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nyheder2019oktober25

17d

Cosmos Magazine

200+

What's good for people is good for the planet, study confirms

Mega analysis reveals how small dietary changes can benefit health and the environment.

17d

Cosmos Magazine

34

Darker eggs have their purpose

Colour helps with survival in more ways than one.

17d

Cosmos Magazine

Blaming the driver in a 'driverless' car

Study suggests we cut machines some slack when humans are in the loop.

17d

Cosmos Magazine

52

Is this the smallest dwarf planet in the Solar System?

Astronomers have taken a close look at Hygiea's credentials.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Climate engineering: International meeting reveals tensions

At this point, the greatest danger of climate engineering may be how little is known about where countries stand on these potentially planet-altering technologies. Who is moving forward? Who is funding research? And who is being left out of the conversation?

17d

Phys.org

500+

Salt helps proteins move on down the road

With a lot of hard work and a dash of salt, Rice University scientists have taken a step toward simplifying drug manufacture.

17d

Scientific American Content

5K

Don't Fall Prey to Scaremongering about 5G

Activists cite low-quality studies in arguing radio-frequency radiation is dangerous, but the weight of evidence shows no risk — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

Cosmos Magazine

Tracking tau may help fight Alzheimer's

Rapid spread does not mean immediate impact, research suggests.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA finds Arabian sea tropical cyclone Kyarr's heavy rainfall

Tropical Cyclone Kyarr is moving through the central Arabian Sea and NASA provided forecasters with an analysis of rainfall rates occurring in the powerful tropical cyclone.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Enabling autonomous vehicles to see around corners

To improve the safety of autonomous systems, MIT engineers have developed a system that can sense tiny changes in shadows on the ground to determine if there's a moving object coming around the corner.

17d

New on MIT Technology Review

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China's leaders have embraced blockchains (er, minus the decentralized bit)

[no content]

17d

Big Think

1K

Psilocybin 'markedly' boosts feelings of self-transcendence during meditation

During a mindfulness retreat, participants that tried psilocybin reported having a richer cognitive and emotional experience. The effects of psilocybin were prominent even four months after the retreat. The combination of psychedelics and meditation is a field that's ripe for study in therapeutic settings. None In his classic work on psychedelics, The Doors of Perception , Aldous Huxley writes th

17d

The Scientist RSS

56

Zoonotic Disease Research Program Shut Down

The USAID's Predict program, which conducted animal virus surveillance and disease outbreak prevention training, is ending after its 10-year funding run.

17d

Futurity.org

26

Embryo stem cells get marching orders via 'waves'

In order to trigger differentiation, colonies of human embryonic stem cells use dynamic molecular signaling waves that pass from cell to cell, researchers report. Once prompted, the cells begin to organize into the three germ layers—the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm—that ultimately become an embryo . The discovery counters explanations dating back to 1952 research by British mathematician Alan

17d

The Atlantic

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America Has Already Forgotten the Tree of Life Shooting

PITTSBURGH—Last year's shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue was a stone dropping in water, creating concentric circles of grief. At the center were the survivors and the families of victims. Then came the first responders, and the local leaders who handled the overwhelming logistics involved in the aftermath. On and on: members of the Pittsburgh Jewish community. Pittsburghers writ large. Ameri

17d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

NASA Puzzled as InSight Drilling Instrument Pops Back Out of Martian Surface

NASA's InSight lander doesn't get as much attention as the Curiosity rover, but it has been on Mars and making history for almost a year. It's sent back weather reports from the red planet, recorded the ghostly sounds of the Martian wind , and deployed the first-ever seismometer on another planet. It's not all peachy for InSight, though. After finally making some progress with the lander's burrow

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Unearthing history

Samples of rocks found on a Greek island reveal the source of oxidizing fluids feeding ancient volcanos as scientists seek to pinpoint geochemical forces at work millions of years ago, a team of researchers from Boston College, the Sorbonne, the University of South Carolina, and Durham University (UK), report in Nature Geoscience.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Smartphone data can help surgeons understand a patient's recovery

Surgeons report that they can describe the impact of certain postoperative events in their patients by capturing passively collected accelerometer data from a patient's smartphone.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New insights could help block the path of cancer 'super-highways'

A key mechanism controlling tissue structure, which could help identify drugs that make it harder for cancer cells to spread, has been identified by researchers at the Francis Crick Institute.

17d

BBC News – Science & Environment

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Probing the Universe's Dark Energy with a super-telescope

A super telescope has begun the most detailed observation of the Universe ever undertaken.

17d

Wired

500+

Apple AirPods Pro: Price, Details, Release Date

The next version of Apple's white ear-dongles enter a crowded wirefree headphone market on October 30.

17d

Nature

500+

Human origins in a southern African palaeo-wetland and first migrations

Nature, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1714-1 Analyses of mitochondrial genomes from populations in southern Africa provide evidence of a southern African origin of anatomically modern humans and a sustained occupation of the homeland before the first migrations of people appear to be driven by regional climate shifts.

17d

Nature

Seeing mesoatomic distortions in soft-matter crystals of a double-gyroid block copolymer

Nature, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1706-1 Slice-and-view scanning electron microscopy tomography is used to characterize a double-gyroid block copolymer, finding mesoatomic distortions that break the symmetry of these soft-matter crystals across multiple scales.

17d

New Scientist

300+

Quantum supremacy: What can we do with a quantum computer?

Quantum computers could be used to crack open chemistry's most elusive problems or help to create new medicines

17d

New Scientist

300+

Quantum supremacy: Will quantum computers break the internet for good?

Google's claims of quantum supremacy have some people worried that the internet is now broken. Here's what the development actually means for cybersecurity

17d

Phys.org

24

Evacuations as wildfire breaks out in Los Angeles

More than 1,000 firefighters battled a wind-driven blaze Monday that broke out near the renowned Getty Center in Los Angeles, prompting widespread evacuations as the flames destroyed several homes and forced the shutdown of schools and roads.

17d

Wired

500+

Congress Still Doesn't Have an Answer for Ransomware

As data hijackers continue to target local governments and hospitals, legislators remain stymied over how best to address the problem.

17d

Futurity.org

100+

Carbon capture might not be such a great idea

Carbon capture technologies can cause more harm than good, according to new research. Capturing carbon from the air is one proposed method for reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere—and reducing the risk of climate change. "All sorts of scenarios have been developed under the assumption that carbon capture actually reduces substantial amounts of carbon. However, this research find

17d

Futurism

1K

What Was the Air Force's Secret Space Plane Doing in Orbit for 779 Days?

The U.S. Air Force announced Sunday that its top secret X-37B space plane had landed at the Kennedy Space Center, after spending 779 days in space — its longest stint yet. The Air Force remains extremely tight lipped about the purpose of the two-year spaceflight. In a vaguely-worded press release , it said the craft "enables the US to more efficiently and effectively develop space capabilities ne

17d

Phys.org

South Africa urges water restrictions as dam levels drop

South Africa's government urged people to restrict water usage Monday as reservoir levels drop and rainfall is not expected until December.

17d

Phys.org

100+

The frostier the flower, the more potent the cannabis

Cannabis flowers with the most mushroom-shaped hairs pack the biggest cannabinoid and fragrance punch, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.

17d

The Atlantic

100+

'Nesting' During Pregnancy Is a Real Thing

The rug had been in Pruszcz Gdański for more than a month. I'd been checking up on it daily, via the shipping company's website, but nothing was changing. Status: Originating post is preparing to dispatch this mail piece . An insomniac night of online reconnaissance indicated that the rug's situation was a common one, since apparently many items traveling through this particular town in northern

17d

Science News Daily

Google buying Fitbit is good for Google, bad for wearables

If it happens — and that's already a big if — it's not going to be good for consumers, is it? Yesterday, shortly before Alphabet's Q3 earnings call, news hit that …

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

95

The frostier the flower, the more potent the cannabis

Cannabis flowers with the most mushroom-shaped hairs pack the biggest cannabinoid and fragrance punch, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.

17d

New on MIT Technology Review

100+

NASA is sending a rover to the moon to look for water ice

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17d

Phys.org

King tides are a glimpse into future with rising seas. For many, flooding is the new normal

Periodically throughout the year in South Florida, water from the sea invades our coast. It leaks out of bays, climbs over sea walls and docks, and floods out of sewer drains built to contain it.

17d

Phys.org

Theory explains biological reasons that force fish to move poleward

The Gill-Oxygen Limitation Theory, known as GOLT, explains the biological reasons that force fish, particularly larger or older ones, to move poleward when the waters in their habitats heat-up due to climate change.

17d

Phys.org

42

NASA tracking Eastern Atlantic's late season Tropical Storm Pablo

Pablo is a tropical cyclone that formed late on Oct. 25 and strengthened into a hurricane for a short time before weakening again into a tropical storm. NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites provided imagery that covered that fast transition. Pablo's formation was also interesting because it formed within a larger system.

17d

Phys.org

28

Drug overdose treatment for humans can detox turtles poisoned by red tide, study shows

A detox therapy used to treat overdoses in humans may help save endangered sea turtles from red tide poisoning.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Theory explains biological reasons that force fish to move poleward

The Gill-Oxygen Limitation Theory, known as GOLT, explains the biological reasons that force fish, particularly larger or older ones, to move poleward when the waters in their habitats heat-up due to climate change.

17d

Science | The Guardian

4K

US Air Force space plane returns after secret two-year mission

Air force quiet on what plane did in orbit for 780 days Officials say mission completed its objectives A US Air Force space plane has returned to Earthafter a record-breaking secret mission. The X-37B landed at Nasa's Kennedy Space Center in Florida early on Sunday. The Air Force is keeping quiet about what the plane did in orbit for the 780 days after it was launched on a SpaceX rocket in 2017.

17d

Phys.org

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Olga merge with a cold front

Tropical Depression 17 strengthened briefly into a tropical storm on the same day it formed, Oct. 25. NASA's Terra satellite captured a look at the clouds associated with its remnants merging with a cold front over the southern U.S.

17d

Phys.org

100+

Soft double gyroids are unique, but imperfect, crystals

What appears to be an impossibly complicated maze is actually quite simple. Two complicated mazes, intertwined but not touching, tell a different story.

17d

Phys.org

100+

Tiny NASA satellite will soon see 'rainbows' in clouds

NASA's next attempt to map invisible specks in the atmosphere that impact climate change and air quality started from a window seat over the Pacific.

17d

Phys.org

Public blame accidents on drivers more than their automated cars when both make mistakes

The public are more likely to blame accidents involving semi-autonomous cars on driver—rather than machine—error, a new study has found.

17d

Phys.org

100+

Giant neutrino telescope to open window to ultra-high-energy universe

The long-sought, elusive ultra-high-energy neutrinos—ghost-like particles that travel cosmological-scale distances—are key to understanding the Universe at the highest energies. Detecting them is challenging, but the Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection (GRAND), a next-generation neutrino detector is designed to find them.

17d

Phys.org

67

Genetics reveal Pacific subspecies of fin whale

New genetic research has identified fin whales in the northern Pacific Ocean as a separate subspecies, reflecting a revolution in marine mammal taxonomy as scientists unravel the genetics of enormous animals otherwise too large to fit into laboratories.

17d

Phys.org

37

Great Barrier Reef island coral decline

A long-term study of coral cover on island groups of the Great Barrier Reef has found declines of between 40 and 50 percent of live, hard corals at inshore island groups during the past few decades.

17d

The Scientist RSS

Pii to Manufacture FDA-Approved Hormone Therapy Injection Drug Product

Pharmaceutics International, Inc. (Pii), a Contract Development and Manufacturing Organization (CDMO) headquartered in Hunt Valley, Maryland, is pleased to announce the commercial supply of Fulvestrant Injection 250mg/5ml drug product, which was recently approved by the FDA.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

28

Drug overdose treatment for humans can detox turtles poisoned by red tide, study shows

A detox therapy used to treat overdoses in humans may help save endangered sea turtles from red tide poisoning.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

67

Genetics reveal Pacific subspecies of fin whale

New genetic research has identified fin whales in the northern Pacific Ocean as a separate subspecies, reflecting a revolution in marine mammal taxonomy as scientists unravel the genetics of enormous animals otherwise too large to fit into laboratories.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

33

Great Barrier Reef island coral decline

A long-term study of coral cover on island groups of the Great Barrier Reef has found declines of between 40 and 50 percent of live, hard corals at inshore island groups during the past few decades.

17d

Nature

Daily briefing: Why the search for dark matter depends on ancient shipwrecks

Nature, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03300-1 Clue: it's all about the lead. Plus, the clock's stopped on the Venice 'time machine', and some scientific ideas seem immune to criticism.

17d

Phys.org

500+

Topological nanoelectronics

Topological insulators are materials with astonishing properties: Electric current flows only along their surfaces or edges, whereas the interior of the material behaves as an insulator. In 2007, Professor Laurens Molenkamp at Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg in Bavaria, Germany, was the first to experimentally demonstrate the existence of such topological states. His team achieved th

17d

Phys.org

Potential alternative for petroleum polycarbonate containing environmental hormone sources

The Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT) has developed a bio-polycarbonate which has been monopolized by Japan, and has opened up the possibility of bio-polycarbonate commercialization.

17d

The Scientist RSS

Bio-Rad Joins EMBL's Corporate Partnership Programme

Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), a global leader of life science research and clinical diagnostic products, announces that it has joined the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) Corporate Partnership Programme, to help expand EMBL's portfolio of innovative scientific training courses designed for budding young scientists.

17d

Scientific American Blog Posts

80

Mind the Mass Gap

Astronomers are getting closer to figuring out where the dividing line lies between neutron stars and black holes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

Wired

8K

A Secret Space Plane Just Landed After a Record Stay in Orbit

The plane spent 780 continuous days in orbit conducting classified experiments for the US Air Force before autonomously landing itself.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Women surgical residents suffer more mistreatment, burnout, suicidal thoughts

Women surgical residents suffer more mistreatment than men, which leads to a higher burnout rate and more suicidal thoughts among female residents, reports a new study that surveyed trainees in all accredited 260 US general surgical residency programs. But when the study authors adjusted for the occurrence of mistreatment (discrimination, harassment, abuse), the rates of burnout were similar for m

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

24

How Alzheimer's disease spreads through the brain

Tau can quickly spread between neurons but is not immediately harmful, according to research in mouse neurons published in JNeurosci. Intervening during the initial accumulation of tau could potentially halt the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

17d

Science News Daily

Apple debuts AirPods Pro with noise cancelling, higher price

Apple is offering a $250 version of its wireless AirPods Pro earbuds with a new design and noise cancellation feature.

17d

The Atlantic

66

Letter: Menopause Can Be a 'Passage of Liberation'

The Secret Power of Menopause In The Atlantic's October issue, Liza Mundy wrote about why the end of fertility doesn't mark the start of decline—and may even help explain our success as a species. I'm so pleased that The Atlantic published this article to revive the conversation about understanding menopause. My prior writing on the subject, in the book The Silent Passage , was not an expression

17d

Future(s) Studies

3-D-printed device finds 'needle in a haystack' cancer cells by removing the hay

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Electricity Makes Soft Robotics More Like Us Meatbags

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Researchers create blueprint for 'quantum battery' that doesn't lose charge

submitted by /u/duremovich [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Why We Can't Tell the Truth About Aging

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Funding for program which could develop "care robots" for elderly

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Atrium Health surgeons demonstrate use of robots in surgery on jack-o-lantern

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Collaborative Robots Team Up Build Space Stations and Save Lives | Digital Trends

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

US Army Announces plans to use Additive Manufacturing for Faster & Cheaper repairing of Tanks & Equipment – MANUFACTUR3D

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

U.S. Air Force experimental test spaceship lands after a record 780 days in orbit – over two years after it originally launched on its latest mission aboard a SpaceX rocket.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Advances in anti-ageing research: how chemistry could hold the key to better health

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Apple Is Patenting an Autonomous Navigation System That Learns. The Apple nav system would have a route-evaluation module to make a car smarter as it moves down the road.

submitted by /u/warlockx77 [link] [comments]

17d

Futurism

1K

Watch a Massive 3D-Printed Building Take Shape

Record Holder Dubai is now home to the world's largest 3D-printed two-story building. On Wednesday, officials in the city's Warsan neighborhood unveiled the building , which is 9.5 meters (31 feet) tall and has a total area of 640 square meters (6,889 square feet). The structure's concrete walls were constructed in place using a massive 3D printer — and the entire building serves as a testament t

17d

NYT > Science

5K

Is Crispr the Next Antibiotic?

In nature, the gene-editing tool Crispr protects bacteria against viruses. Now it's being harnessed in the fight against superbugs and the flu.

17d

Scientific American Content

5K

Formal U.S. Withdrawal from Paris Climate Agreement Looms

The Trump administration is expected to notify the U.N. on Nov. 4, leaving the pact a year later, after the U.S. election — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

Scientific American Content

81

Mind the Mass Gap

Astronomers are getting closer to figuring out where the dividing line lies between neutron stars and black holes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Extinction of cold-water corals on the Namibian shelf due to low oxygen contents

Researchers have only been aware of the existence of fossil cold-water corals off the coast of Namibia since 2016. But it was not known when and why the cold-water corals in this region became extinct. By dating fossil coral fragments, Leonardo Tamborrino of MARUM — Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen, and his co-authors have determined that this localized extinct

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Teen marijuana use may have next-generation effects

A new study by the University of Washington's Social Development Research Group shows how a parent's use of marijuana, past or present, can influence their child's substance use and well-being.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA tracking Eastern Atlantic's late season Tropical Storm Pablo

Pablo is a tropical cyclone that formed late on Oct. 25 and strengthened into a hurricane for a short time before weakening again into a tropical storm. NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites provided imagery that covered that fast transition. Pablo's formation was also interesting because it formed within a larger system.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Theory explains biological reasons that force fish to move poleward

The Gill-Oxygen Limitation Theory explains the biological reasons that force fish, particularly larger or older ones, to move poleward when the waters in their habitats heat-up due to climate change.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Let there be…a new light

Light is the fastest way to distinguish right- and left-handed chiral molecules, which has important applications in chemistry and biology. However, ordinary light only weakly senses molecular handedness. Researchers from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Israel Institute of Technology (Technion) and Technische Universitaet Berlin have now shown ho

17d

Nature

Elusive cousins of graphene are captured in a golden ribbon

Nature, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03260-6 Researchers manage to make inherently unstable carbon materials that could have quantum applications.

17d

Scientific American News

1K

Lush Okavango Delta Pinpointed as Ancestral Homeland of All Living Humans

Genetic evidence traces our origins to a hunter-gatherer community that lived 200,000 years ago, but the study has generated controversy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

Scientific American Content

1K

Lush Okavango Delta Pinpointed as Ancestral Homeland of All Living Humans

Genetic evidence traces our origins to a hunter-gatherer community that lived 200,000 years ago, but the study has generated controversy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

ScienceAlert – Latest

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Astronomers Just Found What May Be The Smallest Dwarf Planet in The Solar System

Hi, Hygiea!

17d

Scientific American Blog Posts

Meta-Post: Posts on Physics

Cross-check columns on physics, cosmology and related topics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

61

Tungsten suboxide improves the efficiency of platinum in hydrogen production

Researchers presented a new strategy for enhancing catalytic activity using tungsten suboxide as a single-atom catalyst (SAC). This strategy, which significantly improves hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in metal platinum (pt) by 16.3 times, sheds light on the development of new electrochemical catalyst technologies.

17d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

24

Transforming DNA repair errors into assets

A new bioinformatics tool, MHcut reveals that a natural repair system for DNA damage, microhomology-mediated end joining, is probably far more common in humans than originally assumed. Using MHcut and commercial genome-editing technology, the researchers created mutations in iPS cells with extraordinary precision to model diseases without the need of patient samples. The tool is expected to make i

17d

New Scientist

300+

Surprisingly round asteroid may actually be the smallest dwarf planet

The best ever image of the asteroid Hygiea has revealed its shape for the first time and it looks as if it is round enough to be a tiny dwarf planet like Pluto

17d

New Scientist

500+

Have we found the African origin of all humanity? It's complicated

A study claims to have pinpointed the Okavango Delta in Botswana as the origin of humanity, but geneticists and anthropologists say the evidence is deeply flawed

17d

Big Think

90

Can we afford to live longer?

A person reaching 65 today can expect to live into their mid-80s, many into their 90s. A 30-year retirement requires a nest egg of more than $1 million, yet 77 percent of American households fall short of such savings and investments. Experts recommend several strategies for affording a longer life, such as pushing the retirement age back to at least 70. None If you are reading this, you are one

17d

Futurism

2K

Wealthy Californians Are Hiring Private Firefighters

Private Firefighters Money can buy many things — but can it buy you the assurance that your resort-sized beachfront property will be safe during the next wildfire? As wildfires are becoming more frequent and more ferocious than ever thanks to climate change, wealthy Californians — Kim Kardashian and Kanye West included — are choosing to supplement the firefighting services provided to them by loc

17d

Science and technology

4K

Where was Eden? Perhaps in a sun-baked salt plain in Botswana

Mitochondrial Eve, an ancestor of all alive now, dwelt by a vanished lake

17d

BBC News – Science & Environment

99K

Origin of modern humans 'traced to Botswana'

Scientists say the possible homeland of all humans alive today is an area south of the Zambezi River.

17d

Futurism

5K

CGI Video Shows Military Robot Flipping a Table of Guns

Super Soldier The "Bosstown Dynamics" team still hasn't learned how to treat its robots. In June, Los Angeles-based production studio Corridor Digital released a Boston Dynamics parody video in which a robot seeks revenge on its makers after they subject it to over-the-top robustness training. In a new video, the "Bosstown Dynamics" team heads to a desert shooting range for an intense training se

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Soft double gyroids are unique, but imperfect, crystals

Rice University engineers analyze soft double gyroids and find their crystalline forms are not perfect. Gyroids interact with light and sound waves and promise nanoscale materials with novel properties.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Public blame accidents on drivers more than their automated cars when both make mistakes

The public are more likely to blame accidents involving semi-autonomous cars on driver — rather than machine — error, a new study has found.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Improving governance is key for adaptive capacity

Governance in climate vulnerable countries will take decades to improve, substantially impeding the ability of nations to adapt to climate change and affecting billions of people globally, according to new research published in Nature Sustainability.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Topological nanoelectronics

Physicists at the University of Würzburg have made a ground-breaking discovery: They have realized a fundamental nanoelectronic device based on the topological insulator HgTe previously discovered in Würzburg.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Who will get depressed under major stress? Study shows promise of genetic risk prediction

Depression doesn't come from one gene, one life event, or one personality trait. That's what makes it so hard to predict, prevent or treat effectively. But new research suggests the power of a tool that uses a range of genetic information to predict a person's chance of developing depression when they're under intense stress. The findings might help lead to a better understanding of the pathways t

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How much do obesity and addictions overlap?

A large analysis of personality studies has found that people with obesity behave somewhat like people with addictions to alcohol or drugs. But obesity is also a complex condition that cannot be fully explained by the addiction model.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Crystallization clarified, researchers report

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University have made it possible to observe and simulate the self-assembly of crystalline materials at a much higher resolution than before.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

ESO telescope reveals what could be the smallest dwarf planet yet in the solar system

Astronomers using ESO's SPHERE instrument at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) have revealed that the asteroid Hygiea could be classified as a dwarf planet. The object is the fourth largest in the asteroid belt after Ceres, Vesta and Pallas. For the first time, astronomers have observed Hygiea in sufficiently high resolution to study its surface and determine its shape and size. They found that Hygie

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Overcoming weak governance will take decades with implications for climate adaptation

Governance in climate vulnerable countries will take decades to improve, substantially impeding the ability of nations to adapt to climate change and affecting billions of people globally, according to new research involving the University of East Anglia (UEA).

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

33% of people on anticoagulants take OTC supplements with potentially serious interactions

Nearly 98% percent of people prescribed direct-acting oral anticoagulants such as apixaban used over-the-counter products. Of those, 33% took at least one such product that, in combination with the anticoagulants, could cause dangerous internal bleeding. People on these medications largely lacked knowledge of some potentially serious interactions. Direct-acting oral anticoagulants are the drug of

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists identify key knowledge gaps in sustainability research

The loss of biodiversity continues at an alarming rate despite decades of research and international policies setting out clear goals in the area. In an article published this week in Nature Sustainability, an international team of scientists including researchers from McGill identified seven key areas for future research in order to tackle, effectively, the root causes of the problem. They reache

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New synthesis method yields degradable polymers

MIT chemists have come up with a way to make certain drug-delivery polymers more readily degradable by adding a novel type of building block to the polymer backbone.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

HHU-led research consortium wants to eliminate dangerous plant diseases in rice

The 'Healthy Crops' research consortium, headed by Humboldt Professor Wolf B. Frommer from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU), develops tools for combating 'bacterial blight,' one of the most devastating diseases of rice. In the most recent edition of the journal Nature Biotechnology, the team published two studies introducing multi-resistant rice varieties as well as a diagnostic kit to r

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Clear goals but murky path to ecosystem sustainability: Key knowledge gaps identified

International sustainability policies set out clear goals for protecting ecosystems and biodiversity, but how to actually achieve these goals remains elusive in practice, as biodiversity loss continues at an alarming rate. A new study published in the journal Nature Sustainability by an international team of 32 scientists identifies key knowledge gaps that need to be answered to tackle the root ca

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The homeland of modern humans

A landmark study pinpoints the birthplace of modern humans in southern Africa and suggests how past climate shifts drove their first migration.

17d

forskning.se

Bättre batterier för elbilar med nytt nanomaterial

Med hjälp av ett nytt nanomaterial av grafen och kisel har forskare vid Mittuniversitetet utvecklat bättre litium-jon-batterier som ökar lagringskapaciteten med 25 procent. Den nya metoden är skalbar och kan bli särskilt viktig för elbilsbranschen. Batteriforskningen vid Mittuniversitetet har tagit sig an ett problem som gäckat den internationella batteriforskningen under lång tid. Det har länge

17d

The Atlantic

1K

Has Humanity's Homeland Been Found?

Earlier this year, while flying over northern Botswana, Vanessa Hayes looked out over the Makgadikgadi Pans —giant salt flats that stretch for more than 6,000 square miles. They are the remnants of what was once Africa's largest lake. Hayes could see traces of the lake's shoreline from the air. She glimpsed massive fault lines running across its former bed—signs of the tectonic activity that even

17d

ScienceDaily

65

Tungsten suboxide improves the efficiency of platinum in hydrogen production

Researchers presented a new strategy for enhancing catalytic activity using tungsten suboxide as a single-atom catalyst (SAC). This strategy, which significantly improves hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in metal platinum (pt) by 16.3 times, sheds light on the development of new electrochemical catalyst technologies.

17d

ScienceDaily

38

Lenalidomide may delay onset of myeloma-related bone, organ damage

The largest randomized trial in asymptomatic patients with smoldering multiple myeloma suggests that lenalidomide, a cancer drug, may delay the onset of bone and other myeloma-related organ damage.

17d

ScienceDaily

24

Transforming DNA repair errors into assets

A new bioinformatics tool, MHcut reveals that a natural repair system for DNA damage, microhomology-mediated end joining, is probably far more common in humans than originally assumed. Using MHcut and commercial genome-editing technology, the researchers created mutations in iPS cells with extraordinary precision to model diseases without the need of patient samples. The tool is expected to make i

17d

ScienceDaily

24

Mathematics reveals new insights into Marangoni flows

Scientists have discovered new mathematical laws governing the properties of Marangoni flows. The new theory better matches experimental observations of the well-known effect.

17d

ScienceDaily

20

Advanced cancer drug shrinks and intercalates DNA

A new study has found that the drug first forces itself between the strands of the DNA molecule's double helix, prying them apart. It then compacts the structures by partially neutralizing their phosphate backbones.

17d

ScienceDaily

30

Paid leave may widen the mommy gap but increase time with children

Many policymakers and scholars believe offering paid leave to families would be a game changer for US moms and families, leading to increased equity in labor markets and helping eliminate the 'mommy gap' in pay.

17d

ScienceDaily

37

Mutated ferns shed light on ancient mass extinction

At the end of the Triassic around 201 million years ago, three out of four species on Earth disappeared. Up until now, scientists believed the cause of the catastrophe to be the onset of large-scale volcanism resulting in abrupt climate change. Now, an international research team has found a contributing cause: poisoning by mercury emitted by the volcanoes.

17d

Science | The Guardian

11K

Ancestral home of modern humans is in Botswana, study finds

Other scientists raise questions about results, which were based on DNA samples Scientists claim to have traced the ancestral home region of all living humans to a vast wetland that sprawled over much of modern day Botswana and served as an oasis in an otherwise parched expanse of Africa. The swathe of land south of the Zambezi River became a thriving home to Homo sapiens 200,000 years ago, the r

17d

Science | The Guardian

1K

Scientists crack mystery of bird eggs' colour variation

Darker eggs may be at an advantage in colder regions as they are more heat-absorbent Scientists have cracked the mystery of why bird eggs are different colours, with new research suggesting it boils down to temperature. The appearance of bird eggs is rooted in two pigments , one of which is greenish and the other reddish-brown. Different concentrations of these pigments, together with the underly

17d

Livescience.com

13K

Scientists Think They've Found 'Mitochondrial Eve's' First Homeland

Using genetic data from 1,200 modern indigenous Africans, researchers believe they've pinpointed the location of the first permanent human settlement, which thrived 200,000 years ago.

17d

Phys.org

1K

ESO telescope reveals what could be the smallest dwarf planet yet in the solar system

Astronomers using ESO's SPHERE instrument at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) have revealed that the asteroid Hygiea could be classified as a dwarf planet. The object is the fourth largest in the asteroid belt after Ceres, Vesta and Pallas. For the first time, astronomers have observed Hygiea in sufficiently high resolution to study its surface and determine its shape and size. They found that Hygie

17d

Phys.org

500+

New synthesis method yields degradable polymers

MIT chemists have devised a way to synthesize polymers that can break down more readily in the body and in the environment.

17d

Scientific American News

500+

What We Know about the Possible Carcinogen Found in Zantac

The popular heartburn drug may produce potentially unsafe levels of NDMA when its active ingredient breaks down — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Research team wants to eliminate dangerous plant diseases in rice

Rice is the No. 1 staple food for the world's poorest and most undernourished people. More than half of the world's population eats rice every day. In sub-Saharan Africa, rice is the fastest-growing food source, providing more food calories than any other crop. One dangerous threat to food security is the rice disease bacterial blight, caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). T

17d

Science Magazine

3K

Experts question study claiming to pinpoint birthplace of all humans

Our species likely arose in many places around Africa, not just around the Kalahari Desert, critics say

17d

Science Magazine

Some spots on Earth are too hostile for life

Studies of Ethiopian hot spring ponds and Antarctica's deserts identify the limits of life

17d

Livescience.com

1K

The Black Knight Satellite: A Hodgepodge of Alien Conspiracy Theories

Some think it could be an extraterrestrial spacecraft — but is it?

17d

Livescience.com

300+

Most People Don't Actually Feel Euphoric When They Take Opioids, Study Finds

Mounting research suggests that the average person doesn't actually reach a euphoric state after taking opioids.

17d

Futurism

1K

Scientists Detect the Smallest Dwarf Planet in Our Solar System

Moving on Up The asteroid Hygiea just got a promotion. Using European Southern Observatory's SPHERE instrument at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) , astronomers were able to get their most detailed look yet at Hygiea, an object in the asteroid belt. And based on what they saw, they think the asteroid deserves reclassification as a dwarf planet — making it the smallest one yet identified in the enti

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Olga merge with a cold front

Tropical Depression 17 strengthened briefly into a tropical storm on the same day it formed, Oct. 25. NASA's Terra satellite captured a look at the clouds associated with its remnants merging with a cold front over the southern U.S.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study points to another possible correlation between sleep and overall good health

As if you didn't already have enough to worry about to keep you up at night, a new study indicates that poor sleep can negatively affect your gut microbiome, which can, in turn, lead to additional health issues.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Financial incentives plus information decrease patient preference for diagnostic testing

Providing financial incentives to forego testing significantly decreases patient preference for testing, even when accounting for test benefit and risk.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Teaching cars to drive with foresight

Good drivers anticipate dangerous situations and adjust their driving before things get dicey. Researchers at the University of Bonn now also want to teach this skill to self-driving cars. They will present a corresponding algorithm at the International Conference on Computer Vision which is held at Friday, November 1st, in Seoul. They will also present a data set that they used to train and test

17d

Phys.org

Research team wants to eliminate dangerous plant diseases in rice

Rice is the No. 1 staple food for the world's poorest and most undernourished people. More than half of the world's population eats rice every day. In sub-Saharan Africa, rice is the fastest-growing food source, providing more food calories than any other crop. One dangerous threat to food security is the rice disease bacterial blight, caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). T

17d

Phys.org

200+

Crystallization clarified, researchers report

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University have made it possible to observe and simulate the self-assembly of crystalline materials at a much higher resolution than before.

17d

Phys.org

1K

The homeland of modern humans

A study has concluded that the earliest ancestors of anatomically modern humans (Homo sapiens sapiens) emerged in a southern African 'homeland' and thrived there for 70 thousand years.

17d

Phys.org

400+

Overcoming weak governance will take decades with implications for climate adaptation

Governance in climate vulnerable countries will take decades to improve, substantially impeding the ability of nations to adapt to climate change and affecting billions of people globally, according to new research involving the University of East Anglia (UEA).

17d

Phys.org

61

Scientists identify key knowledge gaps in sustainability research

The loss of biodiversity continues at an alarming rate despite decades of research and international policies setting out clear goals in the area. In an article published this week in Nature Sustainability, an international team of scientists including researchers from McGill identified seven key areas for future research in order to tackle, effectively, the root causes of the problem. They reache

17d

Phys.org

57

3-D-printed device finds 'needle in a haystack' cancer cells by removing the hay

Finding a handful of cancer cells hiding among billions of blood cells in a patient sample can be like finding a needle in a haystack. In a new approach enabled by 3-D-printed cell traps, researchers are removing the hay to expose the cancer cells.

17d

Phys.org

300+

How to move against the current? One answer is 'tilt'-illating

Going upstream, and against a current, involves a front-first downward tilt and then moving along a surface, shows new research by a team of scientists, which created "nano-motors" to uncover this effective means of locomotion under such conditions. Its findings and the creation of these tiny motors offer new insights into the nature of movement in fluids and have implications for engineering.

17d

Viden

Ny forskning piller igen ved historien om menneskets oprindelse

DNA-prøver tyder på, at Homo sapiens levede i det sydligste Afrika for allerede 200.000 år siden.

17d

Scientific American Content

1K

What We Know about the Possible Carcinogen Found in Zantac

The popular heartburn drug may produce potentially unsafe levels of NDMA when its active ingredient breaks down — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

The Atlantic

400+

BoJack Horseman and Women Who Try to 'Have It All'

This story contains spoilers for the second episode of BoJack Horseman Season 6 . Even when they're technically anthropomorphized cats, women still can't have it all . Princess Carolyn (voiced by Amy Sedaris), the long-suffering Hollywood agent on Netflix's BoJack Horseman , has learned this repeatedly over the past five seasons. She's navigated wobbly relationships, fertility struggles, and, of

17d

The Atlantic

100+

Porn Infiltrates Suburbia in Mrs. Fletcher

Tom Perrotta's 2017 novel, Mrs. Fletcher , is ostensibly about porn, but it's really about disappointment. Its characters are lonely, frustrated, dispirited fragments of suburban flotsam who keep bobbing up against one another, hoping to connect. Eve Fletcher, the missus of the book's title, is a 46-year-old divorcée whose son, in the opening chapters, leaves for college, abandoning Eve to solita

17d

Futurity.org

Could a universal flu vaccine come from an antibody that protects mice?

Researchers have found an antibody that protects mice against a wide range of lethal influenza viruses, according to a new study. The antibody could serve as a template to aid in the design of a universal flu vaccine that protects against all strains of the virus, and a drug to treat and protect against severe cases of flu, including pandemics.­ "There are many strains of influenza virus that cir

17d

Phys.org

42

UV satellite will open new view on exploding stars and black holes

A new space telescope will open up an unprecedented view of the universe in ultraviolet light. The ULTRASAT satellite will provide fundamental new insights into high-energy phenomena such as supernova explosions, colliding neutron stars and active black holes, all of which can also generate gravitational waves and act as cosmic particle accelerators.

17d

Phys.org

New venture team success requires collective ownership—with boundaries, study says

A sense of collective ownership is crucial to a startup team's success. The energy and enthusiasm that come from working toward a shared vision can be powerful. But how an entrepreneur interacts with a team to build a sense of ownership can make a big difference, according to new research from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin.

17d

Phys.org

100+

Protected: DESI's 5000 eyes open as Kitt Peak Telescope prepares to map space and time

A new instrument on the 4-m Mayall telescope has opened its array of thousands of fiber-optic "eyes" to the cosmos and successfully captured the light from distant galaxies. The milestone marks the beginning of final testing for the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), which is poised to begin creating the most detailed map of the Universe ever undertaken. The Mayall telescope is located a

17d

ScienceDaily

41

An overlooked piece of the solar dynamo puzzle

A previously unobserved mechanism is at work in the Sun's rotating plasma: a magnetic instability, which scientists had thought was physically impossible under these conditions. The effect might even play a crucial role in the formation of the Sun's magnetic field, say researchers.

17d

ScienceDaily

'Protein-scaffolding' for repairing DNA damage

Researchers have discovered how some types of proteins stabilize damaged DNA and thereby preserve DNA function and integrity. This new finding also explains why people with inborn or acquired defects in certain proteins cannot keep their DNA stable and develop diseases such as cancer.

17d

Ingeniøren

Vindmøller til havs får lagt fundamentet ned

PLUS. To møller på en platform, der ikke stikker ret dybt, er et nyt forsøg på flydende havvindmøller.

17d

Phys.org

An amazingly simple recipe for nanometer-sized corundum

Almost everyone uses nanometer-sized alumina these days—this mineral, among others, constitutes the skeleton of modern catalytic converters in cars. Until now, the practical production of nanocorundum with a sufficiently high porosity has not been possible. The situation has changed radically with the presentation of a new method of nanocorundum production, developed as part of a German-Polish coo

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

High rates of dementia, Alzheimer's observed among older people with Down syndrome

A study of Wisconsin Medicaid enrollees with Down syndrome has found that more than half of those ages 55 and older have filed at least three claims for dementia and nearly a third have filed at least three claims for Alzheimer's disease. The analysis was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lack of free time is not a barrier to Americans getting more exercise

There is a general perception among the public and even public health professionals that a lack of leisure time is a major reason that Americans do not get enough physical activity. A new study finds that Americans average more than 5 hours of free time each day, but the most common use of that time is looking at screens.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How to move against the current? One answer is 'tilt'-illating

Going upstream, and against a current, involves a front-first downward tilt and then moving along a surface, shows new research by a team of scientists, which created 'nano-motors' to uncover this effective means of locomotion under such conditions.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds inflammatory protein can protect against spread of herpes virus

UA College of Medicine – Phoenix researchers discover protein function that can improve current therapeutics.

17d

NYT > Science

500+

Meet the Bloodsuckers

Vampires get all the attention at this time of year, but bloodthirsty leeches, insects and birds are just as compelling — and they're real.

17d

Phys.org

23

Study tracks evolutionary history of metabolic networks

By analyzing how metabolic enzymes are built and organized, researchers have reconstructed the evolutionary history of metabolism. Their study shows how metabolic networks—which drive every cellular process from protein building to DNA repair—became less random, more modular and more hierarchical over time, the researchers say.

17d

Phys.org

Paid leave may widen the 'mommy gap' but increase time with children

Many policymakers and scholars believe offering paid leave to families would be a game changer for U.S. moms and families, leading to increased equity in labor markets and helping eliminate the "mommy gap" in pay.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Study tracks evolutionary history of metabolic networks

By analyzing how metabolic enzymes are built and organized, researchers have reconstructed the evolutionary history of metabolism. Their study shows how metabolic networks—which drive every cellular process from protein building to DNA repair—became less random, more modular and more hierarchical over time, the researchers say.

17d

NYT > Science

100+

Searching for a Rectangular Sun Above the Arctic Circle

As polar winter sets in during an expedition on a research vessel, a reporter hopes she'll catch a glimpse of a brilliant mirage.

17d

Nature

44

Podcast Extra: Detecting gravitational waves

Nature, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03104-3 As part of Nature's 150th anniversary celebrations, we look back at an important moment in the history of science.

17d

Phys.org

55

An overlooked piece of the solar dynamo puzzle

A previously unobserved mechanism is at work in the Sun's rotating plasma: a magnetic instability, which scientists had thought was physically impossible under these conditions. The effect might even play a crucial role in the formation of the Sun's magnetic field, say researchers from Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), the University of Leeds and the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics P

17d

Phys.org

Signaling waves determine embryonic fates

Timing is everything for young cells waiting to determine their identities.

17d

Phys.org

1K

Hubble captures cosmic face

In celebration of Halloween, this new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captures two galaxies of equal size in a collision that appears to resemble a ghostly face. This observation was made on 19 June 2019 in visible light by the telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys.

17d

Phys.org

Yersinia: A novel genomic tool for identifying strains

The Yersinia genus covers a vast range of bacteria that are distinguished by criteria such as whether or not they are able to cause disease (their pathogenicity). For instance, Yersinia pestis causes plague, while the bacteria Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are responsible for bowel diseases. Researchers at the Institut Pasteur have developed a new genomic analysis method

17d

Futurity.org

American culture may explain opioid use among immigrants

The longer immigrants live in the United States, the more likely they are to use prescription opioids, according to new research. The finding contradicts popular views linking wealth and health, and suggests that American culture is uniquely favorable toward prescribing opioids. In an adjusted analysis, researchers found that immigrants who lived in the US between five and 15 years were more than

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Signaling waves determine embryonic fates

Timing is everything for young cells waiting to determine their identities.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Yersinia: A novel genomic tool for identifying strains

The Yersinia genus covers a vast range of bacteria that are distinguished by criteria such as whether or not they are able to cause disease (their pathogenicity). For instance, Yersinia pestis causes plague, while the bacteria Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are responsible for bowel diseases. Researchers at the Institut Pasteur have developed a new genomic analysis method

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists are developing a way to counter ulcerative colitis

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a long-term condition that results in inflammation and ulcers of the colon and rectum. The research is aimed at finding a cure.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New diagnostic method to determine liver cancer consistency

Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have developed a new diagnostic technique which enables the grading of tumor consistency using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The researchers used an imaging technique known as tomoelastography to visualize the mechanical properties of liver tumors. Results from this research have been published in Cancer Research*.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study tracks evolutionary history of metabolic networks

By analyzing how metabolic enzymes are built and organized, researchers have reconstructed the evolutionary history of metabolism. Their study shows how metabolic networks – which drive every cellular process from protein building to DNA repair – became less random, more modular and more hierarchical over time, the researchers say.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

In Wisconsin, 3 in 5 people with Down syndrome diagnosed with dementia by age 55

A new study of 3,000 people in Wisconsin aged 21 and older with Down syndrome, published today [Monday, Oct. 28, 2019] in JAMA Neurology by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, shows that by age 55, three in five will be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or a similar neurodegenerative condition. Meanwhile, people without Down syndrome are rarely diagnosed with dementia before age 6

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New findings could improve diagnosis, treatment of depression

UC Berkeley researchers investigating three symptoms of depression in chronically stressed mice have found a specific brain region associated with one of these symptoms – lack of motivation – and with no other symptoms. In this region, the lateral habenula, the scientists found upregulated genes and brain circuits associated with the symptom. The finding could eventually lead to diagnosis of speci

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Workplace sales ban on sugared drinks shows positive health effects

A workplace ban on the sale of sugar-sweetened beverages led to a 48.5% average reduction in their consumption and significantly less belly fat among 202 participants in a study by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Medicare fraud and abuse linked to patient deaths and hospitalizations

Patients treated by health care professionals later excluded from the Medicare program for committing fraud and abuse were between 14 to 17 percent more likely to die than similar patients treated by non-excluded physicians, nurses, and other professionals, according to a new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

In the wake of mass shootings, a reluctance to talk about gun safety

At a time when discussions about access to firearms and gun safety are paramount, trusted professionals find it difficult to have those conversations. A new study shows that in the months immediately following mass shootings, doctors are less likely to ask routine questions about gun safety in the home.

17d

ScienceDaily

500+

One avocado a day helps lower 'bad' cholesterol for heart healthy benefits

New research suggests that eating one avocado a day may help keep 'bad cholesterol' at bay. According to the researchers, bad cholesterol can refer to both oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and small, dense LDL particles.

17d

Science News Daily

Samsung's 'Space Selfie' Satellite Plummets From Sky Onto Michigan Horse Farm

A satellite that Samsung used for a PR stunt in which it sent a selfie of model and actor Cara Delevingne into space has crash-landed on a farm in Gratiot County, Michigan. Read more…

17d

Scientific American Blog Posts

2K

Are You a Moral Grandstander?

New research suggests that moral grandstanding may be a major source of conflict in the world today — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

Science | The Guardian

1K

Doctors call on workplaces to ban sale of sugary drinks

Research at University of California shows a ban slashed staff's intake by nearly half Doctors have called on workplaces to ban sales of sugary drinks after research showed that removing them from cafes, canteens and vending machines helped reduce people's waistlines and improve their health. Researchers monitored more than 200 staff at the University of California in San Francisco and its associ

17d

ScienceDaily

Giving valleytronics a boost

Physicists have revealed a new quantum process in valleytronics that can speed up the development of this fairly new technology.

17d

ScienceDaily

200+

Dolphins demonstrate coordinated cooperation

Researchers investigated the cooperative abilities of dolphins. Utilizing a simplified Hirata Task, the team found that dolphins coordinated their behavior to work together on a shared task. Specifically, the 'initiator' would wait on their partner and the 'follower' would coordinate their swimming speed to match the initiator's behavior.

17d

BBC News – Science & Environment

2K

Telescope tracks 35 million galaxies in Dark Energy hunt

The most detailed survey of the cosmos aims to shed light on the mysteries of its creation.

17d

BBC News – Science & Environment

2K

Seven Worlds, One Planet: 'Gorgeous' nature series gets five-star reviews

Critics call Sir David Attenborough's new nature series "breathtaking" and "visually magnificent".

17d

Quanta Magazine

500+

The Most-Magnetic Objects in the Universe Attract New Controversy

Magnetars have long been an astrophysical mystery. These compact hunks of nuclear matter — the ultradense remnants of supermassive stars — generate the most extreme magnetic fields in the universe. Researchers have debated exactly how these magnetic fields come about. But a new study of the explosions that gave rise to magnetars suggests that a long-favored theory might not hold up. The idea of a

17d

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

1K

How to bring affordable, sustainable electricity to Africa | Rose M. Mutiso

Energy poverty, or the lack of access to electricity and other basic energy services, affects nearly two-thirds of Sub-Saharan Africa. As the region's population continues to increase, so will the need to build a new energy system to grow with it, says Rose M. Mutiso. In a bold talk, she discusses how a balanced mix of solutions like solar, wind farms, geothermal power and modern grids could creat

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Signaling waves determine embryonic fates

Embryonic stem cells begin to self-organize when they sense interacting waves of molecular signals that help them start — and stop — differentiating into patterns. These patterns ultimately guide cells as they become skin, bone, nerve, organs and blood.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

51

Hubble captures cosmic face

In celebration of Halloween, this new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captures two galaxies of equal size in a collision that appears to resemble a ghostly face. This observation was made on 19 June 2019 in visible light by the telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys.

17d

Phys.org

New research may contribute to a better diagnosis of cancer

A team of researchers from the Institute of Materials Science at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania together with colleagues from Japan and Latvia came up with a method that forces over 300 million metal nanoparticles to self-assemble into regular structures, which enhance their interaction with light by orders of magnitude. This work might be beneficial in developing ultra-small las

17d

Phys.org

47

Researchers find 'protein-scaffolding' for repairing DNA damage

At the University of Copenhagen, researchers have discovered how some types of proteins stabilize damaged DNA and thereby preserve DNA function and integrity. This new finding also explains why people with inborn or acquired defects in certain proteins cannot keep their DNA stable and develop diseases such as cancer.

17d

forskning.se

24

Växelvist boende funkar bra när barnen har en nära relation till båda föräldrarna

Att bo växelvis hos separerade föräldrar fungerar som bäst när barnet har inflytande över sin boendeform – och har goda och nära relationer med båda föräldrarna. Det visar Rakel Berman, Göteborgs universitet, som undersökt hur barn och unga upplever sin familjemodell. – Många av barnen som deltog i studien hade en stark längtan att dela vardagslivet med båda föräldrarna – men bara om de hade en n

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

43

Researchers find 'protein-scaffolding' for repairing DNA damage

At the University of Copenhagen, researchers have discovered how some types of proteins stabilize damaged DNA and thereby preserve DNA function and integrity. This new finding also explains why people with inborn or acquired defects in certain proteins cannot keep their DNA stable and develop diseases such as cancer.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

35

Make fungi think they're starving to stop them having sex, say scientists

Tricking fungi into thinking they're starving could be the key to slowing down our evolutionary arms race with fungal pathogens, as hungry fungi don't want to have sex.

17d

Phys.org

43

Make fungi think they're starving to stop them having sex, say scientists

Tricking fungi into thinking they're starving could be the key to slowing down our evolutionary arms race with fungal pathogens, as hungry fungi don't want to have sex.

17d

Phys.org

Lend me a flipper: Dolphins and cooperation

Cooperation is one of the most important abilities for any social species. From hunting, breeding, and child rearing, it has allowed many animals—including humans—to survive and thrive. As we better understand the details on how animals work together, researchers have been focusing on the degree of cooperation and the cognitive abilities required for such activity.

17d

Science News Daily

Apple warns iPhone 5 users to update iOS or risk not having a working phone – CNET

A GPS quirk requires an iOS update by Nov. 3 to keep the device online.

17d

Science News Daily

The all-electric Mini Cooper SE will start at $29,900

BMW has revealed the all-electric Mini Cooper SE will start at $29,900, less than the $35,000 estimate the automaker gave when it unveiled the vehicle in July. The car, which is the …

17d

Science News Daily

Development of mass production equipment for thin magnetic ribbon, minimizing energy-loss

JST announces that enterprise-led development of production equipment for ultra-low loss nano crystal ribbon, supported through the NexTEP-B type phase of the agency's "Adaptable and Seamless …

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Lend me a flipper: Dolphins and cooperation

Cooperation is one of the most important abilities for any social species. From hunting, breeding, and child rearing, it has allowed many animals—including humans—to survive and thrive. As we better understand the details on how animals work together, researchers have been focusing on the degree of cooperation and the cognitive abilities required for such activity.

17d

Futurism

500+

Watch a Surgery Robot Operate on a Jack-o'-Lantern

Carving Pumpkins Halloween came early at Atrium Health, a hospital in North Carolina. A team of surgeons from Charlotte, North Carolina have demonstrated new robotic surgeon technology by carving a jack-o'-lantern, according to local news station WBTV . The team treated the seeds inside the pumpkin as tumors and carefully excised them one by one. The robot surgeon wasn't de-seeding the pumpkin au

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study underscores changes in brain structure, function in long-duration space missions

New study demonstrates for the first time that changes in cognitive performance correlate with changes in brain structure in NASA astronauts following spaceflight.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lenalidomide may delay onset of myeloma-related bone, organ damage

The largest randomized trial in asymptomatic patients with smoldering multiple myeloma suggests that lenalidomide, a cancer drug, may delay the onset of bone and other myeloma-related organ damage. Results of the study, which was conducted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group and funded by the National Cancer Institute, were published Friday, Oct. 25, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Looking at the way we walk can help predict cognitive decline

The way people walk is an indicator of how much their brains, as well as their bodies, are aging. Scientists reporting in a special supplement to the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (JAD) say that gait disorders, particularly slowing gait, should be considered a marker of future cognitive decline. They propose testing motor performance as well as cognitive performance in older adults with mild cogn

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

An amazingly simple recipe for nanometer-sized corundum

Almost everyone uses nanometer-sized alumina these days — this mineral, among others, constitutes the skeleton of modern catalytic converters in cars. Until now, the practical production of nanocorundum with a sufficiently high porosity has not been possible. The situation has changed radically with the presentation of a new method of nanocorundum production, developed as part of a German-Polish

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tungsten suboxide improves the efficiency of platinum in hydrogen production

Researchers presented a new strategy for enhancing catalytic activity using tungsten suboxide as a single-atom catalyst (SAC). This strategy, which significantly improves hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in metal platinum (pt) by 16.3 times, sheds light on the development of new electrochemical catalyst technologies.

17d

Science | The Guardian

200+

Virgin Galactic launches (on the New York stock exchange)

Public investors can now buy shares in Sir Richard Branson's space tourism venture Virgin Galactic has become the first publicly traded space tourism company as Sir Richard Branson's venture prepares to take its first paying customers beyond the confines of the planet. Investors can buy shares under the stock market ticker symbol "SPCE" in the company, which is betting enough wealthy tourists wil

17d

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Ekonomiska klyftor som slutat växa?

Man hör ofta påståenden om att de ekonomiska klyftorna i världen ökar. Men stämmer det verkligen? Nya data utmanar den sedvanliga bilden. Världsbanken rapporterade nyligen att klyftorna istället minskar, enligt de senaste siffrorna. Data från åren mellan 2008 och 2013 visar att den globala ojämlikheten minskade för första gången sedan den industriella revolutionen inleddes för över 200 år sedan.

17d

Futurity.org

100+

Why people with cancer go to the emergency room

Cancer patients most often head to the emergency department for pain, nausea, and shortness of breath, research finds. There are an estimated 15 million people in the United States with active cancer. "We are seeing patients with active cancer every single day in our emergency department and most cancer centers with attached emergency departments are experiencing the exact same thing," says David

17d

Phys.org

Transforming DNA repair errors into assets

A new bioinformatics tool, MHcut, developed by researchers in Kyoto, Japan, and Montreal, Canada, reveals that a natural repair system for DNA damage, microhomology-mediated end joining, is probably far more common in humans than originally assumed. Using MHcut and commercial genome-editing technology, the researchers created mutations in iPS cells with extraordinary precision to model diseases wi

17d

Phys.org

31

Advanced cancer drug shrinks and intercalates DNA

Because of the harmful side-effects of chemotherapy, and the increasing resistance to drugs found in many cancer cells, it is critical for researchers to continually search for new ways to update current cancer treatments. Recently, a drug named Pixantrone (PIX) was developed, which is far less damaging to the heart than previous, less advanced compounds. PIX is now used to treat cancers including

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New research finding gives valleytronics a boost

An international research team led by physicists at the University of California, Riverside, has revealed a new quantum process in valleytronics that can speed up the development of this fairly new technology.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Paid leave may widen the mommy gap but increase time with children

Many policymakers and scholars believe offering paid leave to families would be a game changer for US moms and families, leading to increased equity in labor markets and helping eliminate the 'mommy gap' in pay.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

54

Mutated ferns shed light on ancient mass extinction

At the end of the Triassic around 201 million years ago, three out of four species on Earth disappeared. Up until now, scientists believed the cause of the catastrophe to be the onset of large-scale volcanism resulting in abrupt climate change. Now, an international research team has found a contributing cause: poisoning by mercury emitted by the volcanoes.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

One avocado a day helps lower 'bad' cholesterol for heart healthy benefits

New research from Penn State suggests that eating one avocado a day may help keep 'bad cholesterol' at bay. According to the researchers, bad cholesterol can refer to both oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and small, dense LDL particles.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Newly created magnets are cheaper, more effective and 'smarter'

Ferromagnets, or more precisely, magnets — are extremely demanded materials in modern electronics. The magnets present in almost every device — TVs, computers, fridges, cars, smartphones, etc.But it is necessary to remember, that ferromagnetic alloys are made of rare-earth elements (REE) that is way an effective and high-powered magnet is an expensive thing.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

An overlooked piece of the solar dynamo puzzle

A previously unobserved mechanism is at work in the Sun's rotating plasma: a magnetic instability, which scientists had thought was physically impossible under these conditions. The effect might even play a crucial role in the formation of the Sun's magnetic field, say researchers from Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), the University of Leeds and the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics P

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Psychiatric diagnoses 'neither necessary nor sufficient' for access to NHS care in UK

A new study, published in the Journal of Mental Health, finds psychiatric diagnoses are seldom used as entry criteria for NHS mental health services in the UK.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Yersinia — a novel genomic tool for identifying strains

The Yersinia genus covers a vast range of bacteria that are distinguished by criteria such as whether or not they are able to cause disease (their pathogenicity). For instance, Yersinia pestis causes plague, while the bacteria Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are responsible for bowel diseases. Researchers at the Institut Pasteur have developed a new genomic analysis method

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lend me a flipper

Researchers at Kyoto University's Primate Research Institute, Kindai University, and Kagoshima City Aquarium investigated the cooperative abilities of dolphins. Utilizing a simplified Hirata Task, the team found that dolphins coordinated their behavior to work together on a shared task. Specifically, the 'initiator' would wait on their partner and the 'follower' would coordinate their swimming spe

17d

forskning.se

Höftproteser ökar inte risken för cancer

Det tycks inte finnas någon generell ökad risk för cancer efter proteskirurgi. Det har forskare vid Uppsala universitet kommit fram till efter en genomgång av flera rikstäckande register där de undersökte samband mellan cancer och höftproteser. Kan man få cancer av en höftprotes? Frågan är faktiskt inte gripen ur luften, eftersom höftproteser innehåller både metalljoner och andra kemiska ämnen so

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Transforming DNA repair errors into assets

A new bioinformatics tool, MHcut, developed by researchers in Kyoto, Japan, and Montreal, Canada, reveals that a natural repair system for DNA damage, microhomology-mediated end joining, is probably far more common in humans than originally assumed. Using MHcut and commercial genome-editing technology, the researchers created mutations in iPS cells with extraordinary precision to model diseases wi

17d

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

Advanced cancer drug shrinks and intercalates DNA

Because of the harmful side-effects of chemotherapy, and the increasing resistance to drugs found in many cancer cells, it is critical for researchers to continually search for new ways to update current cancer treatments. Recently, a drug named Pixantrone (PIX) was developed, which is far less damaging to the heart than previous, less advanced compounds. PIX is now used to treat cancers including

17d

Wired

200+

Disney\+ Is Getting a Puppet Talk Show

*Earth to Ned*, a collaboration with Jim Henson Co., will launch in 2020.

17d

Science News Daily

Energy companies turn to animal poo for clean power

In the search for clean electricity, power companies in Finland are going green by way of brown, and have set their sights on a previously untapped energy source: animal dung.

17d

Phys.org

Mathematics reveals new insights into Marangoni flows

The Marangoni effect is a popular physics experiment. It is produced when an interface between water and air is heated in just one spot. Since this heat will radiate outwards, a temperature gradient is produced on the surface, causing the fluid to move through the radiation process of convection. When un-dissolvable impurities are introduced to this surface, they are immediately swept to the side

17d

Phys.org

Development of mass production equipment for thin magnetic ribbon, minimizing energy-loss

JST announces that enterprise-led development of production equipment for ultra-low loss nano crystal ribbon, supported through the NexTEP-B type phase of the agency's "Adaptable and Seamless Technology Transfer Program through Target-driven R&D" (A-STEP) program, has succeeded in its goal of creating mass production equipment. This equipment should allow for the mass production of 250 mm-width na

17d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

33

3D-printed device finds 'needle in a haystack' cancer cells by removing the hay

Finding a handful of cancer cells hiding among billions of blood cells in a patient sample can be like finding a needle in a haystack. In a new approach enabled by 3D-printed cell traps, researchers are removing the hay to expose the cancer cells.

17d

Phys.org

90

Video: Gaia astronomical revolution

Launched in December 2013, the Gaia mission is revolutionizing our understanding of the Milky Way. The space telescope is mapping our galaxy in unprecedented detail—measuring the position, movement and distance of stars.

17d

Phys.org

500+

Researchers transmit energy with laser in 'historic' power-beaming demonstration

It was the second day of a three-day-long tech demonstration at the David Taylor Model Basin at the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Bethesda, Maryland, where attendees had gathered to stand around in the dark to look at something they mostly couldn't see.

17d

ScienceDaily

24

Training for Title IX investigators lacks tested, effective techniques

Interviews are the central component of any Title IX investigation, but new research finds the techniques investigators are using may not be the most effective. Researchers evaluated the available training programs for investigators and identified techniques and suggested practices at odds with science-based interviewing strategies.

17d

ScienceDaily

New venture team success requires collective ownership — with boundaries, study says

A sense of collective ownership is crucial to a startup team's success. The energy and enthusiasm that come from working toward a shared vision can be powerful. But how an entrepreneur interacts with a team to build a sense of ownership can make a big difference, according to new research.

17d

ScienceDaily

35

3D-printed device finds 'needle in a haystack' cancer cells by removing the hay

Finding a handful of cancer cells hiding among billions of blood cells in a patient sample can be like finding a needle in a haystack. In a new approach enabled by 3D-printed cell traps, researchers are removing the hay to expose the cancer cells.

17d

Futurity.org

50

Privacy and security threats lurk in these everyday choices

Individuals and businesses unknowingly expose themselves to security and privacy threats, as experts explain here. "We can opt out of providing our information to content, app, and social media providers." Ari Trachtenberg , Gianluca Stringhini , and Ran Canetti of Boston University offer some best-practices for protecting yourself and those around you: The post appeared first on Futurity .

17d

Phys.org

81

Image: A ghost in the Pleiades

This ghostly image shows what can happen when an interstellar cloud passes too close to a star. Barnard's Merope Nebula, also known as IC 349, is a cloud of interstellar gas and dust traveling through the Pleiades star cluster at a relative speed of 11 kilometers per second. It is passing close to the star Merope, located 0.06 light years away from the cloud, which is equivalent to about 3,500 tim

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Make fungi think they're starving to stop them having sex, say scientists

Tricking fungi into thinking they're starving could be the key to slowing down our evolutionary arms race with fungal pathogens, as hungry fungi don't want to have sex.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

36

Transforming DNA repair errors into assets

A new bioinformatics tool, MHcut reveals that a natural repair system for DNA damage, microhomology-mediated end joining, is probably far more common in humans than originally assumed. Using MHcut and commercial genome-editing technology, the researchers created mutations in iPS cells with extraordinary precision to model diseases without the need of patient samples. The tool is expected to make i

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Advanced cancer drug shrinks and intercalates DNA

A new study published in EPJ E has found that the drug first forces itself between the strands of the DNA molecule's double helix, prising them apart. It then compacts the structures by partially neutralising their phosphate backbones.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers find 'protein-scaffolding' for repairing DNA damage

At the University of Copenhagen, researchers have discovered how some types of proteins stabilize damaged DNA and thereby preserve DNA function and integrity. This new finding also explains why people with inborn or acquired defects in certain proteins cannot keep their DNA stable and develop diseases such as cancer.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

DNA is like everything else: it's not what you have, but how you use it

A new paradigm for reading out genetic information in DNA is described by Dr. Alan Herbert from InsideOutBio in a paper published online on October 25th, 2019 in Trends in Genetics based on flipons. Flipons are a dynamic way for a cell to change how it uses the information stored in its genome.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mathematics reveals new insights into Marangoni flows

In a new study published in EPJ E, Thomas Bickel at the University of Bordeaux has discovered new mathematical laws governing the properties of Marangoni flows. The new theory better matches experimental observations of the well-known effect.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Argonaute proteins help fine-tune gene expression

A protein, with a name reminiscent of legendary Greek sailors, has an unexpected role inside the human nucleus.

17d

Singularity Hub

400+

New Tech Is Helping Nuclear Power Make a Comeback

Nuclear power has a lot going for it. It's carbon-free, can produce huge amounts of power from relatively small amounts of fuel, and once plants are built, they're cheap to run. But containing the powerful nuclear processes at its heart is incredibly complex, which means building plants is expensive and catastrophic failure is always a possibility. That's not to mention the highly radioactive was

17d

The Atlantic

400+

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi's Ugly Legacy

In the Syrian rebel's telling, he'd encountered Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi without even realizing it. It was early in Syria's civil war, he explained, before the Islamic State surged to global notoriety. The jihadist group was then still in a tenuous partnership with rebel groups such as his in an insurgency against the Bashar al-Assad regime. During occasional meetings with ISIS leaders, the rebel sai

17d

The Atlantic

200+

Silicon Valley Questions the Morality of Success

This article contains spoilers through Season 6 Episode 1 of Silicon Valley. Throughout most of Silicon Valley 's run, Richard Hendricks (played by Thomas Middleditch) and his band of programmers endured a seemingly never-ending series of compromises and close calls to make their start-up, Pied Piper, succeed—until last season's finale, when Richard finally gained control of his own company. As t

17d

Phys.org

28

A multimodal novel lensless microscopy technology for medical applications

Today's state-of-the-art analysis of biological samples by light microscopy includes a vast variety of techniques ranging from conventional bright field microscopy and phase contrast microscopy to high resolution confocal laser scanning microscopy and to recently developed super resolution microscopy techniques like stimulated emission depletion (STED) or stochastic optical reconstruction microsco

17d

Futurity.org

23

Solar power tech improves light-up probes for cancer cells

A new way to detect and attack cancer cells uses technology traditionally reserved for solar power. The results showcase dramatic improvements in light-activated fluorescent dyes for disease diagnosis, image-guided surgery, and site-specific tumor treatment. "We've tested this concept in breast, lung cancer, and skin cancer cell lines and mouse models, and so far it's all looking remarkably promi

17d

ScienceDaily

50

Attacking metastatic breast cancer with sound

Drugs can be safely delivered to cancerous lymph nodes via the lymphatic system and then released inside the nodes using sound waves. Researchers tested the treatment on mice with metastatic breast cancer.

17d

ScienceDaily

40

Genetics reveal pacific subspecies of fin whale

New genetic research has identified fin whales in the northern Pacific Ocean as a separate subspecies, reflecting a revolution in marine mammal taxonomy as scientists unravel the genetics of enormous animals otherwise too large to fit into laboratories.

17d

ScienceDaily

100+

The frostier the flower, the more potent the cannabis

Cannabis flowers with the most mushroom-shaped hairs pack the biggest cannabinoid and fragrance punch, according to new research.

17d

Science News Daily

Xbox All Access lets players upgrade to Project Scarlett – CNET

It's like the iPhone Upgrade Program but for the Xbox.

17d

Science News Daily

DJI Mavic Mini Gets Official With 30-Minute Flight Time And $399 Price Tag

Earlier this week, many details (including images) of DJI's new Mavic Mini drone leaked onto the internet. Today, however, DJI has officially introduced the newest member to its growing family. In …

17d

Science News Daily

Supercomputer analyzes web traffic across entire internet

Using a supercomputing system, MIT researchers have developed a model that captures what web traffic looks like around the world on a given day, which can be used as a measurement tool for internet …

17d

Phys.org

From 'cavewalking' to spacewalking

It might not be obvious, but there are many similarities between working deep underground and in outer space.

17d

Phys.org

28

How to rig an election: Twitter's problem with political saboteurs

A new study from researchers at The University of Manchester investigates the sophisticated network of agents on Twitter who work to distribute fake news during election campaigns.

17d

Phys.org

500+

New research finding gives valleytronics a boost

An international research team led by physicists at the University of California, Riverside, has revealed a new quantum process in valleytronics that can speed up the development of this fairly new technology.

17d

Phys.org

Tungsten suboxide improves the efficiency of platinum in hydrogen production

Researchers presented a new strategy for enhancing catalytic activity using tungsten suboxide as a single-atom catalyst (SAC). This strategy, which significantly improves hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in metal platinum (pt) by 16.3 times, sheds light on the development of new electrochemical catalyst technologies.

17d

Futurity.org

20

Disease won't follow most positive TB tests

A new analysis challenges the longstanding notion that tuberculous infection is a life-long condition that could strike at any time and cause TB. Based on a review of clinical studies, researchers show that people who test positive with immunologic tuberculosis skin or blood tests rarely develop the disease. That's because people's immune systems likely killed the infecting organism, Mycobacteriu

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

88

Viable alternatives to trophy hunting exist, say scientists

A recent letter in Science cited a lack of alternatives to trophy hunting. The authors suggested that bans on imports of hunting trophies would undermine biodiversity conservation efforts, but offered weak evidence of any positive conservation gains specific to trophy hunting. In a response published in the October 25, 2019 issue of Science, a group of scientists summarize evidence of negative eff

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

30

Can watching movies detect autism?

In the current study, the researchers presented ASD and control children with three short movies, each shown twice. Two of the movies were animated and one was a realistic home video; all contained social interactions between at least two individuals. This experimental design allowed comparisons across movies, presentations and different eye tracking measures to identify what is the best technique

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New venture team success requires collective ownership — with boundaries, study says

A sense of collective ownership is crucial to a startup team's success. The energy and enthusiasm that come from working toward a shared vision can be powerful. But how an entrepreneur interacts with a team to build a sense of ownership can make a big difference, according to new research from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Training for Title IX investigators lacks tested, effective techniques

Interviews are the central component of any Title IX investigation, but new research finds the techniques investigators are using may not be the most effective. Iowa State University researchers evaluated the available training programs for investigators and identified techniques and suggested practices at odds with science-based interviewing strategies.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

3D-printed device finds 'needle in a haystack' cancer cells by removing the hay

Finding a handful of cancer cells hiding among billions of blood cells in a patient sample can be like finding a needle in a haystack. In a new approach enabled by 3D-printed cell traps, researchers are removing the hay to expose the cancer cells.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Great Barrier Reef island coral decline

A long-term study of coral cover on island groups of the Great Barrier Reef has found declines of between 40 and 50 percent of live, hard corals at inshore island groups during the past few decades.Scientists say the data was so alarming that they checked and re-checked it.

17d

Phys.org

200+

New Horizons team pieces together the best images they have of Pluto's far side

Pluto was discovered in 1930 by astronomer Clyde Tombaugh. For decades, not much detail was known about the erstwhile planet. We assumed it was a frozen, dormant world.

17d

Phys.org

100+

The Blinky Bill effect: When gum trees are cut down, where do the koalas go?

In the past two decades there has been an unprecedented increase in the area of blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus) plantations in southern Australia. In southwest Victoria alone, some additional 80,000 hectares of commercial blue gum have been planted.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

The Blinky Bill effect: When gum trees are cut down, where do the koalas go?

In the past two decades there has been an unprecedented increase in the area of blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus) plantations in southern Australia. In southwest Victoria alone, some additional 80,000 hectares of commercial blue gum have been planted.

17d

Dagens Medicin

200+

Efter afsløring om sygehusbyggerier: Nu bliver sundhedsministeren afkrævet et svar

Ifølge Sundhedsministeriet bygger kravet om milliard-effektiviseringer til de nye sygehusbyggerier på et norsk hospital, som ingen kender til. Det skal sundhedsminister Magnus Heunicke (S) redegøre for, siger Enhedslisten.

17d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

51

Se världens snabbaste myra

I Saharaöknen lever silvermyran som antas vara världens snabbaste myra. Hastigheten gör att myran kan överleva i ökenhettan.

17d

Phys.org

World's first production of aluminum scandium nitride via MOCVD

Scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF have achieved what was previously considered impossible: They are the first in the world who have managed to manufacture aluminum scandium nitride (AlScN) via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). Devices based on AlScN are considered to be the next generation of power electronics. With this breakthrough, Fraunho

17d

Phys.org

500+

Gold-DNA nanosunflowers for efficient gene silencing and controlled transformation

Developing an efficient delivery system for enhanced and controlled gene interference-based therapeutics is an existing challenge in molecular biology. The advancing field of nanotechnology can provide an effective, cross-disciplinary strategy to facilitate nucleic acid delivery. In a new report, Shuaidong Huo and colleagues in the interdisciplinary departments of Nanoscience, Interactive Material

17d

Phys.org

Cyberbullying: Help children build empathy and resilience as their identity develops

Disturbing events related to cyberbullying in recent months and years have raised great concern among parents, youths and educators regarding the everyday lives of children in online spaces —as well as how they develop their capacities to judge right and wrong.

17d

Phys.org

Student maps Niagara's invasive species

They hitch rides on the soles of people's shoes and in water carried and dumped by ships, enabling them to sneak through borders undetected.

17d

Phys.org

The hidden traffic impacts of private schooling

In Australia today, just over 40% of secondary school children and almost 30% of primary school children attend a private school. By contrast, in the UK only 7% of children are privately educated.

17d

Phys.org

100+

Technology will not save us from climate change, but imagining new forms of society will

Citizen action on climate change has reached a new intensity: school children by the thousands regularly skip school to protest and Extinction Rebellion's civil disobedience recently caused widespread disruption in cities around the world. Challenge and disruption is important in prompting change. But it's also key that we consider—and show—how a zero carbon future could work in practice. This is

17d

Phys.org

Preserved pollen tells the history of floodplains

Many of us think about pollen only when allergy season is upon us.

17d

Phys.org

40

New study reveals important yet unprotected global ocean areas

The largest synthesis of important marine areas conducted to date reveals that a large portion of Earth's oceans are considered important and are good candidates for protection. A first of its kind, the study was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of researchers including Ellen Pikitch, Ph.D., and Christine Santora of Stony Brook University and Dr. Natasha Gownaris, a Ph.D. graduate of Stony Br

17d

Phys.org

66

Scientists develop efficient methods to turn woody biomass into fuels

Increasing production of second-generation biofuels—those made from non-food biomass such as switchgrass, biomass sorghum, and corn stover—would lessen our reliance on burning fossil fuels, which contributes to climate change.

17d

Phys.org

200+

New VIPER lunar rover to map water ice on the moon

NASA is sending a mobile robot to the South Pole of the moon to get a close-up view of the location and concentration of water ice in the region and for the first time ever, actually sample the water ice at the same pole where the first woman and next man will land in 2024 under the Artemis program.

17d

Phys.org

Complex potato genome further unveiled

Scientists from Wageningen University & Research (WUR) and scale-up Solynta, the inventor of hybrid potato breeding, have published the most complete genome sequence for potatoes to date. A unique aspect is that both sequence and plant material are made available for research (under specific conditions). This may in the future result in a potato that is more resistant to heat or drought or has a g

17d

Phys.org

47

Insight-HXMT team releases new results on black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries

Scientists with the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (Insight-HXMT) team presented their new results on black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries during a press conference held Oct. 25 at the first China Space Science Assembly in Xiamen.

17d

Phys.org

500+

Placing another piece in the dark matter puzzle

Very little is known about the exact nature of dark matter. Currently, some of the most promising dark matter candidates are extremely light bosonic particles such as axions, axion-like particles or even dark photons. "These can also be regarded as a classical field oscillating at a certain frequency. But we can't yet put a figure on this frequency—and therefore the mass of the particles," explain

17d

Phys.org

400+

Stars pollute, but galaxies recycle

Galaxies were once thought of as lonely islands in the universe: clumps of matter floating through otherwise empty space. We now know they are surrounded by a much larger, yet nearly invisible cloud of dust and gas. Astronomers call it the circumgalactic medium, or CGM. The CGM acts as a giant recycling plant, absorbing matter ejected by the galaxy and later pushing it right back in.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Student maps Niagara's invasive species

They hitch rides on the soles of people's shoes and in water carried and dumped by ships, enabling them to sneak through borders undetected.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Preserved pollen tells the history of floodplains

Many of us think about pollen only when allergy season is upon us.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

32

New study reveals important yet unprotected global ocean areas

The largest synthesis of important marine areas conducted to date reveals that a large portion of Earth's oceans are considered important and are good candidates for protection. A first of its kind, the study was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of researchers including Ellen Pikitch, Ph.D., and Christine Santora of Stony Brook University and Dr. Natasha Gownaris, a Ph.D. graduate of Stony Br

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

59

Scientists develop efficient methods to turn woody biomass into fuels

Increasing production of second-generation biofuels—those made from non-food biomass such as switchgrass, biomass sorghum, and corn stover—would lessen our reliance on burning fossil fuels, which contributes to climate change.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Complex potato genome further unveiled

Scientists from Wageningen University & Research (WUR) and scale-up Solynta, the inventor of hybrid potato breeding, have published the most complete genome sequence for potatoes to date. A unique aspect is that both sequence and plant material are made available for research (under specific conditions). This may in the future result in a potato that is more resistant to heat or drought or has a g

17d

Phys.org

30

Rising seas threaten low-lying coastal cities, 10% of world population

The recent Typhoon Hagibis—the most powerful storm to hit Japan since 1958—caused massive destruction. The reported death toll as of October 22 has climbed to 80, with another 398 injured and 11 people still missing. Tens of thousands of homes were flooded, damaged, or without power after torrential rain and powerful winds resulted in tornadoes, widespread mudslides, and overflowing rivers. In add

17d

Phys.org

26

Prisons are not the answer to preventing crime

Each day in the United States and Canada, it seems like the news media reports another shooting or act of violence that ends in tragedy. As a result, politicians and the public often leap to the conclusion that violence is on the rise and that the answer is to throw more people behind bars.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

36

Giant neutrino telescope to open window to ultra-high-energy universe

Ultra-high-energy neutrinos, long sought, are crucial to understanding the high-energy Universe. Neutrinos are light, electrically neutral, and weakly interacting particles. They travel billions of light-years to Earth, bringing information about the most energetic processes of the Universe. The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection (GRAND) is an ambitious next-generation detector designed to d

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

Genetics reveal Pacific subspecies of fin whale

New genetic research has identified fin whales in the northern Pacific Ocean as a separate subspecies, reflecting a revolution in marine mammal taxonomy as scientists unravel the genetics of enormous animals otherwise too large to fit into laboratories.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Attacking metastatic breast cancer with sound

Drugs can be safely delivered to cancerous lymph nodes via the lymphatic system and then released inside the nodes using sound waves. Tohoku University researchers tested the treatment on mice with metastatic breast cancer and published their findings in the journal Scientific Reports.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

KRICT comes in as a new leading player in the monopolized bio-polycarbonate market

The Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology(KRICT) developed a bio-polycarbonate which has been monopolized by Japan, and opened up the possibility of bio-polycarbonate commercialization. the Research Center for Bio-based Chemistry of KRICT utilized the plant-based components of isosorbide and nanocellulose to develop the bio-polycarbonate.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

63

The frostier the flower, the more potent the cannabis

Cannabis flowers with the most mushroom-shaped hairs pack the biggest cannabinoid and fragrance punch, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Middle-aged adults with borderline personality disorder potentially at higher risk for heart attacks

Middle-aged adults who show symptoms of borderline personality disorder may be at greater risk for a heart attack, as they show physical signs of worsening cardiovascular health more than other adults, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

17d

Ingeniøren

100+

Ørsted er verdensleder på potent havvindsmarked

I ny rapport udpeger IEA det danske selskab Ørsted til verdensmarkedsleder for havvind med en markedsandel på knap 13 pct. og i alt 12 GW havvind enten i drift, under opbygning eller under udvikling.

17d

Science News Daily

'Death Stranding' Oozes Onto PC Next Summer

After Hideo Kojima's messy breakup with Konami, the industry watched with bated breath to see who his rebound publisher would be. And considering the long history …

17d

Phys.org

1K

American whiskey found to leave distinctive 'fingerprint' when it evaporates

A team of researchers at the University of Louisville has found that unlike other whiskeys, American whiskey leaves a distinctive "fingerprint" behind when it evaporates on a flat surface. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Fluids, the researchers describe how they came to find the unique patterns and note possible uses for such information.

17d

Phys.org

Not all genes are necessary for survival: These species dropped extra genetic baggage

Humans, the latest tally suggests, have approximately 21,000 genes in our genome, the set of genetic information in an organism. But do we really need every gene we have? What if we lost three or four? What if we lost 3,000 or 4,000? Could we still function? Humans have variation in their genomes, but the overall size does not vary dramatically among individuals, with the exception of certain gene

17d

Phys.org

A step towards greater biomass uptake in Europe

Increasing the production and mobilization of biomass is crucial for tackling climate change, ensuring food security, creating sustainable raw materials and diversifying energy resources. In particular, the development of industrial crops able to grow on marginal or unused lands is expected to play an important role in driving the transition from a fossil- to a biobased economy.

17d

Scientific American: Mind & Brain

74

Mass Shootings' Social Contagion

Why we need to stop making murderers (in)famous — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Not all genes are necessary for survival: These species dropped extra genetic baggage

Humans, the latest tally suggests, have approximately 21,000 genes in our genome, the set of genetic information in an organism. But do we really need every gene we have? What if we lost three or four? What if we lost 3,000 or 4,000? Could we still function? Humans have variation in their genomes, but the overall size does not vary dramatically among individuals, with the exception of certain gene

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

A step towards greater biomass uptake in Europe

Increasing the production and mobilization of biomass is crucial for tackling climate change, ensuring food security, creating sustainable raw materials and diversifying energy resources. In particular, the development of industrial crops able to grow on marginal or unused lands is expected to play an important role in driving the transition from a fossil- to a biobased economy.

17d

The Scientist RSS

DNASTAR Appoints Inqaba Biotec as African Distributor

DNASTAR® has appointed Inqaba Biotechnical Industries (Pty) Ltd (trading as inqaba biotecTM) as a distributor of its DNA, RNA and protein sequence analysis software in Africa, effective immediately.

17d

Wired

200+

The Best Fanny Packs: Cheap, Waterproof, and More

Whether you call it a fanny pack, a waist bag, or a hip sling, these are our top picks for you.

17d

Sciencemag

100+

Graduate Abuse

Today's column goes out to readers in graduate school. Are you feeling as if you have more to do than a single person can accomplish? Does your boss expect a lot of you, pushing for results? All that can be pretty standard for the PhD experience, but here's another question: does your research advisor scream at you and threaten you? Constantly insult and berate you and other lab members? That is

17d

The Scientist RSS

DNASTAR Appoints Inqaba Biotec as African Distributor

[no content]

17d

Phys.org

Testing a new therapy for horses struggling to breathe

Pixie, a thirteen-year-old Shetland pony, is only about one-fifth the size of most horses seen for asthma at Tufts Equine Center. That doesn't make his breathing problems any less significant, though.

17d

Phys.org

500+

New outburst detected from a luminous supersoft source in a nearby galaxy

Astronomers from Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany have observed a new outburst from SSS1, a luminous transient supersoft X-ray source in the nearby galaxy NGC 300. The newly detected event could shed more light on the nature of this mysterious transient. The finding is detailed in a paper published October 18 on arXiv.org.

17d

Phys.org

22

Baby steps for transparent electronics

A submicrometer-thin mesh of silver nanowires—that is transparent to light, highly electrically conductive, flexible and stretchable, and simple to make—has been developed by researchers at KAUST. The material could find use in flexible electronic displays, sensors, solar cells or even incubators for newborn babies.

17d

Scientific American Content

66

Mass Shootings' Social Contagion

Why we need to stop making murderers (in)famous — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Testing a new therapy for horses struggling to breathe

Pixie, a thirteen-year-old Shetland pony, is only about one-fifth the size of most horses seen for asthma at Tufts Equine Center. That doesn't make his breathing problems any less significant, though.

17d

Phys.org

26

Image: Hubble captures the IC 4653 galaxy

This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows IC 4653, a galaxy just over 80 million light-years from Earth. That may sound like quite a distance, but it's not that far on a cosmic scale. At these kinds of distances, the types and structures of the objects we see are similar to those in our local area.

17d

Phys.org

100+

Researchers: Unusually broad diffraction background marks high-quality graphene

Producing structurally perfect graphene and other 2-D materials is the secret to tapping into their potential novel electronic and spintronic properties. But how do we know when graphene, the most widely studied 2-D material, is perfect— a defect-free and uniform layer of atoms?

17d

Phys.org

100+

Deep dive into Earth's interior shows change isn't skin deep

They say it's what's on the inside that counts. And so it goes with the planet's surface; from mountain ranges to a river's drainage, the deep Earth has a profound influence on what's happening on top.

17d

Phys.org

20

Improving indoor air quality during wildfires

In California and other U.S. western states, wildfires have become more frequent and intense, adversely impacting air quality and human health. Smoke from wildfires contains many toxins and irritants, including particles smaller than 2.5 microns in diameter, which, due to their size, penetrate deep into the lungs and contribute to cardiopulmonary and respiratory illness. Many health agencies and d

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

39

Scientists call for improved approach to biodiversity targets on invasive species

A Monash-led international commentary on the harm caused by biological invasions has urged policy makers to develop conversation targets in a unified framework informed by new data integration methods developed in the last decade.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Helpful insects and landscape change

We might not notice them, but the crops farmers grow are protected by scores of tiny invertebrate bodyguards. Naturally occurring arthropods like spiders and lady beetles patrol crop fields looking for insects to eat. These natural enemies keep pests under control, making it easier to grow the crops we depend on.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Key role for calcium release in root development

The role of calcium is well understood as a function of signaling between plants and symbiotic fungi that assist nitrogen fixation and phosphate uptake.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Argonaute proteins help fine-tune gene expression

A nuclear protein bound to RNA molecules affects chromatin structure and gene expression.

17d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

Here's the Mars 2020 Rover, Standing on its Own Six Wheels

It's been nearly eight years since Curiosity launched from Cape Canaveral, and the aging rover should soon have company on the Red Planet. The Mars 2020 rover, currently being assembled at JPL, has met a major launch milestone and is now standing on its own six wheels. NASA celebrated the milestone with a time-lapse video of the rover's assembly and a discussion of the vehicle. The Mars 2020 rove

17d

New on MIT Technology Review

200+

Can we use powerful lights to propel spacecraft at the speed of light?

Your space questions, answered.

17d

forskning.se

Växter försvarar sig mot bladlöss genom enzymer i cellväggen

När en bladlus angriper en växt initieras ett försvar, som kan utlösas antingen av växtätaren eller av själva växten. I en artikel i tidskriften Plant Physiology visar Umeå-forskarna Benedicte Albrectsen och Karen Kloth ett av de cellväggsmodifierande enzymens roll för försvaret mot bladlusangrepp. – Kunskap om mekanismen bakom en sådan respons kan användas för att utveckla strategier för att bek

17d

Science News Daily

Instagram expands ban on images that depict self-harm or suicide – CNET

The company's head says the social app is trying to strike a "difficult balance."

17d

Science News Daily

Intel Increases 14nm Capacity by 25 Percent, Still Constrained Through Q4

Intel's ongoing CPU shortage will extend into Q4, but the company is also performing remarkably well. The post Intel Increases 14nm Capacity by 25 Percent, …

17d

Phys.org

41

Scientists call for improved approach to biodiversity targets on invasive species

A Monash-led international commentary on the harm caused by biological invasions has urged policy makers to develop conversation targets in a unified framework informed by new data integration methods developed in the last decade.

17d

Phys.org

Helpful insects and landscape change

We might not notice them, but the crops farmers grow are protected by scores of tiny invertebrate bodyguards. Naturally occurring arthropods like spiders and lady beetles patrol crop fields looking for insects to eat. These natural enemies keep pests under control, making it easier to grow the crops we depend on.

17d

Phys.org

21

Key role for calcium release in root development

The role of calcium is well understood as a function of signaling between plants and symbiotic fungi that assist nitrogen fixation and phosphate uptake.

17d

Phys.org

200+

Microscale rockets can travel through cellular landscapes

A new study from the lab of Thomas Mallouk shows how microscale "rockets," powered by acoustic waves and an onboard bubble motor, can be driven through 3-D landscapes of cells and particles using magnets. The research was a collaboration between researchers at Penn and the University of San Diego, the Harbin Institute of Technology in Shenzhen, and Pennsylvania State University, where the study wa

17d

Phys.org

Researchers: Abolish marriage consummation as requirement for citizenship

Two political scientists at the University of Alberta argue consummation of marriage as a requirement for Canadian citizenship should be abolished.

17d

Phys.org

Argonaute proteins help fine-tune gene expression

A nuclear protein bound to RNA molecules affects chromatin structure and gene expression.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Trout habitat improvements also benefit nongame native fish

Habitat improvements in the Laramie River intended to boost the brown trout fishery also have benefited native nongame fish, according to newly published research by University of Wyoming scientists.

17d

Vetenskap och Hälsa

Forskare om vinterkräksjukans spridning på sjukhus

Smittor sprids på flera olika sätt och extra svårt kan det vara att skydda sig mot de som är luftburna. Vinterkräksjukan som orsakas av noroviruset är ett sådant. Carl-Johan Fraenkel, infektionsläkare och vårdhygienläkare, disputerar nu med en avhandling vid Lunds universitet som undersöker olika aspekter kring hur denna vinterkräksjuka sprids på sjukhus.

17d

Phys.org

53

New photo-responsive hydrogels developed with eye on biomedical applications

3-D printed, transplantable organs may sound like science fiction, but, thanks to advances in polymer chemistry, they could become a reality. Stimuli-responsive hydrogels represent a broad class of soft materials that change their mechanical properties when certain external triggers are applied. Last year researchers from the lab of Jonathan Barnes, assistant professor of chemistry, created a new

17d

Phys.org

Trout habitat improvements also benefit nongame native fish

Habitat improvements in the Laramie River intended to boost the brown trout fishery also have benefited native nongame fish, according to newly published research by University of Wyoming scientists.

17d

Phys.org

100+

Study shows ability to detect light from UV to the IR optical regimes using spin currents

A University of Wyoming researcher and his team have shown that the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) can be used to detect light across a broad optical range—ultraviolet through visible to near-infrared. This work has future implications on novel spin current-based technologies.

17d

Phys.org

200+

Alert system for failing nuclear plant pipes uses thin films and sound vibrations

A failing pipe can be tough to spot. It may cause a puddle, produce another sign of damage, or simply burst before detection. A flooded kitchen or laundry room is messy and inconvenient, but the stakes are much, much higher in nuclear power plants—which on average contain many miles of pipeline.

17d

Phys.org

Completing DNA synthesis

The final stage of DNA replication—"termination"—occurs when two DNA copy machines advance upon each other and unwind the final stretch of DNA. This process occurs about 60,000 times per human cell cycle and is crucial to prevent mutations.

17d

Futurity.org

76

Team hits major milestone: quantum supremacy

A team of scientists reports achieving quantum supremacy. Using 53 entangled quantum bits or "qubits," the Sycamore quantum computer has taken on—and solved—a tough problem for classical computers. "A computation that would take 10,000 years on a classical supercomputer took 200 seconds on our quantum computer," says Brooks Foxen, a graduate student researcher who works with John Martinis of the

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Completing DNA synthesis

The final stage of DNA replication—"termination"—occurs when two DNA copy machines advance upon each other and unwind the final stretch of DNA. This process occurs about 60,000 times per human cell cycle and is crucial to prevent mutations.

17d

ScienceDaily

200+

Soft drinks found to be the crucial link between obesity and tooth wear

A new study has found that sugar-sweetened acidic drinks, such as soft drinks, is the common factor between obesity and tooth wear among adults.

17d

ScienceDaily

24

Study implicates flavored e-cigs in the teen vaping epidemic

Teens who vape candy- or fruit-flavored e-cigarettes are more likely to stick with the habit and vape more heavily.

17d

ScienceDaily

45

Nonnutritive sweetener use in children

Nonnutritive or artificial sweeteners are a growing part of US diets, now consumed by at least one in four children. A new American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement offers a summary of the existing data around nonnutritive sweeteners and recommends future research into how they affect children's weight, taste preferences, the risk for diabetes, and long-term safety.

17d

ScienceDaily

89

Biomarker for schizophrenia can be detected in human hair

Working with model mice, post-mortem human brains, and people with schizophrenia, researchers have discovered that a subtype of schizophrenia is related to abnormally high levels hydrogen sulfide in the brain. Experiments showed that this abnormality likely results from a DNA-modifying reaction during development that lasts throughout life.

17d

New Scientist

500+

California fires see 200,000 evacuated while 3 million may lose power

For the third year in a row, an enormous wildfire is destroying homes and properties in California, with smaller fires raging elsewhere in the state

17d

Phys.org

Cryptocurrencies could eliminate banking's easiest moneymaker

If the measure of a currency's importance is how much it's used to actually buy and sell things, digital currencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum have barely gotten off the ground. And Facebook's proposed entry, Libra, has run into a wall of skepticism.

17d

Phys.org

How new plant species get their names

Scientists count 1.4 million different names for plants on Earth. But botanists estimate there are just 300,000 existing species. That means there's a veritable Tower of Babel of plant names are kicking around.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

How new plant species get their names

Scientists count 1.4 million different names for plants on Earth. But botanists estimate there are just 300,000 existing species. That means there's a veritable Tower of Babel of plant names are kicking around.

17d

Science News Daily

NVIDIA SHIELD TV 2019 Review: AI Enhanced Android TV Streaming

The NVIDIA SHIELD TV is widely regarded as the best media streaming device on the market. In addition to offering high-performance, access to a massive repository of 4K streaming services and …

17d

Science News Daily

Boris Johnson may let Huawei access UK's 5G network – CNET

The UK may create a rift with the US by working with the controversial Chinese telecom, the Sunday Times reported.

17d

Science News Daily

Spotify hits 113 million subscribers – CNET

Growth keeps streaming along.

17d

Scientific American

500+

Zombie Cells, Creepy Crawlers and a Deep-Sea Ghost: Halloween Science GIFs

Enjoy and spooky loop on — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

NeuroLogica Blog

1K

The Golden Rice Saga

Science Writer Ed Regis has recently published a book, Golden Rice: The Imperiled Birth of a GMO Superfood , in which he tells the tragic story of golden rice. In his telling he does not come off as an ideologue, or someone who kept with an initial dramatic narrative regardless of the facts. Rather, he wished to find the truth, which is often messy and nuanced. Golden rice is a genetically modifi

17d

The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Sea Cucumber Hormone Therapy

Researchers will inject a relaxin-like hormone into sea cucumbers to boost the animals' numbers.

17d

Wired

500+

The 12 Best Foreign Horror Movies You Can Stream Right Now

Dim the lights, grab some popcorn, and hold on tight as you travel the world in search of some Halloween frights.

17d

Scientific American News

500+

Zombie Cells, Creepy Crawlers and a Deep-Sea Ghost: Halloween Science GIFs

Enjoy and spooky loop on — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

Nature

24

Homing in on the jaguar

Nature, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03273-1 Kerrie Mengersen recreates South American jungle habitats in virtual reality to understand better the threatened jaguar.

17d

Scientific American Content

500+

Undying Cells, Speedy Ants and a Deep-Sea Ghost: Science GIFs to Start Your Halloween Week

Enjoy and loop on — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

New Scientist

300+

Google's qubit rivals: The race to useful quantum computers has begun

Google recently claimed to have achieved quantum supremacy, but many companies are still hoping their own quantum computers will soon overtake Google's

17d

BBC News – Science & Environment

1K

'Green gold' tree offers Brazil deforestation hope

Trees that help keep soils fertile could slow deforestation in Brazil's "arc of destruction".

17d

Ingeniøren

Disse iOS-apps indeholder ondsindet software, som åbner websites i baggrunden

De 17 apps er fjernet fra App Store.

17d

Ingeniøren

Volvo tester nye biler med dansk spil-software

PLUS. Den dansk-udviklede spilmotor Unity bruges i stigende grad af ingeniører verden over til 3D-simuleringer og tests. Som hos Volvo, der bruger mixed reality til hurtige tests af sikkerhedssystemer.

17d

New on MIT Technology Review

1K

Microsoft has beaten Amazon to the Pentagon's $10 billion cloud computing contract

[no content]

17d

Livescience.com

500+

These Weirdo Stellar Corpses Have Creamy Centers Filled with Exotic Quantum Liquids

Physicists have figured out what's lurking inside of white dwarfs, revealing the stellar corpses are creamy and filled with exotic quantum liquids.

17d

The Atlantic

115K

Trump's Error at the World Series

If President Donald Trump is impeached, convicted, and removed from office, or defeated in next year's election, the political backdrop of his downfall is unlikely to be better dramatized than it was last night during Game 5 of the World Series. Trump was in the stands with his wife, Melania, having announced that very morning that U.S. Special Forces had killed the ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghda

17d

Future(s) Studies

Vertical Industries debuts a chubby eVTOL capable of carrying 3 people – With the ability to carry up to 250 kg (551 lb) of payload at speeds up to 80 km/h (50 mph), the 12-rotor Seraph is Britain's leading electric VTOL air taxi candidate.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

How The Military Will Spark The Death Of Fossil Fuels. A Pentagon report earlier this year concluded that about two-thirds of 79 major military installations are vulnerable to flooding, while half are susceptible to drought. Half of them are at risk to wildfires.

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Lab cultured 'steaks' grown on an artificial gelatin scaffold – Ethical meat eating could soon go beyond burgers. Cooking and handling tests showed that the texture and springiness of the lab meat was somewhere between a hamburger and a beef tenderloin.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

The Department of Home Affairs proposes using face scanning tech to verify Aussie porn users are over 18 – With the ominous nickname 'The Capability', the national facial recognition database has faced scrutiny at every turn.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Latest AI Robots Makes Soldiers Obsolete

submitted by /u/radioactive_horse [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Weaponized cells seek and destroy HIV lurking in the body, which could allow people infected with HIV to set aside their medications. Scientists used CAR-T cells — immune cells that are engineered to home in on and destroy specific targets such as cancer cells.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Does the singularity not come down to NLP?

What does all the advances in AI today (excluding NLP) matter if a machine cannot make sense of knowledge humans have created? Imagine if today major breakthroughs are found and we have ourselves a machine that can read and interpret human language. What would we do with that machine? We would let it loose on our scientific articles so it can understand everything we have discovered and built. B

17d

Future(s) Studies

'Zen curtain' saves birds from hitting glass windows at University of Queensland: Dozens of rainbow lorikeets have been flying into large glass windows at a Queensland university — some dying on impact — but a unique style of curtain has come to the rescue.

submitted by /u/honolulu_oahu_mod [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Scientists bake gluten-free bread using a revolutionary technology

submitted by /u/esco123 [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Bangladeshi scientists plan to turn waste into eco-friendly hydrogen fuel. "We're now talking of green energy; and hydrogen is portable too. I see the future in hydrogen energy"

submitted by /u/chopchopped [link] [comments]

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Biomarker for schizophrenia can be detected in human hair

Working with model mice, post-mortem human brains, and people with schizophrenia, researchers at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science in Japan have discovered that a subtype of schizophrenia is related to abnormally high levels hydrogen sulfide in the brain. Experiments showed that this abnormality likely results from a DNA-modifying reaction during development that lasts throughout life.

17d

forskning.se

Samhället skulle tjäna på miljövänligare skogsbruk

Ett annat skogsbruk än dagens skulle bidra till större välfärd och välmående för samhället i stort, jämfört med dagens metoder som främst gynnar skogsindustrin. Det visar två forskare från Lunds universitet i en ny studie. Just nu pågår det en intensiv debatt om hur vi bäst ska använda skogen som resurs, inte minst utifrån behovet av biomassa när användandet av fossila bränslen och material måste

17d

The Atlantic

500+

Dear Therapist: I'm Tired of Explaining Why I Don't Want to Get Pregnant

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I'm 27 years old and have been married to my wonderful husband for three months, and already the inevitable onslaught of questions regarding our reproductive choices has begun. It seems that we are constantly

17d

Undark Magazine

400+

For Afghan Health Workers, a Gauntlet of Making Do

In a country of more than 37 million, Afghanistan has just 150 hospitals and a mere three doctors — often poorly equipped — per 10,000 people. The shortfalls are particularly pronounced in rural areas, where 85 percent of the population lives below the poverty line, and where illness and violence are rampant.

17d

Scientific American Blog Posts

87

How Sustainable Campuses Can Spark Broader Change

The key is remembering that human beings seldom change their mind, their perspective or their behavior based on logic or evidence alone — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

Ingeniøren

Dansk firma vil skabe balance til det tyske elnet

PLUS. IoT-virksomheden Seluxit undersøger, om 5G-netværk kan bruges til at balancere Tysklands elnet, hvis tranformerstationer ofte har dårlig bredbåndsdækning.

17d

Ingeniøren

Techtopia #129: Tænk på et ord, og din computer skriver det

Hjerne til computer interfaces er ikke hverdag. Endnu. Men den danske startup Braintell har et nyt produkt på markedet.

17d

Nature

1K

The nano-revolution spawned by carbon

Nature, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02838-4 In 1985, scientists reported the discovery of the cage-like carbon molecule C60. The finding paved the way for materials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, and was a landmark in the emergence of nanotechnology.

17d

Livescience.com

500+

If There's a Wormhole Hiding in Our Galaxy, Could We Really Find It?

Researchers describe how to find wormholes in the folds of our galaxy.

17d

Wired

1K

What's Blockchain Actually Good for, Anyway? For Now, Not Much

Not long ago, blockchain technology was touted as a way to track tuna, bypass banks, and preserve property records. Reality has proved a much tougher challenge.

17d

Wired

300+

This Week's Cartoons: Murder, Death, and Email Dread

Inbox zero? Bah humbug.

17d

Wired

300+

Why Are Parking Lots So Tricky for Self-Driving Cars?

Elon Musk Tesla California

Here's why Tesla's "Smart Summon" feature is taking them on anyway.

17d

Scientific American Content

100

How Sustainable Campuses Can Spark Broader Change

The key is remembering that human beings seldom change their mind, their perspective or their behavior based on logic or evidence alone — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

Scientific American Content

100+

Warming Will Cost Rich and Poor Countries Alike

Limiting global temperature rise will substantially reduce the economic toll of climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

Livescience.com

4K

Human-Size Blob Drifts by Divers. And It's Packed with Hundreds of Thousands of Baby Squid.

A trio of divers off the western coast of Norway had a close encounter with a drifting gelatinous blob — a squid's egg sac as big as an adult human.

17d

The Atlantic

1K

The Far Right Is Taking On Cultural Institutions

BERLIN—Protests against public artworks in Dresden and Kassel. A ban on political discussions at the city theater in Freiberg. And a criminal investigation against a performance art collective. Germany's far right is fighting a culture war—and at the forefront is the country's largest opposition party, the Alternative for Germany (AfD). Founded only six years ago, the group has transitioned from

17d

Ingeniøren

55

Britisk ingeniør: Jeg har opfundet fremtidens elbilsbatteri

PLUS. En tidligere britisk flådeofficer og ingeniør har arbejdet på et nyt batteri, der skal udskiftes i stedet for at blive opladet. Dansk batteriforsker maner dog til forsigtighed.

17d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Targeted knock-in mice expressing the oxidase-fixed form of xanthine oxidoreductase favor tumor growth

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12565-z The roles of the convertible forms, xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and xanthine oxidase (XO) during tumorigenesis is not known. Here, the authors develop XDH-stable and XO-locked knock-in (ki) mice and show increased tumor growth in XO ki mice, via macrophage-mediated immunoregulatory responses.

17d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Aspartate/asparagine-β-hydroxylase crystal structures reveal an unexpected epidermal growth factor-like domain substrate disulfide pattern

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12711-7 AspH catalyses hydroxylation of asparagine and aspartate residues in epidermal growth factor-like domains (EGFDs). Here, the authors present crystal structures of AspH with and without substrates and show that AspH uses EFGD substrates with a non-canonical disulfide pattern.

17d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Modification of boron nitride nanocages by titanium doping results unexpectedly in exohedral complexes

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12877-0 Although isolated experimentally, the molecular structures of metal-containing boron nitride cages are still unknown. Here the authors show via DFT calculations that externally bound complexes of boron nitride fullerenes doped with a single titanium atom are strikingly more stable than the endohedral ones.

17d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Hydralazine targets cAMP-dependent protein kinase leading to sirtuin1/5 activation and lifespan extension in C. elegans

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12425-w Hydralazine is a drug used in the treatment of heart failure and cancer, and it has recently been shown to promote lifespan in C. elegans. Here, the authors elucidate the mechanism of action of hydralazine, and show that it targets PKA to promote mitochondrial function via Sirtuin1/5.

17d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

30

Integrated multilayer stretchable printed circuit boards paving the way for deformable active matrix

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12870-7 To realize multilayer stretchable printed circuit boards (SPCBs), advancements in industrially-viable materials and processing methods are required. Here, the authors report multilayer SPCBs with electrical wiring capable of interconnecting isolated devices in different layers within an elastomeric matrix.

17d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Engineered amphiphilic peptides enable delivery of proteins and CRISPR-associated nucleases to airway epithelia

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12922-y Delivering biological cargo to airway epithelial cells is very challenging. Here, the authors use engineered amphiphilic peptides to shuttle proteins and CRISPR RNPs into airway cells in vivo.

17d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

25

A reference map of murine cardiac transcription factor chromatin occupancy identifies dynamic and conserved enhancers

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12812-3 Mapping transcription factors (TFs) occupancy is essential for understanding transcriptional programs. Here the authors use biotinylated knockin alleles of key cardiac TFs (GATA4, NKX2-5, MEF2A, MEF2C, SRF, TBX5, TEAD1) to map their genome-wide occupancy in the fetal and adult mouse heart, providing insight i

17d

The Atlantic

500+

The Kingpin Problem

Updated at 8:30 a.m. For nearly two decades, American leaders have stressed the need to address the root causes of terrorism. More often, though, they focus on something else: killing terrorists. Donald Trump did so with particular relish when he announced yesterday morning that Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the Islamic State's leader and the world's most wanted terrorist, had died "whimpering and crying

17d

The Atlantic

2K

A Constitutional Case for Gun Control

Supreme Court briefs are not known for their colorful writing. Readers are far more likely to encounter austere Latin legalisms than gripping personal narratives. Yet March for Our Lives chose to upend this norm in its amicus brief—a legal filing written by an interested outside party—in the upcoming Supreme Court case New York State Rifle & Pistol Association Inc. v. City of New York . Its brief

17d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Broad and Efficient Control of Klebsiella Pathogens by Peptidoglycan-Degrading and Pore-Forming Bacteriocins Klebicins

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51969-1

17d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Substrate composition directs slime molds behavior

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50872-z

17d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Shear-induced microstructures and dynamics processes of phospholipid cylinders in solutions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51933-z

17d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Roadkill and space use data predict vehicle-strike hotspots and mortality rates in a recovering bobcat (Lynx rufus) population

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50931-5 Roadkill and space use data predict vehicle-strike hotspots and mortality rates in a recovering bobcat ( Lynx rufus ) population

17d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

The earliest cut marks of Europe: a discussion on hominin subsistence patterns in the Orce sites (Baza basin, SE Spain)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51957-5

17d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Time and rate dependent synaptic learning in neuro-mimicking resistive memories

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51700-0

17d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

A murine model demonstrating reversal of structural and functional correlates of cirrhosis with progenitor cell transplantation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51189-7

17d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Higher Toughness of Metal-nanoparticle-implanted Sodalime Silicate Glass with Increased Ductility

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51733-5

17d

Retraction Watch

26

Former Northwestern psychology prof has paper subjected to an expression of concern

A paper by Ping Dong, a former researcher at Northwestern who left her post less than a year after having a paper retracted from Psychological Science, has been subjected to an expression of concern. The 2017 paper, in the Journal of Consumer Research, claimed to show that "Witnessing Moral Violations Increases Conformity in Consumption." It … Continue reading

17d

Big Think

100+

How can we predict success in humans?

The brain evolved in three parts, from back to front: First, the so-called reptilian brain or spatial brain; then the monkey or social brain; and the most recently evolved section is the frontal lobe, which understands time. What's so special about this temporal ability? It allows humans to forecast into the future—to consciously plan, dream and strategize. That's a unique trait in the animal kin

17d

Ingeniøren

79

Branchedirektør: Vi er nødt til at sortere plast, hvis vi skal genanvende mere

Det er i sig selv utilfredsstillende, at under en tredjedel af plasten indsamlet i danske husholdninger genanvendes. Men vi er nødt til at sortere det for at blive bedre, mener direktør for brancheorganisation.

17d

Nature

500+

Senescent cells feed on their neighbours

Nature, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03271-3 Chemotherapy-treated cancer cells that enter a non-dividing state called senescence can nevertheless boost cancer growth. The finding that these cells eat neighbouring cells reveals a mechanism that enables senescent cells to persist.

17d

Nature

200+

Weaponized cells seek and destroy HIV lurking in the body

Nature, Published online: 28 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03220-0 Approach could allow people infected with HIV to set aside their medication — without risking a resurgence of the virus.

17d

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

De näthatar medan andra fredagsmyser

Män i 40 till 60-årsåldern, som är särskilt aktiva under fredagskvällar, och med en lägre grad av öppenhet och vänlighet jämfört med genomsnittliga forumanvändare. Det är de som uttrycker hat eller skriver nedsättande kommentarer om journalister på forumet Flashback, visar en ny studie om näthat från Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut. För att plocka fram sin data gick forskarna igenom tusentals i

17d

The Atlantic

400+

James Foley's Mother Is Grateful Baghdadi Is Dead

Americans are prone to apathy. Attention is a finite resource; empathy can be, too. But there are still moments that shock and galvanize—news events that can serve as strong antidotes to moral lethargy. This ethos is what drove the journalist James Foley toward conflict zones—first in Libya, and then in Syria, where he was kidnapped and eventually killed. James's mother, Diane Foley, spent nearly

17d

The Atlantic

1K

Get Used to Trump Talking About Baghdadi

It was the cinematic moment Donald Trump had been craving at this perilous point in his presidency—and when it arrived, he made sure it didn't go to waste. President Trump's vivid—perhaps too vivid?—re-creation of the U.S. Special Forces raid that killed the Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi Saturday night is sure to become a go-to story for the remainder of his time in office, and figure

17d

The Atlantic

500+

A No-Win Situation for the Democratic Chairman

There are days when Tom Perez feels the weight of 2020 collapsing in on him—the sense that the future of his party, the country, and the world all depend on him pulling off a victory next year. "If you have an impulse that you have to be liked by everyone, don't take this job," Perez told me as we drove around Ohio a couple of weeks ago, on the day before the October Democratic debate. "Because m

17d

Phys.org

28

Delhi fights hazardous pollution after Diwali party

After India's biggest firework party of the year, Delhi awoke to a pollution hangover Monday with the capital forced to breathe hazardous levels of toxic particles.

17d

Phys.org

57

State of emergency declared as California wildfires rage

California's governor declared a statewide emergency on Sunday as a huge blaze, fanned by strong winds, forced mass evacuations and power blackouts as it bore down on towns in the famed Sonoma wine region.

17d

Phys.org

1K

Chill your Netflix habit, climate experts say

Movie nights once required driving to the local video store to rent, rewind and return the latest blockbuster. Now on-demand video content providers offer countless binge-worthy options at the touch of a finger.

17d

Phys.org

500+

New species found in whale shark mouth

A whale shark's mouth might not seem like the most hospitable environment for a home, but Japanese researchers have found there's no place like it for a newly-discovered shrimp-like creature.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

500+

New species found in whale shark mouth

A whale shark's mouth might not seem like the most hospitable environment for a home, but Japanese researchers have found there's no place like it for a newly-discovered shrimp-like creature.

17d

Science-Based Medicine

200+

The Cleveland Clinic publishes a study claiming to show benefits from functional medicine. It doesn't.

Last week, the Cleveland Clinic published a study purporting to show that functional medicine improves health-related quality of life. Not surprisingly, on closer examination, there's a lot less to the study than meets the eye, and its results are quite underwhelming.

17d

Science | The Guardian

32K

Post-term pregnancy research cancelled after six babies die

Swedish researchers say proceeding with induction trial would have been unethical Sweden has cancelled a major study of women whose pregnancy continued beyond 40 weeks after six babies died. The research was halted a year ago after five stillbirths and one early death in the babies of women allowed to continue their pregnancies into week 43. Continue reading…

17d

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Partydrogen som lindrar depressioner

Långt efter midnatt låg Johanna sömnlös och googlade med mobilen på en beklämmande kombination av ord: "depression" och "kronisk". En av träffarna handlade om en experimentell behandling med ketamin, ett narkosmedel som även används som partydrog under namnet Special K. – Jag hade inga förhoppningar om att det skulle göra någon skillnad. Men jag tänkte att jag har inget att förlora, säger Johanna,

17d

Science News Daily

MPs demand action over rise in online bank crashes

Report says more regulation and a levy on firms may be needed to protect customers from IT failures.

17d

ScienceAlert – Latest

1K

Dramatic Video Reveals The Moment California's Kincade Fire Ignited

It all happens so fast.

17d

ScienceAlert – Latest

2K

Engineer Has a Bold Plan to Help Stop Arctic Melting Using Millions of Glass Beads

"Technology like this gives us time to act."

17d

Future(s) Studies

How is AI coming along in terms of being able to provide human interaction?

I'm thinking of something along the lines of Cortana in Halo or the AI in blade runner or Hal from 2001 space Odyssey. Obviously it's going to be gradual progress. I feel like the Google/Ciri/Cortana/Alexa are early examples of such AI but they usually just give short answers as far as I know. You can't have long drawn out discussions with any of these AI or talk about your day and have them act

17d

Future(s) Studies

What specific technologies would pico and femto technology allow?

submitted by /u/rex097 [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

NASA is partnering with Caterpillar to make Moon mining machines

submitted by /u/V1ncentAdultman [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

These Worm-Like Robots Could One Day Build Spaces – They scoot around like tiny inch worms but these robots can build absolutely huge structures.

submitted by /u/tocreatewebsite [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Moonshots Are Changing The World

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

THE FUTURE OF LABOR (last decades of the 21st century) according to Mundo Ultimate News Cp (my web series)

Hello I am 17 years old and my goal was to find some futuristic subculture group that I could fit in with my passion that is futurology and science fiction thing that was hard. I am so focused on this that I develop my own futuristic ideas in addition to creating a science fiction. The following concept was based on contemporary futurology and my particular views represented in my work. It's list

17d

ScienceAlert – Latest

3K

This Creepy Life-Sized Doll Is a Warning About What Office Life Is Doing to Us

Meet Emma.

17d

Viden

Kan du kende forskel? Kunstig intelligens skriver ligesom Donald Trump

Teknologien bag kan både bruges positivt og negativt, siger forskere.

17d

ScienceAlert – Latest

23K

Rarely Seen Gravity Waves Captured Rippling in Earth's Atmosphere

Fluid dynamics in the sky.

17d

Science | The Guardian

100+

Some parts of UK ageing twice as fast as others, new research finds

Study by thinktank Resolution Foundation warns divergence will have political and economic impacts Parts of the UK are ageing twice as fast as other areas of the country, while in some cities the population is getting younger, a divergence that will have a lasting impact on local economies, local government and national politics, according to new research. A study by the Resolution Foundation , a

17d

Ingeniøren

40

Inkognito-tilstand på vej til Google Maps – brugerne bliver dog stadig sporet

Google Maps får inkognito-tilstand, der skal gøre det muligt for brugere at anonymisere aktivitet. Alligevel vil Google fortsat være i stand til at vide, hvor folk er, og hvad de søger efter.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

USC study implicates flavored e-cigs in the teen vaping epidemic

Teens who vape candy- or fruit-flavored e-cigarettes are more likely to stick with the habit and vape more heavily.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Maternal and newborn health improves in rural Nigeria, Ethiopia and India but inequities still exist

Community-based health programs in parts of rural Nigeria, Ethiopia and India were successful in improving health care for mothers and newborns, but inequities still exist, according to a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

49

American Academy of Pediatrics looks at use of nonnutritive sweeteners by children

Nonnutritive or artificial sweeteners are a growing part of US diets, now consumed by at least one in four children. A new American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement offers a summary of the existing data around nonnutritive sweeteners and recommends future research into how they affect children's weight, taste preferences, the risk for diabetes, and long-term safety.

17d

Ingeniøren

26

Danmark risikerer at tabe kapløb om 5G-netværk

PLUS. Usikkerhed om de kommende 5G-frekvenser forhindrer danske virksomheder i at blive klar til nye trådløse teknologier. Ny rapport fra Nordisk Råd viser, at Danmark er bagud.

17d

Skeptical Science

60 Years of Satellite Earth Radiation Budget Observations

[Per remarks in comments below, a couple of corrections have been made to this article, to do with human employment of energy and Earth energy imbalance. It's always appreciated when readers with sharp eyes improve our work— thank you.] 60 years ago this month the first direct observation "Earth Radiation Budget" experiment (ERB) was successfully lofted into orbit on Explorer VII , after a string

17d

Future(s) Studies

World Population Growth Stats by Country

submitted by /u/TimeProfessional [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Life-sized doll shows office workers could have permanently hunched backs in 20 years

submitted by /u/dingo8yobb [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Scientists newly identified set of three antibodies isolated from a person sick with the flu, and found that the antibodies provided broad protection against several different strains of influenza when tested both in vitro and in mice, which could become the basis for new antivirals and vaccines.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

A new study outlines a method for detecting wormholes, which form a passage between two separate regions of spacetime. Though the paper focuses on traversable wormholes, the technique it outlines could indicate the presence of either a traversable or non-traversable wormhole.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

60

California implements new law that requires high schools to begin classes no earlier than 8:30 AM and middle schools 8:00 AM that will go into effect from 2022.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Bravo for Google's 'quantum supremacy.' Here's what needs to happen next.

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

Gas Station Converts To Electric Charging Station And Speeds Ahead Of Curve

submitted by /u/somewhatimportantnew [link] [comments]

17d

Future(s) Studies

21

We have the tools and technology to work less and live better – The reasons we don't and aren't, are social and economic, not technical

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

17d

Discover Magazine

100+

Say hello to Hurricane Pablo, the northernmost hurricane to form so late and so far north on record

Hurricane Pablo, as seen in the eastern Atlantic by NASA's Terra satellite on Oct. 27, 2019 A late October tropical storm spinning in the North Atlantic entered the record books today when it strengthened into a strange little hurricane. Say hello to Hurricane Pablo, seen in the image above acquired by NASA's Terra satellite. As of about 5 p.m. EST in the U.S., the tiny storm had attained maximum

17d

ScienceAlert – Latest

13K

Lab Worker Accidentally Infects Herself With Virus Related to Smallpox

Just one prick of a needle.

17d

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

How Dust Could Have Brought About The Collapse of a Once Mighty Empire

A storm season that changed everything.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Soft drinks found to be the crucial link between obesity and tooth wear

A new study published today in the journal Clinical Oral Investigations, has found that sugar-sweetened acidic drinks, such as soft drinks, is the common factor between obesity and tooth wear among adults.

17d

Discover Magazine

As the Kincade Fire was whipped by hurricane force winds, here's what it looked like from space

California's Kincade Fire, as seen by the GOES-17 weather satellite on Oct. 27, 2019. Also visible is a blaze more than 50 miles away in Vallejo, CA — believed to have started from embers from the Kincade Fire. (Note: The animation may take a little while to load, especially on phones. Source: RAMMB/CIRA/SLIDER) Early this morning, winds gusted to 93 miles per hour near California's Kincade Fire.

17d

ScienceAlert – Latest

19K

Universe Is Expanding Much Faster Than We Thought, Creating a 'Crisis in Cosmology'

The evidence is now impossible to ignore.

17d

Science | The Guardian

96

Starwatch: crescent moon passes close by Jupiter and heads for Saturn

The moon, just entering its first quarter, comes into conjunction with the bright and steady giant planet near the south-western horizon Keep an eye out this week for a fine conjunction between a thin crescent moon and the giant planet Jupiter. To see the pairing you will need a clear south-western horizon, which may take some effort for city dwellers to find. However, having secured a good vanta

17d

Livescience.com

1K

US Air Force's X-37B Space Plane Lands After Record 780-Day Mystery Mission

The U.S. Air Force's unpiloted X-37B space plane landed back on Earth Sunday (Oct. 27) after a record 780 days in orbit , racking up the fifth ultra-long mission for the military's mini-shuttle fleet.

17d

Scientific American Blog Posts

300+

The Spookiverse

The most haunting thing about the universe is how empty it is — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17d

Future(s) Studies

The secret to better beer could lie in cell signaling networks

submitted by /u/ChickenTeriyakiBoy1 [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

The Extreme Physics Pushing Moore's Law to the Next Level

submitted by /u/Ignate [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

28

New gene editing technology could correct 89% of genetic defects – Prime editing builds on powerful CRISPR gene editing, but is more precise and versatile — it "directly writes new genetic information into a specified DNA site" – developed by researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

submitted by /u/StcStasi [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

Towards a Scalable, Efficient Cryptocurrency: Bitcoin's New Low-Energy Competitor

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

The extreme physics pushing Moore's Law to the next level

submitted by /u/wavfunction [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

The Extreme Physics Pushing Moore's Law to the Next Level

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

Hello From the Year 2050. We Avoided the Worst of Climate Change — But Everything Is Different

submitted by /u/MAGICookiez [link] [comments]

18d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

400+

Oil spill threatens rare Bangladesh dolphin breeding zone

An oil spill on a river in southeast Bangladesh has threatened the breeding ground of the critically endangered Ganges dolphin, environmentalists said Sunday, describing it as a "major disaster" for the mammal.

18d

Phys.org

61

Powerful winds fan flames as 'historic' California blaze spreads

Powerful winds fanned Calfornia's biggest wildfire Sunday, threatening the city of Santa Rosa and forcing the evacuation of tens of thousands of people.

18d

Phys.org

1K

Oil spill threatens rare Bangladesh dolphin breeding zone

An oil spill on a river in southeast Bangladesh has threatened the breeding ground of the critically endangered Ganges dolphin, environmentalists said Sunday, describing it as a "major disaster" for the mammal.

18d

Phys.org

55

Brazil oil spill leaves local fishermen in the lurch

Holding his breath for 90 seconds, Arivaldo Sousa dives to depths of up to 65 feet (20 meters) to haul lobsters from the seafloor off Bahia state, one of tens of thousands of fishermen who make a living from the rich waters in one of Brazil's top tourist destinations.

18d

Phys.org

5K

Rare Bangladesh crocodile lays eggs in new hope for species

A rare river-dwelling crocodile has started to lay eggs after being paired with an introduced male, Bangladesh conservationists said Sunday, raising hopes a successful hatching could save the critically endangered species from extinction.

18d

Scientific American Content

55

It's Factoradical!

How to write numbers in a whole new way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

4K

Rare Bangladesh crocodile lays eggs in new hope for species

A rare river-dwelling crocodile has started to lay eggs after being paired with an introduced male, Bangladesh conservationists said Sunday, raising hopes a successful hatching could save the critically endangered species from extinction.

18d

Science News Daily

Facebook AI Can Now 'Hide' You From Facial Recognition Systems

Facebook has come under fire in recent times over various privacy-related scandals, leading to some to call upon other users to delete their Facebook accounts. However, in a pretty strange …

18d

Phys.org

44

Balkans suffering 'very high' air pollution

Health officials in Serbia warned on Sunday about the risks of "very high" levels of air pollution in Belgrade and several other cities, a problem also being experienced in neighbouring Bosnia and North Macedonia.

18d

Phys.org

2K

Dutch inventor unveils device to scoop plastic out of rivers

A young Dutch inventor is widening his effort to clean up floating plastic from the Pacific Ocean by moving into rivers, too, using a new floating device to catch garbage before it reaches the seas.

18d

Phys.org

500+

Space: a major legal void

The internet of space is here. SpaceX founder Elon Musk tweeted this week using a connection provided by the first satellites in his high-speed Starlink constellation, which one day could include… 42,000 mini-satellites.

18d

The Atlantic

4K

Trump's Message to Washington: Listen to Me

We've heard a common refrain from all corners of Washington in recent weeks: In withdrawing troops from northeastern Syria and thus abandoning America's Kurdish partners in the fight against the Islamic State, Donald Trump risked sacrificing the safety of Americans on the altar of "America first." It was an argument made in various forms by Republican and Democratic lawmakers, experts, former U.S

18d

Viden

Økonom: Amazonas kan kollapse i 2021

Regnskoven kan snart ikke længere lave sit eget regnvejr, advarer forsker. Andre mener, at det vil tage 15-20 år.

18d

Singularity Hub

300+

Towards a Scalable, Efficient Cryptocurrency: Bitcoin's New Low-Energy Competitor

The idea behind Bitcoin—creating a decentralized currency that allows for secure peer-to-peer transactions without the use of banks—may well be a good one. But it's not working out in practice. The cryptocurrency has generated far more hype and wild investment speculation than practical use. The energy consumption required to continue this speculative bubble is tremendous. Maintaining the Bitcoin

18d

Science News Daily

Microsoft's upcoming Windows 10X might appear on more than just foldables

Microsoft's intentions regarding 10X's user interface were almost entirely revealed by a now-absent webpage, first mentioned to a little blue bird by a prowling feline. The changes are sweeping …

18d

Futurism

7K

MIT Scientists Say They Found a New Way to Scrub Atmospheric CO2

Carbon Capture A team of MIT engineers claims to have figured out how to scrub harmful carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere, potentially giving the world a new weapon in the fight against climate change. While many scientists argue that carbon capture technology is a necessary part of preventing the worst effects of climate change, current approaches to the tech have never scaled enough to be pra

18d

Big Think

400+

We have the tools and technology to work less and live better

In 1930, a year into the Great Depression, John Maynard Keynes sat down to write about the economic possibilities of his grandchildren. Despite widespread gloom as the global economic order fell to its knees, the British economist remained upbeat, saying that the 'prevailing world depression … blind[s] us to what is going on under the surface'. In his essay , he predicted that in 100 years' time,

18d

Scientific American Content

100+

What Made Dinos Sore?

A new review digs into how the terrible lizards dealt with aches and pains — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18d

Science | The Guardian

8K

Oktoberfest 'produces 10 times as much methane as Boston'

First analysis of environmental impact of Munich festival reveals extent of emissions For the millions of people who descend on Munich for the annual bash, Oktoberfest is a celebration of beer, bands and bratwurst. But as the dust settles for another year on the world's largest folk festival, and die Bierleichen (" beer corpses") return to the land of the living, environmental scientists have rel

18d

The Atlantic

400+

Chance the Rapper Hosted SNL Again. Chaos Ensued.

Was there something in the air this week in the halls of Studio 8H? Did the whole Saturday Night Live cast need to get something out of their system? Almost every sketch in last night's episode felt like an exercise in controlled chaos. Most involved at least one performer breaking , and a wild Jason Momoa even appeared. The result was a fever dream of an installment that seemed to have been made

18d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

1K

Engineers develop a new way to remove carbon dioxide from air

A new way of removing carbon dioxide from a stream of air could provide a significant tool in the battle against climate change. The new system can work on the gas at virtually any concentration level, even down to the roughly 400 parts per million currently found in the atmosphere.

18d

Big Think

500+

Science explains why we love being scared

Psychologists link anxiety from ambiguity to why we find some people or situations creepy. A study showed that people who go to scary attractions find their moods improving and stress levels lowered. Scary situations can produce a euphoria and a sense of achievement. None With Halloween upon us, we are once again reminded that we like to be scared. There's just something about creepy and frighten

18d

Futurism

500+

Experts: Population Control Won't Solve Climate Change

Holistic Approach We already know that climate change is a human-made problem. So, cutting back on Earth's human population should fix it, right? Not so much, a group of experts recently told CBC News . Population is "one of a number of things that needs to be considered as we try to address or respond to this incredibly difficult problem that the world is facing," Robert Engelman, a senior fello

18d

Ingeniøren

42

Ingeniører overså flere himmelråbende faretegn før fatalt brokollaps i Miami

Fejlene på den bro, der i 2018 kollapsede over en ottesporet vej i Miami, var så åbenlyse, at hverken bygherre, rådgivere, entreprenører eller myndighederne kan undskylde, at de ikke reagerede, siger havarirapport.

18d

Wired

300+

I Tracked Everything My Baby Did Until Nothing Made Sense Anymore

Has a baby pooped at all if it can't be viewed as part of a Poop Frequency Trend Chart going back three months?

18d

Science News Daily

Buying a new mattress: 7 questions to ask before you shop – CNET

This mattress-buying guide will help you pick the right bed for better sleep.

18d

ScienceDaily

55

Energy regulation rollbacks threaten progress against harmful ozone

The fight against harmful ozone is under legal threat. Air quality and carbon emissions regulations are currently in limbo in courts and congress, from core legislation from the 1970s to rules from the last US administration. This study models the future losses in the fight to drive down respiratory-damaging ozone if the regulations go away.

18d

Cosmos Magazine

53

Australian scientists helping Nepal navigate water management

Two very different countries have similar issues. Andrew J Wight reports from Kathmandu.

18d

The Atlantic

500+

Pope Francis, the Revolutionary, Takes On the Traditionalists

Pope Francis has helped open the door to allowing married men to become priests, albeit in just one region of the Amazon for now. He has made environmentalism a major focus of his papacy. Yesterday he gave a shout-out to Greta Thunberg and thanked journalists for doing their jobs, rather than calling them enemies of the people. He's decried income inequality and nationalism and spoken out on beha

18d

The Atlantic

4K

Baghdadi's Death Punctuates the End of an Era

Updated on Sunday, October 27, 2019, at 9:32 am. Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the hirsute rapist whom hundreds of thousands of Islamic State supporters considered their absolute leader, died yesterday during a U.S. military raid in northwestern Syria's Idlib province, President Donald Trump announced on Sunday morning. Baghdadi became the head of ISIS in 2010 but was not seen in public until 2014, when

18d

Scientific American: Mind & Brain

500+

Dog Science Is Timeless

Seven ways science matters to dogs and the people who love them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18d

Cosmos Magazine

I know you're counting, not just talking

Babies understand the concept of numbers before they can say them.

18d

Cosmos Magazine

200+

Early Celts believed wine should be for all

Analysis of ceramic vessels throws new light on social customs.

18d

Cosmos Magazine

300+

Your brain approaches tricky tasks in a surprisingly simple way

James Shine, from Australia's University of Sydney, investigates the 'low-dimensional manifold'.

18d

Cosmos Magazine

Science history: Joseph Black, teacher of genius

James Watt's friend was also an innovator of note.

18d

Cosmos Magazine

23

Ready and Abell

Big telescopes observe something big taking shape.

18d

Livescience.com

500+

Rock Star's Company Seeks UFOs, Finds Military Contract

A private company that researches UFOs has a new contract with the U.S. government.

18d

Wired

100+

Danger for Pedestrians, a Tesla Profit, and More Car News This Week

The US government said pedestrian fatalities rose for a second consecutive year. But, hey, Tesla's back in the black, and promising record deliveries this quarter.

18d

Wired

100+

Trump's Impeachment Tweet Tops This Week's Internet News Roundup

For yet another week, the congressional investigation into the president—and his polarizing tweets about it—are driving online conversation.

18d

Future(s) Studies

32

Hours worked for the same output by the average working class by country. We now do in 7 hours what took us 90 hours a century ago. Why don't we work significantly less?

submitted by /u/SirT6 [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

From rovers on Mars to an orbiting Tesla, this decade revolutionized how we see space – The 2010s started with overheated worlds around a distant star and led us into a new push to live beyond our own world.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

Researchers identify senescent human melanocytes as driver of human skin aging.

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

Reduce Red Tape for the Red Planet: Regulations governing the responsible exploration of Mars and other worlds require regular, frequent updates, according to NASA, who plans to send astronauts to Mars sometime in the 2030s, and SpaceX could conceivably land humans on the Red Planet even sooner.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

Block on GM rice 'has cost millions of lives and led to child blindness' – Eco groups and global treaty blamed for delay in supply of vitamin-A enriched Golden Rice. It was developed two decades ago but is still struggling to gain approval in most nations, even though it may lead to a better future.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

A lightbulb moment for nuclear fusion? Scientists pursuing the holy grail of energy generation are taking giant steps. "I came to fusion because I passionately believe that it is needed – that it can change the world. I'm convinced that not only is fusion important: it's going to happen."

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

The Ocean Cleanup expands to polluted rivers: The Ocean Cleanup unveil its new automated system The Interceptor, which will be deployed to catch plastic debris in rivers before it reaches our oceans.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

New drug forces flu virus into 'error catastrophe,' overwhelming it with mutations. It was effective against multiple influenza strains in human airway epithelial cultures, and the viruses did not develop resistance. When ferrets got it 12 hours after infection, they did not develop disease at all.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

34

Nearly unbeatable and difficult to identify fungus has adapted to global warming and can now survive the warm body temperature of humans. With a 50% mortality rate in 90 days, meet Candida auris, the first pathogenic fungus caused by human-induced global warming

submitted by /u/MayonaiseRemover [link] [comments]

18d

Scientific American Content

New Clues in the Hunt for a Room-Temperature Superconductor

Could new theoretical and computational advances finally deliver the elusive room-temperature superconductor? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18d

Scientific American Content

500+

Dog Science Is Timeless

Seven ways science matters to dogs and the people who love them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18d

Wired

3K

Physicists Get Close to Knowing the Mass of the Neutrino

The KATRIN experiment is working to "weigh the ghost," which could point to new laws of particle physics and reshape theories of cosmology.

18d

NYT > Science

500+

Growing Meat in a Lab That Doesn't Look Like Mush

In their quest to make a lab-grown steak, researchers devised a form of scaffolding made with gelatin.

18d

Livescience.com

500+

Why Does Hunger Sometimes Cause Nausea?

Chemical signals in your body can go a little haywire if you don't heed your hunger.

18d

cognitive science

How memory works: Contextual-binding theory explains recency, context-dependent memory, distributed learning, and benefits of rest on memory

submitted by /u/adamantaboutcomics [link] [comments]

18d

cognitive science

Can computers prove theorems?: "And will we soon all be out of a job? Kevin Buzzard worries us all."

submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]

18d

Ingeniøren

33

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan påvirker rotationen Jordens form?

En læser har læst, at Jorden ikke er helt rund. Passer det? Ja, det er rigtigt nok, forsikrer lektor fra Aarhus Universitet.

18d

Wired

200+

How to Change the Default Apps on All Your Devices

Don't settle for the preinstalled apps Apple, Microsoft, and Android stick you with. Mix it up a little\!

18d

Wired

1K

Scientists Take Baby Steps Toward Extraterrestrial Babies

Can sperm survive microgravity? Do eggs hold up to radiation? The new science of off-planet procreation is now getting underway.

18d

The Atlantic

29K

The American System of Tipping Makes No Sense

Here's a simple question. It's Sunday. You order coffee and a simple breakfast—eggs, bacon, toast—at a local diner. The service is efficient, but not memorable. The bill comes, and it's $10. What's the tip? $1.50, according to typical online guides for foreign travelers in America $2.00 at least, according to The Washington Post $3.00 for sure, according to The New York Times Whatever the hell yo

18d

The Atlantic

300+

The New Approach to Local Journalism

Here's another installment in the ongoing series on how local news operations, especially newspapers, can devise new ways to stay in business. For previous entries—from Mississippi , from Maine , from Massachusetts , from Southern California and the San Francisco Bay Area , from Massachusetts again , and from points beyond —please check these preceding links. A theme that runs through nearly all

18d

Big Think

51

How are implicit biases holding us back?

Girls and women who are talented in STEM subjects are often invisible, notes Allison Stanger, who shares an example from her own life. A female may be equally good at mathematics and verbal skills, yet they are only praised and encouraged on the merits of their humanities aptitude. Encouraging women in STEM from an early age is increasingly important within fields like artificial intelligence, wh

18d

Science | The Guardian

4K

A lightbulb moment for nuclear fusion?

Boris Johnson's gung-ho claims may be wide of the mark, but scientists pursuing the holy grail of energy generation are taking giant steps "They are on the verge of creating commercially viable miniature fusion reactors for sale around the world," Boris Johnson told the Conservative party conference earlier this month – "they" apparently being UK scientists. It was, at best, a rash promise for ho

18d

Ingeniøren

Affaldsselskab: »Vi er blevet klogere på, at der bare er sindssygt meget folie«

PLUS. Metalbånd, skivefiltre og småjusteringer har skudt kapaciteten på affaldsselskabet Reno-Nords sorteringsanlæg i vejret.

18d

Future(s) Studies

World Problems After AI, UBI, Universal Healthcare, and Clean Energy are Achieved

What problems will Earth still have after most countries adopt AI, UBI, universal healthcare, and clean energy? submitted by /u/DrewwwBjork [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

Bloomberg: PBOC Is Planning to Roll Out Its Own Digital Currency Soon

submitted by /u/simplelifestyle [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

Energy Harvesting Footwear | MIT Technology Licensing Office

submitted by /u/cirquemedia [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

100+

SpaceX is on a mission to beam cheap, high-speed internet to consumers all over the globe. The project is called Starlink, and if it's successful it could forever alter the landscape of the telecom industry.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

British workers could be forced to negotiate with 'AI robots' to get a pay rise

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

18d

Viden

Nu er det bevist: Der findes dårlige orgasmer

Mere end halvdelen af os har oplevet en ubehagelig en af slagsen, viser forskning.

18d

ScienceAlert – Latest

20

We Might Finally Know Why Nacre Is So Incredibly Tough

One of the toughest composite materials found in nature.

18d

ScienceAlert – Latest

2K

If You Have Asthma, Avoiding The Flu Shot Can Actually Be a Deadly Mistake

Don't delay.

18d

ScienceAlert – Latest

1K

The World Is Experiencing a Critical Shortage of Blood, First Global Count Reveals

We need to fix this.

18d

Science News Daily

We took iPhone 11 Pro to the Scottish Highlands and all we got are these incredible photos – CNET

Can phone photos actually compete with a professional DSLR? We took the iPhone 11 Pro on a road trip through the Scottish Highlands to find out.

18d

Science News Daily

Google CEO, in leaked video, says company is 'genuinely struggling' with employee trust

At Google's closed-door meeting, CEO Sundar Pichai and other top executives sought to quell employee discontent and defended the hiring of a former Department of Homeland Security official, …

18d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

100+

Uråldriga papyrusdokument visar: Så byggdes pyramiderna

När arkeologerna grävde fram 4 500 år gamla dokument vid Röda havets strand, hittades de enda förstahandstexterna om hur Cheopspyramiden byggdes. – Forntida kalkyler på papyrus redogör för vad faraons arbetare fick, säger egyptologen Mark Lehner i SVT:s Vetenskapens värld.

18d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

34

Välnärda och avlönade säsongsarbetare byggde pyramiderna

Forskningen idag visar en mer nyanserad bild av vilka som byggde pyramiderna. De var inte slavar utan välnärda och avlönade arbetare. Forskare anser att de som deltog i bygget till stor del var säsongsarbetare och bönder, som under perioden när Nilen svämmade över kunde arbeta med det enorma byggprojektet.

18d

Science | The Guardian

1K

The five: ways to slow the onset of Alzheimer's

Scientists have conducted a series of trials that point to various ways to check the progress of the disease Last week, a US biotechnology company claimed to have produced the first drug with the ability to slow down the development of Alzheimer's. Biogen says it hopes to release aducanumab on to the market after it gets US Food and Drug Administration approval, which could take up to two years.

18d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

AAP recommends greater access to surgical treatments for severe obesity

Recognizing that severe obesity is a serious and worsening public health crisis in children and adolescents, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is calling for greater access to metabolic and bariatric surgery, one of the few strategies that has been shown to be effective in treating the most severe forms of the chronic disease.

18d

BBC News – Science & Environment

500+

The underwater archaeologist unearthing Durham's past

Over the past decade more than 12,000 valuable artefacts have been found.

18d

BBC News – Science & Environment

2K

Jane Fonda 'inspired by Greta Thunberg'

Actress Jane Fonda was arrested alongside fellow actor Ted Danson at a climate protest.

18d

Future(s) Studies

China's Efforts to Lead the Way in AI Start in Its Classrooms

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

Gas Station Converts To Electric Charging Station And Speeds Ahead Of Curve : RS Automotive — the first U.S. gas station fully converted to an electric vehicle-charging station — opened a month

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

What technologies that are in the prototype and laboratory stages now, will hit the mainstream in the 2020s?

(I hope for nanobots that seek out and kill cancer cells, clean up the amyloid plaques of dementia patients' brains, and so on.) submitted by /u/Inagnusnah [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

SpaceX details new timeline for sending humans to the moon, Mars and beyond – The Starship is about to embark on major voyages.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

"I rode in one of Zoox's self-driving cars in San Francisco — and it was more comfortable than the Uber and Lyft I took to and from the airport"

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

The newest gene editor radically improves on CRISPR – Harvard researchers have developed "prime editing," a true search-and-replace function for DNA.

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

University of Pennsylvania study shows how micro-scale 'rockets,' powered by acoustic waves and an on-board bubble motor, can be maneuvered through 3D landscapes of cells and particles using magnets.

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

The Ocean Cleanup Unveils Plan to Address the Main Source of Ocean Plastic Pollution: Rivers

submitted by /u/houston_wehaveaprblm [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

Skynet, But For Welfare: Automating Social Services Is Killing People

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

18d

Future(s) Studies

Dubai creates world's largest 3D printed building. The project stands almost 10 metres tall and requires half as many people to build as conventional construction

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

18d

ScienceAlert – Latest

300+

Here's How Your Brain Deals With Tricky Tasks

It's surprisingly simple.

18d

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

Scientists Are Arguing About The Messed Up 'Tully Monster' All Over Again

We may never know the truth.

18d

Science News Daily

Facebook pulls false political ad about Sen. Graham – CNET

Move shows that falsehood exemption doesn't apply to political groups.

18d

Discover Magazine

A Space-Age Journey into the Past with Albert Lin

Albert Lin with one of his drones, preparing to explore the Nan Madol site in Micronesia, in a scene from Lost Cities. (Credit: National Geographic) One of the happy surprises of the space age is that the same technologies propelling our civilization into the future have also proven hugely valuable for recovering lost details of civilizations in our past. Over the past three decades, satellite ima

18d

Discover Magazine

"Historic" wind event could whip California's Kincade blaze into a raging firestorm

The GOES-16 weather satellite captured this view of smoke streaming out over the Pacific Ocean from California's Kincade Fire on Oct. 24, 2019. (Source: RAMMB/CIRA/SLIDER) Northern California is bracing for winds forecast to gust as high as 80 miles per hour on Sunday morning — posing extreme wildfire risks in an area primed to burn. "A potentially historic, long duration, extremely critical offsh

18d

Scientific American Blog Posts

100+

Saving the Vaquita: New Promises and New Threats

In response to pressures from the international community, Mexico has agreed to take more steps to prevent the porpoises' extinction—but with fewer than 20 remaining, will that be enough? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19d

Scientific American Content

200+

Saving the Vaquita: New Promises and New Threats

In response to pressures from the international community, Mexico has agreed to take more steps to prevent the porpoises' extinction—but with fewer than 20 remaining, will that be enough? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19d

Wired

1K

Ocean Cleanup's New Plastic-Catcher … Kinda Already Exists?

The anti-plastic crusaders have another plan to keep junk from reaching the sea: trash-eating barges in rivers.

19d

ScienceDaily

Nerve cell protection free from side effects

The hormone erythropoietin (Epo) is a well-known doping substance that has a history of abuse in endurance sports. In addition to promoting red blood cell production, Epo protects nerve cells from death. To use this effect to cure neurodegenerative diseases, negative effects need to be prevented. Researchers have now discovered another Epo receptor that could have protective effects in humans with

19d

ScienceDaily

54

Microscale rockets can travel through cellular landscapes with precision

A new study shows how micro-scale 'rockets,' powered by acoustic waves and an on-board bubble motor, can be maneuvered through 3D landscapes of cells and particles using magnets.

19d

ScienceDaily

20

Engineers develop a new way to remove carbon dioxide from air

A new way of removing carbon dioxide from a stream of air could provide a significant tool in the battle against climate change. The new system can work on the gas at virtually any concentration level, even down to the roughly 400 parts per million currently found in the atmosphere.

19d

ScienceDaily

First in-depth study of marine fungi and their cell-division cycles

A first deep dive into the diversity of marine fungi and their cell division cycles has revealed unusual cell cycles, cell division patterns, and polarity. The study broadens our knowledge of ocean diversity into the nearly unstudied Kingdom Fungi.

19d

ScienceDaily

36

Discovery in monkeys could lead to treatment for blindness-causing syndrome

A genetic mutation that leads to a rare, but devastating blindness-causing condition called Bardet-Biedl Syndrome has been discovered in monkeys for the first time. The finding offers a promising way to develop gene and cell therapies that could treat people with the condition, which leads to vision loss, kidney disfunction, extra fingers or toes, and other symptoms.

19d

ScienceDaily

Micromotors push around single cells and particles

A new type of micromotor — powered by ultrasound and steered by magnets — can move around individual cells and microscopic particles in crowded environments without damaging them. In one demonstration, a micromotor pushed around silica particles to spell out letters. Researchers also controlled the micromotors to climb up microsized blocks and stairs, demonstrating their ability to move over thr

19d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

24

Electrospun fibers weave new medical innovations

Scientist are developing new applications for a fabrication process called coaxial electrospinning, which combines two or more materials into a fine fiber for use in industry, textiles or even medicine. Electrospinning combines the amazing properties of one material with the powerful benefits of another.

19d

Future(s) Studies

"Boston Dynamics: New robot makes soldiers obsolete"

submitted by /u/_vorkosigan [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Senator proposes $454 billion plan to swap gas cars for EVs

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

why are there no deep-underwater dome cities ?

i'm not sure if it's the right subreddit to ask to, but why don't governments build underwater cities ? i know it doesnt serve any special purpose. but then what about underwater domes that are made for scientific studies ? i think humanity should colonize the dark secrets that lie under the water submitted by /u/Trapsarenotgay6900 [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Game Changer: New Chemical Could Protect Crops From Drought – A University of California Riverside-led team has created a chemical to help plants hold onto water, which could stem the tide of massive annual crop losses from drought and help farmers grow food despite a changing climate

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Top 15 Countries Generating The Most Nuclear Energy 1965-2018

submitted by /u/ZakMHX [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Since this subreddit was created, what whiz bang technology discussed on here has actually been successfully brought to market?

One obvious example I can think of is electric cars and Telsa. submitted by /u/crazy_eric [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Heat camera at tourist attraction spots woman's breast cancer

submitted by /u/SirT6 [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

Digit v2: Special Delivery

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

October: Offshore wind to become a $1 trillion industry

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

19d

Future(s) Studies

China-based startup Pony.ai to launch BotRide robo-taxi service in Irvine, California on November 4th

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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