gets £2m decades after he invented diabetes test

Prof Ian Shanks used his daughter's toy microscope to build a prototype for the device in the 1980s.

21d

Wired

2K

Pompeo Was Riding High—Until the Ukraine Mess Exploded

The US secretary of state may be a Trump favorite, but the Ukraine scandal appears to threaten Mike Pompeo's ambitions for higher office.

21d

Wired

200+

Amazon Echo Dot Deal: It's on Sale for Just $9

This is a ridiculously good price for Amazon's popular 3rd-Generation Echo Dot—but there is one tiny caveat.

21d

Science | The Guardian

16K

Dogs show a nose for archaeology by sniffing out 3,000 year old tombs

Trained canines help locate burial sites dating back to the iron age in Croatia The scent-tracking abilities of trained dogs have helped archaeologists discover iron age tombs in Croatia dating back nearly three thousand years. The dogs sniffed out burial chests containing human bones and artefacts in a hilltop fort in the Velebit mountains along the Adriatic coast. Experts have said that using d

21d

Undark Magazine

3K

More Inclusive Science Journalism Is Better Science Journalism

When we expand our pool of storytellers and broaden our horizons beyond the kinds of stories we've long told, we will produce work that more fully reflects the spectrum of how science is done and why it matters to society. The young science journalists I work with understand this — and we can learn from them.

21d

forskning.se

Fyrfotingen som aldrig klev upp ur vattnet

Det var tetrapoderna, de första fyrfota djuren, som tog det evolutionära klivet från vatten till land för ungefär 390 miljoner år sedan. Nu har forskare funnit fossil från en som valde att stanna kvar i vattnet: Parmastega. De mycket välbevarade fossilen från Ryssland kastar ett nytt, och lite förvånande, ljus över tetrapoderna. Fyrfotingarna som tog klivet från vatten till land och på detta blev

21d

Ingeniøren

4.400 patienter skal sluge en kamerapille: Kan erstatte ubehagelig kikkertundersøgelse

PLUS. En nyt stort dansk forskningsprojekt undersøger forskellen på kamerapiller og kikkertundersøgelser. Tidligere resultater fra Syddansk Universitet viser, at kamerapillen finder 70 procent flere polypper i tarmen end en kikkertundersøgelse.

21d

Phys.org

500+

Martian landslides not conclusive evidence of ice

Detailed three-dimensional images of an extensive landslide on Mars, which spans an area more than 55 kilometres wide, have been analysed to understand how the unusually large and long ridges and furrows formed about 400 million years ago.

21d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

68

Scientists identify British butterflies most threatened by climate change

Scientists have discovered why climate change may be contributing to the decline of some British butterflies and moths, such as Silver-studded Blue and High Brown Fritillary butterflies.

21d

Phys.org

67

Scientists identify British butterflies most threatened by climate change

Scientists have discovered why climate change may be contributing to the decline of some British butterflies and moths, such as Silver-studded Blue and High Brown Fritillary butterflies.

21d

For Better Science

27

Karolinska's haunted leadership

Johan Thyberg discusses the Macchiarini affair in the context of ethical shortcomings of Karolinska's own leadership.

21d

Ingeniøren

45

Københavns Politi vil bruge ansigtsgenkendelse

Systemer til ansigtsgenkendelse vil være et effektivt redskab i politiets arbejde, siger chefpolitiinspektøren i Københavns Politi, der håber på at kunne sikre borgernes tillid.

21d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

High-performance chemical- and light-inducible recombinases in mammalian cells and mice

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12800-7 The availability of high performance recombinases with low basal activity and high dynamic range is limited. Here the authors present a library of over 20 orthogonal split recombinases that can be induced by small molecules, light and temperature in vivo.

21d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Genome-wide microhomologies enable precise template-free editing of biologically relevant deletion mutations

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12829-8 DNA repair by microhomology-mediated end joining creates precise deletions based on flanking microhomologies. Here the authors use CRISPR-Cas9 to recreate pathogenic deletion mutations using existing microhomologies in the human genome identified by their program MHcut.

21d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

A tumour-selective cascade activatable self-detained system for drug delivery and cancer imaging

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12848-5 The activation of drugs within cellular systems may provide targeted therapies for cancer. Here, the authors make a drug delivery system that is activated within the cell and exploits XIAP expression to cleave a linker region, resulting in the self-assembly of the system and drug release within cancer cells.

21d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Fate-mapping post-hypoxic tumor cells reveals a ROS-resistant phenotype that promotes metastasis

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12412-1 Hypoxia is known to promote tumor progression. Here, the authors evaluate hypoxic cells using a fate mapping approach and identify a distinct gene expression profile of cells exposed to intratumoral hypoxia and show that post-hypoxic tumor cells have an ROS-resistant phenotype enabling metastasis in vivo.

21d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Chloroplastic metabolic engineering coupled with isoprenoid pool enhancement for committed taxanes biosynthesis in Nicotiana benthamiana

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12879-y Engineering Taxol pathway in microbes needs to overcome the difficulty of expressing plant P450 enzymes. Here, the authors use a compartmentalized metabolic engineering strategy to construct the taxanes production pathway in chloroplasts of Nicotiana benthamiana and realize the production of taxadience-5α-ol.

21d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Unraveling the thermodynamic criteria for size-dependent spontaneous phase separation in soft porous crystals

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12754-w Soft porous crystals hold big promise as functional nanoporous materials due to their stimuli responsive flexibility. Here, molecular dynamics simulations reveal a new type of spatial disorder in mesoscale crystals that helps to understand the size-dependency of their phase transition behavior.

21d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Dynamic oxygen adsorption on single-atomic Ruthenium catalyst with high performance for acidic oxygen evolution reaction

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12886-z Monitoring catalyst structural changes under working conditions is crucial for understanding how catalysts operate. Here, authors examine single-atom Ru electrocatalyst by operando synchrotron spectroscopies to identify the catalytic mechanism during the acidic oxygen evolution reaction.

21d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Ultrabroadband 3D invisibility with fast-light cloaks

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12813-2 Three-dimensional invisibility cloaks are either limited in bandwidth or disregard the phase of the impinging wave or work only in specific directions. Here, the authors report that these restrictions can be lifted by using cloaks made of fast-light media where the wave group velocity is larger than the speed

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mindfulness meditation enhances positive effects of psilocybin

Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the clinical application of classic psychedelics in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. Researchers of the University of Zurich have now shown that mindfulness meditation can enhance the positive long-term effects of a single dose of psilocybin, which is found in certain mushrooms.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists identify British butterflies most threatened by climate change

Many British butterflies and moths have been responding to warmer temperatures by emerging earlier in the year and for the first time scientists have identified why this is creating winners and losers among species.

21d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Martian landslides not conclusive evidence of ice

Giant ridges on the surface of landslides on Mars could have formed without ice, challenging their use by some as unequivocal evidence of past ice on the red planet, finds a new UCL-led study using state-of-the-art satellite data.

21d

Future(s) Studies

Kuwait, OPEC's fourth-biggest member, is considering cuts to its oil production capacity targets, in large part because mounting concern about climate change will constrict demand for fossil fuels.

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Climate change has turned permafrost into a carbon emitter (in Canada)

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

[Tesla Starlink] a low latency, broadband internet system to meet the needs of consumers across the globe. provide fast, reliable internet to populations with little or no connectivity, including those in rural communities and places where existing services are too expensive or unreliable.

submitted by /u/SarEngland [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Researchers have developed a new method for upcycling abundant, seemingly low-value plastics into high-quality liquid products, such as motor oils, lubricants, detergents and even cosmetics. The discovery also improves on current recycling methods that result in cheap, low-quality plastic products.

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Google has officially laid claim to quantum supremacy. The quantum computer Sycamore reportedly performed a calculation that even the most powerful supercomputers available couldn't reproduce.

submitted by /u/justcauseme [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Bamboo may be the ideal building material for a warming world.

submitted by /u/fuzzyshorts [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Will people donate their gut biome to science?

I've been reading up on the science that we are learning about this marvelous internal community. I've also seen so many new possibilities since CRISPR is publicly available. I'm wondering how one might go about doing that? submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Tesla updates Autopilot safety numbers; almost 9x safer than average driving

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

21d

Future(s) Studies

Tesla's 'Full Self-Driving' feature may get early-access release by the end of 2019 – Elon Musk says select Tesla owners will get a 'feature complete' version

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

21d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Influence of genetic polymorphism on transcriptional enhancer activity in the malaria vector Anopheles coluzzii

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51730-8

21d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Changing patterns and influencing factors of involuntary admissions following the implementation of China's mental health law: A 4-year longitudinal investigation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51980-6

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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