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nyheder2019oktober31

Sheldon Breiner, 82, Dies; Used Magnetism for Explorations

He developed the techniques he used to help locate sunken submarines and enormous stone heads, as well as early applications for artificial intelligence.

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How the Neutrino's Tiny Mass Could Help Solve Big Mysteries – Facts So Romantic

Reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine's Abstractions blog. The KATRIN experiment is closing in on the mass of the neutrino, which could point to new laws of particle physics and reshape theories of cosmology. Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe Of all the known particles in the universe, only photons outnumber neutrinos. Despite their abundance, however, neutrinos are hard to catch and inspect,

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The next software revolution: programming biological cells | Sara-Jane Dunn

The cells in your body are like computer software: they're "programmed" to carry out specific functions at specific times. If we can better understand this process, we could unlock the ability to reprogram cells ourselves, says computational biologist Sara-Jane Dunn. In a talk from the cutting-edge of science, she explains how her team is studying embryonic stem cells to gain a new understanding o

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How the Aztecs could improve modern urban farming

Roland Ebel of the Sustainable Food Systems Program at Montana State University conducted a research project to determine the extent to which an ancient Aztec agricultural technique could benefit 21st century horticultural needs.

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Hindu children more apt to echo propaganda that 'Indian equals Hindu'

With a multi-faith population of some 1.3 billion, India claims to be the world's largest secular democracy. But when it comes to the question of who is a true Indian, the country's Hindu children are more likely than their Muslim peers to connect their faith to their national identity, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Daily briefing: Triple-therapy drug shows dramatic effect on cystic fibrosis

Nature, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03378-7 Dramatically effective drug could transform life for 90% of people with cystic fibrosis, primate embryos grown in the lab for longer than ever before and measles erases immune 'memory' for other diseases.

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Why Desalinating Water is Hard — and Why We Might Need To Anyway

A desalination plant in Hamburg, Germany. (Credit: Andrea Izzotti/Shutterstock) In places like San Diego and Dubai, where freshwater is scarce, humans turn to machines that pull the salt out of seawater, transforming it into clean drinking water. This process, called desalination, has been turning sea and brackish groundwater into potable water since the mid-20th century. The technology could beco

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China Is Going to the Moon, Coming Back With Moon Rocks

Require More Minerals China has a plan to gather Moon rocks and bring them back to Earth — all using robotic orbiters and rovers. The mission, scheduled for late 2020, will be the first to return lunar samples since a Soviet Union mission in 1976, SpaceNews reports . If the ambitious plan succeeds, scientists will have access to another two kilograms of Moon rocks to study back here on Earth. Mov

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Astronomers Spot Black Hole the Size of Manhattan

Very Big, Very Small Black holes can get very big — in some instances, big enough to encompass the orbits of all our solar system's planets. But not all are huge. Yesterday, we wrote about a new study by a team of astronomers from Ohio State University led by astronomer Todd Thompson, claiming to have discovered an entirely new and previously missing class of black holes. The extensive investigat

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How the Aztecs could improve modern urban farming

Highly intensive production systems with low resource demand are a strategic goal of urban agriculture developers. Research was conducted to determine the extent to which an ancient Aztec agricultural technique could benefit 21st century horticultural needs.

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Estrogen's opposing effects on mammary tumors in dogs

Estrogen's role in canine mammary cancer is more complex than previously understood, according to new research led by the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. The nuanced findings may help explain why dogs spayed at a young age are more likely to develop more aggressive cancers, the team says.

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Lymphatic system found to play key role in hair regeneration

To grow new hair, stem cells throughout the skin must work in sync. Researchers have discovered the molecular communication tool, part of the lymphatic system, that the cells use to synchronize their activities.

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Eagle Talon Jewelry Suggests Neanderthals Were Capable of Human-Like Thought

New evidence from an archaeological site in Spain reignites a debate about Neanderthal cognition

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ACLU Sues FBI For "Dystopian Surveillance Technology" Info

ACLU Lawsuit In January, the American Civil Liberties Union submitted a Freedom of Information Act request to the Justice Department (DOJ), the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and the FBI asking for any policies, contracts, or records related to the agencies' use of surveillance tech, such as facial recognition software. None of the agencies have turned over that information willingly — so

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Diablo IV Officially Announced, Goes Back To Its Horror Roots

There were rumors that come BlizzCon 2019, Blizzard would finally take the wraps off Diablo IV, a game that many thought would be announced last year but was not. Sure enough, the rumors were …

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Garmin's Latest Nav System Can 'AutoLand' Small Planes In An Emergency

Garmin is one of the companies that has its fingers in lots of pies from the consumer electronics market to general aviation. Gamin International has announced what it calls a "revolution in …

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What Is Convergent Evolution?

Why do dolphins look so much like sharks? Why do pandas have thumbs? Because evolutionarily speaking, sometimes there tends to be one best way to get the job done.

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Ornament with eagle talons from Neanderthal Period

For the first time, researchers found evidence of the ornamental uses of eagle talons in the Iberian Peninsula.

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The secret behind crystals that shrink when heated

Scientists have new experimental evidence and a predictive theory that solves a long-standing materials science mystery: why certain crystalline materials shrink when heated. Their work could have widespread application for matching material properties to specific applications in medicine, electronics, and other fields, and may even provide fresh insight into unconventional superconductors.

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Gene flow among distantly-related butterfly species

Researchers analyzed the genomes of 20 butterfly species and found evidence that many butterflies — including distantly related species — have a surprisingly high amount of gene flow between them. The findings challenge conventional views about species, and indicate that hybridization may be a key process in the emergence of biological diversity.

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A #MeToo Scandal Erupts. The Morning Show Captures What Happens Next.

Sometimes more information changes everything. In 2013, the then– New York Times media reporter Brian Stelter published Top of the Morning , a splashy dive into the "cutthroat world" of morning television. In his book, Stelter examined the rivalry between NBC's Today and ABC's Good Morning America , the fraught relationship between the former Today hosts Matt Lauer and Ann Curry, and the health b

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Hindu children more apt to echo propaganda that 'Indian equals Hindu'

When it comes to the question of who is a true Indian, Hindu children in the world's largest secular democracy are more likely than their Muslim peers to connect their faith to their national identity, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Sov lige på det: En god nats søvn kan faktisk løse dit problem

Din hjerne kører for fuld skrue, når du sover. Og derfor kan du komme sovende til mange løsninger.

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Green Climate Fund attracts record US$9.8 billion for developing nations

Nature, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03330-9 Despite no new contribution from the United States, several rich countries doubled their pledges compared with the last funding round.

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Google Buys Fitbit, Promises Not to Use Health Data to Sell Ads

The rumors were true: Google just pulled the trigger on buying Fitbit — and the company says it won't exploit all your health and biometric data that it now owns. On Monday, Reuters reported that Google was in talks to buy the health and fitness-focused wearable company. Friday morning, both Google and Fitbit confirmed the purchase, with the former paying a whopping $2.1 billion for the latter. M

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Google's big plan to fight tech addiction: A piece of paper

Paper Phone is not a joke—it's part of the company's "digital well-being experiments." Digital detox experts aren't having it.

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Tourism is one small step on our way to the stars

Interstellar opportunities abound beyond flying trips for the rich

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NBCUniversal reportedly considering making its Peacock streaming service totally free

the-office-nbc-netflix Comcast and NBCUniversal are reportedly weighing whether to make its upcoming Peacock streaming service free for all customers, according to CNBC. This …

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Disordered proteins become stable, 'super-sticky' materials

Biomedical engineers from Duke University have demonstrated that they can create stable materials from engineered disordered proteins by altering the environmental triggers that cause them to undergo phase transitions. This discovery shines a light on previously unexplored behaviors of disordered proteins and allows researchers to create novel materials for applications in drug delivery, tissue en

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Chemotherapy sometimes set the stage for drug-resistant leukemia at relapse

An international collaboration has identified therapy-induced, drug-resistance mutations in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapse.

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'Transformative electronics systems' to broaden wearable applications

A research team at KAIST says their new platform called 'Transformative Electronics Systems' will open a new class of electronics, allowing reconfigurable electronic interfaces to be optimized for a variety of applications.

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The last Neanderthal necklace

For the first time, researchers found evidence of the ornamental uses of eagle talons in the Iberian Peninsula. An article in the cover of Science Advances and led by Antonio Rodríguez-Hidalgo, researcher at the IDEA and member of the research team in a project of the SERP of the UB, talks about the findings, that widen the temporary limits estimated for this kind of Neanderthal ornaments.

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The secret behind crystals that shrink when heated

Scientists at Brookhaven Lab have new experimental evidence and a predictive theory that solves a long-standing materials science mystery: why certain crystalline materials shrink when heated. Their work could have widespread application for matching material properties to specific applications in medicine, electronics, and other fields, and may even provide fresh insight into unconventional super

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What one member of Trump's new science advisory council wants it to tackle

Dario Gil, IBM's research chief, on the value of U.S. science and how to address foreign influence

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Nvidia G-Sync support is being added to LG's 2019 TVs this week

We told you it was coming back in September and now it is here.

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A toe bone hints that Neandertals used eagle talons as jewelry

An ancient eagle toe bone elevates the case for the use of symbolic bird-of-prey pendants among Neandertals, researchers say.

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New California fire grows as crews make headway on other blazes

A new wildfire in California grew to nearly 9,000 acres (3,700 hectares) on Friday, sending thousands of people fleeing and further stretching resources in a state struggling with a spate of wildfires this season.

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Subunit cell-level measurement of polarization in an individual polar vortex

Recently, several captivating topological structures of electric dipole moments (e.g., vortex, flux closure) have been reported in ferroelectrics with reduced size/dimensions. However, accurate polarization distribution of these topological ferroelectric structures has never been experimentally obtained. We precisely measure the polarization distribution of an individual ferroelectric vortex in P

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Impact of nuclear vibrations on van der Waals and Casimir interactions at zero and finite temperature

Recent advances in measuring van der Waals (vdW) interactions have probed forces on molecules at nanometric separations from metal surfaces and demonstrated the importance of infrared nonlocal polarization response and temperature effects, yet predictive theories for these systems remain lacking. We present a theoretical framework for computing vdW interactions among molecular structures, account

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Supramolecular silicone coating capable of strong substrate bonding, readily damage healing, and easy oil sliding

Polymer coatings with a combined competence of strong bonding to diverse substrates, broad liquid repellency, and readily damage healing are in substantial demand in a range of applications. In this work, we develop damage-healable, oil-repellent supramolecular silicone (DOSS) coatings to harvest abovementioned properties by molecular engineering siloxane oligomers that can self-assemble onto coa

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Avalanches and criticality in self-organized nanoscale networks

Current efforts to achieve neuromorphic computation are focused on highly organized architectures, such as integrated circuits and regular arrays of memristors, which lack the complex interconnectivity of the brain and so are unable to exhibit brain-like dynamics. New architectures are required, both to emulate the complexity of the brain and to achieve critical dynamics and consequent maximal co

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Electrodeposited surfaces with reversibly switching interfacial properties

Engineered surfaces with reversibly switching interfacial properties, such as wettability and liquid repellency, are highly desirable in diverse application fields but are rare. We have developed a general concept to prepare metallic porous surfaces with exceptionally powerful wettability switch capabilities and liquid-repellent properties through an extremely simple one-step electrochemical depo

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TiO2 metasurfaces: From visible planar photonics to photochemistry

TiO 2 metasurfaces have been intensively studied in the past few years. To date, the TiO 2 metadevices only used their high reflective index ( n ). The controllable light extinction coefficient ( k ) of TiO 2 has not been exploited yet. Here, we converted TiO 2 metasurfaces to black TiO 2 metasurfaces and explored their new opportunities in photochemistry. A complementary metal oxide semiconducto

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Breathing dissipative solitons in mode-locked fiber lasers

Dissipative solitons are self-localized coherent structures arising from the balance between energy supply and dissipation. Besides stationary dissipative solitons, there are dynamical ones exhibiting oscillatory behavior, known as breathing dissipative solitons. Substantial interest in breathing dissipative solitons is driven by both their fundamental importance in nonlinear science and their pr

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The Chatelperronian Neanderthals of Cova Foradada (Calafell, Spain) used imperial eagle phalanges for symbolic purposes

Evidence for the symbolic behavior of Neanderthals in the use of personal ornaments is relatively scarce. Among the few ornaments documented, eagle talons, which were presumably used as pendants, are the most frequently recorded. This phenomenon appears concentrated in a specific area of southern Europe during a span of 80 thousand years. Here, we present the analysis of one eagle pedal phalange

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Spin-orbit torque manipulated by fine-tuning of oxygen-induced orbital hybridization

Current-induced spin-orbit torques provide an effective way to manipulate magnetization in spintronic devices, promising for fast switching applications in nonvolatile memory and logic units. Recent studies have revealed that the spin-orbit torque is strongly altered by the oxidation of heterostructures with broken inversion symmetry. Although this finding opens a new field of metal-oxide spin-or

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A mutually stabilized host-guest pair

By using click chemistry, a hexacationic cage was synthesized. The cage contains two triscationic -electron–deficient trispyridiniumtriazine (TPZ 3+ ) platforms that are bridged in a face-to-face manner by three ethylene-triazole-ethylene linkers. A diversity of -electron–rich guests can be recognized within the pocket of the cage, driven by host-guest – interactions. The cage cavity acts as a pr

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Cyclodextrin polymer networks decorated with subnanometer metal nanoparticles for high-performance low-temperature catalysis

The synthesis of support materials with suitable coordination sites and confined structures for the controlled growth of ultrasmall metal nanoparticles is of great importance in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, by rational design of a cross-linked β-cyclodextrin polymer network (CPN), various metal nanoparticles (palladium, silver, platinum, gold, and rhodium) of subnanometer size (

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Resolving the topological classification of bismuth with topological defects

The growing diversity of topological classes leads to ambiguity between classes that share similar boundary phenomenology. This is the status of bulk bismuth. Recent studies have classified it as either a strong or a higher-order topological insulator, both of which host helical modes on their boundaries. We resolve the topological classification of bismuth by spectroscopically mapping the respon

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Dissociating stable nitrogen molecules under mild conditions by cyclic strain engineering

All quiet on the nitrogen front. The dissociation of stable diatomic nitrogen molecules (N 2 ) is one of the most challenging tasks in the scientific community and currently requires both high pressure and high temperature. Here, we demonstrate that N 2 can be dissociated under mild conditions by cyclic strain engineering. The method can be performed at a critical reaction pressure of less than 1

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Mechanically transformative electronics, sensors, and implantable devices

Traditionally, electronics have been designed with static form factors to serve designated purposes. This approach has been an optimal direction for maintaining the overall device performance and reliability for targeted applications. However, electronics capable of changing their shape, flexibility, and stretchability will enable versatile and accommodating systems for more diverse applications.

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Entropic elasticity and negative thermal expansion in a simple cubic crystal

While most solids expand when heated, some materials show the opposite behavior: negative thermal expansion (NTE). In polymers and biomolecules, NTE originates from the entropic elasticity of an ideal, freely jointed chain. The origin of NTE in solids has been widely believed to be different. Our neutron scattering study of a simple cubic NTE material, ScF 3 , overturns this consensus. We observe

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Climate change could double toxic arsenic in rice

Climate change may cause a dramatic drop in rice production in major growing regions, a decline that could jeopardize critical food supplies, researchers report. New experiments exploring rice production in future climate conditions show rice yields could drop about 40% by 2100—with potentially devastating consequences in parts of the world that rely on the crop as a basic food source. What's mor

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The secret behind crystals that shrink when heated

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have new experimental evidence and a predictive theory that solves a long-standing materials science mystery: why certain crystalline materials shrink when heated. Their work, just published in Science Advances, could have widespread application for matching material properties to specific applications in medicine, electr

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The last Neanderthal necklace

Eagle talons are regarded as the first elements used to make jewelery by Neanderthals, a practice that spread around Southern Europe about 120,000 to 40,000 years ago. Now, for the first time, researchers have found evidence of the ornamental uses of eagle talons in the Iberian Peninsula. An article published on the cover of the journal Science Advances talks about the findings from the Foradada C

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How Human Innovation Shapes Global Health

Health care breakthroughs have far-reaching effects in an interconnected world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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School safety policies can amp up racial inequity

School safety policies enacted following shootings tend to exacerbate racial and ethnic discipline disparities in several different ways, according to a new study. Restorative justice has the potential to avert bad behavior and school shootings, the study suggests. "Racial equity is not a societal luxury, so it is not a reasonable sacrifice for safer schools." "Racial equity and safe schools are

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New technique lets researchers map strain in next-gen solar cells

Researchers have developed a way to map strain in lead halide perovskite solar cells without harming them. Their approach can image the grain structure of a perovskite solar cell, showing that misorientation between microscopic perovskite crystals is the primary contributor to the buildup of strain within the solar cell. Crystal misorientation creates small-scale defects in the grain structure, wh

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Oil and gas wastewater used for irrigation may suppress plant immune systems

A new study gives pause to the idea of using oil and gas wastewater for irrigation. The team conducted a greenhouse study using produced water to irrigate common wheat crops. Their study showed that these crops had weakened immune systems.

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California Wildfires Signal the Arrival of a Planetary Fire Age

The Earth may be entering an era in which natural and human-generated fire together are reshaping the planet.

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Astronomers Just Found the First Evidence That 'Mini Black Holes' Exist

"It's always interesting to try to find things that can't be seen."

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Our Hospital's New Software Frets About My 'Deficiencies'

But the patient records system, called Epic, has a few shortcomings of its own, including a voice that amplifies the insecurities that come with being a doctor.

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New technique lets researchers map strain in next-gen solar cells

Researchers have developed a way to map strain in lead halide perovskite solar cells without harming them. Their approach can image the grain structure of a perovskite solar cell, showing that misorientation between microscopic perovskite crystals is the primary contributor to the buildup of strain within the solar cell. Crystal misorientation creates small-scale defects in the grain structure, wh

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Oil and gas wastewater used for irrigation may suppress plant immune systems

A new study gives pause to the idea of using oil and gas wastewater for irrigation. The team conducted a greenhouse study using produced water to irrigate common wheat crops. Their study showed that these crops had weakened immune systems.

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Promising discovery could lead to a better, cheaper solar cell

Researchers have gained tantalizing new insights into the properties of perovskites, one of the world's most promising materials in the quest to produce a more efficient, robust and cheaper solar cell.

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NASA finds Tropical Storm Maha's heavy rain potential over Lakshadweep

Tropical Cyclone Maha continued to move north along the southwestern coast of India when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and analyzed the cloud top temperatures. Satellite imagery showed the storms with the greatest rainfall potential were over the Lakshadweep islands.

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Trump to Nominate Stephen Hahn, Cancer Researcher, to Head F.D.A.

In choosing him, President Trump is passing over the acting F.D.A. commissioner, Norman E. Sharpless, who has been running the agency since Scott Gottlieb resigned last spring.

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Disease-causing protein in cystic fibrosis has ancient roots in sea lamprey

The oldest known ortholog of the ion channel that is defective in patients with cystic fibrosis arose approximately 450 million years ago in the sea lamprey, researchers report. Many differences between lamprey and jawed vertebrate orthologs of this protein, called the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, are vestiges of the evolutionary transition from a transporter to a specializ

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Important gene variants found in certain African populations

In the nearly 20 years since the Human Genome Project was completed, experts in genetic variants increasingly have raised concerns about the overemphasis on studying people of European descent when performing large population studies. A study aims to address some of this disparity by focusing on populations living in rural Uganda, thus revealing several new genetic variants related to human health

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Research reveals how malaria parasite plans ahead, preparing blueprint to strike in humans

Within seconds after an infected mosquito bites, the malaria parasite navigates the host skin and blood vessels to invade the liver, where it will stay embedded until thousands of infected cells launch malaria's deadly blood-stage infection. Now, for the first time, a team describes how malaria Plasmodium parasites prepare for this journey. Researchers say this knowledge may help identify new stra

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Ground penetrating radar reveals why ancient Cambodian capital was moved to Angkor

The largest water management feature in Khmer history was built in the 10th century as part of a short-lived ancient capital in northern Cambodia to store water but the system failed in its first year of operation, possibly leading to the return of the capital to Angkor.

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Key mechanism in insulin release by cholesterol metabolite found

Insulin which is released by pancreatic beta-cells is the main regulator of blood sugar. Previous and current studies by a research group have identified around hundred different receptors on the surface of the beta-cells, with a diverse functional impact on the beta-cells. Now researchers have discovered that one of these receptors plays a key role in the release of insulin.

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High-intensity exercise improves memory in seniors

Researchers who examine the impact of exercise on the brain have found that high-intensity workouts improve memory in older adults.

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Zoo animal research skewed towards 'popular' species

Research on zoo animals focuses more on 'familiar' species like gorillas and chimpanzees than less well known ones like the waxy monkey frog, scientists say.

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Discovery may help derail Parkinson's 'runaway train'

Researchers have discovered a new enzyme that inhibits the LRRK2 pathway. Mutations of the LRRK2 gene are the most common cause of genetic Parkinson's disease. The enzyme they found – called PPM1H – has been shown to possess remarkable properties to reverse the biology triggered by LRRK2.

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Social Bonds Among Captive Vampire Bats Persist in the Wild

Bats that share food with their hungry cage-mates stay close after being released.

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Mysterious exoplanet shouldn't exist where it is

Researchers have found an exoplanet that, according to current theories, shouldn't exist in its current location. Researchers studied the red-giant stars HD 212771 and HD 203949, revising the parameters for the two red-giant stars, which are known to host exoplanets. These are the first detections of oscillations in previously known exoplanet-host stars TESS has made. Asteroseismology is the stud

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Warren Won't Soak the Middle Class After All

Updated on November 1 at 1:58 p.m. ET Senator Elizabeth Warren is giving the middle class a surprising reprieve. For the past few months, it seemed like the Massachusetts Democrat was slowly preparing the nation for a fiscal truth bomb: If progressive voters wanted a universal, Medicare for All health-care system, middle-class voters would have to fork over more in taxes. That was virtually the o

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Mimicking body's circulatory AC could keep airplanes, cars and computers cooler

Engineers report on how a computational technique they developed can quickly produce designs for 3D printing carbon-fiber composite materials with an internal vasculature optimized for active-cooling.

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Scientists Accidentally Recreate Big Bang Detonation in the Lab

Ask a scientist — or anyone, really — about the birth of the universe, and they'll probably tell you it started with the Big Bang . What nobody knows, though, is what caused that explosion. Some suspect the Big Bang was actually a massive star going supernova , but again, no one knows what exactly causes those stars to ignite , either. That might have just changed, though, thanks to a University

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Mimicking body's circulatory AC could keep airplanes, cars and computers cooler

Engineers report on how a computational technique they developed can quickly produce designs for 3D printing carbon-fiber composite materials with an internal vasculature optimized for active-cooling.

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A kinase identified as possible target to treat heart failure

An unexplored kinase in heart muscle cells may be a good target to treat heart failure, a disease that is only incrementally delayed by existing therapies. Failing human hearts showed reduced amounts of this kinase, and preclinical experiments showed that restoring the amount of this kinase in a kinase-depleted mouse model rescued the animal from heart failure.

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Shedding new light on charging lithium-ion batteries

Researchers have discovered a photo-excitation process that speeds up the charging of lithium-ion batteries. If commercialized, such technology could be a game changer for electric vehicles.

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One of the most challenging problems in educational policy and practice

Language proficiency has an important influence on learners' ability to answer scientific questions a new study has found. And this is particularly challenging for children from homes where English is not their first language — now a significant and increasing proportion of classrooms worldwide.

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Novel research aims to identify new medications for the treatment of opioid use disorder

A new study shows the first evidence supporting a role for glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists in opioid reinforcement and analgesic responses. Using recently established models of opioid-taking and -seeking behaviors in rats, researchers have shown that systemic administration of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 reduced oxycodone self-administration and the reinstatement of oxyc

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Common early sign of cardiovascular disease also may indicate cancer risk, study finds

A new study involving 488 cardiac patients whose cases were followed for up to 12 years finds that microvascular endothelial dysfunction, a common early sign of cardiovascular disease, is associated with a greater than twofold risk of cancer.

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An Upside to Narcissism? Trait Linked to Lower Levels of Stress and Depression

Narcissists display lower levels of stress and depression, an indication that the trait might sometimes be helpful. (Credit: G-Stock Studio/Shutterstock) Kostas Papageorgiou wants you to embrace your inner narcissist. Fittingly, it's for your own benefit: The Queen's University Belfast psychology researcher's latest study shows narcissism might be linked to lower stress levels and reduced risk of

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Most American 11-Year-Olds Now Have Smartphones

According to a new report by Common Sense Media, a company that recommends entertainment and technology to families and schools, the average screen time for children in the U.S. is as high as it's ever been — almost five hours a day for eight- to 12-year-olds, excluding computer time for homework. The trend is in part due to children getting smartphones at younger and younger ages. According to t

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How to spend your money, according to science

To prove money can't buy happiness, people point to millionaires and lottery winners who ruined their lives. Psychological studies have shown that learning how to spend your money can improve overall happiness. We explore eight money-spending principles that research suggests can bolster life satisfaction. None Gerald Muswagon won $10 million playing the lottery . He bought cars and a party pad.

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NASA finds Tropical Storm Maha's heavy rain potential over Lakshadweep

Tropical Cyclone Maha continued to move north along the southwestern coast of India when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and analyzed the cloud top temperatures. Satellite imagery showed the storms with the greatest rainfall potential were over the Lakshadweep islands.

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HVTN study confirms correlates of risk associated with decrease in HIV transmission

A pilot study led by senior authors Georgia Tomaras and Peter Gilbert and first authors Scott Neidich, Youyi Fong and Shuying Li of the NIAID-funded HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) demonstrated that an increase in three antibody-mediated immune responses (antibody-mediated Fc? receptor [Fc?R] recruitment, antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis [ADCP], and anti-Env IgG3) correlated with a decre

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These Rats Drive Tiny Cars—for Science

The rodents that lived in an enriched environment did better at driver's ed than the rats brought up in standard cages. The implications are fascinating.

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AI could help us deconstruct why some songs just make us feel so good

Machine learning can map which musical qualities trigger what types of physical and emotional responses. One day the technique could even be used in music therapy.

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Google Buys Fitbit to Fulfill Its Own Bigger Ambitions

A Google-branded fitness tracker is only the beginning of the company's wider "ambient computing" vision.

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SP Acquires Spain Based i-Dositecno

SP Industries, Inc. ("SP"), a leading designer and manufacturer of state-of-the-art laboratory equipment, pharmaceutical fill-finish manufacturing solutions, laboratory supplies and glassware, announced today that it has acquired the assets of privately held i-Dositecno. Located in Mataró, Spain, i-Dositecno is a global provider of complete sterile filling lines for pharmaceutical, cosmetic and op

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Exclusive: Spray-on gene editing could make genetic modification easy

Genetically modifying plants could soon be almost as easy as spraying them with water. A new technique involving nanoparticles could have a wide variety of uses

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Paper to EBR in 9 Months: How a Strong Collaboration Leads to Project Success

On 12 November, Lonza will host a free 60-minute webinar during which Nephron Pharmaceuticals will explain its decision to take a paperless approach to batch record management. Nephron will also discuss how its close relationship with Lonza allowed for a rapid implementation of Lonza's MODA-ES™ Electronic Batch Record (EBR) Platform in just nine months, leading to increased operational efficiency

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What Reddit's basketball fans can tell us about online discourse

New research dives deep into Reddit's r/nba discussion platform, providing a new window on an enduring sports tradition: trash talk.

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Harvesting genes to improve watermelons

An international team of researchers has taken a comprehensive look at the genomes of all seven species of watermelon, creating a resource that could help plant breeders increase the domestic fruit's quality and ability to thrive during an era of climate change. The paper describing this work is being published in the Nov. 1 issue of Nature Genetics.

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Focus on renewable energy, not carbon capture, say researchers

Retrofitting carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology to fossil fuel-based power plants makes sense; our main problem, after all, is the CO2 these plants emit, right? Early studies have suggested that these CCS solutions could be 85 to 95 percent efficient. A new study that is among the first to study actual field data suggests this wildly underestimates the impact of upstream and downstream s

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Levende kortdata for viderekomne: Kommunen tjekker asfalten i en browser

PLUS. Med ny opmålingsbil kan enorme mængder kort­data indsamles og ikke mindst fordeles til de rette brugere.

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Efficient hydrogen conversion via PEC water splitting using hematite mesocrystals

A research group has succeeded in developing photocatalysts that can convert an efficient level of hydrogen from water using solar light. It is hoped that methods like this one, which uses titanium-modified hematite mesocrystal-based photoanodes, could form the foundation for a commercial solar water splitting system. This would allow the clean fuel hydrogen to be produced more easily, making it a

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Efficient hydrogen conversion via PEC water splitting using hematite mesocrystals

A research group has succeeded in developing photocatalysts that can convert an efficient level of hydrogen from water using solar light. It is hoped that methods like this one, which uses titanium-modified hematite mesocrystal-based photoanodes, could form the foundation for a commercial solar water splitting system. This would allow the clean fuel hydrogen to be produced more easily, making it a

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Artificial intelligence learns muscle anatomy in CT images

Scientists report a new deep learning tool based on Bayesian U-Net architecture that can segment individual muscles from CT images. The high accuracy of the results offers a new level of personalized biomechanical modeling for patients for better therapies and athletes for better performance.

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Discovery of 'cellular bike couriers' clue to disease spreading

A previously unknown component of our cells that delivers proteins like a bike courier in heavy traffic could shed light on the mechanisms that allow cells to spread in diseases such as cancer.

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Opinion: We Need More than New Antibiotics to Fight Resistance

Metabolic disrupters, phages, and other approaches are going to be needed to treat the broadest possible range of patients infected by bacterial pathogens resistant to multiple drugs.

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NASA satellite imagery finds Rebekah now post-tropical

NASA's Terra Satellite provided a visible image of Post-Tropical Cyclone Rebekah as it continued moving in an easterly direction through the North Atlantic Ocean. Satellite data has confirmed that Rebekah is now a post-tropical cyclone.

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USDA decides to move two research agencies to Missouri, but many employees won't go

Some Democrats in Congress still trying to block relocation of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture and economic research office

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Soft Skills in the Life Sciences

To reduce the talent gap, companies must invest in developing these abilities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Potential genetic markers of multiple sclerosis severity

In a bid to determine factors linked to the most debilitating forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), researchers say they have identified three so-called 'complement system' genes that appear to play a role in MS-caused vision loss. The researchers were able to single out these genes — known to be integral in the development of the brain and immune systems — by using DNA from MS patients along with h

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Quantum chip 1,000 times smaller than current setups

Researchers have developed a quantum communication chip that is 1,000 times smaller than current quantum setups, but offers the same superior security quantum technology is known for.

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Double-sided tape for tissues could replace surgical sutures

Inspired by a sticky substance spiders use to catch prey, engineers designed a double-sided tape that can rapidly seal tissues together. This adhesive may eventually be used in place of surgical sutures or to implant medical devices.

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Helping hands from within: Live-in bacteria protect plants against infections

Micro-organisms living inside plant roots team up to boost the plant's growth and tolerance to stress. An international research team led by the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) and Wageningen UR reports its discovery in today's issue of the renowned scientific journal Science.

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NASA satellite imagery finds Rebekah now post-tropical

NASA's Terra Satellite provided a visible image of Post-Tropical Cyclone Rebekah as it continued moving in an easterly direction through the North Atlantic Ocean. Satellite data has confirmed that Rebekah is now a post-tropical cyclone.

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Harvesting genes to improve watermelons

When many people think of watermelon, they likely think of Citrullus lanatus, the cultivated watermelon with sweet, juicy red fruit enjoyed around the world as a dessert. Indeed, watermelon is one of the world's most popular fruits, second only to tomato—which many consider a vegetable. But there are six other wild species of watermelon, all of which have pale, hard and bitter fruits.

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Harvesting genes to improve watermelons

When many people think of watermelon, they likely think of Citrullus lanatus, the cultivated watermelon with sweet, juicy red fruit enjoyed around the world as a dessert. Indeed, watermelon is one of the world's most popular fruits, second only to tomato—which many consider a vegetable. But there are six other wild species of watermelon, all of which have pale, hard and bitter fruits.

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Soft Skills in the Life Sciences

To reduce the talent gap, companies must invest in developing these abilities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Martin Scorsese's Epic Funeral for the Gangster Genre

If Frank Sheeran (played by Robert De Niro), the central figure in Martin Scorsese's The Irishman , has a theme song, it's " In the Still of the Night ," a mid-'50s doo-wop hit from the Five Satins. A romantic ballad that evokes images of soda fountains and high-school dances, it nevertheless has a mournful quality, with a haunting, repetitive backing track beneath the sappy lyrics. Besides the s

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'Bodysnatching' fungus hides inside its neighbors between blazes

The bonfire scalycap emerges only after forest fires

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Scientists Let Blind "See" With Next-Gen Bionic Glasses

This summer, scientists used camera-mounted glasses and arrays of electrodes to send visual data directly into the brains of blind patients. A company called Second Sight makes a similar implant that it claims is being used by 350 patients around the world. But those experiments have failed to provide patients with anything like regular vision. "None of the patients gave up their white cane or gu

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Tactical voting campaign says maths can solve the UK's political mess

A site designed to help voters who want to stop Brexit has come under fire for its recommendations, but the group behind it say it is backed by statistics

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Five Things You Probably Didn't Know GPS Could Do

Scientists use the navigation system to measure and monitor many aspects of our planet

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The US Said This Pipeline Would Have "No Impact." Now It's Leaking Crude Oil.

Oops On Thursday, the Keystone Pipeline spilled about 383,000 gallons of crude oil in North Dakota. It's nothing short of an environmental disaster — and it probably won't be the last time that the particularly-leaky pipeline spills, experts told The New York Times . The pipeline, which the U.S. government said in 2011 would pose "no significant impact" to the area, has now flooded half an acre o

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Use of neonicotinoids on rice paddies linked to fishery collapse in Japan

A team of researchers with members affiliated with several institutions in Japan has found what they describe as compelling evidence of two fisheries collapsing due to use of neonicotinoid pesticides by nearby rice farmers. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their study of fishery water quality data over two decades and what they learned from it. Olaf Jensen with R

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Artificial wombs and the promise for premature babies – Science Weekly podcast

In October, a team of Dutch researchers were awarded a grant of €2.9m to develop a working prototype of an artificial womb for use in the clinic. But they are not the only ones working on this kind of technology. In 2017, a team in Philadelphia created the 'biobag' , which could sustain premature lambs. Both teams hope their artificial wombs could allow premature babies to continue to develop as

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UN confirms Madrid as new location for climate summit

The United Nations global climate meeting next month will take place in Madrid after previous host Chile canceled at short notice, officials said Friday.

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Use of neonicotinoids on rice paddies linked to fishery collapse in Japan

A team of researchers with members affiliated with several institutions in Japan has found what they describe as compelling evidence of two fisheries collapsing due to use of neonicotinoid pesticides by nearby rice farmers. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their study of fishery water quality data over two decades and what they learned from it. Olaf Jensen with R

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Researchers can now quickly, accurately scan for nutrient content in the produce aisle

The first quick, accurate, nondestructive and portable way to scan produce for nutrients has been demonstrated by a team of Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists. The same scan can also identify diseases in living plants before visible symptoms appear.

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Bringing ideas to life through experimental physics

Even the most brilliant scientific ideas need data. Just this year, the first-ever image of a black hole finally provided the evidence needed to support Einstein's 100-year-old theories.

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Mobile app to provide the latest on black hole collisions and merging neutron stars

PhD students from the Institute for Gravitational Wave Astronomy have released a new app to encourage members of the public to stay up to date with new gravitational wave events in near real time.

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Jupiter-sized exoplanet discovered through microlensing

The path of a light beam is bent by the presence of mass, and a massive body can therefore act like a lens (a "gravitational lens") to distort the image of an object seen behind it. Scientists first confirmed Einstein's prediction quantitatively during the now famous total eclipse of 29 May 1919 by observing starlight bent by the mass of the Sun. Microlensing is the name given to a related phenome

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A new spin on life's origin?

Researchers used a rotary evaporator to coax non-chiral molecules to form supermolecules of a specific helicity. This work may be used to synthesize cheaper pharmaceuticals, and also explain how the handedness of biomolecules originated.

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Double-sided tape for tissues could replace surgical sutures

Inspired by a sticky substance spiders use to catch prey, engineers designed a double-sided tape that can rapidly seal tissues together. This adhesive may eventually be used in place of surgical sutures or to implant medical devices.

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Being physically active can lower older adults' risk for dying

A team of researchers looked more carefully at the relationship between death and physical exercise among older adults in Brazil (where the number of older adults grew 40 percent between 2002 and 2012). Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Cage molecules act as molecular sieves for hydrogen isotope separation

In a new study published in Science, researchers at the University of Liverpool's Materials Innovation Factory have created hybrid porous organic cages capable of high-performance quantum sieving that could help advance the deuterium/hydrogen isotope separation technologies needed for fusion power.

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How good was Blade Runner's vision of tech in November 2019

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'Alarming' loss of insects and spiders recorded

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Math explains why arrhythmia drug doesn't work for everyone

A new mathematical model may offer a way to improve outcomes for people with irregular heartbeats, or arrhythmia, researchers say. As reported in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Basic to Translational Science , researchers developed the first computational model that shows the molecular groundwork of a popular drug's effectiveness in a variety of ways. Current treatment for arr

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Artificial wombs and the promise for premature babies – Science Weekly podcast

In October, a team of Dutch researchers were awarded a grant of €2.9m to develop a working prototype of an artificial womb for use in the clinic. But they are not the only ones working on this kind of technology. In 2017, a team in Philadelphia created the 'biobag', which could sustain premature lambs. Both teams hope their artificial wombs could allow premature babies to continue to develop as th

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Doctors Should Protest Climate Inaction, Top Medical Journal Says

Health professionals have joined climate protests and organizations have divested from fossil fuels — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bloodhound car ramps up its speed to 461mph

The arrow-shaped, jet-powered racer is now the third fastest British car of all time – unofficially.

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ADHD across racial/ethnic groups

This study of patients from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds who received care at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California health system looked at how common attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnoses were over a 10-year period across seven racial/ethnic groups.

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Study shows media overlook best practices when reporting a celebrity suicide death

A study published today in JAMA Network Open by researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital examined suicide reporting guideline adherence by the media for the suicide deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain. The study found that some media coverage of the Spade and Bourdain deaths did not adhere to several of the suicide reporting guidelines.

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A new spin on life's origin?

Researchers used a rotary evaporator to coax non-chiral molecules to form supermolecules of a specific helicity. This work may be used to synthesize cheaper pharmaceuticals, and also explain how the handedness of biomolecules originated.

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Letters: Was It Fair to Boo the President?

The Presidency Deserves Respect—Even When the President Does Not When President Donald Trump made an appearance at Game 5 of the World Series, he was met with a cascade of boos and chants of "Lock him up!" and "Impeach Trump!" from the crowd. On Tuesday, Peter Wehner argued that the institution of the presidency is not synonymous with the occupant of the office, and that in certain circumstances,

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Europe's first home brain-zap device for depression launched in UK

A headset that allows you to treat the symptoms of depression by zapping your brain has gone on sale in the UK

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Wildfires Envelop California, With Blame to Spare

Human decisions helped cause the wildfire problem, but whether human decisions can help solve it is, for the moment, more difficult to tell. It's a puzzling intersection of housing policy, climate policy, economics, individual decisions — and a mixture of carelessness, bad luck, and bad engineering.

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This Alaska mine could generate $1 billion a year. Is it worth the risk to salmon?

A brown bear loped across rolling green tundra as Charles Weimer set down a light, single-engine helicopter on a remote hilltop.

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Four decades of data sounds early warning on Lake George

Although concentrations of chemicals and pollutants like salt and nutrients have increased in the deep waters of Lake George, they're still too low to harm the ecosystem at those depths, according to an analysis of nearly 40 years of data published Thursday in Limnology and Oceanography. However, the changes in the deep water sound an early warning for what are likely much larger impacts in the st

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How changing your story can change your life | Lori Gottlieb

Stories help you make sense of your life — but when these narratives are incomplete or misleading, they can keep you stuck instead of providing clarity. In an actionable talk, psychotherapist and advice columnist Lori Gottlieb shows how to break free from the stories you've been telling yourself by becoming your own editor and rewriting your narrative from a different point of view.

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Living skin can now be 3D-printed with blood vessels included

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a way to 3D print living skin, complete with blood vessels. The advancement, published online today in Tissue Engineering Part A, is a significant step toward creating grafts that are more like the skin our bodies produce naturally.

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Dartmouth engineers develop new way to know liars' intent

Dartmouth engineering researchers have developed a new approach for detecting a speaker's intent to mislead. The approach's framework, which could be developed to extract opinion from 'fake news,' among other uses, was recently published as part of a paper in Journal of Experimental & Theoretical Artificial Intelligence.

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Cities, tribes try a new environmental approach: Give nature rights

When members of the White Earth band of Ojibwe in Minnesota take out their canoes to harvest wild rice, they're gathering a source of nourishment and following a tradition that has connected them to the land for generations.

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Ford Sync 4 Gets Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, and Over-the-Air Updates

Version 4 of Ford Sync infotainment brings support for screens as big as 15.5 inches, wireless connections for Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, and over-the-air updates for a wide range of software/firmware updates to the car, not just infotainment updates. There will be an always-on, Alexa-like agent (wake word: Ford). It comes next year in Fords and Lincolns that are all-new or major-refresh veh

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'On The Backs Of Tortoises' Challenges Us To Consider How Much Of Life Is Intertwined

Nominally an environmental and social history of the Galápagos Islands, it lays bare the entangled issues confronting us as we attempt conservation efforts while facing a sweeping ecological crisis. (Image credit: Education Images/Universal Image)

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Controversial Russian law to control internet enters force

A controversial law that would allow Russia to cut internet traffic from international servers came into force Friday, prompting fears from rights activists of online isolation.

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'Call of Duty: Modern Warfare' Has Nothing Interesting to Say

The latest title in the franchise fails to interrogate the realities of combat.

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2-minute screening flags suicide risk for kids in ER

A new screening tool used in pediatric emergency rooms appears to provide an accurate gauge of children's risk for suicide, researchers report. The tool, which Johns Hopkins Medicine implemented in its pediatric emergency department six years ago, has identified more than 2,000 patients who might benefit from mental health treatment and resources, according to a new study. The authors suggest tha

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Quarter of all pigs worldwide could die from swine fever, animal health organization says

At least a quarter of the world's pig population could die as a mass outbreak of African swine fever spreads, a global animal health organization says.

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Quarter of all pigs worldwide could die from swine fever, animal health organization says

At least a quarter of the world's pig population could die as a mass outbreak of African swine fever spreads, a global animal health organization says.

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November 2019 Interactive Crossword Puzzle

Try your hand at a sciency brain teaser.

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Variability in the molecules of life

How variable are gene transcripts and proteins, the molecules of life, across the tissues and organs of the human body? Furthermore, how variable are they within the same tissue type from different people? Understanding this variability will be key for the realization of personalized medicine. These questions are the focus of a new study led by researchers from Uppsala University, which is publish

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Image: Halloween crack in the Brunt ice shelf

The Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission takes us over cracks in the Brunt ice shelf, which lies in the Weddell Sea sector of Antarctica.

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Variability in the molecules of life

How variable are gene transcripts and proteins, the molecules of life, across the tissues and organs of the human body? Furthermore, how variable are they within the same tissue type from different people? Understanding this variability will be key for the realization of personalized medicine. These questions are the focus of a new study led by researchers from Uppsala University, which is publish

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Dutch emission reduction targets probably won't be met

The Netherlands is unlikely to reach its target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 49% by 2030 despite a tough package of measures agreed in June, a government agency said Friday.

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River deltas are 'drowning,' threatening hundreds of millions of people

The world's river deltas take up less than 0.5 percent of the global land area, but they are home to hundreds of millions of people. Many live in major fast-growing cities such as Kolkata in the Ganges delta, Bangkok in the Chao Phraya delta, or Shanghai, one of dozens of large cities in the Yangtze delta region.

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Value chain collaboration in new product development yields innovativeness and performance

Businesses looking for a cutting edge with their new products when facing technological turbulence benefit from greater innovativeness and better results for both the product and the companies overall when working with other firms in the same value chain.

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Doubt Anyone Who's Confident That Facebook Should Ban Political Ads

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey announced Wednesday that the social-media platform he runs will no longer allow political advertising. The company has reached the judgment that "political message reach should be earned," as when people decide to follow or retweet a politician, rather than "bought," as with targeted political ads. Commercial ads are fine, he argued. But political ads, which "can be used t

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The Books Briefing: Let's Talk About Death

The Mexican holiday Día de Muertos, marked by processions and other festivities in which families honor dead loved ones and celebrate the cycle of life, takes place this weekend. For those who participate, the Day of the Dead can be an annual reminder that death comes to everyone, and that it isn't necessarily something to fear. Among medical practitioners in the United States, however, such fran

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Moffitt researchers identify a mechanism controlling tumor cell recognition by immune cells

Immunotherapy has become a standard treatment approach for several types of cancer, including melanoma. However, tumors can escape immune cell detection even with the use of immunotherapies. In a new study published in Cancer Immunology Research, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with the University of Miami's Miller School of Medicine, describe a cellular mechanism that controls

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Four decades of data sounds early warning on Lake George

Although concentrations of chemicals and pollutants like salt and nutrients have increased in the deep waters of Lake George, they're still too low to harm the ecosystem at those depths, according to an analysis of nearly 40 years of data published Thursday in Limnology and Oceanography.

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Reversed halo signs manifest in septic pulmonary embolism due to IV drug use

According to an article published ahead-of-print in the January 2020 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), reversed halo signs were frequently observed on the chest CT scans of patients with IV substance use disorder-related septic pulmonary embolism.

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A new material for regenerative medicine capable of controlling cell immune response

Scientists at Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the University of Montana (USA) proposed a promising new material for regenerative medicine for recovery of damaged tissues and blood vessels. This is a 3-D scaffold, made of biodegradable material and filled with special inhibitors, which were also obtained at TPU. They literally turn off the work of enzymes, responsible for the inflammation

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A new spin on life's origin?

A research team at The University of Tokyo has reproducibly synthesized staircase-like supramolecules of a single handedness, or chirality, using standard laboratory equipment. By gradually removing the solvent from a rotating solution containing non-chiral precursors, they were able to produce helixes that twist preferentially in a particular direction. This research may lead to new and cheaper d

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Japan retailers to charge for plastic bags from 2020

Japanese retailers including supermarkets and convenience stores will be required to charge for plastic bags from next summer ahead of the Tokyo Olympics, a government panel agreed Friday.

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Brain size may predispose people to drinking more

Reduced brain size may suggest a genetic predisposition towards heavier alcohol consumption, according to new research. For years, researchers have observed a link between alcohol consumption and reduced brain volume and concluded that drinking can literally shrink the brain. But the new research turns that theory on its head. "Our results suggest that associations between alcohol consumption and

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A microscope can unmask a single atom's magnetic properties

Nature, Published online: 31 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03344-3 Tweaks to a widely used scientific tool allow it to detect spin, a fundamental quality of atoms and subatomic particles.

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Den matematiske opskrift på perfekte toner bliver udviklet af dansk forsker

PLUS. Dansk producent af strenge til musikinstrumenter får hjælp af studerende til videnskabelig metode, der skal finde den rette streng til det rette publikum.

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The Millennial Booze Fatigue Syndrome

"I'm sick of finding meaning in alcohol," says 24-year-old Connor Hunter-Kysor from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He's not alone—many Millennials are similarly disenchanted with America's culture around alcohol. But has it caused them to change their drinking habits? In a new episode of The Idea File , staff writer Amanda Mull discusses her widely read investigation into the changing mores around alc

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How Friendship Changes at the End of Life

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week, she talks with two women who met through the nontheistic religion of Ethical Culture and have spent a significant amount of time ministering to aging and dying members of their congregation. They discuss how f

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New research explains why people with Down syndrome have spatial memory problems

Professor Juan Lerma's group, from the UMH-CSIC Institute of Neurosciences, in Alicante (Spain), has identified the gene called GRIK1, fundamental in the balance between excitation and inhibition in the brain, as one of the causes for people with Down syndrome having spatial orientation problems.

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New study sheds light on conditions that trigger supernovae explosions

For the first time, researchers were able to demonstrate the process of detonation formation using both experiments and numerical simulations carried out on supercomputers.

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One in four oncologists fails to mention cost when discussing genomic testing

Nearly one in four oncologists discussing genomic testing with their patients rarely or never discusses the costs of testing, according to a new study led by American Cancer Society investigators.

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Don’t cancel your Apple TV Plus trial until it’s almost over

Illustrations by Alex Castro / The Verge Apple TV Plus launches today, and Apple has a pretty slick limited time deal: buy a new iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, Apple TV, or Mac, and …

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One Free Press Coalition Spotlights Journalists Under Attack

The focus in November is on four murdered journalists, whose killers have not been held to account.

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How proteins stabilize and repair broken DNA

New research shows how some types of proteins stabilize damaged DNA and thereby preserve DNA function and integrity. Two proteins called 53BP1 and RIF1 engage to build a three-dimensional "scaffold" around the broken DNA strands. This scaffold then locally concentrates special repair proteins, which are in short supply, and that are critically needed to repair DNA without mistakes. "This could be

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Flying Cars, Aerial Ridesharing, and the Not-Too-Distant Future of Transport

In 2018, for the sixth straight year, Los Angeles earned the dubious honor of being the most gridlocked metropolis in the world, where the average driver spends 2.5 working weeks per year trapped in traffic. And countless cities are close behind. For the average driver, dreams of being elevated above jammed freeways and flying—uninterrupted—to one's destination seem well out of reach. Yet these v

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Bourbon or Scotch? A droplet's dynamics reveal the truth

Nature, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03333-6 A whisky's country of origin can be gleaned from the residue of an evaporated droplet.

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Cannabis use disorder is declining among young adolescents and young adults

The prevalence of cannabis use disorder decreased in 2002 to 2016 among frequent users. Changes in social attitudes and the traits of frequent users may explain the decline, according to researchers. This is one of the first studies to examine the general health profile of people using cannabis daily or almost daily and the trends in the prevalence of cannabis use disorder in this population.

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Sponge-like 2D material with interesting electrical conductivity and magnetic properties

Researchers synthesize a new 2D Metal Organic Framework with an ever-growing list of possible applications.

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System provides cooling with no electricity

Imagine a device that can sit outside under blazing sunlight on a clear day, and without using any power cool things down by more than 23 degrees Fahrenheit (13 degrees Celsius). It almost sounds like magic, but a new system can do exactly that.

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Food waste in tourism is a bigger issue than previously thought

There are major gaps in how food waste in tourism is understood and calculated, according to researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Southern California. Food waste originating from hotels, restaurants and events is recognised and can be estimated and calculated, but as the tourism industry is becoming more and more diverse, so are the sources of its food waste.

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Low blood oxygen strongly increases sick children's risk of death

Low blood oxygen is more common in sick children than previously thought, and strongly increases children's risk of death, Australian-led research has found.

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Value chain collaboration in new product development yields innovativeness and performance

Businesses looking for a cutting edge in new products find greater innovativeness and better performance of both product and company overall when working with other firms in the same value chain.

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Here's something that will raise your blood pressure

The apelin receptor (APJ) has been presumed to play an important role in the contraction of blood vessels involved in blood pressure regulation. A University of Tsukuba-led research team found that APJ was closely associated with hypertension through effects on vascular smooth muscle cells in laboratory mice. In addition, APJ worked synergistically with the α1A-adrenergic receptor to cause vasocon

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Delayed gratification and the quest to bridge the person-situation debate

Are behaviors innate, or are they shaped by our surroundings? David Epstein poses this question as he examines the person-situation debate through the lens of the famed marshmallow test, an experiment in the self-control of children. Simple strategies can be taught to help delay gratification, which suggests our personality traits can undergo change depending on context. Range: Why Generalists Tr

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"Blade Runner" Was Set This Month. Where Are Our Flying Cars?

In 1982, director Ridley Scott graced the world with "Blade Runner," the cult-favorite sci-fi film noir that painted a stunning picture of a bleak, distant future: November 2019. Since that starts, well, today, let's compare our current timeline to the one in "Blade Runner." Just please don't bring back those insufferable jokes about hoverboards that flooded the internet in 2015 when we hit the f

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Heavy smoking can have a damaging effect on facial ageing, study shows

Heavy smoking may have a causal effect on facial ageing, according to new research led by the University of Bristol. The study searched across 18,000 traits from the UK Biobank cohort to identify those that may be affected by how heavily someone smokes. As well as recognising several known adverse effects such as on lung health, the research also found heavy smoking could influence appearance.

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Evidence of cross-species filovirus transmission from bats to humans

Virus spillover may be occurring between bats and humans in Nagaland, India, according to a new collaborative study by the National Centre of Biological Sciences (NCBS) in India, Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore, and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) in the USA. The study published in the scientific journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, reaffirms the importan

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Numerical evidence for the merger of MOTSs inside a binary black hole

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Rochester Institute of Technology and the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics have recently gathered strong numerical evidence for a new phenomenon that takes place in the interior of binary black holes. In their study, published in Physical Review Letters, they collected observations that could offer exciting new insight i

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The scientists who are creating a bio-internet of things

The internet of things connects devices across the globe. Now researchers are considering how bacteria can join the network.

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Danske forskere har knækket koden til at fremstille nye fluorescerende farvestoffer

Nye fluorescerende farvestoffer, der er robuste, stabile og nemme at fabrikere, kan være på vej til biotekforskernes palet.

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Watch an AI Turn Music Into a Brain-Melting Visualization

Neural Synesthesia Synesthesia is the rare condition when our senses melt together — some say they can hear colors, others that they can taste words. But what if we let the senses of an artificial intelligence overlap instead? Belgium-based machine learning researcher and educator Xander Steenbrugge has developed a neural network that can turn music into trippy visualizations. It's an impressive

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Worldwide observations confirm nearby 'lensing' exoplanet

Researchers using telescopes around the world confirmed and characterized an exoplanet orbiting a nearby star through a rare phenomenon known as gravitational microlensing. The exoplanet has a mass similar to Neptune, but it orbits a star lighter (cooler) than the Sun at an orbital radius similar to Earth's orbital radius. The results of this research suggest that Neptune-sized planets could be co

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A new material for regenerative medicine capable to control cell immune response

Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the University of Montana (USA) proposed a new promising material for regenerative medicine for recovery of damaged tissues and blood vessels. This is a 3D scaffold, made of biodegradable material and filled with special inhibitors, which were also obtained at TPU. They literally turn off the work of enzymes, responsible for the inflammation

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A new spin on life's origin?

University of Tokyo researchers used a rotary evaporator to coax non-chiral molecules to form supermolecules of a specific helicity. This work may be used to synthesize cheaper pharmaceuticals, and also explain how the handedness of biomolecules originated.

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1989

I have an anniversary to celebrate this time of year: it's now been thirty years since I started work in industrial drug discovery. Given the state of the industry over that time, just being able to say that at all has called for some luck and some flexibility along the way, but I'm very glad to still be at it. What were the drug labs like in the fall of ? For equipment, I can think of two big di

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Climate models and geology reveal new insights into the East Asian monsoon

A team of scientists have used climate models and geological records to better understand changes in the East Asian monsoon over long geologic time scales.

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Imposters could pose as a relative using your DNA info

Using a site called GEDmatch that connects potential relatives based on genetic testing results, a malicious user could construct a fake genetic profile to impersonate someone's relative, researchers report. DNA testing services like 23andMe, Ancestry.com, and MyHeritage are making it easier for people to learn about their ethnic heritage and genetic makeup. People can also use genetic testing re

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Withings Move ECG Review: It Keeps Tabs on Your Heart

Even if you don't have a heart condition, the Move ECG watch is a useful, affordable fitness tracker.

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Opinion: Don't Let a Tech Slowdown Threaten Our Military

The right software and digital engineering can take military aircraft back to the future.

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What you might have missed

The likely homeland of modern humans, decoding abstract thoughts, and humanoid robots – here are some highlights from a week in science.

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New Experimental EV Battery Design Can Charge in Just 10 Minutes

A new style of battery could let electric cars charge quickly. Credit: Yang Wang Group Battery technology has finally reached the point that you can drive an electric vehicle without constant range anxiety, but you still have to plan ahead for charging. Even Teslas, which charge faster than other EVs, need almost an hour to fill up completely at a SuperCharger. Researchers from Penn State Univers

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Drug cocktail proves toxic to leukemia

A combination of drugs that affect mitochondria—the power plants inside cells—may become the best weapons yet to fight acute myeloid leukemia, according to new research. Researchers found that mitocans, anti-cancer drugs that target mitochondria, are particularly adept at killing leukemia cells, especially when combined with a glycolytic inhibitor, while leaving healthy blood cells in the same sa

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Quality over quantity! Interval walking training improves fitness and health in elderly individuals

Interval Walking Training is a method that is effective in increasing overall fitness and decreasing healthcare costs associated with lifestyle-related diseases of the middle-aged and elderly. High-intensity walking time is the key. Participants who walk longer at 70% or more of their maximum capacity see improvements in health and fitness. 50 minutes a week is what one needs to see peak aerobic c

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Differences in human and non-human primate saliva may be caused by diet

Humans are known to be genetically similar to our primate relatives. But major differences can be found in our saliva, according to new research by scientists at the Forsyth Institute and the University of Buffalo.

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New ranavirus threatens US amphibian diversity

Biologists modeled how a chimeric Frog virus 3 (FV3)-like ranavirus, also known as RCV-Z2, could spread rapidly throughout a population of North American wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) tadpoles.

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Rice yields plummet and arsenic rises in future climate-soil scenarios

Research combining future climate conditions and arsenic-induced soil stresses predicts rice yields could decline about 40 percent by 2100, a loss that would impact about 2 billion people dependent on the global crop.

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How measles wipes out the body's immune memory

A new study shows that measles wipes out 20 to 50 percent of antibodies against an array of viruses and bacteria, depleting a child's previous immunity. A measles-ravaged immune system must 'relearn' how to protect the body against infections. The study details the mechanism and scope of this measles-induced 'immune amnesia.' The findings underscore the importance of measles vaccination, suggestin

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Three-drug combo improves lung function in most common genetic form of cystic fibrosis

A phase three clinical trial determined that a 3-drug combination improved lung function and reduced symptoms in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients who have a single copy of the most common genetic mutation for the disease.

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Are we 'brainwashed' during sleep?

A new study illustrates that the brain's cerebrospinal fluid pulses during sleep, and that these motions are closely tied with brain wave activity and blood flow. It may confirm the hypothesis that CSF flow and slow-wave activity both help flush toxic, memory-impairing proteins from the brain.

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An astronaut smart glove to explore the moon, Mars and beyond

The NASA Haughton-Mars Project (HMP) and collaborating organizations SETI Institute, Mars Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, Collins Aerospace, and Ntention are announcing the successful field test of an "astronaut smart glove" for future human exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond. The smart glove is a prototype for a human-machine interface (HuMI) that would allow astronauts to wirelessly

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'Decoy' implants could replace dangerous cancer biopsies

Taking samples from a tiny "decoy" implant just beneath the skin could replace invasive procedures to biopsy tissue from cancer-tainted organs, new research in mice shows. These devices have a knack for attracting cancer cells traveling through the body . In fact, they can even pick up signs that cancer is preparing to spread, before cancer cells arrive. "Biopsying an organ like the lung is a ris

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The largest seabirds in the North Atlantic travel hundreds of miles just to catch food

Gannets, the largest seabirds in the North Atlantic, can travel hundreds of miles from their homes just to catch food for their chicks. However, with around a million square miles of ocean to choose from, it has always been a mystery how they decide where is best to search for fish.

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Artificial cell division a step closer to reality

Researchers at TU Delft have succeeded in replicating a biological mechanism that is essential for cell division in bacteria in the lab. The research is an important step within a larger project with the ultimate goal of creating a fully artificial cell that can sustain and divide itself. The researchers have published their findings in Nature Communications.

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Soil bacteria found to use several approaches in 'suppressive soils' to protect plants

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in The Netherlands and two in Brazil has discovered how some soil bacteria protect crops against a fungal disease. In their paper published in the journal Science, they describe their transcriptional analysis of several types of soil bacteria. Susannah Tringe with the U.S. DOE's Joint Genome Institute, has published a Perspective piece in

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Echolocation found to be cheap for deep-diving whales

A new international study led by Aarhus University in Denmark, in collaboration with the Universities of St Andrews and La Laguna, Tenerife, reveals how whales have evolved to live in the world's deepest oceans.

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New monitoring technque lets your remotely operated vehicle do the snorkelling

They have been trialling their new method, which involves using Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) as a monitoring tool, at Macquarie's Marine Conservation and Management, and Advanced Marine Conservation and Management Master's degree courses, run at Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef.

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Ancient gas cloud shows that the first stars must have formed very quickly

Astronomers led by Eduardo Bañados of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy have discovered a gas cloud that contains information about an early phase of galaxy and star formation, merely 850 million years after the Big Bang. The cloud was found serendipitously during observations of a distant quasar, and it has the properties that astronomers expect from the precursors of modern-day dwarf galaxi

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The largest seabirds in the North Atlantic travel hundreds of miles just to catch food

Gannets, the largest seabirds in the North Atlantic, can travel hundreds of miles from their homes just to catch food for their chicks. However, with around a million square miles of ocean to choose from, it has always been a mystery how they decide where is best to search for fish.

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Cage molecules act as molecular sieves for hydrogen isotope separation

A new hybrid material developed by scientists at the University of Liverpool may bring the dream of carbon-free nuclear fusion power a step closer.

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Researchers build a silicon-graphene-germanium transistor for future THz operation

In 1947, the first transistor, a bipolar junction transistor (BJT), was invented in the Bell Laboratory and has since led to the age of information technology. In recent decades, there has been a persistent demand for higher frequency operation for a BJT, leading to the inventions of new devices such as heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBT) and hot electron transistors (HET). The HBTs have enab

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Artificial cell division a step closer to reality

Researchers at TU Delft have succeeded in replicating a biological mechanism that is essential for cell division in bacteria in the lab. The research is an important step within a larger project with the ultimate goal of creating a fully artificial cell that can sustain and divide itself. The researchers have published their findings in Nature Communications.

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Soil bacteria found to use several approaches in 'suppressive soils' to protect plants

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in The Netherlands and two in Brazil has discovered how some soil bacteria protect crops against a fungal disease. In their paper published in the journal Science, they describe their transcriptional analysis of several types of soil bacteria. Susannah Tringe with the U.S. DOE's Joint Genome Institute, has published a Perspective piece in

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Echolocation found to be cheap for deep-diving whales

A new international study led by Aarhus University in Denmark, in collaboration with the Universities of St Andrews and La Laguna, Tenerife, reveals how whales have evolved to live in the world's deepest oceans.

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New monitoring technque lets your remotely operated vehicle do the snorkelling

They have been trialling their new method, which involves using Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) as a monitoring tool, at Macquarie's Marine Conservation and Management, and Advanced Marine Conservation and Management Master's degree courses, run at Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef.

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Ötzi the Iceman's Unfortunate Last Journey Possibly Uncovered

The mummified body of Ötzi the Iceman was discovered alongside 75 different species of mosses and liverworts, some of which he carried with him.

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Did Body Cameras Backfire?

In 2014, when Police Officer Darren Wilson fatally shot an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown on a street in Ferguson, Missouri, police brutality rocketed to the center of the national discourse on race. Law enforcement needed more accountability, activists argued, and body cameras became the state's preferred corrective. The Obama administration's Department of Justice offered more than

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Musk Wants the Moon by 2022

From SpaceX we get the following statement: "Aspirationally, we want to get Starship to orbit within a year. We definitely want to land it on the Moon before 2022. We want to […] stage cargo there to make sure that there are resources for the folks that ultimately land on the Moon by 2024, if things go well, so that's the aspirational time frame." That is quite aspirational. People have mixed fee

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Seismology in the service of peace

Twenty years ago, Switzerland ratified the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. This important agreement is based on a sophisticated network that makes it possible to monitor compliance with the treaty.

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Involving kids in making schools sustainable spreads the message beyond the classroom

The recent student-led climate protests reflect the need for schools to provide opportunities to nurture their students' global, environmentally conscious minds. Modern education isn't only about teaching kids the traditional concepts of say, English and Mathematics—it is also about helping to develop confident adults and informed citizens.

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Gadget Lab Podcast: AirPods Pro, Smart Speaker Privacy

On this week's podcast, we talk about Apple's new AirPods, why they cost so much, and how they are impacting our culture.

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Stalaktitter, korrosion og revnede søjler: Se billeder fra afspærret rutebilstation

PLUS. Ingeniøren har fået aktindsigt i den visuelle inspektion, som fik Aarhus Kommune til straks at lukke parkeringskælder og busholdeplads.

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Burning Questions: The Role of Inflammation in Disease

Download this poster from The Scientist's Creative Services Division to learn more about the double-edged sword that is inflammation!

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Image of the Day: Zebrafish Olfactory Epithelium

Studies of the rosette-like structure can reveal clues to brain recovery after injury.

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Sustainability of new creosote alternative confirmed

A recently published study has confirmed the sustainability credentials of a new biobased alternative to creosote that is being developed in the Bio4Products project. The use of wood modification based on pyrolysis oil was shown to contribute 82% less greenhouse gas emissions compared to fossil-based creosotes. Due to lower toxicity it is also 7.4 times less damaging to human health.

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Sustainability of new creosote alternative confirmed

A recently published study has confirmed the sustainability credentials of a new biobased alternative to creosote that is being developed in the Bio4Products project. The use of wood modification based on pyrolysis oil was shown to contribute 82% less greenhouse gas emissions compared to fossil-based creosotes. Due to lower toxicity it is also 7.4 times less damaging to human health.

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Is your drinking water safe?

From Legionella bacteria and non-tuberculous mycobacteria, safe transport of mains water depends on best practice and good policy, environmental health experts say.

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Changing the soil the key to reducing childhood lead exposure

The link between Port Pirie's lead smelter emissions and childhood health issues is well documented, but a new study reveals a possible solution for reducing childhood lead exposure—amending the soil.

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Papkort til NemID smides på porten fra 2021

Om lidt over et år skal danskerne sige farvel til både NemID og et fysisk papkort, når Digitaliseringsstyrelsen begynder at indkøre afløseren, MitID.

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It's not 'wild dog' management—we are just killing dingoes

Dingo or just wild dog? A new study busts the misconception that pure dingoes are extinct in NSW—and finds several 'dingo hotspots' around the state.

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Victorian scientists thought they'd found an explanation for ghosts—but the public didn't want to hear it

As the film Ghostbusters showed, true believers in the supernatural rarely prosper in the scientific establishment. Throughout history, scientists who entertained theories on ghosts, magic and the afterlife were discredited by their peers and condemned for tarnishing the rational foundations of the discipline. Even Isaac Newton carefully downplayed his interest in alchemy to preserve his reputatio

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Food waste in tourism is a bigger issue than previously thought

There are major gaps in how food waste in tourism is understood and calculated, according to researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Southern California. Food waste originating from hotels, restaurants and events is recognised and can be estimated and calculated, but as the tourism industry is becoming more and more diverse, so are the sources of its food waste.

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It's not 'wild dog' management—we are just killing dingoes

Dingo or just wild dog? A new study busts the misconception that pure dingoes are extinct in NSW—and finds several 'dingo hotspots' around the state.

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Oxygen in old rocks reveals new details of its own early history on Earth

Despite bearing witness to its own increase in Earth's atmosphere by around 2.5 to 2.3 billion years ago, oxygen has had relatively little to say about its own early history until now. A recent EU-funded study provides a fresh perspective on one of Earth history's most significant stories—the rise of oxygen.

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Worldwide observations confirm nearby 'lensing' exoplanet

Researchers using telescopes around the world confirmed and characterized an exoplanet orbiting a nearby star through a rare phenomenon known as gravitational microlensing. The exoplanet has a mass similar to Neptune, but it orbits a star lighter (cooler) than the Sun at an orbital radius similar to Earth's orbital radius. Around cool stars, this orbital region is thought to be the birth place of

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What drives circadian rhythms in the polar regions?

In temperate latitudes, the right timing is crucial for almost all living things: Plants sprout with the advent of spring, bees know the best times to visit flowers, people get tired in the evening and wake up again in the morning. The constant change between light and dark is the rhythm to which all living beings must adapt if they want to survive and reproduce. Circadian clocks regulate the time

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Delving deeper into the response of plants to drought

Drought has plagued agriculture for centuries. Scientists suspect the reason plants survive under drought may have something to do with the plant's genetic programming and metabolic activities. A recent study delved deeper into the metabolic underpinnings of plants to understand what happens when they undergo prolonged drought stress to the point of mortality.

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Genetic patterns associated with plant immunity

Genomic information from plants can be used to enhance agricultural production and improve food security in a sustainable manner. Through better understanding of the relationship between a plant's genetic information and the resulting behavior, improved crops with better traits (resistance to diseases, tolerance to drought, etc.) can be developed. This can be achieved through cross pollinating pla

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Researchers find new signaling systems in human cells

One-third of all approved drugs target the same family of receptors: the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Now, researchers from the University of Copenhagen, along with two American labs, have expanded the known network of peptides that activate GPCRs by 19 percent.

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Study aims at boosting antitumoral activity of compound extracted from an Amazon plant

Researchers in Brazil have prepared modified forms of the alkaloids produced by Uncaria guianensis, a woody vine native to the Amazon Rainforest.

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What drives circadian rhythms in the polar regions?

In temperate latitudes, the right timing is crucial for almost all living things: Plants sprout with the advent of spring, bees know the best times to visit flowers, people get tired in the evening and wake up again in the morning. The constant change between light and dark is the rhythm to which all living beings must adapt if they want to survive and reproduce. Circadian clocks regulate the time

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Delving deeper into the response of plants to drought

Drought has plagued agriculture for centuries. Scientists suspect the reason plants survive under drought may have something to do with the plant's genetic programming and metabolic activities. A recent study delved deeper into the metabolic underpinnings of plants to understand what happens when they undergo prolonged drought stress to the point of mortality.

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Genetic patterns associated with plant immunity

Genomic information from plants can be used to enhance agricultural production and improve food security in a sustainable manner. Through better understanding of the relationship between a plant's genetic information and the resulting behavior, improved crops with better traits (resistance to diseases, tolerance to drought, etc.) can be developed. This can be achieved through cross pollinating pla

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Study aims at boosting antitumoral activity of compound extracted from an Amazon plant

Researchers in Brazil have prepared modified forms of the alkaloids produced by Uncaria guianensis, a woody vine native to the Amazon Rainforest.

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Researchers find new signaling systems in human cells

One-third of all approved drugs target the same family of receptors: the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Now, researchers from the University of Copenhagen, along with two American labs, have expanded the known network of peptides that activate GPCRs by 19 percent.

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How a Man's Fecal Transplant Turned Fatal

The patient developed a fatal infection from antibiotic-resistant E. coli bacteria.

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Sundhedsøkonom: Der er meget lidt evidens bag effektiviseringskrav

Dokumentationen bag krav om effektiviseringer på supersygehusene er begrænset, siger professor i sundhedsøkonomi. Han er bekymret for, om det nye hospital i Odense kan leve op til kravet på otte procent. Vi skal nok lykkes, siger hospitalsdirektør.

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Vampire bats make 'friends' — and keep them close

Nature, Published online: 31 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03286-w Bats that shared blood and groomed each other preserved their ties even after a change of residence.

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Svart hål kretsar kring röd jättestjärna

En internationell forskargrupp har upptäckt ett säreget objekt som kretsar kring en röd jättestjärna. Himlakroppen är osynlig men har ändå en stark påverkan på stjärnans bana. Med hjälp av datorsimuleringar utförda vid Lunds universitet kan forskarna nu slå fast att den mystiska följeslagaren måste vara ett svart hål. Jättestjärnan befinner sig omkring 10 000 ljusår från solen. Den är 30 gånger s

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We Are the Weather — how to save the planet?

Jonathan Safran Foer asks: what will it take to spur us to act in a crisis that feels distant?

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Share your science career story in Nature

Nature, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03369-8 We welcome contributions that offer advice and support to our global community of scientists across academia, industry and other sectors. Here's the best way to get in touch.

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The F-Word Finally Enters Climate Politics

For the first time, presidential candidates are no longer scared to say "fossil fuels" (okay, that's two f-words) — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Let's Unravel the Time Travel Paradox of *Terminator: Dark Fate*

If you apply the Novikov self-consistency principle to the franchise, it holds up—until it doesn't.

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Wildfire Chasers Are the New Tornado Chasers

A strike team of specially trained researchers drive a highly sophisticated truck into the literal line of fire. Their mission: unravel the extreme complexities of wildfire.

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A Child Got His Tongue Stuck in a Bottle. Doctors Freed It with This Ingenious Method

When a boy's tongue became stubbornly stuck in a juice bottle neck, a doctor had a unique idea to get it unstuck.

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'One of the greatest finds': experts shed light on Staffordshire hoard

First major academic research finds 'war hoard' probably captured in battles between regional kingdoms When an amateur metal detectorist first heard his machine beep in an unpromising field in Lichfield in July 2009 and dug down to uncover gold , it was clear this was no ordinary archaeological discovery. But who had collected the astonishing stash of gold, garnet weapons and ornaments he had fou

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The F-Word Finally Enters Climate Politics

For the first time, presidential candidates are no longer scared to say "fossil fuels" (okay, that's two f-words) — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Deep Sleep Gives Your Brain a Deep Clean

Slow-wave activity during dreamless slumber helps wash out neural detritus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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They Didn't Find Life in a Hopeless Place

In some of the world's saltiest, most acidic bodies of superheated water, even the most extreme forms of archaea couldn't survive.

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In the Blue Holes of the Bahamas, Secrets of Hurricanes Past

Scientists assembled a 1,500-year history of big storm activity by retrieving sediment from the island country's submarine caverns.

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Politiets nyeste værktøj sænker risikoen for tilfældige dna-match med en faktor 500.000.000

PLUS. Overgangen fra et såkaldt 10-dna-system til et 16-dna-system har forstærket sandsynligheden for korrekte dna-match markant, viser beregning fra Aalborg Universitet. Men risikoen for tilfældige sammenfald vil altid være der.

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Deep Sleep Gives Your Brain a Deep Clean

Slow-wave activity during dreamless slumber helps wash out neural detritus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Deep Sleep Gives Your Brain a Deep Clean

Slow-wave activity during dreamless slumber helps wash out neural detritus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In a picture: 'Not enough people are aware of this monster'

Professor Guillermo Rein, a fire scientist, tells Horizon why smouldering peatland fires are so dangerous and why we know so little about them.

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Arbetstiderna som deprimerar

Den nya långtidsstudien från Stressforskningsinstitutet är en av de första i sitt slag. – I andra studier ser vi ofta en förenkling av vad skiftarbete är. Det finns en tendens att klumpa ihop det till bara en sak, men egentligen är det någonting väldigt komplicerat, säger Amy Hall, en av forskarna bakom studien som nu är publicerad i tidskriften BMJ Open.

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Vicedirektør: Vi sender mere end hver fjerde psykiatriske henvisning retur

Praktiserende læger fremhæver psykiatrien som et område, det er særligt vanskeligt at henvise til. Vicedirektør i psykiatriledelsen i Region Sjælland er ikke overrasket. »Vi har været nødt til at fokusere vores indsats.«

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Etisk Råd: Problematisk, der står diabetes på din virtuelle sundhedsprofil

Borgernes sundhedsoplysninger ender i stigende grad i kløerne på tech-firmaer. Det giver problemer, når data samkøres, og der kan tegnes virtuelle profiler af risikoen for sygdomme som eksempelvis diabetes. Løsningen er, at sundhedsapps certificeres, mener Det Etiske Råd.

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Evidence of cross-species filovirus transmission from bats to humans

Virus spillover—the transmission of viruses from one species to another—may be occurring between bats and humans in Nagaland, India, according to a new collaborative study by the National Centre of Biological Sciences (NCBS) in India, Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore, and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) in the U.S.. The study published in the scientific journal

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Evidence of cross-species filovirus transmission from bats to humans

Virus spillover—the transmission of viruses from one species to another—may be occurring between bats and humans in Nagaland, India, according to a new collaborative study by the National Centre of Biological Sciences (NCBS) in India, Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore, and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) in the U.S.. The study published in the scientific journal

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Forskare gräver i historien efter klimatsmarta lösningar

Att stänga av kylskåpet på vintern, hyra ett frysfack eller köpa mer konserver och pulverprodukter. Det kan låta märkligt idag men Matilda Marshall, forskare i måltidsvetenskap vid Örebro universitet, undersöker om vi kan lära av historien för att bli klimatsmarta. – Det är värt att fundera på om det finns förändringar vi kan göra. Vi vet till exempel att vitvaror drar mest el i hemmet och att en

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Epithelial CD47 is critical for mucosal repair in the murine intestine in vivo

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12968-y The role of the transmembrane glycoprotein CD47 in healing injured intestinal mucosa is unclear. Here, the authors show that selective loss of CD47 in the murine intestinal epithelium results in defective mucosal repair after colonic wounding, with suggested impaired cell migration in vitro.

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Conditional quorum-sensing induction of a cyanide-insensitive terminal oxidase stabilizes cooperating populations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13013-8 Quorum sensing (QS) regulates production of 'public goods' by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which releases toxic hydrogen cyanide to constrain QS-deficient cheaters. Here, Yan et al. show that QS-proficient strains protect themselves by producing a cyanide-insensitive enzyme in response to reactive oxygen species

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Synergized regulation of NK cell education by NKG2A and specific Ly49 family members

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13032-5 MHC-I-induced signalling of various natural killer (NK) inhibitory receptors is critical for regulation NK cell education, but clear genetic evidence is still lacking. Here the authors generate multiple lines of mice differentially deficient in Ly49 family and/or NKG2A NK receptors, and find that self-MHCI s

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Rapid mechanochemical encapsulation of biocatalysts into robust metal–organic frameworks

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12966-0 Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are attractive for encapsulating enzymes for industrial purposes because they can increase selectivity, stability, and/or activity of the enzymes. Here, the authors developed an economical solid-state mechanochemical method to encapsulate enzymes during MOF synthesis.

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Essentiality of fatty acid synthase in the 2D to anchorage-independent growth transition in transforming cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13028-1 The mechanisms associated with fatty acid synthase (FASN) upregulation during transformation are unclear. Here, the authors report that FASN promotes anaplerotic shift of the Krebs cycle in cancer cells expressing various oncogenes, and that its inhibition before transformation prevents tumour development an

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Coherent control in the extreme ultraviolet and attosecond regime by synchrotron radiation

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12978-w Synchrotron light sources have wide range of tunable parameters like frequency, intensity. Here the authors demonstrate quantum control of Rydberg states of helium using delay controlled XUV wavepackets generated from synchrotron radiation.

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Disease transmission and introgression can explain the long-lasting contact zone of modern humans and Neanderthals

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12862-7 Modern humans and Neanderthals coexisted in the Levant for tens of thousands of years before modern humans spread and replaced Neanderthals. Here, Greenbaum et al. develop a model showing that transmission of disease and genes can explain the maintenance and then collapse of this contact zone.

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CXCR3 enables recruitment and site-specific bystander activation of memory CD8+ T cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12980-2 T cell bystander activation is induced by systemic inflammation. Here the authors show, using mouse model systems and correlating with human vaccination data, that localized inflammation elicits bystander activation, and that CXCR3 specifically recruits memory CD8+ T cells to sites of activated antigen-prese

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Rice yields plummet and arsenic rises in future climate-soil scenarios

Research combining future climate conditions and arsenic-induced soil stresses predicts rice yields could decline about 40 percent by 2100, a loss that would impact about 2 billion people dependent on the global crop.

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Online tool speeds response to elephant poaching by tracing ivory to source

A new tool uses an interactive database of geographic and genetic information to quickly identify where the confiscated tusks of African elephants were originally poached. It matches genetic sequences from poached ivory to those in the database. It relies on genetic information from a small, highly variable region of mitochondrial DNA from African elephants. This allows a more precise picture of t

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China rolls out 5G services in race to narrow tech gap

China's three major state telecom operators rolled out 5G wireless technology Thursday, as the country races to narrow its technology gap with the US amid a bruising trade war.

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The Impeachment Inquiry Is Fully Legitimate

In declaring the initiation of a formal impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump, Speaker Nancy Pelosi was solemn : "We're not here to call bluffs. We're here to find the truth, to uphold the Constitution of the United States. This is not a game for us; this is deadly serious." In the weeks since, she has upheld that intention: Three different committees of the House of Representatives,

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Lebanon Doesn't Need Heroes

Ten or even 20 years ago, the protests unfolding in Lebanon would have led news bulletins around the world—what is more compelling than large portions of the population of this small, schismatic, but strategic state united in optimism, standing together peacefully to overthrow decades of a dead-handed, morally bankrupt, sectarian kleptocracy? In a matter of days, the exasperated Lebanese proteste

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The Porch Pirate of Potrero Hill Can't Believe It Came to This

The first time Ganave Fairley got busted for stealing a neighbor's Amazon package, she was just another porch thief unlucky to be caught on tape. In August 2016, a 30-something product marketing manager at Google, expecting some deliveries, got an iPhone ping from his porch surveillance camera as it recorded a black woman in a neon hoodie plucking some bundles off his San Francisco stoop. After a

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CENP-A binding domains and recombination patterns in horse spermatocytes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52153-1

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Chaotic synchronization of two optical cavity modes in optomechanical systems

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51559-1

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A molecular detection approach for a cotton aphid-parasitoid complex in northern China

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52266-7

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Size and distribution of the iron oxide nanoparticles in SBA-15 nanoporous silica via SANS study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52417-w

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Effects of multiple stressors on river biofilms depend on the time scale

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52320-4

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Contrasting global, regional and local patterns of genetic structure in gray reef shark populations from the Indo-Pacific region

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52221-6

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Selective Priming of Tumor Blood Vessels by Radiation Therapy Enhances Nanodrug Delivery

Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50538-w

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A foie gras ban is long overdue – but what about other foods made from animal suffering? | Jacy Reese

Some aquatic animals, like fish and octopus, are chewed to death while still alive. Others are boiled alive, ripped or cut apart, or even salted to death On Wednesday the New York City Council passed a ban on foie gras – the French delicacy made by force-feeding ducks and geese – to go into effect in 2022. From the perspective of animal rights activists, this is a long time coming. Foie gras has

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Minister: Slut med at dispensere for brandkrav på plejehjem

Undersøgelse efter dødsbrande viser, at mange kommuner sløser med brandsikkerheden på plejehjem. Derfor fjerner boligminister Kaare Dybvad (S) nu muligheden for at give dispensationer for brandsikkerhedskrav

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PODCAST: Vi kan bedst lide robotter, der taler som Steve Jobs

Troværdige syntetiske stemmer er afgørende for, om vi ønsker at interagere med robotter. Om bare fem år kan faciliteter til fremstilling af grønt flybrændstof stå klar. Bygninger kan holde på varmen, hvis fjernvarmetemperaturen sænkes.

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Stem cell researchers have papers retracted for image manipulation

A group of dentistry researchers in Japan, whose work on stem cells has been the subject of an institutional investigation, have now lost two papers in PLOS ONE for image problems. The authors, from Aichi Gakuin University in Nagoya, were led by Makio Mogi, a medicinal biochemist at the school. Mogi asked for at least … Continue reading

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New Delhi schools shut because of toxic smog

An expert panel in India's capital has declared a health emergency due to air pollution choking the city, with authorities ordering schools closed until Nov. 5.

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Overblik: Sådan prioriterer regionerne psykiatrien i 2020

Landets regioner har vedtaget budgetterne for 2020, og psykiatrien er blevet prioriteret i alle budgetaftaler. Dagens Medicin giver her et overblik over psykiatriens plads i de regionale budgetter.

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Online tool speeds response to elephant poaching by tracing ivory to source

A new tool uses an interactive database of geographic and genetic information to help authorities quickly identify where the confiscated tusks of African elephants were originally poached.

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Rice yields plummet and arsenic rises in future climate-soil scenarios

Rice is the largest global staple crop, consumed by more than half the world's population—but new experiments from Stanford University suggest that with climate change, production in major rice-growing regions with endemic soil arsenic will undergo a dramatic decline and jeopardize critical food supplies.

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Online tool speeds response to elephant poaching by tracing ivory to source

A new tool uses an interactive database of geographic and genetic information to help authorities quickly identify where the confiscated tusks of African elephants were originally poached.

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Vi ved godt, alkohol er usundt. Men vi drikker alligevel: 'Alt bliver bare lidt nemmere'

Alkohol former vores sociale relationer, og derfor kan vi ikke holde fingrene fra det.

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Why Trust in Science Is Critical: Five Questions for Naomi Oreskes

"If we cannot answer the question of why we should trust science," writes science historian Naomi Oreskes, "then we stand little chance of convincing our fellow citizens, much less our political leaders, that they should get their children vaccinated, floss their teeth, and act to prevent climate change."

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Environmental protection

It seems our Government has environmental protection as the least of its priorities. It is left to citizens (me and you) to start practicing #environmentalprotection by first reducing plastic pollution. submitted by /u/richb3atz [link] [comments]

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The Search For Life Beyond Earth

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IBM challenges a recent result in quantum computing

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Researchers create quantum chip 1,000 times smaller than current setups

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Artificial intelligence and its ethics | DW Documentary

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Sundhedsøkonom: De svageste diabetespatienter tabes i sektorovergangene

Uligheden i sundhed forstærkes af sektorovergangene mellem kommune og region, påpeger professor i sundhedsøkonomi. KL og Danske Regioner skal blive bedre til at samarbejde, hvis der skal findes en løsning.

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Algoritme kan identificere patienter i høj risiko for bæltefiksering

Læge Andreas Aalkjær Danielsen har med en lang række data fra journaler og registre lavet en algoritme, der kan genkende mønstre for, hvornår en patient i høj risiko for bæltefiksering.

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Lawsuit accuses Facebook ad targeting of abetting bias

A lawsuit filed on Thursday accuses Facebook of letting ad targeting tools be used to exclude women and older people from offers regarding loans, investments and other financial services.

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Pete Buttigieg Isn't Going Anywhere

I t's not just you . Pete Buttigieg knows this is a little crazy, too. He knows it's crazy that, back in January, his campaign had to schedule his launch announcement at a hotel a few blocks from the White House to persuade enough reporters to cover it, and that now there's such a demand for his all-access bus tour this weekend, they have to rotate reporters in between stops. He knows it's crazy

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Meet the pigs that could solve the human organ transplant crisis

On a farm in Bavaria, German researchers are using gene editing to create pigs that could provide organs to save thousands of lives.

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Ultralyd kan forudse hjertekarsygdom hos personer med type 1-diabetes

Ultralyd kan afsløre stivhed i hjertemusklen, og det har en tæt sammenhæng med hjertekarsygdom og tidlig død, viser resultater fra et studie, som forskere fra Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen netop har fået publiceret i tidsskriftet Diabetologia.

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Energy giants face 35% output cut to hit Paris climate goals: watchdog

The biggest listed oil and gas giants must slash production by more than a third by 2040 to keep emissions within targets laid out in the landmark Paris climate deal, an industry watchdog said Friday.

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More fires and evacuations in weary California

Californian firefighters tackled fresh and fast-moving wildfires overnight Thursday, making headway against a number of major blazes that have forced mass evacuations and power cuts.

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Så ska kapitalförvaltare tänka om plast

Investerare måste ställa krav på plastföretag; hur plasten är producerad, designad, förpackad och hur den kan återvinnas. Brist på strategier för att bryta fossilberoendet utgör en risk för kapitalförvaltare som vill göra hållbara investeringar. Det visar en rapport från Lunds universitet och IVL. – Plastproduktion är otroligt komplext och svårt att förstå eftersom det involverar så många olika s

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The science of zombies: Will the undead rise?

Hordes of brain-munching undead terrorizing neighborhoods make for fun television and movies, but zombies could never be real… or could they?

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A new ranavirus threatens US amphibian diversity

Kudzu and emerald ash borer are widely known examples of an invasive plant and an invasive insect, respectively, that cause harm to our native plants. Their impacts are obvious in our landscapes. Not so well known are the invasive pathogens that are quietly decimating small, little noticed but ecologically important amphibians.

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The science of zombies: Will the undead rise?

Hordes of brain-munching undead terrorizing neighborhoods make for fun television and movies, but zombies could never be real… or could they?

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NASA gets infrared view of Atlantic Halloween subtropical storm

The latest addition to the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season developed quickly. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the eastern North Atlantic Ocean on Halloween and provided forecasters with an infrared view of Subtropical Storm Rebekah.

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A new ranavirus threatens US amphibian diversity

Kudzu and emerald ash borer are widely known examples of an invasive plant and an invasive insect, respectively, that cause harm to our native plants. Their impacts are obvious in our landscapes. Not so well known are the invasive pathogens that are quietly decimating small, little noticed but ecologically important amphibians.

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5 Facial Recognition Technology Trends and Market Predictions

submitted by /u/Harshitkansal [link] [comments]

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Nu byggs nya modeller inom prostatacancervården

Tillförlitligare PSA-prov, fusionsbiopsi, säkrare diagnos med hjälp av artificiell intelligens och nya läkemedel. –Jag tror inte på regelrätt screening men är övertygad om att vi kommer att genomföra organiserad PSA-testning i hela landet, säger Anders Bjartell, professor och överläkare i urologi vid Lunds universitet och Skånes universitetssjukhus.

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October's Spooky Space Pictures

Quiver at the sight of skeletal galaxies, stellar pumpkins and ghostly interstellar visitors. 2_crop_heic1919a.jpg Two galaxies collide in a pattern that resembles a frightening face with glowing eyes. Image credits: NASA, ESA, J. Dalcanton, B.F. Williams, and M. Durbin (University of Washington) Space Thursday, October 31, 2019 – 15:00 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) — This

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SDU vil være centrum for kvantematematik

Dansk matematiker får til opgave at opbygge et center for kvantefysikkens matematiske fundament, der skal måle sig med de allerbedste i verden.

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Climate policies 'will transform UK landscape'

Britain's countryside could be transformed by policies to combat climate change.

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Maternal Fluoride and IQ – The Scientific Community Pushes Back

A follow-up on a questionable study of the impact on water fluoridation and IQ. Science marches on, and we're helping it out!

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Sharp 80% rise in liver cancer deaths in UK

Increase due to several factors including deprivation and rise in obesity says Cancer Research UK Deaths from liver cancer in the UK have shot up in recent years, with a rise of almost 80% in numbers between 2007 to 2017, new figures reveal. Experts say there are several factors behind the rise, including the fact that more people are being diagnosed with the disease, which is notoriously difficu

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Should Britain Abolish Private Schools?

WINDSOR, England—Nestled in a historic town across the river Thames from Windsor Castle, Eton College resembles a small city-state more than a high-school campus. It boasts hundreds of buildings, half a dozen museums and galleries, and a reputation for cultivating the who's who of the British elite. Current and former prime ministers, lawmakers and judges, and countless others who make up this co

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The Crooks of CRUK

Cancer Research UK is a charity which relies on donations, volunteer work and fundraising. What if these citizens knew their money goes to fund bad science?

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Mæslinger knuser kroppens evne til at bekæmpe andre sygdomme

En undersøgelse af uvaccinerede børn viser, at mæslinger ødelægger immunsystemets hukommelse.

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Nordjyske hjertepatienter tilbydes screening for diabetes

Tilbud om screening for diabetes til patienter med iskæmisk hjertesygdom er en realitet i Aalborg, og et tilsvarende initiativ er etableret i Hjørring. Målet er at finde flest muligt patienter med kendt eller nyopdaget diabetes.

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Endless Versions of You in Endless Parallel Universes? A Growing Number of Physicists Embrace the Idea.

The Many Worlds Interpretation of quantum mechanics holds that reality is constantly splitting, creating many versions of physicist Sean Carroll–and everything else. (Credit: Bill Youngblood/Corey S. Powell) Conventionally speaking, there is a single physicist named Sean Carroll at Caltech, busily puzzling over the nature of the quantum world. In the theoretical sense, though, he may be one of a

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Brazil wildfires: Blaze advances across Pantanal wetlands

The area is one of the most biodiverse regions in the world, and a popular tourist destination.

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Photos of the Week: Bike Jousting, Mariachi Surfers, Frozen Whiskers

Wind-driven California wildfires, Saint Simon celebrations in Guatemala, a World Series victory in Houston, an ancient mosque in Niger, continuing protests in Chile, a bus in a sinkhole in Pittsburgh, an oil-tank art gallery in Australia, the vanishing Mekong river, Halloween in Belgium, and much more.

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Dansk pioner om certificeringer til skyen: »Bottomline er, at det ikke betyder så meget«

De store cloud-udbydere tilbyder certificeringer som vejen frem til de gode jobs. Og flere bliver certificerede, men hvor nødvendige er cloud-certificeringerne egentlig? Få tre forskellige bud her.

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Science snapshots from Berkeley Lab

New at Berkeley Lab: Gamers can help speed up biomedical research by designing protein structures with a shape modeling game called Foldit, experiments show dramatic changes in the gut microbiome after switching between raw and cooked foods, and a new porous material can pull an industrial pollutant from the air.

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Black and elderly patients less likely to receive lung cancer treatments

Only about 6 in 10 lung cancer patients in the United States receive the minimal lung cancer treatments recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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How Human Innovation Shapes Global Health

Health care breakthroughs have far-reaching effects in an interconnected world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rigspolitiet: Derfor kan tilfældige dna-match ikke blive en ny teleskandale

PLUS. Forsvarsadvokaters krav om systematisk gennemgang af gamle dna-beviser vil være spild af kræfter, mener både Rigspolitiet og retsgenetiker.

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Living Electrical Wires Plug into Worm Tubes for Stability

Cable bacteria can live in stirred-up sediments by associating with structures built by Chaetopterus variopedatus.

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Infographic: Building an Artificial Chromosome

Integrating a specialized histone into large segments of transgenic DNA enables centromere formation.

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The Sea and the Science She Inspires

For centuries, painters and poets have looked to the ocean for insight. Researchers, too, have found their muse in the Earth's salty realm.

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Watcher of Whales: A Profile of Roger Payne

A love of music and science led the marine biologist to discover that whales sing songs, a discovery that he's since used to convince the world the animals are worth saving.

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Secrets in the Brains of People Who Have Committed Murder

MRI scans from more than 800 incarcerated men pinpoint distinct structural features of people who have committed homicide, compared with those who carried out other crimes.

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How Interconnected Is Life in the Ocean?

To help create better conservation and management plans, researchers are measuring how marine organisms move between habitats and populations.

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Poet of the Sea, 1940s–1950s

Most know Rachel Carson for her work on the dangers of chemical pollutants, but the writer's earlier prose took readers on a tour of a mysterious underwater world.

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The Dawn of Universal Ecology

Will the study of interactions between living things ever mirror the fundamental nature of physics and mathematics?

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Bottlenose Dolphin Adopts Whale Calf of Another Species

Interspecies adoptions are rare, but it's not the first time this population of dolphins in French Polynesia has attempted it.

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Red Tides Under the Microscope

Understanding the dinoflagellates that regularly wreak havoc on marine and nearshore ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico could help researchers mitigate the damage they cause.

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Contributors

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2019 issue of The Scientist.

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Infographic: How the Mitochondrial and Nuclear Genomes Interact

From regulating each other's gene expression to encoding different parts of the same proteins, the two genome types in every eukaryotic cell are far from independent.

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Infographic: Red Tides Still Hold Tantalizing Mysteries

A full description of the lifecycle of Karenia brevis could lead to improved monitoring, prediction, and mitigation of the harmful algal blooms it regularly causes.

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Manta Ray Populations Have Complex Social Structures

Reef mantas in Indonesia exhibit social preferences and form distinct social groups.

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Ten Minute Sabbatical

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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Martha Muñoz Uncovers the Drivers and Dampers of Biodiversity

The Yale biologist says that organisms' behavior, physiology, and morphology engage in a constant "evolutionary dance."

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How Underwater Photography Propels Marine Biology

Marine photographers are helping scientists to document the diversity of coral reefs before the imperiled ecosystems disappear.

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The Two Genomes in Every Eukaryotic Cell

Interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes have further-reaching effects on physiological function, adaptation, and speciation than previously appreciated.

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Infographic: Plugged In

How bacterial filaments ferry electrons through marine sediment

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Eavesdropping on Soil Insects Could Aid Pest Management

Insects in the soil are difficult to monitor, but listening in on the noises they make could help farmers detect pest infestations and improve estimates of biodiversity.

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Streamlined Artificial Chromosome Creation

Recruiting an epigenetic instigator of centromere formation into large segments of cloned DNA facilitates their transformation into artificial chromosomes.

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Warming Permafrost Morphs Microbes into Greenhouse Gas Emitters

Insulating tundra soil with snow increased the abundance of microbial species involved in carbon dioxide and methane release.

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Pharma's Ghost Labs Find New Life

Finding new tenants for former drug development sites isn't always easy. But a new, thriving industry has materialized to do just that.

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Infographic: How Interconnected Is Life in the Ocean?

To help create better conservation and management plans, researchers are measuring how marine organisms move between habitats and populations.

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The Brain Interprets Spoken and Written Language the Same Way

Neural activity associated with the meaning of words is independent of whether those words are read or listened to, a study finds.

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Pollution from US–China trade harms people up and down East Asia

Nature, Published online: 01 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03285-x Emissions from maritime shipping between the two world powers affect health in many nations.

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Dangers and risks of Decentralized Internet?

Hello, I'm working on a novel and could use some input on one world building aspect. Taking a step passed the "utopian" ideals of a decentralized internet, what are some realistic ways that individuals, and more importantly corporations/governments, could take advantage of a universal decentralized internet? The result ideally leads to a situation where a decentralized internet is still better/sa

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Switching to renewable energy is actually cost-effective

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A video highlighting the flaws in shells climate video

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Russia Is About to Disconnect From the Internet: What That Means

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WeWork's ex-CEO faces new pregnancy discrimination complaint

A former top aide to WeWork co-founder Adam Neumann has filed a federal discrimination complaint against him, saying she was demoted for becoming pregnant, subjected to derisive comments and …

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Climate change 'making mountaineering riskier'

Thinning ice and snow cover is leading to more rock-falls and landslides.

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Keratinocyte-intrinsic MHCII expression controls microbiota-induced Th1 cell responses [Immunology and Inflammation]

The cross-talk between the microbiota and the immune system plays a fundamental role in the control of host physiology. However, the tissue-specific factors controlling this dialogue remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that T cell responses to commensal colonization are associated with the development of organized cellular clusters within the…

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Reply to Liang and Gornish: Climate and livestock grazing jointly regulate grassland ecosystem multifunctionality [Letters (Online Only)]

Climate (e.g., precipitation) and grazing disturbance are 2 important factors affecting grassland biodiversity and ecosystem functions (1). Liang and Gornish (2) argue that we do not consider the precipitation effect as an independent factor in our PNAS paper on diversifying livestock promoting multidiversity and ecosystem multifunctionality (EMF) (3). Here, we…

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Pseudouridinylation of mRNA coding sequences alters translation [Biochemistry]

Chemical modifications of RNAs have long been established as key modulators of nonprotein-coding RNA structure and function in cells. There is a growing appreciation that messenger RNA (mRNA) sequences responsible for directing protein synthesis can also be posttranscriptionally modified. The enzymatic incorporation of mRNA modifications has many potential outcomes, including…

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The Atlantic Politics Daily: Women Are More Likely Than Men to Back Impeachment

It's Thursday, October 31. After today's party-lines vote, the House is scheduled to begin a week-long recess. Friday night, the president will hold a rally in Mississippi. The Atlantic 's politics team will be watching. In today's newsletter: ¶ People. GOP, Katie Hill. ¶ Places. Manheim, Pennsylvania, Minute Maid Stadium. ¶ Things. Keep America Great jack-o'-lanterns. * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (To

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Liver cancer deaths climb by around 50% in the last decade

Liver cancer deaths have increased by around 50% in the last decade and have tripled since records began, according to the latest calculations by Cancer Research UK.

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Deaths from liver cancer have tripled in past 20 years in England

More people are being diagnosed with and dying from liver cancer in England than ever before, according to new research to be presented at the 2019 NCRI Cancer Conference. In 20 years, from 1997 to 2016, incidence and deaths from the most common form of the disease, hepatocellular carcinoma, have tripled and it is most common among the most deprived members of society.

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High levels of two hormones in the blood raise prostate cancer risk

Men with higher levels of 'free' testosterone and a growth hormone in their blood are more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer, according to research presented at the 2019 NCRI Cancer Conference.

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Emotional trauma and fear most likely cause of 'Havana Syndrome'

The cause of the mystery illness among US and Canadian diplomats in Havana is most likely to be emotional trauma and fear according to a leading sociologist and an expert in neurodegenerative diseases, writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.

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Uber and Lyft Fight a Law They Say Doesn't Apply to Them

The ride-hail companies are backing a ballot measure to overturn a California law intended to transform gig-economy workers from contractors to employees.

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Zuckerberg's View of Speech on Facebook Is Stuck in 2004

Facebook's flaws are apparent, but the CEO's reluctance to police speech shows he stills sees it as a place that connects people and makes the world a better place.

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Your Brain Cleans Itself, This Jet Lands Itself, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Termites Cannibalize Their Co-Workers for the Good of the Colony

Formosan subterranean termites, which are in the same genus as Asian subterranean termites. (Credit: Scott Bauer/USDA) (Inside Science) — The appetites of social termites extend to cannibalizing their co-workers after death. It's done for the greater good of the community. "Termites have a lot of strategies to keep the nest and the members of the colony clean," said Luiza Helena Bueno da Silva, a

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Measles Leaves Us Vulnerable to Infections Both Old and New, Study Finds

A measles infection can wipe our immune system's memory and even leave us weaker against new infections. (Credit: infohay/Shutterstock) As the number of measles cases rises in the U.S, research reveals a new way the disease can leave patients vulnerable to future infections. Published in Science Immunology, an examination of measles patient immune systems showed that the disease didn't just leave

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Creepy Music and Soviet Spycraft: The Amazing Life of Leon Theremin

Leon Theremin, also known as Lev Termen, demonstrates his musical instrument. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons) Imagine a UFO descending from the heavens, its round disk pale against the night sky. What sound does it make? You're likely imagining a keening whine in your head, like the howling of a haunted wind or the moans of a high-pitched ghost. That's the sound of the theremin, a musical instrument i

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Simple injection of air proves successful in releasing child's tongue trapped in bottle, inspired by opening a wine bottle

A relatively simple injection of air has proved successful in releasing a 7-year-old boy's tongue that became entrapped in a juice bottle, says new research published in the latest edition of the European Journal of Anaesthesiology (the official journal of the European Society of Anaesthesiology).

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Milk from teeth: Dental stem cells can generate milk-producing cells

Stem cells of the teeth can contribute to the regeneration of non-dental organs, namely mammary glands. According to a new study, dental epithelial stem cells from mice can generate mammary ducts and even milk-producing cells when transplanted into mammary glands. This could be used for post-surgery tissue regeneration in breast cancer patients.

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Ynyslas, western Wales – a place made by climate change

Ynyslas, on the Cardigan Bay coast of Wales, is a place well-known for its extensive, shingle spit-fronted sand-dunes, its hinterland of estuarine saltmarsh-flats and, seaward, its golden sandy beach, complete with a several thousand year-old submerged forest. The place gets some 250,000 visitors a year. Taking all of those factors into account, and that Ynyslas is also a direct product of actual

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Spacewatch: Nasa tests new imaging technology in space

Operation was designed to test technology that allows multiple targets to be studied at same time Nasa launched its experimental Fortis (Far-ultraviolet Off Rowland-circle Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy) telescope on 28 October from the White Sands missile range in New Mexico. The flight lasted 15 minutes, reached 162 miles (260km) in altitude, and then fell back to Earth – exactly as pla

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Capturing the Reality TV Drama of a Divided Congress

As the House of Representatives voted to start an official impeachment inquiry, one photograph caught the excitement at its peak.

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This AI birdwatcher lets you 'see' through the eyes of a machine

It can take years of birdwatching experience to tell one species from the next. But using an artificial intelligence technique called deep learning, researchers have trained a computer to identify up to 200 species of birds from just a photo. This tool goes beyond giving the right answer to explain its thinking, in a way that even someone who doesn't know a penguin from a puffin can understand.

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Mutated form of DNA repair protein may shed light on its role in preventing cancer

Researchers created a mutated version of RAD51, a DNA repair protein, to better understand its critical functions at key steps in the cell replication process during times of stress. This work may help cancer biology scientists better understand how cells protect DNA from damage during replication. Defects in this pathway may play a role in causing cancer and a better understanding of the process

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Evading Heisenberg isn't easy

Researchers unravel novel dynamics in the interaction between light and mechanical motion with significant implications for quantum measurements designed to evade the influence of the detector in the notorious 'back action limit' problem.

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Even 'Goldilocks' exoplanets need a well-behaved star

Scientists model how the 'weather' on a star impacts exoplanets to see if even those thought to be in habitable zones could suffer from solar storms. They expect their work to help narrow the number of exoplanets studied for their potential to harbor life.

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Massive wildfires hit southern Brazil's Pantanal

Wildfires are raging across the Pantanal tropical wetlands in southern Brazil, one of the most biodiverse areas in the world and a major tourist destination, regional authorities said Thursday.

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Three-drug combo improves lung function in most common genetic form of cystic fibrosis

A phase three clinical trial that UT Southwestern participated in determined that a 3-drug combination improved lung function and reduced symptoms in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients who have a single copy of the most common genetic mutation for the disease.

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A new ranavirus threatens US amphibian diversity

In a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of Ecological Modelling, a team of University of Tennessee researchers along with a colleague from the University of Florida model how a chimeric Frog virus 3 (FV3)-like ranavirus, also known as RCV-Z2, can spread rapidly throughout a population of North American wood frog (Lithobates sylvaticus) tadpoles.

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NASA gets infrared view of Atlantic Halloween subtropical storm

The latest addition to the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season developed quickly. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the eastern North Atlantic Ocean on Halloween and provided forecasters with an infrared view of Subtropical Storm Rebekah.

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Rare mutations drive cystic fibrosis in Caribbean

Cystic Fibrosis (CF) in the Caribbean is dominated by unusual gene mutations not often observed in previously studied CF populations, according to comprehensive genome sequencing led by physician-scientists at UC San Francisco and Centro de Neumología Pediátrica in San Juan. The rarity of the gene mutations observed in Caribbean CF patients highlights the fact that transformative new drugs for CF,

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Study examines kidney injury in patients taking immunotherapy cancer medications

In patients taking immune checkpoint inhibitors as a treatment for cancer, 17% experienced acute kidney injury (AKI), 8% experienced sustained AKI, and 3% had potential immune checkpoint inhibitor-related AKI. Use of proton pump inhibitors, which are commonly used to treat stomach ulcers or acid reflux, was associated with a higher risk of experiencing sustained AKI.

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Apple set to offer exclusive subscription to Apple Card members

Apple is inching closer to an exclusive program for Apple Card members that lets them finance the latest smartphone over 24 months with 0% interest and it could be called Apple Prime

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3-2-1-Cookoff! Astronauts to bake cookies with new test oven

Forget reheated, freeze-dried space grub. Astronauts are about to get a new test oven for baking chocolate chip cookies from scratch.

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