Search Posts

nyheder2019oktober30

NASA gets infrared view of Atlantic Halloween subtropical storm

The latest addition to the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season developed quickly. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the eastern North Atlantic Ocean on Halloween and provided forecasters with an infrared view of Subtropical Storm Rebekah.

13d

Electrifying science: New study describes conduction through proteins

Amid the zoo of biomolecules essential to life, enzymes are among the most vital. Without these specialized proteins, which speed up the rates of chemical reactions, thousands of essential life processes, from cell growth and digestion to respiration and nerve function, would be impossible.

13d

Complex cellular machine visualized to yield new insights in cancer

Cellular machines that control chromosome structure, such as the RSC complex, are mutated in about one-fifth of all human cancers. Now, for the first time, scientists have developed a high-resolution visual map of this multi-protein machine, elucidating how the RSC complex works and what role it has in healthy and cancer cells.

13d

What caused the Big Bang?

The origin of the universe started with the Big Bang, but how the supernova explosion ignited has long been a mystery — until now.

13d

Heavy smoking causes faces to look older

'Smoker's Face,' a condition where smokers look older than they are, is just one of many negative effects caused by heavy tobacco usage.

13d

Non-GM produce earns 'halo effect' under new labeling laws

Consumers were more willing to buy unlabeled produce after being shown food tagged as "genetically modified" in a new study that comes two months before a new federal law, requiring genetically modified organism disclosure labels on food products, goes into effect.

13d

Cocktail proves toxic to leukemia cells

Bioscientists find a way to predict the sensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia to mitochondria-damaging molecules and develop cocktails to fight the cancer. The discoveries could improve personalized cancer treatment.

13d

A new hazelnut has cracked its competitive marketplace

Researchers from Oregon State University have completed an examination of, and have released, a new cross-bred hazelnut cultivar known as 'PollyO', and they have discovered it to be a rising star of hazelnuts grown within the United States.

13d

Studies Yield 'Impressive' Results in Fight Against Cystic Fibrosis

The findings hold promise for a vast majority of those with cystic fibrosis, according to the director of the National Institutes of Health. "This should be a cause for major celebration," he wrote.

13d

Moving from prison to a PhD

Nature, Published online: 31 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03370-1 Nature spoke to three US researchers who have built academic careers after they were released.

13d

A new hazelnut has cracked its competitive marketplace

Researchers from Oregon State University have completed an examination of, and have released, a new cross-bred hazelnut cultivar known as 'PollyO', and they have discovered it to be a rising star of hazelnuts grown within the United States.

13d

Study analyzed tax treaties to assess effect of offshoring on domestic employment

The practice of offshoring—moving some of a company's manufacturing or services overseas to take advantage of lower costs—is on the rise and is a source of ongoing debate. A new study identified a way to determine how U.S. multinational firms' decisions about offshoring affect domestic employment. The study found that, on average, when U.S. multinationals increase employment in their foreign affil

13d

Ancient rhinos roamed the Yukon

In 1973, a teacher named Joan Hodgins took her students on a hike near Whitehorse in Canada's Yukon Territory. In the process, she made history for this chilly region.

13d

Scientists are producing deadly zoonoses on this tiny German island

The Friedrich Loeffler Institute in Germany is a biosafety level 4 facility where scientists conduct dangerous research on zoonoses. Zoonoses are diseases that can be spread from animals to humans, or vice versa. These diseases not only pose a major threat to humans, but also to animals. None On a small, unassuming German island called Riems lies one of the oldest virus research institutes in the

13d

U. Iowa team is developing new delivery tools for gene editing

Scientists led by University of Iowa researcher Paul McCray, Jr., MD, are using simple peptides to deliver gene-editing tools into notoriously hard-to-access lung and airway cells with the goal of creating new treatments for people with diseases like cystic fibrosis, COPD, and asthma.

13d

Study results may provide a better understanding of Alzheimer's disease

Research suggests that the complex meshwork of proteins and potentially other biomolecules that provides structural and biochemical support to surrounding cells in the brain may play an important role in Alzheimer's disease.

13d

Differences in human and non-human primate saliva may be caused by diet

Humans are known to be genetically similar to our primate relatives. But major differences can be found in our saliva, according to new research by scientists at the Forsyth Institute and the University of Buffalo.

13d

Did On-Site Rapid DNA Testing Identify al-Baghdadi's Remains?

Over the past few years, several companies have developed rapid DNA tests that can be used in the field to identify remains in 90 minutes–but President Trump suggested the confirmation only took 15.

13d

NASA gets infrared view of Atlantic Halloween subtropical storm

The latest addition to the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season developed quickly. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the eastern North Atlantic Ocean on Halloween and provided forecasters with an infrared view of Subtropical Storm Rebekah.

13d

Electrifying science: New study describes conduction through proteins

Researchers investigated a recently discovered feat carried out by enzymes, and most likely, all proteins. Under proper conditions, they can act as superb conductors of electricity, permitting them to be incorporated into a range of electronic devices.

13d

Scientists may have discovered whole new class of black holes

New research shows that astronomers' search for black holes might have been missing an entire class of black holes that they didn't know existed. Astronomers offer a new way to search for black holes, and show that it is possible there is a class of black holes smaller than the smallest known black holes in the universe.

13d

Meme Costumes Are Dead. Long Live the Meme Costume

The trend should be over, bit it's still thriving. Why? Memes are mainstream pop culture now.

13d

New technique lets researchers map strain in next-gen solar cells

Researchers have developed a way to map strain in lead halide perovskite solar cells without harming them. Their approach can image the grain structure of a perovskite solar cell, showing that misorientation between microscopic perovskite crystals is the primary contributor to the buildup of strain within the solar cell. Crystal misorientation creates small-scale defects in the grain structure, wh

13d

Survey suggests mentorship in medical school is vital to future of hematology

A survey of US hematology-oncology fellows suggests medical school plays an important role in shaping their interest in pursuing careers in hematology, particularly when students are exposed to hematology and oncology as part of core clerkships in internal medicine and pediatrics.

13d

Scientists Discover New Class of Tiny Black Holes

It almost seems like astronomers are in a race to unveil the biggest black holes they can find. Most recently, a team of German astronomers claimed to have discovered a black hole 40 billion times the mass of the Sun . But what if there are also black holes many magnitudes smaller? In a study published today in the prestigious journal Science , a team of astronomers from Ohio State University cla

13d

Watchdog sues FBI over facial recognition secrecy

A civil liberties watchdog Thursday sued the FBI and other federal agencies claiming the government is improperly withholding information on how it uses a facial recognition database of millions …

13d

Ancient rhinos roamed the Yukon

Paleontologists have used modern tools to identify the origins of a few fragments of teeth found more than four decades ago by a schoolteacher in the Yukon.

13d

Culturing primate embryos to learn more about human development

Little is known about the molecular and cellular events that occur during early embryonic development in primate species. Now, scientists have created a method to allow primate embryos to grow in the laboratory longer than ever before, enabling the researchers to obtain molecular details of key developmental processes for the first time. This research, while done in nonhuman primate cells, can hav

13d

Study of Ugandan Genomes Yields Novel Variants, Health Links

The authors say their results demonstrate the global benefits of studying African genetics.

13d

A new hazelnut has cracked its competitive marketplace

'PollyO' is a new hazelnut variety from the Oregon State University Breeding Program that combines a high level of resistance to eastern filbert fungal blight along with high nut yield.

13d

Complex cellular machine visualized to yield new insights in cancer

Cellular machines that control chromosome structure, such as the RSC complex, are mutated in about one-fifth of all human cancers. Now, for the first time, scientists have developed a high-resolution visual map of this multi-protein machine, elucidating how the RSC complex works and what role it has in healthy and cancer cells.

13d

The Beets Are Back on Track! | Gold Rush

Mike Beets delivers a huge pay day for the family! Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://www.instag

13d

13d

Twitter bans political ads: Influence is 'earned, not bought'

Twitter's ban on political ads will go into effect in November. Facebook, meanwhile, recently changed its policies to allow political ads—even those which contain lies—to run on its platform. The reactions to Twitter's ban have been mixed, but some have noted that it could hinder the ability of lesser-known candidates to bring their message to the public. None One month after Facebook decided to

13d

AI Beats Top Human Players at Strategy Game StarCraft II

DeepMind's AlphaStar beat all but the very best humans at the fast-paced sci-fi video game — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13d

Supercharge your research: a ten-week plan for open data science

Nature, Published online: 31 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03335-4 Researchers share tips for transforming your group with open data science and teamwork.

13d

Study aims at boosting antitumoral activity of compound extracted from an Amazon plant

Scientists plan to develop a modified strain of U. guianensis and use its own metabolism to scale up the production of therapeutic compounds.

13d

Ancient rhinos roamed the Yukon

Paleontologists have used modern tools to identify the origins of a few fragments of teeth found more than four decades ago by a schoolteacher in the Yukon.

13d

U.S. telescopes get a new overseer

The National Science Foundation creates new structure for four observatories in bid to improve coordination

13d

Electric-car batteries recharge in ten minutes when the heat is on

Nature, Published online: 31 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03346-1 A high temperature allows fast charging of the lithium batteries used in electric and hybrid vehicles.

13d

Measles Wipes Your Immune System's 'Memory,' So It Can't Fight Other Infections

Two new studies detail how the measles virus causes "immune amnesia."

13d

How Deep Sleep May Help The Brain Clear Alzheimer's Toxins

A study of 11 sleeping brains sheds some light on the mysterious link between sleep problems and Alzheimer's disease. The flow of cerebrospinal fluid through the brain appears to be the key. (Image credit: Fultz et al. 2019)

14d

Japan Just Unveiled a Supercar Made out of Wood

Wooden Car Japan just unveiled its vision for the car of the future — and it's made from wood . Specifically, the car's entire body and much of its structural tub are made of cellulose nanofiber , a super-strong, super-light material derived from plants. Twenty-two groups contributed to creating the vehicle, which Japan's Ministry of the Environment unveiled at the Tokyo Motor Show this week — bu

14d

1,100 plants examined in massive, 9-year genomic diversity study

A new study published in Nature traces the genetic histories of the last billion years of plant life on Earth. Nicknamed 1KP, the One Thousand Plant Transcriptomes Initiative involves a global collaboration of scientists who are examining the diversification of plant species, genes and genomes across the 1-billion-year history of green plants.

14d

US Interior Department grounds Chinese-made drones

The US Department of the Interior has grounded its fleet of Chinese-made drones as it conducts a review of the program.

14d

Smartphone sales see modest rebound after two-year slump: survey

Global smartphone sales increased modestly in the third quarter, the first growth for the segment after a two-year slump, a market tracker said.

14d

We Owe Our Pumpkins to Pooping Megafauna

The pumpkin's ancestor was an incredibly bitter, tennis-ball-sized squash—but it was apparently a common snack for mastodons. Christopher Intagliata reports.

14d

Even the Dead Cannot Escape Climate Change

Flooding, permafrost melt and other climate impacts that threaten the long-term viability of cemeteries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

14d

Reusability is key to space travel, anyone agrees

submitted by /u/marshelper22 [link] [comments]

14d

14d

Microrobots clean up radioactive waste

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

14d

Quantum Computers Explained – Limits of Human Technology

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

14d

Can AI enable enable better, faster, smarter human decisions

submitted by /u/BarnesN2020 [link] [comments]

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

'Exhalation: Stories' by Ted Chiang Is Essential Reading for Science Fiction Fans

Science fiction fans are already familiar with author Ted Chiang, and now the writer of Stories of Your Life and Others (which was the source material for 2016's Arrival starring Amy Adams) is back with a new collection called Exhalation: Stories . The new book counts among its fans former President Barack Obama, who calls it "a collection of short stories that will make you think, grapple with b

14d

We've finally figured out what happens when a star explodes

Explosions normally require a build-up of pressure, so how can they occur in the vacuum of space when a star goes supernova? Now we have the answer

14d

Measles has a devastating and long-term effect on your immune system

Measles makes children vulnerable to other infections and now we know why – it wipes a large part of the immune system's memory of other pathogens

14d

A type of brainwave may help clean your brain while you sleep

Slow waves of electrical activity through your brain may help rinse away its waste products while you sleep. The process seems to go awry in Alzheimer's disease

14d

We've found a black hole that may be smaller than any ever seen before

Astronomers have spotted a black hole just 3.3 times the mass of the sun about 10,000 light years away from Earth

14d

Electrifying science: New study describes conduction through proteins

In new research, Stuart Lindsay and his colleagues investigate a recently discovered feat carried out by enzymes, and most likely, all proteins. Under proper conditions, they can act as superb conductors of electricity, permitting them to be incorporated into a range of electronic devices. 'It is a way of plugging the amazing chemical diversity of enzymes directly into a computer,' Lindsay says.

14d

Malaria parasite lives on the edge

The parasite that causes malaria expresses genes that code for the proteins it will need in later life stages, but uses two separate schemes to prevent these proteins from actually being made until they are needed.

14d

Study analyzed tax treaties to assess effect of offshoring on domestic employment

A new study identified a way to determine how US multinational firms' decisions about offshoring affect domestic employment. The study found that, on average, when US multinationals increase employment in their foreign affiliates, they also modestly increase employment in the United States — albeit with substantial dislocation and reallocation of workers.

14d

How did Africa get its name?

"Africa" is just one of the ancient names that competed to define the entire continent. Geographical terms like Sudan, Maghreb, and Guinea have remarkably wide and changeable areas of application. Newly independent African nations sometimes adopted names of former kingdoms – even faraway ones. Vast and varied The names of continents are so well-established that we forget how obscure their origins

14d

Bundlemers (new polymer units) could transform industries

From tires to clothes to shampoo, many ubiquitous products are made with polymers, large chain-like molecules made of smaller sub-units, called monomers, bonded together. Now, a team of researchers has created a new fundamental unit of polymers that could usher in a new era of materials discovery.

14d

Measles Makes Your Immune System's Memory Forget Defenses Against Other Illnesses

New research shows the virus can have devastating effects on the immune system that persist much longer than the illness itself.

14d

The Humiliation of Katie Hill Offers a Warning

Representative Katie Hill's brief career in Congress unwound in the same way that Ernest Hemingway described bankruptcy taking place: gradually and then suddenly. On October 18, the right-wing outlet RedState published an article alleging sexual relationships between Hill and two staffers, along with an explicit photograph of Hill. Other right-leaning publications picked up the story , and it beg

14d

California's Kincade Fire Spawns Huge Plume Visible from Space

Smoke from the Kincade wildfire drifts over Northern California in new satellite imagery.

14d

New technologies promise sharper artificial vision for blind people

Researchers hone techniques to restore sight by stimulating the retina or brain

14d

14d

Artificial pancreas system better controls blood glucose levels than current technology

A multi-center randomized clinical trial evaluating a new artificial pancreas system — which automatically monitors and regulates blood glucose levels — has found that the new system was more effective than existing treatments at controlling blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes.

14d

Heavy smoking causes faces to look older

'Smoker's Face,' a condition where smokers look older than they are, is just one of many negative effects caused by heavy tobacco usage. Louise Millard of the University of Bristol and colleagues report these findings in a new study published Oct. 31, in PLOS Genetics.

14d

Unlocking the black box of embryonic development

Little is known about the molecular and cellular events that occur during early embryonic development in primate species. Now, an internationally renowned team of scientists in China and the United States has created a method to allow primate embryos to grow in the laboratory longer than ever before, enabling the researchers to obtain molecular details of key developmental processes for the first

14d

Are we 'brainwashed' during sleep?

A new study from Boston University, published in Science, is the first to illustrate that the brain's cerebrospinal fluid pulses during sleep, and that these motions are closely tied with brain wave activity and blood flow. It may confirm the hypothesis that CSF flow and slow-wave activity both help flush toxic, memory-impairing proteins from the brain.

14d

Experts propose new healthcare framework to help ageing populations stay healthier longer

An international team of researchers have put forward a position statement, published in Science, which lays out a new healthcare framework to help aging populations stay healthier for longer.

14d

Scientists may have discovered whole new class of black holes

New research shows that astronomers' search for black holes might have been missing an entire class of black holes that they didn't know existed. In a study publishing Oct. 31, 2019 in the journal Science, astronomers offer a new way to search for black holes, and show that it is possible there is a class of black holes smaller than the smallest known black holes in the universe.

14d

Immune system targets vitamin B12 pathway to neutralize bacteria

How a recently identified defensive compound called itaconate tricks the bacteria behind tuberculosis.

14d

How measles wipes out the body's immune memory

Study shows measles wipes out 20 to 50% of antibodies against an array of viruses and bacteria, depleting a child's previous immunity. Measles-ravaged immune system must 'relearn' how to protect the body against infections. Study details mechanism and scope of this measles-induced 'immune amnesia.' Findings underscore importance of measles vaccination, suggesting those infected with measles may be

14d

Fishery in Lake Shinji, Japan, collapsed 1 year after neonicotinoid use

Neonicotinoid pesticide use may have caused the abrupt collapse of two commercial fisheries on Lake Shinji, Japan, in 1993, according to a new study.

14d

Slow-wave sleep critical to brain's automatic 'self-rinse' cycle

Slow oscillating neural activity during non-REM sleep triggers waves of cerebrospinal fluid that flow in and out of the sleeping brain, washing it of harmful metabolic waste products, researchers find.

14d

DNA exchange among species is major contributor to diversity in Heliconius butterflies

Exchange of genetic material among species played a major role in the wide diversity of Heliconius butterflies, according to a new study, results of which inform a centuries-long debate about the value of hybridization to species evolution.

14d

In unvaccinated children, 'immune amnesia' occurs in the wake of measles infection

Two separate investigations into the immune systems of 77 unvaccinated children before and after measles infection have revealed the infection can cripple immunity against viruses and bacteria for the long-term, creating a kind of 'immune amnesia' that leaves individuals more vulnerable to future infections by other pathogens.

14d

Measles infection wipes our immune system's memory leaving us vulnerable to other diseases

Scientists have shown how measles causes long-term damage to the immune system, leaving people vulnerable to other infections. Researchers revealed that the measles virus deletes part of the immune system's memory, removing previously existing immunity to other infections. They also showed that measles resets the human immune system back to an immature state. The study in Science Immunology explai

14d

Butterfly genes flow

An international team of researchers analyzed the genomes of 20 butterfly species and found evidence that many butterflies — including distantly related species — have a surprisingly high amount of gene flow between them. The findings challenge conventional views about species, and indicate that hybridization may be a key process in the emergence of biological diversity.

14d

Measles virus infection destroys immune system memory

In humans and macaques, measles infection wipes out antibodies to previous pathogens and could make individuals more susceptible to disease. Until now, such long-term consequences of measles had been unknown.

14d

UCF researchers discover mechanisms for the cause of the Big Bang

The origin of the universe started with the Big Bang, but how the supernova explosion ignited has long been a mystery — until now.

14d

Bats in Northeast India carry filoviruses that can infect humans

Researchers have proposed that bats are the natural reservoir of filoviruses, including highly fatal Ebola and Marbug viruses. Now, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases that in Northeast India, bats, as well as humans who work in close proximity to bats, carry antibodies that recognize several filoviruses.

14d

'Fungal feature tracker' could accelerate mycology research

A new software tool called Fungal Feature Tracker could accelerate understanding of fungal morphology and growth. Guillermo Vidal-Diez de Ulzurrun and colleagues in the laboratory led by Yen-Ping Hsueh at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, present the tool in PLOS Computational Biology.

14d

Fish simulations provide new insights into energy costs of swimming

A new computational analysis suggests that maximizing swimming speeds while minimizing energy costs depends on an optimal balance between a fish's muscle dynamics and the way its size, shape, and swimming motion affect its movement through water. Grgur Tokic and Dick Yue of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

14d

Delayed neural communication may underlie anticipatory behaviors

Computational modeling suggests that delayed communication between neurons may be an essential factor underlying anticipatory behaviors in people. Irán Román of Stanford University in Stanford, Calif., and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

14d

Rival CEO Literally One-Ups Elon Musk's Million-Tree Donation

Contestant's Row In May, YouTuber Jimmy "MrBeast" Donaldson launched #TeamTrees , a climate change campaign to raise $20 million to plant 20 million trees by 2020. On Tuesday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk pledged a million dollars to the tree campaign, nearly 10 times more than the next-largest donation. But Musk's time atop the donor list was short-lived — on Wednesday, Shopify CEO Tobi Lütke made a pled

14d

'From the internet up': Toronto plans futuristic bayfront

Toronto authorities gave a provisional green light Thursday to plans by a tech company in the Google empire to build a futuristic neighborhood on a strip of lakefront that will include robots …

14d

Measles makes body 'forget' how to fight infection

The virus can cause 'immune amnesia' which shifts our defences back to a 'baby-like' state.

14d

New study says cosmic acceleration and dark energy don't exist

Paper by Oxford University physicist Subir Sarkar and his colleagues challenges how conclusions about cosmic acceleration and dark energy were reached. Physicists who proved cosmic acceleration shared a Nobel Prize. Sarkar used statistical analysis to question key data, but his methodology also has detractors. None Is our Universe's expansion speeding up? The 2011 Nobel Prize went to three scient

14d

We Owe Our Pumpkins to Pooping Megafauna

The pumpkin's ancestor was an incredibly bitter, tennis-ball-sized squash—but it was apparently a common snack for mastodons. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Social lab mice would be better stand-ins for people

Socially isolating mice detracts might actually make them poor models for humans, say researchers. Animal models can serve as gateways for understanding many human communication disorders. Insights into the genetic paths possibly responsible for conditions such as autism and schizophrenia often begin by studying acoustic behavior in mice . The new study suggests that a simple shift to a more real

14d

Primate embryos grown in the lab for longer than ever before

Nature, Published online: 31 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03326-5 The 20-day-old monkey embryos could reopen the debate about how long the human variety should be allowed to grow in a dish.

14d

Measles erases immune 'memory' for other diseases

Nature, Published online: 31 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03324-7 Results from tests of unvaccinated children and monkeys come as measles cases spike around the world.

14d

Astronomers catch wind rushing out of galaxy

Study's findings provide direct evidence for the first time of the role of galactic winds — ejections of gas from galaxies — in creating the circumgalactic medium (CGM).

14d

Screening for drug-resistant E. coli in capsulized fecal transplants

Study recommends enhanced screening for drug-resistant E. coli in capsulized fecal transplants.

14d

Measles wipes out immune system's memory, study finds

Scientists say threat posed by measles is 'much greater than we previously imagined' Measles causes long-term damage to the immune system, leaving children who have had it vulnerable to other infections long after the initial illness has passed, research has revealed. Two studies of unvaccinated children in an Orthodox Protestant community in the Netherlands found that measles wipes out the immun

14d

Astronomers find a small black hole. Or a giant neutron star.

Discovery touches on two of the key questions in astrophysics.

14d

We Owe Our Pumpkins to Pooping Megafauna

The pumpkin's ancestor was an incredibly bitter, tennis-ball-sized squash—but it was apparently a common snack for mastodons. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

14d

News at a glance

[no content]

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

Crossing the line

[no content]

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

Dynamics in a box

[no content]

14d

14d

14d

14d

Itaconyl-CoA forms a stable biradical in methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and derails its activity and repair

Itaconate is an immunometabolite with both anti-inflammatory and bactericidal effects. Its coenzyme A (CoA) derivative, itaconyl-CoA, inhibits B 12 -dependent methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that itaconyl-CoA is a suicide inactivator of human and Mycobacterium tuberculosis MCM, which forms a markedly air-stable biradical adduct with the 5'-deoxyadenosyl moie

14d

Genomic architecture and introgression shape a butterfly radiation

We used 20 de novo genome assemblies to probe the speciation history and architecture of gene flow in rapidly radiating Heliconius butterflies. Our tests to distinguish incomplete lineage sorting from introgression indicate that gene flow has obscured several ancient phylogenetic relationships in this group over large swathes of the genome. Introgressed loci are underrepresented in low-recombinat

14d

Measles virus infection diminishes preexisting antibodies that offer protection from other pathogens

Measles virus is directly responsible for more than 100,000 deaths yearly. Epidemiological studies have associated measles with increased morbidity and mortality for years after infection, but the reasons why are poorly understood. Measles virus infects immune cells, causing acute immune suppression. To identify and quantify long-term effects of measles on the immune system, we used VirScan, an a

14d

Pathogen-induced activation of disease-suppressive functions in the endophytic root microbiome

Microorganisms living inside plants can promote plant growth and health, but their genomic and functional diversity remain largely elusive. Here, metagenomics and network inference show that fungal infection of plant roots enriched for Chitinophagaceae and Flavobacteriaceae in the root endosphere and for chitinase genes and various unknown biosynthetic gene clusters encoding the production of non

14d

Barely porous organic cages for hydrogen isotope separation

The separation of hydrogen isotopes for applications such as nuclear fusion is a major challenge. Current technologies are energy intensive and inefficient. Nanoporous materials have the potential to separate hydrogen isotopes by kinetic quantum sieving, but high separation selectivity tends to correlate with low adsorption capacity, which can prohibit process scale-up. In this study, we use orga

14d

Neonicotinoids disrupt aquatic food webs and decrease fishery yields

Invertebrate declines are widespread in terrestrial ecosystems, and pesticide use is often cited as a causal factor. Here, we report that aquatic systems are threatened by the high toxicity and persistence of neonicotinoid insecticides. These effects cascade to higher trophic levels by altering food web structure and dynamics, affecting higher-level consumers. Using data on zooplankton, water qua

14d

Atomic-scale spin sensing with a single molecule at the apex of a scanning tunneling microscope

Recent advances in scanning probe techniques rely on the chemical functionalization of the probe-tip termination by a single molecule. The success of this approach opens the prospect of introducing spin sensitivity through functionalization by a magnetic molecule. We used a nickelocene-terminated tip (Nc-tip), which offered the possibility of producing spin excitations on the tip apex of a scanni

14d

Coupled electrophysiological, hemodynamic, and cerebrospinal fluid oscillations in human sleep

Sleep is essential for both cognition and maintenance of healthy brain function. Slow waves in neural activity contribute to memory consolidation, whereas cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clears metabolic waste products from the brain. Whether these two processes are related is not known. We used accelerated neuroimaging to measure physiological and neural dynamics in the human brain. We discovered a co

14d

Spontaneous emergence of cell-like organization in Xenopus egg extracts

Every daughter cell inherits two things from its mother: genetic information and a spatially organized complement of macromolecular complexes and organelles. The extent to which de novo self-organization, as opposed to inheritance of an already organized state, can suffice to yield functional cells is uncertain. We used Xenopus laevis egg extracts to show that homogenized interphase egg cytoplasm

14d

A noninteracting low-mass black hole-giant star binary system

Black hole binary systems with companion stars are typically found via their x-ray emission, generated by interaction and accretion. Noninteracting binaries are expected to be plentiful in the Galaxy but must be observed using other methods. We combine radial velocity and photometric variability data to show that the bright, rapidly rotating giant star 2MASS J05215658+4359220 is in a binary syste

14d

Architecture of African swine fever virus and implications for viral assembly

African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a giant and complex DNA virus that causes a highly contagious and often lethal swine disease for which no vaccine is available. Using an optimized image reconstruction strategy, we solved the ASFV capsid structure up to 4.1 angstroms, which is built from 17,280 proteins, including one major (p72) and four minor (M1249L, p17, p49, and H240R) capsid proteins orga

14d

Reversible epitaxial electrodeposition of metals in battery anodes

The propensity of metals to form irregular and nonplanar electrodeposits at liquid-solid interfaces has emerged as a fundamental barrier to high-energy, rechargeable batteries that use metal anodes. We report an epitaxial mechanism to regulate nucleation, growth, and reversibility of metal anodes. The crystallographic, surface texturing, and electrochemical criteria for reversible epitaxial elect

14d

New Products

[no content]

14d

14d

Microbiota and the social brain

Sociability can facilitate mutually beneficial outcomes such as division of labor, cooperative care, and increased immunity, but sociability can also promote negative outcomes, including aggression and coercion. Accumulating evidence suggests that symbiotic microorganisms, specifically the microbiota that reside within the gastrointestinal system, may influence neurodevelopment and programming of

14d

Clonal hematopoiesis in human aging and disease

As people age, their tissues accumulate an increasing number of somatic mutations. Although most of these mutations are of little or no functional consequence, a mutation may arise that confers a fitness advantage on a cell. When this process happens in the hematopoietic system, a substantial proportion of circulating blood cells may derive from a single mutated stem cell. This outgrowth, called

14d

A unified mechanism for unconfined deflagration-to-detonation transition in terrestrial chemical systems and type Ia supernovae

The nature of type Ia supernovae (SNIa)—thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars—is an open question in astrophysics. Virtually all existing theoretical models of normal, bright SNIa require the explosion to produce a detonation in order to consume all of stellar material, but the mechanism for the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) remains unclear. We present a unified theory of tu

14d

Catching Measles Makes You More Susceptible to Other Diseases

Unvaccinated children who contracted the illness lost their immunity to many other infections. MeaslesPatient_topNteaser.jpg A baby with measles in a hospital in the Philippines capital city of Manila in 2014. Image credits: Jim Goodson/CDC Human Thursday, October 31, 2019 – 14:00 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) — Scientists have discovered one more reason to vaccinate your children a

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

14d

Measles Infection Could Leave Kids Vulnerable to Other Diseases

The finding that the virus causes "immune amnesia" further highlights the importance of vaccination — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Vampire bats are friendly, like us

Social bonds formed in captivity continue in the wild.

14d

Species v hybrid. More fuel for the debate

Genome analysis of same-genus butterfly species points to the evolutionary importance of hybridisation.

14d

OK nurse, tape him up

Spider-inspired adhesive could replace surgical sutures.

14d

Scientists warn about the dangers of measles

Two studies highlight the potential long-term impact.

14d

How measles causes the body to 'forget' past infections by other microbes

With measles cases rising around the world, studies showing it causes immune amnesia underscore the importance of widespread vaccination

14d

'Fungal feature tracker' could accelerate mycology research

A new software tool called Fungal Feature Tracker could accelerate understanding of fungal morphology and growth. Guillermo Vidal-Diez de Ulzurrun and colleagues in the laboratory led by Yen-Ping Hsueh at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, present the tool in PLOS Computational Biology.

14d

Delayed neural communication may underlie anticipatory behaviors

Computational modeling suggests that delayed communication between neurons may be an essential factor underlying anticipatory behaviors in people. Irán Román of Stanford University in Stanford, California, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

14d

Unlocking the black box of embryonic development

Little is known about the molecular and cellular events that occur during early embryonic development in primate species. Now, an internationally renowned team of scientists in China and the United States has created a method to allow primate embryos to grow in the laboratory longer than ever before, enabling the researchers to obtain molecular details of key developmental processes for the first

14d

Scientists Now Know How Sleep Cleans Toxins From the Brain

The synchronized brain waves of non-REM sleep may play a key role in preventing toxins from accumulating in a person's brain.

14d

How Measles Leaves Kids Exposed to Other Diseases

New techniques allow researchers to get definitive numbers on how the virus depletes its victims' antibodies and the memory cells that make them.

14d

Spiders inspire double-sided sticky tape to heal wounds

The tape could help surgeons bind tissues together when stitching is difficult, scientists say.

14d

Childhood measles has 'lasting effects'

Research underscores case for vaccinations as 'anti-vax' movement grows

14d

Pas på forhastede konklusioner – i genetik såvel som i statistik

PLUS. Stod menneskehedens vugge i det nuværende Botswana, og giver mobning blodpropper? Genetik og statistik giver svar, men kan vi stole på dem?

14d

Measles Leaves the Immune System Vulnerable to Other Diseases

Two studies present biological evidence that measles infections in unvaccinated children wipe out immune memories of other pathogens, putting the kids at risk of other deadly diseases.

14d

Waves of Fluid Bathe the Sleeping Brain, Perhaps to Clear Waste

During deep sleep, rhythmic pulses of cerebrospinal fluid are coupled with slow waves of electrical activity and fluctuating blood levels in the human brain.

14d

'Fungal feature tracker' could accelerate mycology research

A new software tool called Fungal Feature Tracker could accelerate understanding of fungal morphology and growth. Guillermo Vidal-Diez de Ulzurrun and colleagues in the laboratory led by Yen-Ping Hsueh at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, present the tool in PLOS Computational Biology.

14d

Delayed neural communication may underlie anticipatory behaviors

Computational modeling suggests that delayed communication between neurons may be an essential factor underlying anticipatory behaviors in people. Irán Román of Stanford University in Stanford, California, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

14d

Unlocking the black box of embryonic development

Little is known about the molecular and cellular events that occur during early embryonic development in primate species. Now, an internationally renowned team of scientists in China and the United States has created a method to allow primate embryos to grow in the laboratory longer than ever before, enabling the researchers to obtain molecular details of key developmental processes for the first

14d

Scientists may have discovered whole new class of black holes

Black holes are an important part of how astrophysicists make sense of the universe—so important that scientists have been trying to build a census of all the black holes in the Milky Way galaxy.

14d

Study reveals surprising amount of gene flow among butterfly species

An international team of researchers analyzed the genomes of 20 butterfly species and discovered a surprisingly high amount of gene flow among them – even between species that are distantly related. The findings, published in the journal Science, challenge conventional views about species and point to hybridization as a key process in the emergence of biological diversity.

14d

Researchers discover mechanisms for supernova explosions

The origin of the universe started with the Big Bang, but how the supernova explosion ignited has long been a mystery—until now.

14d

Fish simulations provide new insights into energy costs of swimming

A new computational analysis suggests that maximizing swimming speeds while minimizing energy costs depends on an optimal balance between a fish's muscle dynamics and the way its size, shape, and swimming motion affect its movement through water. Grgur Tokic and Dick Yue of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

14d

A Dragon Approaches Calais

For three days, starting on November 1, actors from the French street-theater company La Machine will escort a 10-meter-tall dragon marionette in a performance across the city of Calais, France. "Le Dragon de Calais," a massive fire-breathing dragon built of steel and carved wood, stars in the tale of a fantasy creature that emerges from the sea and encounters the people of Calais. After the perf

14d

Measles Infection Could Leave Kids Vulnerable to Other Diseases

The finding that the virus causes "immune amnesia" further highlights the importance of vaccination — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Smooth moves at the M-Block party

These robots know who else is in the crowd.

14d

Study reveals surprising amount of gene flow among butterfly species

An international team of researchers analyzed the genomes of 20 butterfly species and discovered a surprisingly high amount of gene flow among them – even between species that are distantly related. The findings, published in the journal Science, challenge conventional views about species and point to hybridization as a key process in the emergence of biological diversity.

14d

Fish simulations provide new insights into energy costs of swimming

A new computational analysis suggests that maximizing swimming speeds while minimizing energy costs depends on an optimal balance between a fish's muscle dynamics and the way its size, shape, and swimming motion affect its movement through water. Grgur Tokic and Dick Yue of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

14d

Bacterial arms race may shape gut microbiome

Researchers wanted to understand what forces drive the composition and ecology of microbes that live in people's guts. The human gut microbiome is critical to aspects of health and disease. The researchers found that several of the Bacteroides species that populate the gut have sizable gene-cluster defenses that neutralize toxins from competitor organisms. The clusters have features that suggest t

14d

Sorghum grain yield could be doubled

A set of genes that make up the biosynthetic pathway controlling hormone production in sorghum plants can influence the number of flowers and seeds produced per plant. The gene has implications in plant breeding, where it could potentially double crop yield.

14d

Bundlemers (new polymer units) could transform industries

From tires to clothes to shampoo, many ubiquitous products are made with polymers, large chain-like molecules made of smaller sub-units, called monomers, bonded together. Now, a team of researchers has created a new fundamental unit of polymers that could usher in a new era of materials discovery.

14d

Cirrus' $2 Million Vision Jet Now Lands Itself, No Pilot Needed

The Safe Return Emergency Autoland System lets passengers hit a big red button to bring the plane to safety if the pilot's incapacitated.

14d

Palestinian farmers benefit from Birmingham water technology project

University of Birmingham scientists have worked with international students to produce prototype desalination equipment that could help Palestinian farmers avoid water shortages and grow crops efficiently.

14d

A Physicist Calculated Our Chances of Surviving a Vampire Attack

Physics Sucks Polish physicist Dominik Czernia has created an online calculator that determines how the human race would fare if vampires were running amok, killing some people and turning others into more vampires. "It combines two things that I find fascinating: fiction and science," Czernia told ScienceAlert . "I love it when we can apply mathematical models to even the most surprising things

14d

Oil and gas wastewater used for irrigation may suppress plant immune systems

The horizontal drilling method called hydraulic fracturing helps the United States produce close to 4 billion barrels of oil and natural gas per year, rocketing the U.S. to the top of oil-producing nations in the world.

14d

NASA finds small area of heavy rain left in Tropical Cyclone Kyarr

Tropical Cyclone Kyarr appears to be winding down as it moves through the Arabian Sea and NASA provided forecasters with an analysis of rainfall rates occurring in the weakening storm.

14d

NASA sees development of Tropical Storm Maha at southwestern India Coast

Tropical Storm Maha has developed near the coastline of southwestern India and NASA's Terra satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the storm.

14d

Vicinal reaction: A radical strategy for linking three organic groups together

A research team has developed a reaction for creating functionalized ketones. Using an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) organocatalyst, with no need for metals or light irradiation, an acyl and an alkyl group are added across the double bond of an alkene. The NHC gives regioselective control over a relay process involving electron transfer followed by successive addition of two radicals onto the alken

14d

Innovative tool analyzes all 22,000 tweets from 2016 Republican presidential candidates

Donald Trump's Twitter activity during the 2016 presidential primaries was largely comprised of tweets characterized by competition. He focused on performance, style, personal attacks and his standing in the polls.

14d

Disruptions of salesperson-customer relationships. Is that always bad?

Researchers from the University of Bochum and the University of Warwick published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing, which shows that sales relationship disruptions can have overall positive effects for the selling firm.

14d

Commission: Virginia let company defy fishing limits in bay

Fishing regulators say the state of Virginia allowed a Canadian-owned company that makes fish-oil supplements to defy catch limits for a tiny and oily fish in the Chesapeake Bay.

14d

DeepMind's StarCraft II AI Can Now Defeat 99.8 Percent of Human Players

Google's DeepMind AI lab has contributed to some of the company's most impressive AI feats in recent years such as the Wavenet voice engine and object recognition in Google Photos. DeepMind has also shown off its AI prowess by beating humans at games we never thought machines would be able to play. It started by besting the world's best Go players, and then moved on to StarCraft II. The "AlphaSta

14d

Commission: Virginia let company defy fishing limits in bay

Fishing regulators say the state of Virginia allowed a Canadian-owned company that makes fish-oil supplements to defy catch limits for a tiny and oily fish in the Chesapeake Bay.

14d

Palestinian farmers benefit from Birmingham water technology project

University of Birmingham scientists have worked with international students to produce prototype desalination equipment that could help Palestinian farmers avoid water shortages and grow crops efficiently.

14d

Researchers find new signaling systems in human cells

One third of all approved drugs target the same family of receptors: the G-Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). Now, researchers from the University of Copenhagen along with two American labs have expanded the known network of peptides that activate GPCRs by 19 percent.

14d

For All Mankind review – Apple's solid alt-space saga avoids crash landing

A splashy new series imagines what would have happened if Russia had won the space race with decent, if rarely compelling, results Months of hype for Apple TV+ and the many A-list names attached has dramatically dissipated this week as reviews have revealed a ragtag bunch of half-formed shows that have replaced big ideas with big production values. It might therefore be faint praise to label glos

14d

For teens, multitasking makes them feel better — and worse

Multitasking makes adolescents feel both more positively and more negatively about the main task they're trying to accomplish, a new study finds. But the study — which examined young people's actual multitasking behaviors over 2 weeks — found that only the positive emotions affected whether young people choose to combine tasks later.

14d

Surgeons report that 12-hour shifts improve patient outcomes, lower costs

Scientists have used a model to cap surgeon shifts at 12 hours for covering surgical emergencies, and a study has shown that it led to shorter hospital stays and lower overall costs for patients with acute appendicitis.

14d

Failure prognosis: Data science predicts which failures will ultimately succeed

Data science finds there is a critical threshold of lessons from failure that must be applied in order to achieve eventual success.

14d

Drones keep an eye on tropical disease hotspots

Satellite images, drone photos, and even Google Earth could help identify communities most at risk for schistosomiasis, one of the world's worst tropical diseases, researchers report. A new study shows that clues in the environment can help identify transmission hotspots for the parasitic disease that is second only to malaria in its global health impact. Researchers used rigorous field sampling

14d

11 myter om alkohol: Hvad du absolut (ikke) skal gøre, når du drikker

Vi har – en gang for alle – undersøgt, hvad alkohol gør ved din krop og dit liv.

14d

It's Official: NASA Is Considering an Interstellar Mission

Going Interstellar A group of researchers from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory are eager to send a probe into interstellar space, Wired reports . Pending NASA's approval, they claim the project could launch as soon as 2030. It could represent "humanity's first explicit step into interstellar space," as team member at the Applied Physics Laboratory Pontus Brandt told Wired , years aft

14d

WhatsApp adds fingerprint lock for Android to stop friends sneaking a look at your private messages

WhatsApp claims the new feature will provide an 'extra layer of security' for Android users, and bring them in line with iPhone users, who can already fingerprint-lock their devices

14d

Trump's First Impeachment Win

So this is how the impeachment of President Donald Trump is going to go. The House this morning cast its first vote in a process that could lead to just the third Senate impeachment trial of a president in U.S. history. When Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced plans for the vote earlier this week, there was at least some promise of drama: Which House Democrats would defect? How many Republicans might

14d

Motherless Brooklyn Is a Passion Project Without Heart

Motherless Brooklyn , Jonathan Lethem's 1999 novel, was defined partly by nostalgia. Set in contemporary times, it had the flavor of a classic gumshoe thriller from the '50s, a pulpy chronicle of detectives and gangsters on the mean streets of New York. Now Edward Norton is leaning even further into the story's throwback spirit. The Oscar-nominated actor is the writer, director, and star of a fil

14d

A Tech Group Suggests Limits for the Pentagon's Use of AI

The Defense Innovation Board, with members from Google, Microsoft, and Facebook, praises the power of military AI but warns of unintended harms or conflict.

14d

Female Asian elephants mysteriously stop reproducing later in life

Like humans and a few whale species, female Asian elephants stop reproducing towards the end of their lives, but the reason why is unclear

14d

Vicinal reaction: A radical strategy for linking three organic groups together

A research team has developed a reaction for creating functionalized ketones. Using an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) organocatalyst, with no need for metals or light irradiation, an acyl and an alkyl group are added across the double bond of an alkene. The NHC gives regioselective control over a relay process involving electron transfer followed by successive addition of two radicals onto the alken

14d

Tumors turn gut 'brain cells' into tumor growth promoters

When enteric glial cells are exposed to secretions from colon tumors, the glial cells convert into promoters of tumor growth. The work demonstrates enteric glial cells' importance in the tumor microenvironment and could lead to new targets for treatment of colon cancer.

14d

Visible light and nanoparticle catalysts produce desirable bioactive molecules

Chemists have used visible light and extremely tiny nanoparticles to quickly and simply make molecules that are of the same class as many lead compounds for drug development. Driven by light, the nanoparticle catalysts perform chemical reactions with very specific chemical products — molecules that don't just have the right chemical formulas but also have specific arrangements of their atoms in s

14d

Two million-year-old ice provides snapshot of Earth's greenhouse gas history

Two million-year old ice from Antarctica recently uncovered by a team of researchers provides a clearer picture into the connections between greenhouse gases and climate in ancient times and will help scientists understand future climate change.

14d

Too real, or too fake? Female Instagram influencers in 'authenticity bind'

Female Instagram influencers — whose livelihoods depend on their numbers of followers, views and likes – endure criticism and harassment both for being too real and for seeming too fake, according to a new study.

14d

Were those experiment results really so predictable? These researchers aim to find out

Researchers have launched a website that will allow researchers, Ph.D. students, and even members of the general public to review proposed research projects and make predictions on the outcome.

14d

Pastcast: Carl Sagan uses Galileo to search for signs of life

Nature, Published online: 31 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03327-4 In the Nature PastCast series, we delve into the archives to tell the stories behind some of Nature's biggest papers.

14d

Obesity Is in the Genes

The science says James Corden was right to call out Bill Maher for fat shaming — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Feds ban ex-Duke lab tech from funding after she faked data linked to 60 NIH grants

Erin Potts-Kant, who lost her job as a researcher at Duke University in 2013 for embezzling more than $25,000 from the institution, has received a rare permanent Federal funding ban from the U.S. Office of Research Integrity (ORI) after investigators concluded that she had used fabricated data in nearly 120 figures. The case has been … Continue reading

14d

Obesity Is in the Genes

The science says James Corden was right to call out Bill Maher for fat shaming — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Joel Kinnaman's Leading-Man Evolution

As an actor, Joel Kinnaman used to think of himself as a weasel. Not a rodent, per se, but a weasel-like human, the kind of guy who plays drug dealers and police informants and creeps. He was not, he thought, leading-man material. "I thought I could play like a weaselly snake," he told me, perching precariously on the back frame of a couch in a New York hotel suite, so his besocked feet rested on

14d

The Party-Line Impeachment

Legally, the passage of a House resolution on the impeachment inquiry on Thursday doesn't mean much. Democrats have already launched the inquiry, and a federal judge ruled last week that they didn't need to have a vote. But it's not clear that the resolution had much political effect either. The final vote on the resolution was 232–196, almost precisely along partisan lines. The story of the impe

14d

A protein that pulls the brake on nerve growth

During embryonic development, nerve cells form thin, long extensions, which they use to wire up a complex network, the brain. Scientists have now identified a protein that regulates the growth of these extensions by pulling a brake. In the long run, their findings could help to develop new approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injuries.

14d

What makes Earth's surface move? Could the surface drive mantle movement?

Do tectonic plates move because of motion in the Earth's mantle, or is the mantle driven by the plates' movement? Or could it be that this question is ill-posed? This is the point of view adopted by scientists who regard the solid Earth as a single system. According to their simulations, the surface mainly drives the mantle, although changes occur over time.

14d

Spain Agrees to Host Key Climate Talks After Chile Pulls Out

Madrid has offered to hold the next United Nations climate talks, the leaders of Spain and Chile announced on Thursday.

14d

'The Witcher' will debut on Netflix December 20th

Netflix's upcoming adaptation of The Witcher series of fantasy novels has a full trailer and, at long last, a release date. As you might expect if you're familiar with the …

14d

Infections during pregnancy may hamper fetal brain development

Severe infections during pregnancy can cause impaired development in the brain of the fetus, research with mice shows. The mother's health is important for the fetus's brain development during pregnancy. Many factors play key roles for healthy brain development, including nutrition, stress , hormonal balance , and the mother's immune system. Researchers have observed in both humans and animals th

14d

Asteroid Impacts Might Wipe Out Alien Life Around Dwarf Stars

What's the recipe for a living planet? A new paper suggests that the right number of impacts is a key ingredient.

14d

Astronomers Discover Glowing 'Galactic Ghoul'

Astronomers have just observed a ghostly nebula of gas resembling the shape of an hourglass, surrounding a known galaxy. This ghoulish structure has dwarfed the galaxy it is surrounding.

14d

UK police need to slow down with face recognition, says data watchdog

A legal code of practice is needed before face recognition technology can be safely deployed by police forces in public places, says the UK's data regulator

14d

DeepMind's new AI masters the online game StarCraft II

Nature, Published online: 31 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03343-4 'AlphaStar' beat human opponents to reach the top 200 players in Europe.

14d

The Firm That Deletes Gore and Child Porn on Facebook Just Quit

Moderating content for Facebook is traumatic. That's not an opinion — it's a fact. Thousands of people spend their work days deciding whether posts violate Facebook's content policies. And a growing number have spoken to the media about the terrible toll of seeing countless images and videos depicting violence, sex abuse, child pornography, and torture. In March 2018, one moderator in Tampa, Flor

14d

Oil and gas wastewater used for irrigation may suppress plant immune systems

A new Colorado State University study gives pause to the idea of using oil and gas wastewater for irrigation. The CSU team conducted a greenhouse study using produced water to irrigate common wheat crops. Their study, published in Environmental Science and Technology Letters, showed that these crops had weakened immune systems.

14d

NASA finds small area of heavy rain left in Tropical Cyclone Kyarr

Tropical Cyclone Kyarr appears to be winding down as it moves through the Arabian Sea and NASA provided forecasters with an analysis of rainfall rates occurring in the weakening storm.

14d

NASA sees development of Tropical Storm Maha at southwestern India Coast

Tropical Storm Maha has developed near the coastline of southwestern India and NASA's Terra satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the storm.

14d

To make laziness work for you, put some effort into it

We are being lazy if there's something that we ought to do but are reluctant to do because of the effort involved. We do it badly, or do something less strenuous or less boring, or just remain idle. In other words, we are being lazy if our motivation to spare ourselves effort trumps our motivation to do the right or best or expected thing – assuming, of course, we know what that is. In the Christ

14d

California biologists are using wildfires to assess health risks of smoke

Nature, Published online: 31 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03345-2 As fires rage in the Bay Area, scientists launch study to track long-term effects of smoke on the heart, lungs and immune system.

14d

After release into wild, vampire bats keep 'friends' made in captivity

Vampire bats that share food and groom each other in captivity are more likely to stick together when they're released back into the wild, find researchers. While most previous evidence of 'friendship' in animals comes from research in primates, these findings suggest that vampire bats can also form cooperative, friendship-like social relationships.

14d

Climate change: Spain offers to host COP25 in Madrid

After Chile withdraws from holding the global climate summit, Spain offers to host it in Madrid.

14d

Impeachment Wasn't Always This Fair

Today the House of Representatives formally authorized an impeachment investigation and committed itself to opening up the proceedings to greater public scrutiny. While this is in part a political maneuver designed to muffle Republican criticism, it is also—even if incidentally—a healthy step in the direction of fundamental fairness. During the Clinton impeachment, I advised several members of Co

14d

Training in mental ill-health a determinant of managers' preventive actions

Managers who have received training in mental health issues, and whose workplaces run general information campaigns on mental health, are significantly more likely to work preventively in this area vis-à-vis their subordinates, a study shows. This applies irrespective of organization size and managers' own experiences of mental ill-health.

14d

First images of Motorola's retro Razr phone leak on Twitter a month before device is unveiled

Images posted to Twitter by leaker Evan Blass show what appear to be official pictures of Motorla's revamped Razr phone with a folding display. The phone is slated to be unveiled next month.

14d

Dozens of Boeing 737 Jets Grounded Because of "Cracks"

Cracks in the Fuselage As if dozens of deaths linked to half-baked piloting software wasn't enough, more issues with aerospace giant Boeing's infamous 737 line up of commercial jets are popping up. Boeing admitted today that dozens of its third-generation 737 NG ("Next Generation") planes have been grounded by a number of airlines, including Australian airline Qantas. The culprit: "cracks in the

14d

Astronomers Discover Glowing 'Galactic Ghoul'

Astronomers have just observed a ghostly nebula of gas resembling the shape of an hourglass, surrounding a known galaxy. This ghoulish structure has dwarfed the galaxy it is surrounding.

14d

Magic angle graphene produces switchable patterns of superconductivity

A new study shows that superconductivity in bilayer graphene can be turned on or off with a small voltage change, increasing its usefulness for electronic devices.

14d

Two-legged robot mimics human balance while running and jumping

Engineers have developed a method to control balance in a two-legged, teleoperated robot — an essential step toward enabling a humanoid to carry out high-impact tasks in challenging environments.

14d

WFIRST will add pieces to the dark matter puzzle

The true nature of dark matter is one of the biggest mysteries in the universe. Scientists are trying to determine what exactly dark matter is made of so they can detect it directly, but our current understanding has so many gaps, it's difficult to know just what we're looking for. WFIRST's ability to survey wide swaths of the universe will help us figure out what dark matter could be made of by e

14d

Evading Heisenberg isn't easy

EPFL researchers, with colleagues at the University of Cambridge and IBM Research-Zurich, unravel novel dynamics in the interaction between light and mechanical motion with significant implications for quantum measurements designed to evade the influence of the detector in the notorious 'back action limit' problem.

14d

Addiction model can't fully explain obesity

There are behavioral similarities between obesity and addiction, but obesity is also a complex condition that the addiction model cannot fully explain, research finds. Obesity rates have tripled since 1975, according to the World Health Organization. An increase in availability of inexpensive, high-calorie food is likely behind the rise. While some researchers blame obesity on food addiction, oth

14d

IBM challenges a recent result in quantum computing

Technically, they are right. Practically, it makes little difference

14d

14d

The answer to livestock that burp methane may be seaweed

But then you have to grow the seaweed

14d

A tale of mistake and retraction shows that science works—eventually

Kids from religious homes are not less generous than secular children

14d

Unraveling the History of Avalanches in Juneau

An ongoing study of tree rings is helping scientists understand their past behavior to help keep the city safe in the future — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Innovative tool analyzes all 22,000 tweets from 2016 Republican presidential candidates

Donald Trump's Twitter activity during the 2016 presidential primaries was largely comprised of tweets about performance, personal attacks and his standing in the polls. Researchers call this type of political messaging a strategy frame. Issue frames, meantime, deal with policy, decision-making, and identifying problems and proposing solutions. Most GOP hopefuls were issue focused. Only Trump and

14d

Promising discovery could lead to a better, cheaper solar cell

McGill University researchers have gained tantalizing new insights into the properties of perovskites, one of the world's most promising materials in the quest to produce a more efficient, robust and cheaper solar cell.

14d

Non-GM produce earns 'halo effect' under new labeling laws

Consumers were more willing to buy unlabeled produce after being shown food tagged as "genetically modified" in a new Cornell University study that comes two months before a new federal law, requiring genetically modified organism disclosure labels on food products, goes into effect.

14d

Screening tool administered in pediatric ER accurately gauges suicide risk

A suicide risk screening tool that Johns Hopkins Medicine implemented in its pediatric emergency department six years ago appears to provide an accurate gauge of which youth are most vulnerable and has identified more than 2,000 patients who might benefit from mental health treatment and resources, according to a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Johns

14d

Movement and flow: Simulating complexity of fluids and strands in the virtual world

Simulating the physics behind the movement of liquids and how fluids — thick or thin — interact with other objects is a key problem in visual effects. A team of computer scientists are addressing this problem in computer graphics with a novel, multi-scale framework that realistically and precisely imitates the complex dynamics of strands interacting with so-called shear-dependent liquids, such a

14d

Disruptions of salesperson-customer relationships. Is that always bad?

Implications from sales relationship disruptions are intricate and can be revitalizing.

14d

Evading Heisenberg isn't easy

EPFL researchers, with colleagues at the University of Cambridge and IBM Research-Zurich, unravel novel dynamics in the interaction between light and mechanical motion with significant implications for quantum measurements designed to evade the influence of the detector in the notorious 'back action limit' problem.

14d

Kidney cancer study uncovers new subtypes and clues to better diagnosis and treatment

In what is believed to be the most comprehensive molecular characterization to date of the most common — and often treatment-resistant — form of kidney cancer, researchers at Johns Hopkins' departments of pathology and oncology, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine report evidence for at least three distinct subtypes of clear cell renal cell car

14d

I scream, you scream…

You're walking down a dark, cobweb-swathed hallway with only the light from a few candles to guide your way. You note the torn and dirty oriental rug beneath your feet and the strange shadows that dart across the ceiling overhead. On the walls, you pass dusty, old-fashioned portraits of stiffly-posed families whose eyes seem to […]

14d

The Ghost of Libet Returns

Last month, I blogged about the famous Libet experiment and how this 1983 study, which was once heralded as undermining the concept of free conscious will, has now been reinterpreted in a less radical way. Libet et al. found an electrical potential, the Readiness Potential (RP), that emerged in the brain about 1 second before the onset of voluntary movement. The key finding was that the RP also pr

14d

Carbon bomb: Study says climate impact from loss of intact tropical forests grossly underreported

A new study says that carbon impacts from the loss of intact tropical forests has been grossly underreported.

14d

Predicting frailty, disability and death

Researchers analyzed patterns of movement among elderly study participants and found that irregular, spontaneous fluctuations could predict a person's risk of frailty, disability and death years later.

14d

Insect decline more extensive than suspected

Compared to a decade ago, today the number of insect species on many areas has decreased by about one third. The loss of species mainly affects grasslands in the vicinity of intensively farmed land – but also applies to forests and protected areas.

14d

Seizures in babies: UVA sheds light on why they have lifelong effects

A doctor is using an elegant new approach to mapping brain activity to shed light on what happens during seizures in newborns that can lead to behavioral issues and learning disabilities much later.

14d

Land restoration in Ethiopia pays off but climate change necessitates many strategies

In the last decade, Ethiopia has invested more than US $1.2 billion annually in restoring landscapes in several regions of the country. Research takes stock of Ethiopia's major restoration projects and investigates their impact on ecosystem services. Researchers say their work can help policymakers tailor future restoration actions to specific ecosystem needs.

14d

Artificial networks shed light on human face recognition

Our brains are so primed to recognize faces – or to tell people apart – that we rarely even stop to think about it, but what happens in the brain when it engages in such recognition is still far from understood. Researchers have now shed new light on this issue. They found a striking similarity between the way in which faces are encoded in the brain and in successfully performing artificial intell

14d

Racial variation in post-op care after knee replacement surgery

A large study analyzing 107,000 knee replacement surgeries found that African Americans were significantly more likely than white patients to be discharged to an inpatient rehabilitation or skilled nursing facility rather than home care after the procedure. Researchers also found that African American patients under 65 were more likely to be readmitted to the hospital within 90 days of a knee repl

14d

Mathematicians Cut Apart Shapes to Find Pieces of Equations

If you have two flat paper shapes and a pair of scissors, can you cut up one shape and rearrange it as the other? If you can, the shapes are "scissors congruent." But, mathematicians wonder, can you tell if two shapes share this relationship even without using scissors? In other words, are there characteristics of each shape you could measure ahead of time to determine whether they're scissors co

14d

NASA microgap-cooling technology immune to gravity effects and ready for spaceflight

A groundbreaking technology that would allow NASA to effectively cool tightly packed instrument electronics and other spaceflight gear is unaffected by weightlessness, and could be used on a future spaceflight mission.

14d

Firefighters battle new blazes in California

Firefighters battled new wildfires on Thursday in California including a fierce blaze in the city of San Bernardino that forced some residents to flee their homes overnight.

14d

People think about breaking up more when they look outside their relationship for psychological fulfillment

As humans we all have psychological needs that we are driven to fulfill, be they companionship or safety, a sense of belonging or personal growth. And we often meet these needs through our relationships with others: They care for us, make us feel secure, and help us develop as individuals. When we are in romantic relationships, our partners are commonly the main source for fulfilling those needs.

14d

Dynamic transition of the blood-brain barrier in the development of non-small cell lung cancer brain

Effective drug delivery through the BTB is one of the greatest therapeutic obstacles in treating brain metastases.Using an experimental model, the researchers defined key changes within the BTB and the BBB in the brain around the tumor region over time.These data provide a comprehensive analysis of the BTB in NSCLC brain metastasis.

14d

Mutated form of DNA repair protein may shed light on its role in preventing cancer

Clemson University researcher Jennifer Mason created a mutated version of RAD51, a DNA repair protein, to better understand its critical functions at key steps in the cell replication process during times of stress. This work may help cancer biology scientists better understand how cells protect DNA from damage during replication. Defects in this pathway may play a role in causing cancer and a bet

14d

Cocktail proves toxic to leukemia cells

Rice bioscientists find a way to predict the sensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia to mitochondria-damaging molecules and develop cocktails to fight the cancer. The discoveries could improve personalized cancer treatment.

14d

Jesus Painting Bound for the Dump Is Lost Renaissance Masterpiece Worth $27 Million

A 13th-century painting that hung over an elderly French woman's hot plate for years has sold at auction for $26.8 million.

14d

$166 Water Could Dictate International Iceberg Law

I tasted my first iceberg in L'anse aux Meadows, Canada, overlooking the windswept grassland that clings to the northern tip of Newfoundland. I had ordered a martini on the rocks from the only bar in town, and it arrived at my table gently fizzing. The jagged pieces of ice swirling around the glass crackled as the millennia-old air inside escaped. It was good fun, like drinking nature's Pop Rocks

14d

Bad Arguments for Limiting Speech

In a Washington Post op-ed titled "Why America Needs a Hate Speech Law," Richard Stengel, who once edited Time , begins by recalling, "When I was a journalist, I loved Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.'s assertion that the Constitution and the First Amendment are not just about protecting 'free thought for those who agree with us but freedom for the thought that we hate.'" But a three-year stint

14d

Privacy attack on DNA website reveals 93 per cent of a person's data

One of the world's biggest genetic genealogy websites, GEDmatch, has a vulnerability that means people's data could be accessed without their permission

14d

Genetic studies have missed important gene variants in African people

A study looking at gene variants in Uganda found dozens that have never been recorded, including genes associated with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases

14d

Team discovers tiny 'bike courier' vesicle in cells

A previously unknown kind of vesicle delivers proteins in cells like a bike courier in heavy traffic, researchers find. The discovery could shed light on the mechanisms that let cells spread in diseases such as cancer , researchers say. Researchers say the newly discovered vesicle is the first identified in 20 years and the smallest known. The discovery appears in the Journal of Cell Biology . Th

14d

Wikipedia-medstifter på vej med socialt medie: »Vi vil aldrig sælge dine data«

Wikitribune Social skal adskille sig fra nuværende sociale medier ved at prioritere kvalitet over brugerinteraktioner og reklamer ifølge Jimmy Wales, der står bag Wikiepedia.

14d

Pharma Sells States on "Netflix Model" to Wipe Out Hep C

Purchase of full-service packages to eradicate the virus can come without cost transparency — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14d

Promising discovery could lead to a better, cheaper solar cell

McGill University researchers have gained tantalizing new insights into the properties of perovskites, one of the world's most promising materials in the quest to produce a more efficient, robust and cheaper solar cell.

14d

Climate engineering should not be considered a public good, new research shows

Countries around the world are preparing to modify the earth's climate to cope with climate change, with many proponents touting it as a "public good."

14d

Scientists tame Josephson vortices

MIPT physicists have learned how to locally control Josephson vortices. The discovery can be used for quantum electronics superconducting devices and future quantum processors. The work has been published in the prestigious scientific journal Nature Communications.

14d

Status of proteins housing DNA controls how cells maintain identity

The inheritance, not only of DNA, but of changes to proteins that package it, maintains the identity of cells as they multiply, a new study finds.

14d

Insurance coverage among patients with head/neck cancer after ACA

Researchers investigated the association between the Affordable Care Act and changes in the percentage of patients with insurance among 130,000 people with head and neck cancer across varying socioeconomic and demographic backgrounds.

14d

Assessing effect of prescribing fewer opioids after corneal surgery

What the association is between decreasing the number of opioid tablets prescribed to patients after corneal surgery and their opiod use and pain control was the focus of this observational study.

14d

Study finds racial disparities in culturally competent cancer care

Many non-white minority cancer survivors place importance on seeing doctors who share or understand their culture, but are less likely than non-Hispanic whites to be able to see such physicians, according to a new study from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

14d

A protein that pulls the brake on nerve growth

During embryonic development, nerve cells form thin, long extensions, which they use to wire up a complex network, the brain. Scientists from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) in Bonn have now identified a protein that regulates the growth of these extensions by pulling a brake. In the long run, their findings could help to develop new approaches for the treatment of spinal c

14d

Eye doctors prescribe fewer opioids without compromising pain control

After eye surgery, patients get more opioids than necessary, according to findings by University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center published in JAMA Ophthalmology. A policy change led to fewer pills prescribed by a cornea clinic without compromising pain control.

14d

Vampire bats give a little help to their 'friends'

Vampire bats could be said to be sort of like people — not because of their blood-sucking ways, but because they help their neighbors in need even if it's of no obvious benefit to them.

14d

Chromosomal abnormalities uncovered in many couples struggling with recurrent miscarriage

A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Shandong University and the Chinese University of Hong Kong uses a special genetic sequencing technique known as low-pass genome sequencing (GS) to look for chromosomal abnormalities in couples with RM. Low-pass GS revealed additional chromosomal abnormalities in more couples than traditional testing, increasing detection to 1 in 9 co

14d

Bound by blood

After studying vampire bat relationships in captivity, researchers at the Smithsonian in Panama released the bats into the wild colony where they originally came from. Using proximity sensors, they discovered that bats stayed close to the same individuals from their captive roost.

14d

Disease-causing protein in cystic fibrosis has ancient roots in sea lamprey

The oldest known ortholog of the ion channel that is defective in patients with cystic fibrosis arose approximately 450 million years ago in the sea lamprey, researchers report in Developmental Cell. Many differences between lamprey and jawed vertebrate orthologs of this protein, called the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, are vestiges of the evolutionary transition from a tran

14d

After release into wild, vampire bats keep 'friends' made in captivity

Vampire bats that share food and groom each other in captivity are more likely to stick together when they're released back into the wild, find researchers in a study reported on Oct. 31 in the journal Current Biology. While most previous evidence of 'friendship' in animals comes from research in primates, these findings suggest that vampire bats can also form cooperative, friendship-like social r

14d

Important gene variants found in certain African populations

In the nearly 20 years since the Human Genome Project was completed, experts in genetic variants increasingly have raised concerns about the overemphasis on studying people of European descent when performing large population studies. A study appearing Oct. 31 in the journal Cell aims to address some of this disparity by focusing on populations living in rural Uganda, thus revealing several new ge

14d

Vampire bat friendships endure from captivity to the wild

Vampire bats can form social bonds that persist from a lab setting to the outdoors, suggesting the cooperative relationships are like friendships.

14d

East Africa reels from deadly floods in extreme weather

A powerful climate phenomenon in the Indian Ocean stronger than any seen in years is unleashing destructive rains and flooding across East Africa—and scientists say worse could be coming.

14d

Flu season is here. Researchers may have discovered a cure.

Researchers at Georgia State University and Emory University tweaked an old drug and found great results. None of the ferrets given EIDD-2801 twelve hours after infection developed the flu. Those given the drug a day later developed less severe symptoms than the control group or those receiving Tamiflu. None Disease is part of the price we pay as biological organisms. Contemplating how many disea

14d

Study addresses one of the most challenging problems in educational policy and practice

Language proficiency has an important influence on learners' ability to answer scientific questions a new joint study by Lancaster and Sheffield Universities has found.

14d

Skull dimensions of Dominicans and Haitians differ despite close physical proximity

Forensic anthropologists analyze skeletal remains to establish the biological profile (sex, age, ancestry and stature). While ancestry is an important component, most research has focused on identifying individuals of African-American and European-American descent.

14d

Tiny swimming donuts deliver the goods

Bacteria and other swimming microorganisms evolved to thrive in challenging environments, and researchers struggle to mimic their unique abilities for biomedical technologies, but fabrication challenges created a manufacturing bottleneck. Microscopic, 3D-printed, tori — donuts ­­– coated with nickel and platinum may bridge the gap between biological and synthetic swimmers, according to an intern

14d

Video: Vampire folklore has more chemistry than you'd think

Halloween season wouldn't be the same without the undead.

14d

Someone Hacked India's Nuclear Power Plants

Nuclear Option After denying reports of a system malware infection Tuesday, the Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited (NPCIL) admitted yesterday that it had indeed been hacked. "Identification of malware in NPCIL system is correct," read a Wednesday statement . "The matter was conveyed by CERT-In [India's national computer emergency response team] when it was noticed by them on September 4,

14d

For These Vampires, A Shared Blood Meal Lets 'Friendship' Take Flight

Common vampire bats might drink the blood of their prey, but it turns out that these fearsome beasts can be warm and fuzzy when it comes to their fellow bats. (Image credit: B.G. Thomson/Science Source)

14d

Vampire bats form bonds of 'friendship' that last beyond captivity

But they don't always play well with other wild bats

14d

Disease-causing protein in cystic fibrosis has ancient roots in sea lamprey

The oldest known ortholog of the ion channel that is defective in patients with cystic fibrosis arose approximately 450 million years ago in the sea lamprey, researchers report October 31st in the journal Developmental Cell. Many differences between lamprey and jawed vertebrate orthologs of this protein, called the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), are vestiges of the evo

14d

Vampire bats give a little help to their 'friends'

Vampire bats could be said to be sort of like people—not because of their blood-sucking ways, but because they help their neighbors in need even if it's of no obvious benefit to them.

14d

Status of proteins housing DNA controls how cells maintain identity

The inheritance, not only of DNA, but of changes to proteins that package it, maintains the identity of cells as they multiply, a new study finds.

14d

A protein that pulls the brake on nerve growth

During embryonic development, nerve cells form long, thin extensions that wire up the complex network of the brain. Scientists from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) in Bonn have now identified a protein that regulates the growth of these extensions by pulling a brake. In the long run, their findings could help to develop new approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injuri

14d

Climate engineering should not be considered a public good, new research shows

According to researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, calling climate engineering a public good misrepresents the technical definition of a public good and doesn't account for the potentially negative impacts of climate engineering.

14d

Disease-causing protein in cystic fibrosis has ancient roots in sea lamprey

The oldest known ortholog of the ion channel that is defective in patients with cystic fibrosis arose approximately 450 million years ago in the sea lamprey, researchers report October 31st in the journal Developmental Cell. Many differences between lamprey and jawed vertebrate orthologs of this protein, called the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), are vestiges of the evo

14d

Vampire bats give a little help to their 'friends'

Vampire bats could be said to be sort of like people—not because of their blood-sucking ways, but because they help their neighbors in need even if it's of no obvious benefit to them.

14d

Status of proteins housing DNA controls how cells maintain identity

The inheritance, not only of DNA, but of changes to proteins that package it, maintains the identity of cells as they multiply, a new study finds.

14d

A protein that pulls the brake on nerve growth

During embryonic development, nerve cells form long, thin extensions that wire up the complex network of the brain. Scientists from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) in Bonn have now identified a protein that regulates the growth of these extensions by pulling a brake. In the long run, their findings could help to develop new approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injuri

14d

Is Botswana is humanity's ancestral home? Maybe not

A recent paper in thejournal Nature claims to show that modern humans originated about 200,000 years ago in the region around northern Botswana. For a scientist like myself who studies human origins, this is exciting news. If correct, this paper would suggest that we finally know where our species comes from.

14d

New animal feed created from rice straw and citric fruit leaves

Rice straw and waste from pruning citric fruit trees have a new use: feed for ruminant animals. A team of researchers from the Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV) has designed new diets for cows, sheep, goats, etc. from these horticultural products. Among its benefits, the use of this new feed would help decrease the burning of these agricultural sub-products, as well as the emissions of meth

14d

Techno-fix futures will only accelerate climate chaos—don't believe the hype

Thanks to the efforts of climate activists, the climate and ecological emergency has never been more prominent. But acknowledging the problem is just a starting point. Now this momentum must be harnessed to dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reverse habitat destruction.

14d

Even 'Goldilocks' exoplanets need a well-behaved star

An exoplanet may seem like the perfect spot to set up housekeeping, but before you go there, take a closer look at its star.

14d

Vampyrfladdermöss matar varandra med blod

Relationer mellan vampyrfladdermöss som uppstår i fångenskap består även i frihet, enligt ny forskning. De bildar blodsband – bokstavligt talat.

14d

What vaccinating vampire bats can teach us about pandemics | Daniel Streicker

Could we anticipate the next big disease outbreak, stopping a virus like Ebola before it ever strikes? In this talk about frontline scientific research, ecologist Daniel Streicker takes us to the Amazon rainforest in Peru where he tracks the movement of vampire bats in order to forecast and prevent rabies outbreaks. By studying these disease patterns, Streicker shows how we could learn to cut off

14d

Is Botswana humanity's ancestral home? Maybe not

A recent paper in thejournal Nature claims to show that modern humans originated about 200,000 years ago in the region around northern Botswana. For a scientist like myself who studies human origins, this is exciting news. If correct, this paper would suggest that we finally know where our species comes from.

14d

New animal feed created from rice straw and citric fruit leaves

Rice straw and waste from pruning citric fruit trees have a new use: feed for ruminant animals. A team of researchers from the Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV) has designed new diets for cows, sheep, goats, etc. from these horticultural products. Among its benefits, the use of this new feed would help decrease the burning of these agricultural sub-products, as well as the emissions of meth

14d

Donald Trump's Woman Problem Is Only Getting Worse

More than a month into the House Democrats' official impeachment investigation into President Donald Trump, Americans' support for the inquiry still looks a bit fuzzy. While the most recent national polls show that roughly 50 percent of the country condones the effort, surveys in several key swing states have shown narrower margins of support. But across all the polling, one trend is strikingly c

14d

The Ultimate Washington Baseball Fan

When I was a boy, there was no baseball in Washington, except in our minds. To watch games, we would drive up I-95 to Baltimore. In the car, my father would tell us stories from the mythical past, about how he would take the trolley to Griffith Stadium to watch the Washington Senators, sometimes even without the knowledge or company of his parents. If he arrived in the late innings, a friendly us

14d

Students develop door handles that kill bacteria

A pair of students in Hong Kong have created a self-cleaning door handle. The device uses ultraviolet light to cause a chemical reaction that kills germs. In tests, it was able to kill 99.8% of microbes on the door handle. Think of the most germ covered places in any building. I'll bet you included door handles on that list. It is a well-studied fact that a filthy door handle can spread disease i

14d

Dental stem cells can generate milk-producing cells

Stem cells of the teeth can contribute to the regeneration of non-dental organs, namely mammary glands. According to a new study from researchers at the University of Zurich, dental epithelial stem cells from mice can generate mammary ducts and even milk-producing cells when transplanted into mammary glands. This could be used for post-surgery tissue regeneration in breast cancer patients.

14d

Gender equality dates back to the Vikings

The Scandinavian countries are regarded as models of equality between the sexes. A new study indicates that this may go back a very long way. Dr. Laura Maravall and Professor Jörg Baten, economic historians working as part of the Collaborative Research Center "ResourceCultures" at the University of Tübingen, compared the health of men and women from the past thousand years, using data gathered fro

14d

Invasiv krabbeart fundet i Øresund

Den asiatiske strandkrabbe er for første gang blevet fundet i Øresund. Der er tale om en invasiv art, og derfor vækker fundet bekymring, lyder det fra akvariechefen hos Øresundsakvariet.

14d

Study addresses one of the most challenging problems in educational policy and practice

Language proficiency has an important influence on learners' ability to answer scientific questions a new joint study by Lancaster and Sheffield Universities has found.And this is particularly challenging for children from homes where English is not their first language -now a significant and increasing proportion of classrooms worldwide.

14d

This AI birdwatcher lets you 'see' through the eyes of a machine

It can take years of birdwatching experience to tell one species from the next. But using an artificial intelligence technique called deep learning, Duke University researchers have trained a computer to identify up to 200 species of birds from just a photo. This tool goes beyond giving the right answer to explain its thinking, in a way that even someone who doesn't know a penguin from a puffin ca

14d

Shedding new light on the charging of lithium-ion batteries

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a photo-excitation process that speeds up the charging of lithium-ion batteries. If commercialized, such technology could be a game changer for electric vehicles.

14d

Why music makes us feel, according to AI

In a new study, a team of USC researchers, with the help of artificial intelligence, investigated how music affects listeners' brains, bodies and emotions.

14d

Even 'Goldilocks' exoplanets need a well-behaved star

Rice University scientists model how the 'weather' on a star impacts exoplanets to see if even those thought to be in habitable zones could suffer from solar storms. They expect their work to help narrow the number of exoplanets studied for their potential to harbor life.

14d

Skull dimensions of Dominicans and Haitians differ despite close physical proximity

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have conducted a craniometric study (measuring the main part of the skull) on understudied and marginalized groups and found that skull dimensions of Dominicans and Haitians, who occupy a relatively small island of Hispaniola, are different from each other.

14d

Dental stem cells can generate milk-producing cells

Stem cells of the teeth can contribute to the regeneration of non-dental organs, namely mammary glands. According to a new study from researchers at the University of Zurich, dental epithelial stem cells from mice can generate mammary ducts and even milk-producing cells when transplanted into mammary glands. This could be used for post-surgery tissue regeneration in breast cancer patients.

14d

There's Weirdly a Lot of *Game of Thrones* News Right Now

The show wrapped up five months ago, but it's still dominating the headlines. Here's why.

14d

Medical Students May Have Secretly Practiced on Human Bodies Found in 19th-Century Burial in Scotland

A grisly find of human bones behind a house in the Scottish city of Aberdeen is now thought to point to a dark chapter in history — the illicit use of dead bodies for anatomical practice in the 19th century.

14d

How much of a difference does the number of kids in a classroom make?

Chicago's teachers are on a strike that has suspended instruction for the city's public school students since Oct. 17.

14d

Mega-infrastructure projects in Africa, Asia and Latin America are reshaping development

Huge investments in infrastructure are redefining global development, from China's Belt and Road Initiative to infrastructure development plans from the African Development Bank and the Initiative for the Integration of the Regional Infrastructure of South America.

14d

The Washington Nationals' Against-All-Odds Championship

The crucial moment of the Washington Nationals' Game 7 World Series victory last night came by way of Howie Kendrick. This year, Kendrick enjoyed the best season of his career, but he's hardly a superstar, having made just one All-Star team over his 14-year career. The 36-year-old is what baseball fans call a "professional hitter," a player who can be relied on to make pitchers work, to move runn

14d

Spitzer Telescope spots a ghoulish gourd

A carved-out cloud of gas and dust looks like a celestial jack-o'-lantern in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

14d

Study explores benefits of workplace neurodiversity

Historically, companies have asked employees to 'trim away' their irregularities; it's easier to fit people together if they are all perfect rectangles. But 'fit' often required employees to leave their differences at home.

14d

Zoo animal research skewed towards 'popular' species

Research on zoo animals focuses more on "familiar" species like gorillas and chimpanzees than less well known ones like the waxy monkey frog, scientists say.

14d

Traffic exhaust at residential address increases the risk of stroke

High levels of traffic exhaust at one's residence increases the risk of stroke even in low-pollution environments, according to a new study. The study suggests that it is mainly black carbon from traffic exhaust that increases the risk for stroke, and not particulate matter from other sources.

14d

In Southeast Asia, illegal hunting is a more threat to wildlife than forest degradation

A new study suggests that for ground dwelling mammal and bird communities, illegal hunting using indiscriminate snares may be a more immediate threat than forest degradation through selective logging.

14d

Immune 'control switch' could prevent brain injury in premature babies

About 15 million babies are born prematurely around the world each year and many suffer brain injuries when their immune response goes into overdrive. Researchers have now discovered an immune control switch that could protect their brains from this damaging hyperactive response. Promising results from pre-clinical trials of a potential treatment show the brain's immune cells could be successfully

14d

Tiny swimming donuts deliver the goods

Bacteria and other swimming microorganisms evolved to thrive in challenging environments, and researchers struggle to mimic their unique abilities for biomedical technologies, but fabrication challenges created a manufacturing bottleneck. Microscopic, 3D-printed, tori — donuts ­­– coated with nickel and platinum may bridge the gap between biological and synthetic swimmers, according to an intern

14d

New technique may reveal the health of human hair follicles

A new method recently examines the activity of hair follicles and could be useful for testing the effects of different treatments on hair growth.

14d

Zoo animal research skewed towards 'popular' species

Research on zoo animals focuses more on "familiar" species like gorillas and chimpanzees than less well known ones like the waxy monkey frog, scientists say.

14d

Bellevue startup uses artificial intelligence to help English learners' pronunciation

While the familiar idiom "you say tomayto, I say tomahto" is meant to showcase the triviality of differences, the irony lies in its illustration of the wide variation in English pronunciation.

14d

Vicinal reaction: A radical strategy for linking three organic groups together

Organic chemists are molecular architects, designing sophisticated structures. As the molecules used in science and medicine become ever more complex, new tools are needed to piece together the building blocks. Now, a Japanese team at Kanazawa University has developed a reaction that links up three components at once using free radical chemistry.

14d

After Chile cancels, the world's largest climate gathering is now without a home

California is on fire. Scientists are warning of catastrophic floods and global food shortages. A 16-year-old activist has inspired millions around the world to protest for more climate change action.

14d

Researchers find high-intensity exercise improves memory in seniors

Researchers at McMaster University who examine the impact of exercise on the brain have found that high-intensity workouts improve memory in older adults.

14d

A kinase identified as possible target to treat heart failure

An unexplored kinase in heart muscle cells may be a good target to treat heart failure, a disease that is only incrementally delayed by existing therapies. Failing human hearts showed reduced amounts of this kinase, and preclinical experiments showed that restoring the amount of this kinase in a kinase-depleted mouse model rescued the animal from heart failure.

14d

Molecular gatekeepers that regulate calcium ions key to muscle function

Controlled entry of calcium ions into the mitochondria, the cell's energy powerhouses, makes the difference between whether muscles grow strong or easily tire and perish from injury, according to research published in Cell Reports.

14d

Milk from teeth: Dental stem cells can generate milk-producing cells

Stem cells of the teeth can contribute to the regeneration of non-dental organs, namely mammary glands. According to a new study from researchers at the University of Zurich, dental epithelial stem cells from mice can generate mammary ducts and even milk-producing cells when transplanted into mammary glands. This could be used for post-surgery tissue regeneration in breast cancer patients.

14d

Key mechanism in insulin release by cholesterol metabolite found

Insulin which is released by pancreatic beta-cells is the main regulator of blood sugar. Previous and current studies by a research group at Lund University in Sweden have identified around hundred different receptors on the surface of the beta-cells, with a diverse functional impact on the beta-cells. Now researchers at Lund University in collaboration with researchers at University of Sharjah, U

14d

Zoo animal research skewed towards 'popular' species

Research on zoo animals focuses more on 'familiar' species like gorillas and chimpanzees than less well known ones like the waxy monkey frog, scientists say.

14d

Scientists tame Josephson vortices

MIPT physicists have learned how to locally control Josephson vortices. The discovery can be used for quantum electronics superconducting devices and future quantum processors. It is expected that the results of the research will serve as an impetus and a basis for developing new methods of local noncontact diagnostics and management of modern superconducting devices and superconducting quantum el

14d

Discovery may help derail Parkinson's 'runaway train'

Researchers at the University of Dundee have discovered a new enzyme that inhibits the LRRK2 pathway. Mutations of the LRRK2 gene are the most common cause of genetic Parkinson's disease.The enzyme they found – called PPM1H – has been shown to possess remarkable properties to reverse the biology triggered by LRRK2.

14d

Radiology: Cardiothoracic Imaging publishes special report on vaping

Radiology: Cardiothoracic Imaging has published a special report on lung injury resulting from the use of electronic cigarettes, or 'vaping.' Researchers aim to raise awareness among radiologists and other medical professionals on how to identify e-cigarette or vaping product use-associated lung injury.

14d

The Trump Campaign's Nonsensical Halloween Celebration

MANHEIM, Pa.—We are gathered here in a place called Spooky Nook Sports, which is an actual place called Spooky Nook Sports, and which evidently maintains its "spooky" modifier even in months that are not October. It is a recreation center that on this rainy Wednesday night has been mostly closed, leaving the arcade in front deserted and dark. In the cavernous space, all is silent save for one sma

14d

Fossils show life's recovery after dino-killing asteroid strike

A newly discovered collection of fossils reveals how life recovered after the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs 66 million years ago at the end of the Cretaceous Period. The unprecedented find—thousands of exceptionally preserved animal and plant fossils from the first million years after the catastrophe—shines light on how life emerged from one of Earth's darkest hours. Scientists une

14d

Distant Galaxies? The Death Star? Nope, These Are Explosions

In his new series, photographer Kevin Cooley creates crazy images using pyrotechnics.

14d

Things We Loved in October: Google Pixel, Galaxy Buds, E-Bikes

The ramp-up to the holidays means we saw gobs of new products in October. Here are some of our favorites.

14d

Psychology researchers probe how juries evaluate jailhouse informant testimony

Jailhouse informant testimony in a legal trial seems to exist at the intersection of two old TV shows, "Law and Order" and "Let's Make a Deal." There's almost always a reward for it, and you'd think that should mitigate against accepting its truthfulness.

14d

Why Do Some People Like to Be Scared?

Do you have the personality trait that leads you to thrive in the face of fear?

14d

Drug shortages are worsening, and there are no simple solutions

Drug shortages, which worsen medical care and patient outcomes, are becoming more and more common. A new Task Force report from the FDA offers a potential way forward.

14d

Mimicking body's circulatory AC could keep airplanes, cars and computers cooler

In a study published in the International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, Ahmad Najafi, Ph.D., a professor in Drexel's College of Engineering, and his faculty collaborator, Jason Patrick, Ph.D., from North Carolina State University, report on how a computational technique they developed can quickly produce designs for 3D printing carbon-fiber composite materials with an internal vasculature opt

14d

Novel research aims to identify new medications for the treatment of opioid use disorder

A new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) shows the first evidence supporting a role for glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists in opioid reinforcement and analgesic responses. Using recently established models of opioid-taking and -seeking behaviors in rats, researchers have shown that systemic administration of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-

14d

Ground penetrating radar reveals why ancient Cambodian capital was moved to Angkor

The largest water management feature in Khmer history was built in the 10th century as part of a short-lived ancient capital in northern Cambodia to store water but the system failed in its first year of operation, possibly leading to the return of the capital to Angkor.

14d

Sponge-like 2D material with interesting electrical conductivity and magnetic properties

Researchers synthesize a new 2D Metal Organic Framework with an ever-growing list of possible applications.

14d

Agriculture of the future: Neural networks have learned to predict plant growth

Scientists from Skoltech have trained neural networks to evaluate and predict the plant growth pattern taking into account the main influencing factors and propose the optimal ratio between the nutrient requirements and other growth-driving parameters. The results of the study were published in the IEEE journal Transactions on Instrumentations and Measurements.

14d

We'll Soon Be Able to Prosper and Save the Earth at the Same Time. Here's How

Life is pretty different today than it was 20 or even 10 years ago. Smartphones and the internet have changed the way we do business, interact socially, and spend our free time. As tech continues to advance towards what some have dubbed the Fourth Industrial Revolution, economists, entrepreneurs, and historians are predicting that the degree of change this time around will be more drastic than du

14d

Astronomers catch wind rushing out of galaxy

Exploring the influence of galactic winds from a distant galaxy called Makani, UC San Diego's Alison Coil, Rhodes College's David Rupke and a group of collaborators from around the world made a novel discovery. Published in Nature, their study's findings provide direct evidence for the first time of the role of galactic winds—ejections of gas from galaxies—in creating the circumgalactic medium (CG

14d

Dark matter experiment's central component takes a deep dive—nearly a mile underground

Q: How do you get a 5,000-pound, 9-foot-tall particle detector, designed to hunt for dark matter, nearly a mile underground?

14d

Intensified global monsoon extreme rainfall signals global warming

Climate change has already led to significant increases in extreme rainfall over the global land monsoon regions over the past century, according to a study recently published in Journal of Climate.

14d

Quality and use of green spaces may determine their health benefits

Numerous scientific studies have demonstrated the benefits that green spaces have in people's lives. In fact, various studies led by ISGlobal have found links between exposure to green spaces such as parks and forests and various health improvements, including slower physical and mental decline, decreased risk of breast cancer and, most recently, reduced risk of developing metabolic syndrome. Howe

14d

Concrete with improved impact endurance for defense structures

Engineers from the Military Studies Center at Far Eastern Federal University (MSC FEFU) developed concrete with improved impact endurance and made of up to 40 percent waste from rice husk cinder, limestone crushing waste and siliceous sand. The new concrete is six to nine times more crackle-resistant than the types produced under GOST standards. The results are published in Inorganic Materials: Ap

14d

Study shows how climate change may affect environmental conservation areas

Brazil contains the largest expanse of tropical ecosystems within protected areas, but a significant proportion of these reserves may be vulnerable to the effects of ongoing global climate change, according to a study published in the journal Conservation Biology.

14d

I Randers sorteres, behandles og anvendes mix-plasten lokalt: »Vi overlader ikke det sure arbejde til andre«

PLUS. Mens flere andre aktører sender deres plast videre til sorteringsanlæg i udlandet, så valgte Randers Kommune at opbevare deres plast, indtil de fik aftaler på plads med lokale aktører, som kunne behandle det. Det har givet en høj genanvendelsesprocent og ro i maven hos kommunens affaldschef.

14d

Adaptive human immunity depends on the factor responsible for the formation of white blood cells

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)has a significant regulatory effect not only on innate, but also on adaptive immunity. That's what scientists from the IKBFU and Research Institute of Fundamental and Clinical Immunology have found.

14d

This Fungus Fires Artillery From the Backs of Zombie Flies

After Entomophthora muscae fatally infects house flies, it makes microscopic stalks for hurtling spores at other insects that come nearby.

14d

Analyzing gut bacteria more accurately to make diagnosis

The microorganisms in our intestines could be linked to certain diseases such as Alzheimer's and diabetes. Researchers from the AD-gut consortium have developed a novel method—combining optical DNA mapping and statistics—for accurately distinguishing and rapidly identifying the various species in the microbiota.

14d

Analyzing gut bacteria more accurately to make diagnosis

The microorganisms in our intestines could be linked to certain diseases such as Alzheimer's and diabetes. Researchers from the AD-gut consortium have developed a novel method—combining optical DNA mapping and statistics—for accurately distinguishing and rapidly identifying the various species in the microbiota.

14d

Video: SMOS 10 years in orbit

The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite has been in orbit for a decade. This remarkable satellite has not only exceeded its planned life in orbit, but also surpassed its original scientific goals. It was designed to deliver data on soil moisture and ocean salinity which are both crucial components of Earth's water cycle.

14d

Squeeze leads to stellar-mass black hole collision precision

Scientists at The Australian National University (ANU) have found a way to better detect all collisions of stellar-mass black holes in the universe.

14d

The science of drought is complex but the message on climate change is clear

The issue of whether Australia's current drought is caused by climate change has been seized on by some media commentators, with debate raging over a remark from eminent scientist Andy Pitman that "there is no link between climate change and drought". Professor Pitman has since qualified, he meant to say "there is no direct link between climate change and drought".

14d

Macaques' stone tool use varies despite same environment

Macaques are the only Old World monkeys that have been observed using percussive stone tools and scientists do not know for certain how or why certain groups have developed this behavior.

14d

Ground-penetrating radar reveals why ancient Cambodian capital was moved to Angkor

The largest water management feature in Khmer history was built in the 10th century as part of a short-lived ancient capital in northern Cambodia to store water but the system failed in its first year of operation, possibly leading to the return of the capital to Angkor.

14d

Researchers create quantum chip 1,000 times smaller than current setups

Researchers at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a quantum communication chip that is 1,000 times smaller than current quantum setups, but offers the same superior security quantum technology is known for.

14d

Macaques' stone tool use varies despite same environment

Macaques are the only Old World monkeys that have been observed using percussive stone tools and scientists do not know for certain how or why certain groups have developed this behavior.

14d

Controlling free-roaming horses in Alberta

Horses roam freely around the world and in many parts of Canada. They can be found on Sable Island in Nova Scotia, in the Bronson Forest in Saskatchewan, the Rocky Mountain Forest Reserve in Alberta, and in the Cholcotin and Brittany Triangle of British Columbia.

14d

Confusion at the fish counter: How to eat fish responsibly

It now seems absurd that anyone once believed the ocean was inexhaustible: fish stocks are in dismal shape and scientists say overfishing is a global problem with potentially irreversible consequences to ecosystems and human livelihoods.

14d

Clouds on Jupiter rising up above the surrounding atmosphere

Though it looks like it to us, Jupiter's clouds do no form a flat surface. Some of its clouds rise up above the surrounding cloud tops. The two bright spots in the right center of this image are much higher than the surrounding clouds.

14d

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply