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nyheder2019oktober24

19d

Future(s) Studies

Verizon Touts 5G Scenarios Amid 'Worrisome Signs' – "5G isn't just another G or a sequel to 4G. 5G is so powerful that the best way to think about it is as a wholly new technology."

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Will Robots (Computing derived AI) Make the Next Big Bestsellers? According to a survey of 352 AI researchers, AI will be writing bestselling novels 20 years from now

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Airless tire makers hope for breakout moment with autonomous driving – "In the past, a car would be driven about 20% of the time and spend the other 80% in the garage. In the age of shared, autonomous vehicles, it will be the opposite"

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

A neural net solves the three-body problem 100 million times faster – Machine learning provides an entirely new way to tackle one of the classic problems of applied mathematics.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Can computers call a better game than human umpires? Major League Baseball wants to find out – System uses radar at home plate to track pitches and make precise calls on strikes and balls

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Need a flying taxi? These two firms can get a cab to you 'by 2022' – Air travel is set to be transformed sooner than you think as firms unveil vertical takeoff electric prototypes

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Garden maintenance bot prunes and trims so you don't have to – The Trimbot 2020 project, an European Commission-funded program, was to create a prototype next-gen garden maintenance automated bot that could be used to support farmers, help folks with limited mobility or maintain community gardens.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Facebook AI researchers alter video to make people invisible to facial recognition: "Face recognition can lead to loss of privacy and face replacement technology may be misused to create misleading videos"

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Sports are feeling heat from climate change. The 2020 Olympic marathon, previously scheduled for Tokyo, is now being relocated to cooler Sapporo, thanks to extreme heat waves that have killed hundreds and hospitalized thousands in recent years.

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

19d

ScienceDaily

32

Improved avenues to train plastic surgeons in microsurgery

Microsurgery is an intricate and challenging surgical technique that involves using miniature instruments and sutures as fine as a hair strand aided by sophisticated microscopes. In plastic surgery, microsurgery is used to repair small damaged vessels and nerves following trauma, or in reconstructive procedures by moving a component of living tissue from one place of the body to another and reconn

19d

ScienceDaily

100

Platform for scalable testing of autonomous vehicle safety

In the race to manufacture autonomous vehicles (AVs), safety is crucial yet sometimes overlooked as exemplified by recent headline-making accidents. Researchers are using artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to improve the safety of autonomous technology through both software and hardware advances.

19d

ScienceDaily

20

Small magnets: Wide-ranging impact on information technology

Physicists have identified a microscopic process of electron spin dynamics in nanoparticles that could impact the design of applications in medicine, quantum computation, and spintronics.

19d

ScienceDaily

32

Electrospun fibers weave new medical innovations

Scientist are developing new applications for a fabrication process called coaxial electrospinning, which combines two or more materials into a fine fiber for use in industry, textiles or even medicine. Electrospinning combines the amazing properties of one material with the powerful benefits of another.

19d

ScienceDaily

Reframing Antarctica's meltwater pond dangers to ice shelves and sea level

On Antarctica, meltwater ponds riddle a kilometer-thick, 10,000-year-old ice shelf, which shatters just weeks later. The collapse shocks scientists and unleashes the glacier behind the ice shelf, driving up sea level. A new study puts damage by meltwater ponds to ice shelves and the ensuing threat to sea level into cool, mathematical perspective.

19d

ScienceDaily

Skiing, snowboarding injuries more serious — skull and face fractures — in younger children

Winter sports like skiing and snowboarding are a great way to keep kids active in the winter, but they are also linked to injuries and for younger children those injuries are more likely to involve fractures to the head or face, according to new research.

19d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

100+

Study casts doubt on carbon capture

Current approaches to carbon capture can increase air pollution and are not efficient at reducing carbon in the atmosphere, according to new research.

19d

ScienceDaily

32

Study casts doubt on carbon capture

Current approaches to carbon capture can increase air pollution and are not efficient at reducing carbon in the atmosphere, according to new research.

19d

Scientific American: Mind & Brain

100+

True Colors Shining Through

This illusion turns gray shades into rainbows — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19d

Scientific American Content

100+

True Colors Shining Through

This illusion turns gray shades into rainbows — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19d

Nautilus

1K

Is the Psychology of Greta Thunberg's Climate Activism Effective? – Facts So Romantic

Greta Thunberg may have weighted her U.N. remarks toward care and fairness, but she didn't omit loyalty. "You are failing us," she said. "But the young people are starting to understand your betrayal." Photograph by Liv Oeian / Shutterstock Last month, Greta Thunberg, the Swedish teenage activist, excoriated world leaders for their ongoing failure to address the climate crisis. "You have stolen m

19d

Futurism

3K

Astrobiologist: Humans Are Going to Ruin Outer Space

Humans have made a mess of the Earth. International conflicts are the norm, groups with power continually exploit those without it, and don't even get us started on the damage we've inflicted on the environment . And if we don't take concrete action to prevent it, we're going to wreak the same havoc on space, astrobiologist Monica Vidaurri argues in a new Quartz essay . As Vidaurri points out, hu

19d

Science | The Guardian

70K

Block on GM rice 'has cost millions of lives and led to child blindness'

Eco groups and global treaty blamed for delay in supply of vitamin-A enriched Golden Rice Stifling international regulations have been blamed for delaying the approval of a food that could have helped save millions of lives this century. The claim is made in a new investigation of the controversy surrounding the development of Golden Rice by a team of international scientists. Golden Rice is a for

19d

Big Think

100+

No, you don't need to be a hoarder to have a clutter problem

When it comes to clutter , it doesn't take anywhere next to hoarder-level accumulation to experience the unwanted side-effects of excess stuff. Maybe you avoid cooking healthy meals when your kitchen is in chaos. Or perhaps your sleep suffers when a mild tsunami hits your bedroom. And keeping work stress in check when your office cubicle is out of control? Not gonna happen. Since clutter and stre

19d

Viden

Nye Google-apps skal give dig digital balance – men er det bare et pr-stunt?

Apps alene ændrer næppe vores adfærd, mener forsker.

19d

NYT > Science

1K

Even Eagles Have Data Roaming Limits, Researchers Find

When one bird being tracked by Russian scientists flew to Iran, its transmitter sent a flood of text messages that ate up the tracking budget.

19d

Futurism

500+

There's a Correlation Between the Price of Bitcoin and Avocados

Chips And Price Dips Bitcoin, a cryptocurrency that seemingly can't help but draw breathless speculation from financial experts, may finally have a basis in our tangible reality. And it's avocados. Bloomberg analyst Tracy Alloway first noticed the trend, tweeting a graph that shows a striking similarity between the rises and falls of Bitcoin and, well, avocado prices. As Decrypt reports , the cor

19d

Retraction Watch

83

Weekend reads: Scientist loses job after 30 retractions; breast cancer researcher committed misconduct; "two crashes" at Duke

Before we present this week's Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: an author irked about "science by tweet" after his paper … Continue reading

19d

Science | The Guardian

300+

How being bullied at school shaped my career choice

Gestures, facial expressions, posture – they are all crucial to what we're communicating, though many of us don't realise it My interest in human behaviour and psychology started in primary school. In my attempts to socialise with other children, I had a constant, nagging feeling that everybody else had received a manual entitled How to Interact with Others . I was socially awkward, to put it mil

19d

Wired

300+

Space Photos of the Week: Moon Walks for Moon Rocks

A look back at what the crews of the Apollo missions photographed on the surface of the moon.

19d

Singularity Hub

100+

This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through October 26)

GENETICS A New CRISPR Technique Could Fix Almost All Genetic Diseases Megan Molteni | Wired "The system, which Liu's lab has dubbed 'prime editing,' can for the first time make virtually any alteration—additions, deletions, swapping any single letter for any other—without severing the DNA double helix. 'If Crispr-Cas9 is like scissors and base editors are like pencils, then you can think of prime

19d

Scientific American Content

200+

Interstellar Conversations

Could there be information networks across the galaxy? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19d

Futurism

200+

This Electric Toothbrush Uses AI Because Nothing is Sacred Anymore

Brush AI These days, it seems like every brand is trying to leverage machine learning to imbue their products with special powers — and, most importantly, make an extra buck in the process. But does your next electric toothbrush really need a dose of AI? Oral-B's says its new $220 electric toothbrush , called "Oral-B GENIUS X with Artificial Intelligence," will leverage data from sensors inside t

19d

Wired

400+

Rudy Giuliani Butt-Dialed a Reporter (Twice!)

A UN phishing attack, Adobe accounts exposed, and more of the week's top security news.

19d

Scientific American: Mind & Brain

A Dangerous Optical Illusion

A common vision correction could interfere with depth perception while driving — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19d

The Atlantic

200+

A Simplistic View of a Mixed-ish America

Mixed-ish , the prequel of the Tracee Ellis Ross–fronted sitcom Black-ish , begins with a rupture. At the tender age of 12, Rainbow "Bow" Johnson (played by Arica Himmel) is ejected from the hippie commune where she and her family live. As the adult Bow, Ross narrates the predicament that follows the government raid of the utopian community: Bow's black mother and white father must now raise thei

19d

Wired

1K

'The Rise of Jordan Peterson' Doesn't Tell You What to Think

The documentary explores how the bestselling author has been both celebrated and reviled.

19d

Wired

400+

Basepaws' $99 Cat DNA Test Tells You What's Truly Wrong With Your Cat

Why is your cat such a freak? This at-home DNA test can't tell you that, but it can reveal some information about its health and heritage.

19d

Ingeniøren

28

Færgeruten Halsskov-Knudshoved giver store fordele for de motorkørende

Den store stigning i jernbane- og biltrafikken på Nyborg-Korsør-overfarten har skabt behov for den nye sejlrute, der formindsker overfartstiden med 25 minutter.

19d

Scientific American Content

A Dangerous Optical Illusion

A common vision correction could interfere with depth perception while driving — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19d

Scientific American Blog Posts

500+

Using Quantum Computers to Test the Fundamentals of Physics

A newly developed algorithm opens a window into understanding the transition from quantum to classical objects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19d

Big Think

31

Ibram X Kendi – Antiracism 101

None I grew up in the almost entirely white suburbs of 1980's Bethesda, Maryland thinking of myself and my world as 100% not racist. It's hard to notice what's missing: for example pretty much any black or brown people anywhere I went except on vacation, in spite of the fact that we were right next to Washington DC. At some point in middle school I learned that my Jewish dad had been unwelcome at

19d

Wired

100+

Microsoft Surface Laptop 3 (15-Inch) Review: Big Size, Small Features

Microsoft goes big with a 15-inch version of its Surface Laptop. It's bigger, and maybe even better if you don't ask too much of it.

19d

NPR

Spike In Air Pollution In U.S.

There's been a spike in air pollution in the U.S. over the past two years — a reversal of previous trends. NPR's Scott Simon talks to Chris Frey, a former Trump administration science adviser.

19d

NPR

Some States With Legal Weed Embrace Vaping Bans, Warn Of Black Market Risks

Many cases of vaping-related injury seem to involve THC, health officials say. That's led some states to take another look at the safety of the regulated cannabis market, as well as the black market. (Image credit: Jovelle Tamayo/Bloomberg/Getty Images)

19d

The Atlantic

500+

John le Carré's Scathing Tale of Brexit Britain

If in John le Carré's novels the British intelligence service stands as a microcosm for the state of the nation itself, then bad news: In 2019, we're looking less at a major global power than at a leaky, pusillanimous, perennially cash-strapped institution. An agent's best transport option for a clandestine mission is a rented "clapped-out Vauxhall." There's a bureaucratic ban on bottled water. N

19d

Livescience.com

1K

Is It Safe to Stand in Front of Microwave Ovens?

When used correctly, microwave ovens are safe, according to the FDA.

19d

Scientific American Content

500+

Using Quantum Computers to Test the Fundamentals of Physics

A newly developed algorithm opens a window into understanding the transition from quantum to classical objects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19d

The Atlantic

1K

'The U.S. Should Have Committed to Its Promises'

Ilham Ahmed was dispatched to Washington, D.C., this week to try to salvage some part of the rapidly deteriorating relationship between the United States and its Kurdish-led Syrian allies. She is one of the two leaders of the political council that, with U.S. backing, has overseen the region in northern Syria controlled by an umbrella militia called the Syrian Democratic Forces, or SDF. Recent da

19d

Wired

200+

6 Best Pumpkin Carving Kits and Tools to Cut Like a Pro

Get your jack-'o-lantern straight with these Halloween-ready tools and kits, including knives, scoopers, and power tools.

19d

Wired

100+

17 Cool Tech Deals on REI Winter Gear, Dyson, and More

We've found great discounts on everything from vacuum cleaners to heated ski boots.

19d

Wired

5K

Tesla Has a New Solar Roof—and Musk Says This One Will Work

Elon Musk revealed Version 3.0 of the Solar Glass Roof, which is made of solar panels, but looks like slate.

19d

New on MIT Technology Review

7K

A neural net solves the three-body problem 100 million times faster

Machine learning provides an entirely new way to tackle one of the classic problems of applied mathematics.

19d

Future(s) Studies

Can electric vehicles go mainstream? | CNBC Reports

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Tesla is launching Solarglass today, a third version of its Solar Roof tiles, which are now cheaper and more beautiful than a concrete tile roof with solar panels, according to the company.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Andrew Yang Expresses Concern Over Walmart's Plans to Increase Robot Labor – Walmart customers may have already seen the machines cleaning floors or stocking shelves, as the company has been testing automated machines in stores since 2017.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Google brings in BERT to improve its search results. This BERT update also marks the first time Google is using its latest Tensor Processing Unit (TPU) chips to serve search results.

submitted by /u/nonaime7777777 [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

google has claim that it has made the quantum computer, making the calculation of tradition computer which cost 10K yrs to 3.5 min, IBM say that it is fake and it needs only 2.5 days to do it by using traditional computer

submitted by /u/SarEngland [link] [comments]

19d

BBC News – Science & Environment

15K

Doubts grow over UK environment protection post-Brexit

Concerns have been raised over how a government established watchdog will enforce new green targets.

19d

Big Think

60

How are implicit biases holding us back?

It's important to realize the implicit biases we carry regarding gender. In school settings, women are less likely to be encouraged to pursue careers in STEM fields because it's assumed that men have greater math skills. This simply isn't true. In the interest of a successful society, everyone should be allowed to pursue work based on their interests and skills. Whistleblowers: Honesty in America

19d

The Atlantic

2K

The President's Lawyers Are Making a Dangerous Argument for Presidential Immunity

For those following along on many major news sites on Wednesday, President Donald Trump's lawyer William Consovoy apparently told federal judges that if a president shot people on Fifth Avenue, not only could he not be indicted, but he could not even be investigated. This was not, in fact, what happened: Consovoy immediately apologized for creating this impression for the judges, clarifying that

19d

The Atlantic

400+

China's 'Most Dangerous Profession'

If you grew up in China in the 1950s and '60s, as Jung Chang did, the last thing you aspired to be was a writer. "Writing was the most dangerous profession," she told me recently. In fact, writing was taken so seriously that most of the violent purges engineered by the Chinese Communist Party's demigod leader, Mao Zedong—including the Cultural Revolution—began with an attack on some article or pl

19d

Ingeniøren

Teaterstykke hylder Danmarks ukendte 'jordskælvsdiva'

PLUS. Jordskælvsforskeren Inge Lehmann kæmpede for at få anerkendt sit vid og ikke mindst sine beviser for, at Jorden har en fast kerne. Kampen er nu opsat som teaterstykke.

19d

Phys.org

51

Rescuers hunt for missing as landslides, floods kill 10 in Japan

Rescuers worked by hand to clear debris from a landslide triggered by heavy rains in central Japan on Saturday, as the toll from the storms rose to 10 dead with a further three people reportedly missing.

19d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

500+

First in-depth study of marine fungi and their cell-division cycles emerges

Marine fungi have long been overlooked in the research community, despite their likely contributions to the health of ocean ecosystems. Now, a first deep dive into the diversity of marine fungi and their cell division cycles has been published by a collaborative team at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), opening the door on this oft-neglected branch of the Kingdom Fungi.

19d

Phys.org

500+

First in-depth study of marine fungi and their cell-division cycles emerges

Marine fungi have long been overlooked in the research community, despite their likely contributions to the health of ocean ecosystems. Now, a first deep dive into the diversity of marine fungi and their cell division cycles has been published by a collaborative team at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), opening the door on this oft-neglected branch of the Kingdom Fungi.

19d

NYT > Science

1K

It's One of Autumn's Best Scents, but Not Everyone Smells It

Foliage is lovely, but so is the odor of the katsura, also known as the "caramel tree."

19d

NYT > Science

3K

Secret Deal Helped Housing Industry Stop Tougher Rules on Climate Change

The arrangement, in place for years, guarantees industry representatives a bloc of seats on two powerful committees that recommend building codes.

19d

NYT > Science

178K

Panic in Pakistani City After 900 Children Test Positive for H.I.V.

Health workers say the reuse of syringes drove the outbreak in the city of Ratodero.

19d

Viden

Nasa sender robot til Månen i 2022 på jagt efter vand

Månen er udset som et muligt pitstop på missioner til Mars. Her kan vand spille en afgørende rolle.

19d

Ingeniøren

Ugens debat: Kan en elbil blive 'årets bil?'

Ifølge Motorbloggen på ing.dk bør Tesla Model 3 blive Årets Bil 2020, når titlen uddeles 27. november. Den melding trak fronterne op mellem Tesla-fans og det modsatte på ing.dk.

19d

Science | The Guardian

200+

Need a flying taxi? These two firms can get a cab to you 'by 2022'

Air travel is set to be transformed sooner than you think as firms unveil vertical takeoff electric prototypes While conventional airlines struggle for more environmentally friendly alternatives to jet fuel , a host of startups are betting on zero-emission flight using electric power. They will not carry a hundred passengers across the Atlantic – but in the global race to develop an air taxi , tw

19d

NYT > Science

6K

How a Rooftop Meadow of Bees and Butterflies Shows N.Y.C.'s Future

A Greenpoint building is part of a push to combat climate change and make the city more welcoming to wildlife.

19d

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

A New Type of Storm Has Been Detected on Saturn's Chaotic Surface

What's going on over there?

19d

ScienceAlert – Latest

1K

New Research Says Toddlers Can Count Long Before They Understand Numbers

What else are they keeping secret?

19d

ScienceAlert – Latest

20K

US Air Quality Got Worse After Years of Improvement, And It's Killing More People

Air pollution has been increasing since 2017.

19d

ScienceAlert – Latest

40K

Scientists Built an 'Artificial Leaf' That Uses Sunlight to Produce Clean Synthetic Fuel

This could be huge.

19d

ScienceAlert – Latest

1K

Astronomers Have Measured The Devastating Aftermath of Two Exoplanets Colliding

They turned each other into dust.

19d

Viden

1K

Jeg spiser vitaminer og kosttilskud om vinteren: Men har jeg egentlig brug for det?

Jeg har altid spist vitaminer. Men nytter det overhovedet noget?

19d

Future(s) Studies

World's smallest camera is size of a grain of sand – OmniVision OV6948 makes it into Guinness Book of Records and will save lives in the hands of surgeons

submitted by /u/tocreatewebsite [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

AI Helps Scientists Design a New Compressible Material – It could be the secret to foldable bicycles (or other large items) that fit in your pocket.

submitted by /u/tocreatewebsite [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

If the Amazon Echo Frames/google glass can be used to swap faces using AI, people can change the face of our their partners to whoever they want.

The videos of face swaps is scarily accurate. If amazon echo Frames were to integrate augmented reality to it and combined with a face swap app, you can swap out your gf/bf face to someone like a supermodel or whoever you fancy. submitted by /u/The_Indian_Dentist [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Momentum Builds for Hydrogen Fuel in Japan, Australia

submitted by /u/bluefirecorp [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Korea to have hydrogen chargers available within 30 min distance by 2030

submitted by /u/bluefirecorp [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Who Wants To Be A Trillionaire?

submitted by /u/misterZ3r0 [link] [comments]

19d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

87

Snus under graviditeten kan påverka barnets blodtryck

Barn som har fått i sig nikotin från snus under fostertiden riskerar att få ökat blodtryck, visar ny svensk forskning.

19d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

Koldioxidfri cement kan bli verklighet

Världens vanligaste byggmaterial är också ett av de sämsta – när det gäller utsläppen av koldioxid. Men ny forskning visar att det går att göra klimatvänligare cement genom elektrolys.

19d

Science News Daily

New Disney+ talk show will be hosted by a Jim Henson alien puppet

Disney+ has added a new talk show entitled Earth to Ned to its lineup of non-scripted originals — and it's hosted by a blue alien and his lieutenant. A blue Jim Henson puppet …

19d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Insight-HXMT team releases new results on black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries

Scientists with the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (Insight-HXMT) team presented their new results on black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries during a press conference held Oct. 25 at the first China Space Science Assembly in Xiamen.

19d

Science News Daily

Migrating Russian eagles run up huge data roaming charges

Russian scientists tracking eagles got huge SMS bills when some birds flew to Iran and Pakistan.

19d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

A peaceful death orchestrates immune balance in a chaotic environment [Commentaries]

Immunity evolved as an impossibly elegant, yet devastatingly destructive force to combat pathogens, environmental insults, and rogue malignant cellular agents arising from within. The immunologic arsenal developed in a veritable coevolutionary arms race with the world's pathogens, culminating in lymphocytic weapons of mass destruction. Indeed, T cells and B cells…

19d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

An approach that someday may boost testosterone biosynthesis in males with late-onset hypogonadism (low testosterone) [Commentaries]

Male hypogonadism (abnormally low levels of circulating serum testosterone resulting from a variety of medical and lifestyle issues) can affect males throughout their life span, often because of aging. The Leydig cells, located in the interstitial compartment of the testis and nestled between the seminiferous tubules, produce testosterone in response…

19d

PNAS – RSS feed of Early Edition articles

A small molecule protects mitochondrial integrity by inhibiting mTOR activity [Pharmacology]

Apoptosis activation by cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol is a normal cellular response to mitochondrial damage. Using cellular apoptosis assay, we have found small-molecule apoptosis inhibitors that protect cells from mitochondrial damage. Previously, we reported the discovery of a small molecule, Compound A, which blocks dopaminergic neuron death…

19d

ScienceDaily

1K

Putting the 'bang' in the Big Bang

Physicists have simulated in detail an intermediary phase of the early universe that may have bridged cosmic inflation with the Big Bang. This phase, known as 'reheating,' occurred at the end of cosmic inflation and involved processes that wrestled inflation's cold, uniform matter into the ultrahot, complex soup that was in place at the start of the Big Bang.

19d

Wired

2K

Microsoft Is the Surprise Winner of a $10B Pentagon Contract

Amazon had long been considered the favorite for JEDI, a project to use cloud computing to modernize warfare.

19d

Science News Daily

Pentagon hands Microsoft $10B 'war cloud' deal, snubs Amazon

The Pentagon awarded Microsoft a $10 billion cloud computing contract , snubbing early front-runner Amazon, whose competitive bid drew criticism from President Donald Trump and its business …

19d

ScienceAlert – Latest

17K

This Mind-Boggling Infographic Shows Just How Much of The Ocean We Don't See

We have so much left to discover.

19d

ScienceAlert – Latest

2K

Mystery Illness Paralysing Children Across The US Has Been Traced to a Rare Virus

We still don't know how it works.

19d

Wired

200+

Facebook Tries Again With News, This Time Paying Publishers

The social media company will pay companies including the New York Times, WIRED—and Breitbart—to distribute their content.

19d

Future(s) Studies

SpaceX's Starlink Broadband Service Will Begin in 2020: Report

submitted by /u/Calskius [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Spreading human rights around the world, one AI at a time? In theory, that means an imprisoned human rights activist could continue to engage with others through their avatar. "You will never be able to silence anyone again"

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

MrBeast partners with more than 600 YouTubers, including PewDiePie and MKBHD, to plant 20 million trees: 'It's freaking time to do something about climate change'

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Several popular YouTube creators have joined together with Arbor Day Foundation to plant 20 million trees by January 1 2020

submitted by /u/OtherWisdom [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Chuck Schumer proposes 'large discounts' to trade in gas-powered cars for electric ones – The entire proposal would cost $454 billion over 10 years

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Let's talk about the human consciousness in the future. What can we achieve there? This talk is from 1981 but it is so relevent for our current times.

submitted by /u/Marten5892 [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Before sending the first woman and next man to the moon, NASA will send a golf cart-sized rover to the lunar south pole to search for sources of ice water. The space agency hopes to have the rover exploring the moon's surface by December 2022.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Bill Nye: It's Space Settlement, Not Colonization

submitted by /u/EdwardHeisler [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Pony.ai to launch BotRide robo-taxi service in Irvine

submitted by /u/Abscess2 [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

100+

Tesla Model 3 owner drives 100,000 miles, lives in an apartment without home charging, charges the car exclusively through Supercharging, and saved $7,000 on fuel over the course of ownership.

submitted by /u/everyEV [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Researchers create blueprint for 'quantum battery' that doesn't lose charge

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

China's Xi Urges Acceleration of Development of Blockchain Technology

submitted by /u/simplelifestyle [link] [comments]

19d

Wired

400+

TikTok, Under Scrutiny, Distances Itself From China

Three senators have called for an investigation into the social media app, which is owned by the Chinese tech giant ByteDance.

19d

NYT > Science

500+

California Emerged From Drought and Is Still Catching Fire

California's eight years of drought officially ended in March, but wildfires are still engulfing parts of the state. Here are three major contributions.

19d

Discover Magazine

Spending Time in the Sun Might Make Your Gut Healthier

(Credit: AbElena/shutterstock) If you spend too much time in the sun, everyone can see it in your red, burnt skin. But if you get just enough sun exposure, scientists can see it in your poop — at least, according to a new study in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology. Specifically, the researchers studied people with low Vitamin D to see how they reacted to UV light. This kind of sunlight is one

19d

Discover Magazine

Researchers Used Green Tea as a 'Remote Control' to Activate Cell Therapies for Diabetes

(Credit: Kirasolly/Shutterstock) Since ancient times, the health benefits of green tea have been the stuff of legend. Now, researchers are turning to the antioxidant-rich leaves for a decidedly modern purpose — triggering cell-based therapies. In a study published Wednesday in Science Translational Medicine, a team of researchers with East China Normal University and First Affiliated Hospital of S

19d

The Scientist RSS

UCL To Phase Out Single-Use Plastics, Including Pipette Tips

Britain's largest university aims to eliminate single-use plastics, in the lab and elsewhere around campus, by 2024. How exactly the institution plans to meet that goal is yet to be determined.

19d

ScienceAlert – Latest

1K

Officials Think This Marker Could Help Explain The Mysterious Vaping Outbreak

Over 1000 people have fallen ill.

19d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

81

Can solar technology kill cancer cells?

Scientists have revealed a new way to detect and attack cancer cells using technology traditionally reserved for solar power. The results showcases dramatic improvements in light-activated fluorescent dyes for disease diagnosis, image-guided surgery and site-specific tumor treatment.

19d

ScienceDaily

96

Can solar technology kill cancer cells?

Scientists have revealed a new way to detect and attack cancer cells using technology traditionally reserved for solar power. The results showcases dramatic improvements in light-activated fluorescent dyes for disease diagnosis, image-guided surgery and site-specific tumor treatment.

19d

Wired

100+

Uber Tipping Behavior Revealed, Apple App Store Malware, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

19d

The Atlantic

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The Atlantic Politics Daily: Even Funerals Are Political Now

Today in Politics It's Friday, October 25. Today , in the Trump era, funerals have become political, too. Plus , one archivist's grim mission. Finally , a better word than emoluments . (CHIP SOMODEVILLA / REUTERS) President Donald Trump wasn't at Elijah Cummings's funeral on Friday. Nor did any of the eulogists honoring the late veteran Democratic lawmaker—from Nancy Pelosi to Hillary Clinton to

19d

Scientific American Blog Posts

Farewell to the Fractional Foot

An outdated unit gets replaced — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19d

ScienceAlert – Latest

1K

Harvard Scientists Think Even Absolutely Tiny Planets Could Support Life

Just 3% the mass of Earth.

19d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

40

A new theory of brain organization takes aim at the mystery of consciousness

Scientists combine classic thermodynamics with neural recording data into a new, cross-disciplinary principle of how the human brain organizes its activity. The theory may lead to new insights about the emergence of conscious thought.

19d

New on MIT Technology Review

300+

The secret to better beer could lie in cell signaling networks

Reusing yeast is an old brewer's trick that saves time and money, but it eventually backfires. Cell biologists are trying to find out why—and the answers could conceivably combat aging as well.

19d

ScienceDaily

76

High fiber, yogurt diet associated with lower lung cancer risk

A diet high in fiber and yogurt is associated with a reduced risk for lung cancer.

19d

Inside Science

30

Bacterial Bullet Takes Aim at Red Tides

Gel-like beads embedded with natural bacteria could fight harmful algal blooms. RedTide.jpg Bloom of Karenia brevis, also known as Florida red tide. Image credits: P.Schmidt, Charlotte Sun Rights information: No restrictions Earth Friday, October 25, 2019 – 16:00 Amanda Heidt, Contributor (Inside Science) — Harmful algal blooms are a rising threat worldwide, triggered when colonies of microscop

19d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

Nobel Laureate Wants to Blast Nuclear Waste With Lasers Until It's Safe

Nuclear power could become increasingly important as the world continues to combat climate change, but atmospheric carbon isn't the only existential threat to the future of humanity. The waste produced by nuclear power is dangerous for millions of years, and no one can decide what to do with it. Nobel laureate Gérard Mourou is using his notoriety to call attention to an interesting solution. Mour

19d

Futurity.org

Plants will make future river flooding way worse

By hoarding water underground, plants will contribute to future river flooding, adding to soil saturation and boosting rain runoff, researchers report. In their new study, the researchers describe the emerging role of plant physiology in flooding. As an adaptation to an overabundance of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, trees, plants, and grasses constrict their stomatal pores to regulate the amo

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NYT > Science

200+

Timothy Egan Makes Room for the Holy Spirit

The "lapsed but listening" Catholic traveled from Canterbury to Rome to figure out what he believes. In "A Pilgrimage to Eternity," he shares his findings.

19d

Big Think

100+

Something weird and wonderful is at a Paris zoo

In recognition of its amazing traits, a zoo has just invited slime mold into its ranks. Neither plant, and probably not a fungus, slime molds may represent a major turning point in our understanding of intelligence. Of course, the French zoo is calling it "Le Blob." None It acts a bit like a fungus, but fungi are no longer considered plants, but rather exemplars of their own classification kingdo

19d

Phys.org

43

New study finds taxi drivers improve earnings through trip selection

A new research study published in the October edition of the INFORMS journal Marketing Science (Editor's note: The source of this research is INFORMS) has revealed how taxi drivers use mobile hailing technology to select longer, more profitable trips to optimize their earnings, rather than seeking to increase the number of trips or working hours to achieve higher earnings.

19d

Phys.org

2K

Study casts doubt on carbon capture

One proposed method for reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere—and reducing the risk of climate change—is to capture carbon from the air or prevent it from getting there in the first place. However, research from Mark Z. Jacobson at Stanford University, published in Energy and Environmental Science, suggests that carbon capture technologies can cause more harm than good.

19d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers identify improved avenues to train plastic surgeons in microsurgery

Microsurgery is an intricate and challenging surgical technique that involves using miniature instruments and sutures as fine as a hair strand aided by sophisticated microscopes. In plastic surgery, microsurgery is used to repair small damaged vessels and nerves following trauma, or in reconstructive procedures by moving a component of living tissue from one place of the body to another and reconn

19d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First in-depth study of marine fungi and their cell-division cycles emerges from MBL

A first deep dive into the diversity of marine fungi and their cell division cycles has been published by a collaborative team at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole, revealing unusual cell cycles, cell division patterns, and polarity. The study broadens our knowledge of ocean diversity into the nearly unstudied Kingdom Fungi.

19d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study finds taxi drivers improve earnings through trip selection

A new research study published in the October edition of the INFORMS journal Marketing Science (Editor's note: The source of this research is INFORMS) has revealed how taxi drivers use mobile hailing technology to select longer, more profitable trips to optimize their earnings, rather than seeking to increase the number of trips or working hours to achieve higher earnings.

19d

Phys.org

400+

Electrospun fibers weave new medical innovations

When you visit Andrew Steckl's lab at the University of Cincinnati, you see a nondescript glass box that weaves together different fibers.

19d

Phys.org

44

NASA observes Tropical Storm Kyarr form near southwest India coast

Tropical Storm Kyarr formed near the southwestern coast of India, and NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the storm that revealed it organized quickly.

19d

Phys.org

20

NASA-NOAA satellite shows wind shear affecting a changing Typhoon Bualoi

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean revealed that Typhoon Bualoi continued to look asymmetric because of ongoing wind shear. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued the final bulletin on Bualoi as it was beginning the transition into an extra-tropical cyclone.

19d

Phys.org

NASA-NOAA satellite catches development of gulf Tropical Depression 17

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Gulf of Mexico and revealed that a low pressure area was developing into a depression. On Oct. 25, that low pressure area became Tropical Depression 17.

19d

Big Think

500+

Thinking about death: High neural activity is linked to shorter lifespans

Researchers have discovered that higher levels of neural activity cause shorter lifespans, with evidence drawn from studies on roundworms, mice, and humans. A protein called REST appears to be a key player; REST regulates the expression of several genes, many of which affect neural activity. The findings offer new targets for further studies on longevity and may even lead to the development of a

19d

Discover Magazine

NASA is Sending a Rover to the Moon to Find Water for Astronauts

An artist illustration of NASA's Volatiles Investigating Polar Exploration Rover, or VIPER. (Credit: NASA Ames/Daniel Rutter) Before sending the first woman and next man to the moon, NASA will send a golf cart-sized rover to the lunar south pole to search for sources of ice water. The space agency hopes to have the rover exploring the moon's surface by December 2022. The new spacecraft was announc

19d

Discover Magazine

Modern Flame Retardants in Consumer Products May be as Toxic as the Ones They Replaced

(Credit: wonderYusya/Shutterstock) Flame retardants are everywhere. They're embedded in your TV, your couch — even your child's car seat. For years, a group of flame retardants was added to a host of consumer products in the U.S. before scientists realized their potentially toxic effects. And now, the old class has been mostly swapped out for a new group that may be just as toxic — and even more w

19d

Inside Science

Amanda Heidt

Contributor is a science journalist living in the Bay Area. She holds a master's degree in marine science from Moss Landing Marine Labs and is currently completing a master's degree in science communication at UC Santa Cruz. The rest of the time, she is either climbing high up on a mountain or diving low beneath the waves. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @Scatter_Cushion.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Broadly protective antibodies could lead to better flu treatments and vaccines

A newly-identified set of three antibodies could lead to better treatments and vaccines against influenza, according to a paper published in Science. NIAID-supported researchers by isolated the antibodies from a person sick with the flu five days after the onset of symptoms. They found that the antibodies, which bind to neuraminidase (NA) proteins on the surface of influenza viruses, provided broa

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stanford study casts doubt on carbon capture

Current approaches to carbon capture can increase air pollution and are not efficient at reducing carbon in the atmosphere, according to research from Mark Z. Jacobson.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

500+

MIT engineers develop a new way to remove carbon dioxide from air

A new way of removing carbon dioxide from a stream of air could provide a significant tool in the battle against climate change. The new system can work on the gas at virtually any concentration level, even down to the roughly 400 parts per million currently found in the atmosphere.

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Wired

1K

Can We Plant 20 Million Trees for 2020? The Math Says Yes

How much land will the \#TeamTrees plan require? A science prof roughs it to assess the feasibility.

20d

Biology / Biochemistry News From Medical News Today

100+

How do gut microbes help mice extinguish fear memories?

A recent study of how intestinal microbes helped mice unlearn fearful memories sheds new light on the mechanisms through which the gut controls the brain.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Microscale rockets can travel through cellular landscapes with precision

A new study shows how micro-scale 'rockets,' powered by acoustic waves and an on-board bubble motor, can be maneuvered through 3D landscapes of cells and particles using magnets.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA observes Tropical Storm Kyarr form near southwest India coast

Tropical Storm Kyarr formed near the southwestern coast of India, and NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the storm that revealed it organized quickly.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Novel formulation of an injectable drug to treat joint inflammation acts for ten days

Tests in rats showed enhanced efficacy of the drug as well as the absence of side effects, such as stomach bleeding. This innovation could be used to treat temporomandibular joint inflammation.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA-NOAA satellite shows wind shear affecting a changing Typhoon Bualoi

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean revealed that Typhoon Bualoi continued to look asymmetric because of ongoing wind shear. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued the final bulletin on Bualoi as it was beginning the transition into an extra-tropical cyclone.

20d

The Atlantic

3K

Trump Has Changed How His Rivals Are Remembered

In the age of Donald Trump, even funerals are political. Elijah Cummings and John McCain did not share a whole lot in common besides the profession of politics. They were of different races and political parties; they had greatly different life experiences; they lived on different ends of the country; and they even served on different sides of the Capitol. But both lawmakers died during Trump's p

20d

Science | The Guardian

6K

Tiny beetle named after climate activist Greta Thunberg

Scientists at Natural History Museum honour teenager's 'outstanding contribution' A tiny species of beetle discovered more than 50 years ago has been named after environmental campaigner Greta Thunberg. Scientists at the Natural History Museum in London have officially called the insect Nelloptodes gretae to honour the 16-year-old Swedish activist's "outstanding contribution" in raising global aw

20d

Nature

Here come the lightning 'megaflashes'

Nature, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03221-z A new eye in the sky is revealing monster lightning discharges, including a bolt that travelled more than 500 kilometres.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers develop platform for scalable testing of autonomous vehicle safety

In the race to manufacture autonomous vehicles (AVs), safety is crucial yet sometimes overlooked as exemplified by recent headline-making accidents. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to improve the safety of autonomous technology through both software and hardware advances.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA-NOAA satellite catches development of gulf Tropical Depression 17

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Gulf of Mexico and revealed that a low pressure area was developing into a depression. On Oct. 25, 2019, that low pressure area became Tropical Depression 17.

20d

BBC News – Science & Environment

186K

Migrating Russian eagles run up huge data roaming charges

Russian scientists tracking eagles got huge SMS bills when some birds flew to Iran and Pakistan.

20d

Wired

500+

In Flying Flags, Emoji Become Political

Adding a new flag to the emoji keyboard now means getting tech companies' support—and that could be an issue if China is involved.

20d

ScienceDaily

49

Fire-spawned forest fungi hide out in other organisms

When a wildfire obliterates a forest, the first life to rise from the ashes is usually a fungus – one of several species that cannot complete its life cycle in the absence of fire. Scientists have long argued about where and how such pyrophilous (fire-loving) fungi survive, sometimes for decades, between fires. A new study finds that some of these fungi hide out in the tissues of mosses and lichen

20d

ScienceDaily

78

Not all hypertension drugs are created equal, reports big-data study

For those with extremely high blood pressure, or hypertension, there are many initial medication options — so many that it can be hard to know which one to use. Now, a new article provides more information about the relative safety and effectiveness of different hypertension drugs in order to inform this critical treatment decision. The study reveals that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhib

20d

ScienceDaily

24

Scientists find molecular key to body making healthy T cells

In a finding that could help lead to new therapies for immune diseases like multiple sclerosis and IBD, scientists report identifying a gene and family of proteins critical to the formation of mature and fully functioning T cells in the immune system.

20d

ScienceDaily

Mysterious microproteins have major implications for human disease

As the tools to study biology improve, researchers are beginning to uncover details into microproteins, small components that appear to be key to some cellular processes. Scientists have recently showed that the 54-amino acid microprotein PIGBOS contributes to mitigating cell stress.

20d

Big Think

500+

Should politicians, en masse, do 'shrooms?

The idea of mass ingestion of psychedelics to drive people to environmental activism has been put forward lately, inspiring much debate. Suppose we gave it to people with power instead. It seems like it would be more effective. While psychedelics can offer some benefits, they won't necessarily be the right ones to get the job done. A couple of months ago, Gail Bradbrook, the co-founder of Extinct

20d

Futurism

2K

AI Researchers Hate The "Terminator" Movies With a Passion

Science Fiction There's a new "Terminator" movie coming out — and artificial intelligence researchers really hope you don't see it. The issue lies in the films' misrepresentation of AI, several experts told BBC News in a fascinating new story , which they worry could stir up irrational fears about the tech the same way "Jaws" once made moviegoers afraid to go in the water. "[The films] paint a pi

20d

The Atlantic

200+

The 'Most Dangerous and Volatile' Place in the World

"It is a paradise that has been set ablaze." That is how Masood Hussain, a renowned Kashmiri artist, describes his homeland. The transmogrification is reflected in his paintings. While Hussain once painted the idyllic rural landscapes of his childhood, his artwork now depicts the reality of Kashmir—a place of perpetual conflict, where normal life has been upended by death, forced disappearances,

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Experts in high-risk pregnancy respond to the published results of the PROLONG trial

The Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine issues guidance for obstetric care providers who care for pregnant patients who have previously experienced a preterm birth.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Electrospun fibers weave new medical innovations

The University of Cincinnati is developing new applications for a fabrication process called coaxial electrospinning, which combines two or more materials into a fine fiber for use in industry, textiles or even medicine. Electrospinning combines the amazing properties of one material with the powerful benefits of another.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Bariatric surgery is safe for teens with morbid obesity

Bariatric surgery is safe and, in many cases, beneficial for teenagers with morbid obesity who would otherwise face a heightened risk of developing severe health problems, including heart disease and stroke, according to a new study from Penn Medicine and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). Researchers will present their findings on Sunday, October 27, 2019, at the American Academy of

20d

Science Magazine

Top stories: Life after dinosaurs, Neanderthal planning, and Russia's CRISPR babies

This week's top Science news

20d

Wired

500+

The Slime Blob That Won the Internet Is Weirder Than You Think

A zoo puts a mysterious slime mold on display, and the internet gushes. Here's everything you need to know about the weirdest blob on Earth.

20d

Futurity.org

What's going on in the minds of thrill seekers?

Thrill seekers and daredevils thrive on the terrifying because of their high-sensation-seeking personalities, according to a new book. The new book, Buzz! Inside the Minds of Thrill-Seekers, Daredevils and Adrenaline Junkies (Cambridge University Press, 2019) digs into the stories of real-life adventurers, such as a scaler of skyscrapers, known as "Spider Man," who enjoys hanging from great heigh

20d

Futurity.org

Rising temps could really mess with earthworms

Climate change could alter earthworm communities worldwide, threatening the many functions they provide, researchers warn. Surprisingly, in any single location, there are typically more earthworms and more earthworm species found in temperate regions than in the tropics, according to their new study. The results of the huge effort—the largest earthworm dataset worldwide, encompassing 6928 sites i

20d

Science Magazine

Hold my beer. Munich's Oktoberfest beats Boston for methane emissions

World's largest folk festival emits so much gas per square meter, thanks to stoves and space heaters

20d

New on MIT Technology Review

500+

Hackers shut down Johannesburg's networks once again

[no content]

20d

Science News Daily

Schumer proposes $462 billion car swapgas for electric

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer is moving Democrats' climate talk to where the rubber meets the road, proposing a $462 billion trade-in program to get millions of Americans out of climate-damaging …

20d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

Steve Wozniak: No Self-Driving Cars in My Lifetime

LAS VEGAS — Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak believes in technology. But that doesn't extend to believing autonomous driving is happening soon. Wozniak, now 69, says autonomous cars that don't need a backup driver on board probably won't happen "in my lifetime." One culprit: Artificial intelligence probably isn't intelligent or flexible enough to be better than even the worst drivers. Wozniak was a

20d

Futurism

500+

Mark Zuckerberg Refuses to Look at Horrible Facebook Gore

No Thanks During his Wednesday appearance before the House Financial Services Committee, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg gave a hard pass to the suggestion that he spend a day working as a content moderator for his social media megacorporation, Business Insider reports . Facebook moderators have a rough job. They're forced to endlessly review the absolute worst of what people try to post on the site

20d

Wired

300+

How Ultra-Flexible Teens Turned 'Tricking' Into a Sport

For more than a decade, Michael Guthrie has dominated the world of tricking, a sport he describes as "emotion and personality, expressed with flips."

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Placing another piece in the dark matter puzzle

A team led by Prof Dmitry Budker has continued their search for dark matter within the framework of the 'Cosmic Axion Spin Precession Experiment' (or 'CASPEr' for short). The CASPEr group conducts their experiments at the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Helmholtz Institute Mainz (HIM). CASPEr is an international research program that uses nuclear

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Micromotors push around single cells and particles

A new type of micromotor — powered by ultrasound and steered by magnets — can move around individual cells and microscopic particles in crowded environments without damaging them. In one demonstration, a micromotor pushed around silica particles to spell out letters. Researchers also controlled the micromotors to climb up microsized blocks and stairs, demonstrating their ability to move over thr

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Small magnets reveal big secrets

An international research team led by a physicist at the University of California, Riverside, has identified a microscopic process of electron spin dynamics in nanoparticles that could impact the design of applications in medicine, quantum computation, and spintronics.

20d

Science News Daily

Jaguar's 'first' all-electric hypercar exists only on your PS4

Jaguar has unveiled its first-ever electric hypercar. There's just one catch: for the moment, it will only exist inside of Gran Turismo Sport. The all-wheel-drive Jaguar Vision …

20d

Futurity.org

A.I. tool suggests ways to improve your outfit

A new artificial intelligence system can look at a photo of an outfit and suggest helpful tips to make it more fashionable. Suggestions may include tweaks such as selecting a sleeveless top or a longer jacket. "We thought of it like a friend giving you feedback," says Kristen Grauman, a professor of computer science at the University of Texas at Austin whose previous research has largely focused

20d

The Scientist RSS

77

Trove of Fossils Shows Mammal Evolution after Dino Extinction

The site, Corral Bluffs in Colorado, also reveals how plants evolved and how ecosystems rebounded after the asteroid impact.

20d

Science Advances current issue

Mobile-surface bubbles and droplets coalesce faster but bounce stronger

Enhancing the hydrodynamic interfacial mobility of bubbles and droplets in multiphase systems is expected to reduce the characteristic coalescence times and thereby affect the stability of gas or liquid emulsions that are of wide industrial and biological importance. However, by comparing the controlled collision of bubbles or water droplets with mobile or immobile liquid interfaces, in a pure fl

20d

Science Advances current issue

Nanoscale mapping of chemical composition in organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite films

Lead-based organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite (OIHP) solar cells can attain efficiencies over 20%. However, the impact of ion mobility and/or organic depletion, structural changes, and segregation under operating conditions urge for decisive and more accurate investigations. Hence, the development of analytical tools for accessing the grain-to-grain OIHP chemistry is of great relevance. Here, we

20d

Science Advances current issue

3D steerable, acoustically powered microswimmers for single-particle manipulation

The ability to precisely maneuver micro/nano objects in fluids in a contactless, biocompatible manner can enable innovative technologies and may have far-reaching impact in fields such as biology, chemical engineering, and nanotechnology. Here, we report a design for acoustically powered bubble-based microswimmers that are capable of autonomous motion in three dimensions and selectively transport

20d

Science Advances current issue

Constraints on bosonic dark matter from ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance

The nature of dark matter, the invisible substance making up over 80% of the matter in the universe, is one of the most fundamental mysteries of modern physics. Ultralight bosons such as axions, axion-like particles, or dark photons could make up most of the dark matter. Couplings between such bosons and nuclear spins may enable their direct detection via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectros

20d

Science Advances current issue

Enabling reversible redox reactions in electrochemical cells using protected LiAl intermetallics as lithium metal anodes

Rechargeable electrochemical cells with metallic anodes are of increasing scientific and technological interest. The complex composition, poorly defined morphology, heterogeneous chemistry, and unpredictable mechanics of interphases formed spontaneously on the anodes are often examined but rarely controlled. Here, we couple computational studies with experimental analysis of well-defined LiAl ele

20d

Science Advances current issue

A sulfur-tethering synthesis strategy toward high-loading atomically dispersed noble metal catalysts

Metals often exhibit robust catalytic activity and specific selectivity when downsized into subnanoscale clusters and even atomic dispersion owing to the high atom utilization and unique electronic properties. However, loading of atomically dispersed metal on solid supports with high metal contents for practical catalytic applications remains a synthetic bottleneck. Here, we report the use of mes

20d

Science Advances current issue

Water nanostructure formation on oxide probed in situ by optical resonances

The dynamic characterization of water multilayers on oxide surfaces is hard to achieve by currently available techniques. Despite this, there is an increasing interest in the evolution of water nanostructures on oxides to fully understand the complex dynamics of ice nucleation and growth in natural and artificial environments. Here, we report the in situ detection of the dynamic evolution of nano

20d

Science Advances current issue

Ablation of water drops suspended in asphaltene/heptol solutions due to spontaneous emulsification

Complex molecules from crude oil, such as asphaltenes, can adsorb onto oil/water interfaces. This creates a viscoelastic network that may cause difficulties in oil recovery and oil spills. In addition to stabilization of oil/water emulsions, they may also cause the spontaneous formation of micron-sized droplets. Here, we investigate spontaneous emulsification in the presence of asphaltenes, probi

20d

Science Advances current issue

Tuning the deformation mechanisms of boron carbide via silicon doping

Boron carbide suffers from a loss of strength and toughness when subjected to high shear stresses due to amorphization. Here, we report that a small amount of Si doping (~1 atomic %) leads to a substantial decrease in stress-induced amorphization due to a noticeable change of the deformation mechanisms in boron carbide. In the undoped boron carbide, the Berkovich indentation–induced quasi-plastic

20d

Science Advances current issue

Electrically control amplified spontaneous emission in colloidal quantum dots

Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are highly promising materials for light amplification thanks to their efficient photoluminescence, tunable emission wavelength and low-cost synthesis. Unfortunately, CQDs are suffering from band-edge state degeneracy which demands multiple excitons to achieve population inversion. As a result, non-radiative Auger recombination increases the lasing threshold and limi

20d

Science Advances current issue

Giant nonlinear damping in nanoscale ferromagnets

Magnetic damping is a key metric for emerging technologies based on magnetic nanoparticles, such as spin torque memory and high-resolution biomagnetic imaging. Despite its importance, understanding of magnetic dissipation in nanoscale ferromagnets remains elusive, and the damping is often treated as a phenomenological constant. Here, we report the discovery of a giant frequency-dependent nonlinea

20d

Futurism

10K

A Top White House Cybersecurity Director Just Quit In Disgust

See Ya The White House's cybersecurity team is in a state of turmoil. In an internal memo obtained by Axios , senior White House cybersecurity director Dimitrios Vastakis detailed his frustration with how the Trump administration has managed a mission established to protect the White House from digital security threats — and then submitted his resignation. Real Subtle The Obama administration est

20d

Phys.org

1K

Small magnets reveal big secrets

An international research team led by a physicist at the University of California, Riverside, has identified a microscopic process of electron spin dynamics in nanoparticles that could impact the design of applications in medicine, quantum computation, and spintronics.

20d

Scientific American Blog Posts

68

Race and the Science of Starvation

A century ago, "experts" argued that extreme carnivory was a hallmark of racial superiority — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20d

Futurity.org

47

Suicide attempts among black teens rose 73% from 1991-2017

While suicide attempts decreased overall among US adolescents between 1991 and 2017, attempts among black teens rose 73%, according to a new study. "The rise in suicide rates among black youth can most likely be traced back to an internalization of issues around structural racism in America, along with a lack of coping mechanisms and lack of investment in mental health services in black communiti

20d

The Atlantic

2K

What Was the Point of the Syria 'Withdrawal'?

No sooner had the president taken a Twitter victory lap for "BRINGING OUR SOLDIERS BACK HOME" from Syria than his secretary of defense offered a slight caveat. Actually, Mark Esper said in a speech today, an unspecified number would stay put—to guard the oil. Weeks of sudden decisions and switchbacks in U.S. Syria policy had come to this: A small number of American troops in Syria had … moved . D

20d

Scientific American Content

96

Race and the Science of Starvation

A century ago, "experts" argued that extreme carnivory was a hallmark of racial superiority — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20d

Science News Daily

Hyundai to test self-driving car service in California

Hyundai on Friday announced that it will begin testing a self-driving ride service in Southern California next month.

20d

Livescience.com

4K

Assyrian Tablets Contain Earliest Written Record of Aurora's Sky Glow

Cuneiform tablets from ancient Assyria dating to 679 B.C. contain the earliest written record of an aurora.

20d

Livescience.com

8K

Lab Tech Accidentally Injects Herself with Smallpox-Related Virus

A lab worker in San Diego became infected with a smallpox-related virus after she accidentally stuck herself with a needle.

20d

ScienceDaily

32

Use of emergency CPR device rising despite lack of evidence

While its use is expanding, mechanical CPR has not been tested for effectiveness by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA).

20d

ScienceDaily

98

What 26,000 books reveal when it comes to learning language

What can reading 26,000 books tell researchers about how language environment affects language behavior? Scientists have completed a computational modeling study that suggests our experience and interaction with specific learning environments, like the characteristics of what we read, leads to differences in language behavior that were once attributed to differences in cognition.

20d

ScienceDaily

28

One step toward using insulating antiferromagnetic materials in future computers

Physicists have demonstrated how information can be written and read electrically in insulating antiferromagnetic materials.

20d

ScienceDaily

40

Brown and white body fat speak different languages

Most adults have two types of body fat: white and brown. New research has shown that the two types of fat secrete different sets of proteins. This means that white and brown fat don't speak the same language when they communicate with the rest of the body.

20d

ScienceDaily

24

Tuberculous infection is not life-long in most people

A new analysis challenges the longstanding notion that tuberculous infection is a life-long infection that could strike at any time and cause tuberculosis.

20d

ScienceDaily

'Swimmer's shoulder,' common in more than three-quarters of swimmers

The painful overuse injury called swimmer's shoulder, common in competitive swimmers, may be caused by excessive swimming distance during training along with a culture in competitive swimming that sublimates pain, according to new research.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Discovery in monkeys could lead to treatment for blindness-causing syndrome

A genetic mutation that leads to a rare, but devastating blindness-causing condition called Bardet-Biedl Syndrome has been discovered in monkeys for the first time. The finding offers a promising way to develop gene and cell therapies that could treat people with the condition, which leads to vision loss, kidney disfunction, extra fingers or toes, and other symptoms.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Empowering pediatricians to reduce preventable firearm injuries and deaths

A Children's National Hospital emergency room physician will participate in a symposium of surgeons, neurosurgeons and emergency medicine doctors during the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference and Exhibition — the first time these groups have come together to help reduce the number of kids hurt or killed by firearms.

20d

The Atlantic

373K

Read Barack Obama's Eulogy for Elijah Cummings

Former President Barack Obama delivered a eulogy today honoring Representative Elijah Cummings of Maryland, who died last week after a decades-long career in the House of Representatives. Cummings was known in Congress as a staunch defender of voting rights and for his perch as chair of the House Oversight Committee, which put him at the center of the impeachment inquiry now facing President Dona

20d

Discover Magazine

This Monster Early Galaxy Made Stars Hundreds of Times Faster than the Milky Way

An artist's rendering shows an early galaxy surrounded by gas and forming new stars at a tremendous rate. (Credit: James Josephides/Christina Williams/Ivo Labbe) Our universe's history began about 13.8 billion years ago with the Big Bang. When astronomers probe deep into space, they see parts of the universe as they were early in this history. That's because it takes light a long time to travel va

20d

ScienceDaily

24

Giant radio galaxies defy conventional wisdom

Astrophysicists discover a fundamental law of classical physics is reversed when we observe the distant universe.

20d

ScienceDaily

1K

Did an extraterrestrial impact trigger the extinction of ice-age animals?

Based on research at White Pond near Elgin, South Carolina, archaeologists present new evidence of a controversial theory that suggests an extraterrestrial body crashing to Earth almost 13,000 years ago caused the extinction of many large animals and a probable population decline in early humans.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Decision support tool reduces unneeded referrals of low-risk patients with chest pain

A simple evidence-based change to standard practice could avert needless referrals of low-risk patients to cardiac specialists, potentially saving nearly $4 million in annual health care spending while also easing worried parents' minds.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Can solar technology kill cancer cells?

Michigan State University scientists have revealed a new way to detect and attack cancer cells using technology traditionally reserved for solar power. The results, published in the current issue of Scientific Reports, showcases dramatic improvements in light-activated fluorescent dyes for disease diagnosis, image-guided surgery and site-specific tumor treatment.

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BBC News – Science & Environment

1K

Brexit: Will the Falkland Islands wildlife suffer?

Conservationists in the Falkland Islands are concerned by the impact of Brexit on the environment.

20d

The Atlantic

500+

The Powerful Woman on the Phone With Kellyanne Conway

"Let me tell you something, from a powerful woman." That's how the presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway described herself during a phone call with a reporter for the Washington Examiner . She was calling Caitlin Yilek to complain about a news story, which reported that Conway was under consideration to serve as President Donald Trump's chief of staff. The Examiner chose to publish a transcript

20d

Phys.org

87

Tiny beetle named after climate activist Greta Thunberg

Climate activist Greta Thunberg has a tiny new namesake.

20d

Phys.org

100+

Reframing Antarctica's meltwater pond dangers to ice shelves and sea level

Dangers to ancient Antarctic ice portend a future of rapidly rising seas, but a new study may relieve one nagging fear: that ponds of meltwater fracturing the ice below them could cause protracted chain reactions that unexpectedly collapse floating ice shelves. Though pooled meltwater does fracture ice, ensuing chain reactions appear short-ranged.

20d

Futurism

100+

MIT Researcher Lied About Feeding Refugees With "Food Computers"

Personal Food Computer Caleb Harper, a principal research scientist at the MIT Media Lab , claimed to have built a " personal food computer " that can grow any plant in a small, controlled environment. He also claimed to have used the machine to feed Syrian refugees. But the machines didn't work. Plagued by hardware and software malfunctions, a troublesome dependence on Wi-Fi connectivity, and fu

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

77

Tiny beetle named after climate activist Greta Thunberg

Climate activist Greta Thunberg has a tiny new namesake.

20d

Viden

Klogere end vi troede: Nyt fund viser, at neandertalerne kunne fremstille lim

En kompleks proces, der kræver planlægning, vurderer forskere.

20d

Livescience.com

3K

History of Halloween

Halloween has its roots in a pagan harvest festival, while different traditions were added throughout the years.

20d

Future(s) Studies

Air-breathing engine precooler achieves record-breaking Mach 5 performance

submitted by /u/bluefirecorp [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

Amazon is dangerously close to tipping point, could be reached as early as 2021

submitted by /u/pizza_science [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Census projects slower population growth, more diversity in coming decades

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

SpaceX wants to land Starship on the Moon before 2022, then do cargo runs for 2024 human landing

submitted by /u/-AMARYANA- [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Mind-Machine Interfaces

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Offshore windfarms 'can provide more electricity than the world needs'

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

In 2030, Our Protein Will Come From a Lab—and We'll All Be Better Off For It

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Governments have pledged nearly $10 billion toward an international fund meant to help poor nations tackle climate change. "Many countries will double their contributions and bring twice more than what they had given at the creation of the fund,"

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

Could AI Beat Radiologists at Spotting Bleeds in the Brain?

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

SpaceX wants to land Starship on the Moon before 2022, then do cargo runs for 2024 human landing

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

Elephants Under Attack Have An Unlikely Ally: Artificial Intelligence

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

Mind-reading tech? How private companies could gain access to our brains: Social media companies can already use online data to make reliable guesses about pregnancy or suicidal ideation – and new BCI technology will push this even further

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

Unilever saves on recruiters by using AI to assess job interviews – System analyses body language and word choice, but polling suggests public are opposed to such use of automation

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

Skynet, But For Welfare: Automating Social Services Is Killing People: This is resulting in the destruction of people's lives and finances as they find themselves unable to challenge these automated determinations.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

20d

Futurism

400+

Life Could Evolve on Tiny Planets With 3% of Earth's Mass

Could a tiny planet, with weak gravity, harbor life? A team of scientists from Harvard University say they've found the smallest possible mass a planet could be before its lack of gravitational forces would cause it to lose its atmosphere and any liquid water. They found that the smallest possible planet that could maintain those life-enabling properties would be about 2.7 percent of the mass of

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Reframing Antarctica's meltwater pond dangers to ice shelves and sea level

On Antarctica, meltwater ponds riddle a kilometer-thick, 10,000-year-old ice shelf, which shatters just weeks later. The collapse shocks scientists and unleashes the glacier behind the ice shelf, driving up sea level. A new study puts damage by meltwater ponds to ice shelves and the ensuing threat to sea level into cool, mathematical perspective.

20d

Big Think

500+

Why aren't we trying to be better ancestors?

Do we have a duty to be "good ancestors"? Creating a legacy of a climate-worsened world is like shooting your kids in the foot. Who are you free to harm? If not any one else, then surely not everyone else? Third-hand carbon counts as an ambient harm that will burden all future humans. None If you knew parts of our way of life would harm (your) kids, would you work to change them? As Greta Thunber

20d

The Atlantic

13K

Donald Trump Has a Big Problem in the Senate

As the White House struggles to build an anti-impeachment strategy, President Donald Trump turned this week to Lindsey Graham, his staunchest ally in the Senate, to try to stiffen Republican spines in that chamber. It's not going the way the president must have hoped. On Thursday, Graham announced that he'd put forward a resolution condemning the House impeachment inquiry. By mid-afternoon, when

20d

Phys.org

1K

Physicists simulate critical 'reheating' period that kickstarted the Big Bang

As the Big Bang theory goes, somewhere around 13.8 billion years ago the universe exploded into being, as an infinitely small, compact fireball of matter that cooled as it expanded, triggering reactions that cooked up the first stars and galaxies, and all the forms of matter that we see (and are) today.

20d

New on MIT Technology Review

1K

DARPA is betting on AI to bring the next generation of wireless devices online

In the agency's latest grand challenge, teams competed for $2 million and a chance to shape the future of communication technology by finding a better way to carve up the radio spectrum.

20d

Big Think

500+

Why aren't we trying to be better ancestors?

Do we have a duty to be "good ancestors"? Creating a legacy of a climate-worsened world is like shooting your kids in the foot. Who are you free to harm? If not any one else, then surely not everyone else? Third-hand carbon counts as an ambient harm that will burden all future humans. None If you knew parts of our way of life would harm (your) kids, would you work to change them? As Greta Thunber

20d

Undark Magazine

500+

When Residents Say 'No' to Aerial Mosquito Spraying

As cases of Eastern Equine Encephalitis spiked nationwide, states responded with aerial spraying initiatives. But in Michigan, where people were given a choice, thousands of households opted out of the spraying, citing safety concerns. An emergency public health plan quickly became a public relations battle.

20d

Scientific American Blog Posts

33

Treating Chronic Pain in the Right Place: Remotely

Research into brain mechanisms is resulting in new options for patients — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20d

Nature

Daily briefing: Travel ban hits major neuroscience meeting

Nature, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03280-2 Some delegates were denied entry to the US or faced visa difficulties. Plus, Africa's hidden climate data, and unpicking the truth about testosterone.

20d

Big Think

Why aren't we trying to be better ancestors?

Do we have a duty to be "good ancestors"? Creating a legacy of a climate-worsened world is like shooting your kids in the foot. Who are you free to harm? If not any one else, then surely not everyone else? Third-hand carbon counts as an ambient harm that will burden all future humans. None If you knew parts of our way of life would harm (your) kids, would you work to change them? As Greta Thunber

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Putting the 'bang' in the Big Bang

Physicists at MIT, Kenyon College, and elsewhere have simulated in detail an intermediary phase of the early universe that may have bridged cosmic inflation with the Big Bang. This phase, known as "reheating," occurred at the end of cosmic inflation and involved processes that wrestled inflation's cold, uniform matter into the ultrahot, complex soup that was in place at the start of the Big Bang.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Nerve cell protection free from side effects

The hormone erythropoietin (Epo) is a well-known doping substance that has a history of abuse in endurance sports. In addition to promoting red blood cell production, Epo protects nerve cells from death. To use this effect to cure neurodegenerative diseases, negative effects need to be prevented. Researchers at the University of Göttingen have now discovered another Epo receptor that could have pr

20d

The Atlantic

200+

Kanye West's Austere Reform Church

In an interview broadcast yesterday, Apple Music's Zane Lowe asked Kanye West when, exactly, he'd been born again. The rapper has always been Christian. He's been putting on "Sunday Service" worship concerts for all of 2019. But there had to be a moment when his faith came to more fully command his life. There had to be a moment that led to West not only titling his new album Jesus Is King but al

20d

Futurism

10K

Here's How 20 Years of Office Work Will Disfigure the Human Body

Emma doesn't look so great. Her legs are puffy and covered in varicose veins. Her eyes are flat and dead, and her back looks like she spends her days ringing the bell at Notre-Dame Cathedral. It's harsh but true. Emma is a life-sized doll depicting what the average office worker in the United Kingdom could look like in 20 years if changes aren't made to the workplace environment. For a new report

20d

Phys.org

22

Nations pledge $9.8B to global climate fund to help the poor

Rich countries have pledged $9.8 billion to help poor nations tackle climate change, the Green Climate Fund said Friday, as environmental activists slammed the United States for refusing to contribute and other nations for giving too little.

20d

Science | Smithsonian

100+

This Device Has Been Measuring the Ocean's Plankton Since the 1930s

Largely unchanged since it was invented, the Continuous Plankton Recorder collects plankton as it is towed behind a ship

20d

Sciencemag

Isotopic Tracers: Remember George de Hevesy

The largest controlled isotopic tracer test that I've ever heard of is underway out in Arizona, in the huge " Biosphere 2 " greenhouses. They're simulating a drought in the rainforest section and comparing the carbon flux under normal and dry conditions through the use of 13C-labeled carbon dioxide. A few weeks ago the sealed system (under normal watering conditions) got a pulse of the labeled ga

20d

New Scientist

500+

A 'gene drain' in the UK's poorest areas? It's really not that simple

A controversial study argues that people carrying genes associated with educational achievement have been moving out of the most deprived areas of the UK

20d

The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Rise of 'Sad Bois'

It's Thursday, October 24. In today's issue: Musical male angst finds a new formula—"sad bois." Plus: a look at three ongoing protests around the world Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We have many other free email newsletters on a variety of other topics. Browse the full list. Today's Big Idea (ALEX WAESPI) The rise of the "sad bois" Their lyrics are steeped in moodiness. Th

20d

Scientific American Content

100+

Treating Chronic Pain in the Right Place: Remotely

Research into brain mechanisms is resulting in new options for patients — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20d

Futurism

500+

Venus Is Covered in Gigantic Crystal Volcanoes

Crystal Mush The surface of Venus is covered in hundred-meter volcanic mountains made of crystals, and scientists think they finally figured out how they formed. The crystals, which form as mushy liquid deep underground and get squeezed through the surface, resemble tiny crystalline structures found here on Earth in Cyprus, New Scientist reports . Scientists from the University of Edinburgh suspe

20d

BBC News – Science & Environment

1K

Bloodhound takes first drive across the desert

The supersonic car completes a gentle run across the Hakskeen lakebed in South Africa.

20d

Wired

500+

How 18 Malware Apps Snuck Into Apple's App Store

Sing it loud: The App Store's not perfect. Especially when it's up against click fraud code this clever.

20d

Scientific American Content

1K

Electric Utilities Can't Blame Wildfires Solely on Climate, Experts Say

More people moving into forested areas and an outmoded power grid also raise fire risk in California — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20d

Futurism

6K

This "Quantum Battery" Never Loses Its Charge

Quantum Battery A team of scientists from the universities of Alberta and Toronto have laid out the blueprints for a "quantum battery" that never loses its charge. To be clear, this battery doesn't exist yet — but if they figure out how to build it, it could be a revolutionary breakthrough in energy storage. "The batteries that we are more familiar with — like the lithium-ion battery that powers

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Not all hypertension drugs are created equal, reports big-data study

For those with extremely high blood pressure, or hypertension, there are many initial medication options — so many that it can be hard to know which one to use. Now, a Yale-coauthored paper in Lancet provides more information about the relative safety and effectiveness of different hypertension drugs in order to inform this critical treatment decision. The study reveals that angiotensin convertin

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

500+

Fire-spawned forest fungi hide out in other organisms, study finds

When a wildfire obliterates a forest, the first life to rise from the ashes is usually a fungus—one of several species that cannot complete its life cycle in the absence of fire. Scientists have long argued about where and how such pyrophilous (fire-loving) fungi survive, sometimes for decades, between fires. A new study finds that some of these fungi hide out in the tissues of mosses and lichens.

20d

Phys.org

400+

Fire-spawned forest fungi hide out in other organisms, study finds

When a wildfire obliterates a forest, the first life to rise from the ashes is usually a fungus—one of several species that cannot complete its life cycle in the absence of fire. Scientists have long argued about where and how such pyrophilous (fire-loving) fungi survive, sometimes for decades, between fires. A new study finds that some of these fungi hide out in the tissues of mosses and lichens.

20d

Phys.org

Two destructive fires. Hundreds of miles apart. One culprit: Winds

The two fires broke out hours apart and hundreds of miles from each other.

20d

Phys.org

What use do teenagers make of YouTube?

"What are teens doing with YouTube? Practices, uses and metaphors of the most popular audio-visual platform" is the title of an article published in the journal Information, Communication & Society by Fernanda Pires, Maria-José Masanet and Carlos A. Scolari, members of the MEDIUM research group at the Department of Communication at UPF and the Department of Library and Information Science and Audi

20d

The Scientist RSS

1K

FDA Approves New Cystic Fibrosis Drug

The treatment, Trikafta, increases lung function in most patients with the disease—but comes with a hefty price tag.

20d

Phys.org

1K

New research on giant radio galaxies defies conventional wisdom

Conventional wisdom tells us that large objects appear smaller as they get farther from us, but this fundamental law of classical physics is reversed when we observe the distant universe.

20d

Phys.org

1K

Did an extraterrestrial impact trigger the extinction of ice-age animals?

A controversial theory that suggests an extraterrestrial body crashing to Earth almost 13,000 years ago caused the extinction of many large animals and a probable population decline in early humans is gaining traction from research sites around the world.

20d

ScienceDaily

41

Insect evolution during the Eocene epoch

Scientists have shown that the incidence of midge and fly larvae in amber is far higher than previously thought. The new finds shed light on insect evolution and the ecology in the Baltic amber forest during the Eocene epoch.

20d

ScienceDaily

24

Rhomboid protease in action

Rhomboid proteases are clinically relevant membrane proteins that play a key role in various diseases. Using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, researchers have now been able to watch rhomboid proteases in a native lipid environment at work. The obtained dynamic images will be useful for the development of new medication for diseases such as Parkinson's and malaria.

20d

ScienceDaily

28

New study on early human fire acquisition squelches debate

Fire starting is a skill that many modern humans struggle with in the absence of a lighter or matches. The earliest humans likely harvested fire from natural sources, yet when our ancestors learned the skills to set fire at will, they had newfound protection, a means of cooking, light to work by, and warmth at their fingertips.

20d

Futurity.org

100+

Your politics may shape your morality

Our politics and political party affiliation may help shape our beliefs and morality, a new study suggests. After tracking people's political attitudes and moral foundations—such as fairness and loyalty—over time, researchers found that while morals did not do a good job of predicting a person's future political attitudes, the opposite was true. The results may help explain the mental gymnastics

20d

Phys.org

Hurried evacuations as wildfires rage in California

Californian firefighters on Friday battled a fast-moving wildfire north of Los Angeles as further evacuation orders were issued after 40,000 residents were already told to flee their homes.

20d

The Atlantic

1K

Why the Search for Dark Matter Depends on Ancient Shipwrecks

In 2017, Chamkaur Ghag , a physicist at University College London, got an email from a colleague in Spain with a tempting offer. The year before, an emeritus professor at Princeton University, Frank Calaprice , had learned of old Spanish ships that had sunk off the New Jersey coast 400 or 500 years ago, while carrying a cargo of lead. Calaprice obtained a few samples of this lead and sent it off

20d

Science News Daily

Sony seeks to bail from streaming TV business by selling off PlayStation Vue

One potential buyer has expressed interest, but success is far from assured.

20d

Futurism

4K

SpaceX "Definitely" Plans to Land Starship on Moon by 2022

Starship 2022 SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell says the spacetech company wants to land its massive Starship spacecraft on the Moon within three years. "Aspirationally, we want to get Starship to orbit within a year," Shotwell said at this year's International Astronautical Congress in Washington DC, as quoted by TechCrunch . "We definitely want to land it on the Moon before 2022." Luggage Rack F

20d

Nature

64

Fresh push for 'failed' Alzheimer's drug

Nature, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03261-5 Biogen seeks FDA approval for aducanumab after revisiting clinical-trial data

20d

Nature

28

Venice 'time machine' project suspended amid data row

Nature, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03240-w Disagreements among international partners leave plans to digitize the Italian city's history in limbo.

20d

Nature

500+

Canadian kids sue government over climate change

Nature, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03253-5 Lawsuit alleges that the federal government has violated citizens' rights by promoting and enabling fossil-fuel development.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fire-spawned forest fungi hide out in other organisms, study finds

When a wildfire obliterates a forest, the first life to rise from the ashes is usually a fungus – one of several species that cannot complete its life cycle in the absence of fire. Scientists have long argued about where and how such pyrophilous (fire-loving) fungi survive, sometimes for decades, between fires. A new study finds that some of these fungi hide out in the tissues of mosses and lichen

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

29

High fiber, yogurt diet associated with lower lung cancer risk

A diet high in fiber and yogurt is associated with a reduced risk for lung cancer, according to a study by Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers published in JAMA Oncology.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

200+

Study finds functional medicine model is associated with improvements in health-related QOL

In the first retrospective cohort study of the functional medicine model, Cleveland Clinic researchers found that functional medicine was associated with improvements in health-related quality of life. The study was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Network Open.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Energy regulation rollbacks threaten progress against harmful ozone

The fight against harmful ozone is under legal threat. Air quality and carbon emissions regulations are currently in limbo in courts and congress, from core legislation from the 1970s to rules from the last US administration. This study models the future losses in the fight to drive down respiratory-damaging ozone if the regulations go away.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

China's carbon emissions growth slows during new phase of economic development

Scientists from from the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, together with collaborators, recently revealed that China's annual carbon emissions growth declined significantly from 10% during the 2002-2012 period to 0.3% during the period from 2012-2017.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Algorithm identifies cancer patients in need of advance care planning conversations

A newly developed algorithm prioritizes patients to ensure that cancer doctors talk to them about their values and goals before it is too late.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How is physical activity associated with fracture risk in older women?

In this observational study of 77,206 postmenopausal women, researchers looked at how physical activity and sedentary behavior were associated with risk of fracture.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Detection of oral HPV DNA in teen, young adult females

Researchers tested for HPV DNA in oral rinse samples collected over 10 years from a group of sexually active females (ages 13 to 21) who were planning to or had received the vaccine that targets four types of HPV. HPV was detected in 6.2% of 1,259 participants at baseline but oral HPV detection became less likely with time since becoming sexually active.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Length of time in US associated with immigrants' opioid use

The more time first-generation immigrants spend in the United States the more likely it appears they will use prescription opioids. This analysis used nationally representative survey data on health services that include prescription medications and self-reported length of time spent in the country. Among an estimated 41.5 million adult immigrants living in the United States, 3.2 million (7.8%) us

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Pediatric cancer study shows usefulness of gene expression analysis

Analyzing gene expression in tumor cells from children with cancer is more likely to reveal targets for therapy than analysis of DNA mutations, according to a new study led by researchers at the UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute. The study looked at 144 tumor samples from 128 pediatric cancer patients enrolled in four precision medicine clinical studies in the United States and Canada.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Integrated solutions for the Indus Basin

New framework helps decision makers find science-based pathways to address water resources and connected sustainability challenges in the Indus River basin.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Model predicts relaxed energy policies plus climate change could worsen US air quality

The Trump administration rolled back the Clean Power Plan in June 2019. The policy aimed to limit power plants' carbon emissions. In addition to the potential impacts on climate change, researchers reporting Oct. 25, 2019, in the journal One Earth find that relaxing US energy regulations would lower air quality by increasing emissions of health-damaging ozone.

20d

Science Magazine

German university finds 'severe' misconduct by researcher who promoted questionable cancer blood test

Court prevents publicity for investigations into Heidelberg University Hospital cancer test scandal

20d

Phys.org

Messages in amber envelopes

Scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that the incidence of midge and fly larvae in amber is far higher than previously thought. The new finds shed light on insect evolution and the ecology in the Baltic amber forest during the Eocene epoch.

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Messages in amber envelopes

Scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that the incidence of midge and fly larvae in amber is far higher than previously thought. The new finds shed light on insect evolution and the ecology in the Baltic amber forest during the Eocene epoch.

20d

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

6K

How we experience awe — and why it matters | Beau Lotto and Cirque du Soleil

Neuroscientist Beau Lotto conducted an ambitious study with Cirque du Soleil on the emotion of awe and its psychological and behavioral benefits. In this talk and live performance, he shares some of their findings — and stands back as Cirque du Soleil dancers create their own awe-inducing spectacle.

20d

Phys.org

Online trade poses new threat for wild orchids

The wild orchid trade in China has extended its reach past physical markets to the Internet. With these rare, endangered plants just a click away, the possibility of extinction has escalated.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What 26,000 books reveal when it comes to learning language

What can reading 26,000 books tell researchers about how language environment affects language behavior? Brendan T. Johns, an assistant professor of communicative disorders and sciences at UB has published a computational modeling study that suggests our experience and interaction with specific learning environments, like the characteristics of what we read, leads to differences in language behavi

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

27

Did an extraterrestrial impact trigger the extinction of ice-age animals?

Based on research at White Pond near Elgin, South Carolina, University of South Carolina archaeologist Christopher Moore and 16 colleagues present new evidence of a controversial theory that suggests an extraterrestrial body crashing to Earth almost 13,000 years ago caused the extinction of many large animals and a probable population decline in early humans.

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Online trade poses new threat for wild orchids

The wild orchid trade in China has extended its reach past physical markets to the Internet. With these rare, endangered plants just a click away, the possibility of extinction has escalated.

20d

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

21

Dynamic images show rhomboid protease in action

Rhomboid proteases are clinically relevant membrane proteins that play a key role in various diseases. Using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, researchers from Berlin's Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) have now been able to watch rhomboid proteases in a native lipid environment at work. The obtained dynamic images will be useful for the development of new medication for di

20d

Phys.org

33

Determining the shapes of atomic clusters

Too large to be classed as molecules, but too small to be bulk solids, atomic clusters can range in size from a few dozen to several hundred atoms. The structures can be used for a diverse range of applications, which requires a detailed knowledge of their shapes. These are easy to describe using mathematics in some cases; while in others, their morphologies are far more irregular. However, curren

20d

Phys.org

Dynamic images show rhomboid protease in action

Rhomboid proteases are clinically relevant membrane proteins that play a key role in various diseases. Using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, researchers from Berlin's Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) have now been able to watch rhomboid proteases in a native lipid environment at work. The obtained dynamic images will be useful for the development of new medication for di

20d

Phys.org

Integrated solutions for the Indus Basin

A new integrated modeling framework could help the Indus Basin region find solutions to water resource challenges and interconnected sustainable development goals. The new framework, described in a perspective article published today in the journal One Earth, was developed by IIASA researchers and colleagues working on the Integrated Solutions for Water, Energy, and Land (ISWEL) Project.

20d

Phys.org

300+

Energy regulation rollbacks threaten progress against harmful ozone

Pollutants from coal-fired power plants help make ground-level ozone, and a warming world exacerbates that. Recent rollbacks of U.S. energy regulations may speed climate change, keep pollutants coming, and thus slow the fight against harmful ozone, according to a new study to be published Friday.

20d

Phys.org

33

Science reveals improvements in Roman building techniques

The Romans were some of the most sophisticated builders of the ancient world. Over the centuries, they adopted an increasingly advanced set of materials and technologies to create their famous structures. To distinguish the time periods over which these improvements took place, historians and archaeologists typically measure the colours, shapes and consistencies of the bricks and mortar used by th

20d

Phys.org

Deflating beach balls and drug delivery

Many natural microscopic objects—red blood cells and pollen grains, for example—take the form of distorted spheres. The distortions can be compared to those observed when a sphere is 'deflated' so that it steadily loses internal volume. Until now, most of the work done to understand the physics involved has been theoretical. Now, however, Gwennou Coupier and his colleagues at Grenoble Alps Univers

20d

ScienceDaily

36

Determining the shapes of atomic clusters

Researchers propose a new method of identifying the morphologies of atomic clusters. They have confirmed that the distinctive geometric shapes of some clusters, as well as the irregularity of amorphous structures, can be fully identified mathematically.

20d

Phys.org

200+

Jurassic dinosaurs trotted between Africa and Europe

Dinosaur footprints found in several European countries, very similar to others in Morocco, suggest that they could have been dispersed between the two continents by land masses separated by a shallow sea more than 145 million years ago.

20d

Phys.org

Retrieving physical properties from two-colour laser experiments

When photons of light interact with particles of matter, a diverse variety of physical processes can unfold in ultrafast timescales. To explore them, physicists currently use 'two-colour pump-probe' experiments, in which an ultrashort, infrared laser pulse is first fired at a material, causing its constituent electrons to move. After a controllable delay, this pulse is followed by a train of simil

20d

Science News Daily

RED Cancels Plans for Second Hydrogen Phone as Founder Steps Down

After promising a revamped RED Hydrogen phone several months ago, company founder Jim Jannard now says he's retiring and the Hydrogen project will shut down. The …

20d

Science News Daily

TCL has a dual-hinged smartphone that can fold into three parts

TCL's accordion style smartphone prototype is looking to change the definition of foldables with a form factor comprised of three screens. The Chinese manufacturer has employed two hinges in …

20d

Science News Daily

Boeing design flaw a factor in Lion Air crash: Indonesian probe

A design flaw, inadequate pilot training and poor flight crew performance contributed to a Boeing jet crashing in Indonesia last year, killing all 189 people on board, investigators said Friday.

20d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

24

Deflating beach balls and drug delivery

Scientists have shown that macroscopic-level models of the properties of microscopic hollow spheres agree very well with theoretical predictions. The new study has implications for targeted drug delivery.

20d

ScienceDaily

37

Birds do not habituate to traffic noise

Noise pollution is one of the leading environmental health risks in humans. In zebra finches, noise affects their health and the growth of their offspring: Researchers found that traffic noise suppresses normal glucocorticoid profiles in the blood, probably to prevent negative effects of chronically elevated levels on the organism. In addition, the young chicks of noise-exposed parents were smalle

20d

ScienceDaily

28

Catalytic immunotherapy for cancer: Nanoparticles act as artificial enzymes

Theoretically, our immune system could detect and kill cancer cells. Unfortunately, tumors are well armed to fight these attacks. Despite modern cancer treatments, metastases and relapses remain a major problem. Increasing anti-tumor immunity might now be made possible, thanks to copper telluride nanoparticles that mimic enzymes, especially under NIR-II light irradiation. This induces oxidative st

20d

ScienceDaily

32

Trampoline injuries have increased over the past decade

Between 2008 and 2017, the incidence of trampoline-related fractures increased by an average of 3.85% in the US, and the driver behind those increases are trampoline injuries outside of the home at places of recreation or sport, according to new research.

20d

ScienceDaily

45

By targeting flu-enabling protein, antibody may protect against wide-ranging strains

A team of researchers has found an antibody that protects mice against a wide range of potentially lethal influenza viruses, advancing efforts to design of a universal vaccine that could either treat or protect people against all strains of the virus.

20d

ScienceDaily

24

Deflating beach balls and drug delivery

Scientists have shown that macroscopic-level models of the properties of microscopic hollow spheres agree very well with theoretical predictions. The new study has implications for targeted drug delivery.

20d

ScienceDaily

20

Retrieving physical properties from two-color laser experiments

Analytical and numerical analysis gives the first indications of how physically useful information can be extracted from two-colour pump probe experiments, and how it can be distinguished from the signatures arising from the initial infrared laser, according to a new article.

20d

ScienceDaily

28

Chemistry: Scientist confirm a new 'magic number' for neutrons

Scientists have shown that 34 is a "magic number" for neutrons, meaning that atomic nuclei with 34 neutrons are more stable than would normally be expected. Earlier experiments had suggested, but not clearly demonstrated, that this would be the case.

20d

ScienceDaily

36

Memory training builds upon strategy use

Researchers have for the first time obtained clear evidence of the important role strategies have in memory training. Training makes participants adopt various strategies to manage the task, which then affects the outcome of the training.

20d

ScienceDaily

83

Mentally ill die many years earlier than others

New research confirms that people with mental disorders have an increased risk of premature mortality. When compared to the general population, average life expectancy is respectively 10 and 7 years shorter for men and women with mental disorders.

20d

ScienceDaily

40

Science reveals improvements in Roman building techniques

Researchers have carried out scientific analysis of the materials used to build the Atrium Vestae in Rome. They found that successive phases of modification to the building saw improvements, including higher quality raw materials, higher brick firing temperatures, and better ratios between carbonate and silicate building materials.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Insect evolution: Insect evolution

Scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that the incidence of midge and fly larvae in amber is far higher than previously thought. The new finds shed light on insect evolution and the ecology in the Baltic amber forest during the Eocene epoch.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Use of emergency CPR device rising despite lack of evidence

While its use is expanding, mechanical CPR has not been tested for effectiveness by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA).

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

IKBFU researchers have discovered another natural antioxidant — alder bark

An alder bark may become a great source of anti-aging and anti-disease natural antioxidants. That's the results discovered by the IKBFU's Institute of Living Systems researchers. For the past 10 years, the workers of the IKBFU's laboratory of the natural antioxidants have been searching for a new perspective source of antioxidants. These substances represent a wide class of various structures of c

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New research on giant radio galaxies defies conventional wisdom

Astrophysicists discover a fundamental law of classical physics is reversed when we observe the distant universe.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

28

New procedure for obtaining a cheap ultra-hard material that is resistant to radioactivity

The material has been made using the technique of laser zone floating, which consists of fusion by means of the application of intense laser radiation and then rapid solidification. Professor Cumbrera's team has used X-ray diffraction techniques to characterize the crystallography of the samples obtained and the defects present in them, as well as the possible preferential ordering of the polycrys

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

45

Ultrastructure of focal adhesion scaffold unveiled in human pluripotent stem cells

Focal adhesions are known as signalling platforms broadcasting the information of the biochemical and physical qualities of the extracellular matrix into intracellular signalling cascades. However, focal adhesions remain unstudied in the context of human pluripotent stem cells. The research group from the Turku Bioscience Centre at the University of Turku in Finland unveiled the ultrastructure of

20d

The Atlantic

The Books Briefing: Costume Party

Halloween is an opportunity for many people to step outside of themselves, donning costumes inspired by favorite fictional figures. Children and adults roll out a litany of popular ensembles around this time of year to channel their inner heroes, villains, and everything in between. It's due to the imagination of their creators that many of these classic characters reemerge throughout the decades

20d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

Top Cars of the 2019 Tokyo Motor Show

The 2019 Tokyo Motor Show is about what you'd expect: cars for the specific needs of a densely populated country with few onshore energy resources. Thus, lots of electric vehicles, small cars, really small cars, and retro car concepts that look odd to American tastes that same way Plymouth's PT Cruiser looked to Japan when it came out in 2000. Every Asian auto show targets trends not fully embrac

20d

forskning.se

Klimatförändringarna ger ökad risk för harpest

Harpest hos människor kan bli allt vanligare i framtiden på nordliga breddgrader. Forskare vid Stockholms universitet har utvecklat en metod för att statistiskt förutsäga hur klimatförändringar påverkar utbrott av harpest. I takt med att årsmedeltemperaturen stiger på nordliga breddgrader förändras också regn- och snöförhållanden samt vattenflödena genom landskapet. Därmed ändras också levnadsför

20d

Ingeniøren

1K

Har prøvet stråling, myresyre og hvidløgssaft: Kun Roundup virker for Banedanmark

Banedanmark er statens største forbruger af pesticider, ganske enkelt fordi alternativerne ikke kan holde sporene fri for ukrudt.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

39

Super-strong magnetic supercrystals can assemble themselves

Materials scientists who work with nano-sized components have developed ways of working with their vanishingly small materials. But what if you could get your components to assemble themselves into different structures without actually handling them at all?

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dynamic images show rhomboid protease in action

Rhomboid proteases are clinically relevant membrane proteins that play a key role in various diseases. Using solid-state NMR spectroscopy, researchers from Berlin's Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) have now been able to watch rhomboid proteases in a native lipid environment at work. The obtained dynamic images will be useful for the development of new medication for di

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study on early human fire acquisition squelches debate

'Fire was presumed to be the domain of Homo sapiens but now we know that other ancient humans like Neanderthals could create it,' says Daniel Adler of UConn.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antibiotics not necessary for most toothaches, according to new ADA guideline

The American Dental Association (ADA) announced today a new guideline indicating that in most cases, antibiotics are not recommended for toothaches. This guidance, published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association, aligns with the ADA's longstanding antibiotic stewardship efforts and its pledged commitment to the US government's Antimicrobial Resistance Challenge.

20d

Retraction Watch

32

'Misguided and ineffectual': Publisher offers mea culpa in retraction of paper questioning link between HIV and AIDS

Anyone who lives near or has ever driven past a cattle ranch knows this much: No amount of perfume can mask the smell of bullshit. If you want proof, and you don't have a car, just ask the editors of Frontiers in Public Health. In 2014, the journal published a paper by a researcher in … Continue reading

20d

Science News Daily

Google's 'cal.new' is a quick way for scheduling Calendar entries

Scheduling a new event in your Google Calendar is not that hard, but it does involve a few steps before you can get to adding the information for it.

20d

Futurity.org

28

Brown and white fat 'speak different languages'

Brown and white fat secrete different sets of proteins, research finds. The proteins that the fats secrete send signals to the rest of the body. What the researchers discovered is that the two types of fat tissue send very different signals to the rest of the body. "We have mapped all of the proteins that are secreted from the fat cells and that they use to communicate with other cells. And there

20d

Futurity.org

38

How the world's toughest material fends off cracks

Scientists finally know how nacre, the world's toughest material, stays so strong. Nacre is the rainbow-sheened material that lines the insides of mussel and other mollusk shells. More commonly known as mother-of-pearl, nacre's combination of hardness and resilience has mystified scientists for more than 80 years. If humans could mimic it, it could lead to a new generation of ultra-strong synthet

20d

Science Magazine

2K

Intensive DNA search yields 10 genes tied directly to schizophrenia

Rare genetic variants could point to new treatments for severe psychiatric disorder

20d

Singularity Hub

1K

In 2030, Our Protein Will Come From a Lab—and We'll All Be Better Off For It

Could a hamburger grown in a lab from Kobe beef stem cells be cheaper, better tasting, and healthier for you? Can you imagine a future where millions of square miles of pastoral land are reclaimed by nature, creating new forests and revitalizing the Earth's vital carbon sinks? Last week , we discussed the hyper-efficient food production systems of 2030. This week, we continue that discussion, but

20d

Wired

300+

A New Study Casts Doubt on 'Gaming Disorder' Diagnoses

"Dysfunctional gaming," as the World Health Organization may call it, seems to be more a symptom than the cause of psychological issues.

20d

The Atlantic

500+

How Much Inheritance Is Too Much?

When Lynn Chen-Zhang's older son was in third grade, he came home from school one day wondering why he bothered studying so hard: A classmate had told him that because he had wealthy parents, he'd be all taken care of in life. What was the use? This question worried Chen-Zhang and her husband—who run a financial-advisory firm in Portage, Michigan—and prompted them to have a talk with their two bo

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

42

Tuberculous infection is not life-long in most people

A new analysis challenges the longstanding notion that tuberculous infection is a life-long infection that could strike at any time and cause tuberculosis

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Jurassic dinosaurs trotted between Africa and Europe

Dinosaur footprints found in several European countries, very similar to others in Morocco, suggest that they could have been dispersed between the two continents by land masses separated by a shallow sea more than 145 million years ago.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Birds do not habituate to traffic noise

Traffic noise affects normal stress reactions in zebra finches and delays offspring growth

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Charta of Neurourbanism dedicated to mental health in cities

How can planners reduce the stress of city living and improve the mental health of city dwellers? An interdisciplinary team of researchers led by Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin has developed a set of recommendations which aim to address these questions. Entitled 'The Charta of Neurourbanism', their work has been published to coincide with the Berlin Mental Health Week.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

One step toward using insulating antiferromagnetic materials in future computers

Physicists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in collaboration with Tohoku University in Sendai in Japan, the synchrotron sources BESSY-II at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB), and Diamond Light Source, the UK's national synchrotron, have demonstrated how information can be written and read electrically in insulating antiferromagnetic materials.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

32

X-ray scout sees first light

Observations with eRosita promise a breakthrough in our understanding of the energetic universe.

20d

Livescience.com

12K

Your Brain 'Shields' Itself from the Existential Threat of Death

Our brains can't understand "the idea of ending, of nothing, of complete annihilation."

20d

ScienceDaily

25

Informal sharing of breast milk gains popularity among women, despite safety risks

Women who are unable to produce enough breast milk for their children are increasingly turning to 'mother-to-mother' informal milk-sharing, a potentially unsafe practice that is discouraged by the pediatric medical community, according to new research.

20d

ScienceDaily

32

Research tests speed of drones in responding to medical emergency scenarios

Could drones be used someday to deliver life-saving medications or interventions in the case of a child's emergency, a drug overdose or in response to a mass casualty scene? According to new research, it's an idea worth exploring.

20d

ScienceDaily

50

At what age is it considered child neglect to leave a child home alone?

A majority of social workers surveyed believe children should be at least 12 before being left home alone four hours or longer, and they are more likely to consider a home-alone scenario as neglect if a child is injured while left unsupervised.

20d

Science News Daily

Twitch loses another major streamer as Shroud moves to Mixer

Fortnite and Twitch megastar Tyler "Ninja" Blevins caused quite a stir in the gaming world when he announced that he was leaving Twitch for Mixer, Microsoft's competing game streaming platform. …

20d

Phys.org

200+

Roaming Russian eagles leave scientists broke

Russian scientists tracking migrating eagles were forced to start a crowdfunding campaign after their birds wandered into Iran and foreign text messages from their tracking devices depleted the project's budget.

20d

Phys.org

100+

Is Earth on fire? Data shows almost five times as many wildfires over last year

Wildfires have been making headlines again this month, with multiple fires burning in Lebanon and California, but these are just some of the many fires 2019 has seen. Fires in the Amazon sparked a global outcry this summer, but fires have also been blazing in the Arctic, France, Greece, Indonesia as well as many other areas in the world.

20d

Phys.org

1K

New study on early human fire acquisition squelches debate

Fire starting is a skill that many modern humans struggle with in the absence of a lighter or matches. The earliest humans likely harvested fire from natural sources, yet when our ancestors learned the skills to set fire at will, they had newfound protection, a means of cooking, light to work by, and warmth at their fingertips.

20d

Nature

45

Community engagement: a starter pack for scientists

Nature, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03229-5 Karen Fortuna worked alongside people with lived experiences of psychiatric conditions to develop technologies to help improve their mental and physical health.

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

200+

Roaming Russian eagles leave scientists broke

Russian scientists tracking migrating eagles were forced to start a crowdfunding campaign after their birds wandered into Iran and foreign text messages from their tracking devices depleted the project's budget.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Brown and white body fat speak different languages

Most adults have two types of body fat: white and brown. New research from the University of Copenhagen has shown that the two types of fat secrete different sets of proteins. This means that white and brown fat don't speak the same language when they communicate with the rest of the body.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Link established between local action of stress factors and systemic response of higher plants

Recent achievements in the study of long-distance electrical signals in higher plants and the analysis of the relationship between the local action of stressors and the systemic physiological responses were summed up in a review article published in the journal Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology by Associate Professor Vladimir Sukhov and his colleagues from the Biophysics Department of L

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Determining the shapes of atomic clusters

In a new study published in EPJ B, researchers propose a new method of identifying the morphologies of atomic clusters. They have confirmed that the distinctive geometric shapes of some clusters, as well as the irregularity of amorphous structures, can be fully identified mathematically.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Immune system upgrade

Theoretically, our immune system could detect and kill cancer cells. Unfortunately, tumors are well armed to fight these attacks. Despite modern cancer treatments, metastases and relapses remain a major problem. Increasing anti-tumor immunity might now be made possible, thanks to copper telluride nanoparticles that mimic enzymes, especially under NIR-II light irradiation. This induces oxidative st

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Science reveals improvements in Roman building techniques

In research published in EPJ Plus, researchers have carried out scientific analysis of the materials used to build the Atrium Vestae in Rome. They found that successive phases of modification to the building saw improvements, including higher quality raw materials, higher brick firing temperatures, and better ratios between carbonate and silicate building materials.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mentally ill die many years earlier than others

New research from Aarhus BSS confirms that people with mental disorders have an increased risk of premature mortality. When compared to the general population, average life expectancy is respectively 10 and 7 years shorter for men and women with mental disorders.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Deflating beach balls and drug delivery

Gwennou Coupier and his colleagues at Grenoble Alps University, Grenoble, France have shown that macroscopic-level models of the properties of microscopic hollow spheres agree very well with theoretical predictions. The new study, which has implications for targeted drug delivery, was recently published in EPJ E.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Retrieving physical properties from two-colour laser experiments

Analytical and numerical analysis gives the first indications of how physically useful information can be extracted from two-colour pump probe experiments, and how it can be distinguished from the signatures arising from the initial infrared laser, according to an article in EPJ D.

20d

Phys.org

Ultrastructure of focal adhesion scaffold unveiled in human pluripotent stem cells

Focal adhesions are known as signaling platforms broadcasting the information of the biochemical and physical qualities of the extracellular matrix into intracellular signaling cascades. However, focal adhesions remain unstudied in the context of human pluripotent stem cells. The research group led by Academy Professor Johanna Ivaska from the Turku Bioscience Centre at the University of Turku unve

20d

The Atlantic

33

Frankie Is a Moody Meditation on Mortality

A particularly rewarding art-house subgenre is the fancy vacation movie—usually a light drama with comic notes, set in some glorious European paradise by the sea and featuring a host of emotional revelations over dinners and drinks. The French director Eric Rohmer made such tales his specialty, and more recent examples include Richard Linklater's Before Midnight and Ridley Scott's A Good Year . N

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Ultrastructure of focal adhesion scaffold unveiled in human pluripotent stem cells

Focal adhesions are known as signaling platforms broadcasting the information of the biochemical and physical qualities of the extracellular matrix into intracellular signaling cascades. However, focal adhesions remain unstudied in the context of human pluripotent stem cells. The research group led by Academy Professor Johanna Ivaska from the Turku Bioscience Centre at the University of Turku unve

20d

New Scientist

400+

A common antibiotic seems to have a strange effect on our memories

A study looking at how antibiotics could be used to treat post-traumatic stress disorder has revealed gaps in our understanding of how memories form

20d

ScienceDaily

53

Cells linked to leading cause of blindness in elderly

Researchers report that glial cells (or support cells), and vasculature cells tasked with providing blood to the retina as well as cone cells contribute to degeneration of the macula, in the central part of the retina.

20d

ScienceDaily

47

Advance in search for new Clostridioides difficile vaccine

Scientists have made a breakthrough in the hunt for a new vaccine for killer hospital bug Clostridioides difficile (C. diff).

20d

ScienceDaily

35

Warming waters, local differences in oceanography affect Gulf of Maine lobster population

Two new studies point to the role of a warming ocean and local differences in oceanography in the rise and fall of lobster populations southern New England to Atlantic Canada.

20d

ScienceDaily

53

Starvation halts brain development, but hungry cells jump-start growth when food becomes available

In tadpole research that holds potential for prenatal health and brain injury, scientists identify cellular workings that stop and restart early brain development.

20d

ScienceDaily

49

Not all plants are good for you

A new scientific review highlights a significant global health issue related to plants that sicken or kill undernourished people around the world, including those who depend upon these plants for sustenance. Some of these plants become even more toxic due to climate change.

20d

ScienceDaily

24

Injuries related to lawn mowers affect young children in rural areas most severely

Each year, more than 9,000 children in the United States are treated in emergency departments for lawn mower-related injuries. New research found that these injuries are more frequent and severe in rural areas, affecting younger children than in urban regions.

20d

ScienceDaily

49

Power of family resilience to protect children from bullying

Studies show that children exposed to childhood trauma known as adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are at increased risk of being bullied or bullying others. New research suggests that family resilience — the ability to work together to overcome problems, for example — reduces this risk.

20d

Phys.org

1K

What Google's 'quantum supremacy' means for the future of computing

For the first time ever, a quantum computer has performed a computational task that would be essentially impossible for a conventional computer to complete, according to a team from Google.

20d

Futurism

6K

This Physicist Believes There Are Countless Parallel Universes

It's the one aspect of reality we all take for granted: an object exists in the world regardless of whether you're looking at it. But theoretical and quantum physicists have been struggling for years with the possibly of a "many worlds" interpretation of reality, which suggests that every time two things could happen, it splits into new parallel realities. Essentially, they think you're living in

20d

Futurism

4K

Los Angeles Is Building a Road From Recycled Plastic Bottles

Plastic Road Soon, the people won't be the only thing that's plastic in Los Angeles — the roads will be, too. Well, one road. The City of Angels is working with a startup called TechniSoil Industrial, according to Fast Company , to repave one of its downtown roads using a mixture of recycled plastic and existing asphalt — and the process could cut down on the environmental impact of construction

20d

Phys.org

400+

Rapid laser solver for the phase retrieval problem

Physicists can explore tailored physical systems to rapidly solve challenging computational tasks by developing spin simulators, combinatorial optimization and focusing light through scattering media. In a new report on Science Advances, C. Tradonsky and a group of researchers in the Departments of Physics in Israel and India addressed the phase retrieval problem by reconstructing an object from i

20d

ScienceDaily

32

Hydrogen boride nanosheets: A promising material for hydrogen carrier

Researchers report a promising hydrogen carrier in the form of hydrogen boride nanosheets. This two-dimensional material, which has only recently begun to be explored, could go on to be used as safe, light-weight, high-capacity hydrogen storage materials.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Memory training builds upon strategy use

Researchers from Åbo Akademi University, Finland, and Umeå University, Sweden, have for the first time obtained clear evidence of the important role strategies have in memory training. Training makes participants adopt various strategies to manage the task, which then affects the outcome of the training.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Postcode lottery for NHS orthotics patients

Specialist orthotics care for patients with mobility issues varies significantly depending on where they live, new research by Staffordshire University reveals.The findings, published on BMJ Open, have uncovered major differences across orthotics services at various NHS trusts and health boards.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists find molecular key to body making healthy T cells

In a finding that could help lead to new therapies for immune diseases like multiple sclerosis and IBD, scientists report in the Journal of Experimental Medicine identifying a gene and family of proteins critical to the formation of mature and fully functioning T cells in the immune system.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientist confirm a new 'magic number' for neutrons

An international collaboration led by scientists from the University of Hong Kong, RIKEN (Japan), and CEA (France) have used the RI Beam Factory (RIBF) at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-base Science to show that 34 is a "magic number" for neutrons, meaning that atomic nuclei with 34 neutrons are more stable than would normally be expected. Earlier experiments had suggested, but not clear

20d

BBC News – Science & Environment

29K

Greta Thunberg: New beetle named after climate activist

The Nelloptodes gretae – named after the teenage climate activist – is less than 1mm long.

20d

Phys.org

Insulating antiferromagnetic materials for future computers

Future computer technology based on insulating antiferromagnets is progressing. Electrically insulating antiferromagnets such as iron oxide and nickel oxide consist of microscopic magnets with opposite orientations. Researchers see them as promising materials replacing current silicon components in computers. Physicists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in collaboration with Tohoku Univ

20d

Phys.org

A new procedure for obtaining a cheap, ultra-hard material that is resistant to radioactivity

University of Seville researchers led by Professor Francisco Luis Cumbrera, together with colleagues from the University of Zaragoza and CSIC, have found a procedure for producing the phase B6C of boron carbide. This phase had previously been theoretical. This scientific-technological advance will make it possible to provide a cheap, ultra-resistant material for the design of planes, cars and othe

20d

Phys.org

South Africa still has a long way to go on the right to food

Fifty-four percent of South Africans are hungry or at risk of hunger. Hunger affects people's health, as well as their ability to live full and productive lives. That's why hunger represents a violation of their basic human rights—not only the right to food, but also the rights to dignity, health and education, since all of these are affected by hunger.

20d

Phys.org

Flight shame: Flying less plays a small but positive part in tackling climate change

"Flyskam"—the Swedish word for "flight shame"—describes a phenomenon that has taken off around the world, as travelers face growing pressure to reduce their carbon emissions by switching to alternative modes of transport. Climate activists have denounced air travel, settling for boats, trains or, at a pinch, paying to offset the carbon emissions from their flights. Celebrities face criticism for f

20d

Phys.org

36

Volcanologist jams to the beat of the Earth's drummer

"We're Barely Listening to the U.S.'s Most Dangerous Volcanoes," read the headline on a recent story in the New York Times, pointing to the dismal state of volcano monitoring in the Pacific Northwest.

20d

Phys.org

52

Climate change is affecting the way Europe floods, experts warn

Climate change is disrupting the rhythms of spring growing and river flooding across Europe, which could pose new problems for biodiversity and food security in floodplains, scientists say.

20d

Phys.org

42

Virtual spaces mirror income inequality

Income inequality drives social segregation and polarization not just in urban neighborhoods, but in online communities as well. That is the conclusion of a new paper by the New England Complex Systems Institute (NECSI) published in Royal Society Open Science. Importantly, this societal fragmentation is more than just the top one percent versus the bottom 99: it exists between every economic class

20d

Phys.org

100+

Chandra spots a mega-cluster of galaxies in the making

Astronomers using data from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory and other telescopes have put together a detailed map of a rare collision between four galaxy clusters. Eventually all four clusters—each with a mass of at least several hundred trillion times that of the sun—will merge to form one of the most massive objects in the universe.

20d

Phys.org

25

Video: Mars 2020 stands on its own six wheels

This time-lapse video, taken on Oct. 8, 2019, at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, captures the first time NASA's Mars 2020 rover has carried its full weight on its legs and wheels.

20d

Phys.org

45

Catalytic immunotherapy for cancer: Nanoparticles act as artificial enzymes

Theoretically, our immune system could detect and kill cancer cells. Unfortunately, tumors are well armed to fight these attacks. Despite modern cancer treatments, metastases and relapses remain a major problem. Increasing anti-tumor immunity might now be made possible, thanks to copper telluride nanoparticles that mimic enzymes, especially under NIR-II light irradiation. This induces oxidative st

20d

Phys.org

54

Building single-atom qubits under a microscope

Our team at IBM Research made a breakthrough in controlling the quantum behavior of individual atoms, demonstrating a versatile new building block for quantum computation.

20d

Phys.org

Testing the feasibility of the UN Sustainable Development Goals on water and sanitation

A RUDN geographer used an economic model to calculate the costs associated with the accomplishment of the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) on water supply and sanitation. The model has demonstrated that by 2050, these goals can be achieved even with relatively moderate costs as compared to the entire global GDP, especially when compared to the relative economic costs that can result from

20d

Phys.org

Dorian left Bahamas coral battered, littered with debris

Mermaid Reef never should have thrived in the shallow curve of ocean just 250 feet off Johnny Cake Lane in Marsh Harbour.

20d

Phys.org

32

Yeast experiments show fit lineages are less tolerant to deleterious mutations

A team of researchers with members from Harvard University and one from the University of California San Diego has carried out experiments with yeast that show more-fit lineages are less tolerant to deleterious mutations than are those that are less fit. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes forcing a number of mutations into the backgrounds of yeast and what they le

20d

Phys.org

Carbon productivity: What if we measured the thing that matters most?

Ask any economist a question, and you will usually get the answer: "productivity."

20d

Futurity.org

Obesity in mice boosts arthritis risk for generations

Obesity may increase arthritis risk across generations, a new study with mice suggests. Arthritis affects one in five Americans, and one in three Americans with obesity, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. When researchers studied mice that became obese after eating a high-fat diet, they found that the animals had an elevated risk for osteoarthritis, which causes cartilag

20d

ScienceDaily

28

Researchers uncover novel amyloidosis

Scientists have discovered a novel amyloid protein that induces amyloidosis in rats. This new amyloid protein is known to be the lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and accumulated very frequently in the mammary gland of aged rats. The results of this research are useful for predicting the future occurrence of human amyloidosis and as a disease model animal.

20d

ScienceDaily

83

Fighting the herpes virus

Researchers have used single-cell RNA sequencing to better understand the viral infections.

20d

ScienceDaily

24

What's driving tropical deforestation? Scientists map 45 years of satellite images

Tropical forests are under increasing pressure from human activity such as agriculture. However, in order to put effective conservation measures in place, local decision-makers must be able to precisely identify which areas of forest are most vulnerable. A new analysis method could hold the key.

20d

ScienceDaily

24

Daylight not rain most important for Africa 'green-up' phenomenon

Contrary to popular belief, seasonal rains are not the most important factor for starting the growth cycle of plants across Africa. New research shows that the amount of daylight plants receive is the biggest contributing factor to starting the iconic 'green-up' phenomenon in Africa – where the continent's plants and trees grow their leaves.

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

32

Yeast experiments show fit lineages are less tolerant to deleterious mutations

A team of researchers with members from Harvard University and one from the University of California San Diego has carried out experiments with yeast that show more-fit lineages are less tolerant to deleterious mutations than are those that are less fit. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes forcing a number of mutations into the backgrounds of yeast and what they le

20d

Futurity.org

36

Test gauges the strength of microbe exoskeletons

A new stress test for microbe exoskeletons separates the tough bacteria from the tender. By scooping the guts out of bacteria and refilling them with an expansive fluid, scientists can discover whether a microbe is structurally strong or weak, gaining insights that could help fight infectious diseases or aid studies of the beneficial bacterial communities known as microbiomes. "Today we study a t

20d

New Scientist

400+

Strange volcanic domes on Venus may be made from hot crystal mush

Venus has a few weird domes that seem to be different from the rest of its surface, which may be because they are full of crystals formed from cooling magma

20d

Futurism

300+

Scientists Can't Agree About Kids and Screen Time

Since 1997, the amount of time that kids aged two or younger spend staring at screens has more than doubled . But knowing how much time kids spend focused on TVs, smartphones, and tablets isn't nearly as important as figuring out how it's affecting their brains. The only problem: different research projects keep arriving at totally different conclusions. According to one recently published study,

20d

Wired

100+

Congress Is Pretty Peeved That Blizzard Suspended Blitzchung

The 'Hearthstone' pro, also known as Chung Ng Wai, was blocked from competing after voicing support for protesters in Hong Kong.

20d

Wired

1K

Facebook's Encryption Makes it Harder to Detect Child Abuse

Opinion: The social network needs to develop better ways to help stop the spread of millions of harmful images.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What use do teenagers make of YouTube?

An article published in the journal Information, Communication & Society by Fernanda Pires and Carlos A. Scolari, members of the MEDIUM research group, with Maria-José Masanet, a researcher at the University of Barcelona, examines teenagers' use of YouTube and the metaphors that arise when putting these uses into discourse. The research is part of the H2020 Transmedia Literacy project, which explo

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

By targeting flu-enabling protein, antibody may protect against wide-ranging strains

A nationwide team of researchers has found an antibody that protects mice against a wide range of potentially lethal influenza viruses, advancing efforts to design of a universal vaccine that could either treat or protect people against all strains of the virus.

20d

Cosmos Magazine

What you might have missed

The first million years of life after the dinosaurs, gut bacteria's link to fear and stress, and the really big book of plants – here are some highlights from a week in science.

20d

Phys.org

100+

A one-step multicatalytic method to enrich racemic mixtures to a single enantiomer

A combined team of researchers from Princeton University and Yale University has developed a multicatalytic technique to enrich racemic mixtures directly to a single enantiomer in a single step. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their technique, how well it works and the ways it might be used. Alison Wendlandt with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has pu

20d

Phys.org

89

Mountain streams emit a surprising amount of carbon dioxide

Mountains cover 25 percent of the Earth's surface, and the streams draining these mountains account for more than a third of the global runoff. But the role that mountain streams play in global carbon fluxes has not yet been evaluated; until now scientists have focused mainly on streams and rivers in low-altitude tropical and boreal regions.

20d

Science Magazine

Argentine scientists rally behind favorite in Sunday's presidential election

Alberto Fernández is expected to embrace pro-science policies of former President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, now his running mate

20d

Scientific American Content

The Significant Problem of P Values

Standard scientific methods are under fire. Will anything change? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Tracking down the functions of the microbiome

All living creatures—from the simplest animal and plant organisms right up to the human body—are colonized by numerous microorganisms. They are thus in a functional relationship with these microbes, and together form a so-called metaorganism. The investigation of this symbiotic cooperation between host organism and microorganisms is a key challenge for modern life sciences research. The compositio

20d

Ingeniøren

27

Nordjysk affaldsselskab: »Glædeligt, at vi genanvender 32,5 procent«

Omkring en tredjedel af nordjydernes plastaffald bliver genanvendt, viser en beregning, Ingeniøren har lavet. Det tal er bestyrelsesformanden i Reno-Nord mere end tilfreds med.

20d

Phys.org

21K

Researchers create blueprint for 'quantum battery' that doesn't lose charge

Scientists from the universities of Alberta and Toronto developed a blueprint for a new quantum battery that doesn't leak charge.

20d

Phys.org

Tracking down the functions of the microbiome

All living creatures—from the simplest animal and plant organisms right up to the human body—are colonized by numerous microorganisms. They are thus in a functional relationship with these microbes, and together form a so-called metaorganism. The investigation of this symbiotic cooperation between host organism and microorganisms is a key challenge for modern life sciences research. The compositio

20d

Phys.org

When the big yellow bus goes green

Every year, car manufacturers roll out new models with sleek styling, improved safety features and better fuel economy. Yet there's one vehicle on the road that has remained almost unchanged since the 1970s: the yellow school bus.

20d

Phys.org

27

80% of household water goes to waste

As regional Australian towns face the prospect of running out of water, it's time to ask why Australia does not make better use of recycled wastewater.

20d

Phys.org

100+

Scientists confirm a new 'magic number' for neutrons

An international collaboration led by scientists from the University of Hong Kong, RIKEN (Japan), and CEA (France) have used the RI Beam Factory (RIBF) at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-base Science to show that 34 is a "magic number" for neutrons, meaning that atomic nuclei with 34 neutrons are more stable than would normally be expected. Earlier experiments had suggested, but not clear

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Tourism zones in Pirin National Park threaten chamois population

WWF-Bulgaria is alarmed that the new draft management plan for Pirin National Park is further endangering the habitat of the chamois. The draft plan foresees an expansion of sport infrastructure that would be allowed on an area 12.5 times greater than what is currently allowed, or 7.5% of the Park territory. The plans involve construction mostly in the northern part of Pirin above the towns of Ban

20d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

Neutron Star Collision May Explain Origin of Heavy Elements

In 2017, scientists around the world were excited by the news that the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) project had detected gravitational waves from the collision of two neutron stars. This discovery confirmed a pivotal prediction of general relativity, and eventually earned multiple Nobel Prizes . A new study now says this cataclysmic event may also have solved the mys

20d

Phys.org

Tourism zones in Pirin National Park threaten chamois population

WWF-Bulgaria is alarmed that the new draft management plan for Pirin National Park is further endangering the habitat of the chamois. The draft plan foresees an expansion of sport infrastructure that would be allowed on an area 12.5 times greater than what is currently allowed, or 7.5% of the Park territory. The plans involve construction mostly in the northern part of Pirin above the towns of Ban

20d

Phys.org

20

Predicting research results can mean better science and better advice

We ask experts for advice all the time. A company might ask an economist for advice on how to motivate its employees. A government might ask what the effect of a policy reform will be.

20d

Science | Smithsonian

400+

The Possibilities and Risks of Genetically Altering Immune Cells to Fight Cancer

Of the ten or so patients I've treated with CAR-T, over half developed strange neurologic side effects ranging from headaches to seizures

20d

Phys.org

25

Study shows how vital coral algae adapts to warming seas

Scientists at the University of Southampton have shown how a specific type of symbiotic algae, which lives in coral tissue, is able to adapt and survive the hotter seawater temperatures caused by global warming.

20d

Phys.org

300+

Living on the edge: How a 2-D material got its shape

Ever since its discovery in 2004, graphene—an atomically thin material with amazing strength and electrical properties—has inspired scientists around the world to design new 2-D materials to serve a broad range of applications, from renewable energy and catalysts to microelectronics.

20d

Phys.org

Study probes gender pay gaps in US federal science agencies

Men make more than women at seven U.S. federal science agencies, but the reasons for these gender-based pay gaps differ by organization, according to new research involving Kaye Husbands Fealing of the Georgia Institute of Technology's School of Public Policy.

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

25

Study shows how vital coral algae adapts to warming seas

Scientists at the University of Southampton have shown how a specific type of symbiotic algae, which lives in coral tissue, is able to adapt and survive the hotter seawater temperatures caused by global warming.

20d

ScienceDaily

40

Game changer: New chemical keeps plants plump

Scientists have created a chemical to help plants hold onto water, which could stem the tide of massive annual crop losses from drought and help farmers grow food despite a changing climate.

20d

ScienceDaily

32

Shoppers tend to reject offers made under time pressure

Giving consumers short time limits on offers means they are less likely to take them up, according to new research. The authors conclude that risk aversion is the main factor behind consumers' tendency to accept time-limited offers.

20d

ScienceDaily

52

Years of education may impact drinking behavior and risk of alcohol dependence

Higher educational attainment — spending more years in education — may impact people's drinking behavior and reduce their risk of alcohol dependence, according to a new study.

20d

ScienceDaily

400+

Only half of US children get enough sleep during the week

Only 48% of school age children in the United States get 9 hours of sleep most weeknights, according to new research. Those who do, the study suggests, are significantly more likely to show a positive outlook toward school and other signs of 'childhood flourishing,' a measure of behavioral and social well-being.

20d

ScienceDaily

33

Mountain streams emit a surprising amount of carbon dioxide

For the first time, scientists have measured the total amount of CO2 emissions from mountain streams worldwide. This research builds on recent findings and shows how important it is to include mountain streams in assessments of the global carbon cycle.

20d

ScienceDaily

20

Scientists uncover the process behind protein mutations that impact gut health

A new study has uncovered why a protein mutation that causes inflammatory bowel diseases is dysfunctional.

20d

Phys.org

Why public dissatisfaction boiled into all-out protest in Chile, Brazil, and Hong Kong

In Chile, bubbling frustration boiled over into deadly, full-blown protests over the weekend after the government announced what amounted to a four-cent subway fare hike in the country's capital.

20d

Phys.org

The salamander that eats its siblings' arms could one day help you grow a new one

Imagine you're a smiley-faced, feathery-gilled Mexican salamander called an axolotl. You've just been born, along with hundreds of brothers and sisters. But salamanders like you live in the wild only in one lake near Mexico City, and that habitat isn't big enough for all of you. There's not enough food. Only the strongest can survive. What do you do?

20d

Phys.org

100+

High pesticide concentrations continue to enter Great Barrier Reef

The combined toxicity of 22 of the most common pesticides found in waterways flowing into the Great Barrier Reef is in many cases not meeting pollution reduction targets.

20d

Phys.org

100+

NASA moon rocks help form new picture of early moon and Earth

Most people only ever encounter rubidium as the purple color in fireworks, but the obscure metal has helped two University of Chicago scientists propose a theory of how the moon may have formed.

20d

Phys.org

100+

New selfie shows Curiosity, the Mars chemist

A new selfie taken by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover is breathtaking, but it's especially meaningful for the mission's team: Stitched together from 57 individual images taken by a camera on the end of Curiosity's robotic arm, the panorama also commemorates only the second time the rover has performed a special chemistry experiment.

20d

Phys.org

59

Happy workers are 13% more productive

Research by Oxford University's Saïd Business School, in collaboration with British multinational telecoms firm BT, has found a conclusive link between happiness and productivity.

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

The salamander that eats its siblings' arms could one day help you grow a new one

Imagine you're a smiley-faced, feathery-gilled Mexican salamander called an axolotl. You've just been born, along with hundreds of brothers and sisters. But salamanders like you live in the wild only in one lake near Mexico City, and that habitat isn't big enough for all of you. There's not enough food. Only the strongest can survive. What do you do?

20d

Phys.org

100+

Hydrogen boride nanosheets: A promising material for hydrogen carrier

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology, University of Tsukuba, and colleagues in Japan have reported a promising hydrogen carrier in the form of hydrogen boride nanosheets. This two-dimensional material, which is not yet well studied, could eventually be used for lightweight, high-capacity hydrogen storage materials with good safety profiles.

20d

The Atlantic

500+

The Deadly End of American Policy in Syria

In Syria, aligning with the United States has often proved costly. Throughout eight years of civil war, Syrians who tied their fortunes to the changing whims of American policy have been systematically arrested, killed, and driven from the country. First it was protesters chanting for democracy—many took encouragement from Barack Obama's statement in the summer of 2011 that the country's dictator

20d

ScienceDaily

24

Contrast-enhanced ultrasound predicts nodule transformation to hepatocellular carcinoma

A new study has identified sonographic biomarkers that can predict eventual malignant transformation of pathologically confirmed cirrhotic nodules for patients at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These additional imaging features may have the potential to be adopted as ancillary or even major features to stratify probability for HCC in the contrast-enhanced LI-RADS system.

20d

ScienceDaily

37

Extracting hidden quantum information from a light source

Researchers report on a technique to extract the quantum information hidden in an image that carries both classical and quantum information. This technique opens a new pathway for quantum enhance microscopes that aim to observe ultra-sensitive samples.

20d

ScienceDaily

20

Scientists adapt CAR-T immunotherapy to target the HIV latent reservoir

Scientists describe a new way of attacking cells infected by HIV. The work showcases a novel version of CAR-T, the technology known for its recent successes in fighting blood cancers.

20d

Ingeniøren

Nyt forskningsprojekt om elbiler: Batteriets tilstand kan nu måles udefra

PLUS. En række projektpartnere med Aalborg Universitet og Teknologisk Institut i front har udviklet et værktøj, som kan tage pulsen på batteriet i brugte elbiler. Og med projektet følger også et par gode råd til elbilejere.

20d

NeuroLogica Blog

100+

Mystery of the Hubble Constant

76.8 kilometers per second per megaparsec. A megaparsec is about 30 million trillion kilometers, or perhaps better stated as 30 exameters. Given the significant figures, and the massive denominator, that makes this constant extremely precise. But is it accurate? Other measures using different methods come up with 74.03, 71.9, 69.8, and even 67.4. We are talking about the Hubble constant , the rat

20d

New on MIT Technology Review

500+

A biased medical algorithm favored white people for health-care programs

[no content]

20d

Wired

200+

Gadget Lab Podcast: The Case for a YouTubers Union

Independent video creators want to unionize, in a play for more transparency from YouTube. Emma Grey Ellis has the story on this week's Gadget Lab.

20d

Wired

300+

The FTC Fosters Fake Reviews, Its Own Commissioners Say

A leaked email revealed that executives at a skin-care firm showed employees how to post fake reviews. But the FTC settled without a fine or admission of guilt.

20d

Livescience.com

300+

How Long Will It Take to Find Proof of Alien Life?

How long until we find evidence of life beyond Earth? If a panel of experts is on track with their estimates, it may be sooner than you think.

20d

Livescience.com

1K

Mystery of 15th-Century Bayeux Tapestry Solved

The Bayeux Tapestry's real home base has been identified in the Bayeux Cathedral in Normandy.

20d

The Scientist RSS

74

Image of the Day: Flight Styles

The evolution of different ways of flying in birds affected wing range of motion, but not wing shape.

20d

Science News Daily

Facebook's Pretty Sure It Won't Fuck Up the News This Time

On Friday, Facebook started tests of what seems like its umpteenth attempt at handling journalism on the platform—a dedicated Facebook News section for users that lives separately from the standard …

20d

Scientific American Blog Posts

100+

How to Save Coffee from Climate Change

We need to find more resilient strains in the wild and on small farms and preserve them in gene banks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20d

New Scientist

400+

Blood proteins reveal your age – and could lead to anti-ageing therapy

The proteins in our blood undergo three waves of changes as we age that can be used to determine how old we are – and potentially guide anti-ageing treatments

20d

Wired

5K

Trying to Plant a Trillion Trees Won't Solve Anything

We're not going to stop climate change with just seedlings and fancy agriculture. We also need to reduce emissions.

20d

Wired

400+

Why Keybase Doesn't Offer Two Factor Authentication

Keybase exists to keep things safe online. And it doesn't use 2FA to do it.

20d

Wired

2K

Your Secret Uber Tipping Behavior, Exposed

A study of 40 million trips finds that men tip more than women, that women drivers get bigger tips, and that riders tip more on repeat rides with a driver.

20d

Scientific American Content

200+

How to Save Coffee from Climate Change

We need to find more resilient strains in the wild and on small farms and preserve them in gene banks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20d

Science | The Guardian

1K

Strike a contrapposto pose to look more attractive, science says

Study finds pose makes waist-to-hip ratio seem lower on one side and looks more appealing Dancers do it, Instagrammers do it, even the Venus de Milo does it. When it comes to striking a pose, it seems the only way is contrapposto. Now research has shed light on why the attitude is so appealing. Experts say the pose, which involves standing with weight predominantly on one foot with a slight twist

20d

Undark Magazine

200+

Can We Break the Cycle of War and Famine?

In "Food or War," Australian climate scholar Julian Cribb explores historical cycles of warfare and famine from the 30 Years' War to contemporary Sudan and Yemen, and argues that unless we address the profound global challenges that endanger today's farming systems, further conflicts will be inevitable.

20d

Ingeniøren

54

Vognmænd vil være grønne: Drukner styrelse med ansøgninger om at køre emissionsfrit

Transportministeren overvejer at fremrykke datoen for totalstop for nye fossile taxier. Men med kommende liberalisering i sigte er interesseorganisation skeptisk.

20d

Scientific American News

100+

Reduce Red Tape for the Red Planet, Report Says

Regulations governing the responsible exploration of Mars and other worlds require regular, frequent updates, according to a new NASA review — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20d

Scientific American Content

500+

Reduce Red Tape for the Red Planet, Report Says

Regulations governing the responsible exploration of Mars and other worlds require regular, frequent updates, according to a new NASA review — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20d

Future(s) Studies

New chemical keeps plants plump. A UC Riverside-led team has created a chemical to help plants hold onto water, which could stem the tide of massive annual crop losses from drought and help farmers grow food despite a changing climate.

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

Chuck Schumer is proposing a $462bn trade-in programme to get millions of Americans out of climate-damaging petrol vehicles and into electric or hybrid cars over the next 10 years.

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

Quantum supremacy: A three minute guide

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

100+

MIT engineers develop a new way to remove carbon dioxide from air.

submitted by /u/AdamCannon [link] [comments]

20d

Future(s) Studies

Photographer uses drone with thermal camera to find missing 6-year-old boy

submitted by /u/blazinfastjohny [link] [comments]

20d

Vetenskap och Hälsa

Nyfödda screenas för typ 1 diabetes och celiaki

Cirka 50 000 personer i Sverige lever med autoimmun diabetes – av dessa är ungefär 7000 barn. I Skåne kan nyfödda barn sedan 2018 medverka i ASTR1D – en screeningstudie där man identifierar barn med förhöjd risk att drabbas av autoimmun diabetes (typ 1 diabetes) eller celiaki (glutenintolerans). I två parallella studier undersöker man sedan om det är möjligt att i ett tidigt stadium förhindra att

20d

Phys.org

61

New research finds ocean warming forces reefs into cool-water refuges

New research from Florida Tech finds that global warming is shifting which environments off the Pacific coast of Panama will support coral reefs. Historically warmer areas that promoted fast coral growth are now becoming intolerably hot, and habitats that for thousands of years were too cold will offer some protection from the heat and temporarily promote thriving coral populations.

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

61

New research finds ocean warming forces reefs into cool-water refuges

New research from Florida Tech finds that global warming is shifting which environments off the Pacific coast of Panama will support coral reefs. Historically warmer areas that promoted fast coral growth are now becoming intolerably hot, and habitats that for thousands of years were too cold will offer some protection from the heat and temporarily promote thriving coral populations.

20d

Nature

A 'quantum knot' unties itself

Nature, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03212-0 For the first time, researchers watch as a knot formed from an ultra-cold gas decays, forming a vortex.

20d

BBC News – Science & Environment

4K

Pesticide poisoned French paradise islands in Caribbean

France has a pollution crisis in the Caribbean caused by toxic chlordecone sprayed on banana crops.

20d

Retraction Watch

100+

Author protests as Elsevier retracts nine papers for fake peer review

An agriculture researcher has lost nine papers from Elsevier journals for "illegitimate reviewer reports." The researcher, Christos Damalas, is, well, irked. The journals included Chemosphere, Crop Protection, Land Use Policy, and Science of the Total Environment, and the papers were all published in 2017 and 2018, with Damalas as corresponding author and co-authors from Iran … Continue reading

20d

The Atlantic

2K

Why Republicans Are Complaining About the Impeachment Process

There's a reason Republicans have been making a great fuss about the process of the impeachment inquiry over the past few days. Unwilling, or more likely unable, to mount any substantive defenses of President Donald Trump's behavior with regard to Ukraine, members have instead assailed the way Democrats are conducting the inquiry. You may doubt the sincerity of these complaints—more on that in a

20d

The Atlantic

5K

WeWork's Adam Neumann Is the Most Talented Grifter of Our Time

This is how the WeWork story ends—for now. The high-flying office-sharing startup, which introduced itself to the world as "a community company" with a mission to "to elevate the world's consciousness," is paying its founder, Adam Neumann, more than $1 billion to go away. Meanwhile, the company is so cash-poor that it cannot afford to pay the severances of the 4,000 workers it intends to cut. WeW

20d

The Atlantic

1K

The Overlooked Conservative Tradition That Embraces an Executive Like Donald Trump

Studies of contemporary public opinion have shown that if most people know one thing about conservatives' ideas about the Constitution, it is that they stand on the rock of originalism —the proposition that judges should read the Constitution by the lights of the nation's Founders. While there have been some laudable exceptions , many originalists at the country's top law schools have steered cle

20d

Big Think

48

Internet activism: How are political movements shaped online?

When it comes to developing an effective online campaign, it's important to build a team of members who understand their audience and who have a clear understanding of their team's division of labor. Successful campaigns understand the pros and cons of various social media platforms — their respective architectures are important when it comes to strategically propagating a message. Having someone

20d

Ingeniøren

PODCAST: Det meste plast brændes af eller downcycles

Kun 32 procent af den plast, nordjyderne sorterer, kan genbruges på mønsteranlæg i Aalborg. Tre gode nyheder fra teknologiens frontløbere. Skat mangler faglighed og bedre ledelse.

20d

Phys.org

400+

Mysterious microproteins have major implications for human disease

As the tools to study biology improve, researchers are beginning to uncover details into microproteins, small components that appear to be key to some cellular processes, including those involved with cancer. Proteins are made up of chains of linked amino acids and the average human protein contains around 300 amino acids. Meanwhile, microproteins have fewer than 100 amino acids.

20d

Phys.org

47

Heavy rains prompt Japan evacuation orders weeks after typhoon

Tens of thousands of people were advised to evacuate on Friday as Japan was hit by heavy rains just two weeks after a deadly typhoon barrelled through the country.

20d

Ingeniøren

Kobolt i københavnske elbusser: Movia afviser at give garanti mod børnearbejde

PLUS. Selv om undersøgelse fra norsk busselskab viser høj risiko for, at udvindingen af kobolt sker under stærkt uforsvarlige forhold, ønsker Movia hverken at stille strengere krav til leverandører eller at boykotte elbusbatterier med kobolt.

20d

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

500+

Mysterious microproteins have major implications for human disease

As the tools to study biology improve, researchers are beginning to uncover details into microproteins, small components that appear to be key to some cellular processes, including those involved with cancer. Proteins are made up of chains of linked amino acids and the average human protein contains around 300 amino acids. Meanwhile, microproteins have fewer than 100 amino acids.

20d

Ingeniøren

Første dom er faldet i Danmark for brud på databeskyttelsesloven

Retten på Frederiksberg fælder dom i første sag om GDPR-brud efter et opslag på Facebook med navn og billede af voldtægtsmistænkt.

20d

Phys.org

100+

Daylight not rain most important for Africa 'green-up' phenomenon

Contrary to popular belief, seasonal rains are not the most important factor for starting the growth cycle of plants across Africa.

20d

BBC News – Science & Environment

1K

Andover runner almost died drinking five litres of water

Marathon runner Johanna Pakenham almost died when she drank five litres of water.

20d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

DNA damage and transcription stress cause ATP-mediated redesign of metabolism and potentiation of anti-oxidant buffering

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12640-5 ERCC1 is involved in a number of DNA repair pathways including nucleotide excision repair. Here the authors showed that reduced transcription in Ercc1-deficient mouse livers and cells increases ATP levels, suppressing glycolysis and rerouting glucose into the pentose phosphate shunt that generates reductive s

20d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Semiarid climate and hyposaline lake on early Mars inferred from reconstructed water chemistry at Gale

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12871-6 Gale Crater on Mars has been demonstrated to have once hosted water, but its chemistry is still under debate. Here the authors use mineralogical rock compositions and show the once saline character of Gale Crater—a result of warmer climate periods during the Hesperian period.

20d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Cortical astrocytes develop in a plastic manner at both clonal and cellular levels

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12791-5 Previous studies on astrocyte development have led to controversial results due to a lack of pertinent tools. Here, authors analyze large numbers of astrocyte clones generated by nearby cortical progenitors using the MAGIC Markers strategy and ChroMS 3D imaging, and show that clonally-related astrocytes organ

20d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Complementary hybrid electrodes for high contrast electrochromic devices with fast response

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12617-4 Electrochromic devices have a range of applications as switchable shutters. Here the authors report a hybrid device that uses complementary electrochromic molecules immobilized on nanoporous electrodes to concurrently achieve fast colouration and bleaching with high contrast over a broad spectral range.

20d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Reverberant 3D optical coherence elastography maps the elasticity of individual corneal layers

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12803-4 Elastic mapping of individual layers of the cornea with elastography uses Lamb waves, which are dependent on the thickness of each layer and the direction of propagation. Here the authors present Reverberant 3D Optical Coherence Elastography to measure elasticity of single layers using waves propagating in al

20d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

MT1-MMP directs force-producing proteolytic contacts that drive tumor cell invasion

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12930-y The mechanism of force production by invadopodia is unclear. Here, the authors show that cell surface MT1-MMP when in contact with collagen, induces Arp2/3 branched actin polymerisation on the concave side of invadopodia, which generates a pushing force along with collagen cleavage by MT1-MMP to invade.

20d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

de Haas-van Alphen effect of correlated Dirac states in kagome metal Fe3Sn2

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12822-1 The kagome lattice is increasingly known as a host for correlated topological electronic states. Here, Ye et al. report quantum de Haas-van Alphen oscillations of a ferromagnetic kagome material Fe3Sn2, where bulk electronic Dirac fermions are found to be modulated by rotation of the magnetic moment.

20d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

A domino reaction for generating β-aryl aldehydes from alkynes by substrate recognition catalysis

Nature Communications, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12770-w Supramolecular interactions may be responsible for higher degree of efficiency and selectivity in homogeneous catalysis. Here, the authors exploit the concept of supramolecular catalysis to develop a domino rhodium-catalyzed hydroformylation of α-alkynoic acids followed by Michael addition of nucleophiles.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mysterious microproteins have major implications for human disease

As the tools to study biology improve, researchers are beginning to uncover details into microproteins, small components that appear to be key to some cellular processes. The lab of Salk Professor Alan Saghatelian, along with Uri Manor, director of the Waitt Advanced Biophotonics Core Facility, recently showed that the 54-amino acid microprotein PIGBOS contributes to mitigating cell stress.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Daylight not rain most important for Africa 'green-up' phenomenon

Contrary to popular belief, seasonal rains are not the most important factor for starting the growth cycle of plants across Africa.New research shows that the amount of daylight plants receive is the biggest contributing factor to starting the iconic 'green-up' phenomenon in Africa – where the continent's plants and trees grow their leaves.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mountain streams emit a surprising amount of CO2

For the first time, an EPFL-led team of scientists has measured the total amount of CO2 emissions from mountain streams worldwide. This research published in Nature Communications builds on findings issued in February 2019 and shows how important it is to include mountain streams in assessments of the global carbon cycle.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fighting the herpes virus

New insights into preventing herpes infections have been published in Nature Communications. Researchers from the Berlin Institute for Medical Systems Biology (BIMSB) at the MDC used single-cell RNA sequencing to better understand the viral infections.sequencing to better understand the viral infections.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Yale researchers find cells linked to leading cause of blindness in elderly

Researchers from Yale University, the Broad Institute of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Harvard University report in the Oct. 25 issue of the journal Nature Communications that glial cells (or support cells), and vasculature cells tasked with providing blood to the retina as well as cone cells contribute to degeneration of the macula, in the central part of the retina.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hydrogen boride nanosheets: A promising material for hydrogen carrier

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology, University of Tsukuba, and colleagues in Japan report a promising hydrogen carrier in the form of hydrogen boride nanosheets. This two-dimensional material, which has only recently begun to be explored, could go on to be used as safe, light-weight, high-capacity hydrogen storage materials.

20d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Retrospective Analysis of 28 Cases of Tuberculosis in Pregnant Women in China

Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51695-8

20d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Mantle degassing along strike-slip faults in the Southeastern Korean Peninsula

Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51719-3

20d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Computational Analysis of Insulin-Glucagon Signalling Network: Implications of Bistability to Metabolic Homeostasis and Disease states

Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50889-4

20d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Doxycycline reduces osteopenia in female rats

Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51702-y

20d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Doppler ultrasonographic evaluation of brachial and femoral veins, and coagulation and lipid profiles in dogs following open splenectomy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51924-0

20d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Pretreatment diagnosis factors associated with overtreatment with surgery in patients with differentiated-type early gastric cancer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51952-w

20d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Thioredoxin-related transmembrane protein 2 (TMX2) regulates the Ran protein gradient and importin-β-dependent nuclear cargo transport

Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51773-x

20d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Bioprocessing of common pulses changed seed microstructures, and improved dipeptidyl peptidase-IV and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities

Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51547-5

20d

NYT > Science

24K

Scientists Were Hunting for the Next Ebola. Now the U.S. Has Cut Off Their Funding.

Predict, a government research program, sought to identify animal viruses that might infect humans and to head off new pandemics.

20d

NPR

Want To Get Rid Of Your Vaping Device? The DEA Will Take It

Amid growing concerns over e-cigarette health risks, the Drug Enforcement Administration says it will collect vaping devices and cartridges at National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on Saturday. (Image credit: Lane Turner/The Boston Globe/Getty Images)

20d

Science | The Guardian

8K

Glacial rivers absorb carbon faster than rainforests, scientists find

'Total surprise' discovery overturns conventional understanding of rivers In the turbid, frigid waters roaring from the glaciers of Canada's high Arctic, researchers have made a surprising discovery: for decades, the northern rivers secretly pulled carbon dioxide from the atmosphere at a rate faster than the Amazon rainforest. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of

20d

Science | The Guardian

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Climate scientist says Sky News commentators misrepresented his views on drought

Exclusive: Andy Pitman says 'misspoken' statement has been used by Alan Jones, Chris Kenny and Andrew Bolt to dismiss links between climate change and drought A leading Australian climate scientist has said his views have been misrepresented by conservative media commentators, who have used a "misspoken" statement to dismiss the links between climate change and drought. Prof Andy Pitman, director

20d

The Atlantic

5K

Will Anyone Remember 11 Dead Jews?

Eric Lidji is a man who cares deeply about modest ambitions. He has lived in Pittsburgh on and off for 20 years. It is a city perfectly sized to his sensibility, neither very small nor very large—a place known to but mostly ignored by those who do not live there. Lidji, 36, has held many jobs; most recently, in late 2017, he became the director and only permanent staff member of the Rauh Jewish H

20d

Ingeniøren

Murerbaljer, plastsække og urtepotter: I Nordjylland bliver god plast genanvendt til dårlig plast

PLUS. Når aalborggenserne sorterer fryseposer, kødbakker og juiceflasker, bliver kun en meget lille del til nye fødevareemballager. To tredjedele brændes, og resten 'downcycles' til andre plastprodukter.

20d

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Krabbor kan minnas vägen i en labyrint

Under fyra veckors tid fick krabborna träna på labyrinten, som innehöll tre återvändsgränder och krävde fem riktningsbyten. Som belöning i andra änden fanns en mussla. Krabborna blev snabbare och snabbare på att hitta vägen, och dessutom mindes de den när de fick ett "examensprov" efter två veckor utan träning. Då utan belöning, för att vara säkra på att de inte luktade sig fram. Resultaten är vik

20d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Evaluating analgesic efficacy and administration route following craniotomy in mice using the grimace scale

Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50826-5

20d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Identification and Characterization of USP7 Targets in Cancer Cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43448-4

20d

Dagens Medicin

100+

Lægeforeningen: Skandale hvis milliard-effektiviseringer hviler på forkerte tal

Baggrunden for effektiviseringskravene til de nye hospitaler er spinkelt, viser en gennemgang Dagens Medicin har lavet. Er tallene forkerte, så skal kravene laves om, mener Lægeforeningen.

20d

Science News Daily

Google digs into deeper meanings of searches

Google is paying more attention to the small words in your searches. Want to figure out how to park on a hill with no curb? Google now takes that "no" into account, and shows top results that …

20d

Science News Daily

Game changer: New chemical keeps plants plump

A UC Riverside-led team has created a chemical to help plants hold onto water, which could stem the tide of massive annual crop losses from drought and help farmers grow food despite a changing …

20d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

2K

Råttor lärde sig köra små bilar – fick dem att slappna av

Forskare vid University of Richmond i USA lärde en grupp av 17 råttor att köra små plastbilar i utbyte mot matbitar. Studien visade att bilkörningen hjälpte råttor att känna sig mindre stressade.

20d

Phys.org

1K

Game changer: New chemical keeps plants plump

A UC Riverside-led team has created a chemical to help plants hold onto water, which could stem the tide of massive annual crop losses from drought and help farmers grow food despite a changing climate.

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

1K

Game changer: New chemical keeps plants plump

A UC Riverside-led team has created a chemical to help plants hold onto water, which could stem the tide of massive annual crop losses from drought and help farmers grow food despite a changing climate.

20d

Phys.org

From hotbed of crime to joggers' paradise: Nairobi forest thrives

"We would collect dead, dumped bodies. Some were decomposing… others were fresh," said John Chege of his early days policing Nairobi's Karura Forest, back when thieves and murderers outnumbered joggers and dog walkers in the woods.

20d

Phys.org

From death strip to 'Green Belt' of life

Olaf Olejnik served among the guards patrolling the heavily fortified border deterring freedom-seeking East Germans from escaping to the capitalist West three decades ago.

20d

Phys.org

India's firecracker hub hit by anti-pollution drive

With thousands of workers painstakingly handmaking vast volumes of firecrackers, Sivakasi in southern India is usually at full tilt before Diwali. But due to efforts to curb air pollution, the pyrotechnics epicentre is fizzling out.

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

From death strip to 'Green Belt' of life

Olaf Olejnik served among the guards patrolling the heavily fortified border deterring freedom-seeking East Germans from escaping to the capitalist West three decades ago.

20d

New Scientist

200+

Some monkeys reuse their stone tools but others just chuck them away

The monkeys on one Asian island reuse their stone tools many times – but on an island just 9 km away, the monkeys throw their tools away after a few uses

20d

Phys.org

21

Warming waters, local differences in oceanography affect Gulf of Maine lobster population

Two new studies published by University of Maine scientists are putting a long-standing survey of the American lobster's earliest life stages to its most rigorous test yet as an early warning system for trends in New England's iconic fishery. The studies point to the role of a warming ocean and local differences in oceanography in the rise and fall of lobster populations along the coast from south

20d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

21

Warming waters, local differences in oceanography affect Gulf of Maine lobster population

Two new studies published by University of Maine scientists are putting a long-standing survey of the American lobster's earliest life stages to its most rigorous test yet as an early warning system for trends in New England's iconic fishery. The studies point to the role of a warming ocean and local differences in oceanography in the rise and fall of lobster populations along the coast from south

20d

Phys.org

Study shows shoppers reject offers made under time pressure

Giving consumers short time limits on offers means they are less likely to take them up, according to new research.

20d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

ZBTB32 restrains antibody responses to murine cytomegalovirus infections, but not other repetitive challenges

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51860-z

20d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

100+

Resting-state fMRI data of awake dogs (Canis familiaris) via group-level independent component analysis reveal multiple, spatially distributed resting-state networks

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51752-2

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Game changer: New chemical keeps plants plump

A UC Riverside-led team has created a chemical to help plants hold onto water, which could stem the tide of massive annual crop losses from drought and help farmers grow food despite a changing climate.

20d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Advance in search for new Clostridioides difficile vaccine

Scientists have made a breakthrough in the hunt for a new vaccine for killer hospital bug Clostridioides difficile (C. diff).

20d

Phys.org

Political affiliation may help drive and shape a person's morals

Which came first—the personal beliefs or the political party? While it may seem intuitive that a person's beliefs or moral compass may steer them toward one political party over another, a new study suggests it may be the other way around.

20d

Phys.org

41

What's driving tropical deforestation? Scientists map 45 years of satellite images

Tropical forests are under increasing pressure from human activity such as agriculture. However, in order to put effective conservation measures in place, local decision-makers must be able to precisely identify which areas of forest are most vulnerable.

20d

Science | The Guardian

10K

The real reason scientists downplay the risks of climate change | Dale Jamieson, Michael Oppenheimer and Naomi Oreskes

Climate deniers often accuse scientists of exaggerating the threats associated with the climate crisis, but if anything they're often too conservative Although the results of climate research have been consistent for decades, climate scientists have struggled to convey the gravity of the situation to laypeople outside their field. If anything, the wider public only recently seems to have awakened

20d

Science-Based Medicine

65

Shiva Ayyadurai: Antivaxxer for Senate

Did Shiva Ayyadurai invent e-mail? Should he represent the Republican Party? Read below to find out!

20d

Wired

500+

Google Search Now Reads at a Higher Level

The company is incorporating new software that better understands subtleties of language, with the biggest changes for queries outside the US.

20d

Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Kroppens to fedttyper taler vidt forskellige sprog

De fleste voksne mennesker har to typer fedt i kroppen: Brunt og hvidt fedt. Nu har forskere fra Københavns…

20d

Science News Daily

Amazon shares hit by earnings disappointment

Amazon on Thursday reported that quarterly profits shy of Wall Street forecasts, sending shares of the tech giant tumbling in after-market trades.

20d

Dagens Medicin

Tarmkræft-overlevelsen i Danmark har fået et stort løft

Femårsoverlevelsen ved tyktarms- og endetarmskræft har taget et stort hop opad og har næsten bragt Danmark på niveau med de andre skandinaviske lande. Højere komorbiditet, tobak og alkoholforbrug trækker dog fortsat ned, mener formanden for Dansk Colorectal Cancer Gruppe, professor Lene H. Iversen, Aarhus Universitetshospital.

20d

Dagens Medicin

23

Slæk på kravene

Kravet om effektiviseringer til supersygehusene rammer ansatte og patienter lige nu og trænger derfor til et serviceeftersyn. , skriver Nicolai Döllner, chefredaktør på Dagens Medicin.

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