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nyheder2019oktober26

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A mesophilic cysteine-less split intein for protein trans-splicing applications under oxidizing conditions [Biochemistry]

Split intein-mediated protein trans-splicing has found extensive applications in chemical biology, protein chemistry, and biotechnology. However, an enduring limitation of all well-established split inteins has been the requirement to carry out the reaction in a reducing environment due to the presence of 1 or 2 catalytic cysteines that need to…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Quantitative structural assessment of graded receptor agonism [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Ligand–receptor interactions, which are ubiquitous in physiology, are described by theoretical models of receptor pharmacology. Structural evidence for graded efficacy receptor conformations predicted by receptor theory has been limited but is critical to fully validate theoretical models. We applied quantitative structure–function approaches to characterize the effects of structurally similar and

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Optimized filopodia formation requires myosin tail domain cooperation [Cell Biology]

Filopodia are actin-filled protrusions employed by cells to interact with their environment. Filopodia formation in Amoebozoa and Metazoa requires the phylogenetically diverse MyTH4-FERM (MF) myosins DdMyo7 and Myo10, respectively. While Myo10 is known to form antiparallel dimers, DdMyo7 lacks a coiled-coil domain in its proximal tail region, raising the question…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multilayered horizontal operon transfers from bacteria reconstruct a thiamine salvage pathway in yeasts [Evolution]

Horizontal acquisition of bacterial genes is presently recognized as an important contribution to the adaptation and evolution of eukaryotic genomes. However, the mechanisms underlying expression and consequent selection and fixation of the prokaryotic genes in the new eukaryotic setting are largely unknown. Here we show that genes composing the pathway…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Evidence for independent brain and neurocranial reorganization during hominin evolution [Anthropology]

Throughout hominin evolution, the brain of our ancestors underwent a 3-fold increase in size and substantial structural reorganization. However, inferring brain reorganization from fossil hominin neurocrania (=braincases) remains a challenge, above all because comparative data relating brain to neurocranial structures in living humans and great apes are still scarce. Here…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

KRAS G13D sensitivity to neurofibromin-mediated GTP hydrolysis [Applied Biological Sciences]

KRAS mutations occur in ∼35% of colorectal cancers and promote tumor growth by constitutively activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. KRAS mutations at codons 12, 13, or 61 are thought to prevent GAP protein-stimulated GTP hydrolysis and render KRAS-mutated colorectal cancers unresponsive to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors….

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cytosolic delivery of inhibitory antibodies with cationic lipids [Applied Biological Sciences]

Antibodies can be developed to directly inhibit almost any protein, but their inability to enter the cytosol limits inhibitory antibodies to membrane-associated or extracellular targets. Developing a cytosolic antibody delivery system would offer unique opportunities to directly inhibit and study intracellular protein function. Here we demonstrate that IgG antibodies that…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Carrier localization in perovskite nickelates from oxygen vacancies [Applied Physical Sciences]

Point defects, such as oxygen vacancies, control the physical properties of complex oxides, relevant in active areas of research from superconductivity to resistive memory to catalysis. In most oxide semiconductors, electrons that are associated with oxygen vacancies occupy the conduction band, leading to an increase in the electrical conductivity. Here…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Synergistic boost of output power density and efficiency in In-Li-codoped SnTe [Applied Physical Sciences]

We report enhanced thermoelectric performance of SnTe by further increasing its intrinsic high carrier concentration caused by Sn vacancies in contrast to the traditional method. Along with In2Te3 alloying, which results in an enhanced Seebeck coefficient, Li2Te is added to further increase the carrier concentration in order to maintain high…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

AFF1 acetylation by p300 temporally inhibits transcription during genotoxic stress response [Biochemistry]

Soon after exposure to genotoxic reagents, mammalian cells inhibit transcription to prevent collisions with repair machinery and to mount a proper DNA damage response. However, mechanisms underlying early transcriptional inhibition are poorly understood. In this report, we show that site-specific acetylation of super elongation complex (SEC) subunit AFF1 by p300…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

PRC2 engages a bivalent H3K27M-H3K27me3 dinucleosome inhibitor [Biochemistry]

A lysine-to-methionine mutation at lysine 27 of histone 3 (H3K27M) has been shown to promote oncogenesis in a subset of pediatric gliomas. While there is evidence that this "oncohistone" mutation acts by inhibiting the histone methyltransferase PRC2, the details of this proposed mechanism nevertheless continue to be debated. Recent evidence…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The deaminase APOBEC3B triggers the death of cells lacking uracil DNA glycosylase [Biochemistry]

Human cells express up to 9 active DNA cytosine deaminases with functions in adaptive and innate immunity. Many cancers manifest an APOBEC mutation signature and APOBEC3B (A3B) is likely the main enzyme responsible. Although significant numbers of APOBEC signature mutations accumulate in tumor genomes, the majority of APOBEC-catalyzed uracil lesions…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

20

Science and Culture: Why "seeing" some scientific phenomena entails a touch of artistry and a dash of interpretation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The first photograph of a black hole, seen around the world this April, was not a photograph in any conventional sense. Computer algorithms stitched together data from seven radio telescope observatories as far flung as Chile, Hawaii, Arizona, Mexico, and Spain and translated that data into shades of colored pixels…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Proteostasis collapse is a driver of cell aging and death [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

What molecular processes drive cell aging and death? Here, we model how proteostasis—i.e., the folding, chaperoning, and maintenance of protein function—collapses with age from slowed translation and cumulative oxidative damage. Irreparably damaged proteins accumulate with age, increasingly distracting the chaperones from folding the healthy proteins the cell needs. The tipping…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Wnt activator FOXB2 drives the neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer [Cell Biology]

The Wnt signaling pathway is of paramount importance for development and disease. However, the tissue-specific regulation of Wnt pathway activity remains incompletely understood. Here we identify FOXB2, an uncharacterized forkhead box family transcription factor, as a potent activator of Wnt signaling in normal and cancer cells. Mechanistically, FOXB2 induces multiple…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Electrostatic shape control of a charged molecular membrane from ribbon to scroll [Chemistry]

Bilayers of amphiphiles can organize into spherical vesicles, nanotubes, planar, undulating, and helical nanoribbons, and scroll-like cochleates. These bilayer-related architectures interconvert under suitable conditions. Here, a charged, chiral amphiphile (palmitoyl-lysine, C16-K1) is used to elucidate the pathway for planar nanoribbon to cochleate transition induced by salt (NaCl) concentration.

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A relatively wide-bandgap and air-stable donor polymer for fabrication of efficient semitransparent and tandem organic photovoltaics [Chemistry]

Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) have attracted tremendous attention in the field of thin-film solar cells due to their wide range of applications, especially for semitransparent devices. Here, we synthesize a dithiaindacenone-thiophene-benzothiadiazole-thiophene alternating donor copolymer named poly{[2,7-(5,5-didecyl-5H-1,8-dithia-as-indacenone)]-alt-[5,5-(5′,6′-dioctyloxy-4′,7′-di-2-thienyl-2′,1′,3

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cellular defects resulting from disease-related myosin II mutations in Drosophila [Developmental Biology]

The nonmuscle myosin II motor protein produces forces that are essential to driving the cell movements and cell shape changes that generate tissue structure. Mutations in myosin II that are associated with human diseases are predicted to disrupt critical aspects of myosin function, but the mechanisms that translate altered myosin…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ion exchange selectivity in clay is controlled by nanoscale chemical-mechanical coupling [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Ion exchange in nanoporous clay-rich media plays an integral role in water, nutrient, and contaminant storage and transport. In montmorillonite (MMT), a common clay mineral in soils, sediments, and muds, the swelling and collapse of clay particles through the addition or removal of discrete molecular layers of water alters cation…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Amazon deforestation drives malaria transmission, and malaria burden reduces forest clearing [Ecology]

Deforestation and land use change are among the most pressing anthropogenic environmental impacts. In Brazil, a resurgence of malaria in recent decades paralleled rapid deforestation and settlement in the Amazon basin, yet evidence of a deforestation-driven increase in malaria remains equivocal. We hypothesize an underlying cause of this ambiguity is…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Middle Paleolithic complex technology and a Neandertal tar-backed tool from the Dutch North Sea [Evolution]

We report the discovery of a 50,000-y-old birch tar-hafted flint tool found off the present-day coastline of The Netherlands. The production of adhesives and multicomponent tools is considered complex technology and has a prominent place in discussions about the evolution of human behavior. This find provides evidence on the technological…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Tissue-specific FAH deficiency alters sleep-wake patterns and results in chronic tyrosinemia in mice [Genetics]

Fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) is the last enzyme in tyrosine catabolism, and mutations in the FAH gene are associated with hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT1 or TYRSN1) in humans. In a behavioral screen of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenized mice we identified a mutant line which we named "swingshift" (swst, MGI:3611216) with a nonsynonymous…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Gastrointestinal dysfunction in autism displayed by altered motility and achalasia in Foxp1+/- mice [Genetics]

Gastrointestinal dysfunctions in individuals with autism spectrum disorder are poorly understood, although they are common among this group of patients. FOXP1 haploinsufficiency is characterized by autistic behavior, language impairment, and intellectual disability, but feeding difficulties and gastrointestinal problems have also been reported. Whether these are primary impairments, the result of.

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

4D electron microscopy of T cell activation [Immunology and Inflammation]

T cells can be controllably stimulated through antigen-specific or nonspecific protocols. Accompanying functional hallmarks of T cell activation can include cytoskeletal reorganization, cell size increase, and cytokine secretion. Photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) is used to image and quantify evanescent electric fields at the surface of T cells as a…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Autoimmune antibodies correlate with immune checkpoint therapy-induced toxicities [Immunology and Inflammation]

Immune checkpoint (IC) therapy provides substantial benefits to cancer patients but can also cause distinctive toxicities termed immune-related adverse events (irAEs). Biomarkers to predict toxicities will be necessary to improve management of patients receiving IC therapy. We relied on serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries to evaluate plasma samples…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inherent reactivity of unselected TCR repertoires to peptide-MHC molecules [Immunology and Inflammation]

The repertoire of αβ T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) on mature T cells is selected in the thymus where it is rendered both self-tolerant and restricted to the recognition of major histocompatibility complex molecules presenting peptide antigens (pMHC). It remains unclear whether germline TCR sequences exhibit an inherent bias to…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Core Concept: Emerging science of chronotherapy offers big opportunities to optimize drug delivery [Medical Sciences]

A growing number of biomedical researchers advocate a simple way to improve the effectiveness of medications: administer them based on what studies say is the ideal time. "Almost every drug that's out there probably could be optimized in terms of the time of day it's delivered," says Erik Herzog, a…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Staphylococcus aureus exhibits heterogeneous siderophore production within the vertebrate host [Microbiology]

Siderophores, iron-scavenging small molecules, are fundamental to bacterial nutrient metal acquisition and enable pathogens to overcome challenges imposed by nutritional immunity. Multimodal imaging mass spectrometry allows visualization of host−pathogen iron competition, by mapping siderophores within infected tissue. We have observed heterogeneous distributions of Staphylococcus aureus sideropho

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rotation and propulsion in 3D active chiral droplets [Physics]

Chirality is a recurrent theme in the study of biological systems, in which active processes are driven by the internal conversion of chemical energy into work. Bacterial flagella, actomyosin filaments, and microtubule bundles are active systems that are also intrinsically chiral. Despite some exploratory attempt to capture the relations between…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Efficient team structures in an open-ended cooperative creativity experiment [Physics]

Creativity is progressively acknowledged as the main driver for progress in all sectors of humankind's activities: arts, science, technology, business, and social policies. Nowadays, many creative processes rely on many actors collectively contributing to an outcome. The same is true when groups of people collaborate in the solution of a…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

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The concurrent decline of soil lead and children's blood lead in New Orleans [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Lead (Pb) is extremely toxic and a major cause of chronic diseases worldwide. Pb is associated with health disparities, particularly within low-income populations. In biological systems, Pb mimics calcium and, among other effects, interrupts cell signaling. Furthermore, Pb exposure results in epigenetic changes that affect multigenerational gene expression. Exposure to…

16d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Shorter distances between papers over time are due to more cross-field references and increased citation rate to higher-impact papers [Social Sciences]

The exponential increase in the number of scientific publications raises the question of whether the sciences are expanding into a fractured structure, making cross-field communication difficult. On the other hand, scientists may be motivated to learn extensively across fields to enhance their innovative capacity, and this may offset the negative…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Work time and market integration in the original affluent society [Social Sciences]

Does integration into commercial markets lead people to work longer hours? Does this mean that people in more subsistence-oriented societies work less compared to those in more market-integrated societies? Despite their venerable status in both anthropology and economic history, these questions have been difficult to address due to a dearth…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Definitions, methods, and applications in interpretable machine learning [Statistics]

Machine-learning models have demonstrated great success in learning complex patterns that enable them to make predictions about unobserved data. In addition to using models for prediction, the ability to interpret what a model has learned is receiving an increasing amount of attention. However, this increased focus has led to considerable…

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Dagens Medicin

Arbejdsmiljøets nye klæder

En beretning fra Odense Universitetshospital anno 2019.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Should preschool writing be more communication and less ABCs?

Writing instruction in early education should be about more than letter formation and penmanship, argue Michigan State University researchers who found preschool teachers don't often encourage writing for communication purposes.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Testing HIV testers

An innovative study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) used a youth-driven mystery shopper methodology to assess YMSM's testing experiences in three metropolitan cities highly impacted by the HIV epidemic. Similar to the announced standardized patient evaluation used in medical training, mystery shopping is used to evaluate healthcare delivery in community setting

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Science Magazine

Alien comets may be common, object from beyond Solar System suggests

Fresh analysis of 2I/Borisov shows interstellar object is similar to Solar System comets

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NYT > Science

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Recall of Generic Version of Xanax Is Announced by F.D.A.

The manufacturer, Mylan Pharmaceuticals, said a batch of alprazolam tablets distributed in July and August might contain a foreign substance.

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Scientific American Content

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California Investigates Blackouts as New Fires Flare

Even with large-scale intentional power outages, utility equipment may have ignited recent blazes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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forskning.se

99

Operation rädda biet – men hur?

Jordbruk och bekämpningsmedel hotar världens bin, som är nödvändiga för pollinering av våra grödor. Ovårdade fältkanter och oklippta gräsmattor med stor mångfald kan vara ett sätt att rädda vildbina som konkurreras ut av tambin – som mest producerar honung. Två tredjedelar av världens livsmedelsgrödor kräver pollinering, liksom 90 procent av de vilda växterna. Det är därför FN:s jordbruksorgan FA

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Ingeniøren

45

Cityringen brudt ned to nætter i træk: Skinnesliber forvirrede it-system

Først brokkede Cityringens overboer sig over støj. Og nu har forsøget på at afhjælpe det problem medført et nyt for den nye metrolinjes morgenpendlerne.

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Science | The Guardian

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Are 90% of giraffes gay – or have their loving looks been misunderstood?

Dawn Butler's claims regarding animal sexuality have been called 'offensive' and 'homophobic' by one of Jeremy Corbyn's advisers. But what's the scientific verdict? A new split has emerged in the Labour party over a matter more urgent than Brexit: the sexuality of giraffes. "Ninety per cent of giraffes are gay," Dawn Butler, the shadow secretary for women and equalities, told a PinkNews awards ev

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Alzheimer's subtypes could affect future treatments, Mayo Clinic researchers find

Despite decades of scientific scrutiny, Alzheimer's disease researchers have yet to work out its cause or treatment. Understanding what underlies its three distinct subtypes is thought to be a promising new research avenue. In a new study in JAMA Neurology, a team of neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida led by Melissa Murray, Ph.D., examined a key region of the brain and found that patterns o

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Scientific American Blog Posts

What Do Hurricanes and Cybersecurity Have in Common?

Much like extreme weather, cyberattacks require international monitoring and cooperation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New Scientist

500+

Up to 630 million people could be threatened by rising seas

Three times more people than we thought are living on land threatened by flooding from sea level rises by 2100, with the threat particularly severe in Asia

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ScienceDaily

Following in Darwin's footsteps: understanding the plant evolution of florist's gloxinia

Researchers discovered that in its 200 years of being cultivated and domesticated, florist's gloxinia, Sinningia speciosa, has reached tremendous levels of phenotypic, or physical, variation and originates from a single founder population.

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The Scientist RSS

77

Value of Medical Marijuana for Mental Health Questioned

A meta-analysis of more than 80 studies from the past four decades finds weak evidence to support the use of medicinal cannabis to treat anxiety, depression, and other mental health disorders.

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New on MIT Technology Review

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Sea-level rise could flood hundreds of millions more than expected

Princeton researchers found that far more people are living closer to the ocean than previously believed.

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Livescience.com

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Mathematicians Solve 'Twin Prime Conjecture' — In an Alternate Universe

Mathematicians have uncovered a big new piece of evidence for one of the most famous unproven ideas in mathematics, known as the twin prime conjecture.

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Cosmos Magazine

Thought decoding in the abstract

Our brain has distinct areas for all manner of ideas, research suggests.

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Cosmos Magazine

200+

New analysis triples risk from rising sea levels

Regular flooding could become a reality for hundreds of millions of people.

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Futurity.org

Biomarker may clear up how depression saps motivation

Researchers have identified biomarkers—genes and specific brain circuits in mice—associated with a common symptom of depression: lack of motivation. The finding could guide research to find new ways to diagnose and potentially treat individuals suffering from lack of motivation and bring closer the day of precision medicine for psychiatric disorders like depression. Depression is the most prevale

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Wired

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Trans Athletes Are Posting Victories and Shaking Up Sports

Transgender athletes at all levels of sport are winning medals, spurring a contentious debate over the future of gendered competition.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New AI deep learning model allows earlier, more accurate ozone warnings

Researchers from the University of Houston have developed an artificial intelligence-based ozone forecasting system, which would allow local areas to predict ozone levels 24 hours in advance.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists learn how to make oxygen 'perform' for them

Chemists have figured out how to keep one particular isotope of oxygen — among the most abundant elements on the planet and a crucial building block for materials like glass and ceramics — spinning during nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy long enough to learn some things about its structure and function.

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Future(s) Studies

SUVs second biggest cause of emissions rise, figures reveal

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Future(s) Studies

3D printed cabin parts now possible with SAE International polymer specifications – 3D Printing Industry

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Missouri panel endorses Half-Billion Dollar Hyperloop test track

submitted by /u/Votings_Good_Folks [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Back to the battery future: Rocky Mountain Institute's new predicts unprecedented battery storage development in the next decade and beyond, as investment far outpaces projections. And, while li-ion will remain to be the tech that's hot in the streets in the short term, the future is diverse.

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Future(s) Studies

3D printing at large scale.

submitted by /u/AdamJefferson [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Amazon's hiring more humans, but robots are handling the holiday crush

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Scientists newly identified a set of 3 antibodies isolated from a person with the flu & found that the antibodies provided broad protection against several different strains of influenza, which could become the basis for new antivirals and vaccines.

submitted by /u/SirT6 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Deepfake apps: Society's new enemy

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Millennial Parents Show Growing Trust in AI, Robotics for Health Care – However, U.S. and U.K. trust in technology is lower than in other parts of the world.

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Scientists Demonstrate Direct Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans: Work on an "Internet of brains" takes another step – the first "organic computer" with living brains tethered together as if they were so many microprocessors.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

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YouTube stars raise over $6m to plant trees around the world – More than 600 creators and social media influencers join campaign to plant 20m trees. They will plant the trees around the world, starting in January, with the aim of completing the project within three years by 2022.

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Future(s) Studies

Volkswagen optimizes traffic flow with quantum computers

submitted by /u/nonaime7777777 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

GM, Toyota and FCA pit themselves against humanity in move which will kill more people with pollution – These automakers have cast their lot in with the fossil fuel interests and EPA's fight against California's clean air rules, which has implications for the future of our air quality.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

With AI, We'll See Faster Fights, but Longer Wars: AI-enabled ISR will increase the speed and accuracy of decision-making on the urban battlefield. Better protected and well-supplied soldiers can endure longer wars.

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

The future of our water supply and the fight to stop Nestlé from taking water to sell in plastic bottles: Should water be commodified and sold by private industry, or is it a basic human right?

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

"It's not nice to step on it, it's much nicer to burn it and use it as a fuel for electricity and heat," Energy companies in Finland turn to animal poo for clean power.

submitted by /u/JohnRSearle [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

World unprepared for impact of climate change on mountain water supplies: experts. In some areas, such as the Alps, extra water from glaciers has caused flash floods while shrinking snow cover in the Andes has led to droughts in places like Chile.

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

California fires show 'the horror' world will face from climate change. Northern California grappled again this weekend with widespread power outages that affected as many as 2 million Californians

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Isotruss, a material 1/12 the weight of steel and 12 times stronger

submitted by /u/Deciimaatee [link] [comments]

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Cosmos Magazine

Introducing spider (inspired) cam

Researchers develop a small and highly effective depth sensor.

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Cosmos Magazine

An opponent on the rise can mess with your head

It's easy to be intimidated by 'status momentum', research shows.

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Cosmos Magazine

'Insufficient evidence' cannabinoids improve mental health

New study analyses the impact on six conditions.

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Cosmos Magazine

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Look into my eyes

Something big is staring back at Hubble.

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ScienceDaily

36

Could mathematics help to better treat cancer?

Impaired information processing may prevent cells from perceiving their environment correctly; they then start acting in an uncontrolled way and this can lead to the development of cancer. To better understand how impaired information transmission influences the activity of diseased cells, researchers are going beyond the field of biology. They propose to examine cellular communication in the ligh

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ScienceDaily

90

Living in a noisy area increases the risk of suffering a more serious stroke

The high levels of environmental noise we are subjected to in large cities can increase both the severity and consequences of an ischaemic stroke. More precisely, researchers put the increased risk at 30% for people living in noisier areas. In contrast, living close to green areas brings down this risk by up to 25%. This is the first time that these factors have been analysed in relation to stroke

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ScienceDaily

Exposing blind spots in the carbon budget space

The impact of 1°C of global heating is already having devastating impacts on communities and ecosystems across the globe. Researchers have identified biases towards some selected carbon budgets in the current scenario literature. They propose a more comprehensive approach to systematically explore the carbon budget scenario space.

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ScienceDaily

Bird bacteria is key to communication and mating

Birds use odor to identify other birds, and researchers have shown that if the bacteria that produce the odor is altered, it could negatively impact a bird's ability to communicate with other birds or find a mate.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

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Study finds exotic parrots aren't impacting native bird populations in South Florida

In a neighborhood on the outskirts of Miami, a red-bellied woodpecker made two individual nests in two neighboring dead palm trees. It picked one. A red-masked parakeet moved into the other. Over the summer, they shared alarm calls when strangers approached. They would fly to the same tree when Joshua Diamond examined their nests. This was when he learned they were both parents, raising their youn

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Futurism

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Ford App Lets Man Control Rental Car He Returned Months Ago

Access Granted A man who rented a Ford Expedition in May is still able to track the SUV's location and control its engine and locks using the FordPass app — despite returning the vehicle five months ago. "I have been opening the app and tracking the vehicle almost every day to see if my access is still there," Masamba Sinclair told Ars Technica , "and sure enough, I can see exactly where my old r

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Science News Daily

Apple Warns HomePod Users Of iOS 13.2 Update

The other day, there were reports that following the release of iOS 13.2, some HomePod users were claiming that their devices were bricked, where the device would keep rebooting itself endlessly …

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Phys.org

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Study finds exotic parrots aren't impacting native bird populations in South Florida

In a neighborhood on the outskirts of Miami, a red-bellied woodpecker made two individual nests in two neighboring dead palm trees. It picked one. A red-masked parakeet moved into the other. Over the summer, they shared alarm calls when strangers approached. They would fly to the same tree when Joshua Diamond examined their nests. This was when he learned they were both parents, raising their youn

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Phys.org

Text-based nudges to high school seniors boost financial aid filing, college enrollment

High school seniors who receive texted reminders—or "nudges"—from their school counselors are 17 percent more likely to complete the college financial aid application process and 8 percent more likely to enroll in college directly after graduating than their peers who are not nudged, according to a new study published today in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, a peer-reviewed journal of

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Science | The Guardian

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Elderly people being 'poisoned' by medication, say drug experts

Too little is known about how drugs affect older people, House of Lords committee told Elderly patients are being "poisoned" with medication because too little is known about how different drugs interact with each other and correct dosages for older people, experts have said. Speaking at the House of Lords' science and technology committee hearing on healthier living in old age, Sir Munir Pirmoha

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Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

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Intuitive virtual reality: Bimodal 'electronic skin' developed

Through the crafty use of magnetic fields, scientists have developed the first electronic sensor that can simultaneously process both touchless and tactile stimuli. Prior attempts have so far failed to combine these functions on a single device due to overlapping signals of the various stimuli. As the sensor is readily applied to the human skin, it could provide a seamless interactive platform for

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Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

24

Cycling is safer with more cyclists on the road, but injuries are on the rise

Cycling is safer with more cyclists on the road, but injuries among older riders are on the rise.

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Quanta Magazine

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Cosmic Triangles Open a Window to the Origin of Time

In late August, paleontologists reported finding the fossil of a flattened turtle shell that "was possibly trodden on" by a dinosaur, whose footprints spanned the rock layer directly above. The rare discovery of correlated fossils potentially traces two bygone species to the same time and place. "It's only by doing that that we're able to reconstruct ancient ecosystems," one paleontologist told T

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Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

"Antiken bara toppen av ett isberg"

– Ja, man backade om antiken, men det är bara toppen av ett isberg. Det säger Hans Albin Larsson, professor emeritus i historiedidaktik vid Jönköpings universitet. Han har varit ordförande i Historielärarnas förening i tolv år och har även varit överdirektör på Skolinspektionen.

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Nature

100+

Beware the UK government's Brexit promises

Nature, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03263-3 Government offers of new funds for UK scientists could be unaffordable.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds companies may be wise to share cybersecurity efforts

Research finds that when one company experiences a cybersecurity breach, other companies in the same field also become less attractive to investors. However, companies that are open about their cybersecurity risk management fare significantly better than peers that don't disclose their cybersecurity efforts.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Text-based nudges to high school seniors boost financial aid filing, college enrollment

High school seniors who receive texted reminders — or 'nudges' — from their school counselors are 17% more likely to complete the college financial aid application process and 8% more likely to enroll in college directly after graduating.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

30

New insight on how bacteria evolve drug resistance could lead to improved antibiotic therapies

Researchers have provided new insight into a mechanism behind the evolution of antibiotic resistance in a type of bacterium that causes severe infections in humans.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

96

Increased depression, suicidal thoughts and stress are reported in patients with chronically itchy skin

Itch is a very common symptom in patients suffering from skin diseases. In a new multicenter cross-sectional study on the psychological burden of itch in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, published by Elsevier, investigators report that the presence of itch in dermatological patients was significantly associated with clinical depression, suicidal ideation and stress. They recommend providi

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Third-party genetic genealogy site is vulnerable to compromised data, impersonations

University of Washington researchers have found that the third-party genealogy site GEDmatch is vulnerable to multiple kinds of security risks.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Breast cancer: AI predicts which pre-malignant breast lesions will progress to advanced cancer

New research at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, could help better determine which patients diagnosed with the pre-malignant breast cancer commonly as stage 0 are likely to progress to invasive breast cancer and therefore might benefit from additional therapy over and above surgery alone.

16d

Science Magazine

The world's best drink cooler may come from pineapple scraps

New material can also block sound

16d

New Scientist

1K

Just thinking about bright objects changes the size of your pupils

Our pupils change size in response to light levels in our environment, but it seems that just thinking about something bright or dark can have the same effect

16d

Phys.org

Facebook and Instagram gave away the presence of the 'Japan pig' seahorse in Taiwan

While monitoring of cryptic and elusive tiny creatures, such as pygmy seahorses that measure only 13 to 27 mm, might be too costly and time-consuming for research teams and institutions, the underwater activity might be proving of particular interest to photography and diving enthusiasts.

16d

Phys.org

Following in Darwin's footsteps: understanding the plant evolution of florist's gloxinia

More than 150 years ago, Charles Darwin's fascination with genetics and domestication catapulted the scientific world into new territory as scientists started to ask: How did a species evolve to be this way?

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Facebook and Instagram gave away the presence of the 'Japan pig' seahorse in Taiwan

While monitoring of cryptic and elusive tiny creatures, such as pygmy seahorses that measure only 13 to 27 mm, might be too costly and time-consuming for research teams and institutions, the underwater activity might be proving of particular interest to photography and diving enthusiasts.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Following in Darwin's footsteps: understanding the plant evolution of florist's gloxinia

More than 150 years ago, Charles Darwin's fascination with genetics and domestication catapulted the scientific world into new territory as scientists started to ask: How did a species evolve to be this way?

16d

Ingeniøren

Debat: Gentænk fordelingen af forskningsmidler

PLUS. Danmarks nye uddannelses- og forskningsminister skal prioritere skarpt – vi har ikke blot brug for flere midler til forskning, men i den grad også for optimering af forbruget af eksisterende midler.

16d

ScienceDaily

28

Intuitive virtual reality: Bimodal 'electronic skin' developed

Through the crafty use of magnetic fields, scientists have developed the first electronic sensor that can simultaneously process both touchless and tactile stimuli. Prior attempts have so far failed to combine these functions on a single device due to overlapping signals of the various stimuli. As the sensor is readily applied to the human skin, it could provide a seamless interactive platform for

16d

ScienceDaily

28

Potential new target for treatment of gout

Researchers have identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of gout, a common type of arthritis that causes episodes of painful and stiff joints. Their study suggests that blocking a signaling molecule known as TAK1 can suppress inflammation caused by gout. The research lays the foundation for the development of potential new treatment strategies for gout.

16d

ScienceDaily

40

Cycling is safer with more cyclists on the road, but injuries are on the rise

Cycling is safer with more cyclists on the road, but injuries among older riders are on the rise.

16d

ScienceDaily

31

Hormonal contraceptives affect the efficacy of exposure therapy

Psychologists have studied in what way hormonal contraceptives affect the efficacy of anxiety therapy. They demonstrated that women who were on the pill benefited less from exposure therapy than women who didn't take any oral contraceptives.

16d

ScienceDaily

44

Scientists invent animal-free testing of lethal neurotoxins

Animal testing will no longer be required to assess a group of deadly neurotoxins, thanks to new research. A new technique could replace conventional methods of testing paralytic neurotoxins, which previously required euthanasia of test subjects.

16d

Big Think

1K

Astrophysicist claims "dark fluid" fills the missing 95% of the Universe

An astrophysicist and cosmologist Dr. Farnes published a paper while at Oxford University with a novel explanation for dark energy and dark matter. His theory claims to explain the missing 95% of the observable universe by the existence of "dark fluid". This fluid has negative mass, repelling other materials. None While it seems we are making great strides in unlocking the mysteries of the Univer

16d

Discover Magazine

Discover Has a New Website Coming Soon

Satisfying everyday curiosity. That's what we're about. And it's why Discover is bringing you an entirely new website. In the coming weeks, we will be refreshing the look and experience on Discovermagazine.com. We'll still have all the great science stories you love, with smart writing and relevant, engaging information. But it will be framed with a sleek, more modern design that we hope you'll li

16d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

88

Asteroid Hygiea May Be the Smallest Dwarf Planet in Our Solar System

Hygiea is the 10th asteroid discovered in the Asteroid Belt and the fourth-largest asteroid by mass. While one of the largest asteroids, its dark surface made it difficult to distinguish from Earth using telescopes of the day. Ceres was discovered in 1801, but Hygiea (formal designation: 10 Hygiea) wasn't located until 1849. We actually discussed Hygiea in passing recently, when we revisited the

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

65

Research shows that early retirement can accelerate cognitive decline

Early retirement can accelerate cognitive decline among the elderly, according to research conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Telehealth effectively diagnoses/manages fetal congenital heart disease in rural patients

A recent study of 368 pregnant mothers, led by Bettina Cuneo, MD, director of perinatal cardiology and fetal cardiac telemedicine at Children's Hospital Colorado, found that fetal congenital heart disease (CHD) was correctly identified and successfully managed according to evidence-based risk stratification. In addition, parents achieved a dramatic cost benefit and patient/physician satisfaction w

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New method identifies aggressive breast cancer

Aggressive forms of breast cancer often manipulate the immune response in their favor. This manipulation is revealed in humans by the same immunological 'signature' as in mice. This is shown by a study carried out by scientists from the University of Bonn together with Dutch colleagues. Their method makes it possible to obtain an indication of the prognosis of the disease using patients' tumor tis

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Wearable activity trackers a reliable tool for predicting death risk in older adults

A federally funded study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers shows that wearable accelerometers — mechanical sensors worn like a watch, belt or bracelet to track movement — are a more reliable measure of physical activity and better than patient surveys and other methods used by physicians at assessing five-year risk of death in older adults.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

When money is scarce, biased behavior happens faster

Discrimination may happen faster than the blink of an eye, especially during periods of economic scarcity, according to a new study from Cornell University.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Survey reveals the hidden costs of care cascades

Just about any medical test can turn up an incidental finding that leads to a cascade of follow-up tests. Through a national survey of physicians, investigators from the Brigham have found that 99% of physicians have experienced these cascades of care firsthand and report that such cascades have caused their patients psychological harm, physical harm and financial burden and have caused frustratio

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Syringe exchange programs prevented thousands of new HIV cases in Philadelphia, Baltimore

Syringe exchange programs established in Philadelphia and Baltimore prevented a total of 12,483 new cases of HIV over a 10-year period, according to a study published today. The averted HIV infections also saved both cities millions of dollars every year, according to the researchers.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'Wolves in sheep's clothing' — the superbugs outsmarting laboratory tests

Hospital screening tests are failing to identify the true extent of microbial resistance, according to new research. Scientists have found that disease-causing bacteria carry antibiotic resistance genes that are dormant as a result of a genetic mutation. During screening, the bacteria appears susceptible to antibiotics. However, such mutations easily become lost, rapidly transforming the bacteria

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Endocrine Society urges policymakers to follow science on transgender health

A custody case in Texas has sparked heated debate and embroiled state policymakers in public discussions about the diagnosis and appropriate medical treatment of transgender children. Unfortunately, many of the claims being made about gender-affirming care for transgender and gender incongruent individuals are inaccurate.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

26

Immune cells in skin kill MRSA bacteria before they enter the body

A type of immune cell called neutrophils could be responsible for controlling bacterial numbers of an antibiotic-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on human skin before the bacteria get a chance to invade, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet published in Cell Reports. The results could provide an explanation for why this superbug is only carried transiently by some pe

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Structured light promises path to faster, more secure communications

Quantum mechanics has come a long way during the past 100 years but still has a long way to go. In AVS Quantum Science, researchers from the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa review the progress being made in using structured light in quantum protocols to create a larger encoding alphabet, stronger security and better resistance to noise.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Seeking better treatment for ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease

In neurodegenerative disease ALS, proteins called TDP-43 aggregate in patient tissues. A team led by researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory found that in ALS, TDP-43 proteins are dysfunctional, causing de-silencing of retrotransposons or 'jumping genes.'

16d

The Atlantic

200+

Tattoos Now Have an Exit Strategy

A few months ago, I walked into a tattoo shop near my apartment, forked over $100, slipped a token into a gumball machine, and opened a plastic pod to find the image I would soon have on my upper arm for the rest of my life. The shop calls this game Get What You Get : You pay the house minimum and get a surprise design via the retro machine, then an artist turns it into a small, full-color tattoo

16d

Futurism

1K

It's Official: Elon Musk Will Go to Trial Over "Pedo" Comments

Court Date Remember last year, when Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk called a cave diver a "pedo guy" on Twitter after the diver criticized his plan to rescue a soccer team of Thai boys who were trapped in a cave? Now the cave diver, Vernon Unsworth, has sued over the comments — and a U.S. District Judge in Los Angeles ruled yesterday that the case will go to trial, according to Bloomberg . Jury Ri

16d

Futurity.org

20

Chameleons' weird speedy tongues inspire faster soft robots

Getting inspiration from a chameleon's tongue, researchers have created soft robots that can recreate high-powered and high-speed motions using stored elastic energy. Chameleons, salamanders, and many toads use stored elastic energy to launch their sticky tongues at unsuspecting insects located up to one-and-a-half body lengths away, catching them within a tenth of a second. The researchers made

16d

Phys.org

81

Laos hydro project switched on along dried-out Mekong

A multi-billion dollar hydro-electric power plant on the Mekong river in Laos was officially switched on Tuesday, as drone images of dried-up downstream areas stirred fresh outcry on one of the world's great rivers.

16d

ScienceDaily

68

Research on large storm waves could help lessen their impact on coasts

An international team of researchers has analyzed months of data of large nearshore waves to provide new insights that could help improve the designs of a variety of coastal structures from seaports to seawalls to better withstand destructive waves.

16d

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

500+

The medical potential of AI and metabolites | Leila Pirhaji

Many diseases are driven by metabolites — small molecules in your body like fat, glucose and cholesterol — but we don't know exactly what they are or how they work. Biotech entrepreneur and TED Fellow Leila Pirhaji shares her plan to build an AI-based network to characterize metabolite patterns, better understand how disease develops — and discover more effective treatments.

16d

Phys.org

61

A new type of acoustic insulation enables sound to be concentrated in corners

A group of researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), in collaboration with Chinese scientists from the University of Nanjing (NJU), have designed a new type of acoustic insulation that enables sound waves to be concentrated in corners. This line of research could have applications in industrial ultrasound technologies or in the improvement of certain medical diagnostic tests su

16d

Phys.org

Swiss lament glacier melting as UN focuses on mountains

A Swiss minister says over 10% of the Alpine country's glaciers have been lost over the last five years—a depletion not seen in over a century—as the U.N.'s weather agency opened its first-ever meeting on how climate change is affecting mountains.

16d

Phys.org

1K

Structured light promises path to faster, more secure communications

Structured light is a fancy way to describe patterns or pictures of light, but deservedly so as it promises future communications that will be both faster and more secure.

16d

Phys.org

Putting the Water Framework Directive to the test

The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) is one of the most progressive regulatory frameworks for water management worldwide. Questioning its objectives and principles would seriously compromise the effective protection of water bodies in the European Union (EU). Its practical implementation, however, requires urgent improvement. This is the conclusion reached by the Leibniz-Institute of Fresh

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Human activities boosted global soil erosion already 4,000 years ago

Soil erosion reduces the productivity of ecosystems, it changes nutrient cycles and it thus directly impacts climate and society. An international team of researchers, including Professor Pierre Francus at the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS), recorded temporal changes of soil erosion by analyzing sediment deposits in more than 600 lakes worldwide. They found that the accumula

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study reveals girls more likely to be admitted to hospital after self-harming

Girls in Wales are much more likely to end up in hospital after self-harming than boys according to new research led by Swansea University.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Therapy for neuroendocrine tumors may be improved by patient-specific dosimetry

In neuroendocrine tumor treatment, different methods of predicting patient response may be required for different patients. By tailoring the method to the specific patient, physicians may better predict the effectiveness of treatment, according to new research published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Distinct brain region alterations in youth with psychosis spectrum disorders

Psychotic spectrum (PS) disorders are characterized by abnormalities in beliefs, perceptions and behavior, but how these disorders manifest themselves in earlier development stages is largely unknown. A new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports differences in brain structure among youth with PS disorders relative to

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Significantly fewer pregnant women take antidepressants

A pregnancy is not always a happy event and as many as 10-15% of pregnant women in Denmark have depressive symptoms. A new study carried out by Aarhus University now shows a significant decrease in the use of antidepressants by pregnant women — with consumption falling by more than 33% since 2011.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research on large storm waves could help lessen their impact on coasts

An international team of researchers has analyzed months of data of large nearshore waves to provide new insights that could help improve the designs of a variety of coastal structures from seaports to seawalls to better withstand destructive waves.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Facebook and Instagram gave away the presence of the 'Japan pig' seahorse in Taiwan

Having turned to local underwater photographers and scuba divers via social media, a research team from Taiwan not only reported a total of five pygmy seahorses, including the elusive, yet mesmerizing 15-millimeter 'Japan pig,' which was so far only known from the 'Land of the Rising Sun,' but also confirmed Taiwan as one of the world's hotspots when it comes to these curious tiny marine inhabitan

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Following in Darwin's footsteps: understanding the plant evolution of florist's gloxinia

In a study published in Plants People Planet, a team led by Virginia Tech researchers discovered that in its 200 years of being cultivated and domesticated, florist's gloxinia, Sinningia speciosa, has reached tremendous levels of phenotypic, or physical, variation and originates from a single founder population.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Whether a fashion model or not, some body image concerns are universal

When researchers from UCLA and the Laureate Institute for Brain Research in Tulsa, Oklahoma, wanted to test an app they created to measure body image perception, they went to the body image experts — fashion models.

16d

Phys.org

Flooding in Central African Republic leaves at least 28,000 homeless

The worst flooding in two decades in the Central African Republic has left at least 28,000 people homeless, the country's Red Cross said Tuesday, with the government calling the disaster a "huge natural catastrophe".

16d

Phys.org

Exposing blind spots in the carbon budget space

The impact of 1°C of global heating is already having devastating impacts on communities and ecosystems across the globe. An international research group that included researchers from IIASA and Japan, identified biases towards some selected carbon budgets in the current scenario literature. They propose a more comprehensive approach to systematically explore the carbon budget scenario space.

16d

The Atlantic

304K

Trump's Defenders Are Now Attacking the Patriotism of a Purple Heart Officer

The White House can't muster a substantive defense of President Donald Trump's behavior regarding Ukraine. Democrats more or less gave way to Republican process complaints about impeachment on Monday. So with few other options left, Trump and his allies are returning to the mode that got him elected in the first place : toxic xenophobia. Monday evening, the opening statement from Lieutenant Colon

16d

Science News Daily

Get ready to hear about Quip's new floss dispenser on all your podcasts

The podcasts you listen to will never be the same. That's because one of the biggest advertisers in the space, toothbrush subscription startup Quip, finally has a new product. …

16d

Science News Daily

Google's .new shortcuts now work with Spotify, Medium and more – CNET

Outside companies get a crack at Google's time-saving .new domains.

16d

Phys.org

100+

Mathematician proposes method to simplify the mathematical model of substance transfer through a cell wall

A mathematician from RUDN University has proposed a new scheme for numerically solving equations with fractional powers of elliptic operators. The new scheme works faster than the existing ones, because it takes into account the properties of the solutions to such equations at singular points. The results could be useful for calculating diffusion processes—for example, fluid leakage in a porous me

16d

Phys.org

Chemist develops method of synthesis for 28 biologically active molecules

RUDN University chemist Erik Van der Eycken has come up with a new method for the synthesis of a large group of complex poly-heterocyclic organic compounds, which may have applications for new pharmaceuticals. The researcher turned to a two-step reaction in which he used affordable and cheap organic reagents and catalysts based on gold, which allowed him to synthesize as many as 28 new molecules.

16d

Futurity.org

Tiny motors show it takes a 'tilt' to swim upstream

Swimming upstream, and against a current, involves a front-first downward tilt and then moving along a surface, new research shows. Researchers created "nano-motors" to uncover this effective means of locomotion under such conditions. The findings and creation of the tiny motors offer new insights into the nature of movement in fluids and have implications for engineering, the researchers say. "T

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Can't stop putting your hand in the candy dish? Scientists may have found why

In the course of their study, the scientists tried to control impulsivity. Their results are surprising.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hope offered to patients with a rare autoimmune condition

A new study has shed light on a debilitating autoimmune condition by identifying a number of subtypes of the disease which could lead to personalised treatment for patients.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Intuitive in the virtual reality

Through the crafty use of magnetic fields, scientists from HZDR and Johannes Kepler University in Linz have developed the first electronic sensor that can simultaneously process both touchless and tactile stimuli. Prior attempts have so far failed to combine these functions on a single device due to overlapping signals of the various stimuli. As the sensor is readily applied to the human skin, it

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A new type of acoustic insulation enables sound to be concentrated in corners

A group of researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), in collaboration with Chinese scientists from the University of Nanjing (NJU), have designed a new type of acoustic insulation that enables sound waves to be concentrated in corners. This line of research could have applications in industrial ultrasound technologies or in the improvement of certain medical diagnostic tests su

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Putting the Water Framework Directive to the test

The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) is one of the most progressive regulatory frameworks for water management worldwide. Questioning its objectives and principles would seriously compromise the effective protection of water bodies in the European Union. Its practical implementation, however, requires urgent improvement. The Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

39

Leipzig primate researchers initiate global collaboration

In order to investigate evolutionary questions, scientists require the largest and most versatile samples possible. If those samples are not available in one place, research institutions can support each other. This is the rationale behind ManyPrimates, a project that aims to establish a culture of global collaboration in primate cognition research. It was set up by researchers from the Leipzig Re

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Numerous polar storms on Saturn analyzed by the UPV/EHU's Planetary Sciences Group

Nature Astronomy has published the results of the research conducted by the Planetary Sciences Group at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country; the group is led by Professor Agustín Sánchez-Lavega and their research deals with the monitoring they carried out on a series of huge, long-lived storms that took place on the planet Saturn.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

82

Bird bacteria is key to communication and mating

Birds use odor to identify other birds, and researchers at Michigan State University have shown that if the bacteria that produce the odor is altered, it could negatively impact a bird's ability to communicate with other birds or find a mate.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Examination of conscience on the role of engineering in sustainable development

In a study conducted by 3 engineers, Josep Maria Basart (UAB), Mireia Farrús (UPF) and Montse Serra (UOC) presented in an article published in September in the journal IEEE Technology and Society Magazine.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Exposing blind spots in the carbon budget space

The impact of 1°C of global heating is already having devastating impacts on communities and ecosystems across the globe. An international research group that included researchers from IIASA and Japan, identified biases towards some selected carbon budgets in the current scenario literature. They propose a more comprehensive approach to systematically explore the carbon budget scenario space.

16d

Phys.org

Re-cracking the genetic code

Crack open a biology textbook and you will find the table summarizing the standard genetic code. This refers to the set of rules by which the cell "decodes" the information contained in DNA and "translates" it into the amino acids that make up proteins. For example, in virtually all organisms, the codon (3-letter DNA sequence) AGA tells the translation machinery to add the amino acid asparagine. W

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Re-cracking the genetic code

Crack open a biology textbook and you will find the table summarizing the standard genetic code. This refers to the set of rules by which the cell "decodes" the information contained in DNA and "translates" it into the amino acids that make up proteins. For example, in virtually all organisms, the codon (3-letter DNA sequence) AGA tells the translation machinery to add the amino acid asparagine. W

16d

Phys.org

300+

Geologists use paleomagnetism to determine the chain of events that resulted in the Himalayan mountains

According to Craig Martin, deciphering Earth's geologic past is like an ant climbing over a car crash. "You've got to work out how the car crash happened, how fast the cars were going, at what angle they impacted," explains Martin, a graduate student at MIT's Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences (EAPS). "You're just a tiny ant wandering over this massive chaos," he adds.

16d

Phys.org

35

Ashes to concrete

Coal ash is the less notorious byproduct of coal-fired power plants. It's the residual solid waste that comes from burning coal. While it doesn't have the same deleterious reputation of its airborne counterparts, tens of millions of tons of ash does up in landfills each year. Now researchers from Drexel University believe they have found a use for the powdery residue—one that could help make concr

16d

Phys.org

36

Image: California's devastating Kincaid fire continues to spread

California's devastating Kincaid Fire located in Sonoma County has grown to over 66,000 acres and NASA's Terra satellite captured this dramatic image of the smoke plume cascading down the coast. The fire is located northeast of Geyserville and is classified as a "vegetation fire" and its origins are still under investigation. CAL Fire released an update on this destructive fire today, October 28 a

16d

Phys.org

Scientists call for a more ambitious approach to management of Marine Protected Areas

Researchers from the University of Plymouth have contributed to a new book addressing some of the most pressing challenges in marine conservation.

16d

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

Scientists developing diagnostic test which aims to detect antibiotic resistance in less than 45 minutes

Scientists are developing a low cost, rapid diagnostic sensor test which aims to show the susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotics within 45 minutes.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Scientists call for a more ambitious approach to management of Marine Protected Areas

Researchers from the University of Plymouth have contributed to a new book addressing some of the most pressing challenges in marine conservation.

16d

Phys.org

21

Scientists developing diagnostic test which aims to detect antibiotic resistance in less than 45 minutes

Scientists are developing a low cost, rapid diagnostic sensor test which aims to show the susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotics within 45 minutes.

16d

Phys.org

28

Abandoned shopping carts: the trillion dollar challenge

With so much competition in the market, ecommerce sites consistently face one huge problem—abandoned shopping baskets. It is believed that around $4.6 trillion worth of merchandise has been left unpurchased in online shopping baskets as consumers click through to the checkout screen, then have second thoughts and leave the site.

16d

Phys.org

59

Here's how your foreign accent can unfairly destroy your credibility

There's an old Punch magazine cartoon depicting a rather typical business boardroom. The group in the illustration includes one woman and several men, with the chairman saying, "That's an excellent suggestion, Miss Triggs. Perhaps one of the men here would like to make it?"

16d

Futurity.org

Buzz about opponents throws us off our game

Hype about your opponent can affect your performance, research finds. A study of more than 117,000 pro tennis matches and more than 5 million observations in online amateur chess indicates that even when competitors are evenly matched, players perform worse against an opponent they know has been climbing in rank. One example might be one of the newest rising stars in tennis—15-year-old prodigy Co

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

MIB2 enhances inflammation by degradation of CYLD

A team of researchers at Ehime University revealed that E3 ubiquitin ligase MIB2 enhances inflammation by degrading the deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD. This finding was published on Sept. 20 in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Living in a noisy area increases the risk of suffering a more serious stroke

The high levels of environmental noise we are subjected to in large cities can increase both the severity and consequences of an ischaemic stroke. More precisely, researchers put the increased risk at 30% for people living in noisier areas. In contrast, living close to green areas brings down this risk by up to 25%. This is the first time that these factors have been analysed in relation to stroke

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Could mathematics help to better treat cancer?

Impaired information processing may prevent cells from perceiving their environment correctly; they then start acting in an uncontrolled way and this can lead to the development of cancer. To better understand how impaired information transmission influences the activity of diseased cells, researchers (UNIGE) are going beyond the field of biology. They propose to examine cellular communication in

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

61

Facebook and Instagram gave away the presence of the 'Japan pig' seahorse in Taiwan

Having turned to local underwater photographers and scuba divers via social media, a research team from Taiwan not only reported a total of five pygmy seahorses, including the elusive, yet mesmerising 15-millimetre 'Japan pig', which was so far only known from the 'Land of the Rising Sun', but also confirmed Taiwan as one of the world's hotspots when it comes to these curious tiny marine inhabitan

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers find 'protein-scaffolding' for repairing DNA damage

At the University of Copenhagen, researchers have discovered how some types of proteins stabilize damaged DNA and thereby preserve DNA function and integrity. This new finding also explains why people with inborn or acquired defects in certain proteins cannot keep their DNA stable and develop diseases such as cancer.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

NUS researchers use light from nanoparticles to intricately control biological processes

Researchers from the National University of Singapore have developed a method to give more control to optogenetics, by using specially designed nanoparticles and nanoclusters (dubbed 'superballs'). These nanoparticles and superballs can emit different colours of light when excited by lasers at different wavelengths. These different colours of light can then be used to trigger specific biological p

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Report outlines social determinants' role in cancer and public health

A new report outlines the critical role social determinants play in shaping population health, highlighting that health disparities are systemic, and cut across multiple population characteristics, including race/ethnicity, age, disability status, sexual orientation or gender identity, or other characteristics historically linked to discrimination or exclusion.

16d

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

24

Scientists invent animal-free testing of lethal neurotoxins

Animal testing will no longer be required to assess a group of deadly neurotoxins, thanks to University of Queensland-led research.

16d

The Atlantic

500+

Why Rhode Island's Governor Is Taking Over Providence's Public Schools

Public schools in Rhode Island are a mess. The situation in the state is considered so extreme by activists, elected officials, students, and parents that last year they filed a class-action lawsuit claiming that Rhode Island had deprived the students of the literacy skills necessary to participate in a democracy. Things in Providence are particularly dire. When Johns Hopkins released a report ab

16d

Phys.org

Disbanded EPA clean air science panel found that particle pollution regulations aren't sufficient

Since 1980, emissions of six common air pollutants have decreased by 67%, thanks largely to government regulation. At the same time, U.S. gross domestic product has increased by 165%. While some assert that regulation acts as a drag on the economy, this record indicates that environmental protection does not have to undercut economic growth.

16d

Phys.org

1K

Antarctic sea ice is key to triggering ice ages, study finds

We've known for years that Earth's climate is like a giant Rube Goldberg machine: Pull one lever, and a massive chain of events starts into motion. Yet many of the steps that drive these changes have remained shrouded in uncertainty.

16d

Phys.org

26

Scientists invent animal-free testing of lethal neurotoxins

Animal testing will no longer be required to assess a group of deadly neurotoxins, thanks to University of Queensland-led research.

16d

Phys.org

57

Research on large storm waves could help lessen their impact on coasts

When cyclones or other massive oceanic storms make landfall, their giant waves batter coastlines and sometimes cause widespread damage.

16d

Phys.org

Availability of health data for refugees and migrants in Europe

A new study commissioned by the World Health Organization (WHO) and conducted by researchers at the University Bielefeld and University Hospital Heidelberg shows data gaps and policy options for the 53 Member States.

16d

Phys.org

New strategies against the antibiotics crisis

One of the most serious threats to public health worldwide is posed by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. The World Health Organization (WHO) warns of the imminent beginning of a post-antibiotic era in which harmless infections can no longer be treated and could once again become one of the most frequent non-natural causes of death. Decades of using various antibiotics as standard therapy have greatl

16d

Phys.org

40

Method removes one of the main toxins in water used for bitumen extraction

New technology developed by engineers at the University of Alberta shows potential in cleaning and decontaminating process water from oilsands production.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

New strategies against the antibiotics crisis

One of the most serious threats to public health worldwide is posed by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. The World Health Organization (WHO) warns of the imminent beginning of a post-antibiotic era in which harmless infections can no longer be treated and could once again become one of the most frequent non-natural causes of death. Decades of using various antibiotics as standard therapy have greatl

16d

Phys.org

Researchers' theory predicts the lifespan of liquid droplets

Researchers at the University of Warwick have developed a new understanding of how liquids evaporate into vapour, pointing to potential applications for engineering design.

16d

Phys.org

4K

A new method of extracting hydrogen from water more efficiently to capture renewable energy

A new method of extracting hydrogen from water more efficiently could help underpin the capture of renewable energy in the form of sustainable fuel, scientists say.

16d

Phys.org

Adverse effects of humanitarian food aid disputed in new study

A renowned 1992 sketch on "Saturday Night Live" follows newly elected President Bill Clinton as he and Secret Service agents jog into McDonald's. When a customer asks if he's in favor of sending U.S. troops to Somalia, Clinton (played by Phil Hartman) provides his own humanitarian aid metaphor by grabbing McNuggets from other customers and claiming "it's being intercepted by warlords."

16d

ScienceDaily

44

Cracking the colon code: New light shed on gut function

New insights into how the colon functions and actually expels its contents have been revealed for the first time following decades of study. It promises new diagnostics tools and treatments for gastrointestinal disorders to address problems with bowel movements leading to constipation, diarrhea and pain, affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide.

16d

NYT > Science

2K

How Climate Change Could Shift California's Santa Ana Winds, Fueling Fires

Recent research suggests that as the climate warms, Santa Ana winds may become less frequent. Coupled with precipitation changes, that could mean more intense fires later in the year.

16d

Nature

From the archive

Nature, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03272-2 How Nature reported a ban on artificial sweeteners in 1969, and the growing awareness of vitamins in 1919.

16d

Nature

400+

Ethical research — the long and bumpy road from shirked to shared

Nature, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03270-4 From all too scarce, to professionalized, the ethics of research is now everybody's business, argues Sarah Franklin in the sixth essay in a series on how the past 150 years have shaped science, marking Nature's anniversary.

16d

Ingeniøren

Mysteriet om molekylernes farlige spejlbilleder

PLUS. Aminosyrer findes i to former, der er hinandens spejlbilleder, men livet base­rer sig kun på den ene type. Derfor skal lægemidler også have den rigtige form.

16d

Wired

500+

HBO's 'His Dark Materials' Is a Smart Pragmatic Adaptation

The show promises to engage with the ambiguities of truth and knowledge, and (please!) maybe even give some backstory on the charming, enigmatic Mrs. Coulter.

16d

Futurism

500+

Eagle With Tracking Device Racks up Enormous Roaming Charges

Expensive Eagle An eagle named Min just wiped out a Russian research team's entire budget — by racking up hundreds of dollars in roaming charges. Min was one of 13 eagles, according to The New York Times , that the team fitted with a tracking device that texted the animal's location four times a day, with each text costing the researchers a bit of money. Five months ago, the team stopped receivin

16d

Singularity Hub

2K

The Origin of Consciousness in the Brain Is About to Be Tested

Here's something you don't hear every day: two theories of consciousness are about to face off in the scientific fight of the century. Backed by top neuroscientist theorists of today, including Christof Koch, head of the formidable Allen Institute for Brain Research in Seattle, Washington, the fight hopes to put two rival ideas of consciousness to the test in a $20 million project. Briefly, volun

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

PPPL findings: Discoveries from fusion to astrophysics at global gathering

Feature wraps-up wide-ranging PPPL talks on fusion and plasma science at the 61st conference of the American Physical Society-Department of Plasma Physics.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tough as nails: Older people reluctant to ask for mental health support

New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research has found that more than 40 per cent of older Australians with chronic disease would be unlikely to seek help for mental health conditions even if they needed it.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cracking the colon code — new light shed on gut function

New insights into how the colon functions and actually expels its contents have been revealed for the first time following decades of study by Flinders University researchers. It promises new diagnostics tools and treatments for gastrointestinal disorders to address problems with bowel movements leading to constipation, diarrhea and pain, affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide.

16d

forskning.se

Forskare spårar vinterkräksjukans spridning på sjukhus

Smittor sprids på flera olika sätt och extra svårt kan det vara att skydda sig mot de som är luftburna. Vinterkräksjukan som orsakas av noroviruset är ett sådant. Carl-Johan Fraenkel, infektionsläkare och vårdhygienläkare, disputerar nu med en avhandling vid Lunds universitet som undersöker olika aspekter kring hur denna vinterkräksjuka sprids på sjukhus. Alla vill undvika vinterkräksjukan, men k

16d

ScienceDaily

100+

Faith, truth and forgiveness: How your brain processes abstract thoughts

Researchers have leveraged machine learning to interpret human brain scans, allowing the team to uncover the regions of the brain behind how abstract concepts, like justice, ethics and consciousness, form.

16d

ScienceDaily

28

Re-cracking the genetic code

Research suggests that we may have only begun to scratch the surface on the number of variations present in the genetic codes of all living organisms.

16d

ScienceDaily

28

First structure of human cotransporter protein family member solved

In work that could someday improve treatments for epilepsy, scientists have the first three-dimensional structure of a member of a large family of human proteins that carry charged particles — ions — across the cell membrane.

16d

ScienceDaily

40

New coal ash aggregate helps concrete cure

Researchers have developed a process for turning the solid waste products of coal power plants into a useful ingredient that could improve properties of concrete.

16d

Phys.org

200+

"Wolves in sheep's clothing" – the superbugs outsmarting laboratory tests

Hospital screening tests are failing to identify the true extent of microbial resistance, according to new research.

16d

Science News Daily

Aussie consumer watchdog sues Google over location data use

Australia's consumer watchdog on Tuesday announced legal action against Google for allegedly misleading customers about the way it collects and uses personal location data.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

"Wolves in sheep's clothing" – the superbugs outsmarting laboratory tests

Hospital screening tests are failing to identify the true extent of microbial resistance, according to new research.

16d

Phys.org

What can polling tell us about impeachment? An identity politics expert has the answer.

Donald Trump became just the fourth President in American history to face the prospect of removal from office when Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi initiated the impeachment inquiry that has roiled Washington for the past several weeks.

16d

Phys.org

22

First magnet installed for the ALPS II experiment at DESY

The international ALPS II ("Any light particle search") collaboration installed the first of 24 superconducting magnets today, marking the start of the installation of a unique particle physics experiment to look for dark matter. Located at the German research centre DESY in Hamburg, it is set to start taking data in 2021 by looking for dark matter particles that literally make light shine through

16d

Phys.org

100+

TESS reveals an improbable planet

Using asteroseismology, a team led by an Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA) researcher studied two red-giant stars known to have exoplanets, and around one of them, found a seemingly improbable planet.

16d

Phys.org

48

New online, interactive atlas gives comprehensive view of Texas quail decline

The Texas A&M Natural Resources Institute, or NRI, has recently published the Texas Quail Atlas, a free online resource and the newest "story map" to be developed by the institute.

16d

Phys.org

Most native bird species are losing their homes, even the ones you see every day

Across parts of Australia, vast areas of native vegetation have been cleared and replaced by our cities, farms and infrastructure. When native vegetation is removed, the habitat and resources that it provides for native wildlife are invariably lost.

16d

The Scientist RSS

Synthego Launches High Throughput Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Genome Engineering

National Institutes of Health awards contract for CRISPR-based disease modeling in iPS cell lines associated with Alzheimer's, Stem cell pioneer Bill Skarnes joins advisory board

16d

The Scientist RSS

PolyScience: Innovation in the Laboratory – DuraChill® Chillers

DuraChill chillers are easy to operate and easy to maintain. Find out why ease-of-use became the mantra at PolyScience when designing these innovative, reliable chillers.

16d

Dagens Medicin

Mere fokus på læring for patientsikkerhedens skyld

Åbenhed er en forudsætning for læring og dermed et mere sikkert sundhedsvæsen. Derfor er det min opfordring til politikere, regioner og myndigheder, at de holder sig det for øje, når Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed skal evalueres.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

New online, interactive atlas gives comprehensive view of Texas quail decline

The Texas A&M Natural Resources Institute, or NRI, has recently published the Texas Quail Atlas, a free online resource and the newest "story map" to be developed by the institute.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Most native bird species are losing their homes, even the ones you see every day

Across parts of Australia, vast areas of native vegetation have been cleared and replaced by our cities, farms and infrastructure. When native vegetation is removed, the habitat and resources that it provides for native wildlife are invariably lost.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Why a sense of kinship is key to caring about the living world

Leading thinkers in environmental economics and conservation are asking a pressing question. Why are we ignoring the destruction of the living world?

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists invent animal-free testing of lethal neurotoxins

Animal testing will no longer be required to assess a group of deadly neurotoxins, thanks to University of Queensland-led research. Associate Professor Bryan Fry, of UQ's Venom Evolution Lab, said a new technique could replace conventional methods of testing paralytic neurotoxins, which previously required euthanasia of test subjects.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Hormonal contraceptives affect the efficacy of exposure therapy

Psychologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have studied in what way hormonal contraceptives affect the efficacy of anxiety therapy. They demonstrated that women who were on the pill benefitted less from exposure therapy than women who didn't take any oral contraceptives. Friederike Raeder, Professor Armin Zlomuzica and colleagues describe the results in the Journal of Psychiatric Research, published

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cycling is safer with more cyclists on the road, but injuries are on the rise, Rutgers study finds

Cycling is safer with more cyclists on the road, but injuries among older riders are on the rise.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

21

WSU study identifies potential new target for treatment of gout

Researchers at Washington State University Health Sciences Spokane and elsewhere have identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of gout, a common type of arthritis that causes episodes of painful and stiff joints. Published in the journal Cellular and Molecular Immunology, their study suggests that blocking a signaling molecule known as TAK1 can suppress inflammation caused by gout. Th

16d

Phys.org

Why a sense of kinship is key to caring about the living world

Leading thinkers in environmental economics and conservation are asking a pressing question. Why are we ignoring the destruction of the living world?

16d

Phys.org

400+

New findings detail a method for investigating the inner workings of stars in a rare phase

In 5 billion years or so, when the sun has used up the hydrogen in its core, it will inflate and turn into a red giant star. This phase of its life—and that of other stars up to twice its mass—is relatively short compared with the more than 10 billion-year life of the sun. The red giant will shine 1000 times brighter than the sun, and suddenly the helium deep in its core will begin fusing to carbo

16d

Phys.org

37

Liquid crystal droplets as versatile microswimmers

Nature's most common swimmers are single-celled organisms such as microalgae that swim toward light sources, and sperm cells that swim toward an ovum. For a physicist, cells are simply biochemical machines, which must obey well-described laws of chemistry and physics. Can scientists therefore create life-like, swimming micro-machines without invoking biology?

16d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

100+

How to Make Sense of Google's Quantum Supremacy Claim

If you've been reading some of the sensationalist headlines about the paper Google published in Nature claiming "quantum supremacy," you'd be forgiven for thinking the day of omniscient supercomputers and shattered security systems are nearly upon us. You may have been curious enough to wade through the paper itself to see what's been actually achieved and how far there is to go; if so, awesome.

16d

The Scientist RSS

Synthego Launches High Throughput Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Genome Engineering

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16d

Futurity.org

In 2016, top GOP candidates used this Twitter strategy

Among the Republican hopefuls in the 2016 presidential primaries, the last two standing—Donald Trump and John Kasich—employed the same Twitter strategy, research finds. Trump's Twitter activity during the 2016 presidential primaries was largely comprised of tweets characterized by competition. He focused on performance, style, personal attacks, and his standing in the polls. Communication researc

16d

Futurism

300+

Plan to Create Super-Smart Designer Babies Won't Work, Says Study

In November, a company called Genomic Prediction announced that it had developed a multi-gene screening technique for embryos. This method, the company claimed, allowed it to scan an embryo for conditions or traits impacted by numerous genes, including intelligence, and give it a "polygenic score." The company said this was so parents could avoid using an embryo with an abnormally low score for i

16d

New Scientist

200+

AI could solve baffling three-body problem that stumped Isaac Newton

The three-body problem has vexed mathematicians and physicists for 300 years, but AI can find solutions far faster than any other method anyone has come up with

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

Bird bacteria is key to communication and mating

Birds use odor to identify other birds, and researchers at Michigan State University have shown that if the bacteria that produce the odor is altered, it could negatively impact a bird's ability to communicate with other birds or find a mate.

16d

Phys.org

100+

Bird bacteria is key to communication and mating

Birds use odor to identify other birds, and researchers at Michigan State University have shown that if the bacteria that produce the odor is altered, it could negatively impact a bird's ability to communicate with other birds or find a mate.

16d

Phys.org

11K

Researchers uncover an anomaly in the electromagnetic duality of Maxwell Theory

Researchers at the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI) and Tohoku University in Japan have recently identified an anomaly in the electromagnetic duality of Maxwell Theory. This anomaly, outlined in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, could play an important role in the consistency of string theory.

16d

Phys.org

36

Turning a dangerous toxin into a biosensor

Some types of bacteria have the ability to punch holes into other cells and kill them. They do this by releasing specialized proteins called "pore-forming toxins" (PFTs) that latch onto the cell's membrane and form a tube-like channel that goes through it. This structure across the membrane is called a pore. Punctured by multiple PFTs, the target cell self-destructs.

16d

Phys.org

34

Extinction of cold-water corals on the Namibian shelf due to low oxygen contents

Researchers have only been aware of the existence of fossil cold-water corals off the coast of Namibia since 2016. But it was not known when and why the cold-water corals in this region became extinct. By dating fossil coral fragments, Leonardo Tamborrino of MARUM—Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen, and his co-authors have determined that this localized extinction

16d

Ingeniøren

20

Microsoft vil sikre IoT-gadgets med Linux-baseret operativsystem

Azure Sphere fra Microsoft omfatter tre komponenter, herunder en Linux-kerne.

16d

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

22

Turning a dangerous toxin into a biosensor

Some types of bacteria have the ability to punch holes into other cells and kill them. They do this by releasing specialized proteins called "pore-forming toxins" (PFTs) that latch onto the cell's membrane and form a tube-like channel that goes through it. This structure across the membrane is called a pore. Punctured by multiple PFTs, the target cell self-destructs.

16d

Phys.org

Migratory birds are worse off in West Africa

Migratory sandpipers breeding in Greenland who choose to spend the winter in West Africa instead of elsewhere along the East Atlantic coast have a lower chance of survival, are more likely to skip their first breeding season and arrive later at their breeding grounds. An article in the Journal of Animal Ecology, spearheaded by researcher Jeroen Reneerkens (University of Groningen and the Royal Net

16d

Phys.org

96

Human activities boosted global soil erosion already 4,000 years ago

Soil erosion reduces the productivity of ecosystems, it changes nutrient cycles and it thus directly impacts climate and society. A team of researchers recorded temporal changes of soil erosion by analyzing sediment deposits in more than 600 lakes worldwide. The scientists found that the accumulation of lake sediments increased significantly on a global scale around 4,000 years ago. At the same ti

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First structure of human cotransporter protein family member solved

In work that could someday improve treatments for epilepsy, UT Southwestern scientists have published the first three-dimensional structure of a member of a large family of human proteins that carry charged particles — ions — across the cell membrane.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Teens with autism can master daily living skills when parents teach, reach for iPads

Daily tasks are difficult for some people with autism because they often involve sequential steps. Since people with autism are strong visual learners, a study examined if parents could help their teens learn using portable, mainstream devices like an iPad. Similar studies have primarily targeted parents of young children with autism. Results show that video prompting interventions produced both i

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ashes to concrete

Drexel University researchers have developed a process for turning the solid waste products of coal power plants into a useful ingredient that could improve properties of concrete.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Re-cracking the genetic code

Research suggests that we may have only begun to scratch the surface on the number of variations present in the genetic codes of all living organisms.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Faith, truth and forgiveness: How your brain processes abstract thoughts

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have leveraged machine learning to interpret human brain scans, allowing the team to uncover the regions of the brain behind how abstract concepts, like justice, ethics and consciousness, form.

16d

Science News Daily

Echo Buds review: Alexa smarts packed into a mediocre AirPods rival

By the time Amazon got around to announcing its Alexa-powered earbuds in September, the rumors had already been swirling for months. They were hardly a surprise. The online retail giant …

16d

Science News Daily

Lyft is taking the human judgment out of critical safety decisions

The team entrusted with making decisions on whether to deactivate drivers has had its responsibilities eroded.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Migratory birds are worse off in West Africa

Migratory sandpipers breeding in Greenland who choose to spend the winter in West Africa instead of elsewhere along the East Atlantic coast have a lower chance of survival, are more likely to skip their first breeding season and arrive later at their breeding grounds. An article in the Journal of Animal Ecology, spearheaded by researcher Jeroen Reneerkens (University of Groningen and the Royal Net

16d

Phys.org

3K

Using an accurate measurement of the parameters of planetary bodies to constrain the mass of the graviton

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in France has revisited the idea of improving on estimates of the upper limit of the mass of a graviton. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their accurate measurement of the parameters of planetary bodies and what they found.

16d

New Scientist

300+

Can video games help reduce symptoms of mental health conditions?

Video game developer Ninja Theory has previously worked with scientists to portray psychosis and now plans to create games to aid mental health

16d

New Scientist

500+

Newly discovered brain cells help us recall where we last saw objects

We've discovered brain cells that may help humans judge the distance to an object, and they remain active even if the object is no longer visible, suggesting a role in memory

16d

Futurity.org

100+

You learn more from success than failure

Contrary to common beliefs about learning from failure, you learn more from success, according to new research. "Our society celebrates failure as a teachable moment," write the study's authors, who found in a series of experiments that "failure did the opposite: It undermined learning." "We are taught to learn from failure, to celebrate failure, to fail forward," says Ayelet Fishbach, an expert

16d

Futurity.org

63

When parents use marijuana, their kids are more likely to use, too

When parents use marijuana, either in the present or the past, it can have an effect on their child's substance use and well-being, a new study shows. Substance use at any age has consequences. But researchers have been unsure of how patterns of alcohol or marijuana use in one phase of life can affect the next generation, even long after an individual has stopped using. "The really important take

16d

Livescience.com

42

Why We Love Blood-Curdling Screams

The arsenal of human screams has been honed over millions of years of evolution. Here's why we love blood-curdling screams.

16d

ScienceDaily

97

Projected doubling of Americans living with dementia

The number of Americans living with Alzheimer's disease or other dementias will double to nearly 13 million over the next 20 years, according to the new report.

16d

Phys.org

69

Microsatellites to take never-before-seen look at the young solar wind

Scientists know that a solar wind streams out of the Sun and rushes into the void of space, constantly buffeting Earth and the other planets with gales of charged particles.

16d

Phys.org

Argonne lends a hand toward climate and weather understanding

On summer evenings, high above the surface of the southern Great Plains, a phenomenon occurs that contributes significantly to the climate dynamics of the region. Called low-level jets, these winds can reach speeds upward of 55 mph, and they play a role in the transport of heat and moisture into the region and contribute to the development of tornadoes and the generation of wind energy.

16d

Phys.org

300+

Astronomers observe blazar S5 0836+710 during high activity period, detect two gamma-ray flares

Italian astronomers have conducted multi-band observations of the high-redshift blazar S5 0836+710 during its period of high activity. The monitoring campaign resulted in the detection of two major gamma-ray flares from this source and provided more insights on the object's properties. The findings are available in a paper published October 18 on arXiv.org.

16d

Futurism

500+

This Game Is "Oregon Trail" Meets Climate Catastrophe

Climate Trail In the new free-to-play video game " Climate Trail, " developer William Volk imagines an apocalyptic world in which we failed to fight climate change. The title — available on iOS, Android, macOS and Windows — is a nod towards the iconic educational video game "Oregon Trail," an iconic simulator of 19th-century pioneer life. But rather than being set over a hundred years ago, accord

16d

Wired

4K

Mark Zuckerberg Needs to Shut Up

Opinion: Since 2017, nearly every time the Facebook CEO has tried to sound thoughtful, he sounds unprepared, shallow, and full of hubris. Time to zip it.

16d

Wired

1K

Google's .New Shortcuts Are Now for Everyone

Want to start a playlist, make a dinner reservation, or post code to Github? Try something .new

16d

Wired

500+

Warren Targets 'Revolving Door' Between Government and Tech

Warren's latest plan would prohibit large companies from hiring senior government employees right out of office—and she comes out swinging against Facebook.

16d

Nature

500+

South Korea deploys snipers and drones to fend off deadly pig virus

Nature, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03237-5 Outbreaks of African swine fever have killed millions of pigs across Asia, and the virus has recently been detected in wild boars near the North Korean border.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

36

Eye damage linked to popular over-the-counter vitamin that lowers cholesterol can be reversed

Study is the first to identify specific cellular toxicity and show improvement after stopping supplement use.

16d

Science News Daily

Introducing spider (inspired) cam

Researchers develop a small and highly effective depth sensor.

16d

Phys.org

28

Climate change could drive British crop farming north and west

Unchecked climate change could drive Britain's crop growing north and west, leaving the east and south east unable to support crop growing, new research suggests.

16d

Scientific American: Mind & Brain

21

Your Brain on Google Maps

For better or for worse, navigation apps change our sense of direction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16d

forskning.se

Tallsteklar växer bättre på älgbetade tallar

Det är inte ovanligt att växtätare av skilda slag lever på samma växt – men vi vet ganska lite om hur de olika växtätarna samspelar med varandra. Nu visar forskning att älgars tall-bete kan leda till högre äggproduktion hos tallstekelhonor. Det är forskare vid SLU tillsammans med Max Planck-institutet för kemisk ekologi i Tyskland som har undersökt hur älgarnas bete påverkar insekten röd tallstek

16d

Scientific American Content

Your Brain on Google Maps

For better or for worse, navigation apps change our sense of direction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16d

ScienceDaily

43

Climate change could drive British crop farming north and west

Unchecked climate change could drive Britain's crop growing north and west, leaving the east and south east unable to support crop growing, new research suggests.

16d

ScienceDaily

Red algae thrive despite ancestor's massive loss of genes

You'd think that losing 25 percent of your genes would be a big problem for survival. But not for red algae, including the seaweed used to wrap sushi. An ancestor of red algae lost about a quarter of its genes roughly one billion years ago, but the algae still became dominant in near-shore coastal areas around the world.

16d

ScienceDaily

24

Severe drought shuts down reproduction in copperhead snakes, study finds

A long-term study of copperhead snakes in a forest near Meriden, Conn., revealed that five consecutive years of drought effectively ended the snakes' reproductive output.

16d

ScienceDaily

99

How far schoolkids live from junk food sources tied to obesity

As measured in city blocks, proximity to fast and convenience food sellers can impact a student's chances of becoming obese, according to a new study.

16d

ScienceDaily

28

Migratory birds are worse off in West Africa

Migratory sandpipers breeding in Greenland who choose to spend the winter in West Africa instead of elsewhere along the East Atlantic coast have a lower chance of survival, are more likely to skip their first breeding season and arrive later at their breeding grounds. The new research challenges the widely held idea that the costs of longer migratory flights are inevitably offset by benefits in th

16d

ScienceDaily

24

Turning a dangerous toxin into a biosensor

Some bacteria release a toxin that forms pores on other cells. Scientists have studied the pore-forming toxin aerolysin and genetically engineered it to be used as a high-resolution sensor for biological molecules like DNA and proteins.

16d

ScienceDaily

46

Cognitive screen paired with odor identification predicts lack of transition to dementia

A new study has found that performing well on two brief tests measuring cognitive ability and ability to identify odors indicates very low risk for Alzheimer's. We know that these tests can help predict the risk of developing dementia, but didn't know if they could help rule out those unlikely to develop Alzheimer's.

16d

ScienceDaily

200+

Narcissism can lower stress levels and reduce chances of depression

People who have grandiose narcissistic traits are more likely to be 'mentally tough,' feel less stressed and are less vulnerable to depression, research has found.

16d

ScienceDaily

61

Exerting self-control does not mean sacrificing pleasure

New research challenges the view that self-control equals sacrificing pleasure.

16d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

24

Turning a dangerous toxin into a biosensor

Some bacteria release a toxin that forms pores on other cells. Scientists have studied the pore-forming toxin aerolysin and genetically engineered it to be used as a high-resolution sensor for biological molecules like DNA and proteins.

16d

Ingeniøren

Sukker efter 5G: Mobile robotter savner stabile trådløse netværk

PLUS. Der mangler stabile og pålidelige trådløse netværk i produktionsmiljøer i industrien. Fynske MiR håber, at 5G med tiden vil gøre deres mobile robotter hurtigere og mindre.

16d

NeuroLogica Blog

100+

Hygiea May Be a Dwarf Planet

Hygiea is the fourth largest asteroid in the asteroid belt, after Ceres, Vesta and Pallas. Recent observations of Hygiea are now challenging the distinction between an asteroid and a dwarf planet. For some context, Ceres is the largest asteroid and is also the only one that is unambiguously a dwarf planet, by current definitions. Actually, when first discovered in 1801 it was considered a planet.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Milken Institute projects doubling of Americans living with dementia

The number of Americans living with Alzheimer's disease or other dementias will double to nearly 13 million over the next 20 years, according to the new Milken Institute report 'Reducing the Cost and Risk of Dementia: Recommendations to Improve Brain Health and Decrease Disparities.'Milken Institute research estimates that by 2020, 4.7 million women in the US will have dementia, accounting for nea

16d

ScienceDaily

300+

Anti-inflammatory agents can effectively and safely curb major depressive symptoms, study suggests

Anti-inflammatory agents, such as aspirin/paracetamol, statins, and antibiotics, can safely and effectively curb the symptoms of major depression, finds a pooled analysis of the available evidence.

16d

ScienceDaily

100+

Insufficient evidence that medicinal cannabinoids improve mental health

The most comprehensive analysis of medicinal cannabinoids and their impact on six mental health disorders — combining 83 studies including 3,000 people — suggests that the use of cannabinoids for mental health conditions cannot be justified based on the current evidence. This is due to a lack of evidence for their effectiveness, and because of the known risks of cannabinoids.

16d

Sciencemag

Balancing Protons

Catalytically active proteins come in many varieties, and you can classify them in many ways. When you look closely at their structures, one such scheme might be the "solid" ones versus the "delicately balanced" ones. In the first category would be things like carbonic anhydrase or acetylcholinesterase: they do their jobs more or less constantly and at their full (terrifying) catalytic speed. The

16d

New on MIT Technology Review

200+

Facebook will now remind you to get health checkups (if you want)

[no content]

16d

Phys.org

Kids, not gender, the biggest influence on work/care policy attitudes

Young dads consider paid parental leave and childcare to be as important to their future success at work as mothers. And it's the same trend in attitudes to shared household work, according to new University of Sydney research.

16d

Phys.org

Casting light on iron enrichment in the ocean's twilight zone

Half of the marine life in the world's oceans depends on the enrichment of phytoplankton by dissolved iron, just as plants at the base of the food chain on land need nutrients to help them grow.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Climate change could drive British crop farming north and west

Unchecked climate change could drive Britain's crop growing north and west, leaving the east and south east unable to support crop growing, new research suggests.

16d

The Atlantic

15K

The Toxic Bubble of Technical Debt Threatening America

In northern California, the fires have come again, sending hundreds of thousands fleeing by mandate. They've been aided by a historic wind event that a forecaster told me was " off the charts ," with offshore winds showing up as six standard deviations away from normal in National Weather Service models. On Sunday, the wind gusted to 100 miles per hour on a mountaintop near the Kincade Fire. It w

16d

The Atlantic

2K

Deadly Algae Are Creeping Northward

In the late winter of 2015, more than 1 million common murres—prim, black-and-white seabirds—died off the shores of Alaska. They'd been washing up all along the Pacific Coast that winter, as far south as California. But in Alaska, the die-off took over our lives, dominating the front pages of our newspapers, our back-and-forths on social media, our conversations at school pickup. Where I live, in

16d

The Scientist RSS

1K

Academics in Ukraine Fighting Against Rampant Misconduct

Plagiarism and bribery are commonplace, they say, and they've begun calling out lapses in scientific integrity.

16d

Futurity.org

The right 'noise' can get around one of WiFi's limits

A new method for sending data can circumvent a limitation in WiFi, researchers report. WiFi was originally designed for high-speed data communications. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) set the standards for communications—that's the 802.11 protocol, a familiar number on many wireless routers. According to the protocol, once a device is unable to send at least one megab

16d

Wired

100+

Google Nest Mini Review: Better Sound, Same Cheap Price

The new version of Google's budget smart speaker packs improved sound and onboard machine learning.

16d

Phys.org

96

Stripes can help prey stay hidden on the move, our new research reveals

For prey in the animal kingdom, one wrong move can mean death. Species have evolved camouflage to blend into their environment – some moths may share the colour of the tree bark they rest on while a lizard might resemble the sandy yellow of its desert home. But what about when these animals need to dart out from cover? How can they keep their camouflage when on the move?

16d

Scientific American: Mind & Brain

40K

Scientists Demonstrate Direct Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans

Work on an "Internet of brains" takes another step — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16d

The Scientist RSS

22

Image of the Day: Upside-Down Landings

Blue bottle flies use many different movements and a specific behavior sequence in order to stick a ceiling landing.

16d

Scientific American Content

50K

Scientists Demonstrate Direct Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans

Work on an "Internet of brains" takes another step — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16d

forskning.se

56

Tryck från vattendroppar ger växten panik

Vatten inte bara bidrar till växters tillväxt. Vattendroppars tryck mot bladytan utlöser även stresshormoner som jasmonsyra. Dessa cellulära förändringar går snabbt och gör växter bättre rustade mot sjukdomar och torka. Det visar en internationell studie ledd av forskare vid Lunds universitet och The University of Western Australia. Till skillnad från människor kan växter inte känna smärta. Men s

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

Stripes can help prey stay hidden on the move, our new research reveals

For prey in the animal kingdom, one wrong move can mean death. Species have evolved camouflage to blend into their environment – some moths may share the colour of the tree bark they rest on while a lizard might resemble the sandy yellow of its desert home. But what about when these animals need to dart out from cover? How can they keep their camouflage when on the move?

16d

Phys.org

1K

Why plants panic when it rains

An international team of scientists involving The University of Western Australia's School of Molecular Sciences, the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology and Lund University has made the surprising discovery that a plant's reaction to rain is close to one of panic.

16d

Phys.org

500+

Hot as shell: birds in cooler climates lay darker eggs to keep their embryos warm

Birds lay eggs with a huge variety of colours and patterns, from immaculate white to a range of blue-greens and reddish browns.

16d

Phys.org

500+

Dark energy: new experiment may solve one of the universe's greatest mysteries

As an astronomer, there is no better feeling than achieving "first light" with a new instrument or telescope. It is the culmination of years of preparations and construction of new hardware, which for the first time collects light particles from an astronomical object. This is usually followed by a sigh of relief and then the excitement of all the new science that is now possible.

16d

Phys.org

Researchers use light emitted from nanoparticles to control biological processes

The biological technique of 'optogenetics' uses light to control cells within living tissues that have been genetically modified to be light-sensitive. However, there is limited control of processes like this, as the light can activate several genes at once, and deeply penetrating light is often needed to reach the genes in living tissues.

16d

Phys.org

44

In an interconnected world, can environmentalists really 'act locally'?

Like many Americans, I worry about the state of the planet and try to make a positive impact through decisions in my day-to-day life. But I also am nagged by the feeling that I often get it wrong, even though I analyze environmental problems for a living.

16d

Phys.org

77

Humanity's birthplace: why everyone alive today can call northern Botswana home

Where was the evolutionary birthplace of modern humans? The East African Great Rift Valley has long been the favoured contender—until today.

16d

Phys.org

Sewage, rivers and soils provide missing link in antibiotic resistance story

If you think that the key to beating antibiotic resistance is only for doctors to prescribe less and scientists to find new drug candidates, you are probably wrong. The fundamental solutions may lie far from medicine—in managing our rivers and soils.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

200+

Why plants panic when it rains

An international team of scientists involving The University of Western Australia's School of Molecular Sciences, the ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology and Lund University has made the surprising discovery that a plant's reaction to rain is close to one of panic.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

400+

Hot as shell: birds in cooler climates lay darker eggs to keep their embryos warm

Birds lay eggs with a huge variety of colours and patterns, from immaculate white to a range of blue-greens and reddish browns.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Sewage, rivers and soils provide missing link in antibiotic resistance story

If you think that the key to beating antibiotic resistance is only for doctors to prescribe less and scientists to find new drug candidates, you are probably wrong. The fundamental solutions may lie far from medicine—in managing our rivers and soils.

16d

Phys.org

68

Scientists synthesize light with new intrinsic chirality to tell mirror molecules apart

Light is the fastest way to distinguish right- and left-handed chiral molecules, which has important applications in chemistry and biology. However, ordinary light only weakly senses molecular handedness. Researchers from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), the Israel Institute of Technology (Technion) and Technische Universitaet Berlin (TU Berlin) now r

16d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

100+

MIT Taught Self-Driving Cars to See Around Corners with Shadows

We're inching ever-closer to a world where cars can drive themselves. The most advanced autonomous vehicles in testing by companies like Alphabet's Waymo can drive in many situations as well as a human, but the hope is to make cars better than human drivers. Ideally, a self-driving car would be able to use all its processing might to avoid an accident, but to do that, they need data. Researchers

16d

New Scientist

2K

Experimental tuberculosis vaccine could save millions of lives

A new vaccine is the first that prevents people with a dormant tuberculosis infection from developing active disease

16d

Phys.org

22

Red algae thrive despite ancestor's massive loss of genes

You'd think that losing 25 percent of your genes would be a big problem for survival. But not for red algae, including the seaweed used to wrap sushi.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

22

Red algae thrive despite ancestor's massive loss of genes

You'd think that losing 25 percent of your genes would be a big problem for survival. But not for red algae, including the seaweed used to wrap sushi.

16d

Scientific American Blog Posts

1K

We're Incentivizing Bad Science

Current research trends resemble the early 21st century's financial bubble — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16d

Phys.org

300+

Severe drought shuts down reproduction in copperhead snakes, study finds

A long-term study of copperhead snakes in a forest near Meriden, Connecticut, revealed that five consecutive years of drought effectively ended the snakes' reproductive output.

16d

Livescience.com

1K

You Totally Have Enough Time to Exercise If You Just Put Down Your Phone

Many Americans actually do have enough free time in their day for exercise, but they spend that time looking at screens instead, a new study suggests.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

200+

Severe drought shuts down reproduction in copperhead snakes, study finds

A long-term study of copperhead snakes in a forest near Meriden, Connecticut, revealed that five consecutive years of drought effectively ended the snakes' reproductive output.

16d

BBC News – Science & Environment

500+

HMS Beagle: Dock where Darwin's ship 'was dismantled' revealed

Researchers use specialist technology to trace the outline on the mud flats of a river in Essex.

16d

Ingeniøren

Microsoft slår alarm om cyberangreb mod antidoping-organisationer

Den russiske hackergrupper Fancy Bear har i løbet af den seneste måned stået bag flere cyberangreb mod antidoping-organisationer, lyder det fra Microsoft.

16d

Dagens Medicin

Samarbejde nødvendigt for at vende den negative fertilitetstrend

Trods store fremskridt indenfor behandling af ufrivillig barnløshed, er succesraten pr. behandling stadig under 30 pct. Derfor er der fortsat stort behov for nye og effektive behandlinger.

16d

Ingeniøren

40

Ulovlige indtrængere er de hyppigst dræbte i jernbaneulykker

Af 41 dræbte på jernbanen sidste år, tog 31 deres eget liv, mens ti døde i egentlige jernbaneulykker. Heraf var de syv trængt ulovligt ind. Ti blev kvæstet på skinnerne i 2018.

16d

Wired

400+

The Shady Cryptocurrency Boom on the Post-Soviet Frontier

Dodgy energy deals, loose regulation, and dubious characters—with links to the Hillary Clinton email hackers—are fueling a burgeoning crypto industry that could provide an end run around US sanctions.

16d

Wired

500+

Bees, Please: Stop Dying in Your Martian Simulator

Future space colonists will need pollinators to grow food on the moon and Mars. But first scientists need to figure out how to keep them alive.

16d

Nature

300+

On the troubling trail of psychiatry's pseudopatients stunt

Nature, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03268-y Susannah Cahalan's investigation of the social-psychology experiment that saw healthy people sent to mental hospitals finds inconsistencies — Alison Abbott reviews.

16d

forskning.se

100+

Barn vars förälder dömts till fängelse klarar sig sämre i livet

Barn vars förälder dömts till fängelse klarar sig sämre i skolan och har en ökad risk för egen kriminalitet i tonåren. Som unga vuxna har de svårare att etablera sig på arbetsmarknaden, visar en ny IFAU-rapport. Varje år har omkring 8 000 barn och ungdomar i Sverige minst en förälder i fängelse. Rapportförfattarna följer drygt 40 000 barn vars förälder åtalats och dömts till fängelsestraff 1997–2

16d

Scientific American Content

500+

We're Incentivizing Bad Science

Current research trends resemble the early 21st century's financial bubble — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16d

NPR

Newly Discovered Beetle Named For Greta Thunberg: Nelloptodes Gretae

The London Natural History Museum has named a species of beetle after Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg to honor her contribution to raising awareness of environmental issues.

16d

Phys.org

1K

Air Force's mystery space plane lands, ends 2-year mission

The Air Force's mystery space plane is back on Earth, following a record-breaking two-year mission.

16d

Future(s) Studies

European wind farms could meet global energy demand, researchers now say

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

16d

Future(s) Studies

The Grav Drive

I have this vision of how travel will be done in the future based on this idea: Take a pair of entangled electrons X and Y and let X fall into a large mass (the sun). While Y rests in place, it should grow in mass as X descends towards the sun. The increase in mass would be due to the increase in the velocity of X. The faster X goes the heavier both X and Y would get. I think this would solve a f

16d

Future(s) Studies

Compact depth sensor inspired by eyes of jumping spiders

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

16d

Future(s) Studies

The nano-revolution spawned by carbon

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

16d

Future(s) Studies

We Need AI That Is Explainable, Auditable, and Transparent

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Nanoscale structural defects in oblique Ar+ sputtered Si(111) surfaces

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52099-4 Nanoscale structural defects in oblique Ar + sputtered Si(111) surfaces

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Yeast two-hybrid screening for proteins that interact with PFT in wheat

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52030-x

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Maladaptive alterations of resting state cortical network in Tinnitus: A directed functional connectivity analysis of a larger MEG data set

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51747-z

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Declining abundance of coral reef fish in a World-Heritage-listed marine park

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52016-9

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

An investigation of microstructural, magnetic and microwave absorption properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes/Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52233-2 An investigation of microstructural, magnetic and microwave absorption properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes/Ni 0.5 Zn 0.5 Fe 2 O 4

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Association between Atrial Fibrillation, Myocardial Infarction, Heart Failure and Mortality in Patients with Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection: a nationwide population-based study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51801-w

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Coating Cutting Blades with Thin-Film Metallic Glass to Enhance Sharpness

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52054-3

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

NEMA Performance Evaluation of CareMiBrain dedicated brain PET and Comparison with the whole-body and dedicated brain PET systems

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51898-z

16d

Nature

94

Chile — right to free will needs definition

Nature, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03295-9

16d

Nature

79

Nobel Committee responds to criticism

Nature, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03293-x

16d

Nature

23

India aims for national policy on scientific social responsibility

Nature, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03294-w

16d

Nature

200+

How Australopithecus provided insight into human evolution

Nature, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02839-3 In 1925, a Nature paper reported an African fossil of a previously unknown genus called Australopithecus. This finding revolutionized ideas about early human evolution after human ancestors and apes split on the evolutionary tree.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Red algae thrive despite ancestor's massive loss of genes

You'd think that losing 25 percent of your genes would be a big problem for survival. But not for red algae, including the seaweed used to wrap sushi. An ancestor of red algae lost about a quarter of its genes roughly one billion years ago, but the algae still became dominant in near-shore coastal areas around the world, according to Rutgers University-New Brunswick Professor Debashish Bhattachary

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Severe drought shuts down reproduction in copperhead snakes, study finds

A long-term study of copperhead snakes in a forest near Meriden, Conn., revealed that five consecutive years of drought effectively ended the snakes' reproductive output.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Turning a dangerous toxin into a biosensor

Some bacteria release a toxin that forms pores on other cells. EPFL scientists have studied the pore-forming toxin aerolysin and genetically engineered it to be used as a high-resolution sensor for biological molecules like DNA and proteins.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Where to install renewable energy in US to achieve greatest benefits

A new Harvard study shows that to achieve the biggest improvements in public health and the greatest benefits from renewable energy, wind turbines should be installed in the Upper Midwest and solar power should be installed in the Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic regions.

16d

Dagens Medicin

Krav til nye sygehuse: Mytedræber

Fremstillingen i Dagens Medicin af kravet til rationaliseringsgevinster ved sygehusbyggeri er noget misvisende

16d

The Atlantic

4K

Trump's Tantrums Won't Make Impeachment Go Away

Ambassador Bill Taylor is concerned about process. The longtime diplomat—who began his career as a West Point cadet, went on to a role as an infantry officer in Vietnam, and now serves as a chief of mission in Ukraine—reluctantly took his current position in Kiev only to discover what he called last week "a confusing and unusual arrangement for making U.S. policy" toward Ukraine. There were, he s

16d

The Atlantic

1K

Kanye West Strains His Voice on Jesus Is King

Why does Kanye West matter? One reason is that he's made the world rethink the human voice. In the early 2000s, his take on the "chipmunk soul" style of rap production used classic vocals for the retro-future fun that pop culture now devours. He later presided over the evolution of auto-tune and other vocal-manipulation tools from being seen as pitch-correcting crutches to being seen as instrumen

16d

The Atlantic

64K

The U.S. Only Pretends to Have Free Markets

When I arrived in the United States from France in 1999, I felt like I was entering the land of free markets. Nearly everything—from laptops to internet service to plane tickets—was cheaper here than in Europe. Twenty years later, this is no longer the case. Internet service, cellphone plans, and plane tickets are now much cheaper in Europe and Asia than in the United States, and the price differ

16d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Constraining the rise of oxygen with oxygen isotopes

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12883-2 The loss of anomalous sulfur isotope compositions from sedimentary rocks has been considered a symptom of permanent atmospheric oxygenation. Here the authors show sulfur and oxygen isotope evidence from

16d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Hypothalamus-hippocampus circuitry regulates impulsivity via melanin-concentrating hormone

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12895-y Impulsive behaviour is common in various neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, the authors identify a pathway from the lateral hypothalamus to the ventral hippocampus and the role of melanin-concentrating hormone signaling in these neurons in specifically regulating impulsivity.

16d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Increased yields and biological potency of knob-into-hole-based soluble MHC class II molecules

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12902-2 Recombinant MHC class II molecules are instrumental in antigen-specific T-cell identification assays and showed efficacy as experimental medicines. Here, the authors engineer MHC class II molecules with species-specific knob-into-hole heteromerization domains, enabling a translatable purification process with

16d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Intronic ATTTC repeat expansions in STARD7 in familial adult myoclonic epilepsy linked to chromosome 2

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12671-y Familial cortical myoclonic tremor (FAME) has so far been mapped to regions on chromosome 2, 3, 5 and 8 and pentameric repeat expansions in SAMD12 were identified as cause of FAME1. Here, Corbett et al. identify ATTTT/ATTTC repeat expansions in intron 1 of STARD7 in individuals with FAME2."

16d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Unifying scrambling, thermalization and entanglement through measurement of fidelity out-of-time-order correlators in the Dicke model

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13016-5

16d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Unstable TTTTA/TTTCA expansions in MARCH6 are associated with Familial Adult Myoclonic Epilepsy type 3

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12763-9 Familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy (FAME) is a slowly progressing cortical tremor mapping to various genomic loci, including intronic expansions in SAMD12 for FAME1. Here, Florian et al. describe mixed intronic TTTTA/TTTCA expansions of various lengths in the first intron of MARCH6 as a cause of

16d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

34

Cryo-EM structure and polymorphism of Aβ amyloid fibrils purified from Alzheimer's brain tissue

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12683-8 Alzheimer's disease is characterised by the deposition of Aβ amyloid fibrils and tau protein neurofibrillary tangles. Here the authors use cryo-EM to structurally characterise brain derived Aβ amyloid fibrils and find that they are polymorphic and right-hand twisted, which differs from in vitro generated Aβ f

16d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

TAF1 plays a critical role in AML1-ETO driven leukemogenesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12735-z AML1-ETO is a fusion protein in which acetylation of lysine-43 is critical to leukemogenesis. Here, they show that TAF1 is required for AML1-ETO mediated gene expression such that it binds to acetylated AML1-ETO to facilitate the association of AML1-ETO with chromatin, and consequently, promotes leukemic self

16d

Discover Magazine

What would a truly modern human look like?

A recurring theme in evolutionary psychology is that humans did not evolve to live in the modern world. Homo sapiens emerged in the harsh conditions of small hunter-gatherer societies of the Pleistocene era. Then, in just a few thousand years, we found ourselves in a very different world of big cities, fast food and all the rest. This change happened so suddenly that evolution had no time to adapt

16d

Retraction Watch

No 'possible fraudulent explanation': Frequent co-author tasked with clearing colleagues of image manipulation

A journal has allowed a group of researchers in Italy to correct a 2016 paper with questionable images after a faculty member in their institution — and a frequent co-author of the group's — said his investigation found no reason to doubt their integrity. The article, "Arg tyrosine kinase modulates TGF-β1 production in human renal … Continue reading

16d

Science | The Guardian

6K

Tick-borne encephalitis found in UK for first time

Infected ticks are discovered in Norfolk and on Hampshire-Dorset border A disease that can harm the brain, and which is spread to humans through tick bites, has been identified in the UK for the first time. Public Health England (PHE) confirmed the presence of the tick-borne encephalitis virus in Thetford Forest, Norfolk, and on the Hampshire-Dorset border. Continue reading…

16d

Undark Magazine

200+

In Paraguay, Leveraging Thirst for 'Mate' to Save Local Forests

Rich in caffeine and antioxidants, yerba mate is a popular drink in Paraguay and abroad. With help from nonprofits, farmers are now growing and harvesting more mate locally. The economic boost steers communities away from clearing forest for other forms of farming and has led to more mate trees being planted.

16d

Nature

Challenge to test reproducibility of old computer code

Nature, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03296-8

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Pre-pregnancy underweight and obesity are positively associated with small-for-gestational-age infants in a Chinese population

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52018-7

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Uterine SOX17: a key player in human endometrial receptivity and embryo implantation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51751-3

16d

Science

22

The Book of Life will be the century's most valuable enterprise

Scientists are racing to code the genetic sequences of all complex species on the planet

16d

BBC News – Science & Environment

22K

Narcissists 'horrible people but happy'

They might be shameless attention-seekers but narcissists are also likely to be happier people.

16d

Ingeniøren

Folketinget videresendte personoplysninger på politikere ved en fejl

184 tidligere og aktuelle politikere fik ved en fejl sendt navne, CPR-numre og information om kontingentindbetalinger videre til andre partiers sekretariater. Oplysningerne er ikke nået ud til offentligheden.

16d

Big Think

63

Musk vs. Bezos: Whose philosophy will get him to space first?

The billionaires Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk are driving the private space sector, however, they both have different motivations and goals for doing so. For Musk, space colonization is a matter of saving the human species — having a Plan B. For Bezos, he believes Earth can be saved and transformed into a "residential only" zone. Goods from industrial manufacturing would be outsourced from space colo

16d

BBC News – Science & Environment

1K

Great Orme copper mine 'traded widely in Bronze Age'

Copper from a prehistoric mine was traded from "Brittany to the Baltic", metal analysis shows.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study finds inequities in access to heart failure care

As part of an initiative by the Department of Medicine Health Equity Committee at Brigham and Women's Hospital, investigators conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted to the Brigham with a diagnosis of heart failure. The team found that patients who self-identified as black, Latinx, female or over the age of 75 were less likely to be admitted to the cardiology service, even afte

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Racial inequities uncovered in hospital admissions for heart failure

Black and Latino patients with heart failure are less likely to be treated in cardiac units when admitted to the hospital. Women with heart failure and those older than 75 are also less likely to be treated in specialty heart units. Heart failure patients not treated in a specialized cardiac care unit are more likely to be readmitted within one month of discharge.

16d

Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

47

Laks og makrel flere gange om ugen gør børn sundere

Et nyt forskningsprojekt fra Institut for Idræt og Ernæring på Københavns Universitet…

16d

Ingeniøren

400+

Ny rapport: Vi kan flyve grønt om få år

I en rapport, som offentliggøres i dag, viser forskerne, at det er muligt at fremstille bæredygtigt flybrændstof i Danmark på basis af CO2, brint og den biogas, som afgasses fra gylle, halm og fødevareaffald.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Scientists discover the implication of a new protein involved in liver cancer

.The finding has a clear clinical relevance, since it will facilitate patient selection to offer a more specific therapy.

16d

Ingeniøren

100+

Derfor skal Danmarks største rundtømmerbro rives ned efter kun otte år

PLUS. En kun otte år gammel træbro skal rives nu ned på grund af omfattende rådskader. Man skulle aldrig have brugt douglasgran til den bærende konstruktion, vurderer skønsmanden.

16d

Phys.org

30

Fishing plastic 'ghost nets' out of the Baltic

On a small fishing boat out in the Baltic Sea, Pekka Kotilainen rifles through buckets of fishing gear, mixed with rubbish and mussel shells.

16d

Phys.org

36

Virgin Galactic becomes first space tourism company to land on Wall Street

Virgin Galactic landed on Wall Street Monday, debuting its listing on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in a first for a space tourism company.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

30

Fishing plastic 'ghost nets' out of the Baltic

On a small fishing boat out in the Baltic Sea, Pekka Kotilainen rifles through buckets of fishing gear, mixed with rubbish and mussel shells.

16d

Phys.org

63

Automakers side with Trump in legal fight with California

General Motors, Fiat Chrysler, Toyota and many others in the auto industry are siding with the Trump administration in a lawsuit over whether California has the right to set its own greenhouse gas emissions and fuel economy standards.

16d

Ingeniøren

Danmarks største rundtømmerbro rådnet før tid

Med et frit spænd på 36 meter er Kællinghøl Broen ved Bjerringbro i Viborg Kommune Danmarks længste bro af rundtømmer. Men nu skal den rives ned. For broens gitterspær er bygget af ubehandlet douglasgran, som ikke kan tåle vind og vejr. Se skaderne her.

16d

forskning.se

Molekyler hittade – som kan blockera bakteriers proteintillverkning

Forskare vid Uppsala universitet har hittat små syntetiska molekyler som kan blockera själva födelsen av nya proteiner i bakterier. Och därmed hämma bakteriers tillväxt. Många olika typer av antibiotika fungerar på så sätt att de blockerar bakteriernas förmåga att tillverka proteiner. Proteintillverkning är den viktigaste processen för bakteriers tillväxt och den består av ett antal olika delmome

16d

forskning.se

60

Intensivare skogsbruk och biologisk mångfald – hur går det ihop?

En skogspolitisk debatt pågår i Sverige om en framtida ytterligare intensifiering av skogsbruket. Runt 2000 skogslevande arter är rödlistade. En tvärvetenskaplig forskargrupp har undersökt om Sveriges naturvårdsinsatser kan hålla jämna steg med ett allt intensivare skogsbruk. En skogspolitisk debatt pågår i Sverige om en framtida ytterligare intensifiering av skogsbruket. Nuvarande skogspolitik a

16d

forskning.se

Skogsbränder kan öka risken för sorkfeber

Stora skogsbränder kan leda till ökad spridning av sjukdomar som bärs av gnagare, till exempel av virus som orsaker sorkfeber, visar forskning från SLU och Umeå universitet. Det kan också vara en möjligt konsekvens av fjolårets svåra skogsbränder, menar forskarna. Forskarna har undersökt möjliga konsekvenser av skogsbränder, när det gäller sjukdomar som sprids via gnagare, i det område som berörd

16d

forskning.se

Utbildning i psykisk ohälsa avgör om chefer arbetar förebyggande

Chefer som fått utbildning i psykisk ohälsa, och där arbetsplatsen gör generella informationsinsatser, är avsevärt mer benägna att arbeta förebyggande mot psykisk ohälsa, visar en studie. Detta oavsett chefernas egna erfarenheter av psykisk ohälsa, och organisationens storlek. – Det är viktigt att organisationer bedriver generella preventiva och informativa åtgärder, och att man hjälper chefer at

16d

Phys.org

How do you save endangered gorillas? With lots of human help

Deep in the rainforest of Volcanoes National Park, a 23-year-old female gorilla named Kurudi feeds on a stand of wild celery. She bends the green stalks and, with long careful fingers, peels off the exterior skin to expose the succulent inside.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Intense monitoring and care lift mountain gorilla numbers

Deep in the rainforest of Volcanoes National Park, a 23-year-old female gorilla named Kurudi feeds on a stand of wild celery. She bends the green stalks and, with long careful fingers, peels off the exterior skin to expose the succulent inside.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ground-breaking work improves understanding of brain function

Dr. Corrado Calì, a Research Scientist specializing in brain imaging at KAUST, and Swiss scientists from the Blue Brain Project (BBP), have shown how lactate is necessary for memory formation and learning, which could lead to improved learning and memory function.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

25

How far schoolkids live from junk food sources tied to obesity

As measured in city blocks, proximity to fast and convenience food sellers can impact a student's chances of becoming obese, according to a new study by researchers at NYU School of Medicine.

16d

Phys.org

200+

Exerting self-control does not mean sacrificing pleasure

Choosing to eat chocolate cake instead of carrot sticks does not equal a lack of self-control, according to new research co-authored by a Cass Business School academic.

16d

Science-Based Medicine

62

Lipo-Flavonoid for Tinnitus

Lipo-Flavonoid is sold to treat tinnitus. The claims are misleading, and the evidence isn't there.

16d

The Atlantic

400+

The Quotidian Uncertainty of Britain's Monumental Shift

The Polish chef who was erroneously denied the right to indefinitely remain in Britain. The Italian partner of a British army veteran whose local member of Parliament had to intervene to secure hers. The Hungarian man who mistakenly accepted a temporary status. At first blush, these cases demonstrate some of the complications that have emerged as a result of Britain's ambitious plan to absorb mil

16d

ScienceAlert – Latest

500+

Growing Older Doesn't Automatically Mean You'll Get Fat, According to Science

You can prevent it.

16d

ScienceAlert – Latest

400+

Annoying 'Duracrust' on Mars Just Kicked Out InSight's Heat Probe, Again

A sad day for engineers.

16d

Future(s) Studies

Driverless cars are stuck in a jam: Blame Silicon Valley hype—and the limits of AI

submitted by /u/boemul [link] [comments]

16d

Future(s) Studies

Museum of the Future: The building designed by an algorithm

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

16d

Future(s) Studies

Searching for a prophetic book (holographic dust cover)

Hi guys, wondering if anybody can help me find this incredible book I stumbled across in a library while I was traveling. The reason it caught my eye is it had this holographic print that completely covered the dust cover. Never have I ever seen a book like it before or since. I can't for the life of me remember the title or the author. I read a few chapters and had to leave it. If I remember it

16d

Future(s) Studies

IBM Research today revealed a breakthrough nanotechnology technique that allows researchers to position individual atoms and control their quantum properties. This could be a watershed moment on the path to generally useful quantum computers

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

16d

Future(s) Studies

Watch Out Tesla and Nikola! The New Hyundai Neptune HDC-6 Concept Semi Truck Is Here With Hydrogen Fuel Cell Power (Debut)

submitted by /u/chopchopped [link] [comments]

16d

Future(s) Studies

Researchers at the University of Arizona have received $1.8 million from the National Institute on Aging to study whether near-infrared light can help revitalize aging brains

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

16d

ScienceAlert – Latest

1K

Migrating Eagles Bankrupted a Russian Science Study With Excessive Mobile Charges

The story has a happy ending, though.

16d

ScienceAlert – Latest

1K

'First Light' Achieved on an Experiment That Could Crack The Mystery of Dark Energy

Mapping the structures in the Universe.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Migratory birds are worse off in West Africa

Migratory sandpipers breeding in Greenland who choose to spend the winter in West Africa instead of elsewhere along the East Atlantic coast have a lower chance of survival, are more likely to skip their first breeding season and arrive later at their breeding grounds. An article in the Journal of Animal Ecology challenges the widely held idea that the costs of longer migratory flights are inevitab

16d

ScienceAlert – Latest

1K

New Neural Network Could Solve The Three-Body Problem 100 Million Times Faster

Boom.

16d

NYT > Science

2K

New TB Vaccine Could Save Millions of Lives, Study Suggests

There are 10 million new cases each year of tuberculosis, now the leading infectious cause of death worldwide. Even a partly effective vaccine could help turn the tide.

16d

Ingeniøren

300+

Ny funktion sletter automatisk din historik hos Google – hvis du altså slår den til

En funktion til automatisk sletning af aktivitet skal give Googles brugere bedre mulighed for at kontrollere mængden af data, som virksomheden har indsamlet.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Exerting self-control does not mean sacrificing pleasure

New research challenges the view that self-control equals sacrificing pleasure.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

26

Chameleon's tongue strike inspires fast-acting robots

Purdue University researchers were inspired by a chameleon's tongue to create soft robots able to quickly catch a live flying beetle. Fabricated robots capable of performing such large-amplitude motions at high speed like chameleons could mean many automated tasks could be completed more accurately and in a much faster way.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Cognitive screen paired with odor identification predicts lack of transition to dementia

A new study has found that performing well on two brief tests measuring cognitive ability and ability to identify odors indicates very low risk for Alzheimer's. We know that these tests can help predict the risk of developing dementia, but didn't know if they could help rule out those unlikely to develop Alzheimer's.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

Narcissism can lower stress levels and reduce chances of depression

People who have grandiose narcissistic traits are more likely to be 'mentally tough,' feel less stressed and are less vulnerable to depression, research led by Queen's University Belfast has found.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Can aspirin decrease the rate of intracranial aneurysm growth?

Researchers investigated whether aspirin can aid in the prevention of intracranial aneurysm rupture by hindering aneurysm growth. The researchers identified 146 patients harboring multiple intracranial aneurysms, five millimeters or less in diameter, that had been observed for at least five years. In this set of patients, the researchers found an association between aspirin use and a decreased rat

16d

Ingeniøren

200+

Nordisk samarbejde om 5G ligner et regulært flop

PLUS. Knap halvandet år efter de nordiske statsministre aftalte at samarbejde tæt om udvikling af 5G-teknologier, er der intet sket og samarbejdet er ikke-eksisterende. Det konkluderer ny rapport fra Nordisk Råd.

16d

60-Second Science

24

Crabs Do a Maze

Green crabs learned to navigate a maze without making a single wrong turn—and remembered the skill weeks later. Christopher Intagliata reports.

16d

Science News Daily

Facebook will now remind you to get health check-ups (if you want)

[no content]

16d

Scientific American

24

Crabs Do a Maze

Green crabs learned to navigate a maze without making a single wrong turn—and remembered the skill weeks later. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16d

Scientific American: Mind & Brain

42

Crabs Do a Maze

Green crabs learned to navigate a maze without making a single wrong turn—and remembered the skill weeks later. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16d

Scientific American Content

24

Crabs Do a Maze

Green crabs learned to navigate a maze without making a single wrong turn—and remembered the skill weeks later. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16d

Science News Daily

New US rules would require carriers to remove Chinese equipment

US regulators on Monday proposed rules to block telecom carriers from buying from Chinese tech companies Huawei and ZTE, and to remove any of their equipment already in place.

16d

ScienceDaily

48

Using whole-genome sequencing for early identification and containment of AMR pathogens

A study published today examines the evolutionary and epidemiologic history of an epidemic strain of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) — called LAM4/KZN. This strain was first reported in a 2005 outbreak where it was associated with 90 percent mortality among predominantly HIV infected individuals, and has since become widespread throughout the province. A new study identifies key

16d

ScienceDaily

40

Satellite, drone photos could help predict infections of a widespread tropical disease

An international team has discovered a cheap and efficient way to identify transmission hotspots for schistosomiasis. The research uses rigorous field sampling and aerial images to precisely map communities that are at greatest risk for infection.

16d

ScienceDaily

100+

Science shows hype about your opponent actually messes with your game

A study of more than 117,000 pro tennis matches and more than 5 million observations in online amateur chess indicates that even when competitors are evenly matched, players perform worse against an opponent they know has been climbing in rank.

16d

ScienceDaily

300+

Nutritious foods have lower environmental impact than unhealthy foods

Widespread adaptation of healthier diets would markedly reduce the environmental impact of agriculture and food production. For the first time, researchers have tied the health impacts of foods to their overall environmental impact.

16d

ScienceDaily

32

Salt helps proteins move on down the road

Chemists match models and experiments to see how salt modifies surface interactions in chromatography used to separate valuable drug proteins. The research could be a step toward simplifying drug manufacture.

16d

ScienceDaily

41

Extent of human encroachment into world's protected areas revealed

Largest study yet to compare protected with 'matched' unprotected land finds 'significantly higher' increases in human pressure — primarily through agriculture — in protected areas across the tropics. Researchers argue that efforts to increase coverage may not help save wildlife unless protecting land 'on paper' is backed up by funding and local community engagement.

16d

ScienceDaily

100+

Compact depth sensor inspired by spiders

Inspired by jumping spiders, researchers have developed a compact and efficient depth sensor that could be used on board microrobots, in small wearable devices, or in lightweight virtual and augmented reality headsets. The device combines a multifunctional, flat metalens with an ultra-efficient algorithm to measure depth in a single shot.

16d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

32

Salt helps proteins move on down the road

Chemists match models and experiments to see how salt modifies surface interactions in chromatography used to separate valuable drug proteins. The research could be a step toward simplifying drug manufacture.

16d

ScienceAlert – Latest

3K

Hubble Catches a Giant Spooky Face Staring at Us From Deep Within The Cosmos

But what is it, really?

16d

ScienceDaily

20

New clues as to why mutations in the MYH9 gene cause broad spectrum of disorders in humans

Researchers have used the Drosophila embryo to model human disease mutations that affect myosin motor activity. Through in vivo imaging and biophysical analysis, they demonstrated that engineering human MYH9-related disease mutations into Drosophila myosin II produces motors with altered organization and dynamics that fail to drive rapid cell movements, resulting in defects in epithelial morphogen

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Genetic variants for autism linked to higher rates of self-harm and childhood maltreatment

People with a higher genetic likelihood of autism are more likely to report higher childhood maltreatment, self-harm and suicidal thoughts according to a new study by researchers at the University of Cambridge. A better understanding of these issues is critical to improving wellbeing in autistic people.

16d

ScienceAlert – Latest

7K

That Mysterious US Space Plane Just Landed After a Mind-Blowing 780 Days in Orbit

Its mission? Who knows.

16d

Wired

500+

Uber Eats Hopes Drones Can Lift It to Profitability

Uber Lyft DoorDash

Uber reveals the design of a drone with six rotors that change position for vertical takeoffs and landings. It can stay aloft for 18 minutes, with a range of 18 miles.

16d

Science News Daily

HomePod update adds multi-user support and music handoffs

Apple just made the HomePod considerably more useful for whole households, albeit somewhat later than expected. It accompanied the release of iOS 13.2 with a corresponding HomePod …

16d

Science News Daily

Waymo's autonomous cars are now picking up Phoenix riders without a safety driver

Waymo has been testing its technology in Phoenix for quite a while now, but usually with a safety driver present — this latest move represents the first fully-realized example of Level 4 autonomous …

16d

Science News Daily

Google falls short on third-quarter profit

Google parent company Alphabet reported mixed third-quarter results Monday that beat analyst expectations for revenue, but fell short on profits. The stock fell almost 3% in after-hours trading.

16d

Wired

2K

California's Wildfires Are the Doom of Our Own Making

The state is being squeezed by uber-wildfires and rising seas—climate change's twin agents of chaos. It's a struggle that will define us.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

28

Anti-inflammatory agents can effectively and safely curb major depressive symptoms

Anti-inflammatory agents, such as aspirin/paracetamol, statins, and antibiotics, can safely and effectively curb the symptoms of major depression, finds a pooled analysis of the available evidence, published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UK vets need special training to report suspected animal abuse

UK vets need special training to report cases of suspected animal abuse and neglect, finds research published online in Vet Record.

16d

ScienceAlert – Latest

2K

New Study Pinpoints The Ancestral Homeland of All Humans Alive Today

Not everyone is convinced, though.

16d

Phys.org

UK vets need special training to report suspected animal abuse

UK vets need special training to report cases of suspected animal abuse and neglect, finds research published online in Vet Record.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

UK vets need special training to report suspected animal abuse

UK vets need special training to report cases of suspected animal abuse and neglect, finds research published online in Vet Record.

16d

Science | The Guardian

10K

Risks of cannabis use for mental health treatment outweigh benefits

New study shows evidence of positive outcomes is scarce while symptoms can be exacerbated The use of cannabis medicines to treat people with depression, anxiety, psychosis or other mental health issues cannot be justified because there is little evidence that they work or are safe, according to a major new study. A review of evidence from trials conducted over nearly 40 years, published in the jo

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Amaryllidaceae alkaloids: identification and partial characterization of montanine production in Rhodophiala bifida plant

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50830-9

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Publisher Correction: Development of a viability digital PCR protocol for the selective detection and quantification of live Erwinia amylovora cells in cankers

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49873-9

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Insights into Pasteurellaceae carriage dynamics in the nasal passages of healthy beef calves

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52010-1

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Matrix-bound nanovesicles prevent ischemia-induced retinal ganglion cell axon degeneration and death and preserve visual function

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50829-2

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Quantitative vessel tortuosity: A potential CT imaging biomarker for distinguishing lung granulomas from adenocarcinomas

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52008-9

16d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Publisher Correction: Structural basis for the inhibitory effects of a novel reversible covalent ligand on PPARγ phosphorylation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50831-8

16d

New Scientist

3K

There is little evidence that cannabis helps mental health problems

New research raises doubts around the use of cannabis for mental health conditions, prompting concerns that the benefits are being oversold

16d

Science News Daily

Blaming the driver in a 'driverless' car

Study suggests we cut machines some slack when humans are in the loop.

16d

Future(s) Studies

South Africa rations water to save dwindling supplies. Dam levels across the country have dropped by 10% to 60% compared to 2018, according to a recent report by the Department of Water and Sanitation

submitted by /u/Wagamaga [link] [comments]

16d

Future(s) Studies

The U.S. and China Need to Put Aside Their Rivalry and Focus on the Common Enemy: Climate Change

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

16d

Future(s) Studies

Largest 3D printed building unveiled in Dubai

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

16d

Future(s) Studies

A new theory inspired by thermodynamics takes a high-level perspective of how neural networks in the brain transiently organize to give rise to memories, thought and consciousness

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

16d

Future(s) Studies

Diesel and petrol-fuelled cars banned in Brussels by 2035

submitted by /u/everyEV [link] [comments]

16d

Future(s) Studies

100+

Soldiers' bottled water consumption is unsustainable in the next war – at one forward operating base in Iraq during the 2000s, more than 864,000 bottles of water were consumed each month, with that number doubling during hotter months, according to Army report

submitted by /u/anon99129 [link] [comments]

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The Lancet Psychiatry: Insufficient evidence that medicinal cannabinoids improve mental health

The most comprehensive analysis of medicinal cannabinoids and their impact on six mental health disorders — combining 83 studies including 3,000 people — suggests that the use of cannabinoids for mental health conditions cannot be justified based on the current evidence. This is due to a lack of evidence for their effectiveness, and because of the known risks of cannabinoids.

16d

Livescience.com

4K

There's No Evidence Marijuana Will Treat Your Anxiety or Depression

Existing evidence doesn't validate the use of cannabinoids to treat mental health disorders.

16d

Discover Magazine

This Swarm of Search and Rescue Drones Can Explore Without Human Help

Each bot in the swarm weighs in at just over an ounce. Credit: TU Delft / MAVLab In 2008, a fire ripped through the architectural building at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) in the Netherlands. Firefighters got the burn under control, but afterward, the school wanted to know if any furniture was salvageable. So Guido de Croon, an associate professor of aerospace engineering, flew a drone

16d

ScienceDaily

200+

In the long run, drugs and talk therapy hold same value for people with depression

Spending an hour in talk therapy with a trained counselor costs much more, and takes more time, than swallowing an inexpensive antidepressant pill. But for people with a new diagnosis of major depression, the costs and benefits of the two approaches end up being equal after five years, a new study shows.

16d

Discover Magazine

Why We Love Big, Blood-Curdling Screams

A scream evokes a response that few other sounds can. (Credit: GlebSStock/Shutterstock) Of all the sounds humans produce, nothing captures our attention quite like a good scream. They're a regular feature of horror films, whether it's Marion Crane's infamous shower scream in "Psycho" or Chrissie Watkins' blood-curdling scream at the beginning of "Jaws." Screams might seem simple, but they can actu

16d

NYT > Science

120K

General Motors Sides With Trump in Emissions Fight, Splitting the Industry

Along with Toyota and Fiat Chrysler, the auto giant backed the administration in its clash with California over pollution standards.

16d

ScienceDaily

100

To rid electric grid of carbon, shore up green energy support

Engineers, along with an economist, have created an energy model that helps to remove carbon-generated power from the US electric grid — replacing it with a greener, financially feasible wind, solar and hydro energy system.

16d

ScienceDaily

100+

The homeland of modern humans

A landmark study pinpoints the birthplace of modern humans in southern Africa and suggests how past climate shifts drove their first migration.

16d

ScienceDaily

72

High rates of dementia, Alzheimer's observed among older people with Down syndrome

A study of Wisconsin Medicaid enrollees with Down syndrome has found that more than half of those ages 55 and older have filed at least three claims for dementia and nearly a third have filed at least three claims for Alzheimer's disease.

16d

ScienceDaily

40

Crimped or straight? Lung fiber shape influences elasticity

Stiff collagen and stretchy elastin fibers packed together in rows allow the respiratory system to stretch and snap back into shape. Scientists previously thought these fibers govern the mechanics of the airways due to their composition. New research has instead observed that differences in the shape and form of tissue fibers influence respiratory elasticity. These findings will help scientists be

16d

ScienceDaily

100+

Teen marijuana use may have next-generation effects

A new study shows how a parent's use of marijuana, past or present, can influence their child's substance use and well-being.

16d

ScienceDaily

89

Theory explains biological reasons that force fish to move poleward

The Gill-Oxygen Limitation Theory explains the biological reasons that force fish, particularly larger or older ones, to move poleward when the waters in their habitats heat-up due to climate change.

16d

ScienceDaily

83

Enabling autonomous vehicles to see around corners

To improve the safety of autonomous systems, MIT engineers have developed a system that can sense tiny changes in shadows on the ground to determine if there's a moving object coming around the corner.

16d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

88

To rid electric grid of carbon, shore up green energy support

Engineers, along with an economist, have created an energy model that helps to remove carbon-generated power from the US electric grid — replacing it with a greener, financially feasible wind, solar and hydro energy system.

16d

The Atlantic

63

The Atlantic Politics Daily: Trump Wants His Own bin Laden Moment

Today in Politics It's Monday, October 28. Today , how the President plans to use Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi's death on the campaign trail. Plus , boos at a World Series game. Finally , why Nancy Pelosi wants this one particular impeachment inquiry vote. (Ryan Melgar) This was never going to be Trump's bin Laden moment. The first whisper of the news came—how else?—in a teaser of a tweet from President

16d

Wired

2K

Russian Hackers Are Still Targeting the Olympics

Fancy Bear has attacked 16 anti-doping agencies around the world, indicating that its Olympics grudge is far from over.

16d

Science | The Guardian

36

Weatherwatch: cloud 'x-rays' seek to reveal anatomy of a storm

Satellite cameras are being used to penetrate thunderstorms and produce a map of their density Scientists have long used satellite cameras, such as the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), to count lightning flashes and monitor storms. Now Michael Peterson, of Los Alamos National Laboratory, is using the pulses of illumination to produce "fulminograms" showing clouds from inside. "The output res

16d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

Scientists synthesized light with new intrinsic chirality to tell mirror molecules apart

Light is the fastest way to distinguish right- and left-handed chiral molecules, which has important applications in chemistry and biology. However, ordinary light only weakly senses molecular handedness. Researchers have now shown how to generate and characterize an entirely new type of light, synthetic chiral light, which identifies molecules' handedness exceptionally distinctly.

16d

ScienceDaily

47

Public blame accidents on drivers more than their automated cars when both make mistakes

The public are more likely to blame accidents involving semi-autonomous cars on driver — rather than machine — error, a new study has found.

16d

ScienceDaily

23

Source of unique chemical composition of volcanic rocks

Samples of rocks found on a Greek island reveal the source of oxidizing fluids feeding ancient volcanoes as scientists seek to pinpoint geochemical forces at work millions of years ago, a team of researchers report.

16d

ScienceDaily

200+

ESO telescope reveals what could be the smallest dwarf planet yet in the solar system

Astronomers using ESO's SPHERE instrument at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) have revealed that the asteroid Hygiea could be classified as a dwarf planet. The object is the fourth largest in the asteroid belt after Ceres, Vesta and Pallas. For the first time, astronomers have observed Hygiea in sufficiently high resolution to study its surface and determine its shape and size. They found that Hygie

16d

ScienceDaily

72

Climate engineering: International meeting reveals tensions

At this point, the greatest danger of climate engineering may be how little is known about where countries stand on these potentially planet-altering technologies. Who is moving forward? Who is funding research? And who is being left out of the conversation?

16d

ScienceDaily

Scientists synthesized light with new intrinsic chirality to tell mirror molecules apart

Light is the fastest way to distinguish right- and left-handed chiral molecules, which has important applications in chemistry and biology. However, ordinary light only weakly senses molecular handedness. Researchers have now shown how to generate and characterize an entirely new type of light, synthetic chiral light, which identifies molecules' handedness exceptionally distinctly.

16d

ScienceDaily

67

Risk assessment tools lead to fewer incarcerations without jeopardizing public safety

A sweeping study looking at an extensive collection of data — involving more than a million offenders at 30 different Canadian and US research sites — found that while fewer people were being locked up, crime rates showed some declines.

16d

ScienceDaily

42

Gabapentinoids appear increasingly to be prescribed, off-label, for cancer pain

Between 2005 and 2015, as the opioid crisis in America came into focus, prescriptions for gabapentinoid medications — gabapentin and pregabalin — to adults with cancer saw a two-fold increase, a new study has found.

16d

ScienceDaily

24

New method promises advances in 3D printing, manufacturing and biomedical applications

In a development offering great promise for additive manufacturing, researchers have created a method to precisely create droplets using a jet of liquid. The technique allows manufacturers to quickly generate drops of material, finely control their size and locate them within a 3D space.

16d

The Atlantic

5K

The Democrats Call Trump's Bluff

If Republicans want a vote so badly, they can have a vote, Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced today. President Donald Trump's allies in and out of the White House have spent recent days complaining that the impeachment inquiry in the House of Representatives is illegitimate or at least unfair because the full chamber hadn't voted on it. In a letter this afternoon, however, Pelosi told Democratic lawm

16d

ScienceDaily

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Which came first: Brain size or drinking propensity?

Contrary to the belief that drinking can literally shrink one's brain, a new study that includes researchers suggests that a small brain might be a risk factor for heavier alcohol consumption.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Using whole-genome sequencing for early identification and containment of AMR pathogens

A study published today examines the evolutionary and epidemiologic history of an epidemic strain of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) — called LAM4/KZN. This strain was first reported in a 2005 outbreak where it was associated with 90 percent mortality among predominantly HIV infected individuals, and has since become widespread throughout the province. A new study identifies key

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study: In the long run, drugs and talk therapy hold same value for people with depression

Spending an hour in talk therapy with a trained counselor costs much more, and takes more time, than swallowing an inexpensive antidepressant pill. But for people with a new diagnosis of major depression, the costs and benefits of the two approaches end up being equal after five years, a new study shows.

16d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

24

How to move against the current? One answer is 'tilt'-illating

Going upstream, and against a current, involves a front-first downward tilt and then moving along a surface, shows new research by a team of scientists, which created 'nano-motors' to uncover this effective means of locomotion under such conditions.

16d

ScienceDaily

53

Study underscores changes in brain structure, function in long-duration space missions

New study demonstrates for the first time that changes in cognitive performance correlate with changes in brain structure in NASA astronauts following spaceflight.

16d

ScienceDaily

48

Chicks born with ability to distinguish and avoid different dangers

Chicks are born with the knowledge to flee from predators rather than learning it from experience, according to a new study.

16d

ScienceDaily

24

Soft double gyroids are unique, but imperfect, crystals

Engineers analyze soft double gyroids and find their crystalline forms are not perfect. Gyroids interact with light and sound waves and promise nanoscale materials with novel properties.

16d

ScienceDaily

24

How to move against the current? One answer is 'tilt'-illating

Going upstream, and against a current, involves a front-first downward tilt and then moving along a surface, shows new research by a team of scientists, which created 'nano-motors' to uncover this effective means of locomotion under such conditions.

16d

ScienceDaily

65

Teaching cars to drive with foresight

Good drivers anticipate dangerous situations and adjust their driving before things get dicey. Researchers now also want to teach this skill to self-driving cars.

16d

ScienceDaily

200+

New study points to another possible correlation between sleep and overall good health

As if you didn't already have enough to worry about to keep you up at night, a new study indicates that poor sleep can negatively affect your gut microbiome, which can, in turn, lead to additional health issues.

16d

The Atlantic

15K

Nancy Pelosi's Big Move

After weeks of shooting down demands from Republicans and the White House that the House formally vote on impeachment, Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced that on Thursday, lawmakers would vote on a resolution "that affirms our ongoing, existing investigation." In other words: The impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump will soon get its first official vote. The speaker's decision means tha

16d

Scientific American Blog Posts

Society for Neuroscience at 50 Delves into Mini Brains, Gene Therapy, Prosthetics and All Else Related to Our Three-Pound Wonders

The organization's anniversary comes at a time when some scientists have been barred from attending its annual meeting because of the U.S. travel ban — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16d

Livescience.com

Tuberculosis: Symptoms, Treatment & Prevention

Tuberculosis is one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide, affecting mainly children and the elderly.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Crimped or straight? Lung fiber shape influences elasticity

Stiff collagen and stretchy elastin fibers packed together in rows allow the respiratory system to stretch and snap back into shape. Scientists previously thought these fibers govern the mechanics of the airways due to their composition. New research has instead observed that differences in the shape and form of tissue fibers influence respiratory elasticity. These findings will help scientists be

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Medical alarms may be inaudible to hospital staff

Thousands of alarms are generated each day in any given hospital. New research shows that masking of an alarm's primary harmonic is sufficient to make an alarm sound indistinguishable to health care providers.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

To rid electric grid of carbon, shore up green energy support

Cornell and Northwestern University engineers, along with a federal economist, have created an energy model that helps to remove carbon-generated power from the US electric grid — replacing it with a greener, financially feasible wind, solar and hydro energy system.

16d

NYT > Science

1K

Climate Change Could Shift California's Winds, Fueling Big Winter Fires

Recent research suggests that as the climate warms, Santa Ana winds may become less frequent. Coupled with precipitation changes, that could mean more intense fires later in the year.

16d

Phys.org

300+

Climate engineering: International meeting reveals tensions

At this point, the greatest danger of climate engineering may be how little is known about where countries stand on these potentially planet-altering technologies. Who is moving forward? Who is funding research? And who is being left out of the conversation?

16d

Phys.org

Digital evidence falls short, can hurt victims of intimate partner violence

New research from LSU's Manship School of Mass Communication published in the International Journal of Communication shows digital evidence—from tablets, smartphones, computers and other electronic communication methods—can fall short of providing reliable legal evidence in cases of domestic and sexual assault, known as intimate partner violence. The paper also shows that digital evidence may expo

16d

Phys.org

500+

Compact depth sensor inspired by eyes of jumping spiders

For all our technological advances, nothing beats evolution when it comes to research and development. Take jumping spiders. These small arachnids have impressive depth perception despite their tiny brains, allowing them to accurately pounce on unsuspecting targets from several body lengths away.

16d

Science News Daily

The Technology 202: Facebook employees demand tougher standards for political ads

The leak of an open letter could signal a new emphasis on activism.

16d

Science News Daily

Helping autonomous vehicles see around corners

To improve the safety of autonomous systems, MIT engineers have developed a system that can sense tiny changes in shadows on the ground to determine if there's a moving object coming around …

16d

Phys.org

100+

New clues as to why mutations in the MYH9 gene cause broad spectrum of disorders in humans

Myosins are motor proteins that convert chemical energy into mechanical work, generating force and movement. Myosin II generates forces that are essential to drive cell movements and cell shape changes that generate tissue structure. While researchers know that mutations in the genes that encode nonmuscle myosin II lead to diseases, including severe congenital defects as well as blood platelet dys

16d

Phys.org

100+

Research team pinpoints the source of unique chemical composition of volcanic rocks

A new analysis has revealed the source of oxidation found in rock samples from the coast of Greece, where geological activity spawned explosive arc volcanoes about 45 million years ago, a team of researchers reports in the journal Nature Geoscience.

16d

Phys.org

37

NASA finds Arabian sea tropical cyclone Kyarr's heavy rainfall

Tropical Cyclone Kyarr is moving through the central Arabian Sea and NASA provided forecasters with an analysis of rainfall rates occurring in the powerful tropical cyclone.

16d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

New clues as to why mutations in the MYH9 gene cause broad spectrum of disorders in humans

Myosins are motor proteins that convert chemical energy into mechanical work, generating force and movement. Myosin II generates forces that are essential to drive cell movements and cell shape changes that generate tissue structure. While researchers know that mutations in the genes that encode nonmuscle myosin II lead to diseases, including severe congenital defects as well as blood platelet dys

16d

Big Think

500+

MIT engineers unveil emissions-free cement

Cement production accounts for 8 percent of total carbon dioxide emissions worldwide. The new method uses renewable electricity to generate heat for the mixing process, while an electrochemical technique allows for carbon dioxide to be captured and stored. This method isn't likely to be implemented at scale anytime soon, but it's an "important first step," the researchers said. None MIT engineers

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Digital evidence falls short, can hurt victims of intimate partner violence

New research from LSU's Manship School of Mass Communication published in the International Journal of Communication shows digital evidence — from tablets, smartphones, computers and other electronic communication methods — can fall short of providing reliable legal evidence in cases of domestic and sexual assault, known as intimate partner violence.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Evidence of humans, not 'bots,' key to uncovering disinformation campaigns

Political disinformation campaigns are often hard to detect, but a new study pulls back the curtain on one type called 'astroturfing.' The study suggests the key to uncovering such campaigns lies not in finding automated 'bots' but in specific traces of human coordination and behavior. The gift to researchers was a South Korean court case that identified more than 1,000 fake Twitter accounts used

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Which came first: Brain size or drinking propensity?

Contrary to the belief that drinking can literally shrink one's brain, a new study that includes researchers from Arts & Sciences suggests that a small brain might be a risk factor for heavier alcohol consumption.

16d

Wired

300+

Apple's New AirPods, Tesla's New Solar Roof, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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cognitive science

The Effects on Your Brain Being Kept Alive in a Jar.

submitted by /u/bransfordc [link] [comments]

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

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Treating the TOTAL patient: clinical trial reduces relapse

A St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study lowered the rate of relapse for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

16d

Livescience.com

1K

More Obese Children Should Get Weight-Loss Surgery, Doctors Say

Weight-loss surgery could treat severely obese children more effectively than lifestyle changes alone, pediatricians say.

16d

Discover Magazine

Drones Could Let First Responders Give Help Faster

(Credit: GaudiLab/Shutterstock) While sitting in traffic on the way to work, Mark Hanna, an emergency pediatrician at Maimonides Medical Center in New York, watched as cars blocked the path of an ambulance on a choked-up Brooklyn street. Hanna, a self-proclaimed drone nerd, thought to himself: Is there any way an airborne, medicine-carrying device could reach a patient faster than an ambulance on

16d

Discover Magazine

Humans' "Ancestral Homeland" Found, Claim Researchers

A baobab tree amid the Makgadikgadi Pan, a region researchers say is the ancestral homeland of all living humans. (Credit: Diego Delso/Wikimedia Commons) A provocative study claims every living human has an ancestral homeland in what's now Botswana, and that our early ancestors dispersed from that area due to climate change. Dig into the details, however, and there are a few hefty caveats about th

16d

Science | Smithsonian

500+

The Science Behind Hollywood's Movie Monsters

Massive hits at the time, the films that brought Frankenstein, Dracula, the Mummy and more to life also tapped into societal fears and traumas

16d

Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

Vilde planter skal blive til fremtidens mad

Forskere på Københavns Universitet vil lave nye afgrøder ud af vilde planter. Klimaforandringerne…

16d

Science | The Guardian

35

Virgin Galactic wins space tourism race to float on stock market

Sir Richard Branson beat Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos by listing his venture in New York Publicity-hungry billionaires must have a space venture, and here's Sir Richard Branson's: Virgin Galactic is now a stock market-listed company with a $2.4bn valuation. Actual space tourists won't depart until next year, but Branson has beaten Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos in getting his business floated in New York.

16d

NYT > Science

1K

John T. Tate, Familiar Name in the World of Numbers, Dies at 94

Many of his explanations of fundamental ideas now bear his name, a much-honored one among mathematicians.

16d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

31

NASA Plans VIPER Lunar Mission to Map Moon's Water Reserves

We've known about the likely presence of ice reserves on the Moon for decades, but we haven't actually sent a dedicated ground-based probe to check our nearest neighbor. Instead, the presence of water ice in shadowed craters at the Moon's south pole has been intuited from various space-based measurements and tests. Now, NASA will investigate the likelihood of water more directly by launching a pr

16d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

ET Deals: Dell 43-Inch 4K Multi-Client Monitor $649, Apple 6th Gen iPad 128GB $299, Dell Inspiron Intel Core i5 Desktop $449

Having a large display with tons of desktop real estate can make getting your work done easier than having a multi-monitor setup. Today's top deal is a 4K monitor that measures 43 inches diagonally and that can function as four separate 1080p displays all in one. Dell P4317Q 43-Inch 4K Multi-Client Monitor ($649.99) In addition to supporting a native resolution of 3840×2160, this large 43-inch di

16d

The Scientist RSS

1K

The First Modern Humans Came from What Is Now Botswana: Study

Mitochondrial DNA and other factors place our ancestors in southern Africa 200,000 years ago.

16d

Big Think

100+

Wedding bells or single again: Psychology predicts where your relationship is headed

Is he or she the one? You know… the one to introduce to my parents, the one to move in with, the one to start a family with, the one to marry? At some point in every dating relationship, you ask yourself some version of these questions. Of course you're invested in predicting the fate of your own relationship. Psychology researchers are interested as well. Are there recognizable signs that can fo

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Gabapentinoids appear increasingly to be prescribed, off-label, for cancer pain

Between 2005 and 2015, as the opioid crisis in America came into focus, prescriptions for gabapentinoid medications — gabapentin and pregabalin — to adults with cancer saw a two-fold increase, a University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center study has found.

16d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New clues as to why mutations in the MYH9 gene cause broad spectrum of disorders in humans

Researchers have used the Drosophila embryo to model human disease mutations that affect myosin motor activity. Through in vivo imaging and biophysical analysis, they demonstrated that engineering human MYH9-related disease mutations into Drosophila myosin II produces motors with altered organization and dynamics that fail to drive rapid cell movements, resulting in defects in epithelial morphogen

16d

Futurism

100+

Your Bed Is a Disgusting Bacteria Buffet, but These High-Tech Bed Sheets Can Help

Bed sheets, towels, and pillowcases are basic components of every home. If you're really on top of things you keep them washed a couple of times a week. But even then science, unfortunately, indicates that these are hot spots for all kinds of nasty little microbes unless you replace these germ breeding grounds with those made by the folks at Miracle . Miracle All of Miracle's products are enginee

16d

New on MIT Technology Review

400+

Russian hackers are targeting the 2020 Olympics

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17d

Biology / Biochemistry News From Medical News Today

500+

Could turmeric help solve the antibiotic resistance crisis?

New research uses nanocapsules that contain curcumin, the main ingredient in turmeric, to tackle antibiotic resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori.

17d

Futurism

1K

A Samsung Satellite Just Crashed Into a Michigan Farm

Satellite Crash Samsung launched an unusual satellite weeks ago, featuring a Galaxy S10 smartphone tethered to a gigantic balloon . But its journey was cut short when the satellite came crashing down to Earth, NBC reports , crashing onto a Michigan farm. The satellite was meant to allow you to take a " SpaceSelfie" — a questionable PR stunt where your selfies get sent to space, are photographed w

17d

Futurity.org

Title IX interviews may not use evidence-based methods

Title IX investigators may not be using the most effective interview techniques, research finds. Title IX investigations take place in the United States when schools receive complaints of sex-based discrimination. These civil procedures rely on the participation, recall, and evidence provided by complainants (individuals who report experiencing sexual misconduct), respondents (individuals who are

17d

Futurity.org

Why more kids don't play outside

Moms in low-income neighborhoods say physical and social barriers in their neighborhoods discourage them from allowing their children to play outside, according to a new study. The decline in outdoor play, particularly unsupervised or independent play among children and adolescents, can affect physical, emotional, and social development, the study finds. Poor neighborhoods tend to have less acces

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Risk assessment tools lead to fewer incarcerations without jeopardizing public safety

A sweeping study looking at an extensive collection of data — involving more than a million offenders at 30 different Canadian and US research sites — found that while fewer people were being locked up, crime rates showed some declines.

17d

Livescience.com

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This Newly Discovered Virus Replicates in a Completely Unknown Way

It lacks the proteins needed to replicate. Yet somehow, it's thriving.

17d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

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Nytt mikroskop kan leda till framsteg i kampen mot Parkinsons

Genom vanliga mikroskop kan man se saker som är en miljon gånger mindre än en meter. Med det nya kan man se saker som är en miljard gånger mindre än en meter. En viktig uppfinning minst sagt, som kan hjälpa forskare att göra framsteg som kan leda till att man i framtiden botar sjukdomar, som exempelvis Parkinsons.

17d

Livescience.com

1K

These Mesmerizing Images Show 'Invisible Gravity Waves' Rippling Over Australia

Satellite images captured a rare glimpse of a phenomenon known as atmospheric gravity waves.

17d

Futurism

1K

Australians May Be Forced to Scan Their Faces to Watch Porn

In September, an Australian government committee asked for ideas on how to make it harder for minors to access online porn. Now, another government body — the Department of Home Affairs — has submitted a response to that inquiry. Its totalitarian solution: start scanning porn viewers' faces , and matching them up with government photos, to verify their ages. Home Affairs — essentially the Aussie

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Compact depth sensor inspired by spiders

Inspired by jumping spiders, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a compact and efficient depth sensor that could be used on board microrobots, in small wearable devices, or in lightweight virtual and augmented reality headsets. The device combines a multifunctional, flat metalens with an ultra-efficient algorithm to measure de

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Salt helps proteins move on down the road

Rice chemists match models and experiments to see how salt modifies surface interactions in chromatography used to separate valuable drug proteins. The research could be a step toward simplifying drug manufacture.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Chicks born with ability to distinguish and avoid different dangers

Chicks are born with the knowledge to flee from predators rather than learning it from experience, according to a study by University of Trento and Queen Mary University of London.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Research brief: Nutritious foods have lower environmental impact than unhealthy foods

Widespread adaptation of healthier diets would markedly reduce the environmental impact of agriculture and food production. For the first time, researchers have tied the health impacts of foods to their overall environmental impact.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study: Underground fungal relationships key to thriving plants

For a plant to thrive, it needs the help of a friendly fungus — preferably one that will dig its way deep into the cells of the plant's roots. A new paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and co-authored by ecologist Stephanie Kivlin, an assistant professor at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, shows that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are especially helpful to

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Extent of human encroachment into world's protected areas revealed

Largest study yet to compare protected with 'matched' unprotected land finds 'significantly higher' increases in human pressure — primarily through agriculture — in protected areas across the tropics. Researchers argue that efforts to increase coverage may not help save wildlife unless protecting land 'on paper' is backed up by funding and local community engagement.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Science shows hype about your opponent actually messes with your game

A study of more than 117,000 pro tennis matches and more than 5 million observations in online amateur chess indicates that even when competitors are evenly matched, players perform worse against an opponent they know has been climbing in rank.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Follow the dotted line

In a development offering great promise for additive manufacturing, Princeton University researchers have created a method to precisely create droplets using a jet of liquid. The technique allows manufacturers to quickly generate drops of material, finely control their size and locate them within a 3D space.

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Consumer markets, companies linked to habitat loss for rare species in Brazil's savannah

Global consumer markets could be responsible for more than half of the impact of expanding soy production on rare species in one of the world's most biodiverse regions, the Cerrado savannah, according to a new article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

17d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

23

Satellite, drone photos could help predict infections of a widespread tropical disease

An international team has discovered a cheap and efficient way to identify transmission hotspots for schistosomiasis. The research uses rigorous field sampling and aerial images to precisely map communities that are at greatest risk for infection.

17d

Science News Daily

Hot as shell: birds in cooler climates lay darker eggs to keep their embryos warm

Birds lay eggs with a huge variety of colours and patterns, from immaculate white to a range of blue-greens and reddish browns.

17d

Science News Daily

The First Modern Humans Came from What Is Now Botswana: Study

Mitochondrial DNA and other factors place our ancestors in southern Africa 200,000 years ago.

17d

Science News Daily

Apple unveils AirPods Pro, coming October 30 for $249

Apple's latest in-ear audio solution was designed for "comfort and fit." They include three different sizes of silicone ear tips and utilize a vent system to help equalize pressure within the …

17d

The Atlantic

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John Kelly's Astonishing Accusation

Accepting the Republican nomination for president three years ago, Donald Trump told delegates in Cleveland, "I alone can fix it." John Kelly, Trump's former White House chief of staff, offered an alternative on Saturday: Aides alone can fix it . Speaking at the Washington Examiner 's Sea Island Summit, Kelly took an implicit swipe at his embattled successor , Mick Mulvaney, by recounting a warni

17d

The Atlantic

500+

The Oscars Finally Find Their Rightful Winners

Given how concerned the Academy Awards have been about the running time of the Oscars broadcast, they should have given a prize to David Lynch long ago. At yesterday's Governors Awards, a special ceremony that hands out honorary Oscars for lifetime achievement and humanitarian causes, the venerated director of such films as Blue Velvet and Mulholland Dr. was presented a trophy and kept his remark

17d

Futurism

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Here Are The First-Ever Images From the Dark Matter Telescope

X-Ray Observations Scientists just released the first-ever images taken with the German space agency's X-ray telescope eROSITA, at an event at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. The new images could give us invaluable insight into the nature of dark energy — the mysterious form of unknown energy that accounts for roughly 68 percent of the known universe — by mapping the struct

17d

Science | The Guardian

8K

Healthy diet means a healthy planet, study shows

Healthier food choices almost always benefit environment as well, according to analysis Eating healthy food is almost always also best for the environment, according to the most sophisticated analysis to date. The researchers said poor diets threaten society by seriously harming people and the planet, but the latest research can inform better choices. Continue reading…

17d

Science Magazine

NSF tallies 16 cases of alleged harassment by grantees in first year of new rules

Universities worry about protecting privacy as they confront a growing problem

17d

Phys.org

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Nutritious foods have lower environmental impact than unhealthy foods

Widespread adaptation of healthier diets would markedly reduce the environmental impact of agriculture and food production, according to new research from the University of Minnesota and Oxford University.

17d

Phys.org

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Chicks born with ability to distinguish and avoid different dangers

Chicks are born with the knowledge to flee from predators rather than learning it from experience, according to a study by University of Trento and Queen Mary University of London.

17d

Phys.org

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Underground fungal relationships key to thriving plants

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Phys.org

Satellite, drone photos could help predict infections of a widespread tropical disease

Satellite images, drone photos and even Google Earth could help identify communities most at risk for getting one of the world's worst tropical diseases.

17d

Phys.org

500+

Consumer markets, companies linked to habitat loss for rare species in Brazil's savannah

Overseas consumer markets could be responsible for more than half of the impact of expanding soy production on rare species in one of the world's most biodiverse regions, the Cerrado savannah in Brazil, according to a new article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

17d

Phys.org

500+

Extent of human encroachment into world's protected areas revealed

A study of human activity within thousands of conservation spaces in over 150 countries suggests that—on average across the world—protected areas are not reducing the "anthropogenic pressure" on our most precious natural habitats.

17d

Scientific American Blog Posts

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Don't Fall Prey to Scaremongering about 5G

Activists cite low-quality studies in arguing radio-frequency radiation is dangerous, but the weight of evidence shows no risk — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientific American Blog Posts

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Tropical Cyclone Kyarr (150-mph Winds): Arabian Sea's 2nd Strongest Storm on Record

A recent increase in powerful late-season Arabian Sea tropical cyclones is linked to human-caused climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

400+

Chicks born with ability to distinguish and avoid different dangers

Chicks are born with the knowledge to flee from predators rather than learning it from experience, according to a study by University of Trento and Queen Mary University of London.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

3K

Underground fungal relationships key to thriving plants

For a plant to thrive, it needs the help of a friendly fungus—preferably one that will dig its way deep into the cells of the plant's roots.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Satellite, drone photos could help predict infections of a widespread tropical disease

Satellite images, drone photos and even Google Earth could help identify communities most at risk for getting one of the world's worst tropical diseases.

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

400+

Consumer markets, companies linked to habitat loss for rare species in Brazil's savannah

Overseas consumer markets could be responsible for more than half of the impact of expanding soy production on rare species in one of the world's most biodiverse regions, the Cerrado savannah in Brazil, according to a new article in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

17d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

500+

Extent of human encroachment into world's protected areas revealed

A study of human activity within thousands of conservation spaces in over 150 countries suggests that—on average across the world—protected areas are not reducing the "anthropogenic pressure" on our most precious natural habitats.

17d

Cosmos Magazine

200+

Likely human homeland identified

Genetic analysis pinpoints ancient African wetlands.

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