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nyheder2019september10

Discovery of periodic tables for molecules

The periodic table of elements was proposed in 1869, and thereafter became one of the cornerstones of the natural sciences. This table was designed to contain all the elements found in nature in a special layout that groups them in rows and columns according to one of their most important characteristics, the number of electrons. Scientists have used the periodic table for decades to predict the c

4h

Ingeniørløfte skal minde ingeniører om deres etiske ansvar

Under festtalen på AAU København spurgte adjunkt David Hansen de nyuddannede ingeniører, om de ville bruge uddannelsen til at bidrage til en bedre verden. Det var første forsøg med et ingeniørløfte herhjemme. Måske er der et mere formelt løfte på vej. IDA nedsætter arbejdsgruppe om etik og teknol…

4h

Europeans face significant challenges to participate in lung cancer clinical trials

A survey of patients with lung cancer in several European countries revealed that half did not know what a cancer clinical trial is, and 22% had never heard of a cancer clinical trial. The research was reported by Dr. A.M. Baird, on behalf of Lung Cancer Europe, today at the IASLC 2019 World Conference on Lung Cancer hosted by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer.

6h

LATEST

Scientists Find the Skull of Humanity’s Ancestor — on a Computer

By comparing fossils and CT scans, researchers say they have reconstructed the skull of the last common forebear of modern humans.

2min

Unexpected species diversity in electric eels with a description of the strongest living bioelectricity generator

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11690-z A single species of electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, has been described. Here, de Santana et al. show that there are three major lineages of Electrophorus distributed across Greater Amazonia and describe two new species, one with a much stronger electric discharge than was previously known.

2min

Foot painters' toes mapped like fingers in the brain

The brain has a dramatic ability to forge new connections. Paul Biegler reports.

3min

An ancestor ‘modern in many ways’

Scientists create virtual skull from 263 real ones. Dyani Lewis reports.

3min

Shock me: 200% increase in electric eel species

Newly identified Electrophorus voltai is the strongest known living bioelectricity generator. Ian Connellan reports.

3min

The final chapter for GW170817 captured

International team painstakingly constructs the afterglow.

3min

Shorter people at greater risk of type 2 diabetes

New study finds being tall and thin is an advantage.

3min

Adolescents with high levels of physical activity perform better in school over two years

Adolescents with higher levels of physical activity performed better in school during transition from primary school to lower secondary school than their physically inactive peers.

6min

Software companies follow the skills and move where the staff are

Software companies are more likely to base their operations in locations where skilled potential recruits already work — rather than staff moving to new areas for fresh opportunities.

6min

Researchers find earliest evidence of milk consumption

A research team, led by archaeologists at the University of York, have identified a milk protein called beta lactoglobulin (BLG) entombed in the mineralised dental plaque of seven individuals who lived in the Neolithic period around 6,000 years-ago.

6min

A new species of electric eel produces the highest voltage discharge of any known animal

There are at least three species of electric eels (Electrophorus spp.), not just one as previously believed. Two new species have recently been described with São Paulo Research Foundation—FAPESP's support by a group of researchers affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution and National Geographic Society, among other institutions. One of the new species can discharge up to 860 volts, the stronge

7min

Warning signs in a poisonous Papuan songbird

Bright colors and conspicuous markings are often used in nature to warn off would-be predators. While we are used to seeing such markings—termed aposematic signals—in plants, caterpillars and snakes, we do not usually think of colorful bird plumage as conveying the same message. However, members of the New Guinea songbird genus Pitohui use their plumage to warn predators that they are toxic.

7min

Amazon employees step up pressure on climate issues, plan walkout Sept. 20

A group of Amazon employees pressuring the company to take meaningful action to slow climate change revealed plans Monday for a walkout Sept. 20 to support the student-led Global Climate Strike.

8min

Do animals control earth's oxygen level?

No more than 540 million years ago there was a huge boom in the diversity of animals on Earth. The first larger animals evolved in what is today known as the Cambrian explosion. In the time that followed, the animals evolved and grew larger, but concurrently with the evolution of animals, the oxygen level in the atmosphere dropped and this temporarily slowed radiation. However, subsequent oxygenat

8min

A new species of electric eel produces the highest voltage discharge of any known animal

There are at least three species of electric eels (Electrophorus spp.), not just one as previously believed. Two new species have recently been described with São Paulo Research Foundation—FAPESP's support by a group of researchers affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution and National Geographic Society, among other institutions. One of the new species can discharge up to 860 volts, the stronge

8min

Reconfigurable electronics show promise for wearable, implantable devices

Medical implants of the future may feature reconfigurable electronic platforms that can morph in shape and size dynamically as bodies change or transform to relocate from one area to monitor another within our bodies.

8min

Tougher arsenic standard shows desired effect: Public's drinking water is safer

Toughening the federal standard for arsenic in 2001 has led to fewer violations by the public systems that supply more than 80 percent of the United States' drinking water, research led by Oregon State University shows.

8min

Warning signs in a poisonous Papuan songbird

Bright colors and conspicuous markings are often used in nature to warn off would-be predators. While we are used to seeing such markings—termed aposematic signals—in plants, caterpillars and snakes, we do not usually think of colorful bird plumage as conveying the same message. However, members of the New Guinea songbird genus Pitohui use their plumage to warn predators that they are toxic.

8min

What the cranium of oldest human ancestor would have looked like

Despite having lived about 300,000 years ago, the oldest ancestor of all members of Homo sapiens had a surprisingly modern skull, as suggested by a model created by CNRS researcher Aurélien Mounier of the Histoire Naturelle de l'Homme Préhistorique laboratory (CNRS / Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle) and Cambridge University professor Marta Mirazón Lahr. After comparing the virtually rendered

8min

Pterosaur identified, 30 years on

Cryodrakon boreas was a new genus and species.

11min

Survey shows many primary care doctors are unprepared to help patients avoid diabetes

Researchers say their survey of 1,000 randomly selected PCPs revealed significant gaps in the group's overall knowledge of risk factors, diagnostic criteria and recommended management/prevention practices for prediabetes.

11min

Major fortress-settlement in Armenian Highlands excavated

A team of researchers unearthed huge storage jars, animal bones and fortress walls from 3,000 years ago in Armenia as they initiated the Ararat Plain Southeast Archaeological Project (APSAP) during the summer of 2019.

11min

Regulator of first responder cells to brain injury

Researchers identified nuclear factor I-A (NFIA) as a central regulator of both the generation and activity of reactive astrocytes.

11min

A "living drug" that could change the way we treat cancer | Carl June

Carl June is the pioneer behind CAR T-cell therapy: a groundbreaking cancer treatment that supercharges part of a patient's own immune system to attack and kill tumors. In a talk about a breakthrough, he shares how three decades of research culminated in a therapy that's eradicated cases of leukemia once thought to be incurable — and explains how it could be used to fight other types of cancer.

13min

Archaeological team excavates at one of the major fortress-settlements in the Armenian Highlands

A team of researchers and students from HKU unearthed huge storage jars, animal bones and fortress walls from 3,000 years ago in Armenia as they initiated the Ararat Plain Southeast Archaeological Project (APSAP) during the summer of 2019.

14min

For the First Time Ever, Astronauts Mix Cement in Space

Space Cement A team of scientists on board the International Space Station have successfully mixed cement in the microgravity of space. And that’s a big deal: the material could facilitate the construction of future space stations and colonies, allowing us to establish a permanent footprint beyond the Earth. The team mixed the basic ingredients of cement — a compound called tri-calcium silicate h

15min

16min

SNK's Neo Geo Arcade Stick Pro Is A Killer Self-Contained Retro Gaming Console

The retro gaming market is hot right now, mostly because people have fond memories of growing up playing old school Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) and SNES games. It's not just Nintendo …

16min

Smart, good-looking coffee makers for your daily grind

Wakey wakey. (Emre Gencer via Unsplash/) How can you be expected to make coffee if you haven’t had any coffee? Luckily, there are some amazing coffee makers on the market to make the transition from zombie to human way easier. Whether you need a 10-cup pot for the whole family or a single cup for a solo morning, different coffee makers are designed to suit particular needs. It’s also a matter of

17min

Milwaukee’s Secret Salmon Runs

In the spring and fall, watch huge salmon fly up two rivers in Milwaukee to spawn with the city as a backdrop

17min

Making biopsies less invasive and more informative

A team of researchers has developed a novel technology that could sensitively and accurately detect and classify cancer cells, as well as determine the disease aggressiveness from the least invasive biopsies. With this new technology called STAMP (Sequence-Topology Assembly for Multiplexed Profiling), comprehensive disease information can be obtained faster, at a much earlier stage of the clinical

25min

Raising a glass to grapes' surprising genetic diversity

Here's a discovery well worth toasting: A research team has deciphered the genome of the Chardonnay grape. By doing so, they have uncovered something fascinating: grapes inherit different numbers of genes from their mothers and fathers.

25min

The danger of heat and cold across Australia

Cold temperatures are not nearly as deadly as heat, with around 2% of all deaths in Australia related to heat, according to new research.

25min

Role of mediator protein complex in transcription and gene expression

A new study advances existing knowledge about transcription and gene expression. This multi-institution team of researchers made interesting discoveries about the role of the Mediator protein complex in expressing genetic information as diverse cell proteins.

25min

26min

Colorful microreactors utilize sunlight

The sun is the most sustainable energy source available on our planet and could be used to power photochemical reactions. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists present a widely applicable, cost-effective photomicroreactor. It is based on "Luminescent Solar Concentrators", which harvest, convert, and make photons available for chemical reactions. Thus, the researchers were able to synthesize

27min

Do animals control earth's oxygen level?

For the first time, researchers have measured how the production of algae and the Earth's oxygen level affect each other — what you might call 'Earth's heartbeat'. Studies of 540 million-year-old limestone indicate that it is not just the oxygen level that affects animals, but that animals can indeed regulate the oxygen level.

27min

Chronic enteroviral infection modifies broadly pancreatic cellular functions

Enteroviral infections are common viral infections with usually rather few symptoms and also believed to be linked to the onset of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is a disorder in which the pancreatic insulin-producing beta-cells are destroyed, and it is more common in Finland than anywhere else in the world. A new study by the University of Turku and Tampere University in Finland supports the li

27min

The vagina monocultures

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have taken the first step towards trials of vaginal microbiota transplantation (VMT). Inspired by the success of fecal transplantation, it is hoped that transplants of vaginal fluids from healthy donors will provide the first restorative, curative treatment for bacterial vaginosis. Published in Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, the team's donor screenin

27min

Research shows 80% drop in ICU bloodstream infections

Bloodstream infections acquired in UK Intensive Care Units (ICUs) reduced by 80% between 2007 and 2012, according to research funded by the NIHR Guy's and St Thomas' Biomedical Research Centre.

27min

The danger of heat and cold across Australia

Cold temperatures are not nearly as deadly as heat, with around 2% of all deaths in Australia related to heat, according to new research from the University of Technology Sydney.

32min

New flying reptile species was one of largest ever flying animals

A newly identified species of pterosaur is among the largest ever flying animals, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.

37min

Global trade of tree seeds can introduce harmful pests

The trade of forest tree seeds is, on a global scale, not as safe as previously believed. Researchers from CABI and, among other institutions, the Swiss Federal Institute WSL, revealed that insect pests and fungal pathogens associated with seeds pose a great risk to trees and forest ecosystems worldwide.

38min

New report reveals 'epidemic' levels of crime in shops

A hard-hitting new report calls on action to stem the rising number of crimes against shop workers, which has hit a five-year high, and highlights workers suffering with post-traumatic stress disorder, more commonly seen in the armed forces.

38min

Global trade of tree seeds can introduce harmful pests

The trade of forest tree seeds is, on a global scale, not as safe as previously believed. Researchers from CABI and, among other institutions, the Swiss Federal Institute WSL, revealed that insect pests and fungal pathogens associated with seeds pose a great risk to trees and forest ecosystems worldwide.

38min

Prosthesis lets amputees feel knees and feet

A new interface that connects a leg prosthesis with the residual nerves in the user’s thigh allows above-the-knee amputees to feel their prosthetic foot and knee in real time, a new study shows. While walking, people with intact legs feel when they move their knee or when their feet touch the ground. The nervous system constantly draws on sensory feedback of this sort to precisely control muscles

38min

Ambulances aren’t taking 40% of patients to nearest hospital

Factors outside the location of the nearest hospital may shape where emergency medical services take patients, researchers report. In a new study, researchers found large differences between the EMS-transport destinations of black and Hispanic patients in comparison with their white counterparts. In addition, they also found that EMS did not take 40% of patients overall, regardless of race, to th

38min

Science Didn’t Disprove Free Will After All

The death of free will began with thousands of finger taps. In 1964, two German scientists monitored the electrical activity of a dozen people’s brains. Each day for several months, volunteers came into the scientists’ lab at the University of Freiburg to get wires fixed to their scalp from a showerhead-like contraption overhead. The participants sat in a chair, tucked neatly in a metal tollbooth

38min

Algoritmer hæver stemmen i auditoriet

PLUS. I tre auditorier på Mærsk Tårnet i København taler undervisere og studerende sammen uden mikrofoner for munden og uden et klassisk PA-anlæg med kunstig lyd. Knap 100 mikrofoner og 124 højtalere fra amerikanske Meyer Sound sørger for en naturlig lyd.

41min

Raising a glass to grapes' surprising genetic diversity

Here's a discovery well worth toasting: A research team led by Professor Brandon Gaut with the University of California, Irvine and Professor Dario Cantu with the University of California, Davis has deciphered the genome of the Chardonnay grape. By doing so, they have uncovered something fascinating: grapes inherit different numbers of genes from their mothers and fathers. Their paper has just bee

44min

Optical vacuum cleaner can manipulate nanoparticles

Scientists at Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with Russian and international colleagues developed the concept for constructing an "optical vacuum cleaner." Due to its optical properties, it can trap nanoparticles from the environment. Currently, there are no effective devices for this task. The research results were published in Scientific Reports. In the future, such "vacuum cleaners" can be

44min

Raising a glass to grapes' surprising genetic diversity

Here's a discovery well worth toasting: A research team led by Professor Brandon Gaut with the University of California, Irvine and Professor Dario Cantu with the University of California, Davis has deciphered the genome of the Chardonnay grape. By doing so, they have uncovered something fascinating: grapes inherit different numbers of genes from their mothers and fathers. Their paper has just bee

44min

Facebook Warns Users About iOS 13 And Android 10 Privacy And Tracking Updates

In the infinite wisdom of Facebook, the world's largest social network felt it necessary to put a call out to Android and iOS users—practically every person with a mobile phone—to pay attention …

44min

Are black holes made of dark energy?

Researchers have identified and corrected a subtle error that was made when applying Einstein's equations to model the growth of the universe.

47min

An oral splint that can reduce Tourette syndrome tics

Researchers developed a new device that ameliorates the characteristic vocal and motor tics of Tourette syndrome. By biting down on the simple, removable oral splint, both adults and children with Tourette syndrome experienced a reduction in their tics. The action of biting down on the oral splint could serve as a sensory trick; sensory tricks are known to ameliorate motor symptoms in cervical dys

47min

Link between gut microbes and muscle growth suggests future approach to tackle muscle loss

Scientists have established a link between gut microbes and muscle growth and function — a finding that could open new doors to interventions for age-related skeletal muscle loss.

47min

Food insecurity in toddler years linked to poor health, but not obesity

Young children, who grow up in homes with limited access to nutritious foods (known as food insecurity), are more likely to experience poor overall health, hospitalizations, and developmental problems, but they are not at higher risk of developing obesity, a new study finds.

47min

New volcanic eruption forecasting technique

Volcanic eruptions and their ash clouds pose a significant hazard to population centers and air travel, especially those that show few to no signs of unrest beforehand. Geologists are now using a technique traditionally used in weather and climate forecasting to develop new eruption forecasting models. By testing if the models are able to capture the likelihood of past eruptions, the researchers a

47min

HKU archaeological team excavates at one of the major fortress-settlements in the Armenian Highlands

A team of researchers and students from HKU unearthed huge storage jars, animal bones and fortress walls from 3,000 years ago in Armenia as they initiated the Ararat Plain Southeast Archaeological Project (APSAP) during the summer of 2019.

48min

Survey shows many primary care doctors are unprepared to help patients avoid diabetes

In a report on their findings in the Journal of General Internal Medicine (JGIM), the researchers say their survey of 1,000 randomly selected PCPs revealed significant gaps in the group's overall knowledge of risk factors, diagnostic criteria and recommended management/prevention practices for prediabetes.

48min

USC scientist identifies new species of giant flying reptile

USC scientist and colleagues found a new species of giant flying reptile that once soared over North America. It's one of the largest pterosaurs discovered and it's called Frozen Dragon of the North.

48min

A liquid biopsy test can identify patients who may respond to immune checkpoint blockade

A new liquid biopsy test could detect microsatellite instability (MSI) and tumor mutational burden (TMB), indicating that it could help determine which patients are likely to respond to immune checkpoint inhibitors.

48min

Breeders release new flaxseed cultivar with higher yield

The small but mighty flaxseed has many health benefits for humans, as well as other important uses. Yield, and therefore profits, are important for the few farmers who grow it in the United States.

50min

Breeders release new flaxseed cultivar with higher yield

The small but mighty flaxseed has many health benefits for humans, as well as other important uses. Yield, and therefore profits, are important for the few farmers who grow it in the United States.

50min

Nix, pillren trimmar inte kroppen

Marknadsföringen är ofta brutal, bokstavligt talat, med ett språkbruk som för tankarna till kamp, krig, våld, galenskap. Flera produkter tar redan i namnet hjälp av gudar som har ett rykte om sig att vara kraftfulla, som Viking Power Thor’s Hammer Mjölner, ett så kallat PWO ( pre workout ) som beskrivs som en ”brutal storebror” till en annan produkt. Inte ens smaksättningen kommer undan kraftsprå

52min

Are black holes made of dark energy?

Two University of Hawaii at Manoa researchers have identified and corrected a subtle error that was made when applying Einstein's equations to model the growth of the universe.

55min

Study finds parole 'a roll of the dice' for those convicted as teens

A review of parole-hearing transcripts since California's juvenile justice reform law took effect in 2014 found that black people in prison who were convicted as teenagers, especially those without private attorneys, had a low likelihood of gaining parole.

55min

Science and Star Wars

Might popular culture, such as the Star Wars science fiction franchise be used to boost skills among those involved in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics)? Writing in the International Journal of Social Media and Interactive Learning Environments, Stephan Längle of the Danube University Krems in Austria discusses the possibility.

55min

Study explores role of mediator protein complex in transcription and gene expression

Did you know that the DNA in any cell of the human body—or any organism for that matter—contains the genetic information required to develop every possible type of cell within that organism? Yet cell types differ markedly from each other both structurally and functionally. This is manifest through the production of different proteins encoded in the genetic information of the cell.

55min

Study explores role of mediator protein complex in transcription and gene expression

Did you know that the DNA in any cell of the human body—or any organism for that matter—contains the genetic information required to develop every possible type of cell within that organism? Yet cell types differ markedly from each other both structurally and functionally. This is manifest through the production of different proteins encoded in the genetic information of the cell.

55min

Do Our Faces Deserve the Same Protection as Our Phones?

Facial recognition technology raises a vital question: What role do we want this form of artificial intelligence to play in our society?

1h

Researchers unveil new volcanic eruption forecasting technique

Volcanic eruptions and their ash clouds pose a significant hazard to population centers and air travel, especially those that show few to no signs of unrest beforehand. Geologists are now using a technique traditionally used in weather and climate forecasting to develop new eruption forecasting models. By testing if the models are able to capture the likelihood of past eruptions, the researchers a

1h

Image: Australian bushfires

Australia is tackling multiple bushfires that have broken out across New South Wales and Queensland over the past few days.

1h

Urban growth, heat islands, humidity, climate change: Costs multiply in tropical cities

Some 60% of the planet's expected urban area by 2030 is yet to be built. This forecast highlights how rapidly the world's people are becoming urban. Cities now occupy about 2% of the world's land area, but are home to about 55% of the world's people and generate more than 70% of global GDP, plus the associated greenhouse gas emissions.

1h

Researchers develop app to detect areas most vulnerable to life-threatening haze

Forest and land-use fires are ravaging Indonesia's Sumatra and Kalimantan islands. Haze from these fires threatens lives as inhaling smoke can cause heart and respiratory diseases, leading to premature deaths.

1h

New method for material research gets hundred times stronger

Researchers from the Faculty of Science at the University of Oulu have increased the sensitivity of an emerging spectroscopic method with promising applications for materials studies.

1h

What Does Ethical AI Look Like? Here’s What the New Global Consensus Says

Elon Musk usually isn’t one for advocating regulation and oversight. But when it comes to AI, he doesn’t mince words. AI is humanity’s “ biggest existential threat ,” he once proclaimed to some controversy. While that statement may be overblown, the fears aren’t: AI will be the next technological force that transforms the face of society—for better or worse—much as the industrial revolution once

1h

Optical vacuum cleaner can manipulate nanoparticles

Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with Russian and international colleagues developed the concept for constructing an optical vacuum cleaner. Due to its optical properties, it can trap nanoparticles from the environment. Currently, there are no effective devices for this task. The research results were published in Scientific Reports (IF:4,525; Q1). In the future, such vacuum clea

1h

NUS invention makes biopsies less invasive and more informative

A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a novel technology that could sensitively and accurately detect and classify cancer cells, as well as determine the disease aggressiveness from the least invasive biopsies. With this new technology called STAMP (Sequence-Topology Assembly for Multiplexed Profiling), comprehensive disease information can be obtained

1h

South Korea’s ‘Nobel prize project’ rocked by tough year

Nature, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02363-4 Researchers fear for the future of the Institute for Basic Science, which has faced accusations of misconduct and a sizeable budget cut.

1h

Molecular dynamics simulation sheds new light on methane hydrate formation

In a paper published this week in PNAS, researchers at the University of Amsterdam's Van 't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences and the Amsterdam Center for Multiscale Modeling provide atomistic insight in the formation of methane hydrates. On the basis of molecular dynamics simulations they explain how selection between competing methane hydrate polymorphs occurs, and how this might be generali

1h

New system designed to monitor the water quality of rivers

Water distribution networks, as well as river and maritime ecosystems near the coast, can be exposed to involuntary contamination that can alter the quality of the water. This can threaten human health if the water is used as a source of drinking water, as well as threatening the stability of the aquatic ecosystems. The companies that manage water for human consumption use systems to monitor the q

1h

Software companies follow the skills and move where the staff are

Software companies are more likely to base their operations in locations where skilled potential recruits already work—rather than staff moving to new areas for fresh opportunities.

1h

How do you leave a warning that lasts as long as nuclear waste?

In January 1997, the crew of a fishing vessel in the Baltic Sea found something unusual in their nets: a greasy yellowish-brown lump of clay-like material. They pulled it out, placed it on deck and returned to processing their catch. The next day, the crew fell ill with serious skin burns. Four were hospitalized. The greasy lump was a substance called yperite, better known as sulfur mustard or mus

1h

Time for a radical rethink about sand?

On a sandbank on the Chambal River in northern India, the critically endangered gharial and red-crowned roofed turtle (the Chambal is the latter's last known refuge) bask side by side. It's late March and approaching the middle of the dry season, the start of nesting season for these species, which both lay eggs in holes dug into the sand, taking extreme care to select the right combination of san

1h

How do encounters with police affect the mental health of black Americans?

Black Americans comprise 13 percent of the US population, yet data suggests that they represent 23 percent of those fatally shot by police officers. Data on non-lethal encounters with police in the black community is limited but suggests that these encounters can result in emotional trauma, stress responses, and depressive symptoms.

1h

Introducing quantum convolutional neural networks

Machine learning techniques have so far proved to be very promising for the analysis of data in several fields, with many potential applications. However, researchers have found that applying these methods to quantum physics problems is far more challenging due to the exponential complexity of many-body systems.

1h

Single-particle cryogenic electron microscopy used to study T cell receptor complex

A team of researchers from the Harbin Institute of Technology and Peking University has used single-particle cryogenic electron microscopy to study the human T cell receptor complex. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their study and what they learned from it.

1h

Experiments at temperature of sun offer solutions to solar model problems

Experimenting at 4.1 million degrees Fahrenheit, physicists at Sandia National Laboratories' Z machine have found that an astronomical model—used for 40 years to predict the sun's behavior as well as the life and death of stars—underestimates the energy blockage caused by free-floating iron atoms, a major player in those processes.

1h

Getting a look under the hood of topological insulators

Certain materials, like copper, conduct electricity very well. Other materials, like glass, do not. A certain kind of material, called a topological insulator, acts partially like one and partially like the other ― it behaves like a conductor at its surface and an insulator in its interior.

1h

Mid-mass black hole hurls star across the Milky Way

An international team of astronomers has pinpointed the origin of a runaway high-velocity star named PG 1610+062 and determined that it was likely ejected from its birth cluster with the help of a mid-mass black hole (MMBH).

1h

Making waves with metamaterials

For Jordan Raney, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, cutting-edge science sometimes involves whacking a rubber disc with a hammer.

1h

Gravitational wave detectors might be able to detect dark matter particles colliding with their mirrors

The field of astronomy has been revolutionized, thanks to the first-ever detection of gravitational waves (GWs). Since the initial detection was made in February of 2016 by scientists at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), multiple gravitational events have been detected. These have provided insight into a phenomenon that was predicted over a century ago by Albert Einst

1h

Single-particle cryogenic electron microscopy used to study T cell receptor complex

A team of researchers from the Harbin Institute of Technology and Peking University has used single-particle cryogenic electron microscopy to study the human T cell receptor complex. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their study and what they learned from it.

1h

Google's 'Play Pass' for Android is coming soon

Google has confirmed that it's working on a service called Google Play Pass in a teaser tweet. It didn't reveal any other detail about it other than it's coming soon, …

1h

The Atlantic Acquires Faire Design, Integrating Into its Creative and Consulting Division Atlantic 57

The Atlantic has acquired Faire Design , a start-up strategy and design firm, and is integrating Faire’s team, work, and book of business into its creative and consulting division Atlantic 57 . With this, Kate Watts , the founder of Faire Design and former U.S. president of the global agency Huge, becomes president of Atlantic 57. Atlantic 57 is a top agency for organizations looking to grow thro

1h

Drug may protect against Alzheimer’s symptoms

A new drug, BPN14770, may protect against memory loss, nerve damage, and other symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, researchers report. Preclinical research found that BPN14770 deters the effects of amyloid beta , a hallmark protein of Alzheimer’s that is toxic to nerve cells. Recent studies find Alzheimer’s may develop without dementia in nearly 25% of healthy 80-year-old patients, suggesting the bo

1h

Ny språkteknik ska hjälpa datorn skilja ”rock” från ”rock”

Språket är centralt för digitala verktyg som används i allt från apparater som ger röstkommandon till en digital assistent, till automatiserade sammanfattningar av dagens nyhetsartiklar. Men för att verktygen ska fungera som de ska måste de underliggande datorsystemen räkna med en semantisk modell som ger datorn information om varje ords betydelse. Det kan vara extra svårt när det gäller ord med

1h

Study explores role of mediator protein complex in transcription and gene expression

A new study led by Ryerson University called 'The Med31 Conserved Component of the Divergent Mediator Complex in Tetrahymena thermophila Participates in Developmental Regulation' advances existing knowledge about transcription and gene expression. Led by Dr. Jeffrey Fillingham, this multi-institution team of researchers made interesting discoveries about the role of the Mediator protein complex in

1h

The danger of heat and cold across Australia

Cold temperatures are not nearly as deadly as heat, with around 2% of all deaths in Australia related to heat, according to new research from the University of Technology Sydney.

1h

Link between gut microbes & muscle growth suggests future approach to tackle muscle loss

Scientists led by NTU Singapore's Professor Sven Pettersson established a link between gut microbes and muscle growth and function — a finding that could open new doors to interventions for age-related skeletal muscle loss. The findings were published in Science Translational Medicine.

1h

Are black holes made of dark energy?

Two University of Hawaii at Manoa researchers have identified and corrected a subtle error that was made when applying Einstein's equations to model the growth of the universe.

1h

An oral splint that can reduce Tourette syndrome tics

Osaka University researchers developed a new device that ameliorates the characteristic vocal and motor tics of Tourette syndrome. By biting down on the simple, removable oral splint, both adults and children with Tourette syndrome experienced a reduction in their tics. The action of biting down on the oral splint could serve as a sensory trick; sensory tricks are known to ameliorate motor symptom

1h

Math skills aren't enough to get through hard decisions

Almost a third of American adults don't have the math skills necessary to make effective decisions about their health and finances.

1h

McDonald's Acquires Apprente to Double Down on Tech

The Golden Arches will acquire Apprente, a "sound-to-meaning" voice assistant, to speed up its drive-thru.

1h

Google Finally Bans Dangerous Miracle Cure Ads

Snake Oil Sellers On Friday, Google announced the establishment of a new Google Ads healthcare and medicines policy that prohibits sellers from hawking unproven or experimental medical treatments and therapies , including many stem cell and gene therapies. “[W]e have seen a rise in bad actors attempting to take advantage of individuals by offering untested, deceptive treatments,” Google wrote in

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Hindered Ethers Made Easier

Since I mentioned a new Mitsunobu-type reaction yesterday , I should note that a new route to hindered ethers has come out this summer from the Baran group at Scripps. Here’s the ChemRxiv version, and here’s the Nature paper that just appeared. And there are more details at the group’s blog here . It’s an electrochemical reaction that involves decarboxylation to give very reactive carbocations th

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How to ferment (almost) everything

That's quite a haul — time to see what you can ferment. (Markus Spiske via Unsplash/) This story was originally published on Saveur . There's a reason chef Cortney Burns of "A Living Larder" has a basement filled wall to wall with jars. The art of fermenting vegetables is as simple as soaking them in salt and water, or—another technique she loves—rubbing them in salt so they form a natural brine.

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Tesla Pushes Pickup Truck Unveiling to November

Tesla has made incredible headway when it comes to selling electric sedans and sports cars, and the company is going to launch its first hatchback next year. However, Tesla’s next major vehicle will be a tougher sell. The company was expected to show off its upcoming pickup truck this summer, but now the company is looking at a November reveal at the earliest. Tesla launched its first electric ve

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Huge Explosions May Have Formed Lakes on Saturn’s Moon Titan

Explosion Craters An international team of scientists say that the methane-filled lakes on the surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, could have been formed by massive explosions. The proposed theory suggests that a greenhouse gas effect warmed up small pockets of liquid nitrogen in Titan’s crust until they blew up and left massive craters behind. Precipitating liquid methane, acting much like

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Raising a glass to grapes' surprising genetic diversity

Here's a discovery well worth toasting: A research team led by Professor Brandon Gaut with the University of California, Irvine and Professor Dario Cantu with the University of California, Davis has deciphered the genome of the Chardonnay grape. By doing so, they have uncovered something fascinating: grapes inherit different numbers of genes from their mothers and fathers. Their paper has just bee

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Researchers unveil new volcanic eruption forecasting technique

Volcanic eruptions and their ash clouds pose a significant hazard to population centers and air travel, especially those that show few to no signs of unrest beforehand. Geologists are now using a technique traditionally used in weather and climate forecasting to develop new eruption forecasting models. By testing if the models are able to capture the likelihood of past eruptions, the researchers a

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Scientist Lampoons Birth Announcements With Discovery of New 'Spadenose' Ray

The new species sees the light of day after more than 70 years tucked away in museum collections

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Loophole That Lets People Share Your Private Instagram Pics and Stories Isn't a 'Hack'—but Still, Heads Up

Here’s another reminder to be wary of what you share online: BuzzFeed News noticed on Monday that the way Instagram and its owner Facebook serve up media content allows for anyone who has access …

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Logging study reveals huge hidden emissions of the forestry industry

Logging is a massive source of uncounted carbon emissions. But growing the right mix of trees and felling them less often could transform it for the better

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From the archive

Nature, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02665-7 How Nature reported computer-made music in 1969, and a book on the early history of numbers in 1919.

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If aliens call, do not hold a referendum on what to do next, say Britons

Vote-weary public decide against planetary poll should ETs contact Earth In the event that aliens ever contact Earth, the British public is clear on one thing: do not hold a referendum to decide what to do next. The option to hold a planetary vote on how to respond to inquiring extraterrestrials ranked bottom in a poll of 2,000 Britons asked how humanity’s reaction should be determined. Continue

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Læger er de bedste chefer

Britisk forskning dokumenterer, at det burde være læger – ikke djøffere – der leder hospitaler og sundhedsorganisationer. Både hvad angår behandlingskvalitet, forskningskvalitet og arbejdsglæde scorer lægefaglige ledere højere end eksperter i økonomi og ledelse.

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Affaldsdirektør om plast-mål: Tror ikke 75 procent kan genanvendes

PLUS. Direktøren for Danmarks største affaldsselskab afviser, at han tidligere har kendt til, at selskabet gennem flere år overdrev genanvendelsesprocenten for plastaffald.

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Birds of a Feather Flap Faster to Stay Together

Pigeons fly in groups, even though it costs them more energy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Food insecurity in toddler years linked to poor health, but not obesity

Young children, who grow up in homes with limited access to nutritious foods (known as food insecurity), are more likely to experience poor overall health, hospitalizations, and developmental problems, but they are not at higher risk of developing obesity, a new University of Maryland School of Medicine study finds.

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If Computers Are So Smart, How Come They Can’t Read?

Deep learning excels at learning statistical correlations, but lacks robust ways of understanding how the meanings of sentences relate to their parts.

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Astronomers investigate an unusual massive gas-rich galaxy

Russian astronomers have observed UGC 1378—an unusual, massive gas-rich galaxy with extended gaseous and low-surface brightness stellar discs. Results of the new research, presented in a paper published August 29, provide more insights into the nature of this rare type of galaxy.

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Birds of a Feather Flap Faster to Stay Together

Pigeons fly in groups, even though it costs them more energy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The day the dinosaurs' world fell apart

Scientists reconstruct the seconds, minutes and hours following the dino-killing asteroid impact.

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Polaroid Lab turns your phone photos into instant print masterpieces – CNET

Want Polaroid photos, but hate the idea of carrying any camera but your phone? You're in luck.

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Image of the Day: Ancient Footprints

A discovery of Neanderthal footprints reveals insights into the hominin's social structure.

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Glowing shark, Greta and glacier goodbye — August’s best science images

Nature, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02628-y The month’s sharpest science shots, selected by Nature’s photo team.

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How less professionalism will get you ahead in the workplace of the future

Dell and the Institute for the Future recently conducted a study that found 85 percent of the jobs in 2030 don't exist today. Having the conversation with kids on what they want to be when they grow up is becoming increasingly irrelevant because of this. They will need to be more adaptable for what future jobs may arise. We commonly describe a "professional" as someone who can do the same thing m

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To save honey bees we need to design them new hives

Honey bees are under extreme pressure. The number of honey bee colonies in the US has been declining at an average rate of almost 40% since 2010. The biggest contributor to this decline is viruses spread by a parasite, Varroa Destructor. But this isn't a natural situation. The parasite is spread by beekeeping practices, including keeping the bees in conditions that are very different from their na

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To save honey bees we need to design them new hives

Honey bees are under extreme pressure. The number of honey bee colonies in the US has been declining at an average rate of almost 40% since 2010. The biggest contributor to this decline is viruses spread by a parasite, Varroa Destructor. But this isn't a natural situation. The parasite is spread by beekeeping practices, including keeping the bees in conditions that are very different from their na

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Genetic mutation linked to flu-related heart complications

For the first time, research in mice has shown a link between a genetic mutation, flu and heart irregularities that researchers say might one day improve the care of flu patients.

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Do we tend to centre our Instagram selfies on our left eye?

New research suggests that we tend to compose 'selfies' that horizontally centre on one of our eyes, particularly the left. The study authors speculate that this alignment is because our eyes provide a wealth of information about our gaze direction and what we are paying attention to, which may in turn be used to share important information with the viewer about our mood and what we are thinking a

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Male honeybees inject queens with blinding toxins during sex

They say love is blind, but if you're a queen honeybee it could mean true loss of sight. New research finds male honeybees inject toxins during sex that cause temporary blindness.

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Scientists find biology's optimal 'molecular alphabet' may be preordained

Life uses 20 coded amino acids (CAAs) to construct proteins. This set was likely evolutionarily 'standardized' from smaller sets as organisms discovered how to make and encode them. Scientists modeled how the adaptive properties of the CAAs evolved over time. They found that sets containing even only a few CAAs were better than an enormous choice of alternatives, suggesting each time a modern CAA

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Herbalife or Herbadeath?

A case of fatal liver failure in India was attributed to Herbalife products, adding to many other reports from around the world. Analysis showed Herbalife products contain heavy metals and other contaminants. The products have not been scientifically tested, and in the absence of evidence of benefit to human health, they can't be recommended.

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Rare pictures uncover diverse marine life at Ningaloo Reef

Researchers at The University of Western Australia have collected rare imagery revealing rich marine biodiversity at Ningaloo Reef, after deploying baited underwater cameras to analyze various fish species.

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Wild mountain gorillas found to play in water like humans

A team of researchers from Kyoto University, Primate Cognition Research Group and Conservation through Public Health, has found that wild mountain gorillas living in Uganda play very much like humans when having fun in the water. In their paper published in the journal Primates, the group describes three episodes they observed of solitary gorillas splashing around in water.

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Effects of environmental changes in the Holocene on megaherbivores

An international team involving Hervé Bocherens of the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen has studied the effects of environmental changes in the Holocene on the megaherbivores, i.e., European bison, moose, and aurochs. The researchers concluded that the aurochs was unable to adapt to the altered conditions—the increasing spread of forests an

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Rare pictures uncover diverse marine life at Ningaloo Reef

Researchers at The University of Western Australia have collected rare imagery revealing rich marine biodiversity at Ningaloo Reef, after deploying baited underwater cameras to analyze various fish species.

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Wild mountain gorillas found to play in water like humans

A team of researchers from Kyoto University, Primate Cognition Research Group and Conservation through Public Health, has found that wild mountain gorillas living in Uganda play very much like humans when having fun in the water. In their paper published in the journal Primates, the group describes three episodes they observed of solitary gorillas splashing around in water.

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Effects of environmental changes in the Holocene on megaherbivores

An international team involving Hervé Bocherens of the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen has studied the effects of environmental changes in the Holocene on the megaherbivores, i.e., European bison, moose, and aurochs. The researchers concluded that the aurochs was unable to adapt to the altered conditions—the increasing spread of forests an

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On 9/11, Luck Meant Everything

Joseph Lott, a sales representative for Compaq computers, survived one of the deadliest days in modern American history because he had a penchant for “art ties,” neckties featuring famous masterpieces. “It began many years earlier, in the ’90s,” he said in an oral history with StoryCorps. “I love Impressionist paintings, and I use them as a way to make points with my kids. I’d put on an art tie,

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Dietary supplement may help with schizophrenia

A dietary supplement, sarcosine, may help with schizophrenia as part of a holistic approach complementing antipsychotic medication, according to a researcher.

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Hemophilia three times more prevalent than thought

Researchers performed a meta-analysis of the registry data in countries with the most comprehensive registries of hemophilia, which were Australia, Canada, France, Italy, New Zealand and the UK.

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The diet-microbiome connection in inflammatory bowel disease

A change in diet is a go-to strategy for treating inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn's. In dogs with a similar illness, researchers tracked specific changes in the microbiome as the pets went into remission. The team's findings, which mirror what is seen in children with Crohn's, could inform the design of improved therapeutic diets.

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Breast cancer cells 'stick together' to spread through the body during metastasis

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center discovered that a cell adhesion protein, E-cadherin, allows breast cancer cells to survive as they travel through the body and form new tumors, a process termed metastasis. Their conclusions, obtained through laboratory experiments and in mouse models, help explain how metastasis works in the most common form of breast cancer, invasive ductal c

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Date palms picky about bacterial partners

Bacterial DNA sequencing analyses show date palms that are cultivated over a vast stretch of the Tunisian Sahara Desert consistently attract two types of growth-promoting bacteria to their roots, regardless of the location. This finding could help with improving crop cultivation in a warming climate.

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Date palms picky about bacterial partners

Bacterial DNA sequencing analyses show date palms that are cultivated over a vast stretch of the Tunisian Sahara Desert consistently attract two types of growth-promoting bacteria to their roots, regardless of the location. This finding could help with improving crop cultivation in a warming climate.

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Immune-cell pioneers win prestigious Lasker medical award

Nature, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02710-5 Jacques Miller and Max Cooper, who discovered T- and B-cells, share US$250,000 basic-research prize.

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Violence and racism shape views of environmental issues

People living in marginalized communities in St. Louis, particularly African Americans, have been enduring, as one study participant said, "real problems" such as violence and racism that are perceived as more immediate than issues of climate change, finds a study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

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How the Brain Filters Sound

Our brains are constantly assailed by sensory stimuli. Sound, in particular, may bombard us from every direction, depending on the environment. That is a lot of information for brains to process, and so mammalian brains evolved mechanisms to filter out stimuli that is less likely to be useful. As our understanding of these mechanisms has become more sophisticated it has become clear that the brai

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She Doesn’t Believe All Women

John Cuneo On the afternoon of July 3, the day before President Donald Trump’s rained-on Independence Day celebration (or “show of a lifetime,” depending on whose Twitter feed you look at), a small but committed group left a wharf in Washington, D.C., for a cruise on the Potomac. In 2016, we learned that the Trump coalition was broader than many had assumed: the hold-your-nose-vote-your-pocketboo

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11 survival tricks to keep you safe in the woods

This story was originally published on Outdoor Life . Any good outdoor adventure involves a certain amount of risk. (John Hafner/) We all make mistakes. It’s only human. But what happens when our mistakes are combined with treacherous conditions in the outdoors? What happens when our blunders combine into a series of unfortunate events? Here we’ll look at the conditions and thought processes that

3h

Fighting Instagram's $1.3 Billion Problem—Fake Followers

As influencers strive for ever-higher engagement numbers, the battle between fake followers and fake-follower-detection tools is turning into an arms race.

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Sean Carroll Thinks We All Exist on Multiple Worlds

In his book *Something Deeply Hidden*, the physicist explores the idea of Many Worlds, which holds that the universe continually splits into new branches.

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Image of the Day: Ancient Footprints

A discovery of Neanderthal footprints reveals insights into the hominin's social structure.

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Danskernes nye biler bliver stadigt mere sorte

De små biler bliver fravalgt af danskerne, mens salget af SUV'er er steget markant de seneste år. Det samme gælder resten af Europa.

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New investigation cuts through the haze surrounding 'smoke-free' tobacco products

A class of alternative tobacco product called heat-not-burn is quickly gaining in popularity across the globe. The product manufacturers claim that these battery-operated devices produce a "clean," nicotine-laden vapor that contains fewer irritant and carcinogenic chemicals than a conventional cigarette—and are therefore a less harmful option for tobacco users. New research from the Department of

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A Blood Test Might One Day Mass-Screen Military Personnel for PTSD

An assay that measures 28 variables could identify individuals who need further treatment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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[N] Hyundai Develops VEX Exoskeleton to Support Assembly Line Workers

submitted by /u/Tardigradelegs [link] [comments]

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Here's why we need a Futurist in the White House.

This is going to be a long write-up so skip this if you don't think you have time on your hands . I genuinely don't see much getting done with any of those other candidates because they aren't tackling something at the core of human nature : The fact that we require incentives to drive us and progress. The question becomes, what kind of incentives are these, and how can we prevent Corporations or

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Her er Danmarks sundeste kommune

Et godt udgangspunkt blandt borgerne og et aktivt arbejde mod de grupper, der ifølge data viser behov for øget fokus betyder, at Gentofte Kommune kan kalde sig Danmarks sundeste kommune.

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A Blood Test Might One Day Mass-Screen Military Personnel for PTSD

An assay that measures 28 variables could identify individuals who need further treatment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Stanna eller gå – när är det dags för pension?

Delegationen för senior arbetskraft har av regeringen fått i uppdrag att hitta möjligheter för att bättre ta tillvara äldres erfarenhet och kompetens, så att de som vill och kan ska kunna fortsätta arbeta efter pensionsåldern. Kerstin Nilsson, forskare i folkhälsovetenskap, har precis slutfört en underlagsrapport.

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A Blood Test Might One Day Mass-Screen Military Personnel for PTSD

An assay that measures 28 variables could identify individuals who need further treatment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Forensic proteomics, a new tool for crime labs and anthropology

DNA evidence has revolutionized forensic science in the past few years, cracking open cold cases and bringing both convictions and exonerations. The same techniques help archaeologists and anthropologists studying remains from ancient peoples or human ancestors.

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A dash of salt could fortify MXene 'supermaterials' against oxidation

They can store electricity better than almost any material on Earth, block an onslaught of electromagnetic interference, and sniff out the faintest trace of toxins in the air, but MXenes, the latest super-material-in-waiting, have trouble with water. Like a rake left out in the rain, they oxidize, and quickly, when stored or mixed in water. It's an issue of consequence, considering some of the mos

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Higher suspension rates are linked to feeling less 'connected' at school

Adolescents attending schools with high suspension rates reported lower levels of feeling "connected" at school, according to a recent study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. Previous research has shown that feeling "connected" at school and volunteering relate to a positive school climate. Researchers also found that connectedness and volunteerism varied by race and income.

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Right Again, Einstein! Wobbling Pulsar Confirms General Relativity

A pulsar 25,000 light-years away is wobbling in a weird way. But Einstein's theory of general relativity predicted it more than a century ago.

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Short Stature Linked with Higher Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

Shorter people may be at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes compared with taller people.

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Three Ways to Fix the Drug Industry's Rampant Dysfunction

Big Pharma has come under fire for mislabeled drugs, price spikes, and life-threatening shortages. Now a handful of startups hope to clean up the industry.

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World leaders set to discuss how to ramp up climate change efforts

The UN climate action summit on 23 September will be the most important event since the Paris climate deal, but a lack of ambition could hold efforts back

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Scientists find biology's optimal 'molecular alphabet' may be preordained

An international and interdisciplinary team working at the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) at the Tokyo Institute of Technology has modeled the evolution of one of biology's most fundamental sets of building blocks and found that it may have special properties that helped bootstrap itself into its modern form.

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Nanotherapy: Controlled delivery of chemotherapeutics to fight cancer stem cells

Chemotherapy is one of the most used treatments against cancer, along with surgery and radiotherapy. In a chemotherapy treatment, one or several drugs are administered to the patient to remove or damage cancer cells. Nevertheless, the treatment has several drawbacks that are hard to overcome, particularly the side effects. In this case, the inherent toxicity of the drugs employed causes a variety

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Scientists find biology's optimal 'molecular alphabet' may be preordained

An international and interdisciplinary team working at the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) at the Tokyo Institute of Technology has modeled the evolution of one of biology's most fundamental sets of building blocks and found that it may have special properties that helped bootstrap itself into its modern form.

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Using rigorous evaluation to reduce and prevent homelessness in North America

For millions of people in the United States, the struggle for stable housing both shapes and is shaped by numerous factors, such as employment opportunities and wages, housing market dynamics, access to health care, financial stability, and involvement with the criminal justice system. In the United States, more than 500,000 people experience homelessness on a given night, and 1.4 million people p

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How STEM Education Must Evolve

We need to enhance the curriculum so graduates have a deeper understanding of how their work affects humanity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How STEM Education Must Evolve

We need to enhance the curriculum so graduates have a deeper understanding of how their work affects humanity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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3-D Printers Could Help Spread Weapons of Mass Destruction

Experts warn that new technology makes it easier to covertly produce WMDs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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3-D Printers Could Help Spread Weapons of Mass Destruction

Experts warn that new technology makes it easier to covertly produce WMDs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Brain-computer interface will make people telepathic, scientists say

submitted by /u/Professional-Dragon [link] [comments]

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Bukfetma farligare för kvinnor än för män

Forskarna undersökte även hur vår genetik påverkar inlagringen av fett i buken och presenterar en ny, enklare metod för att mäta bukfetma. Det är sedan tidigare känt att fettet som lagras runt organen i bukhålan och runt tarmarna (visceralt fett) är associerad med en ökad risk för diabetes och hjärt-kärlsjukdom. I den nya studien går forskarna ett steg längre och visar med hjälp av genetiska data

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What’s next for Registered Reports?

Nature, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02674-6 Reviewing and accepting study plans before results are known can counter perverse incentives. Chris Chambers sets out three ways to improve the approach.

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How Canadians Raised Millions to Save 2,000 Pristine Acres

Thousands of people came up with $2.3 million to buy the land in British Columbia and protect it from loggers.

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Climate Change Is Driving People Out of Central America

Both rapid-onset and long-term environmental crises continue to displace people from their homes in Central America. Displacement often happens indirectly through the impact of climate change on agricultural livelihoods, but countries like Honduras and Nicaragua are also affected by extreme weather events.

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Malcolm Gladwell Reaches His Tipping Point

It’s a bit embarrassing to finish a book by Malcolm Gladwell—master of the let me take you by the hand prose style, dealer in the simple and unmistakable thesis—and realize you don’t quite know what he’s driving at. Gladwell’s method is well established and, you would think, fail-safe. It’s one of the reasons his books have sold millions of copies. Among his other talents, he’s one of those “prof

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The Trade War Will Catch Up to Trump

The tariffs are piling up. By December 15, President Donald Trump plans to hit nearly everything Americans buy from China with duties, covering 20 percent of total U.S. imports. Predictably, Beijing has retaliated by eliminating access to a 1.4-billion-person market that took soybean farmers and other American businesses years to develop. Relations with China are getting more toxic by the day. No

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‘I’m Not Tossing in the Towel Yet’

The new print issue of the magazine has a short thought-experiment article , by me, on what happened after the fall of the Roman empire. (As I point out, this concerned the Western empire only—the one based in Italy, and the one Edward Gibbon described in The Decline and Fall . The Eastern empire, based in Constantinople, had many more centuries to run.) In a first round of reader responses , his

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STEM Is Overrated

A chorus of politicians, policy experts, and economically minded columnists have located the value of college in preparing young people for jobs. They argue that college students should spend their time in classes that will further their future careers and that colleges should offer curricula directed toward the positions that corporate America can offer graduates. One prominent argument in these

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Apple Event Liveblog: All the iPhone News as It Happens

Join us for live commentary beginning at 1 pm Eastern, 10 am Pacific.

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AI Can Pass Standardized Tests—But It Would Fail Preschool

Opinion: Sure, an AI aced an 8th-grade science test, but the method it used highlights its lack of common sense or anything resembling human understanding.

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Mangel på robotfolk? Find dem i produktionen

PLUS. Små og mellemstore industrivirksomheder mangler ofte kvalificeret arbejdskraft til automatisering. Men der er løsninger, hvis man leder de rigtige steder.

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Forget Driving. You’ll Wish You Could Watch TV in This Car

An electric SUV from Chinese startup Byton features a 4-foot-wide curved screen, as well as 270 horsepower and a 224-mile range.

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Apple event – live: What time, iPhone 11 release date, Apple Watch and how to stream online

Apple is holding the biggest event of the year, during which it reveal a whole host of its most premium products.

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Därför går vi upp i vikt när vi blir äldre

Forskarna studerade fettväven hos 54 män och kvinnor över en genomsnittlig period på 13 år. Under denna period hade vissa ökat, minskat eller bibehållit sin vikt. Gemensamt för alla var att omsättningen av fettet (så kallade lipider) i fettvävens fettceller minskade över tid. De som inte kompenserade detta med minskat kaloriintag ökade i vikt med i genomsnitt 20 procent, enligt studien som gjorde

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Should AI Researchers Get Special Access to Visas?

An industry group proposes that countries create a special visa for AI specialists, to foster the exchange of ideas.

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Gene-diet interactions associated with complex trait variation in an advanced intercross outbred mouse line

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11952-w Complex traits associate with genetic variation and environment and their interaction. Here, the authors study the influence of different diets on trait variability in 1154 outbred mice from an advanced intercross line and find gene-diet interactions associated with spontaneous autoimmunity development in t

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RuvC uses dynamic probing of the Holliday junction to achieve sequence specificity and efficient resolution

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11900-8 Holliday junctions (HJs) are four-way DNA structures that occur in DNA repair by homologous recombination which are removed by nucleases such as RuvC. Here the authors provide structural and biochemical details on the steps required for the completion of the process.

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Broadband on-chip single-photon spectrometer

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12149-x Single photon devices are needed for many future technologies, but resolving the color of single photons in a compact architecture is still a challenge. The authors present a broadband, chip-scale spectrometer for measuring single photon wavelengths from 600 to 2000 nm with no moving parts.

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Surpassing the 10% efficiency milestone for 1-cm2 all-polymer solar cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12132-6 Thick film is preferred for sufficient light absorption and tolerant processing but it easily spoils the charge transport in the all-polymer solar cells. Here Fan et al. reconcile by tuning the film morphology and deliver high efficiency of 10% in 1 cm2 area devices.

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Different brain networks mediate the effects of social and conditioned expectations on pain

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11934-y Our experience of pain can be affected by our expectations about how much pain we will feel. Here, the authors show that both social information-driven expectations, and those based on personal experience, are both able to modulate pain, but by different neural pathways.

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The CONSTANS flowering complex controls the protective response of photosynthesis in the green alga Chlamydomonas

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11989-x In flowering plants, the CONSTANS (CO) and Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) transcription factors connect light perception to floral induction. Here Tokutsu et al. show that in the green alga Chlamydomonas, CO and NF-Y form an analogous complex that can prevent photodamage in response to excess light.

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The enlightenment of age

Nature, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02667-5 Toren Finkel lauds two books outlining very different ways of achieving a longer ‘healthspan’ — through pharmacology or integrative care.

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Scientists — make time for contemplation

Nature, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02693-3

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South African system tracks SDG research

Nature, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02678-2

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Not a first: identifying hominin fossils from their proteins

Nature, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02692-4

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Colombia short on political will to protect pollinators

Nature, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02680-8

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Bioethicists clarify mitochondrial-therapy ban

Nature, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02679-1

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Diabetes nearly double for Japanese-Americans

A new study found that Japanese-American adults who are not obese have a much higher prevalence of diabetes than non-obese non-Hispanic white Americans.

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Google Docs now displays the word count as you type

One of the most frustrating things about Google Docs is having to manually access the menu every time you need to check if you've finally hit that essay's elusive word count. …

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Dorian insured damages in Caribbean as much as $6.5 bn

Hurricane Dorian, which lashed the Bahamas with devastating winds and surges of water, likely caused between $3.5 and $6.5 billion in insured damages in the Caribbean, said risk modelling and analytics firm RMS.

5h

Hundreds of schools shut as forest-fire haze blankets SE Asia

Huge fires are raging across vast swathes of Indonesia's rainforests—some of the world's biggest—with toxic smog shutting hundreds of schools in Southeast Asia, officials said Tuesday.

5h

Crystallization properties of arsenic doped GST alloys

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49168-z

5h

Transgenic Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes Transfer Genes into a Natural Population

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49660-6

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NeTFactor, a framework for identifying transcriptional regulators of gene expression-based biomarkers

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49498-y

5h

Demonstration of polarization control GaN-based micro-cavity lasers using a rigid high-contrast grating reflector

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49604-0

5h

Association between regular walking and periodontitis according to socioeconomic status: a cross-sectional study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49505-2

5h

Adhesion abilities and biosorption of Cd and Mg by microorganisms – first step for eco-friendly beneficiation of phosphate ore

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49406-4

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Damped resonance for broadband acoustic absorption in one-port and two-port systems

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49222-w

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Menstruations-apps med millioner af brugere sender følsomme data til Facebook

To populære applikationer til menstruations-tracking har sendt oplysninger om kvindernes brug af prævention, humør, tidspunkterne for deres menstruation og symptomer såsom hævelse og kramper til Facebook, påpeger ny rapport.

5h

Neanderthal footprints found in France offer snapshot of their lives

Scientists find 257 prints preserved over 80,000 years, suggesting a group of 10 to 13 comprising mostly children Like modern humans and primates, Neanderthals – our closest evolutionary cousins – are thought to have lived in groups, but their size and composition have been difficult to infer from archaeological and fossil remains. Now, though, scientists have reported the discovery of 257 footpr

5h

The new battle in Hong Kong isn’t on the streets: it’s in the apps

Activists are using Airdrop, livestreams, and innovative maps to keep their protest alive. But the authorities have plenty of tech of their own.

6h

A GABAergic and peptidergic sleep neuron as a locomotion stop neuron with compartmentalized Ca2+ dynamics

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12098-5 The GABAergic and peptidergic neuron RIS mediates sleep in Caenorhabditis elegans. The authors demonstrated here that RIS also functions as a locomotion stop neuron. Its optogenetic stimulation caused acute and persistent inhibition of locomotion, and brief intrinsic RIS activity preceded slowing.

6h

Samtlige bakterier i danske renseanlæg er nu kortlagt

Hvordan får vi hurtigere fjernet skum fra bassiner og optimeret andre processer i renseanlæg? Det ved forskerne langt mere om, efter at de nu har kortlagt samtlige bakteriearter i de danske anlæg, som renser vores spildevand. Resultaterne er på vej ud på web i det, der med tiden skal blive til en…

6h

Patients taking nivolumab experience five-fold increase in overall survival compared to chemotherapy

Pooled data on two clinical trials demonstrate patients taking nivolumab realized a greater than five-fold increase in five-year overall survival rate compared with the chemotherapy docetaxel. The presentation was made today by Dr. Scott Gettinger of Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, New Haven, Conn., at the IASLC 2019 World Conference on Lung Cancer, hosted by the International Association for th

6h

Nurse led follow-up service aids patients with respected early stage lung cancer, improves clinic efficiency

The presence of the specialist nurse within thoracic surgical centers in the United Kingdom increased clinic capacity and efficiency, reduced waiting time for appointments, promoted junior medical training and ensured continuity of care for the patients, according to an analysis reported today by Jenny Mitchell from Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, in Oxford, United Kingdom.

6h

KEYNOTE-024 three-year survival update

First line pembrolizumab monotherapy provides durable long-term overall survival benefit compared to chemotherapy, according to data presented today by Dr. M. Reck, Lung Clinic Grosshansdorf, Airway Research Center North (ARCN), Member of the German Center for Lung Research Grosshansdorf, Germany. The presentation was made at the IASLC 2019 World Conference on Lung Cancer, hosted by the Internatio

6h

IMpower131

Patients with Stage IV squamous non-small cell lung cancer enrolled in clinical trial to test the immunotherapy atezolizumab and chemotherapy against chemotherapy alone experienced a longer survival rate, among a subgroup of patients with high PD-LI.

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'Herculean' efforts save homes as Australia fires rage

Massive bushfires across eastern Australia could be blazing for weeks, authorities warned Tuesday, as firefighters launched "Herculean" efforts to save homes from destruction.

6h

India locates missing Moon lander

Indian space scientists were desperately trying Tuesday to establish communication with their broken Moon lander, having located the probe that went silent moments before it was due to make a historic soft landing.

6h

Ash tree species likely will survive emerald ash borer beetles, but just barely

"Lingering ash." That's what the U.S. Forest Service calls the relatively few green and white ash trees that survive the emerald ash borer onslaught. Those trees do not survive by accident, and that may save the species, according to Penn State researchers, who conducted a six-year study of ash decline and mortality.

6h

Plastics, fuels and chemical feedstocks from CO2? They're working on it

One way to reduce the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, which is now at its highest point in 800,000 years, would be to capture the potent greenhouse gas from the smokestacks of factories and power plants and use renewable energy to turn it into things we need, says Thomas Jaramillo.

6h

Ash tree species likely will survive emerald ash borer beetles, but just barely

"Lingering ash." That's what the U.S. Forest Service calls the relatively few green and white ash trees that survive the emerald ash borer onslaught. Those trees do not survive by accident, and that may save the species, according to Penn State researchers, who conducted a six-year study of ash decline and mortality.

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Can neural computer interfaces in the future help people with mental illnesses like schizophrenia ?

By modulating brain responses ? submitted by /u/rolling_pandas_2212 [link] [comments]

6h

Stretchy plastic electrolytes could enable new lithium-ion battery design

The growing popularity of lithium-ion batteries in recent years has put a strain on the world's supply of cobalt and nickel—two metals integral to current battery designs—and sent prices surging.

6h

Buzzkill? Male honeybees inject queens with blinding toxins during sex

They say love is blind, but if you're a queen honeybee it could mean true loss of sight.

6h

Bulgaria, Romania struggle with swine fever outbreaks

When Vanya Dimitrova received the Bulgarian veterinary services' notice to kill her pigs because of African swine fever, she was shocked.

6h

Buzzkill? Male honeybees inject queens with blinding toxins during sex

They say love is blind, but if you're a queen honeybee it could mean true loss of sight.

6h

Bulgaria, Romania struggle with swine fever outbreaks

When Vanya Dimitrova received the Bulgarian veterinary services' notice to kill her pigs because of African swine fever, she was shocked.

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7h

UK farms plan for going 'carbon neutral'

Farm union unveils plan to slash emissions and combat CO2 – but critics ask why no mention of meat?

7h

Danmarks første polytekniske tidsskrifter kan nu læses på skærmen

Nu kan du læse H.C. Ørsteds diskussion af elektromagnetisme fra 1822 i Ingeniørernes danmarkshistorie

7h

Nye strækbare sensorer kan sættes direkte på kroppen

PLUS. De måler sved på panden og væske i bleen. Nye materialer gør det muligt at lave engangssensorer i tøj eller på kroppen, der kommunikerer trådløst med omverdenen.

7h

Scientists spot six near-extinct vaquita marinas

Scientists said Monday they have spotted six vaquita marinas, one of the most endangered animals on Earth, off the coast of Mexico, reviving hopes for the survival of the world's smallest porpoise.

7h

Scientists spot six near-extinct vaquita marinas

Scientists said Monday they have spotted six vaquita marinas, one of the most endangered animals on Earth, off the coast of Mexico, reviving hopes for the survival of the world's smallest porpoise.

7h

World must adapt to 'inevitable' climate change, warns report

Nations rich and poor must invest now to protect against the effects of climate change or pay an even heavier price later, a global commission warned Tuesday.

7h

Following Neanderthals' footsteps to learn how they lived

Like modern humans and primates, Neanderthals—our closest evolutionary cousins—are thought to have lived in groups, but their size and composition have been difficult to infer from archeological and fossil remains.

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7h

Experts say adapting to climate change can pay off manifold

A group of leaders from business, politics and science have called for a massive investment in adapting to climate change over the next decade, arguing it would reap significant returns as countries avoid catastrophic losses and boost their economies.

7h

Study: Children are interested in politics but need better education from parents and schools

The 2020 election is approaching—how should we talk with children about this election and about politics more broadly? The findings of a new multisite study of children's reactions to the 2016 U.S. presidential election might inform these conversations.

7h

8h

Car makers near CO2 cliff-edge in electrification race

submitted by /u/mynameisalex1 [link] [comments]

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Cyberpunk version 0.01 alpha

submitted by /u/I_sa_ac [link] [comments]

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Do we tend to center our Instagram selfies on our left eye?

New research suggests that we tend to compose 'selfies' that horizontally center on one of our eyes, particularly the left. The study authors speculate that this alignment is because our eyes provide a wealth of information about our gaze direction and what we are paying attention to, which may in turn be used to share important information with the viewer about our mood and what we are thinking a

8h

Buzzkill?

They say love is blind, but if you're a queen honeybee it could mean true loss of sight. New research from UC Riverside finds male honeybees inject toxins during sex that cause temporary blindness.

8h

Australian watchdog hurt competition by barring Vodafone, TPG merger: telcos

Australia's antitrust regulator has hurt competition by blocking a A$15 billion ($10 billion) merger between the nation's third- and fourth-largest telecoms providers, the companies said in …

8h

'Neural revolution': Royal Society calls for inquiry into new wave of brain implants

Scientists think devices could allow people to communicate telepathically or the paralysed to walk in the next decades Society must prepare for a technological revolution in which brain implants allow people to communicate by telepathy, download new skills, and brag about their holidays in “neural postcards”, leading scientists say. While such far-fetched applications remain fiction for now, rese

9h

Brexit and Britain’s Northern Ireland Déjà Vu

An ostensibly intractable problem in Northern Ireland. Historic grievances bubbling to the surface. Peace on the line. Leaps of faith required. Trust in short supply. With Britain and Ireland now at loggerheads over the terms of the United Kingdom’s departure from the European Union, with Brexit causing seemingly unending chaos in the British Parliament, and with the main political actors insisti

9h

‘The End of Hong Kong as We Know It’

HONG KONG—Before this summer’s rallies, the last major protest movement here was an exuberant affair. At the main site of the 2014 Umbrella Movement, rows of rainbow-colored tents lined the roads while cultural expression flourished—every available surface, from walls to sidewalks, bridges to traffic barriers, was plastered in banners, posters, flyers, chalk drawings, Post-it notes, and sculpture

9h

Tesla's Battery Guru Describes A New Cell With Massive Lifetime

submitted by /u/Abscess2 [link] [comments]

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10h

Newest Pterosaur Was Likely as Tall as a Giraffe

Ancient flying reptile dubbed Cryodrakon boreas, the "cold dragon of the north winds," may shed light on the evolution of these dinosaur relatives. Maas-Cryodrakon-boreas.jpg Image credits: David Maas Rights information: Used with permission Creature Tuesday, September 10, 2019 – 00:15 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — A new species of giant pterosaur has been discovered in the Di

10h

Genetic mutation linked to flu-related heart complications

For the first time, research in mice has shown a link between a genetic mutation, flu and heart irregularities that researchers say might one day improve the care of flu patients. The study, led by Jacob Yount at The Ohio State University, appears today in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

10h

Scientists find biology's optimal 'molecular alphabet' may be preordained

Life uses 20 coded amino acids (CAAs) to construct proteins. This set was likely evolutionarily 'standardized' from smaller sets as organisms discovered how to make and encode them. Scientists modeled how the adaptive properties of the CAAs evolved over time. They found that sets containing even only a few CAAs were better than an enormous choice of alternatives, suggesting each time a modern CAA

10h

Study: Children are interested in politics but need better education from parents and schools

The 2020 election is approaching — how should we talk with children about this election and about politics more broadly? The findings of a new multisite study of children's reactions to the 2016 US presidential election might inform these conversations.

10h

Researchers propose the 'Alzheimer's Disease Exposome' to address environmental risks

USC and Duke researchers propose the 'Alzheimer's Disease Exposome' to address major gaps in understanding environmental risk factors.

10h

Caregiver stress: The crucial, often unrecognized byproduct of chronic disease

There is growing evidence that caregivers of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) are vulnerable to developing their own poor cardiovascular health. Investigators report in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, published by Elsevier, on a proof-of-concept couples-based intervention in a cardiac rehabilitation setting. This intervention has shown potential for reducing caregiver distress, and f

10h

Study: Adults' actions, successes, failures, and words affect young children's persistence

Children's persistence in the face of challenges is key to learning and academic success. However, we know little about how parents and educators can help foster persistent behavior in children before they begin formal schooling. A new US study looked at the interactions of preschool-age children with adults to determine how they affected the children's persistence. It found that the efforts adult

10h

Last Day of The Dinosaurs Revealed in Stunning Glimpse of Asteroid Disaster

A fiery hell with the force of 10 billion atomic bombs.

11h

Derfor bragede NemLog-in ned trods failover: Host forsøgte at bruge forkert storage

En fortrolig problemrapport fra NNIT kaster lys over, hvad der gik galt med den sikkerhedsløsning, som skulle forhindre nedbruddet af det kritiske it-system ved navn NemLog-in.

11h

New flying reptile species was one of largest ever flying animals

A newly identified species of pterosaur is among the largest ever flying animals, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.

11h

Interview: Ikke engang 31 procent genanvendelse kan Vestforbrænding dokumentere

PLUS. Danmarks største affaldsselskab Vestforbrænding kunne sidst i august kun med sikkerhed sige, at 31 procent af københavnernes plastaffald blev genanvendt. Men nu viser det sig, at Vestforbrænding heller ikke kan bevise genanvendelsen af den del.

12h

New flying reptile species was one of largest ever flying animals

A newly identified species of pterosaur is among the largest ever flying animals, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.

12h

Antibiotic resistance can spread in the absence of drugs

Using mice, scientists have recently identified a mechanism independent of antibiotic use that can spread drug resistance among intestinal bacteria.

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12h

Building climate change defences could massively boost world economy

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

12h

Meet The Hyperloop's Truest Believers

submitted by /u/futuredude [link] [comments]

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12h

Unusual Lakes Detected on Titan Could Be The Ancient Scars of Giant Explosions

These mysterious formations are not what we thought.

13h

Climate change: Five ways to be resilient

The Global Commission on Adaptation – a group of 34 leaders in politics, business and science say the world urgently needs to be made more "climate change resilient".

13h

EA is testing its cloud gaming service – CNET

Project Atlas enters trial phase across four games on PC: FIFA 19, Titanfall 2, Need for Speed Rivals and Unravel.

13h

14h

These apps may have told Facebook about the last time you had sex

A new report finds that some period-tracking apps shared intimate information with Facebook. In some cases, that data included when the user reported last having sex.

14h

Experimental 'blood test' accurately screens for PTSD

An artificial intelligence tool confirmed with 77% accuracy a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in male combat veterans.

14h

5 factors influence water use for single-family homes

A community’s built environment—in particular, design factors such as vegetated land cover, housing density, and lot size—closely relates to how much water single-family residences use, according to a new study. The findings can provide key data for city planners and water managers looking to develop sustainable water use strategies for their communities, researchers suggest in a new paper in the

14h

Once or twice weekly daytime nap linked to lower heart attack/stroke risk

A daytime nap taken once or twice a week may lower the risk of having a heart attack/stroke, finds new research. But no such association emerged for either greater frequency or duration of naps.

15h

Why people gain weight as they get older

Many people struggle to keep their weight in check as they get older. Now new research has uncovered why that is: lipid turnover in the fat tissue decreases during aging and makes it easier to gain weight, even if we don't eat more or exercise less than before.

15h

Scientists triple storage time of human donor livers

A new method of preservation maintains human liver tissue for up to 27 hours will give doctors and patients a much longer timeframe for organ transplant.

15h

Building climate change defences could massively boost world economy

Adapting to climate change could boos the world economy by trillions of dollars, says a report backed by Ban Ki-Moon, Bill Gates and the head of the World Bank

15h

Stretchy plastic electrolytes could enable new lithium-ion battery design

Researchers have developed a promising new cathode and electrolyte system that replaces expensive metals and traditional liquid electrolyte with lower cost transition metal fluorides and a solid polymer electrolyte.

15h

Success of gene therapy for a form of inherited blindness depends on timing

An FDA-approved gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis, an inherited vision disorder with a childhood onset and progressive nature, has improved patients' sight. But new research on the blinding condition but new research underscores the importance of further investigation to halt the progression of the disorder.

15h

Watching music move through the brain

Scientists have observed how the human brain represents a familiar piece of music, according to research published in JNeurosci. Their results suggest that listening and remembering music involve different cognitive processes.

15h

Scientists develop technique to reveal epigenetic features of cells in the brain

Researchers combined two different analysis techniques into one method, to simultaneously analyze how chromosomes, along with their epigenetic features, are compacted inside of single human brain cells. The method, called single-nucleus methyl-3C sequencing, not only enabled them to identify gene regulatory elements in distinct cell types, but also paves the way toward a new understanding of how s

15h

Bird call ‘building blocks’ mirror human language

The “building blocks” of bird calls resemble those of human languages, according to new research. Through analysis of the calls of the chestnut-crowned babbler, a highly social bird from the Australian Outback, the researchers say they’ve gained new insight into the evolution of human language. Human languages comprise meaningful words, which themselves are built from different combinations of me

15h

Climate change: 'Invest $1.8 trillion to adapt'

Global Commission calls for trillions of dollars to help the world adapt to climate change.

15h

FDA Says Juul Can't Claim to Be Safer Than Cigarettes

Regulators say Juul hasn't proved its claim that e-cigarettes are safer than tobacco, and uses misleading appeals to kids.

15h

The Atlantic Politics Daily: All the President’s Tempers

We’re trying something new with The Atlantic’s signature politics newsletter. Comments or questions? Send us an email anytime. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We appreciate your continued support for our journalism. General Motors and Fuyao (Netflix) The U.S.-China relationship is often defined through buzzwords—tariffs, more tariffs, trade war, great-power competition. When

15h

Dietary supplement may help with schizophrenia

A dietary supplement, sarcosine, may help with schizophrenia as part of a holistic approach complementing antipsychotic medication, according to a UCL researcher.

15h

Royal Society urges UK to regulate machine-brain interfaces

Report highlights country’s potential for neural interface research but warns of ethical concerns

15h

Cement Mixed on ISS Helps Pave the Way for Future Space Colonies

As cement hardens through a process called hydration, the molecules within the mixture develop millions of microscopic crystals, like those seen in this screenshot from the NASA video below. These interlocking crystals help the cement molecules bind with each other, as well as other concrete ingredients like gravel, sand, and small rocks. (Credit: NASA ScienceCasts) Concrete, in one form or anothe

15h

AI creates new drug compounds in just 21 days

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

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Hands on with the 32.5-megapixel Canon EOS 90D DSLR

The EOS 90D is a new EF-mount camera with a 32.5 megapixel APS-C sensor. (Jeanette D. Moses/) This story originally published on Popphoto.com . Early this morning, Canon released news about a ton of forthcoming products, among them was the Canon EOS 90D, a new EF-mount camera with a 32.5 megapixel APS-C sensor that is powered by a DIGIC 8 processor. The camera has an optical viewfinder (as you’d

16h

Is veganism bad for brain health?

More and more people are turning to vegetarianism and veganism, which is good news for the fight against climate change. However, the switch to more restrictive diets such as these could exacerbate an existing issue of inadequate choline consumption. An essential nutrient that supports brain health, choline is already underrepresented in our diets and is easily to miss with a poorly-constructed v

16h

Marchetti’s Constant: The curious principle that shapes our cities

The average commute, from antiquity to now: half an hour That's Marchetti's Constant, and it informs the growth of our modern cities But we're stuck in traffic, and waiting for the next great leap forward. The curious constant What do the citizens of ancient Rome have in common with those of modern Atlanta? The duration of their daily commute: an hour, at most. No matter whether we move on foot o

16h

A Fight for the Soul of NOAA

Updated on Sept. 10, 2019, at 8:44 am Hurricane Dorian did not hit Alabama. It did not come within hundreds of miles. When it came as close as it ever got, it was still more than 200 miles away. That was on September 5, and in Alaga, Alabama—the town “closest” to Dorian’s eye—it was mostly sunny that day, with a gentle breeze , according to the weather almanac Dark Sky. So: Hurricane Dorian did n

16h

The world’s strongest lightning hits—not in summer—but from November to February

"Superbolts" of lightning strike the ocean more often than land

16h

Food Expiration Dates May Mislead Consumers

Better food labeling could prevent people from throwing away a lot of "expired" food that's still perfectly edible.

16h

US political sanctions on Iran curtailing global scientific progress: analysis

The political sanctions imposed on Iran by the US are curtailing global scientific progress, suggests an analysis published in the online journal BMJ Global Health.

16h

16h

Author Correction: Domestic cats (Felis catus) discriminate their names from other words

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46257-x Author Correction: Domestic cats ( Felis catus ) discriminate their names from other words

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Publisher Correction: On the role of ocular torsion in binocular visual matching

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49308-5

16h

ADHD medication: How much is too much for a hyperactive child?

When children with ADHD don't respond well to Methylphenidate (MPH, also known as Ritalin) doctors often increase the dose. Now a new review shows that increasing the dose may not always be the best option, as it may have no effect on some of the functional impairments associated with ADHD. This work is presented at the ECNP Conference in Copenhagen.

16h

Why don't the drugs work? Controlling inflammation can make antidepressants more effective

Research shows that controlling inflammation may be key to helping the brain develop the flexibility to respond to antidepressant drugs, potentially opening the way for treatment for many millions of people who do not respond to the drugs. This is experimental work on mice, and has not yet been confirmed in humans. It is presented together for the first time at the ECNP Congress in Copenhagen, aft

16h

Study shows shorter people are at higher risk of type 2 diabetes

Short stature is associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a new study in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes).Tall stature is associated with a lower risk, with each 10cm difference in height associated with a 41% decreased risk of diabetes in men and a 33% decreased risk in women.

16h

How we make decisions depends on how uncertain we are

A new study on how we use reward information for making choices shows how humans and monkeys adopt their decision-making strategies depending on the uncertainty of information present. The findings challenge one of the most fundamental assumptions in economics, neuroeconomics and choice theory that decision-makers typically evaluate risky options in a multiplicative way when in fact this only appl

16h

Acute periodontal disease bacteria love colon and dirt microbes

Mythbuster: The idea that bacterial collaborations within microbiomes, like in the mouth, have evolved to be generous and exclusive very much appears to be wrong. In an extensive experiment, lavish collaborations ensued between random microbes. And some bacteria from the same microbiome were stingy with one another.

16h

The Myth of Processed Foods, an Amazon Walkout, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

16h

Google's Nest Hub Max smart screen is bigger, better, and always watching (if you want it to)

The Nest Hub Max has a 10-inch screen that looks great in the kitchen. (Stan Horaczek/) Every time I walk into my kitchen, a small picture of my face pops up on in the top-right corner of the Nest Hub Max 's 10-inch screen. If it's the first time it has seen me on any given day, it automatically displays the weather forecast. If I ask it for my appointments, it knows which calendar to look at. Al

16h

What does self-actualization mean in different cultures?

When Abraham Maslow developed his hierarchy of needs, he focused entirely on students, peers, and historical figures, all of whom were from the West. This led many critics to argue that his model of human development and the concept of self-actualization were not universal; they merely reflected Western ideas about development and self-improvement. Other cultures ranging from Blackfoot Native Ame

17h

States Are Turning Up the Heat on Google and Facebook

State attorneys general revealed investigations into possible anticompetitive behavior by tech giants, adding to probes by Congress and federal agencies.

17h

Food Expiration Dates May Mislead Consumers

Better food labeling could prevent people from throwing away a lot of "expired" food that's still perfectly edible. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

Affordable essential oil diffusers to make your space feel a bit lovelier

You can ignore a lot of the essential oil hype, but it's true a diffuser can improve the stench of your space. (Christin Hume via Unplash/) There's a lot of pseudo-science surrounding essential oils, but they don't need to cure any ailments in order to improve your life. Helping your home smell nicer (without the risk associated with a candle's open flame) is nice enough. Lavender and chamomile m

17h

50 US attorneys general have launched an antitrust investigation of Google

The move is part of a wide-ranging push to rein in the power of Big Tech

17h

Federal Watchdog Warns EPA Is Failing To Enforce Lead Paint Abatement Rules

Home renovations can kick up dangerous dust from lead-based paint. A new report finds the Environmental Protection Agency is not adequately enforcing rules meant to protect kids from lead exposure. (Image credit: Stew Milne/AP)

17h

Commerce Chief Threatened Firings at NOAA After Trump’s Dorian Tweets, Sources Say

Wilbur L. Ross Jr. made the threat after the agency’s Alabama office contradicted the president’s claim that Hurricane Dorian might hit the state.

17h

Don't Get Screwed Out of Your Equifax Settlement Money

If you signed up for $125 payout in the Equifax settlement, you just hit another hurdle. But this isn't over.

17h

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It’s Not the Storm; It’s the Cover-Up

President Donald Trump’s mind-bending debacle over Hurricane Dorian and Alabama comes to resemble the storm itself more by the day: unpredictable in course, lingering far longer than anyone hoped or expected, and ultimately disastrous. There’s still no compelling explanation for why Trump has become so obsessed with the particular claim that he was right when he said that Dorian was headed for Al

17h

How we make decisions depends on how uncertain we are

A new Dartmouth study on how we use reward information for making choices shows how humans and monkeys adopt their decision-making strategies depending on the uncertainty of information present. The findings published in Nature Human Behavior challenge one of the most fundamental assumptions in economics, neuroeconomics and choice theory that decision-makers typically evaluate risky options in a m

17h

Hemophilia three times more prevalent than thought

For the World Federation of Hemophilia, Iorio assembled an international team of researchers from France, US and UK to perform a meta-analysis of the registry data in countries with the most comprehensive registries of hemophilia, which were Australia, Canada, France, Italy, New Zealand and the UK.

17h

New York’s Governor Wants to Ban Flavored Vapes

During a press briefing to address the deadly vaping-related epidemic sweeping the nation, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo delivered a succinct message to anyone thinking about vaping in his state: Don’t do it. “Common sense says if you do not know what you are smoking, don’t smoke it,” he said . “And right now, we don’t know what you are smoking in a lot of these vaping substances.” In addition t

17h

LinkedIn loses appeal in suit against data scraping startup

A federal appeals court has affirmed the right of a startup company to scrape people's profiles on networking service LinkedIn for data.

17h

Teeth offer vital clues about diet during the Great Irish Famine

Scientific analysis of dental calculus — plaque build-up — of the Famine's victims found evidence of corn (maize), oats, potato, wheat and milk foodstuffs.

17h

Birds string together meaningless sounds to make 'words'

A new study sheds light on whether animal vocalizations, like human words, are constructed from smaller building blocks. By analyzing calls of the Australian chestnut-crowned babbler, the researchers have for the first time identified the meaning-generating building blocks of a non-human communication system.

17h

Rocks at asteroid impact site record first day of dinosaur extinction

The research centers on the asteroid impact that wiped out non-avian dinosaurs, with the researchers getting the most detailed look yet of the aftermath that followed by examining the rocks and debris that filled the crater within the first 24 hours after impact.

17h

Good at math? It means little if you're not confident

Being good at math relates to better financial and medical outcomes — unless you don't have confidence in your own abilities with numbers, new research suggests. In two studies, researchers found that the key to success in personal finances and dealing with a complex disease was a match between a person's math abilities and how comfortable and assured he or she felt using those skills.

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To reduce pollution, policymakers should broaden focus beyond smokestacks

Researchers used integrated assessment models to compute marginal damages from fine particulate matter-related emissions to measure economy-wide gross external damage due to premature mortality and other health outcomes.

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The best video games to play after your kids go to sleep

Power on. (Alexander Andrews via Unsplash/) As people who were kids at the time of the Nintendo Entertainment System's release age up, a new league of gamers emerges, one that—thanks to the recent arrival of offspring—is made up of people unable to devote time to playing except for late in the evening, when the little ones are (hopefully) asleep. But the problem with being a so-called midnight da

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“Unjustified authorship” spikes paper by daughter of South Korea official

Following weeks of scrutiny, the daughter of a high-profile official in South Korea has had a paper she wrote as a high school student retracted, in part because the journal determined she had made no intellectual contributions to the study. Cho Kuk, who was officially appointed yesterday (September 9) as the top justice official in … Continue reading

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India Still Trying to Contact its Lost Moon Lander

This photo of the Virkam lander shows it being hoisted and readied, prior to its launch this past July. (Credit: ISRO) The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) isn’t giving up hope for its lost lunar lander just yet. The space agency will keep trying to establish contact with the Virkam lander for 14 days, according to the Times of India. On September 6, the spacecraft was scheduled to have a

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Did a Single Genetic Mutation Make Humans the Heart Attack Species?

(Credit: halfbottle/Shutterstock) There are many things that set us humans apart from other species: large brains, bipedalism, a predilection for puns. But we’re also defined by our singular vulnerability to cardiovascular disease. Heart attacks and strokes, the leading causes of death in humans worldwide, are rampant in our species and our species alone. Even chimpanzees, our closest relatives in

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Stretchy plastic electrolytes could enable new lithium-ion battery design

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a promising new cathode and electrolyte system that replaces expensive metals and traditional liquid electrolyte with lower cost transition metal fluorides and a solid polymer electrolyte.

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Head of US Space Command: Space Is “Clearly a Warfighting Domain”

Four-Point Plan General John Raymond, head of the U.S. Space Command , just announced the newly-formed organization’s priorities as it prepares for a future where battles are fought in outer space. Raymond told members of the press Monday that the U.S. could no longer assume superiority in space, according to C4ISRNET . He said that the organization would first bolster its forces in hopes of dete

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The diet-microbiome connection in inflammatory bowel disease

A change in diet is a go-to strategy for treating inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn's. In dogs with a similar illness, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania tracked specific changes in the microbiome as the pets went into remission. The team's findings, which mirror what is seen in children with Crohn's, could inform the design of improved therapeutic diets.

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Success of gene therapy for a form of inherited blindness depends on timing

An FDA-approved gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis, an inherited vision disorder with a childhood onset and progressive nature, has improved patients' sight. But new research on the blinding condition, led by Kristin Gardiner, William Beltran, and Gustavo Aguirre from the School of Veterinary Medicine in partnership with Artur Cideciyan and Samuel Jacobson from the Perelman School of Medi

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Plastics, fuels and chemical feedstocks from CO2? They're working on it

Four SUNCAT scientists describe recent research results related to the quest to capture CO2 from the smokestacks of factories and power plants and use renewable energy to turn it into industrial feedstocks and fuels.

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Acute periodontal disease bacteria love colon and dirt microbes

Mythbuster: The idea that bacterial collaborations within microbiomes, like in the mouth, have evolved to be generous and exclusive very much appears to be wrong. In an extensive experiment, lavish collaborations ensued between random microbes. And some bacteria from the same microbiome were stingy with one another.

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Electric kettles to rely on when the weather gets cold

A flawless cup of tea. (Toa Heftiba via Unsplash/) Want an easy, no-mess way to boil water on the quick? Electric kettles are the solution. They can bring water to a full boil in under eight minutes, and automatically shut down, so you won’t have to worry about water boiling over. Some can maintain the water temperature after boiling, and some lets you set precise temperatures, which is ideal for

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White noise machines that may help you fall asleep faster

Machines to help you get some shut-eye—even when your upstairs neighbor is enthusiastically playing video games. (Kalegin Michail via Unsplash/) White noise machines are useful in more settings than you’d think. While they are best known for helping people fall asleep, they can also be used for quite the opposite. Say you’re at the office and need to focus—a white noise machine can protect your c

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Apple Says Google Blew iPhone Hacking Report Out of Proportion

Apple talks up iPhone security, but Zerodium says it's falling behind. Apple is used to promoting the security of its products in comparison to the competition, but it was on the defensive last week following a report from Google’s Project Zero. According to Google researchers , iOS was the target of a sophisticated attack for two years until Google alerted Apple in early 2019. However, Apple is

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Life, the Universe, and Math: 42 Proven to be the Sum of 3 Cubes

Image credit: Martinultima/Wikipedia The problem of 42 — at least as it relates to whether the number could be considered the sum of three cubes — has finally been solved. The question of whether every number under 100 could be expressed in this fashion has been a long-standing puzzle in the world of mathematics. Now, two mathematicians, Andrew Sutherland of MIT and Andrew Booker of Bristol, have

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Ash tree species likely will survive emerald ash borer beetles, but just barely

'Lingering ash.' That's what the US Forest Service calls the relatively few green and white ash trees that survive the emerald ash borer onslaught. Those trees do not survive by accident, and that may save the species, according to Penn State researchers, who conducted a six-year study of ash decline and mortality.

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Researchers find regulator of first responder cells to brain injury

Researchers identified nuclear factor I-A (NFIA) as a central regulator of both the generation and activity of reactive astrocytes.

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Four XLR cables for every audiophile

Cables for days. (Oscar Keys via Unsplash/) Shorthand for “external line connector,” XLR is nothing more than a fancy name for this three-pronged cable that’s as ubiquitous and essential to the music industry toolbox as the ¼” guitar cable. Got a microphone to hook up? This is your ticket. Plugging speakers into a mixer? Look no further. From Woodstock ‘69 to Saturday night karaoke, this is the c

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Genetic ‘road map’ reveals the lost birthplace of a 150-year-old butterfly

DNA mapping method could help geolocate other disputed species

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Scientists Says Politicization Of The Weather Will Not Affect How They Do Their Jobs

At the National Weather Association conference in Huntsville, Ala., this week, scientists say the politicization of weather is cause for concern, but will not affect the way they do their jobs.

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Tokyo Clerk Memorized 1300+ Credit Cards To Steal Them

We have observed multiple events where the customer’s credit card info gets leaked (hacked) or simply a victim of any online scam. If you are visiting trusted web services (and know …

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50 states and territories launch massive joint probe into Google

All but two states are on board; federal, international probes have a head start.

18h

New drug may protect against memory loss in Alzheimer's disease

A new drug discovered may protect against memory loss, nerve damage and other symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

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Heart rate monitors to track your vitals while on the run

Know when to push yourself and when to cool off. (Emma Simpson via Unsplash/) Heart rate monitors can tell you when you need to pick up the pace or that you're pushing your limits. These heart rate monitors will give you a more accurate reading than your Apple Watch or that old treadmill at the gym. Just one button. (Amazon/) The Polar Ft1 heart monitor watch comes with a chest strap that is adju

18h

Prominent Researcher Predicts That Democracy Is Going to Collapse

Doomsayer Democracy may be on its way out, to be replaced by far-right populism and authoritarianism. Shawn Rosenberg, a prominent psychologist at the University of California, Irvine shocked the crowd at a recent meeting of the International Society of Political Psychologists by arguing that “democracy is devouring itself,” Politico reports . Ultimately, he doesn’t believe that everyday people a

18h

Employee contract structures in startups can be determining factors of success

Conventional wisdom in the startup community is that with the right incentives, the venture can meet and exceed expectations, and a major component of this is how you structure your contracts for founders and early employees.

18h

Fermilab achieves world-record field strength for accelerator magnet

To build the next generation of powerful proton accelerators, scientists need the strongest magnets possible to steer particles close to the speed of light around a ring. For a given ring size, the higher the beam's energy, the stronger the accelerator's magnets need to be to keep the beam on course.

18h

NASA finds Tropical Storm Faxai's heavy rainmaking storms off-shore from Japan

The big island of Japan received Tropical Storm Faxai and NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center infrared data and cloud top temperature information that revealed the most powerful storms just off-shore when the satellite flew overhead.

18h

NASA estimates Hurricane Dorian's massive rainfall track

On Monday morning, September 9, Hurricane Dorian was a post-tropical storm after a mid-latitude weather front and cold seas had altered its tropical characteristics over the weekend. NASA compiled data on Hurricane Dorian and created a map that showed the heavy rainfall totals it left in its wake from the Bahamas to Canada.

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Experience of being a minority puts US teens at higher risk of anxiety, depression

Puerto Rican teens growing up as minorities in the South Bronx are more likely to experience anxiety and depression than their peers growing up as a majority in Puerto Rico, even under similar conditions of poverty.

19h

Transplant organs can be supercooled to below zero for longer storage

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Purdue University welcomes delivery robots

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This Apartment-Like Camper Van Could Be the Future of Van Life

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'Superblocks' model could prevent almost 700 premature deaths every year in Barcelona

The city of Barcelona could prevent 667 premature deaths every year by implementing the proposed "Superblocks" project in its entirety. This result would be achieved mainly as a result of decreased air pollution (NO2), but reductions in traffic noise and mitigation of heat island effects would also be contributing factors. These were some of the conclusions of a recent study published in Environme

19h

Swapping 1 atom lets visible light trigger fluorescent dyes

Replacing just one atom gives new powers to biocompatible fluorescent molecules, say researchers. The Rice University lab of chemist Han Xiao reports in the Journal of the American Chemical Society that it has developed a single-atom switch to turn fluorescent dyes used in biological imaging on and off at will. The technique will enable high-resolution imaging and dynamic tracking of biological p

19h

Police Drone Caught Barking Orders at Chinese Driver

Order From Above Police in China don’t have to pull drivers over to warn them of traffic offenses — now they can just bark orders from hovering drones. On Friday, state broadcaster CCTV aired footage of traffic police using a drone to tell a scooter rider to put on his helmet, according to a newly published South China Morning Post story . After realizing the disembodied voice was speaking to him

19h

Misconduct findings fell KI Vice-President Dahlman-Wright

Karolinska Vice-president Karin Dahlman-Wright was found guilty of research misconduct, not much, only in one case, and even that shared. But she already resigned.

19h

New blood test accurately predicts when people will die — within 5–10 years

A research team found 14 biomarkers can accurately predict death within 5–10 years. Such a test could help doctors and researchers prescribe better courses of treatments for patients. Information about mortality might inspire people to eat better and exercise more, thus reversing the effects of some biomarkers. None Portending the future has long been a preoccupation of our species. Whether fortu

19h

Photos of the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair

In April 1904, St. Louis opened its doors to the world for what was officially called the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, but was widely known as the St. Louis World’s Fair. Millions of dollars had been spent to build the 1,200-acre fairgrounds and its nearly 1,500 buildings—a huge scale that ended up delaying the opening by a year. During the eight months the fair stayed open, nearly 20 million p

19h

How Safari and iMessage Have Made iPhones Less Secure

Security researchers say iOS's security woes stem in part from Apple putting too much trust in its own software's code.

19h

What Happened the Day a Giant, Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid Hit the Earth

Using rock cores from Chicxulub crater, geologists piece together a new timeline of the destruction that followed impact

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Commerce Chief Threatened Firings at NOAA After Trump’s Dorian Tweets, Sources Say

Wilbur L. Ross Jr. made the threat after the agency’s Alabama office contradicted the president’s claim that Hurricane Dorian might hit the state.

19h

Pluralism: Beyond the One and Only Truth

Some big questions, like how matter makes mind and what quantum mechanics means, may not have a single, definitive answer. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

3 Asteroids Are Zipping Past Earth Today

Hundreds of orbiting comets and asteroids are thought to present some risk of colliding with Earth, but the threat is typically very small.

19h

How many planets can support life like Earth?

Pale blue dots in a haystack. (Sara Chodosh/) Astronomers’ cups have runneth over with alien worlds since NASA launched its (now retired) ­exoplanet-​­hunting ­Kepler space telescope in 2009. But sussing out which orbiting rocks could support life as we know it isn’t an exact science; our current deep-space-searching technology can’t peer closely enough to determine surface and atmospheric compos

19h

What a Turkey-Saudi Arabia ‘cold war’ will mean for the Middle East

While much attention has focused on the conflict between Iran and Saudi Arabia, one expert says there’s a less-noticed rivalry roiling the Middle East between Saudi Arabia and Turkey. Nader Habibi, professor of the economics of the Middle East at Brandeis University, describes the Turkey-Saudi Arabia antagonism as a “cold war” with both countries working with groups and leaders in other countries

19h

NASA finds Gabrielle's strength on its northern side

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Central Atlantic Ocean and provided a visible view of Tropical Storm Gabrielle that helped pinpoint its strongest side.

19h

Teeth offer vital clues about diet during the Great Irish Famine

Scientific analysis of dental calculus — plaque build-up — of the Famine's victims found evidence of corn (maize), oats, potato, wheat and milk foodstuffs.

19h

'Building blocks' of bird calls resemble human languages

New study sheds light on whether animal vocalisations, like human words, are constructed from smaller building-blocks. Findings raise the exciting possibility that the capacity to generate meaning from meaningless building blocks is widespread in animals.

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Building blocks of bird babble identified

A new study by an international team headed by the University of Zurich sheds light on whether animal vocalizations, like human words, are constructed from smaller building blocks. By analyzing calls of the Australian chestnut-crowned babbler, the researchers have for the first time identified the meaning-generating building blocks of a non-human communication system.

19h

Rocks at asteroid impact site record first day of dinosaur extinction

The research centers on the asteroid impact that wiped out non-avian dinosaurs, with the researchers getting the most detailed look yet of the aftermath that followed by examining the rocks and debris that filled the crater within the first 24 hours after impact.

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Ancient footprints show Neanderthals may have been taller than thought

The biggest collection of Neanderthal footprints yet discovered offers a window on their social structure, and shows that their group was filled with children

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The rocks below a famous crater

Geologists examine what unfolded after that asteroid hit. Richard A Lovett reports.

20h

'Supercooling' keeps livers longer

Breakthrough could provide a bigger transplant window.

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Brain-machine interface set to improve life for amputees

Small study finds implanted electrodes lead to less stressful prosthetics. Barry Keily reports.

20h

Scientists: Birthplace of All Comets Could Explain Life on Earth

Origin Story All the comets in our solar system may share the same origin story — and it could help explain how life on Earth came to exist. A team of American and European scientists found that 14 different comets originated at the same time and place: a protoplanetary disk orbiting near our newly-formed sun, according to research that’ll be published by the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics . An

20h

Victor Vescovo: Adventurer reaches deepest ocean locations

Financier Victor Vescovo completes his quest to visit the deepest parts of Earth's five oceans.

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‘Failing forward’ in science: how college athletics prepared me for setbacks in graduate school

Nature, Published online: 09 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02704-3 Taking an athlete’s mindset into graduate school equipped Joshua D. Smith with more transferable skills than he expected.

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Building blocks of bird babble identified

A new study by an international team headed by the University of Zurich sheds light on whether animal vocalizations, like human words, are constructed from smaller building blocks. By analyzing calls of the Australian chestnut-crowned babbler, the researchers have for the first time identified the meaning-generating building blocks of a non-human communication system.

20h

To reduce pollution, policymakers should broaden focus beyond smokestacks

Emissions from air pollutants are associated with premature mortality. Between 2008 and 2014, air pollution health damage from fine particulate matter exposure fell by 20 percent in the United States. There are four sectors in the U.S. economy that together are responsible for over 75 percent of air pollution damage but contribute less than 20 percent to national GDP: agriculture, utilities, manuf

20h

Rocks at asteroid impact site record first day of dinosaur extinction

When the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs slammed into the planet, the impact set wildfires, triggered tsunamis and blasted so much sulfur into the atmosphere that it blocked the sun, which caused the global cooling that ultimately doomed the dinos.

20h

Good at math? It means little if you're not confident

Being good at math relates to better financial and medical outcomes—unless you don't have confidence in your own abilities with numbers, new research suggests.

20h

Teeth offer vital clues about diet during the Great Irish Famine

Scientific analysis of dental calculus—plaque build-up—of the Famine's victims found evidence of corn (maize), oats, potato, wheat and milk foodstuffs.

20h

Building blocks of bird babble identified

A new study by an international team headed by the University of Zurich sheds light on whether animal vocalizations, like human words, are constructed from smaller building blocks. By analyzing calls of the Australian chestnut-crowned babbler, the researchers have for the first time identified the meaning-generating building blocks of a non-human communication system.

20h

Strong student-adult relationships lower suicide attempts in high schools

Study of social networks in 38 high schools shows evidence that clearly identified, competent adult mentors that are connected to many students can help prevent suicide attempts.

20h

Study supports germline testing for all metastatic breast cancer patients

Genetic testing for all metastatic breast cancer patients may be an optimal strategy for identifying additional patients with increased risk as well as response to targeted therapies, according to research published in JAMA Oncology.

20h

New drug may protect against memory loss in Alzheimer's disease

A new drug discovered through a research collaboration between the University at Buffalo and Tetra Therapeutics may protect against memory loss, nerve damage and other symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

20h

The hunt for a 12-billion-year-old signal

Astronomers nudging closer thanks to data from a remote part of Australia.

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Will genetic screening of athletes change sport as we know it?

There’s little evidence that performance capacity can be predicted based on genes, writes Gregory Haff from Australia’s Edith Cowan University.

20h

A new view of Messier 81

Infrared image released to celebrate Spitzer’s sweet 16.

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Brain cells that suppress drug cravings may be the secret to better addiction medicines

Scientists have shed light on poorly understood brain mechanisms that suppress drug and alcohol cravings, uncovering new insights that may help in the development of better addiction medicines.

20h

Employee contract structures in startups can be determining factors of success

Conventional wisdom in the startup community is that with the right incentives, the venture can meet and exceed expectations, and a major component of this is how you structure your contracts for founders and early employees. New research has found that when it comes to those contracts, it may be less about incentive, and more about identifying the right people to incentivize.

20h

Liquid biopsies reveal genetic alterations linked to cancer drug resistance

New research shows that liquid biopsies taken from blood provide a more complete picture than traditional biopsy of both the genetic diversity of a patient's cancer and how tumors evolve drug resistance at the molecular level.

20h

World-record field strength for accelerator magnet

Scientists have announced that they achieved the highest magnetic field strength ever recorded for an accelerator steering magnet, setting a world record of 14.1 teslas, with the magnet cooled to 4.5 kelvins or minus 450 degrees Fahrenheit. The previous record of 13.8 teslas, achieved at the same temperature, was held for 11 years.

20h

The CIA's Secret Quest For Mind Control: Torture, LSD And A 'Poisoner In Chief'

Journalist Stephen Kinzer reveals how CIA chemist Sidney Gottlieb worked in the 1950s and early '60s to develop mind control drugs and deadly toxins that could be used against enemies of the state. (Image credit: Courtesy of the CIA)

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Johns Hopkins Launches Research Center on Psychedelics

The facility, focused on finding treatments for mental health disorders, will be the first of its kind in the US.

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The Largest Volcano in Alaska gets New Monitoring

Wrangell and its ice-filled caldera seen from the International Space Station in August 2005. NASA. Alaska is full of volcanoes. Most of them lie along the long, arcuate chain along the Alaska Peninsula and Aleutian Islands, stretching far into the Pacific Ocean. However, they are not the only volcanoes in the vast state. to the east of the Aleutian arc are the Wrangell-St. Elias Range. It is one

20h

The Left Has Reframed Democrats’ Climate Debate

Last week, watching the 2020 Democrats spar over climate change, I thought of 2008, and the early fight over health-care reform. Eleven years ago, the high-stakes Democratic primary was descending into acrimony, and one of America’s most prominent left-wing pundits took a side. Citing a new study by “one of America’s leading health care economists,” the pundit wrote: “If Ms. Clinton gets the Demo

20h

Overcoming resistance in pancreatic cancer

In pancreatic cancer cells' struggle to survive, the cells choose alternative routes when their main pathways are blocked by drugs. Researchers at CSHL recently developed a new cocktail of drugs that shrink pancreatic tumors in mice by blocking both the main and alternative pathways that cancer cells use.

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Brain cells that suppress drug cravings may be the secret to better addiction medicines

Scientists from Scripps Research have shed light on poorly understood brain mechanisms that suppress drug and alcohol cravings, uncovering new insights that may help in the development of better addiction medicines.

20h

Employee contract structures in startups can be determining factors of success

Conventional wisdom in the startup community is that with the right incentives, the venture can meet and exceed expectations, and a major component of this is how you structure your contracts for founders and early employees.New research has found that when it comes to those contracts, it may be less about incentive, and more about identifying the right people to incentivize.

20h

NASA finds Tropical Storm Faxai's heavy rainmaking storms off-shore from Japan

The big island of Japan received Tropical Storm Faxai and NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center infrared data and cloud top temperature information that revealed the most powerful storms just off-shore when the satellite flew overhead.

20h

NASA finds Gabrielle's strength on its northern side

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Central Atlantic Ocean and provided a visible view of Tropical Storm Gabrielle that helped pinpoint its strongest side.

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Russia Accuses Facebook of Meddling In Its Election. Seriously.

Reverse! Reverse! Russian state-owned communications watchdog Roskomnadzor claims that U.S. tech giants Google, Facebook, and YouTube interfered with local elections this week by allowing political ads, Reuters reports . “Such actions can be seen as interference in Russia’s sovereign affairs and hindering the conduct of democratic elections in the Russian Federation,” reads a statement on Roskomn

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4 Automakers Agree to Cleaner California Air. Now They May Be Sued.

Is this crazy, or what: Four automakers face a Department of Justice investigation and possible lawsuit because they possibly conspired to, uh, build more fuel-efficient cars and help make California’s air cleaner. BMW, Ford, Honda, and Volkswagen are the reported targets of a Justice Department investigation into whether they skirted federal competition laws by agreeing with each other to agree

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Shiny tongues, leaky bladders, and the other strange symptoms of vitamin deficiencies

Leafy greens are just one of the veggies you should be eating in order to get all your vitamins (Photo by Agence Producteurs Locaux Damien Kühn/Unsplash/) Thanks to sailors with skin lesions, we all know the importance of getting enough vitamin C. It doesn’t take much to be sufficient, but without at least low levels of certain nutrients in our diet, we humans can waste away. In the developed wor

20h

Taking the Pulse of a Sandstone Tower in Utah

Castleton Tower, near Moab, pulsates at about the rate of a human heartbeat as it taps into the earth’s natural vibrations.

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We’re Barely Listening to the U.S.’s Most Dangerous Volcanoes

A thicket of red tape and regulations have made it difficult for volcanologists to build monitoring stations along Mount Hood and other active volcanoes.

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Fermilab achieves world-record field strength for accelerator magnet

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermilab have announced that they achieved the highest magnetic field strength ever recorded for an accelerator steering magnet, setting a world record of 14.1 teslas, with the magnet cooled to 4.5 kelvins or minus 450 degrees Fahrenheit. The previous record of 13.8 teslas, achieved at the same temperature, was held for 11 years by Lawrence Berkeley Nationa

20h

NASA estimates Hurricane Dorian's massive rainfall track

On Monday morning, September 9, Hurricane Dorian was a post-tropical storm after a mid-latitude weather front and cold seas had altered its tropical characteristics over the weekend. NASA compiled data on Hurricane Dorian and created a map that showed the heavy rainfall totals it left in its wake from the Bahamas to Canada.

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‘Jeopardy!’ fans can now answer trivia questions while they drive

Jeopardy! fans can now test their knowledge while they drive. To celebrate the 36th season of Jeopardy!, which premieres tonight on CBS, Sony has partnered with Drivetime. Starting …

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Tesla Researcher Says New Battery Could Last One Million Miles

Powering Up Battery developers working for electric automaker Tesla claim to have built a battery pack that could power a car for a million miles. In April, CEO Elon Musk said that he wants Tesla to crack fully-autonomous driving and launch a fleet of robotaxis. While they won’t help with the many remaining challenges facing self-driving car developers, the batteries could at least stand to make

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High-fat foods can change the brain super quickly

Eating a diet of high-fat foods contributes to irregularities in the hypothalamus region of the brain, according to new research. The hypothalamus regulates body weight homeostasis and metabolism. While research has pointed to how an unhealthy diet correlates to obesity, researchers haven’t explored how diet can bring about neurological changes in the brain. Led by Sabrina Diano, professor of cel

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Team solves 50-year-old lottery ticket math mystery

After years of work, mathematics researchers have answered a mysterious half-century-old riddle. Is there a lottery ticket that always wins? That’s the popular version of a theoretical conundrum posed in 1969 by English mathematician Adrian RD Mathias within the field of set theory, an area dealing with infinity in mathematics. The problem remained a mystery throughout the 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s, a

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The Plan to Make Harvey Weinstein a Hero

“You should be the hero of the story, not the villain. This is very doable.” In December 2016, the lawyer Lisa Bloom sent a memo to Harvey Weinstein. Written as an audition of sorts—Bloom signs it with a polite request that Weinstein put her on retainer—the document offers a point-by-point insight into the mechanics of reputation-laundering. It includes breezy suggestions about the philanthropic

21h

BioMILD trial demonstrates lung cancer screening using MicroRNA blood test enhances prevention

Lung cancer screening efforts have accelerated in the last decade, with researchers showing that low dose CT screening is effective in reducing lung cancer mortality. Now, researchers in Milan report that using a blood test, accompanied by low dose CT screening, is safe and effective. The results were shared today at the IASLC 2019 World Conference on Lung Cancer hosted by the International Associ

21h

How stress can weaken defenses

Research shows how a dynamic regulation of a stress neurohormone regulates the trade-off between acute and long-term stress responses.

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Deepest optical image of first neutron star merger

Astronomers have painstakingly constructed the afterglow of GW170817, the historic neutron star merger captured in 2017, using images from the Hubble Space Telescope.

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Children of anxious mothers twice as likely to have hyperactivity in adolescence

A large study has shown that children of mothers who are anxious during pregnancy and in the first few years of the child's life have twice the risk of having hyperactivity symptoms at age 16.

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Scientists find psychiatric drugs affect gut contents

Scientists have found that antidepressants and other psychiatric drugs can change the quantity and composition of gut bacteria in rats. These results raise questions about the specificity of psychoactive drug action, and if confirmed in humans whether psychiatrists might need to consider the effects on the body before prescribing. The research team is currently carrying out a large-scale human obs

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'Clamp' regulates message transfer between mammal neurons

Scientists have described a key component of the nerve biology system — the brake, or 'clamp,' that prevents the fusion pore from completing its formation and opening.

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Doctors Identify New Link Between “Vape Lung” Sufferers

A mysterious vaping-related respiratory illness has killed five people across the United States, prompting health officials to urge vapers to give up their e-cigarettes and vape pens, at least temporarily. Now, researchers in Utah claim they’ve identified a new connection between sufferers of “vape lung” — and it could help health officials finally get to the bottom of the strange sickness. On Fr

21h

New Research: Aliens May Have Already Visited Earth

Technical Possibilities A new explanation for why we haven’t found extraterrestrial life: since the stars of the Milky Way whirl around a central point, passing nearer and farther from one another over millions of years, aliens might be waiting to visit until the journey is shorter. That’s according to a new study in The Astronomical Journal arguing that spacefaring lifeforms might just be biding

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Chefen fra Helvede: Din leder kan være afgørende for, om du får stress

Du skal være opmærksom på, at din chef ikke stiller urealistiske krav til dit arbejde, siger ekspert.

21h

Capcom Drops Trailer For Resident Evil Project Resistance Team-Based Spinoff Game

One of the franchises that Capcom is best known for that has also spawned a few movies, is Resident Evil. Capcom has unveiled a trailer for Project Resistance, which is a new type of game for …

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China's Geely takes stake in German 'flying taxi' firm Volocopter

German "flying taxi" developer Volocopter said Monday it had raised 50 million euros ($55.1 million) from investors including automaker Geely, risking a revived debate about Chinese investments …

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Hubble explores the formation and evolution of star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud

Just as people of the same age can vary greatly in appearance and shape, so do collections of stars or stellar aggregates. New observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope suggest that chronological age alone does not tell the complete story when it comes to the evolution of star clusters.

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New models suggest Titan lakes are explosion craters

Using radar data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, recently published research presents a new scenario to explain why some methane-filled lakes on Saturn's moon Titan are surrounded by steep rims that reach hundreds of feet high. The models suggests that explosions of warming nitrogen created basins in the moon's crust.

21h

Discovery of 'periodic tables' for molecules

Scientists have develop tables similar to the periodic table of elements but for molecules. Their approach could be used for predicting novel stable substances and creating useful materials.

21h

Paid family leave improves vaccination rates in infants

Parents who take paid family leave after the birth of a newborn are more likely to have their child vaccinated on time compared to those who do not, according to new research.

21h

Ages of the Navajo Sandstone

The Navajo Sandstone is known for its beautiful red and tan crossbedded sandstones that grace many of the national parks and monuments in the southwest USA. The sands were deposited in dunes within the largest known sand sea (erg) in Earth's history during the Early Jurassic. These deposits show a record of desertification — the process by which fertile lands become desert. How did this landscape

21h

Negative impacts of food insecurity on children's health

A new article confirms the negative impact of food insecurity on child health, suggesting the urgent need for policies to combat this problem.

21h

Discovery of 'periodic tables' for molecules

Scientists have develop tables similar to the periodic table of elements but for molecules. Their approach could be used for predicting novel stable substances and creating useful materials.

21h

New salt-based propellant proven compatible in dual-mode rocket engines

For dual-mode rocket engines to be successful, a propellant must function in both combustion and electric propulsion systems. Researchers have now used a salt-based propellant that had already been proven successful in combustion engines, and demonstrated its compatibility with electrospray thrusters.

21h

Electrochemistry breakthrough simplifies creation of coveted molecules for drugs, electronics

A new chemistry method from scientists greatly simplifies the creation of an important class of compounds called hindered ethers, which are integral to many drugs and commercial products. Hindered ethers are often coveted for their special properties, but until now have required laborious methods to synthesize.

21h

Liquid biopsies reveal genetic alterations linked to cancer drug resistance

New research shows that liquid biopsies taken from blood provide a more complete picture than traditional biopsy of both the genetic diversity of a patient's cancer and how tumors evolve drug resistance at the molecular level.

21h

Lung cancer screening model favored in Europe detects more cancers than 1 preferred in the US

Researchers reported today that a prospective trial comparing 2 screening methods for at-risk lung cancer patients found that a model used by Canadian, Australian and European public health organizations detected more cancers than the screening model used by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). The results were shared today at the IASLC 2019 World Conference on Lung Cancer ho

21h

New research from Alkema lab shows how stress can weaken defenses

Research from the lab of Mark Alkema, Ph.D., at UMass Medical School, shows how a dynamic regulation of a stress neurohormone regulates the trade-off between acute and long-term stress responses.

21h

Intergenerational relationships promote aging immigrants' health, lower caregivers' stress

Filial piety is central to the Chinese concept of family and has long shaped intergenerational relationships for older Chinese adults. The intersection of Eastern values and Western norms, however, can alter cultural beliefs across generations and negatively impact aging Chinese immigrants' physical and mental health and the caregiving burdens faced by their children, according to two new Rutgers

21h

Afterglow sheds light on the nature, origin of neutron star collisions

An international team led by Northwestern University has painstakingly constructed the afterglow of GW170817, the historic neutron star merger captured in 2017, using images from the Hubble Space Telescope.

21h

ENT researchers showcase studies at Otolaryngology's Annual Meeting

The most current research on head and neck cancer, cochlear implants, techniques in tonsillectomies, opioid prescribing patterns, residency matching, and other topics related to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery will be presented in New Orleans, LA, September 15-18, 2019, during the 2019 Annual Meeting & OTO Experience of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation.

21h

Car vacuums to suck all the crumbs and dirt out of your vehicle

Keep your cupholders clean. (Tim Trad via Unsplash/) You vacuum the inside of your home frequently, but how often do you actually vacuum your car? Pet hair, crumbs, and dirt build up quickly and unfortunately, we don’t have robot vacuums for cars yet. Quickly clean up your messes with one of these handheld car vacuum cleaners. A wet mess is no match for the MEG. (Amazon/) If you’re on the go and

21h

Even without jail time, convictions may harm health

Being convicted of a crime is associated with a decline in physical health, even if the conviction doesn’t lead to jail time, according to a new study. The study also confirms previous work finding that being arrested is associated with adverse mental health outcomes, even if an individual isn’t ultimately charged with a crime. “Many people often think of low-level interactions with the justice s

21h

Trump tweets increasingly moving markets: report

Donald Trump has been tweeting more than ever in recent months and is also moving financial markets more, according to a new report by JPMorgan Chase that analyzed the US president's Twitter habit.

21h

Ages of the Navajo Sandstone

The real Jurassic Park was as an ancient landscape home to a vast desert covered mostly in sand dunes as far as the eye could see, where dinosaurs and small mammals roamed southern Utah. The Navajo Sandstone is known for its beautiful red and tan crossbedded sandstones that grace many of the national parks and monuments in the southwest USA—for example Arches, Canyonlands, Capitol Reef, and Zion n

21h

Post Malone Is the Voice of Modern Brain Fog

Among the many foul betrayals committed by beautiful women in the lyrics of Post Malone’s new album, the most relatable crime is not being totally sure who he is. “You see me on TV, you know I’m a star,” the 24-year-old sings over a muted pop-punk thump. “You say you don’t know me, but I know that’s false.” It’s a believable story. Malone’s singles tend to debut near the top of the Billboard Hot

21h

Trump Administration Releases Billions in Disaster Resilience Funding

Rather than simply rebuilding, the $7.65 billion is intended to reduce communities’ vulnerabilities to storms, floods and fires — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

Scientists isolate protective proteins that influence outcomes for type 2 diabetes

Scientists have, for the first time, discovered a family of proteins that are associated with lower blood sugar levels among obese patients with type 2 diabetes, implying that those proteins are associated with a better control of the patient's disease.

21h

New salt-based propellant proven compatible in dual-mode rocket engines

For dual-mode rocket engines to be successful, a propellant must function in both combustion and electric propulsion systems. Researchers have now used a salt-based propellant that had already been proven successful in combustion engines, and demonstrated its compatibility with electrospray thrusters.

21h

Electrochemistry breakthrough simplifies creation of coveted molecules for drugs, electronics

A new chemistry method from scientists greatly simplifies the creation of an important class of compounds called hindered ethers, which are integral to many drugs and commercial products. Hindered ethers are often coveted for their special properties, but until now have required laborious methods to synthesize.

21h

Repetitive impacts key to understanding sports-associated concussions

Scientists have made a significant advance in our understanding of mild head trauma (concussive brain injury) and how it may be managed and treated in the future. It seems that repetitive impacts — as opposed to single events — cause the all-important damage to blood vessels in the brain. These repetitive impacts can be visualized via an MRI signal.

21h

Custom data collection system to improve health disparity research

Researchers have developed an innovative web-based data collection and management system that addresses linguistic and cultural barriers for researching minority populations.

21h

Action-oriented goals produce higher probability of purchases under tight deadlines

People on a tight deadline have stronger intentions to enact behaviors — whether it's redeeming a coupon or following through on receiving a flu shot — immediately after moving than after sitting.

21h

Protein mapping pinpoints why metastatic melanoma patients do not respond to immunotherapy

Researchers say they have discovered why more than half of patients with metastatic melanoma do not respond to immunotherapy cancer treatments.

21h

Electrochemistry breakthrough simplifies creation of coveted molecules for drugs, electronics

A new chemistry method from scientists at Scripps Research in La Jolla, California, greatly simplifies the creation of an important class of compounds called hindered ethers, which are integral to many drugs and commercial products. Hindered ethers are often coveted for their special properties, but until now have required laborious methods to synthesize.

21h

Hard as a diamond? Scientists predict new forms of superhard carbon

Superhard materials can slice, drill and polish other objects. They also hold potential for creating scratch-resistant coatings that could help keep expensive equipment safe from damage.

21h

Report: MIT’s Much-Hyped Robotic Agriculture Project is a Sham

Industry Plant MIT’s much-hyped “personal food computer” project, a robotic system that promised to let anybody grow food at home, isn’t everything it cracked up to be, sources close to the matter revealed to Business Insider . The devices, as part of MIT’s Open Agriculture Initiative, are meant to allow people across the world to grow their own food inside a controlled environment thanks to LED

21h

Researchers identify negative impacts of food insecurity on children's health

A new paper by researchers at the Boston University School of Social Work and American University's School of Public Affairs confirms the negative impact of food insecurity on child health, suggesting the urgent need for policies to combat this problem.

21h

Ages of the Navajo Sandstone

The real Jurassic Park was as an ancient landscape home to a vast desert covered mostly in sand dunes as far as the eye could see, where dinosaurs and small mammals roamed southern Utah. The Navajo Sandstone is known for its beautiful red and tan crossbedded sandstones that grace many of the national parks and monuments in the southwest USA — for example Arches, Canyonlands, Capitol Reef, and Zio

21h

Compound offers prospects for preventing acute kidney failure

Russian researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, the Institute of Cell Biophysics, and elsewhere have shown an antioxidant compound known as peroxiredoxin to be effective in treating kidney injury in mice. The study reports tripled survival rates in test animals treated with the chemical prior to sustaining an ischemia-reperfusion injury. The team says peroxiredoxin also of

21h

Discovery of periodic tables for molecules

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) develop tables similar to the periodic table of elements but for molecules. Their approach could be used for predicting novel stable substances and creating useful materials.

21h

HIV significantly increases risk for irregular heartbeat

HIV infection significantly increases the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) — one of the most important causes of irregular heartbeats and a leading cause of stroke — at the same rate or higher than known risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

21h

Watching music move through the brain

Scientists have observed how the human brain represents a familiar piece of music, according to research published in JNeurosci. Their results suggest that listening and remembering music involve different cognitive processes.

21h

Stylish, non-permanent home upgrades all renters should know

Upgrade your rental. (Becca Tapert via Unsplash/) Though painting your apartment walls and retiling the bathroom may elevate the value of the property in your eyes, the landlord might use this as terms to keep your security deposit—or kick you out. Below, find affordable, home-changing products that help make your rented space feel like your very own. The best part: none of these changes put your

21h

One-atom switch supercharges fluorescent dyes

A lab developed a single-atom switch to turn fluorescent dyes used in biological imaging on and off at will.

21h

New way to test for drug resistant infections

Scientists have modified an antibiotic from the beta-lactam family so that it can be attached to a sensor, enabling them to detect the presence of bacteria resistant to treatment.

21h

What Really Prompted Trump to Call Off Afghan Peace Talks

Updated at 5:03 p.m. ET on September 9, 2019. Yesterday, Mike Pompeo was all over television, joining so many political shows that one half-expected him to pop up for his next interview in the sportscasters’ booth at a football game. And during each appearance, the U.S. secretary of state told the same story about the presidential tweets that in one minute on Saturday night had terminated, for no

22h

Misunderstanding Susan Sontag

Anthony Gerace “T o experience a thing as beautiful means: to experience it necessarily wrongly,” Friedrich Nietzsche wrote in The Will to Power . It is a line that Susan Sontag quotes toward the end of her 1977 essay collection, On Photography , about how photographs aestheticize misery. It is a line that Sontag’s authorized biographer, Benjamin Moser, quotes to describe Sontag’s susceptibility

22h

What Daniel Patrick Moynihan Actually Thought About Race

Ronald Reagan’s Long-Hidden Racist Conversation With Richard Nixon This summer, the National Archives released audio of a 1971 conversation between President Richard Nixon and then–California Governor Ronald Reagan. The tapes, Tim Naftali wrote in July , rev eal that both men subscribed to the racist belief that Africans and African Americans are somehow inferior. Naftali also cited an earlier co

22h

Here's what's inside my dream garage

Auto products for a tricked-out garage. (Alex Suprun via Unsplash/) You put a car in your garage, but some folks put their whole lives and egos into them. Car people treat their vehicles like family members. They tinker with, polish, obsess over, and ogle their machines. This gear will turn any drive-in-able space into Car-vana. The ultimate car-lifting machine. (Amazon/) Normals might use a jack

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Repetitive impacts key to understanding sports-associated concussions

Scientists have made a significant advance in our understanding of mild head trauma (concussive brain injury) and how it may be managed and treated in the future. It seems that repetitive impacts — as opposed to single events — cause the all-important damage to blood vessels in the brain. These repetitive impacts can be visualized via an MRI signal.

22h

NIAID officials call for innovative research on sexually transmitted infections

Sexually transmitted infections, or STIs, pose a significant public health challenge. Globally, more than one million new STI cases are diagnosed each day. In a new article in The Journal of Infectious Diseases, experts from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, suggest that the biomedical research community must refocus its c

22h

Electrochemistry breakthrough simplifies creation of coveted molecules for drugs, electronics

A new chemistry method from scientists at Scripps Research greatly simplifies the creation of an important class of compounds called hindered ethers, which are integral to many drugs and commercial products. Hindered ethers are often coveted for their special properties, but until now have required laborious methods to synthesize.

22h

New salt-based propellant proven compatible in dual-mode rocket engines

For dual-mode rocket engines to be successful, a propellant must function in both combustion and electric propulsion systems. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign used a salt-based propellant that had already been proven successful in combustion engines, and demonstrated its compatibility with electrospray thrusters.

22h

Scientists isolate protective proteins that influence outcomes for type 2 diabetes

Scientists from the School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, have, for the first time, discovered a family of proteins that are associated with lower blood sugar levels among obese patients with type 2 diabetes, implying that those proteins are associated with a better control of the patient's disease.

22h

The best bouldering accessories for your first rock climbing trip

Stay safe. Stay comfy. (Tommy Lisbin via Unsplash/) Making the transition from pulling on plastic stones at your indoor rock climbing gym to clamoring real boulders requires a bit of gear and preparation. For beginner boulderers, here is a list of essential outdoor accessories to take with you on your first trip to the great outdoors. An aggressive beginner’s boulderer shoe. (Amazon/) California-

22h

Hard as a diamond? Scientists predict new forms of superhard carbon

Superhard materials can slice, drill and polish other objects. Now, science is opening the door to the development of new materials with these seductive qualities. Researchers have used computational techniques to identify 43 previously unknown forms of carbon that are thought to be stable and superhard — including several predicted to be slightly harder than or nearly as hard as diamonds.

22h

How brain rhythms organize our visual perception

Imagine that you are watching a crowded hang-gliding competition, keeping track of a red and orange glider's skillful movements. Our brain uses separate circuits to achieve such outstanding tracking ability, one specialized to process color information and the other specialized for processing directions of motion. A team of scientists now discovered that the brain's specialized color and motion ci

22h

Offering children a variety of vegetables increases acceptance

Although food preferences are largely learned, dislike is the main reason parents stop offering or serving their children foods like vegetables. A new study has demonstrated that repeatedly offering a variety of vegetables increased acceptance and consumption by children.

22h

MIT Media Lab Hid Donations From Sex Offender Jeffrey Epstein

In late August, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology came clean about accepting what it said amounted to $800,000 in donations from recently deceased convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein, with MIT President L. Rafael Reif telling staff the money went to either famed MIT physicist Seth Lloyd or the school’s prestigious Media Lab. But on Friday, The New Yorker published a bombshell report re

22h

YouTube Videos Are a Gold Mine for Health Researchers

Earlier this summer, a team at England’s Keele University published a behavioral study on children with autism . But it didn’t do it by interviewing subjects, or administering questionnaires. Instead, it used YouTube videos. Bappaditya Mandal and his colleagues trained an artificial intelligence to study the body movements of children with autism, using it to classify their behaviors as either ty

22h

High blood pressure in pregnancy has spiked since 1970

The rate of chronic hypertension among pregnant women has increased more than 75% since 1970, according to a new study. In addition, black women have persistent high blood pressure at more than twice the rate of white women. For the study in Hypertension , researchers looked at the pregnancies of more than 151 million women in the United States between 1970-2010. Using data from the National Hosp

22h

Protein mapping pinpoints why metastatic melanoma patients do not respond to immunotherapy

Tel Aviv University and Sheba Medical Center researchers say they have discovered why more than half of patients with metastatic melanoma do not respond to immunotherapy cancer treatments.

22h

Study: Action-oriented goals produce higher probability of purchases under tight deadlines

People on a tight deadline have stronger intentions to enact behaviors — whether it's redeeming a coupon or following through on receiving a flu shot — immediately after moving than after sitting, says research co-written by U. of. I. social psychology expert Dolores Albarracin.

22h

Researchers develop custom data collection system to improve health disparity research

Rutgers researchers develop innovative web-based data collection and management system that addresses linguistic and cultural barriers for researching minority populations.

22h

Offering children a variety of vegetables increases acceptance

Although food preferences are largely learned, dislike is the main reason parents stop offering or serving their children foods like vegetables. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, demonstrated that repeatedly offering a variety of vegetables increased acceptance and consumption by children.

22h

How to make your period more eco-friendly

Reducing your plastic consumption could start with nixing your tampon's plastic applicator. (Josefin via Unsplash/) Periods can be a pain—the cramps, the bloating, the ruined underwear—but what can make that time of the month even more frustrating? Thinking about the amount of waste associated with many traditional menstrual products. If you're looking to decrease the number of pads, tampons, and

22h

Lack of reporting on phosphorus supply chain dangerous for global food security

A new study shows that while Phosphorus is a key element to global food security, its supply chain is a black box. This can lead to social, political and environmental issues, which in turn can create phosphorus supply crises.

22h

The fast and the curious: Fitter adults have fitter brains

In a large study, scientists have shown that physical fitness is associated with better brain structure and brain functioning in young adults. This opens the possibility that increasing fitness levels may lead to improved cognitive ability, such as memory and problem solving, as well as improved structural changes in the brain.

22h

Bias against single people affects their cancer treatment

New research reveals the dangerous bias that's been buried in the fine print of academic and medical journals for more than 30 years. Unmarried patients with cancer are less likely to get potentially life-saving surgery or radiotherapy than their married counterparts, as medical providers may rely on stereotypes that discount sources of social support other than a current spouse.

22h

Sound-shape associations depend on early visual experiences

Data from individuals with different types of severe visual impairment suggest that the associations we make between sounds and shapes — a 'smooth' b or a 'spiky' k — may form during a sensitive period of visual development in early childhood.

22h

One-atom switch supercharges fluorescent dyes

A lab developed a single-atom switch to turn fluorescent dyes used in biological imaging on and off at will.

22h

High-fat diets affect your brain, not just your physical appearance

Much research has pointed to how an unhealthy diet correlates to obesity, but has not explored how diet can bring about neurological changes in the brain. A recent study has discovered that high-fat diets contribute to irregularities in the hypothalamus region of the brain, which regulates body weight homeostasis and metabolism.

22h

New way to test for drug resistant infections

Scientists have modified an antibiotic from the beta-lactam family so that it can be attached to a sensor, enabling them to detect the presence of bacteria resistant to treatment.

22h

Lack of reporting on phosphorus supply chain dangerous for global food security

Our global food production system uses 53 million tonnes of phosphate fertilizers annually, processed from 270 million tonnes of mined phosphate rock. Estimates show up to 90% phosphate loss from mine to fork. A considerable part of this loss is phosphate pollution in water, some of which creates "dead zones," areas where little or no marine life can survive. With an increase in food demand by 60%

22h

'It Chapter Two' Ruled the Box Office This Weekend

It fell short of beating its predecessor, though. Also, 'Joker' won the top prize at the Venice Film Festival and Kristen Stewart wants to play a gay superhero.

22h

Google Bans Ads for Experimental Medical Treatments

The new policy will increase scrutiny and pressure on stem cell clinics, according to industry experts.

22h

Scientists alleviate environmental concerns about BCA usage on powdery mildews

Powdery mildew is a common fungal disease that infects many plants around the world, absorbing their nutrients and weakening or even killing them. In turn, powdery mildews are often attacked in the field by even smaller mycoparasites (fungi that feed on other fungi).

22h

Scientists alleviate environmental concerns about BCA usage on powdery mildews

Powdery mildew is a common fungal disease that infects many plants around the world, absorbing their nutrients and weakening or even killing them. In turn, powdery mildews are often attacked in the field by even smaller mycoparasites (fungi that feed on other fungi).

22h

Cities Are Trying—Again—to Plan for Autonomous Vehicles

The bloom is off the rose for self-driving tech among urban transportation officials, who are planning for a future with fewer private cars.

22h

Why you might need a dedicated camera

Those amazing Instagram photos? They were probably taken with a dedicated camera. Maybe it's time to get one. (Erik Mclean via Unsplash/) As smartphone cameras get more capable, sales of dedicated cameras like DSLRs and mirrorless cameras are plummeting . For most people it just doesn't make sense to own one, but for starting photo enthusiasts, it still might. If you were planning on becoming a p

22h

What's Causing These Strange Holes at Indiana Dunes National Park?

Wind sweeps over sand dunes along the shores of Lake Michigan at Indiana Dunes National Park. (Credit: Delmas Lehman/Shutterstock) (Inside Science) — On the shores of Lake Michigan, near the northeastern tip of Indiana Dunes National Park, an approximately 125-foot-high dune rises into the air. Named Mount Baldy, the crescent-shaped mound is arguably the most famous sand dune in the park. Rangers

22h

Scientists establish new way to test for drug resistant infections

Scientists have developed a method to test whether an infection is resistant to common antibiotics.

22h

Earthquake fault long thought dormant could devastate Los Angeles, researchers say

Scientists citing new research say an earthquake fault along the Los Angeles coast, previously believed to be dormant, is active and could cause a destructive 6.4 magnitude earthquake if it ruptured.

22h

One-atom switch supercharges fluorescent dyes

It only took the replacement of one atom for Rice University scientists to give new powers to biocompatible fluorescent molecules.

22h

Scientists establish new way to test for drug resistant infections

Scientists have developed a method to test whether an infection is resistant to common antibiotics.

22h

New research provides hope for people living with chronic pain

Researchers have been investigating which brain circuits are changed by injury, in order to develop targeted therapies to reset the brain to stop chronic pain.

22h

Puberty changes the brains of boys and girls differently

Scientists have found that brain networks develop differently in males and females at puberty, with boys showing an increase in connectivity in certain brain areas, and girls showing a decrease in connectivity as puberty progresses. These analyses were focused on brain regions previously identified as conferring risk for mood problems in adolescents, suggesting an association, although this needs

22h

Equifax settlement administrator calls for proof of credit monitoring before disbursement of funds

Those who elected to receive a lump-sum payment of $125 from the Equifax settlement should check their emails. The administrator of the funds is asking customers to confirm that they are currently …

22h

Uber adding 2,000 jobs in Chicago, mostly in Freight unit

Uber plans to open a new office in Chicago and add 2,000 people to its area workforce over the next three years.

22h

Making and controlling crystals of light

Optical microresonators convert laser light into ultrashort pulses travelling around the resonator's circumference. These pulses, called "dissipative Kerr solitons," can propagate in the microresonator maintaining their shape.

22h

China Sky Eye, the world's largest single-dish radio telescope, is now fully operational

China's Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope, known as FAST, is the world's most sensitive listening device. The single-dish radio telescope is made of 4,450 individual panels that scan the sky, detecting the universe's whispers and shouts. It's cradled in a natural Earth depression the size of 30 soccer fields. It has more than twice the collecting area of the world's previous la

22h

Scientists alleviate environmental concerns about BCA usage on powdery mildews

This research revealed that mycoparasites can live up to 21-days on mildew-free host plant surfaces, where they can attack powdery mildew structures as soon as they appear. Also of note, this research showed that these mycoparasites cannot spread in sterile soil or in decomposing leaves on the ground, showing that concerns about the potentially negative environmental impact of the BCAs are largely

22h

How brain rhythms organize our visual perception

Imagine that you are watching a crowded hang-gliding competition, keeping track of a red and orange glider's skillful movements. Our brain uses separate circuits to achieve such outstanding tracking ability, one specialized to process color information and the other specialized for processing directions of motion. A German-Iranian team of scientists now discovered that the brain's specialized colo

22h

Hard as a diamond? Scientists predict new forms of superhard carbon

Superhard materials can slice, drill and polish other objects. Now, science is opening the door to the development of new materials with these seductive qualities. Researchers have used computational techniques to identify 43 previously unknown forms of carbon that are thought to be stable and superhard — including several predicted to be slightly harder than or nearly as hard as diamonds.

22h

Lack of reporting on phosphorus supply chain dangerous for global food security

A new study from Stockholm University and University of Iceland shows that while Phosphorus is a key element to global food security, its supply chain is a black box. This can lead to social, political and environmental issues, which in turn can create phosphorus supply crises. The article 'Opening access to the black box: The need for reportingon the global phosphorus supply chain' is published i

22h

Are there health consequences associated with not using a smartphone?

Many studies have examined the health effects of smartphone abuse, but a new study looks at the sociodemographic features and health indicators of people who have a smartphone but do not use it regularly.

22h

22 million pounds of plastics enter the Great Lakes each year

On a sunny August morning at 31st Street Beach, Tyrone Dobson assembled 20 volunteers to pick up litter from the shores of Lake Michigan.

22h

Amazon countries seal pact against destruction of rainforest

Countries of South America's Amazon region on Friday announced measures for its preservation following devastating wildfires and growing concern over the destruction of the world's biggest rainforest.

22h

Fossil Mix-Up Could Rewrite the History of Beetles, the Largest Group of Animals on Earth

The reclassification of a 226-million-year-old beetle species could change our understanding of insect evolution

22h

Daily briefing: The lost continent that lies submerged below Europe

Nature, Published online: 09 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02702-5 A new history of Greater Adria, bad news about India’s Moon lander and Germany has pledged millions to protect insects.

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Can Humans Use Swarm Intelligence to Make Smarter, Faster Decisions?

submitted by /u/TrekmasterB [link] [comments]

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Similar embryos can start with very different instructions

Embryos that appear the same can start out with surprisingly different instructions, according to new research with roundworms. “We found that a lot of undercover evolution occurs in early embryos,” says Joel Rothman, a professor in the molecular, cellular, and developmental biology department at the University of California, who led the team. Indeed, although members of the same species are iden

22h

India Locates Its Lost Vikram Lander on the Moon

No signals have been received from the lander, but attempts are underway to establish communication — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Did you solve it? Getting through passport control

The solution to today’s puzzle Earlier today I set you the following question: Let’s say that 1 in 10,000 people who present themselves at UK passport control have invalid passports, and let’s say that UK passport control is very good at detecting invalid passports. When presented with an invalid passport, an officer will pick this up 99 times out of 100. Travellers found with invalid documents a

22h

The Darker Side of John Wesley Powell

Like other early American geologists, the man who explored the Colorado River did anthropologic research that presupposed the racial inferiority of Native Americans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Feeling legs again improves amputees' health

Two volunteers are the first above-knee amputees in the world to feel their prosthetic foot and knee in real time. Their bionic prosthesis, which was developed by an international team of researchers, features sensors that connect to residual nerves in the thigh. The resulting neurofeedback greatly reduces physical and mental strain for users of the prosthesis, as well as their phantom limb pain,

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US funding scramble leaves science agencies in limbo

Nature, Published online: 09 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02662-w A divided Congress has until 1 October to hammer out next year’s budget.

23h

High-fat diets affect your brain, not just your physical appearance

Much research has pointed to how an unhealthy diet correlates to obesity, but has not explored how diet can bring about neurological changes in the brain. A recent Yale study has discovered that high-fat diets contribute to irregularities in the hypothalamus region of the brain, which regulates body weight homeostasis and metabolism.

23h

One-atom switch supercharges fluorescent dyes

A Rice lab develops a single-atom switch to turn fluorescent dyes used in biological imaging on and off at will.

23h

Bias against single people affects their cancer treatment

New research reveals the dangerous bias that's been buried in the fine print of academic and medical journals for more than 30 years. Unmarried patients with cancer are less likely to get potentially life-saving surgery or radiotherapy than their married counterparts, as medical providers may rely on stereotypes that discount sources of social support other than a current spouse.

23h

Sound-shape associations depend on early visual experiences

Data from individuals with different types of severe visual impairment suggest that the associations we make between sounds and shapes — a 'smooth' b or a 'spiky' k — may form during a sensitive period of visual development in early childhood.

23h

Scientists establish new way to test for drug resistant infections

Scientists from the University of York have modified an antibiotic from the beta-lactam family so that it can be attached to a sensor, enabling them to detect the presence of bacteria resistant to treatment.

23h

Researchers unearth 'new' extinction

A team of scientists has concluded that earth experienced a previously underestimated severe mass-extinction event, which occurred about 260 million years ago, raising the total of major mass extinctions in the geologic record to six.

23h

Researchers unearth 'new' extinction

A team of scientists has concluded that earth experienced a previously underestimated severe mass-extinction event, which occurred about 260 million years ago, raising the total of major mass extinctions in the geologic record to six.

23h

Loch Ness Contains No 'Monster' DNA, Say Scientists

A scientific survey of the waters of Loch Ness found it contains no traces of "monster" DNA at all, adding weight to the already-likely prospect that "Nessie" doesn't really exist.

23h

European Doctor Who Prescribes Abortion Pills To U.S. Women Online Sues FDA

A federal lawsuit seeks to block the Food and Drug Administration from taking enforcement actions against a European doctor or her U.S.-based patients for prescribing or buying abortion pills online. (Image credit: Stormi Greener/Star Tribune via Getty Images)

23h

Lightning 'superbolts' form over oceans from November to February

Lightning superbolts — which unleash a thousand times more low-frequency energy than regular lightning bolts — occur in dramatically different patterns than regular lightning, according to a new, nine-year survey of these rare events.

23h

Making and controlling crystals of light

Scientists have shown how light inside optical on-chip microresonators can be crystallized in a form of periodic pulse trains that can boost the performance of optical communication links or endow ultrafast LiDAR with sub-micron precision.

23h

Spintronics: Physicists discover new material for highly efficient data processing

A new material could aid in the development of extremely energy efficient IT applications. The electrons at the oxide interface of the material possess special properties which drastically increase the conversion rate of spin current to charge current. The material is more efficient than any previously investigated material.

23h

Feeling legs again improves amputees' health

Two volunteers are the first above-knee amputees in the world to feel their prosthetic foot and knee in real time. Their bionic prosthesis, which was developed by an international team of researchers, features sensors that connect to residual nerves in the thigh. The resulting neurofeedback greatly reduces physical and mental strain for users of the prosthesis, as well as their phantom limb pain,

23h

Identity crisis for fossil beetle helps rewrite beetle family tree

A tiny fossil beetle, about the size of FDR's nose on the US dime, is a totally different species than scientists thought it was, meaning that the beetle family tree needs a rewrite.

23h