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nyheder2019september12

Novel atomic clock design offers 'tweezer' control

Physicists have demonstrated a novel atomic clock design that combines near-continuous operation with strong signals and high stability, features not previously found together in a single type of next-generation atomic clock. The new clock, which uses laser 'tweezers' to trap, control and isolate the atoms, also offers unique possibilities for enhancing clock performance using the tricks of quantu

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Controversial insecticides shown to threaten survival of wild birds

New research shows how the world's most widely used insecticides could be partly responsible for dramatic declines in farmland bird populations. In the first experiment to track effects of a neonicotinoid pesticide on birds in the wild, the team found that white-crowned sparrows who consumed small doses of imidacloprid insecticide suffered weight loss and delays to their migration — effects that

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Why is Earth so biologically diverse? Mountains hold the answer

Life on Earth is amazingly diverse, and exhibits striking geographical global patterns in biodiversity. A pair of companion papers reveal that mountain regions — especially those in the tropics — are hotspots of extraordinary and baffling richness. Although mountain regions cover only 25% of Earth's land area, they are home to more than 85% of the world's species of amphibians, birds, and mammal

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How a carbon-fixing organelle forms via phase separation

Algae remove vast amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis thanks to an organelle called the pyrenoid, which boosts the efficiency of carbon-fixation. Researchers have known that the pyrenoid forms via a process of phase separation, the same process that causes oil to cluster into droplets in water. The new study looks deeper into how this happens.

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The Day After 9/11

WIRED Ideas contributor Virginia Heffernan: I still halfway believe I have no right to the word 'trauma'

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An Interstellar Object May Have Just Entered Our Solar System

Fast Flyer On August 30, an amateur astronomer in the Ukraine was the first to spot a comet zipping across the night sky. Further observations by additional astronomers have revealed that the comet, now known as C/2019 Q4 (Borisov), is moving too fast to be pulled by the Sun’s gravity — a sign it might hail from outside our solar system. Check It Out Astronomers are now trying to plot the traject

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The genetics of cancer

A research team has identified a new circular RNA (ribonucleic acid) that increases tumor activity in soft tissue and connective tissue tumors. It's a discovery that may help improve how cancer is identified and treated.

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Big game hunting for a more versatile catalyst

For the first time, researchers at Harvard University and Cornell University have discovered exactly how a reactive copper-nitrene catalyst works, a finding that could revolutionize how chemical industries produce everything from pharmaceuticals to household goods. In a paper in Science, the team describes how the catalyst performs its magic and how to bottle the tool to break stubborn carbon-hydr

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Bone marrow may be the missing piece of the fertility puzzle

A woman's bone marrow may determine her ability to start and sustain a pregnancy, report Yale researchers in PLOS Biology. The study shows that when an egg is fertilized, stem cells leave the bone marrow and travel via the bloodstream to the uterus, where they help transform the uterine lining for implantation. If the lining fails to go through this essential transformation, the embryo cannot impl

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Cells that make bone marrow also travel to the womb to help pregnancy

Bone marrow-derived cells play a role in changes to the mouse uterus before and during pregnancy, enabling implantation of the embryo and reducing pregnancy loss, according to research published Sept. 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology.

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Cause of congenital nystagmus found

Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience have overturned the long held view that congenital nystagmus, a condition where eyes make repetitive involuntary movements, is a brain disorder by showing that its cause is actually retinal. Deficits in just a few proteins involved in one of the retina's earliest light-signal processing steps result in the eye sending an erroneous movemen

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JILA's novel atomic clock design offers 'tweezer' control

JILA physicists have demonstrated a novel atomic clock design that combines near-continuous operation with strong signals and high stability, features not previously found together in a single type of next-generation atomic clock. The new clock, which uses laser 'tweezers' to trap, control and isolate the atoms, also offers unique possibilities for enhancing clock performance using the tricks of q

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Special issue, 'mountain life,' celebrates Alexander von Humboldt's lasting legacy

Alexander von Humboldt was born 250 years ago this month, and while he spent much of his life studying Earth's mountainous regions, his vision of how science is intertwined with the broader human experience has helped to lay the groundwork for aspects of modern science more broadly.

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Researchers and rats play 'hide and seek,' illuminating playful behavior in animals

Rats can be taught to play hide and seek with humans and can become quite skilled at the game, according to a new study, which presents a novel paradigm for studying insights into the neurobiology of playful behavior in animals.

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Neonicotinoid insecticides cause rapid weight loss and travel delays in migrating songbirds

Songbirds exposed to imidacloprid, a widely used neonicotinoid insecticide, exhibit anorexic behavior, reduced body weight and delays in their migratory itinerary, according to a new study.

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Gravitational lensing provides a new measurement of the expansion of the universe

Amid ongoing uncertainty around the value of the Hubble Constant, uncertainty largely created by issues around measuring distances to objects in the galaxy, scientists who used a new distance technique have derived a different Hubble value, one 'somewhat higher than the standard value,' as Tamara Davis describes it in a related Perspective.

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Gem-like nanoparticles of precious metals shine as catalysts

Northwestern University researchers have developed a new method for making highly desirable catalysts from metal nanoparticles that could lead to better fuel cells, among other applications. The researchers also discovered the method can take spent catalysts and recycle them into active catalysts. Made mainly of precious metals, these coveted catalysts are shaped like gems. Each particle has 24 di

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Controversial insecticides shown to threaten survival of wild birds

New University of Saskatchewan research shows how the world's most widely used insecticides could be partly responsible for dramatic declines in farmland bird populations. In the first experiment to track effects of a neonicotinoid pesticide on birds in the wild, the team found that white-crowned sparrows who consumed small doses of imidacloprid insecticide suffered weight loss and delays to their

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Why is Earth so biologically diverse? Mountains hold the answer

Life on Earth is amazingly diverse, and exhibits striking geographical global patterns in biodiversity. A pair of companion papers published Sept. 13 in Science reveal that mountain regions — especially those in the tropics — are hotspots of extraordinary and baffling richness. Although mountain regions cover only 25% of Earth's land area, they are home to more than 85% of the world's species of

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Simple model captures almost 100 years of measles dynamics in London

A simple epidemiological model accurately captures long-term measles transmission dynamics in London, including major perturbations triggered by historical events. Alexander Becker of Princeton University in New Jersey, US, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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FASEB Journal: Anesthetic drug sevoflurane improves sepsis outcomes, animal study reveals

Patients with sepsis often require surgery or imaging procedures under general anesthesia, yet there is no standard regimen for anesthetizing septic patients. Of volatile (inhaled) anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane are the most commonly used drugs, despite their undetermined mechanisms of action. A novel study in The FASEB Journal suggests that the type of drug used in general anesthesia cou

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Insecticides May Be Giving Songbirds Anorexia and Delaying Their Migrations

An experiment with white-crowned sparrows shows that insecticides may be impacting songbirds. (Credit: Phil Lowe/Shutterstock) Some migrating songbirds may be starving thanks to agricultural …

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Why some experts are trying to redefine suicide

A movement is building to define suicidality as a condition in its own right. (Noah Silliman/Unsplash/) One night in her Nashville apartment, Bre Banks read a comment from her boyfriend on Facebook. They were in a shaky spell, and his words seemed proof she would lose him. She put her laptop down on the couch and headed to the bedroom to cry. “My legs seized up, and I fell,” she recalled. With he

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African American bachelor's degrees see growth, behind in physical sciences, engineering

African Americans are seeing growth in engineering and physical sciences but are not progressing at the same rate when compared to the general population. A report examined the number of bachelor's degrees earned from 2005 to 2015.

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Role of nuclear glycogen in non-small cell lung cancers

Researchers have made a breakthrough discovery that solves a mystery long forgotten by science and have identified a potentially novel avenue in pre-clinical models to treat non-small cell lung cancers.

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Elaborate Komodo dragon armor defends against other dragons

Just beneath their scales, Komodo dragons wear a suit of armor made of tiny bones. These bones cover the dragons from head to tail, creating a 'chain mail' that protects the giant predators. However, the armor raises a question: What does the world's largest lizard — the dominant predator in its natural habitat — need protection from?

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'Fire inversions' lock smoke in valleys

There's an atmospheric feedback loop, says an atmospheric scientist, that can lock smoke in valleys in much the same way that temperature inversions lock the smog and gunk in the Salt Lake Valley each winter. But understanding this loop can help scientists predict how smoke will impact air quality in valleys, hopefully helping both residents and firefighters alike.

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Why HIV patients are more likely to develop tuberculosis

Tuberculosis and HIV — two of the world's deadliest infectious diseases — are far worse when they occur together. Now researchers have pinpointed an important mechanism at work in this troubling health problem. And, their discovery could lead to a new mode of treatment for people at risk.

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Semiconducting material more affected by defects than previously thought

A promising semiconductor material, halide perovskite, could be improved if flaws previously thought irrelevant to performance are reduced, according to new research.

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Epilepsy surgery: The earlier the better, overview study shows

A person with drug resistant epilepsy who gets an early surgical intervention has a better chance of becoming seizure free. This is shown in a systematic review and meta-analysis in which researchers analyzed results from a range of previous studies. They concluded that people with drug resistant epilepsy should, as early as possible, be referred for epilepsy surgery evaluation.

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Promising treatment for an incurable, deadly kidney disease

A potential treatment for polycystic kidney disease — a genetic disorder that causes the kidneys to swell with multiple cysts and can eventually lead to organ failure — has shown promising results in animal testing.

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Stem cell researchers reactivate 'back-up genes' in the lab

Scientists have unraveled parts of a mechanism that may one day help to treat Rett syndrome and other genetic disorders linked to the X chromosome.

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Innovative model created for NASA to predict vitamin levels in spaceflight food

Food scientists have developed a groundbreaking, user-friendly mathematical model for NASA to help ensure that astronauts' food remains rich in nutrients during extended missions in space.

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The Most Popular Names of This Year’s College Freshmen

When Laura Wattenberg dropped her daughter off at college late last month, she got distracted. The freshman residence halls displayed “a hand-painted banner welcoming new students by name,” Wattenberg recalls. All she wanted to do was “stop and take notes on the name lists,” she told me in an email. Wattenberg is the self-titled Baby Name Wizard , best known for her popular baby-name guidebooks a

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Why Are American Homes So Big?

GraphicaArtis / Getty America is a place defined by bigness. It is infamous, both within its borders and abroad, for the size of its cars, its portions, its defense budget—and its houses. Rightly so: U.S. houses are among the biggest—if not the biggest—in the world. According to the real-estate firms Zillow and Redfin, the median size of an American single-family home is in the neighborhood of 1,

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The Game That Made Rats Jump for Joy

Annika Reinhold says that she likes playing with animals (she has two cats) and “doing unconventional things that no one has done before.” When the chance came up to teach rats to play hide-and-seek , she was a natural candidate. One might question the wisdom of training rats to hide, but there’s a good reason to do so. In neuroscience, animal research is traditionally about control and condition

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Depth of Field: The Shared Memory of One World Trade Center

Spencer Platt's photograph of the building from the September 11th anniversary shows its ties to history and the future.

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Decline of migrating birds could be partly due to pesticides

It’s not just bees that are harmed by neonicotinoids, it’s birds too. A study found the pesticides can cause birds to lose weight and delay their migration (edited)

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Ny iPhone-chip skal finde dine forsvundne nøgler

Dansk ekspert siger, at potentialet i Apples nye U1-chip er meget større.

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Flipping a lipid

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Hazardous delays

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News at a glance

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War of nerves

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Evolving emotions

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High living

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Fire on the mountain

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Hypoxia city

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Sunken summits

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Humboldts enigma: What causes global patterns of mountain biodiversity?

Mountains contribute disproportionately to the terrestrial biodiversity of Earth, especially in the tropics, where they host hotspots of extraordinary and puzzling richness. With about 25% of all land area, mountain regions are home to more than 85% of the world’s species of amphibians, birds, and mammals, many entirely restricted to mountains. Biodiversity varies markedly among these regions. To

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Building mountain biodiversity: Geological and evolutionary processes

Mountain regions are unusually biodiverse, with rich aggregations of small-ranged species that form centers of endemism. Mountains play an array of roles for Earth’s biodiversity and affect neighboring lowlands through biotic interchange, changes in regional climate, and nutrient runoff. The high biodiversity of certain mountains reflects the interplay of multiple evolutionary mechanisms: enhance

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Above- and belowground linkages shape responses of mountain vegetation to climate change

Upward shifts of mountain vegetation lag behind rates of climate warming, partly related to interconnected changes belowground. Here, we unravel above- and belowground linkages by drawing insights from short-term experimental manipulations and elevation gradient studies. Soils will likely gain carbon in early successional ecosystems, while losing carbon as forest expands upward, and the slow, hig

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A global perspective on tropical montane rivers

Tropical montane rivers (TMR) are born in tropical mountains, descend through montane forests, and feed major rivers, floodplains, and oceans. They are characterized by rapid temperature clines and varied flow disturbance regimes, both of which promote habitat heterogeneity, high biological diversity and endemism, and distinct organisms’ life-history adaptations. Production, transport, and proces

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Flipping a lipid

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Hazardous delays

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Too sleepy to drive?

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Moving a motor

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Warming from loss

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A measurement of the Hubble constant from angular diameter distances to two gravitational lenses

The local expansion rate of the Universe is parametrized by the Hubble constant, , the ratio between recession velocity and distance. Different techniques lead to inconsistent estimates of . Observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNe) can be used to measure , but this requires an external calibrator to convert relative distances to absolute ones. We use the angular diameter distance to strong gravit

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Synthesis of a copper-supported triplet nitrene complex pertinent to copper-catalyzed amination

Terminal copper-nitrenoid complexes have inspired interest in their fundamental bonding structures as well as their putative intermediacy in catalytic nitrene-transfer reactions. Here, we report that aryl azides react with a copper(I) dinitrogen complex bearing a sterically encumbered dipyrrin ligand to produce terminal copper nitrene complexes with near-linear, short copper–nitrenoid bonds [1.74

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Mitoribosomal small subunit biogenesis in trypanosomes involves an extensive assembly machinery

Mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) are large ribonucleoprotein complexes that synthesize proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome. An extensive cellular machinery responsible for ribosome assembly has been described only for eukaryotic cytosolic ribosomes. Here we report that the assembly of the small mitoribosomal subunit in Trypanosoma brucei involves a large number of factors and proc

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Cryo-EM structures capture the transport cycle of the P4-ATPase flippase

In eukaryotic membranes, type IV P-type adenosine triphosphatases (P4-ATPases) mediate the translocation of phospholipids from the outer to the inner leaflet and maintain lipid asymmetry, which is critical for membrane trafficking and signaling pathways. Here, we report the cryo–electron microscopy structures of six distinct intermediates of the human ATP8A1-CDC50a heterocomplex at resolutions of

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An optical tweezer array of ultracold molecules

Ultracold molecules have important applications that range from quantum simulation and computation to precision measurements probing physics beyond the Standard Model. Optical tweezer arrays of laser-cooled molecules, which allow control of individual particles, offer a platform for realizing this full potential. In this work, we report on creating an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled calcium

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Shape regulation of high-index facet nanoparticles by dealloying

Tetrahexahedral particles (~10 to ~500 nanometers) composed of platinum (Pt), palladium, rhodium, nickel, and cobalt, as well as a library of bimetallic compositions, were synthesized on silicon wafers and on catalytic supports by a ligand-free, solid-state reaction that used trace elements [antimony (Sb), bismuth (Bi), lead, or tellurium] to stabilize high-index facets. Both simulation and exper

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Non-Hermitian topological light steering

Photonic topological insulators provide a route for disorder-immune light transport, which holds promise for practical applications. Flexible reconfiguration of topological light pathways can enable high-density photonics routing, thus sustaining the growing demand for data capacity. By strategically interfacing non-Hermitian and topological physics, we demonstrate arbitrary, robust light steerin

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Time-resolved crystallography reveals allosteric communication aligned with molecular breathing

A comprehensive understanding of protein function demands correlating structure and dynamic changes. Using time-resolved serial synchrotron crystallography, we visualized half-of-the-sites reactivity and correlated molecular-breathing motions in the enzyme fluoroacetate dehalogenase. Eighteen time points from 30 milliseconds to 30 seconds cover four turnover cycles of the irreversible reaction. T

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N6-methyladenosine RNA modification-mediated cellular metabolism rewiring inhibits viral replication

Host cell metabolism can be modulated by viral infection, affecting viral survival or clearance. Yet the cellular metabolism rewiring mediated by the N 6 -methyladenosine (m 6 A) modification in interactions between virus and host remains largely unknown. Here we report that in response to viral infection, host cells impair the enzymatic activity of the RNA m 6 A demethylase ALKBH5. This behavior

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A neonicotinoid insecticide reduces fueling and delays migration in songbirds

Neonicotinoids are neurotoxic insecticides widely used as seed treatments, but little is known of their effects on migrating birds that forage in agricultural areas. We tracked the migratory movements of imidacloprid-exposed songbirds at a landscape scale using a combination of experimental dosing and automated radio telemetry. Ingestion of field-realistic quantities of imidacloprid (1.2 or 3.9 m

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Behavioral and neural correlates of hide-and-seek in rats

Evolutionary, cognitive, and neural underpinnings of mammalian play are not yet fully elucidated. We played hide-and-seek, an elaborate role-play game, with rats. We did not offer food rewards but engaged in playful interactions after finding or being found. Rats quickly learned the game and learned to alternate between hiding versus seeking roles. They guided seeking by vision and memories of pa

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New Products

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The parent trap

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Comment on "Spin coating epitaxial films"

Kelso et al . (Reports, 12 April 2019, p. 166) claim that inorganic epitaxial films were deposited onto single-crystal or single-crystal–like substrates by spin coating. The epitaxial relationships were determined by x-ray diffraction. According to their pole figures, we estimate that each of their films contains only 4.1% to 25.5% epitaxial grains. None of their films can be considered epitaxial

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Response to Comment on "Spin coating epitaxial films"

Lu and Tang claim that the spin-coated films in our study are not epitaxial. They assume that all of the background intensity in the x-ray pole figures of the spin-coated materials is due to randomly oriented grains. There is no evidence for randomly oriented grains in the 2 x-ray patterns. The background intensity in the pole figures is also comparable to the background from the single-crystal s

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In the world’s highest city, a lack of oxygen ravages the body

At 5100 meters above sea level, one in four residents suffers from chronic mountain sickness

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Common pesticide makes migrating birds anorexic

Seeds contaminated with neonicotinoids may cause birds to lose weight and delay migration

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Lab rats play hide-and-seek for the fun of it, new study shows

They prolong the game and execute “joy jumps” when found

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Mountains hidden in the deep sea are biological hot spots. Will mining ruin them?

Researchers are starting to document the biological and mineral riches of seamounts

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Science snapshots: Messenger proteins, new TB drug, artificial photosynthesis

Science Snapshots: messenger proteins, new TB drug, artificial photosynthesis

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Controversial insecticides shown to threaten survival of wild birds

New research at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows how the world's most widely used insecticides could be partly responsible for a dramatic decline in songbird populations.

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Simple model captures almost 100 years of measles dynamics in London

A simple epidemiological model accurately captures long-term measles transmission dynamics in London, including major perturbations triggered by historical events. Alexander Becker of Princeton University in New Jersey, U.S., and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Why is Earth so biologically diverse? Mountains hold the answer

What determines global patterns of biodiversity has been a puzzle for scientists since the days of von Humboldt, Darwin, and Wallace. Yet, despite two centuries of research, this question remains unanswered. The global pattern of mountain biodiversity, and the extraordinarily high richness in tropical mountains in particular, is documented in two companion Science review papers this week. The pape

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Gem-like nanoparticles of precious metals shine as catalysts

A Northwestern University research team has developed a new method for making highly desirable catalysts from metal nanoparticles that could lead to better fuel cells, among other applications. The researchers also discovered the method can take spent catalysts and recycle them into active catalysts.

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JILA's novel atomic clock design offers 'tweezer' control

JILA physicists have demonstrated a novel atomic clock design that combines near-continuous operation with strong signals and high stability, features not previously found together in a single type of next-generation atomic clock. The new clock, which uses laser "tweezers" to trap, control and isolate the atoms, also offers unique possibilities for enhancing clock performance using the tricks of q

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The newly discovered architecture of a copper-nitrenoid complex could revolutionize chemical synthesis

To make soap, just insert an oxygen atom into a carbon-hydrogen bond. The recipe may sound simple. But carbon-hydrogen bonds, like gum stuck in hair, are difficult to pull apart. Since they provide the foundation for far more than just soap, finding a way to break that stubborn pair could revolutionize how chemical industries produce everything from pharmaceuticals to household goods.

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Controversial insecticides shown to threaten survival of wild birds

New research at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows how the world's most widely used insecticides could be partly responsible for a dramatic decline in songbird populations.

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Simple model captures almost 100 years of measles dynamics in London

A simple epidemiological model accurately captures long-term measles transmission dynamics in London, including major perturbations triggered by historical events. Alexander Becker of Princeton University in New Jersey, U.S., and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Why is Earth so biologically diverse? Mountains hold the answer

What determines global patterns of biodiversity has been a puzzle for scientists since the days of von Humboldt, Darwin, and Wallace. Yet, despite two centuries of research, this question remains unanswered. The global pattern of mountain biodiversity, and the extraordinarily high richness in tropical mountains in particular, is documented in two companion Science review papers this week. The pape

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Heathrow drone protest: Five arrested over planned disruption

The co-founder of activist group Extinction Rebellion is among those held in "pre-emptive" raids.

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This Solar Panel-Like Device Can Generate Electricity in the Dark

Dusk Till Dawn Solar panels are great — but when the Sun goes down, they turn into expensive slabs of metal. But a new invention could allow us to continue generating renewable energy even in the dark, the New York Times reports . Electrical engineer Aaswath Raman, at the University of California in LA, has come up with a device that can harness energy from a dark night sky to power an LED — hint

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This new device generates light from the darkness of space

Thermoelectric generator can power a light-emitting diode after the sun goes down

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K2-18b: every habitable planet surely has life | Letter

As a new world with life-sustaining qualities is discovered, Prof Chandra Wickramasinghe discusses the likelihood that life has taken root Your report that water vapour, perhaps even rain, has been detected in a planet in the so-called Goldilocks zone of a distant star is of no surprise because water is a common stable molecule that is found throughout the universe ( Discovery of water raises hope

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'Fire inversions' lock smoke in valleys

Smoke from a summer wildfire is more than just an eye-stinging plume of nuisance. It's a poison to the lungs and hearts of the people who breathe it in and a dense blanket that hampers firefighting operations.

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'Fire inversions' lock smoke in valleys

There's an atmospheric feedback loop, says University of Utah atmospheric scientist Adam Kochanski, that can lock smoke in valleys in much the same way that temperature inversions lock the smog and gunk in the Salt Lake Valley each winter. But understanding this loop, Kochanski says, can help scientists predict how smoke will impact air quality in valleys, hopefully helping both residents and fire

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Metamaterials used to create two-part optical security features

Researchers have developed advanced optical security features that use a two-piece metamaterial system to create a difficult-to-replicate optical phenomenon. The new security features could offer improved forgery protection for high-value products or banknotes and enhance encryption of information such as pin numbers that are physically sent to recipients.

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Charge change: How electric forces vary in colloids

When calculating the electrokinetic force, the convention has been to assume that there is no relative velocity of the fluid compared to the surface, which holds true for hydrophilic surfaces. However, it needs to be reconsidered for hydrophobic surfaces.

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Elaborate Komodo dragon armor defends against other dragons

Just beneath their scales, Komodo dragons wear a suit of armor made of tiny bones. These bones cover the dragons from head to tail, creating a "chain mail" that protects the giant predators. However, the armor raises a question: What does the world's largest lizard—the dominant predator in its natural habitat—need protection from?

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Early detection is key: Screening test could improve lives of cats with heart disease

A new, two-minute screening technique could help save cats from dying prematurely of heart disease. Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University recently developed a focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) protocol for use by veterinarians in general practice to increase detection of cardiac issues in cats that aren't outwardly showing sign

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Innovative model created for NASA to predict vitamin levels in spaceflight food

A team of food scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has developed a groundbreaking, user-friendly mathematical model for NASA to help ensure that astronauts' food remains rich in nutrients during extended missions in space.

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Elaborate Komodo dragon armor defends against other dragons

Just beneath their scales, Komodo dragons wear a suit of armor made of tiny bones. These bones cover the dragons from head to tail, creating a "chain mail" that protects the giant predators. However, the armor raises a question: What does the world's largest lizard—the dominant predator in its natural habitat—need protection from?

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Early detection is key: Screening test could improve lives of cats with heart disease

A new, two-minute screening technique could help save cats from dying prematurely of heart disease. Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University recently developed a focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) protocol for use by veterinarians in general practice to increase detection of cardiac issues in cats that aren't outwardly showing sign

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African American bachelor's degrees see growth, behind in physical sciences, engineering

African Americans are seeing growth in many engineering and physical sciences fields, but they are not progressing at the same rate when compared to the general population.

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Rising Emissions Overshadow Airlines' Fuel-Efficiency Gains

New mandates from aviation authorities will not go far enough to reduce greenhouse gases, experts say — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers explore how a carbon-fixing organelle forms via phase separation

Plants, algae and other photosynthetic organisms remove carbon dioxide from the air, incorporating it into starches in a process known as carbon fixation. In green algae, which contribute up to a third of global carbon fixation, this activity is greatly enhanced by an organelle called the pyrenoid. A new paper by Princeton researcher Martin Jonikas, assistant professor of molecular biology, and co

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'Time-outs' at home not associated with long-term negative effects in children

Researchers find no differences in emotional and behavioral health between kids whose parents reported using time-outs and those who didn't.

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Satellite study of Amazon rainforest land cover gives insight into 2019 fires

A new study gives important context to the fires burning big swaths of the Amazon today.

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Satellite study of Amazon rainforest land cover gives insight into 2019 fires

Throughout August and early September 2019, media around the world have reported on the extensive forest fires ravaging Brazil's Amazon rainforest. Much of the concern stems from the Amazon's significance to regulating the world's climate. According to the Associated Press, the Amazon absorbs 2 billion tons of carbon dioxide every year—about 5% of global emissions. Thus, fires in the region eat aw

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Researchers explore how a carbon-fixing organelle forms via phase separation

Plants, algae and other photosynthetic organisms remove carbon dioxide from the air, incorporating it into starches in a process known as carbon fixation. In green algae, which contribute up to a third of global carbon fixation, this activity is greatly enhanced by an organelle called the pyrenoid. A new paper by Princeton researcher Martin Jonikas, assistant professor of molecular biology, and co

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All on the table: Researchers call for a more comprehensive assessment of the global food system

While we are increasingly aware of the environmental costs and impacts of raising a handful of widely eaten, large-scale production foods such as cows and pigs, we have glaring blind spots when it comes to such effects of many other foods that are a major part of the global diet. A more complete understanding of the impacts of these "underassessed" foods would go a long way toward creating a clear

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Elaborate Komodo dragon armor defends against other dragons

Just beneath their scales, Komodo dragons wear a suit of armor made of tiny bones. These bones cover the dragons from head to tail, creating a 'chain mail' that protects the giant predators. However, the armor raises a question: What does the world's largest lizard — the dominant predator in its natural habitat — need protection from?

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Markey researchers discover role of nuclear glycogen in non-small cell lung cancers

Researchers at the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center have made a breakthrough discovery that solves a mystery long forgotten by science and have identified a potentially novel avenue in pre-clinical models to treat non-small cell lung cancers.

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African american bachelor's degrees see growth, behind in physical sciences, engineering

African Americans are seeing growth in engineering and physical sciences but are not progressing at the same rate when compared to the general population. A report from the American Institute of Physics Statistical Research Center examined the number of bachelor's degrees earned from 2005 to 2015.

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Princeton researchers explore how a carbon-fixing organelle forms via phase separation

Algae remove vast amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis thanks to an organelle called the pyrenoid, which boosts the efficiency of carbon-fixation. Researchers have known that the pyrenoid forms via a process of phase separation, the same process that causes oil to cluster into droplets in water. The new study looks deeper into how this happens.

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Innovative model created for NASA to predict vitamin levels in spaceflight food

A team of food scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has developed a groundbreaking, user-friendly mathematical model for NASA to help ensure that astronauts' food remains rich in nutrients during extended missions in space.

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Stem cell researchers reactivate 'back-up genes' in the lab

Vincent Pasque and his team at KU Leuven have unravelled parts of a mechanism that may one day help to treat Rett syndrome and other genetic disorders linked to the X chromosome.

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Video: Does adrenaline give you superhero strength?

You've probably heard stories about mothers lifting cars to save their babies trapped underneath—but are those just urban myths?

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Food can help or hurt mouse gut bacteria after antibiotics

Antibiotics change the composition and metabolism of gut bacteria in mice, and food can make things better or worse, according to new research. Antibiotics save countless lives each year from harmful bacterial infections—but the community of beneficial bacteria that live in human intestines, known as the microbiome, frequently suffers collateral damage. Peter Belenky, an assistant professor of mo

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Concerns grow over tainted sewage sludge spread on croplands

For more than 20 years, the eastern Michigan town of Lapeer sent leftover sludge from its sewage treatment plant to area farms, supplying them with high-quality, free fertilizer while avoiding the expense of disposal elsewhere.

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Charge change: How electric forces vary in colloids

When calculating electrokinetic force, the convention has been to assume that there is no relative velocity of the fluid compared to the surface, which holds true for hydrophilic surfaces. However, this needs to be reconsidered for hydrophobic surfaces. Prof Hiroyuki Ohshima from Tokyo University of Science has conducted theoretical research on electrokinetic phenomena in colloidal particles for 5

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Bluebird

The house was strange, even for a summer house, cold somehow, the wraparound screened porch almost cut off by the trees, though the trees, off and on, would come alive with bluebirds, birds so tame, they would follow on the mountain path down to the small home lake, chur-wi, tru-ly, chur-wi, tru-ly , over and over, in bird-English. Had I ever seen a bluebird so bright a blue?— a blue easily confu

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Researchers design a roadmap for hydrogen supply network

Researchers have developed a hydrogen supply chain model that can enable the adoption of zero-emission, hydrogen-powered cars — transforming them from a novelty into everyday transportation in just 30 years.

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A robot with a firm yet gentle grasp

Human hands are skilled at manipulating a range of objects. We can pick up an egg or a strawberry without smashing it. We can hammer a nail. One characteristic that allows us to perform a variety of tasks is the ability to alter the firmness of our grip, and researchers have developed a two-fingered robotic hand that shares this trait. The goal? Improving safety in industrial settings where robots

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Metamaterials used to create two-part optical security features

Researchers have developed advanced optical security features that use a two-piece metamaterial system to create a difficult-to-replicate optical phenomenon. The new security features could offer improved forgery protection for high-value products or banknotes and enhance encryption of information such as pin numbers that are physically sent to recipients.

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Charge change: How electric forces vary in colloids

When calculating the electrokinetic force, the convention has been to assume that there is no relative velocity of the fluid compared to the surface, which holds true for hydrophilic surfaces. However, it needs to be reconsidered for hydrophobic surfaces.

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Teens who spend hours on social media report these behaviors

Teenagers who spend more than three hours a day on social media are more likely to report high levels of behaviors that may indicate mental health problems compared to adolescents who do not use social media at all, according to a new study. The study examines the time adolescents reported spending on social media and both internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Internalizing behaviors can inv

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Vi taler alle med 39 bit/s

PLUS. Informationsindholdet pr. stavelse varierer meget fra sprog til sprog, men informationshastigheden i bit/s er stort set ens.

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Saturn's rings shine in Hubble's latest portrait

Saturn is so beautiful that astronomers cannot resist using the Hubble Space Telescope to take yearly snapshots of the ringed world when it is at its closest distance to Earth.

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A promising treatment for an incurable, deadly kidney disease

A potential treatment for polycystic kidney disease — a genetic disorder that causes the kidneys to swell with multiple cysts and can eventually lead to organ failure — has shown promising results in animal testing.

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Epilepsy surgery: The earlier the better, overview study shows

A person with drug resistant epilepsy who gets an early surgical intervention has a better chance of becoming seizure free. This is shown in a systematic review and meta-analysis in which Sahlgrenska Academy researchers, in collaboration with the Swedish Council for Assessment of Health Technology and Social Services (SBU), analysed results from a range of previous studies. They concluded that peo

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Semiconducting material more affected by defects than previously thought

A promising semiconductor material, halide perovskite, could be improved if flaws previously thought irrelevant to performance are reduced, according to research published today in Nature Communications.

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Early detection is key: Screening test could improve lives of cats with heart disease

A new, two-minute screening technique could help save cats from dying prematurely of heart disease. Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University recently developed a focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) protocol for use by veterinarians in general practice to increase detection of cardiac issues in cats that aren't outwardly showing sign

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Texas Biomed researchers pinpoint why HIV patients are more likely to develop tuberculosis

Tuberculosis and HIV — two of the world's deadliest infectious diseases — are far worse when they occur together. Now, Texas Biomedical Research Institute researchers have pinpointed an important mechanism at work in this troubling health problem. And, their discovery could lead to a new mode of treatment for people at risk. The results were published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, a

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New review highlights benefits of plant-based diet for rheumatoid arthritis

A plant-based diet may alleviate painful symptoms associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a new review published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition.

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Satellite study of Amazon rainforest land cover gives insight into 2019 fires

A University of Kansas study in the journal Ecohydrology headed by Gabriel de Oliveira gives important context to the fires burning big swaths of the Amazon today.

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'Time-outs' not associated with long-term negative effects in children

Researchers find no differences in emotional and behavioral health between kids whose parents reported using time-outs and those who didn't.

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Stem cell researchers reactivate 'back-up genes' in the lab

Biomedical scientists at KU Leuven have unraveled parts of a mechanism that may one day help to treat Rett syndrome and other genetic disorders linked to the X chromosome.

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Stem cell researchers reactivate 'back-up genes' in the lab

Biomedical scientists at KU Leuven have unraveled parts of a mechanism that may one day help to treat Rett syndrome and other genetic disorders linked to the X chromosome.

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Heterogeneity in the workplace: 'Diversity is very important to us—but not in my team'

Diversity in the workplace is highly sought in theory, but often still lacking in practice. A new study shows that people tend to favor diversity for others, but prefer to work with people who are as similar to themselves as possible. A team of researchers from the universities of Basel and Koblenz-Landau published their report in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.

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Researchers use metamaterials to create two-part optical security features

Researchers have developed advanced optical security features that use a two-piece metamaterial system to create a difficult-to-replicate optical phenomenon. Metamaterials are engineered to have a property that is not found in naturally occurring materials. The new security features could offer improved forgery protection for high-value products or banknotes and enhance encryption of information s

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People Are Already Getting Arrested Trying to “Storm Area 51”

Ruimte Buitenaards “Storm Area 51” — a Facebook event jokingly urging attendees to swarm the military base to “see them aliens” — has already landed two people in jail. On Tuesday, Nevada police arrested Dutch YouTube personalities Govert Charles Wilhelmus Jacob Sweep and Ties Granzier for trespassing on the Nevada National Security Site, a government nuclear facility located 10 miles away from A

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Saturn's rings shine in Hubble's latest portrait

Saturn is so beautiful that astronomers cannot resist using the Hubble Space Telescope to take yearly snapshots of the ringed world when it is at its closest distance to Earth. These images, however, are more than just beauty shots. They reveal a planet with a turbulent, dynamic atmosphere.

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We Ignore Expertise at Our Own Peril

Hurricane Dorian seen from the MODIS imager on Terra, August 31, 2019. NASA. We seem to now live in an age where people are comfortable ignoring experts, especially those in the sciences. You may have noticed that Hurricane Dorian didn't hit Alabama. Depending on the circles in which you run, you might think it was a "close call" or a completely mistaken statement that Alabama was ever in any real

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Calming accessories that help you sleep better

Sleep aids to stay rested. (Kinga Cichewicz via Unsplash/) Today's culture is all about the ‘sleep when you’re dead’ mentality, even if it means sacrificing our wellbeing. Luckily, the tide has shifted back to the need for healthy, quality rest, and has put an emphasis on how important sleep is for functioning productively and creatively. This has created a wealth of gadgets and tech to help us g

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Why Do We Need Super Accurate Atomic Clocks?

Explore the applications of state-of-the-art clocks — and the math that describes their performance and limitations. Twisted Clock Face.jpg Image credits: Liseykina/Shutterstock Physics Thursday, September 12, 2019 – 09:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — The GPS receiver in your car or cellphone works by listening to satellites broadcast their time and location. Once the receiver has

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With Looming Ban, People Are Plotting to Hoard Juul Pods

On Wednesday, the Trump Administration called for a ban on all flavored vape liquid in the wake of a mysterious lung illness , tied to vaping, that’s now claimed at least six lives in the U.S. Now, with the FDA expected to take flavored vapes off the shelves in the near future, some people are planning — or at least tweeting about planning — to stock up on their beloved Mango-flavored Juul pods a

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Charge change: How electric forces vary in colloids

When calculating the electrokinetic force, the convention has been to assume that there is no relative velocity of the fluid compared to the surface, which holds true for hydrophilic surfaces. However, it needs to be reconsidered for hydrophobic surfaces. Prof Hiroyuki Ohshima from Tokyo University of Science has conducted theoretical research on electrokinetic phenomena in colloidal particles for

1d

Researchers use metamaterials to create two-part optical security features

Researchers have developed advanced optical security features that use a two-piece metamaterial system to create a difficult-to-replicate optical phenomenon. The new security features could offer improved forgery protection for high-value products or banknotes and enhance encryption of information such as pin numbers that are physically sent to recipients.

1d

A robot with a firm yet gentle grasp

Human hands are skilled at manipulating a range of objects. We can pick up an egg or a strawberry without smashing it. We can hammer a nail. One characteristic that allows us to perform a variety of tasks is the ability to alter the firmness of our grip, and University at Buffalo researchers have developed a two-fingered robotic hand that shares this trait. The goal? Improving safety in industrial

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UBC researchers design roadmap for hydrogen supply network

Researchers at the University of British Columbia have developed a hydrogen supply chain model that can enable the adoption of zero-emission, hydrogen-powered cars — transforming them from a novelty into everyday transportation in just 30 years.

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How to Watch Tonight's Democratic Primary Debate

Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren will be onstage together at last.

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Lights and magnets get soft robots to change shape

A new technique uses light and magnetic fields to remotely control the movement of soft robots, lock them into position for as long as needed, and later reconfigure the robots into new shapes, researchers report. “We’re particularly excited about the reconfigurability,” says Joe Tracy, a professor of materials science and engineering at North Carolina State University and corresponding author of

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How to check if you've been hacked

Getting hacked can make you feel really small. (www_slon_pics via Pixabay/) If you think someone might have gained access to one of your online accounts, the earlier you take action, the better. Every minute you don't is an extra minute the hacker has to do more damage and potentially unlock other connected accounts. Unwelcome visitors usually leave tracks behind, so if you're vigilant, you can s

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Conservation of a Central American region is critical for migrating birds

Many of North America's migratory birds are declining, but the mysteries about when and how birds migrate must to be solved to effectively protect them. A new paper in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, published by Oxford University Press, identifies a previously overlooked area that is critical for conservation: the region between southern Mexico and Guatemala where songbirds fuel up for a grueli

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Conservation of a Central American region is critical for migrating birds

Many of North America's migratory birds are declining, but the mysteries about when and how birds migrate must to be solved to effectively protect them. A new paper in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, published by Oxford University Press, identifies a previously overlooked area that is critical for conservation: the region between southern Mexico and Guatemala where songbirds fuel up for a grueli

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New drug target discovered for the lung disease PAH

Study suggests that targeting an 'Eyes Absent' protein could lead to better medicine for treating PAH, a deadly lung disease.

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Conservation of a Central American region is critical for migrating birds

A new article identifies a previously overlooked area that is critical for conservation: the region between southern Mexico and Guatemala where songbirds fuel up for a grueling flight across the Gulf of Mexico.

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Polysubstance use in young adults — are there predictable patterns?

Researchers offer their insights on the non-medical use of prescription drugs among US young adults, exploring patterns and drivers of young adults' non-medical use of prescription drugs — including prescription sedatives, opioids, or stimulants — and their association with substance use disorder symptoms at age 35.

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Why do birds migrate at night?

Researchers found migratory birds maximize how much light they get from their environment, so they can migrate even at night.

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GymCam tracks exercises that wearable monitors can't

Wearable sensors such as smartwatches have become a popular motivational tool for fitness enthusiasts, but gadgets do not sense all exercises equally. Researchers have found that a stationary camera is a better choice for gym exercises.

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Heterogeneity in the workplace: 'Diversity is very important to us — but not in my team'

Diversity in the workplace is highly sought in theory, but often still lacking in practice. A new study shows that people tend to favor diversity for others, but prefer to work with people who are as similar to themselves as possible.

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Scientists discover new breakthrough in cancer hair-loss treatment

Researchers have discovered a new strategy for how to protect hair follicles from chemotherapy, which could lead to new treatments that prevent chemotherapy-induced hair loss — arguably one of the most psychologically distressing side effects of modern cancer therapy.

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The Problem with Failing to Admit We Don't Know

Although numbers are often treated as cold, hard facts, we should be willing to acknowledge how uncertain they can be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Polysubstance use in young adults — are there predictable patterns?

In a Lancet Psychiatry commentary, Columbia researchers offer their insights on the non-medical use of prescription drugs among US young adults, exploring patterns and drivers of young adults' non-medical use of prescription drugs — including prescription sedatives, opioids, or stimulants — and their association with substance use disorder symptoms at age 35.

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Conservation of a Central American region is critical for migrating birds

A new paper in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, published by Oxford University Press, identifies a previously overlooked area that is critical for conservation: the region between southern Mexico and Guatemala where songbirds fuel up for a grueling flight across the Gulf of Mexico.

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New drug target discovered for the lung disease PAH

Study suggests that targeting an 'Eyes Absent' protein could lead to better medicine for treating PAH, a deadly lung disease.

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Hubble reveals latest portrait of Saturn

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 observed Saturn on 20 June 2019 as the planet made its closest approach to Earth this year, at approximately 1.36 billion kilometres away.

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Scientists discover new breakthrough in cancer hair loss treatment

Researchers based at The University of Manchester have discovered a new strategy for how to protect hair follicles from chemotherapy, which could lead to new treatments that prevent chemotherapy-induced hair loss — arguably one of the most psychologically distressing side effects of modern cancer therapy.

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Google Photos partners with CVS and Walmart for prints

Google Photos, far and away the most used photo sharing app, with over 1 billion users monthly, has partnered with CVS and Walmart to offer on-demand, in-store prints from the app.

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Google will pay $550 million after French investigation over dodged taxes

Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge Google has agreed to pay a nearly $550 million fine to settle an investigation in France over its tax practices, Reuters reports. Google …

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Jurassic crocodile identified in fossil study

A prehistoric crocodile that lived around 180 million years ago has been identified—almost 250 years after the discovery of its fossil remains.

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The Goldfinch Movie Adaptation Is Faithful to a Fault

John Crowley’s The Goldfinch , like the Donna Tartt novel it’s based on, opens as dramatically as possible. There’s a bombing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, a mysterious exchange of dialogue between two of the victims, and a masterpiece snatched from the rubble. This intriguing beginning launches a big, messy story that meanders around the United States and folds in all kinds of eccentric cha

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What Was the Enlightenment?

Don't let the name "Enlightenment" fool you. While new ideas were proposed and advancements in science were made, it was also a time when millions of people in Africa were enslaved and shipped to the Western Hemisphere.

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Generator that runs on heat escaping to the sky can charge phones

A thermoelectric generator that produces off-grid electricity at night from heat radiating from the ground can power lights and phones in remote areas

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Bones release a hormone that helps us deal with sudden danger

Bones secrete a hormone when we are under threat that activates the fight-or-flight response, suggesting our skeletons are more active that we thought

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The FBI Reportedly Thinks Israel Spied on Trump’s Phone

Spy Ring The FBI suspects that Israeli intelligence attempted to spy on the Trump Administration and listen in on phone calls between Trump and members of his cabinet. Three former senior government officials told Politico , under the condition of anonymity, that the FBI traced StingRay devices found in Washington D.C. in 2017 back to Israel. Another explosive claim: they say the Trump Administra

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Daily briefing: This is what it takes to stop Ebola

Nature, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02761-8 African health workers’ moving stories of success and struggle. Plus: Hubble spies water raining on an exoplanet and embryo-like structures created from human stem cells.

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New Clues Show How Russia’s Grid Hackers Aimed for Physical Destruction

A fresh look at the 2016 blackout in Ukraine suggests that the cyberattack behind it was intended to cause far more damage.

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The secret of static electricity? It’s shocking

Scientists say they finally know why rubbing two materials together produces an electric charge

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'The Alexa of chemistry': Researchers on fast track to build open network

D. Tyler McQuade, Ph.D., a professor in the Virginia Commonwealth University College of Engineering, is principal investigator of a multi-university project seeking to use artificial intelligence to help scientists come up with the perfect molecule for everything from a better shampoo to coatings on advanced microchips.

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Saturn's rings shine in Hubble's latest portrait

Saturn is so beautiful that astronomers cannot resist using the Hubble Space Telescope to take yearly snapshots of the ringed world when it is at its closest distance to Earth. These images, however, are more than just beauty shots. They reveal a planet with a turbulent, dynamic atmosphere.

1d

Heterogeneity in the workplace: 'Diversity is very important to us — but not in my team'

Diversity in the workplace is highly sought in theory, but often still lacking in practice. A new study shows that people tend to favor diversity for others, but prefer to work with people who are as similar to themselves as possible. A team of researchers from the universities of Basel and Koblenz-Landau published their report in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.

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Expert feedback improves antibiotic prescribing decisions in paediatrics

In an experimental study, economists and medical experts tested how expert feedback will affect the antibiotic prescribing behaviour of paediatricians. The results suggest that such feedback could reduce and improve how antibiotics are applied in paediatrics.

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The 'pathobiome' — a new understanding of disease

Scientists have presented a novel concept describing the complex microbial interactions that lead to disease in plants, animals and humans.

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Diet impacts the sensitivity of gut microbiome to antibiotics, mouse study finds

Antibiotics change the kinds of bacteria in the mouse gut as well as the bacteria's metabolism — but diet can exacerbate the changes, a new study showed.

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Exercising at home has a positive effect on Parkinson's patients

In a large double-blind study, researchers show that patients in the early stages of Parkinson's disease can exercise regularly at home for 6 months. This regular exercise has a positive effect on their motor disability comparable to the effect of conventional Parkinson's medication.

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What multilingual nuns can tell us about dementia

A strong ability in languages may help reduce the risk of developing dementia, says a new study. The research examined the health outcomes of 325 Roman Catholic nuns who were members of the Sisters of Notre Dame in the United States. The data was drawn from a larger, internationally recognized study examining the Sisters, known as the Nun Study.

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Repeated periods of poverty accelerate the aging process

People who have found themselves below the relative poverty threshold four or more times in their adult life age significantly earlier than others.

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Structural insights into the mechanism of human soluble guanylate cyclase

Nature, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1584-6

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Why do birds migrate at night?

It was a puzzle about birds.

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Why do birds migrate at night?

It was a puzzle about birds.

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Researchers produce synthetic Hall Effect to achieve one-way radio transmission

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have replicated one of the most well-known electromagnetic effects in physics, the Hall Effect, using radio waves (photons) instead of electric current (electrons). Their technique could be used to create advanced communication systems that boost signal transmission in one direction while simultaneously absorbing signals going in the op

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Sulphur emissions from marine algae dropped during glacial periods

Contrary to conventional wisdom, sulphur production by tiny marine algae decreased during glacial periods, and is more closely linked to climate than previously thought, according to the latest research by scientists in Japan. A clearer understanding of the link between the climate and marine phytoplankton, the microscopic single-celled algae that live in the surface waters of the ocean, can help

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The 'pathobiome'—a new understanding of disease

Cefas and University of Exeter scientists have presented a novel concept describing the complex microbial interactions that lead to disease in plants, animals and humans.

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New Deepfake Transforms Tom Holland Into Emo Spider-Man

Spidey Swap We’ve already seen convincing deepfakes of Joe Rogan as Dr. Evil , Will Smith as Neo , and Tom Cruise as Patrick Bateman . Now, YouTuber Aldo Jones has taken it upon himself to create a deepfake of Spider-Man actor Tom Holland as, well, Spider-Man — more specifically, the 2007 “ emo Spider-Man ” played by Tobey Maguire in “Spider-Man 3.” MCU Throwback Holland has played the role of Pe

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Når muskelhunden kontrollerer systemet, er den en tandløs chihuahua

I Svendborg-sagen og i Odense-sagen – der omhandlede en patient der fik for meget metadon – så vi hvordan Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed med usædvanlig nidkærhed politianmeldte og jagtede enkeltpersoner gennem hele retssystemet. Billedet er helt anderledes, når det handler om reaktive organisatoriske tilsyn, her tværer man ansvaret bredt ud i stedet for opad, hvor det rettelig hører til.

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Fight or Flight May Be in Our Bones

A protein released from bone is involved in triggering the body’s reaction to stress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Amazon testing crowd-sourced 'Alexa Answers' that will let strangers respond to your questions

Participants will enter their answers — 300 characters or less — on a dedicated website where they will then compete with other participants to earn points and badges for 'good' responses.'

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Generator that runs on heat escaping to the sky can charge phones

A thermoelectric generator that produces off-grid electricity at night from heat radiating from the ground can power lights and phones in remote areas

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Cancer Drugs in Development May Be Targeting Wrong Proteins

A study of 11 drugs now in clinical trials suggests they do kill cancer cells–but through a different mechanism than indicated in previous research.

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The 'pathobiome'—a new understanding of disease

Cefas and University of Exeter scientists have presented a novel concept describing the complex microbial interactions that lead to disease in plants, animals and humans.

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Four billion particles of microplastics discovered in major body of water

A new study from the University of South Florida St. Petersburg and Eckerd College estimates the waters of Tampa Bay contain four billion particles of microplastics, raising new questions about the impact of pollution on marine life in this vital ecosystem.

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GymCam tracks exercises that wearable monitors can't

Wearable sensors such as smartwatches have become a popular motivational tool for fitness enthusiasts, but gadgets do not sense all exercises equally. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have found that a stationary camera is a better choice for gym exercises.

1d

Why do birds migrate at night?

Researchers found migratory birds maximize how much light they get from their environment, so they can migrate even at night.

1d

The 'pathobiome' — a new understanding of disease

Cefas and University of Exeter scientists have presented a novel concept describing the complex microbial interactions that lead to disease in plants, animals and humans.

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Finding (microbial) pillars of the bioenergy community

In a new study in Nature Communications, Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center scientists at Michigan State University have focused on understanding more about the plant regions above the soil where these microbes can live, called the 'phyllosphere.'

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Fight or Flight May Be in Our Bones

A protein released from bone is involved in triggering the body’s reaction to stress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Fight or Flight May Be in Our Bones

A protein released from bone is involved in triggering the body’s reaction to stress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Whoopi Goldberg and Alexander Skarsgård Are Joining 'The Stand'

The 10-episode series will air on CBS All Access, but a premiere date has not been set.

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Consumer DNA Tests Negate Sperm-Bank-Donor Anonymity

Companies such as 23andMe and Ancestry.com have made it impossible for sperm banks to keep donors’ identities secret — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Chemical reaction method for more efficient drug production

Researchers have developed a more efficient method to produce the building blocks needed for antibiotics and cancer treatment drugs.

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Consumer DNA Tests Negate Sperm-Bank-Donor Anonymity

Companies such as 23andMe and Ancestry.com have made it impossible for sperm banks to keep donors’ identities secret — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Four billion particles of microplastics discovered in major body of water

While collecting water samples and plankton, researchers discovered a high concentration of microplastics, which are known to disrupt the marine food chain.

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Shifting attention can interfere with our perceptions of reality

A new study suggests that distractions — those pesky interruptions that pull us away from our goals — might change our perception of what's real, making us believe we saw something different from what we actually saw. Even more troubling, the study suggests people might not realize their perception has changed – to the contrary, they might feel great confidence in what they think they saw.

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How marketers can shape customer sentiment during events

Marketers' ability to influence user-generated content surrounding customers' brand or firm-related interactions, and its sentiment in particular, may be an un-tapped use of social media in marketing.

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Bone, not adrenaline, drives fight or flight response

Adrenaline is considered crucial in triggering a 'fight or flight' response, but new research shows the response can't get started without a hormone made in bone.

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Device generates light from the cold night sky

An inexpensive thermoelectric device harnesses the cold of space without active heat input, generating electricity that powers an LED at night, researchers report.

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Researchers produce synthetic Hall Effect to achieve one-way radio transmission

Researchers have replicated one of the most well-known electromagnetic effects in physics, the Hall Effect, using radio waves (photons) instead of electric current (electrons). Their technique could be used to create advanced communication systems that boost signal transmission in one direction while simultaneously absorbing signals going in the opposite direction.

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'Lovers of Modena' skeletons holding hands were both men

Researchers believe pair might have been siblings, cousins or soldiers who died together The “Lovers of Modena”, a pair of skeletons so called because they were buried hand-in-hand, were both men, researchers have found. The bones, from between the 4th and 6th century AD, were found in a cemetery in 2009 near Modena in northern Italy. Continue reading…

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Elon Musk Announces “Spaceballs”-Themed Super-Fast Tesla Mode

Gone Plaid What’s faster than Ludicrous Mode on a Tesla? “Going Plaid,” according to CEO Elon Musk — a reference to the 1987 sci-fi comedy “Spaceballs.” The only thing beyond Ludicrous is Plaid — Elon Musk (@elonmusk) September 12, 2019 Musk confirmed in a tweet on Wednesday that the “Plaid powertrain is about a year away from production,” and that it’ll appear in the Roadster but not the Model 3

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Twist on ‘survival of the fittest’ could explain how reality emerges from the quantum haze

Subtle experiment with an electron trapped in diamond tests theory of quantum Darwinism

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What multilingual nuns can tell us about dementia

A strong ability in languages may help reduce the risk of developing dementia, says a new University of Waterloo study. The research, led by Suzanne Tyas, a public health professor at Waterloo, examined the health outcomes of 325 Roman Catholic nuns who were members of the Sisters of Notre Dame in the United States. The data was drawn from a larger, internationally recognized study examining the S

1d

Exercising at home has a positive effect on Parkinson's patients

In a large double-blind study, Radboud university medical center researchers show that patients in the early stages of Parkinson's disease can exercise regularly at home for 6 months. This regular exercise has a positive effect on their motor disability comparable to the effect of conventional Parkinson's medication.

1d

Repeated periods of poverty accelerate the ageing process

People who have found themselves below the relative poverty threshold four or more times in their adult life age significantly earlier than others. This is shown in new research from the Department of Health and Medical Sciences at the University of Copenhagen.

1d

Distractions distort what's real, study suggests

A new study suggests that distractions — those pesky interruptions that pull us away from our goals — might change our perception of what's real, making us believe we saw something different from what we actually saw.Even more troubling, the study suggests people might not realize their perception has changed – to the contrary, they might feel great confidence in what they think they saw.

1d

Four billion particles of microplastics discovered in major body of water

While collecting water samples and plankton, researchers discovered a high concentration of microplastics, which are known to disrupt the marine food chain.

1d

Researchers produce synthetic Hall Effect to achieve one-way radio transmission

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have replicated one of the most well-known electromagnetic effects in physics, the Hall Effect, using radio waves (photons) instead of electric current (electrons). Their technique could be used to create advanced communication systems that boost signal transmission in one direction while simultaneously absorbing signals going in the op

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Delaying start of head, neck cancer treatment in underserved, urban patients associated with worse outcomes

This observational study looked at the factors and outcomes associated with delaying the start of treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in an underserved urban population. The analysis included 956 patients with HNSCC treated at a health center in New York City. The authors report that delaying the initiation of treatment beyond 60 days was associated with poorer survival and

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Knotty problem of cell reprogramming solved, USC scientists report

USC scientists surmount roadblock in regenerative medicine that has constrained the ability to use repurposed cells to treat diseases.

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Environment: Pollutants found in skin and blubber of English Channel dolphins

High levels of pollutants, such as industrial fluids and mercury, may have accumulated in the blubber and skin of one of the largest coastal populations of dolphins in Europe, a study in Scientific Reports indicates. Mercury concentrations found in 82 dolphins living in the English Channel are among the highest concentrations observed in the species, the work suggests.

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Diet impacts the sensitivity of gut microbiome to antibiotics, mouse study finds

Antibiotics change the kinds of bacteria in the mouse gut as well as the bacteria's metabolism — but diet can exacerbate the changes, a new study showed.

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Bone, not adrenaline, drives fight or flight response

Adrenaline is considered crucial in triggering a 'fight or flight' response, but new research shows the response can't get started without a hormone made in bone.

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Device generates light from the cold night sky

An inexpensive thermoelectric device harnesses the cold of space without active heat input, generating electricity that powers an LED at night, researchers report Sept. 12 in the journal Joule.

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Bones secrete a stress hormone

Both rodents and humans release a bone-derived hormone called osteocalcin in response to acute stress, researchers report on Sept. 12 in the journal Cell Metabolism. This fight-or-flight pathway is distinct from others mediated by hormones released by the adrenal glands, such as cortisol, adrenaline, and norepinephrine. The findings help to explain why patients and animals lacking cortisol and add

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Slack's desktop apps get dark mode options

The dark mode trend looks like it's here to stay, with more and more companies introducing black color schemes for their apps. The latest feature in Slack for desktop is support …

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FBI and Nigeria step-up cyber-crime investigations

The FBI and Nigeria's anti-graft agency said Tuesday they have intensified a joint investigation into cyber criminal networks, weeks after the US government released a wanted list of 77 Nigerian …

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Professor om ingeniørløfte: Ord og ritualer kan forandre ingeniørfaget

Selvom et ingeniørløfte ikke vil være juridisk bindende, og selvom man kan hævde, at det bare er ord, vil det virke forpligtende. Man skal ikke underkende ritualer, mener professor.

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Antibiotic use before cancer treatment cuts survival time – study

Patients live longer if they do not take antibiotics in month before immunotherapy Taking antibiotics in the month before starting immunotherapy dramatically reduces a cancer patient’s chances of survival, according to a small but groundbreaking study. Scientists at Imperial College London believe antibiotics strip out helpful bacteria from the gut, which weakens the immune system. This appears t

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A global mass budget for positively buoyant macroplastic debris in the ocean

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49413-5

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High pollutant exposure level of the largest European community of bottlenose dolphins in the English Channel

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-48485-7

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Tea drinkers may get some protection against brain decline

Regular tea drinkers have better organized brain regions—something associated with healthy cognitive function—compared to non-tea drinkers, according to new research. “Our results offer the first evidence of positive contribution of tea drinking to brain structure, and suggest that drinking tea regularly has a protective effect against age-related decline in brain organization,” explains Feng Lei

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Your Cancer Targets May Not Be Real

I wrote here about a paper from Cold Spring Harbor labs that invalidated MELK as a cancer target. That was straightforward enough: knocking it out via CRISPR across a whole range of cancer cell lines had no effect on their growth at all, so it’s kind of hard to make the case that it’s an important thing to go after. At the same time, the paper showed that a MELK inhibitor with activity in cancer

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Climate change in the Southern Hemisphere

On its mission "SouthTRAC," the German research aircraft HALO will investigate the southern atmosphere and its effects on climate change in September and November 2019. Researchers from Goethe University will also be on board.

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Researchers grow citrus disease bacteria in the lab

Washington State University researchers have for the first time grown the bacteria in a laboratory that causes Citrus Greening Disease, considered the world's most harmful citrus disease.

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Researchers grow citrus disease bacteria in the lab

Washington State University researchers have for the first time grown the bacteria in a laboratory that causes Citrus Greening Disease, considered the world's most harmful citrus disease.

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Why a high-profile climate science opponent quit Trump’s White House

Physicist William Happer failed to win backing for high-level critique of climate findings

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Ultra-thin optical elements directly measure polarization

For the first time, researchers have used ultra-thin layers of 2D structures known as metasurfaces to create holograms that can measure the polarization of light. The new metasurface holograms could be used to create very fast and compact devices for polarization measurements, which are used in spectroscopy, sensing and communications applications.

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Patients diagnosed with cancer after skipping appointment more likely to die within a year

Cancer patients who miss an urgent referral appointment for their symptoms are 12% more likely to die within 12 months of diagnosis, a major new study has found. The authors of the study say that more support is needed for patients at risk of non-attendance.

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Microbes are degrading infrastructure, compounding health implications

Microorganisms growing inside aging buildings and infrastructure are more than just a health issue, according to new research. The research examined the impact of fungal mold growth and associated microbes within structures on a university campus. The study focuses on the observed biodeteriorative capabilities of indoor fungi upon gypsum board material (drywall) and how it affects a building's age

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Drinking tea improves brain health, study suggests

A recent study revealed that regular tea drinkers have better organized brain regions compared to non-tea drinkers.

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Routine sparring in boxing can affect brain performance

Routine sparring in boxing can cause short-term impairments in brain-to-muscle communication and decreased memory performance, according to new research.

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Machine learning improves the diagnosis of patients with head and neck cancers

Researchers have successfully solved a longstanding problem in the diagnosis of head and neck cancers. The researchers used artificial intelligence to develop a new classification method which identifies the primary origins of cancerous tissue based on chemical DNA changes. The potential for introduction into routine medical practice is currently being tested.

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Chemical reaction method for more efficient drug production

Researchers have developed a more efficient method to produce the building blocks needed for antibiotics and cancer treatment drugs.

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‘Coerced debt’ follows survivors of domestic abuse

The “coerced debt” that women leaving abusive relationships take with them can jeopardize their chances of starting fresh, research finds. Coerced debt is created when an abusive partner uses coercion or fraud to access credit in their partner’s name. For example, an abuser might force or threaten the victim to take out a loan or use a credit card against her will; or, an abuser might use a victi

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Terahertz waves reveal hidden processes in ultrafast artificial photosynthesis

Researchers have succeeded in observing charge transfer and intermolecular interactions in ultrafast artificial photosynthesis. A new finding will help to develop highly efficient photocatalytic reactions, and TR-ATR terahertz spectroscopy will assist research on biological and chemical reaction processes.

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Hormone secreted by bones may help us escape danger

Osteocalcin, not adrenaline, may be key to the body’s “fight or flight” response

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Researchers find the ocean’s missing plastic

But it’s not good news. Mark Bruer reports.

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K2-18b is like Earth, but not

Richard A Lovett explores the significance of finding water in an atmosphere 110 light-years away.

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Seductive light from the dark side

The promise of power at night flickers for a quarter of the developing world’s population. Ian Connellan reports.

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In the face of danger, it might be osteocalcin kicking in

Skeleton important in preparing for a fight or flight response, research shows.

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Poetic praise for an award well won

Australian immunologist celebrated in a novel way.

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Diet impacts the sensitivity of gut microbiome to antibiotics, mouse study finds

Antibiotics save countless lives each year from harmful bacterial infections—but the community of beneficial bacteria that live in human intestines, known as the microbiome, frequently suffers collateral damage.

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English Channel dolphins carry 'toxic cocktail' of chemicals

Bottlenose dolphins in the English Channel harbor a "toxic cocktail" of chemicals, some of which have been banned for decades and which may be harming the rare marine mammals' health, scientists said Thursday.

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Bone, not adrenaline, drives fight or flight response

When faced with a predator or sudden danger, the heart rate goes up, breathing becomes more rapid, and fuel in the form of glucose is pumped throughout the body to prepare an animal to fight or flee.

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Scientists update soybean genome to golden reference

Soybean is one of the most important crops worldwide. A high-quality reference genome will facilitate its functional analysis and molecular breeding. Previously, biologists from China (Chinese Academy of Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Berry Genomics Corporation) de novo assembled a high-quality Chinese soybean genome—Gmax_ZH13 (She

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Water Detected on Planet Inside the Habitable Zone for the First Time

Image by ESA / UCL The astronomers who comb through data on planetary surveys looking for potentially habitable planets are searching for worlds with certain specific characteristics. We assume that any planet capable of supporting life has to exist within the habitable zone (also sometimes called the “Goldilocks zone”) of its host star. Too close to the star and you bake, too far away and you’ll

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Researchers develop chemical reaction method for more efficient drug production

Researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) in Japan and Mount Allison University in Canada have developed a more efficient method to produce the building blocks needed for antibiotics and cancer treatment drugs.

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Diet impacts the sensitivity of gut microbiome to antibiotics, mouse study finds

Antibiotics save countless lives each year from harmful bacterial infections—but the community of beneficial bacteria that live in human intestines, known as the microbiome, frequently suffers collateral damage.

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English Channel dolphins carry 'toxic cocktail' of chemicals

Bottlenose dolphins in the English Channel harbor a "toxic cocktail" of chemicals, some of which have been banned for decades and which may be harming the rare marine mammals' health, scientists said Thursday.

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Bone, not adrenaline, drives fight or flight response

When faced with a predator or sudden danger, the heart rate goes up, breathing becomes more rapid, and fuel in the form of glucose is pumped throughout the body to prepare an animal to fight or flee.

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First 'overtones' heard in the ringing of a black hole

When two black holes collide, they merge into one bigger black hole and ring like a struck bell, sending out ripples in space and time called gravitational waves. Embedded in these gravitational waves are specific frequencies, or tones, which are akin to individual notes in a musical chord.

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Scientists update soybean genome to golden reference

Soybean is one of the most important crops worldwide. A high-quality reference genome will facilitate its functional analysis and molecular breeding. Previously, biologists from China (Chinese Academy of Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Berry Genomics Corporation) de novo assembled a high-quality Chinese soybean genome—Gmax_ZH13 (She

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Politics this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Business this week

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Transformative? New Device Harvests Energy in Darkness

It doesn’t generate much power, but it works during the one time of day that solar cells can’t: night.

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The Riddle, and Controversy, of All That Missing Plastic

The contentious Ocean Cleanup campaign has an idea where marine plastic ends up. But it's already stirring debate.

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Bone Hormone Sparks Fight-or-Flight Response in Mice

A brain-activated, bone-derived hormone called osteocalcin regulates the acute stress response in rodents and possibly humans.

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The sound of sand reveals its source

It’s all about the ancient shellfish

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Neanderthals had a propensity for earache, nudging them to their doom

A new analysis of their skulls points to an anatomical problem

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There’s no place like home

Some butterflies stick to their burbs.

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Sulphur emissions from marine algae dropped during glacial periods

Contrary to conventional wisdom, sulphur production by tiny marine algae decreased during glacial periods, and is more closely linked to climate than previously thought, according to latest research. A clearer understanding of the link between the climate and marine phytoplankton can help scientists incorporate these impacts in future climate models.

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How astrocytes help the brain process information

New research reveals that noradrenaline plays a key role in how astrocytes — star-shaped cells in the brain closely associated with neurons — track distinct information during behavior. The researchers found that astrocytes can integrate information on arousal state and sensory experience.

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Growing citrus disease bacteria in the lab

Being able to grow the elusive and poorly understood bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), will make it easier for researchers to find treatments for the disease that has destroyed millions of acres of orange, grapefruit and lemon groves around the world and has devastated the citrus industry in Florida.

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Terahertz waves reveal hidden processes in ultrafast artificial photosynthesis

Researchers have succeeded in observing charge transfer and intermolecular interactions in ultrafast artificial photosynthesis. A new finding will help to develop highly efficient photocatalytic reactions, and TR-ATR terahertz spectroscopy will assist research on biological and chemical reaction processes.

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Popular mobile games can be used to detect signs of cognitive decline

New research shows that popular mobile phone games such as Tetris, Candy Crush Saga and Fruit Ninja could provide a new tool to help doctors spot early signs of cognitive decline, some of which may indicate the onset of serious conditions like dementia.

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New cardiac fibrosis study identifies key proteins that translate into heart disease

The formation of excess fibrous tissue in the heart, which underlies several heart diseases, could be prevented by inhibiting specific proteins that bind to RNA while its code is being translated.

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Beekeepers Confront the E.P.A. Over Pesticides

Leaders in the beekeeping industry have sued the environmental agency over its approval of the use of a pesticide that has harmed colonies.

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Climate change could make it harder for soil to soak up water

Climate change may reduce the ability of soil to absorb water in many parts of the world, researchers warn. That could have serious implications for groundwater supplies, food production and security, storm water runoff, biodiversity, and ecosystems. “Since rainfall patterns and other environmental conditions are shifting globally as a result of climate change, our results suggest that how water

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Perfusionsskanninger kan assistere neurologer ved sklerosediagnose

Perfusionsskanninger kan give læger et mere nuanceret billede, når de skal stille en sklerosediagnose. Skanningerne kan også bruges til at finde ud af, om en given behandling virker.

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Dansk skleroseregister er misundelsesværdigt

Det Danske Skleroseregister har eksisteret i 60 år, er så godt som komplet og helt unikt på verdensplan.

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Stor forskel i antallet af afbrudte behandlinger med dimetylfumarat

Danmark og Schweiz ligger på linje, når det kommer til andelen af afbrudte behandlinger med dimetylfumarat på landsplan. Men inden for landene er der stor forskel på de enkelte klinikker.

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Alle patienter med sklerose bør træne

Forskning peger på, at fysisk træning ikke bare kan lindre symptomerne på sklerose. Måske kan træning ligefrem få selve sygdommen til at udvikle sig langsommere.

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Lovers of Modena skeletons holding hands were both men

The male skeletons, buried in Roman times, have been holding hands for around 1,500 years.

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On Chandler Bing’s Job

I n an episode in the fourth season of Friends , Monica, Rachel, Chandler, and Joey find themselves engaged in an argument: Chandler and Joey, they claim, know Monica and Rachel much better than the women know them. Before long, the debate devolves into a game-show-style quiz. The host: Ross, who delights in the job. The topic: the minutiae of the friends’ lives. The stakes (which have become, th

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The Crime-Bill Debate Shows How Short Americans’ Memories Are

It was a moment that may come back to haunt Joe Biden—perhaps as soon as tonight’s Democratic debate: In an earlier round this summer, Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey wheeled on the former vice president, attacking his sponsorship of the 1994 federal crime bill with a roundhouse punch. “There are people right now in prison for life for drug offenses,” Booker said, “because you stood up and used

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New report highlights the impact of health inequalities across Europe

A new report, co-authored by University of Liverpool researchers, reveals that the gap in health between the richest and poorest in Europe is widening in many countries.

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World 'losing battle against deforestation'

A historic global agreement aimed at halting deforestation and curbing dangerous carbon dioxide emissions has failed, according to a report.

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Study finds health isn't the only issue with bacteria growth

Microorganisms growing inside aging buildings and infrastructure are more than just a health issue, according to new research from UBC Okanagan.

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Terahertz waves reveal hidden processes in ultrafast artificial photosynthesis

A team of researchers from Osaka University, in cooperation with Tokyo Institute of Technology, directly observed charge transfer and intermolecular interactions in artificial photosynthesis that occurs on a picosecond (ps) scale (10-12). With time-resolved attenuated total reflection (TR-ATR) spectroscopy in the terahertz (THz) region, they revealed the process of artificial photosynthesis materi

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First Earth observation satellite with AI ready for launch

A few months from now will see the launch of the first European satellite to demonstrate how onboard artificial intelligence can improve the efficiency of sending Earth observation data back to Earth. Dubbed ɸ-Sat, or PhiSat, this revolutionary artificial intelligence technology will fly on one of the two CubeSats that make up the FSSCat mission—a Copernicus Masters winning idea.

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Researcher calculates optimal trajectories to Mars and Mercury for a spacecraft with electric propulsion

RUDN University mathematician has proposed a method for calculating the optimal trajectory of spacecraft with electric propulsion, whose thrust is thousands times less than chemical one has, but it is able to work for years. These motors are best suited for interplanetary missions. Mathematicians calculated the flight parameters of the space probe with such motor to Mars and Mercury. The paper is

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How Black Americans Were Robbed of Their Land

Over the course of the 20th century, black Americans have lost approximately 12 million acres of land. This mass land dispossession—a war waged by deed of title, which has affected 98 percent of black farmers—can only be called theft, says Atlantic writer Vann R. Newkirk II in a new documentary. The Scott family, from Mound Bayou, Mississippi, can trace their land ownership back to 1938, when the

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Chinese Scientists Try to Cure One Man's HIV With Crispr

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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First GMO salmon hitting market after 30 year battle

submitted by /u/Barknuckle [link] [comments]

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This Adorable Baby T-Rex AI Learned To Dribble. [Two Minute Papers]

submitted by /u/Danj_memes_ [link] [comments]

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How the body’s nerves become accomplices in the spread of cancer

An emerging relationship between the nervous system and tumor growth suggests new therapies

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2-million-year-old rhino tooth’s genetic info is the oldest ever

There’s a new method for studying the evolutionary history of fossil species dating back millions of years, researchers report. The researchers extracted genetic information from a 1.77 million-year-old rhino tooth—the largest genetic data set this old to ever be confidently recorded. Researchers identified an almost complete set of proteins, a proteome, in the dental enamel of the now-extinct rh

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Lidar-scanning af 3.125 km jernbane skal måle frirum og skæve spor

Netop nu er data fra en tredjedel af Banedanmarks jernbanespor ved at blive behandlet. Fra næste år skal hele jernbanenetværket scannes årligt.

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What reading slowly taught me about writing | Jacqueline Woodson

Reading slowly — with her finger running beneath the words, even when she was taught not to — has led Jacqueline Woodson to a life of writing books to be savored. In a lyrical talk, she invites us to slow down and appreciate stories that take us places we never thought we'd go and introduce us to people we never thought we'd meet. "Isn't that what this is all about — finding a way, at the end o

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Long-Lived Stellar Blast Kindles Hope of a Supernova We’ve Never Seen Before

A billion years ago, something in the whirling darkness of space erupted with a fury that obscured the glow of entire galaxies. Eventually, the light from that cataclysm reached Earth, and in November 2016, it was captured by a group of intrepid humans at the European Space Agency’s Gaia satellite . They found that the conflagration wasn’t just unfathomably energetic, but, like a lonely bonfire,

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Forests emit carbon dioxide during heatwaves

Forests absorb a lot of CO2 from the air in the summer, but during the heat wave at the end of July, forests in the Netherlands emitted CO2. This is shown by measurements taken by the University of Twente.

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Jurassic crocodile identified in fossil study

A prehistoric crocodile that lived around 180 million years ago has been identified—almost 250 years after the discovery of its fossil remains.

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Mysterious Jurassic crocodile identified 250 years after fossil find

A prehistoric crocodile that lived around 180 million years ago has been identified — almost 250 years after the discovery of it fossil remains.

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Mixed response to Pope Francis in climate news coverage

Public figures, like Pope Francis, can generate attention for a cause, but research finds that the reaction to that influence is far from uniform. In a study of how political and religious identities shape a person’s response to climate change, Catholic Democrats tended to support climate change policies when Pope Francis was featured in a news story about climate change, while Catholic independe

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Nintendo sues ROM-sharing website for at least $2 million

Nintendo isn't afraid of using litigation in its quest to stop piracy, recently succeeding in getting Switch piracy websites blocked in the UK. Now, it is continuing that fight …

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Dynamic charge density fluctuations pervading the phase diagram of a Cu-based high-Tc superconductor

Charge density fluctuations are observed in all families of high-critical temperature (Tc) superconducting cuprates. Although constantly found in the underdoped region of the phase diagram at relatively low temperatures, physicists are unclear how the substrates influence unusual properties of these systems. In a new study now published on Science, R. Arpaia and co-workers in the departments of mi

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Humans more unique than expected when it comes to digesting fatty meals

People have very individualized inflammatory responses to eating a high-fat meal. These were the unexpected results of a study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. They looked at the inflammatory reactions of volunteers at 0, three and six hours after eating a standardized meal containing 38% fat and their responses were completely unique. Like snowflakes, no two were exactly the

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Ultra-thin optical elements directly measure polarization

For the first time, researchers have used ultra-thin layers of 2D structures known as metasurfaces to create holograms that can measure the polarization of light. As reported in the OSA journal Optica, the new metasurface holograms could be used to create very fast and compact devices for polarization measurements, which are used in spectroscopy, sensing and communications applications.

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Conrad Gorinsky obituary

Ethnobiologist who became an authority on the medical use of tropical plants but was accused of trying to exploit Amazon tribes As a long-standing supporter of the rights of indigenous peoples, Conrad Gorinsky, who has died aged 83, was the inspiration behind the creation of the campaigning human rights organisation Survival International and, unwittingly, one of the catalysts for the introduction

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Has another interstellar visitor been found?

An amateur astronomer has discovered a comet that could have come from a distant star.

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Radio Atlantic: The Heir

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher ( How to Listen ) Beginning with a gold-rush brothel in the Yukon, the Trump empire has long been passed down through generations. Donald Trump inherited a business from his father, who inherited it from his father. Now following in those footsteps are Donald Trump Jr., Ivanka Trump, and Eric Trump—all brought into the family busin

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Paris, four other French cities ban use of pesticides

Paris and four other French cities on Thursday banned the use of synthetic pesticides within their boundaries, as an anti-chemicals movement that began in the countryside gains momentum.

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The Suburbanites Making the Desert Bloom With McMansions

Photographer Steven Smith captures the booming suburbs of his native Utah.

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Østrigsk togselskab dropper diesel og opgraderer tog med batterier

I stedet for at igangsætte en produktion af nye tog udskifter Siemens og ÖBB diesel med batterier på taget af eksisterende tog.

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How a Mysterious Manuscript Keeps Confounding AI

Playbook for the Cult of Isis, herbal health instructions, details of the benefits of therapeutic bathing, or a written history of speaking in tongues. Confused? Probably, but not as much as most are when they come face to face with the Voynich Manuscript . That each of the above is a proposed theme for its indecipherable scribbles indicates the level of confusion. A brief meditation on the sente

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For Poison Dart Frogs, Markings Matter When It Comes to Survival

An experiment found that white-striped frogs were less effective at scaring off predators than frogs with yellow stripes. Yet both populations are thriving.

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Metasurface holograms: Fast, compact polarization measurements for spectroscopy and sensing

For the first time, researchers have used ultra-thin layers of 2-D structures known as metasurfaces to create holograms that can measure the polarization of light. The new metasurface holograms could be used to create very fast and compact devices for polarization measurements, which are used in spectroscopy, sensing and communications applications.

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Jakten leder inte till fler älgar på vägarna

Inför varje älgjakt dyker påståendet upp; att jakten gör att älgarna rör på sig mer och kan dyka upp på bilvägarna. Men så är inte fallet, visar forskningen. Det som stämmer i påståendet är att älgarnas rörelsebeteende ändras under hösten, men anledningen är inte jakt utan brunst. För att ta reda på detta har forskare vid SLU:s institution för vilt, fisk och miljö utrustat 172 älgar med GPS-halsb

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Skonsammare fiskfällor för både fisk, fiskare och miljö

För att få fler yngre att bli yrkesverksamma fiskare i Sverige har forskare skapat fiskeredskap som är mer lätthanterliga och dessutom kan ge bra fångster. – Förr hade vi lika många fiskebyar i Gävleborgs län som här finns fiskare idag. Genom att utveckla moderna ergonomiska fällor vill vi ändra på det, säger Lars Hillström, biolog och forskningsledare på Högskolan i Gävle. – Vi har utvecklat en

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Patients diagnosed with cancer after skipping appointment more likely to die within a year

Cancer patients who miss an urgent referral appointment for their symptoms are 12% more likely to die within 12 months of diagnosis, a major new study has found. The authors of the study say that more support is needed for patients at risk of non-attendance.

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New insights into how astrocytes help the brain process information

A collaboration between the laboratories of Vincent Bonin (NERF, empowered by VIB, imec and KU Leuven) and Matthew Holt (VIB-KU Leuven Center for Brain & Disease Research) reveals that noradrenaline plays a key role in how astrocytes — star-shaped cells in the brain closely associated with neurons — track distinct information during behavior. The researchers found that astrocytes can integrate i

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Machine learning improves the diagnosis of patients with head and neck cancers

Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) have successfully solved a longstanding problem in the diagnosis of head and neck cancers. Working alongside colleagues from Technische Universität (TU) Berlin, the researchers used artificial intelligence to develop a new classification method which identifies the primary origins of cancerous tissue base

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What Malaysia Can Teach America’s Aging Leadership

KUALA LUMPUR—During tonight’s Democratic debate, three septuagenarian challengers will vie for the chance to take on a septuagenarian president. Or, as the 94-year-old prime minister of Malaysia might call them: whippersnappers. It’s not unusual for kings or dictators to reign until they fall victim to Father Time. The politburos of China, Vietnam, and the former Soviet Union have generally been

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Sega Genesis Mini review: The best mini console out there

If you're suffering from gaming nostalgia fatigue, you're not alone. But you might want to make some extra room in your media center because the latest retro console, the …

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Danfoss klar til at betale til million-dyr oprydning på Als

En oprydning af Danfoss’ forurening på Himmark Strand på Als kan koste et trecifret millionbeløb. Danfoss vil gerne bidrage til betalingen.

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Report reveals no-deal Brexit impact – here's what you need to know

Shortages of fresh foods, medicines and petrol predicted in Operation Yellowhammer Brexit planning report, as well as problems sharing data between the UK and EU

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Why are countries failing on their promise to stop deforestation?

Despite a pledge in 2014 to halve deforestation by 2020, the area of forest destroyed annually has increased by more than 40 per cent globally in the past five years

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Brexit makes us question democracy – and so does climate change

Beating climate change is for many a “sacred value” that trumps all others – but is it ever legitimate to abandon democratic norms to achieve a goal, asks Graham Lawton

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New cardiac fibrosis study identifies key proteins that translate into heart disease

The formation of excess fibrous tissue in the heart, which underlies several heart diseases, could be prevented by inhibiting specific proteins that bind to RNA while its code is being translated.

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Academics call for structured drug monitoring in care homes

Swansea University academics call for policy makers, regulators and healthcare professionals to adopt a structured medicine monitoring system after research showed a positive impact on the care of people living in care homes and taking mental health medicines.

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Popular mobile games can be used to detect signs of cognitive decline

New research shows that popular mobile phone games such as Tetris, Candy Crush Saga and Fruit Ninja could provide a new tool to help doctors spot early signs of cognitive decline, some of which may indicate the onset of serious conditions like dementia.

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Mysterious Jurassic crocodile identified 250 years after fossil find

A prehistoric crocodile that lived around 180 million years ago has been identified — almost 250 years after the discovery of it fossil remains.

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Routine sparring in boxing can affect brain performance

Routine sparring in boxing can cause short-term impairments in brain-to-muscle communication and decreased memory performance, according to new research.

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Sulphur emissions from marine algae dropped during glacial periods

Contrary to conventional wisdom, sulphur production by tiny marine algae decreased during glacial periods, and is more closely linked to climate than previously thought, according to latest research by scientists in Japan. A clearer understanding of the link between the climate and marine phytoplankton can help scientists incorporate these impacts in future climate models.

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Standardized medical residency exam may reduce pool of diverse and qualified candidates

Test scores bias entry to radiation-oncology residency programs, and potentially other programs.

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What is 'guaranteed income'?

Starting in February, in Stockton, California, the mayor's office of the city—with funding from the Economic Security Project, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and private donors—launched a pilot program that distributes $500 via debit card to 125 randomly selected citizens. No strings attached.

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Musicians Don’t Want Ticketmaster Scanning Your Face at Concerts

Big Brother Taylor Swift may be fine with having her fans’ faces scanned at concerts, but Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello sure isn’t. On Monday Morello started, uh, raging against the machine that is Ticketmaster by joining digital rights group Fight for the Future’s campaign opposing the company’s use of facial recognition tech on concert attendees. “I don’t want Big Brother at my

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How to safely find out what's on a mysterious USB device

Wow, look at all those USB drives. Are they safe? Who knows! (Esa Riutta via Pixabay/) Companies like to hand out USB drives like candy. At media functions, for example, these flash storage devices contain product photos, press information, and details about businesses that hope the journalists who receive them will cover their latest offering. While convenient, there’s a lot that could go wrong.

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How Pundits May Be Getting Electability All Wrong

In the 2020 Democratic primary, electability is like the end of The Sopranos : Everybody talks about it, but nobody agrees on what it means. Third Way, a center-left think tank, offers important insights on the question of electability in an extensive new study of Democratic primary voters it is releasing this morning. The results , provided exclusively to The Atlantic , signal that primary voter

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Decline in tiger shark population defies expectations

New Griffith University research has revealed a 71 percent decline in tiger sharks across Queensland's coastline.

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Study introduces new nanoscale vacuum channel transistors

Vacuum tubes initially played a central role in the development of electronic devices. A few decades ago, however, researchers started replacing them with semiconductor transistors, small electronic components that can be used both as amplifiers and switches.

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Decline in tiger shark population defies expectations

New Griffith University research has revealed a 71 percent decline in tiger sharks across Queensland's coastline.

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MIT’s “disqualified” donors aren’t necessarily banned from donating, says Media Lab whistleblower

Signe Swenson, who leaked details about the lab’s relationship with Jeffrey Epstein, explains how its funding works.

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Researchers develop chemical reaction method for more efficient drug production

Researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) in Japan and Mount Allison University in Canada have developed a more efficient method to produce the building blocks needed for antibiotics and cancer treatment drugs.

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Chinese scientists update soybean genome to a golden reference

Soybean is one of the most important crops worldwide. A high-quality reference genome will facilitate its functional analysis and molecular breeding. Previously, biologists from China de novo assembled a high-quality Chinese soybean genome Gmax_ZH13. Recently, they updated this genome to a golden reference genome Gmax_ZH13_v2.0.

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Terahertz waves reveal hidden processes in ultrafast artificial photosynthesis

Osaka University researchers have succeeded in observing charge transfer and intermolecular interactions in ultrafast artificial photosynthesis. With time-resolved attenuated total reflection (TR-ATR) terahertz spectroscopy, they revealed the process of artificial photosynthesis material [Re(CO) 2 (bpy){P(OEt) 3 } 2 ](PF 6 ) in Triethanolamine solvent as a reductant. This finding will help to deve

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Study led by NUS scientists show that drinking tea improves brain health

A recent study led by researchers from the National University of Singapore revealed that regular tea drinkers have better organised brain regions compared to non-tea drinkers.

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Researchers grow citrus disease bacteria in the lab

Being able to grow the elusive and poorly understood bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), will make it easier for researchers to find treatments for the disease that has destroyed millions of acres of orange, grapefruit and lemon groves around the world and has devastated the citrus industry in Florida.

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'Death Star' bacterial structures that inject proteins can be tapped to deliver drugs

Not all bacteria spread diseases, many are beneficial and this strain has nanoscale syringes that deliver proteins which cause metamorphosis in marine animals, and could be modified as a novel drug delivery tool for future vaccines and cancer care.

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UBC study finds health isn't the only issue with bacteria growth

Microorganisms growing inside aging buildings and infrastructure are more than just a health issue, according to new research from UBC Okanagan. The research, coming from the School of Engineering and biology department, examined the impact of fungal mould growth and associated microbes within structures on university campuses. The study focuses on the observed biodeteriorative capabilities of ind

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Forstærket brug af personlig medicin skal give et løft til det danske sundhedsvæsen

Bedre adgang til patientdata og et nationalt genomcenter skal bringe brugen af personlig medicin videre, fremgik det af debatmøde på Dagens Medicins konference '2 dage for sundheden'. Bl.a. brystkræftområdet blev fremhævet.

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Bats fly around with cold wing muscles

The muscles in bats’ wings are much cooler than the muscles in their core, a new study finds—and this research could one day enhance our understanding of human muscle. Past research suggests that in most other creatures, including humans, muscles involved in exercise become warmer in response to movement. But the small muscles of a bat’s wing are uniquely vulnerable to heat loss during flight, as

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Nintendo Introduces The ‘Ring Fit Adventure’ For The Nintendo Switch

Last week, Nintendo teased a new gaming accessory for the Nintendo Switch. The accessory in question looked like some kind of fitness-related accessory where users could squeeze it and attach …

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45 reasons the Great Barrier Reef is in trouble

When the managers of the Great Barrier Reef recently rated its outlook as very poor, a few well-known threats dominated the headlines. But delve deeper into the report and you'll find that this global icon is threatened by a whopping 45 risks.

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45 reasons the Great Barrier Reef is in trouble

When the managers of the Great Barrier Reef recently rated its outlook as very poor, a few well-known threats dominated the headlines. But delve deeper into the report and you'll find that this global icon is threatened by a whopping 45 risks.

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Can We Forecast Caldera Collapses?

The formation of cauldronlike volcanic depressions is enormously destructive—but it may also be predictable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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MIT Creates Light-Sensitive ‘Reprogrammable’ Ink

You probably had to agonize over colors the last time you bought a car, a pair of shoes, or anything else where color matters. What if you didn’t have to pick a single color, though? Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed a new color-changing ink that you can “reprogram” with light to produce different colors and patterns . Best of al

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The Amazon's new tallest tree is 50% taller than previous tallest tree

Sometimes even the largest natural wonders can remain hidden from human view for centuries. The Amazon is a dense place, full of life with new species of flora and fauna being discovered every other day. Now, using the same technology that takes driverless cars from A to B, we—led by Eric Gorgens and Diego Armando da Silva, and along with colleagues from Brazil, Swansea, Oxford and Cambridge—have

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The Amazon's new tallest tree is 50% taller than previous tallest tree

Sometimes even the largest natural wonders can remain hidden from human view for centuries. The Amazon is a dense place, full of life with new species of flora and fauna being discovered every other day. Now, using the same technology that takes driverless cars from A to B, we—led by Eric Gorgens and Diego Armando da Silva, and along with colleagues from Brazil, Swansea, Oxford and Cambridge—have

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How TV cameras influence candidates' debate success

As the Democratic Party continues to winnow its field of candidates to challenge President Donald Trump, it's important to remember that the way candidates are covered on TV can influence public opinion. That's become increasingly apparent in today's media landscape, with several candidates jockeying for coverage during their party's televised debates.

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Keen IT students can improve their marks when given a chance to learn from their mistakes

From a very young age, we are conditioned to learn to succeed by avoiding failures or mistakes.

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Even If We Knew Everything That Can Be Known, We Wouldn't Know It All

Beyond the unknown unknowns is what's unknowable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Uh Oh: The Milky Way’s Giant Black Hole Is “Getting Hungrier”

Celestial Feast Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy, recently started feasting on matter around it with unprecedented voracity. A team of scientists from the University of California, Los Angeles looked at 13,000 recordings of the Sag A* taken on 133 occasions over the last 16 years and found that it recently started glowing unusually bright, accordin

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How relapse happens: Opiates reduce the brain's ability to form, maintain synapses

Exposure to heroin sharply reduces levels of the protein necessary for developing and maintaining the brain's synapses, a preclinical study has found.

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Spin devices get a paint job

Physicists created a new way to fabricate special kinds of electronic components known as spintronic devices. These high-performance, low-power devices have a promising future, so efficient ways to make them are highly sought after. The new fabrication method is interesting because it uses organic molecules which are relatively easy to configure for different purposes. Layers of molecules could be

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Finding (microbial) pillars of the bioenergy community

Scientists have focused on understanding more about the plant regions above the soil where these microbes can live, called the 'phyllosphere.'

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First 'overtones' heard in the ringing of a black hole

By listening for specific tones in the gravitational waves of black hole mergers, researchers are putting Albert Einstein's theories to new tests.

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Researchers work to understand bacteria killing citrus trees

A team of biologists has put on their detective hats to investigate the complicated bacterium behind citrus greening, a problematic plant disease that has felled citrus orchards across Florida and threatened the Sunshine State's once prosperous orange crop production.

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How Wi-Fi Almost Didn’t Happen

Opinion: Launched 20 years ago this week, Wi-Fi nearly hit a dead spot.

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Need Some Fashion Advice? Just Ask Stitch Fix's Algorithm

Stitch Fix is launching a new service, driven by machine learning, that builds an outfit to suit your personal style.

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The Best iPhone 11 Preorder Deals (and Which Model to Pick)

Are you planning to buy an iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, or iPhone 11 Pro Max? Here's the WIRED guide to choosing between them, how to preorder, and the best preorder deals.

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WIRED's 13 Must-Read Books for Fall

From the *Handmaid's Tale* sequel to Edward Snowden's memoir, the upcoming book season is looking deadly serious. Up to and including lesbian necromancers.

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Researchers work to understand bacteria killing citrus trees

A team of biologists has put on their detective hats to investigate the complicated bacterium behind citrus greening, a problematic plant disease that has felled citrus orchards across Florida and threatened the Sunshine State's once prosperous orange crop production.

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UK officials call for loot boxes to be regulated like gambling

Regulators in both the US and the UK have been investigating the loot box mechanics found in many games to see if they should be considered gambling. The UK Government's Department …

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Even If We Knew Everything That Can Be Known, We Wouldn't Know It All

Beyond the unknown unknowns is what's unknowable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Perks of Being Outdoors Backed Up By Science

The cover story of our latest issue of Scientific American Health & Medicine explores this sweeping new study — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Can We Forecast Caldera Collapses?

The formation of cauldronlike volcanic depressions is enormously destructive—but it may also be predictable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New findings in plant root and fungal interaction help to resolve the complexity of soil carbon cycling

Two new scientific papers accentuate the role of microorganisms in organic matter accumulation and add a new piece in the puzzle of understanding the soil carbon cycle. New findings contribute to improved process understanding that is needed to create better soil carbon models and more reliable climate scenarios.

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New findings in plant root and fungal interaction help to resolve the complexity of soil carbon cycling

Two new scientific papers accentuate the role of microorganisms in organic matter accumulation and add a new piece in the puzzle of understanding the soil carbon cycle. New findings contribute to improved process understanding that is needed to create better soil carbon models and more reliable climate scenarios.

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Male honeybees might blind queens to keep them hive-bound

Bees mating (Wikimedia Commons/) A queen bee stashes all the sperm she'll need to make a lifetime's worth of babies in a few days. Let's just start there. This virgin queen flies out from her nest to mate with as many as 90 male drones mid-flight (though usually more like a dozen), then returns to her hive with a stash of up to 100 million sperm cells in her oviducts. Later she'll pare that down

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Animal research: It's time to be more open

Veterinarians and technicians who care for animals used in medical and veterinary research overwhelmingly believe scientific institutions should be more open about their use of animals. A survey of more than 150 people working in animal care has found that 87 percent believe research institutions in Australia and New Zealand should be more open about their research involving animals.

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Animal research: It's time to be more open

Veterinarians and technicians who care for animals used in medical and veterinary research overwhelmingly believe scientific institutions should be more open about their use of animals. A survey of more than 150 people working in animal care has found that 87 percent believe research institutions in Australia and New Zealand should be more open about their research involving animals.

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Chemists show how bias can crop up in machine learning algorithm results

A team of material scientists at Haverford College has shown how human bias in data can impact the results of machine-learning algorithms used to predict new reagents for use in making desired products. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes testing a machine-learning algorithm with different types of datasets and what they found.

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Why are our rainforests burning?

Rainforests don't burn, or do they?

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Rogue 'Immune Cell X' Is a Completely New Type of Cell. It Could Trigger Type 1 Diabetes.

Scientists have discovered a mysterious population of previously unknown cells lurking in the human body, and they may trigger Type 1 diabetes.

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Lab-Made Embryos Could Save Northern White Rhinos After Last Male Dies

Two embryos have been created from the eggs of the last living northern white rhinoceroses.

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Madagascar's unique dugongs in danger

Scientists have used historic DNA to discover some of the highest-risk populations of the endangered dugong are so genetically distinct, losing them would be the equivalent of losing a species of elephant.

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There's no place like home: Butterflies stick to their burbs

Birthplace exerts a lifelong influence on butterflies as well as humans, new research reveals.

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Madagascar's unique dugongs in danger

Scientists have used historic DNA to discover some of the highest-risk populations of the endangered dugong are so genetically distinct, losing them would be the equivalent of losing a species of elephant.

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Multiple flood events erode neighborhood spirit, study finds

A Rice University study examining the social and political reactions of people in post-Hurricane Harvey Houston found that while first-time flood victims may still feel strong ties to their neighborhoods, this emotional attachment erodes after their neighborhoods repeatedly flood.

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There's no place like home: Butterflies stick to their burbs

Birthplace exerts a lifelong influence on butterflies as well as humans, new research reveals.

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People are escaping city congestion and living costs by working remotely

Many Australians have longed to live outside the city. The treechange and seachange movements—migration from urban areas to rural and coastal towns—have been responsible for much of the population growth outside urban areas in recent years.

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How astronomers detected water on a potentially habitable exoplanet for the first time

With more than 4,000 exoplanets—planets orbiting stars other than our sun—discovered so far, it may seem like we are on the cusp of finding out whether we are alone in the universe. Sadly though, we don't know much about these planets—in most cases just their mass and their radius.

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Where does altruism come from? Discovery of 'greenbeard' genes could hold the answer

Nature is full of animals helping each other out. A classic example is meerkat cooperation. When the group is foraging for food, one individual will head to a vantage point and keep watch for predators. This selfless individual gives up valuable feeding time for the good of others, an example of what biologists call altruism.

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Finding a long-hidden secret in 'Paradise Lost'

It's not every day that an undergraduate makes a significant discovery about one of the most famous poems in English literature, but Miranda Phaal, A18, did just that in her senior year at Tufts. Now she has published an article about it—"The Treble Fall: An Interlocking Acrostic in Paradise Lost"—which is appearing in the Milton Quarterly.

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Criminologist builds computer model for more efficient police patrols

Redrawing patrol beats could result in 20 percent less travel for police officers in Carrollton, Texas, according to research from The University of Texas at Dallas.

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Gloomy forecast for the Aletsch Glacier

The largest glacier in the Alps is visibly suffering the effects of global warming. ETH researchers have now calculated how much of the Aletsch Glacier will still be visible by the end of the century. In the worst-case scenario, a couple of patches of ice will be all that remains.

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Fossil fuel emissions impact Arctic snow chemistry, scientists find

Perennial sea ice is rapidly melting in the Arctic, clearing the way for new shipping routes and fossil fuel extraction. This increased activity could have unexpected impacts on the natural chemistry of the polar region, according to researchers.

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Where does altruism come from? Discovery of 'greenbeard' genes could hold the answer

Nature is full of animals helping each other out. A classic example is meerkat cooperation. When the group is foraging for food, one individual will head to a vantage point and keep watch for predators. This selfless individual gives up valuable feeding time for the good of others, an example of what biologists call altruism.

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A new journey into Earth for space exploration

Six astronauts, five space agencies and a fresh start into underground worlds to help prepare for living on other planets. ESA's latest training adventure will equip an international crew with skills to explore uncharted terrains on the Moon and Mars, this time with a focus on the search for water.

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Nyt lys på gamle sten: Meteoritterne er landet i København

PLUS. Geologisk Museum har fordansket en fransk udstilling med elementer fra museets egen meteoritsamling og eksempler på dansk forskning.

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Discovery concerning the nervous system overturns a previous theory

It appears that when our nervous system is developing, only the most viable neurons survive, while immature neurons are weeded out and die. The results indicate that the long-standing neurotrophic theory, which states that chance determines which cells will form the nervous system, needs to be revised.

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Finding (microbial) pillars of the bioenergy community

Scientists have focused on understanding more about the plant regions above the soil where these microbes can live, called the 'phyllosphere.'

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Advanced MRI brain scan may help predict stroke-related dementia

An advanced MRI brain scan analysis in patients with stroke-damaged blood vessels helped predict problems with thinking (planning, organizing information and processing speed) and dementia.

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Microplastics stunt growth of worms

New research shows that the presence of microplastics can stunt the growth of earthworms, and even cause them to lose weight — potentially having a serious impact on the soil ecosystem.

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Genetic discovery linked to rare eye disease

Paul S. Bernstein, M.D., Ph.D., spent more than a decade working with families at the John A. Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah on the hunt for the first gene known to cause a rare retinal disease known as MacTel.

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Talking receptors may affect relaxin at work

A research team investigating the promising anti-fibrotic effects of a drug version of the hormone, relaxin, has discovered that the receptor through which it mediates its therapeutic actions can communicate and/or interact with other receptors in cells that contribute to fibrosis progression. This research may have implications for the design of clinical trials involving relaxin and its concomita

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A diabetes drug promotes brain repair — but it only works in females

Study finds that the diabetes drug metformin, known to promote brain repair, can also help restore cognitive function in adult mice but only in females and in a way that is dependent on the sex hormone estradiol.

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Scientists solve lingering mystery of poorly understood frog

An international team of scientists has solved a centuries-old mystery of 'Fraser's Clawed Frog', an unusual and elusive species found in West Africa.

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Simple copper becomes an effective spintronic component thanks to molecular film

Physicists have created a fabricate technique for spintronic devices. These high-performance, low-power devices have a promising future, so efficient ways to make them are highly sought after. The new fabrication method uses organic molecules that are relatively easy to configure for many purposes. Layers of molecules could be painted or printed onto metals to create new electronic functions.

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Image: Avalanche season on Mars

Every spring, the sun shines on the side of the stack of layers at the North Pole of Mars known as the north polar layered deposits. The warmth destabilizes the ice and blocks break loose.

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Two studies show promise, safety of proton therapy in the brain in children with cancer

From improving outcomes in children with brain cancer to lowering the risk of damage to the brainstem in children with central nervous system tumors, a pair of new studies published today add to the growing body of research showing the potential benefits of proton therapy.

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Spin devices get a paint job

Physicists created a new way to fabricate special kinds of electronic components known as spintronic devices. These high-performance, low-power devices have a promising future, so efficient ways to make them are highly sought after. The new fabrication method is interesting because it uses organic molecules which are relatively easy to configure for different purposes. Layers of molecules could be

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Has the Presidency Skipped Gen X?

Oliver Munday F or almost 60 years, two generations have held the American presidency. The Greatest Generation—born in the early 20th century—first won the White House in 1960, when John F. Kennedy was 43. Baby Boomers—born after World War II—took over in 1992, when Bill Clinton was 46. By this precedent, Generation X was ripe for a president in 2016. Three of the early Republican front-runners—M

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Ebola in a war zone

Nature, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02733-y On the ground with Ebola responders in the conflict-ridden Democratic Republic of the Congo

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Put participants first in conference design

Nature, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02759-2 By using more sophisticated methods of thinking about conferences, organizers can help to ensure that time spent at a meeting is spent well, say Hannah Turbeville and Ruth Gotian.

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Bioengineers explore cardiac tissue remodeling after aortic valve replacement procedures

Researchers have developed biomaterial-based 'mimics' of heart tissues to measure patients' responses to an aortic valve replacement procedure, offering new insight into the ways that cardiac tissue re-shapes itself post-surgery.

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Baffling maths riddle that looks like a pile of worms almost solved

The Collatz conjecture is simple to state but has baffled mathematicians for 80 years. But a man dubbed the 'Mozart of maths' has now almost proved it

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AI can help us fight climate change. But it has an energy problem, too

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Image of the Day: Famine Victim Teeth

Dental calculus provides a look into the diets of 42 people who died during the Great Irish Famine.

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How to Practice Long-Term Thinking in a Distracted World

Bina Venkataraman, author of *The Optimist's Telescope*, talks about the future: how to imagine it, how to be optimistic, how to not kill a million babies.

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The Land Rover Defender Is Back—With a Softer, Smarter Look

The angular off-roader returns to Land Rover’s lineup with a few rounded corners and a lot of tech-heavy features.

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What Is Red Mercury?

I’m not a fan of the Star Trek movies reboot. While I do like the cast, and as a Trek fan I have some level of enjoyment of anything in the franchise, the movies were disappointing. As is usually the case with big budget movie failures, the problem was in the writing. Case in point – red matter. This is a mysterious substance invented by Vulcans in the future, a single drop of which could produce

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The Strange Persistence of First Languages – Issue 76: Language

Several years ago, my father died as he had done most things throughout his life: without preparation and without consulting anyone. He simply went to bed one night, yielded his brain to a monstrous blood clot, and was found the next morning lying amidst the sheets like his own stone monument. It was hard for me not to take my father’s abrupt exit as a rebuke. For years, he’d been begging me to v

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When Words Fail – Issue 76: Language

In Samuel Beckett’s novel, The Unnamable , the anonymous narrator laments, “I’m all these words, all these strangers, this dust of words, with no ground for their setting, no sky for their dispersing.” For Beckett’s narrator, words have become unmoored from their meaning. They no longer refer to anything in the physical world. Ultimately, they fail to fully convey or contain the inner message tha

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The Communication We Share with Apes – Issue 76: Language

There are few one-offs in life on Earth—rarely can a single species boast a trait or ability that no other possesses. But human language is one such oddity. Our ability to use subtle combinations of sounds produced by our vocal cords to create words and sentences, which when combined with grammatical rules, convey complex ideas. There were attempts in the 1950s to teach chimpanzees to “speak” som

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Language Both Enraptures and Deceives Us – Issue 76: Language

The purpose of language is to reveal the contents of our minds, says Julie Sedivy. It’s a simple and profound insight. We are social animals and language is what springs us from our isolated selves and connects us with others. Sedivy has taught linguistics and psychology at Brown University and the University of Calgary. She specializes in psycholinguistics, the psychology of language, notably th

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Why We Need to Study Consciousness

Science has made outstandingly accurate descriptions of the world but has told us little about our subjective experience of it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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HomePod To Gain New Features This Fall

With the HomePod, Apple has dipped their toes into the smart speaker waters. However, judging from the reports we’ve seen, it has barely made a dent in the market which is still largely …

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Why We Need to Study Consciousness

Science has made outstandingly accurate descriptions of the world but has told us little about our subjective experience of it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Private Option

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.—In the span of 24 days in May 2017, two men died in Forsyth County’s jail. Both were fathers. Both were black. The first man, Deshawn Lamont Coley, had written request after request begging for his asthma inhaler—accurately predicting that his sporadic access to it was putting his life at risk. The second, Stephen Antwan Patterson, was found without a pulse about a week after

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The Bleak Truth Behind My ‘Inspiring’ Path From Oakland to Yale

The day after my 18th birthday, I boarded a plane and left Oakland for Los Angeles, where I was to announce on national TV which university I planned to attend in the fall. It was April 22, 2014. The 45-minute flight was quick, and before I knew it, I was in the green room. Everybody was so kind; the atmosphere was cheerful. I waited backstage for my introduction. “Despite living in the inner cit

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US to ban flavoured e-cigarettes after hundreds get strange illness

The US is planning to ban flavoured e-cigarettes after people have become ill from a mysterious illness, but it is not known if e-cigarettes really are to blame

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The Biggest iPhone News Is the Apple U1 Chip Inside It

By embracing ultra-wideband location tech, Apple has a chance to reshape experiences way beyond AirDrop.

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Would the Internet Be Healthier Without 'Like' Counts?

Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube have moved to hide or obscure measures of popularity, in the name of less toxic dialog. Users give a thumbs-down.

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Why Uber Thinks It Can *Still* Call Its Drivers Contractors

A pending California law was designed to make ride-hail companies classify drivers as employees. Uber says it can evade the requirement.

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Why We Need to Study Consciousness

Science has made outstandingly accurate descriptions of the world but has told us little about our subjective experience of it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Efter lufthavnssag: Chikanesager mod ingeniører er sjældne

IDA-formand er rystet over sagen, hvor to 3F-folk stik mod loven truer et IDA-medlem til at melde sig ud af IDA og ind i 3F. Det er meget positivt at tage et arbejde frem for at gå på understøttelse eller kontanthjælp, mener IDA-formanden.

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VIDEO: Se og hør, hvad sundhedsminister Magnus Heunicke sagde til ‘2 dage for sundheden’

Gik du glip af sundhedsminister Magnus Heunickes tale ved ’2 dage for sundheden’ – så se og lyt til den her.

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From academia to freelance curator

Nature, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02727-w A chance visit to the Science Museum in London brought Emily Scott-Dearing into science communication.

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Baby sea turtles’ treks are captured in fossils

Nature, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02707-0 Rocks preserve prehistoric tracks that resemble those made by two modern sea-turtle species.

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The Gravitational-Wave "Revolution" Is Underway

As the fourth anniversary of the first detection approaches, the field continues to mature—with a bright future ahead — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Gravitational-Wave "Revolution" Is Underway

As the fourth anniversary of the first detection approaches, the field continues to mature—with a bright future ahead — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Overlæger i Region Sjælland i fælles flok: Sundhedsplatformen skal skrottes snarest muligt

Sundhedsplatformen skaber risikofyldte og potentielt livsfarlige situationer for patienterne, lyder det fra ledende læger i Region Sjælland.

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Badning forbudt: Danfoss-forurening på Nordals værre end antaget

Region Syddanmark har fundet høje niveauer af vinylklorid ved Himmark Strand, hvor Danfoss over flere årtier dumpede og afbrændte op mod 52.000 m3 industriaffald

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Lægestafetten: Jeg forbereder mig altid på det værste

I en ny portrætserie af læger i Danmark møder vi traumekirurg Emma Marie Possfelt-Møller. Hun kalder sig for en håndværker. Efter arbejde hører hun gerne høj musik. Jack White, hvis det har været en god dag. Benal, hvis det har været en dårlig dag.

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An important quantum algorithm may actually be a property of nature

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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The Problem at the Core of Progressive Foreign Policy

In 2016, Donald Trump took on and defeated the Republican foreign-policy establishment. Some progressives wonder if they may be able to accomplish the same feat in the Democratic Party in 2020. They are looking for a nominee who rejects the post–Cold War bipartisan consensus, which they believe makes the United States too quick to get into wars and too committed to American primacy, in favor of a

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The WIRED25 Festival Is Back—Get Ready to Fix Things

Join us for four days of lively stage chats and workshops with luminaries and icons, from Chris Evans and N. K. Jemisin to Stewart Butterfield and NSA cybersecurity head Anne Neuberger.

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Can Physicists Rewrite the Origin Story of the Universe?

Cosmologists like Roger Penrose are on a quest to challenge an established dogma: that the universe began with a burst of rapid inflation. But in physics, he and others worry, the quest to unravel the deepest mysteries of the early universe will take a backseat to a far more mundane pursuit: career survival.

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A publisher wants to destigmatize retractions. Here’s how.

It’s no secret that retractions have a stigma, which is very likely part of why authors often resist the move — even when honest error is involved. There have been at least a few proposals to change the nomenclature for some retractions over the years, from turning them into “amendments” to a new taxonomy. Erica … Continue reading

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Academic freedom: What it is, what it isn’t and why there’s confusion

Academic expression is neither free expression nor political, though it is connected to both. Because of this misunderstanding, academic expression is often attacked, not because of the quality of scholars' ideas, but because of scholars' audacity in sharing them. The Scholars at Risk network is working to ensure that academics of all stripes have the academic freedom they need to pursue their wo

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Global warming may threaten availability of essential brain-building fatty acid

By 2100, 96% of the global population may not have sufficient access to a naturally occurring essential brain-building omega-3 fatty acid, according to a study in the journal Ambio.

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Jane Goodall Keeps Going, With a Lot of Hope (and a Bit of Whiskey)

During her girlhood, Tarzan was her role model. When she realized how chimpanzee habitats were being destroyed, she turned into a crusader. At 85, she’s still preaching.

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Förälder till en gamer? Du kan vara lugn

Sedan 2018 listar WHO gaming disorder som en sjukdomsdiagnos. Den har ännu inte fått ett svenskt namn, men tillsammans med hasardspelsyndrom är det de enda missbruksdiagnoserna som inte bygger på att man tillför kroppen en kemisk substans.

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Bonobo-honor föredrar sex med andra honor

Tillsammans med chimpanserna hör bonoboerna till människans närmaste släktingar. De har gjort sig kända som ”hippie-apor” för sitt fridfulla leverne, delad dominans mellan könen och promiskuösa sexuella vanor. Bland annat använder de sex för att lösa och förebygga konflikter. Nu har amerikanska forskare sett att bonobohonor föredrar sex med andra honor om de behöver välja.

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Breakthrough stem cell platform could shed light on mysteries of early human development

A new method for making stem cell colonies that mimic parts of early human development could help investigate important questions in maternal and child health, such as: What chemicals pose risks to developing embryos, and what causes certain birth defects and multiple miscarriages?

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Unexpected periodic flares may shed light on black hole accretion

ESA's X-ray space telescope XMM-Newton has detected never-before-seen periodic flares of X-ray radiation coming from a distant galaxy that could help explain some enigmatic behaviours of active black holes.

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Breakthrough stem cell platform could shed light on mysteries of early human development

A new method for making stem cell colonies that mimic parts of early human development could help investigate important questions in maternal and child health, such as: What chemicals pose risks to developing embryos, and what causes certain birth defects and multiple miscarriages?

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The role of irrigation in changing wheat yields and heat sensitivity in India

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12183-9 Irrigation buffers crop yields from extreme weather, but comes at environmental costs. Here the authors show that in India irrigation has improved wheat yield and reduced its sensitivity to heat, yet further increases are unlikely to offset the impact of warming.

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The EYA3 tyrosine phosphatase activity promotes pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12226-1 Survival and proliferation of vascular cells in the presence of DNA damage is a characteristic of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Here the authors show that the phosphatase EYA3 contributes to vascular remodeling by promoting survival of damaged cells, and present results of genetic and pharmacological EYA

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Differentiation but not ALS mutations in FUS rewires motor neuron metabolism

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12099-4 While energy metabolism has been repeatedly linked to ALS, motor neuron metabolism remains poorly studied. Here, authors show that human iPSCs rewire specific metabolic routes when they differentiate into functional motor neurons and that ALS-causing mutations in FUS do not affect energy metabolism.

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GSTA4 mediates reduction of cisplatin ototoxicity in female mice

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12073-0 A common complication of cisplatin-based chemotherapy is hearing loss. Here, Park et al. show that glutathione transferase α4 (GSTA4) contributes to reducing cisplatin toxicity in the inner ear of female mice by removing 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE).

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An in vitro model maintaining taxon-specific functional activities of the gut microbiome

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12087-8 The authors present an in vitro gut microbiome model that maintains the functional and compositional profiles of individual gut microbiomes, as assessed by metaproteomics. Gut microbiome responses to metformin in this model correlate with those shown in mice fed a high-fat diet.

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Experimental demonstration of quantum advantage for one-way communication complexity surpassing best-known classical protocol

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12139-z The hidden matching communication problem features an exponential classical-quantum gap, but a demonstration is extremely challenging. Here, the authors define a more feasible variant called sampling matching problem, and realise a proof-of-principle implementation beating the best known classical protocol.

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A novel role for the actin-binding protein drebrin in regulating opiate addiction

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12122-8 The underlying transcriptional and cellular events mediating the reduction of dendritic spines on medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) remains unknown. Here, authors demonstrate that heroin self-administration negatively regulates the actin-binding protein drebrin in the NAc, which is shown t

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A potent broadly neutralizing human RSV antibody targets conserved site IV of the fusion glycoprotein

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12137-1 Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of infant hospitalization. Here, the authors isolate a human monoclonal antibody that binds to a highly conserved epitope on the RSV fusion protein, neutralizes RSV A and B subtypes equipotently and is protective in the cotton rat model.

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Robotterne er næsten klar til detailhandlen

PLUS. Detailhandlen har masser af muligheder for at automatisere, men få udnytter dem. En ny amerikansk rapport forudser, at de butikker, som ikke allerede er i gang, taber kapløbet.

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How relapse happens: Opiates reduce the brain's ability to form, maintain synapses

Exposure to heroin sharply reduces levels of the protein necessary for developing and maintaining the brain's synapses, a preclinical study by University at Buffalo researchers has found.

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Discovery concerning the nervous system overturns a previous theory

It appears that when our nervous system is developing, only the most viable neurons survive, while immature neurons are weeded out and die. This is shown in a ground-breaking discovery by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. The results indicate that the long-standing neurotrophic theory, which states that chance determines which cells will form the nervous system, needs to be revised.

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Finding (microbial) pillars of the bioenergy community

In a new study in Nature Communications, Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center scientists at Michigan State University have focused on understanding more about the plant regions above the soil where these microbes can live, called the 'phyllosphere.' Ashley Shade, MSU assistant professor of microbiology and molecular genetics, and her lab classified core members of this community in switchgrass an

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Emerging practice of precision medicine could one day improve care for many heart failure patients

Using precision medicine, healthcare providers may one day be able to identify who is most likely to develop heart failure and which medicines and other treatments are most effective for specific patient groups. Precision medicine is an emerging approach to medical care that takes into account individual variations in genetic make-up, metabolism and other biological and environmental factors to be

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Advanced MRI brain scan may help predict stroke-related dementia

An advanced MRI brain scan analysis in patients with stroke-damaged blood vessels helped predict problems with thinking (planning, organizing information and processing speed) and dementia.

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Stargazing in a War Zone: Veterans on Natural Beauty in Dangerous Places

Veterans share the moments during deployments when natural beauty took their breath away, even if just for a moment.

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Why Beto O’Rourke Argues He Has a New Case to Make to Voters

When Beto O’Rourke takes the stage on the campaign trail, it’s to his favorite song, “Clampdown,” by The Clash, whose dark intro builds to the line What are we gonna do now? Many Americans are angry, frightened, and frustrated these days. Yet the Democratic presidential campaign remains largely a procession of speeches and photo ops. Tonight, in O’Rourke’s home state of Texas, 10 candidates will

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The Question Democrats Have to Answer Before They Can Impeach

Updated on September 12 at 10:18 a.m. ET Democrats clamoring to impeach President Donald Trump scored a victory of sorts this morning when the House Judiciary Committee voted to launch a formal investigation that could result in the adoption of articles of impeachment for consideration by the full House. But the panel’s decision to broaden its probe beyond the issues covered by former Special Cou

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Activation of mucosal-associated invariant T cells in the lungs of sarcoidosis patients

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49903-6

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Aminopeptidase N-null neonatal piglets are protected from transmissible gastroenteritis virus but not porcine epidemic diarrhea virus

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49838-y

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On the evolving nature of c/a ratio in a hexagonal close-packed epsilon martensite phase in transformative high entropy alloys

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49904-5

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Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of CNS penetrant HDAC inhibitors structurally derived from amyloid-β probes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49784-9 Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of CNS penetrant HDAC inhibitors structurally derived from amyloid- β probes

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A novel kit for early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease using a fluorescent nanoparticle imaging

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49711-y

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Microbial characterization and fermentative characteristics of crop maize ensiled with unsalable vegetables

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49608-w

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Lithia/(Ir, Li2IrO3) nanocomposites for new cathode materials based on pure anionic redox reaction

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49806-6 Lithia/(Ir, Li 2 IrO 3 ) nanocomposites for new cathode materials based on pure anionic redox reaction

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A space elevator is possible with today’s technology, researchers say (we just need to dangle it off the moon)

Space elevators would dramatically reduce the cost of reaching space but have never been technologically feasible. Until now.

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Indonesia forest fires surge, stoking global warming fears

The number of blazes in Indonesia's rainforests has jumped sharply, satellite data showed Thursday, spreading smog across Southeast Asia and adding to concerns about the impact of increasing wildfire outbreaks worldwide on global warming.

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Finding (microbial) pillars of the bioenergy community

Stems, leaves, flowers and fruits make up the biggest chunk of potential living space for microbes in the environment, but ecologists still don't know a lot about how the microorganisms that reside there establish and maintain themselves over the course of a growing season.

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Finding (microbial) pillars of the bioenergy community

Stems, leaves, flowers and fruits make up the biggest chunk of potential living space for microbes in the environment, but ecologists still don't know a lot about how the microorganisms that reside there establish and maintain themselves over the course of a growing season.

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Android-telefoner sender din position til alarmcentralen ved kald til 112

Google har nu åbnet for, at alarmcentralerne automatisk får lokationsoplysninger fra borgere, der ringer 112 fra en Android-smartphone. Iphone-brugere må vente, da Apple stadig diskuterer med danske myndigheder om, hvordan teknologien skal implementeres.

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Farmers 'misunderstand' Wales rewilding project

Plans to restore ecosystems in the countryside will support landowners, its director says.

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Midtjyder vil lægge skinner til Danmarks første batteritog

Midtjyske Jernbaner vil gerne indsætte batteridrevne tog på to vestjyske strækninger. Men teknologien er dyrere end de dieseltog, selskabet ellers ville købe.

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FÖRELÄSNING 17 september om Myastenia gravis

Tisdagen 17 september anordnar Neuroförbundet Lundabygden tillsammans med Sjukhusbiblioteket vid Skånes universitetssjukhus en kvällsföreläsning om Myastenia gravis – en autoimmun neuromuskulär sjukdom.

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An important quantum algorithm may actually be a property of nature

Evidence that quantum searches are an ordinary feature of electron behavior may explain the genetic code, one of the greatest puzzles in biology.

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Nytt referensprov hjälper SLE-patienter

Systemisk lupus erythematosus (SLE) är en reumatisk sjukdom som framför allt drabbar kvinnor i fertil ålder. ”Systemisk” innebär att patienterna kan få inflammationssymtom från flera olika organ i hela kroppen. Vissa patienter har enbart lindriga symtom från exempelvis hud eller leder, medan andra patienter har svårare symtom från till exempel njurarna eller det centrala nervsystemet. Normalt ska

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Facebook must come clean and hand over election campaign data

After fake news and election manipulation scandals, Facebook promised to give researchers data on its political influence. They are still waiting, says Timothy Revell

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Bye bye space-time: is it time to free physics from Einstein’s legacy?

Einstein’s framework for the universe, space-time, is at odds with quantum theory. Overcoming this clash and others is vital to unravelling the true nature of the cosmos

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Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer harboring certain BRAF mutations may respond to anti-EGFR

Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer harboring a subset of non-V600 mutations in the BRAF gene, known as class 3 BRAF mutations, were more likely to respond to anti-EGFR treatment.

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Extreme Weather Displaced a Record 7 Million in First Half of 2019

A new report puts 2019 on pace to be one of the most disastrous years in almost two decades even before the effects of Hurricane Dorian on the Bahamas are tallied. But there was also good news.

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Beijing to exit 200 most polluted cities list

Beijing's notoriously bad air quality has improved in recent years and the Chinese capital is expected to drop out of a list of 200 most polluted cities in the world this year, a data provider said Thursday.

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Oil spill adds to list of Dorian-induced woes in Bahamas

The air smells like fuel, the ground is covered in a black paste-like substance and the residents of Grand Bahama are afraid.

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Leonardo da Vinci's mechanical lion goes on display in Paris

Leonardo da Vinci's famous mechanical lion on Wednesday went on display in Paris for a month, in a tribute to the Renaissance master 500 years after his death.

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Strategies to connect with barricaded buyers

Researchers from Clemson University and University of Kentucky published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing, which examines several means by which suppliers can enhance their competitiveness when selling to barricaded buyers.

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How marketers can shape customer sentiment during events

Researchers from University of Tennessee, IESEG School of Management, and Georgia State University published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that investigates the role of firms' customer engagement initiatives in social media and analyzes how firms seek to influence digital sentiment by shaping customers' experiential interactions.

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It takes a 'consortium': Researchers develop metabolic engineering technique

For years, scientists have explored ways to alter the cells of microorganisms in efforts to improve how a wide range of products are made—including medicines, fuels, and even beer. By tapping into the world of metabolic engineering, researchers have also developed techniques to create "smart" bacteria capable of carrying out a multitude of functions that impact processes involved in drug delivery,

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It takes a 'consortium': Researchers develop metabolic engineering technique

For years, scientists have explored ways to alter the cells of microorganisms in efforts to improve how a wide range of products are made—including medicines, fuels, and even beer. By tapping into the world of metabolic engineering, researchers have also developed techniques to create "smart" bacteria capable of carrying out a multitude of functions that impact processes involved in drug delivery,

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Heart attack patients take longer to call emergency when symptoms are gradual

Heart attack symptoms can be gradual or abrupt and both situations are a medical emergency. That's the main message of research published today in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

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Specialized training benefits young STEM researchers

The First-year Research Immersion (FRI) program at Binghamton University, State University of New York has proven that young college students are capable of leading real research. And according to a new study, students in FRI do better when the instructors who oversee their projects are provided extra training.

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Tainted, Toxic Skin Cream Sends Californian Woman Into Comatose State

"You don't really expect something this severe to happen with just a face lotion."

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Microplastics stunt growth of worms: study

New research shows that the presence of microplastics can stunt the growth of earthworms, and even cause them to lose weight—potentially having a serious impact on the soil ecosystem.

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Babies who use eye contact more likely to build up vocabulary

Researchers looked at 12-month-olds’ vocalisations, gestures and gazes, and at how caregivers responded Babies who frequently communicate with their caregivers using eye contact and vocalisations at the age of one are more likely to develop greater language skills by the time they reach two, according to new research. Scientists say the findings should encourage parents to pay close attention to

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Australia bushfires are now 'hotter and more intense'

Scores of fires are raging across Australia's east coast, and the fire season has only just begun.

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Assembling and Unfolding Mirrors of James Webb Space Telescope (Timelapse)

submitted by /u/Universal_Citizen45 [link] [comments]

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Alarming Map Shows Sea Ice Melting Since 1984

submitted by /u/WorldlyBrother [link] [comments]

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New Florida law forces physicians to endorse pseudoscience

A new Florida law forces physicians to endorse chiropractic, acupuncture, and massage as non-opioid alternatives for pain, even if the physician disagrees with that advice.

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Neurotechnology holds the key to a healthy ageing population

Advances in brain science and technology needed to tackle diseases of the elderly

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Where will humans live if Earth becomes uninhabitable?

The Moon, Mars and orbiting colonies are all being explored as possible options

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Næste år flyver tre rovere og to orbitere til Mars

PLUS. Sommeren 2020 drager fire rumfartsnationer mod Mars med både orbitere, landingsfartøjer og rovere.

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Sloges i skolegården og var snotprovokerende: I dag har han en Nobelpris

Michael Rosbash var skolelærernes mareridt, men er endt som topforsker.

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How marketers can shape customer sentiment during events

Marketers' ability to influence user-generated content surrounding customers' brand or firm-related interactions, and its sentiment in particular, may be an un-tapped use of social media in marketing.

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Strategies to connect with barricaded buyers

Shrewd suppliers use pre-RFP meetings to intimidate competitors and go above the minimum with their RFP responses to gain advantage with barricaded buyers.

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Specialized training benefits young STEM researchers

The First-year Research Immersion (FRI) program at Binghamton University, State University of New York has proven that young college students are capable of leading real research. And according to a new study, students in FRI do better when the instructors who oversee their projects are provided extra training.

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Nemours study finds genetic analysis can aid treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis

Personalized medicine — where the proper medicine and proper dose are used for the individual patient — moved a step closer to reality for children suffering from eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an inflammation of the food pipe often caused by an allergic reaction to certain foods.

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Where might humans live in space?

The Moon, Mars or orbiting colonies – FT's Kiran Stacey explores options for interplanetary living

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Scientists succeed in creating northern white rhino embryos.

submitted by /u/AdamCannon [link] [comments]

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