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nyheder2019september13

4h

Borgmestre vil forbyde gamle dieselbiler i byerne

Gamle dieselbiler skal forbydes i byernes miljøzoner, foreslår borgmestrene for landets fire største byer.

7h

Paramagnetic spins take electrons for a ride, produce electricity from heat

Local thermal perturbations of spins in a solid can convert heat to energy even in a paramagnetic material — where spins weren't thought to correlate long enough to do so. This effect, which the researchers call 'paramagnon drag thermopower,' converts a temperature difference into an electrical voltage.

now

Team discovers polymorph selection during crystal growth can be thermodynamically driven

Scientists provide solid calculation to demonstrate the structural transformation in colloidal crystallization can be entirely thermodynamic, in contrast to the kinetic argument, from both theoretical and computational perspectives.

now

Gene editing tool gets sharpened by WFIRM team

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine scientists have fine-tuned their delivery system to deliver a DNA editing tool to alter DNA sequences and modify gene function. The improved 'hit and run' system works faster and is more efficient.

2min

Nonphysician providers rarely interpret diagnostic imaging — except radiography, fluoroscopy

Although Medicare claims data confirm the increasing role of nonphysician providers in imaging-guided procedures across the United States, according to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology, nurse practitioners and physician assistants still rarely render diagnostic imaging services, compared with the overall number of diagnostic imaging interpretations. When nonphysician providers do interpret

2min

NASA-NOAA satellite's night-time look at Tropical Storm Kiko

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean in the early hours of Sept. 12 and grabbed a nighttime look at Tropical Storm Kiko.

2min

A Second Interstellar Visitor Is Approaching Our Solar System

This artist’s impression shows the first interstellar asteroid, `Oumuamua. Observations from ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile and other observatories around the world show that this unique object was travelling through space for millions of years before its chance encounter with our star system. It seems to be a dark red highly-elongated metallic or rocky object, about 400 metres long, and is

13min

Microbes make chemicals for scent marking in a cat

Domestic cats, like many other mammals, use smelly secretions from anal sacs to mark territory and communicate with other animals. A new study shows that many odiferous compounds from a male cat are actually made not by the cat, but by a community of bacteria living in the anal sacs.

16min

Therapeutic strategies for pregnant women with lupus

A highly gender-biased disease, lupus afflicts females some nine times more than males. Because of the disease's unpredictable turns and debilitating flares — the risks of which are elevated in postpartum women — females with the disease are often advised to avoid pregnancy altogether.

16min

Groovy! These grooved patterns better mitigate shock waves

Engineers have discovered a method that could make materials more resilient against massive shocks such as earthquakes or explosions. They found that cutting small grooves in obstacle materials diminished the impacts of what's called the reflected shock wave–once the initial wave has hit the spiral of obstacles and bounced back.

16min

For Older Patients, an ‘Afterworld’ of Hospital Care

Long-term care hospitals tend to the sickest of patients, often near the end of their lives. Many will never return home.

16min

Boy Dies from 'Brain-Eating' Amoeba Infection Picked Up in Hot Spring

The rare infection fatally destroys brain tissue, causing pathological swelling.

19min

'Lovers of Modena' Buried Hand-in-Hand Turn Out to Be Men

The "lovers of Modena" — two 1,600-year-old skeletons found holding hands inside their grave — are both men, new research reveals.

19min

19min

A reaction used by chemists worldwide goes green

Nature, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02717-y Thanks to a catalyst, a crucial chemical process no longer requires an explosive ingredient.

20min

Unlike MIT, Harvard Cut Off Epstein Donations After Conviction

Go Crimson! The latest twist in the saga of financier Jeffrey Epstein, who was charged with of sex trafficking before dying by suicide in jail: Harvard University accepted about $8.9 million from him — but refused to accept more donations after Epstein’s 2008 conviction for underage prostitution. Most of the Epstein money is gone now, according to CBS News , but Harvard plans to donate the remain

28min

Tiny bubbles could deliver cancer-killing drugs

The nano-sized bubbles that healthy cells release to transfer genetic material could carry cancer treatments that target and kill tumor cells, researchers report. “What we’ve done is improve a therapeutic approach to delivering enzyme-producing genes that can convert certain drugs into toxic agents and target tumors,” says lead author Masamitsu Kanada, an assistant professor of pharmacology and t

32min

A Second Interstellar Object May Be Streaking through Our Solar System

The “fluke” find of a possible visitor from another star after the 2017 discovery of ‘Oumuamua offers thrilling scientific opportunities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

39min

National Security Is in Trump's Hands

With the departure of John Bolton from the White House this week, even the former national security advisor’s biggest critics are worried.

40min

Tall twisting tower is made from wood that shapes itself as it dries

A method that uses wood’s tendency to swell and shrink in response to moisture has been used to make a large twisting tower in Germany

43min

A Second Interstellar Object May Be Streaking through Our Solar System

The “fluke” find of a possible visitor from another star after the 2017 discovery of ‘Oumuamua offers thrilling scientific opportunities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

44min

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP tracks fire and smoke from two continents

Wherever fires are burning around the world NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite's Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) can track the smoke and aerosols. On Sept. 13, 2019, data from OMPS revealed aerosols and smoke from fires over both South America and North America.

45min

Gemini observatory captures multicolor image of first-ever interstellar comet

The first-ever comet from beyond our Solar System has been successfully imaged by the Gemini Observatory in multiple colors. The image of the newly discovered object, denoted C/2019 Q4 (Borisov), was obtained on the night of Sept. 9-10 using the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini North Telescope on Hawaii's Maunakea.

45min

Groovy! These grooved patterns better mitigate shock waves

A team of engineers at UC San Diego has discovered a method that could make materials more resilient against massive shocks such as earthquakes or explosions. They found that cutting small grooves in obstacle materials diminished the impacts of what's called the reflected shock wave–once the initial wave has hit the spiral of obstacles and bounced back.

45min

Developing therapeutic strategies for pregnant women with lupus

A highly gender-biased disease, lupus afflicts females some nine times more than males. Because of the disease's unpredictable turns and debilitating flares — the risks of which are elevated in postpartum women — females with the disease are often advised to avoid pregnancy altogether.

45min

Microbes make chemicals for scent marking in a cat

Domestic cats, like many other mammals, use smelly secretions from anal sacs to mark territory and communicate with other animals. A new study from UC Davis shows that many odiferous compounds from a male cat are actually made not by the cat, but by a community of bacteria living in the anal sacs.

45min

Team discovers polymorph selection during crystal growth can be thermodynamically driven

Lehigh University's Jeetain Mittal and his collaborators provide solid calculation to demonstrate the structural transformation in colloidal crystallization can be entirely thermodynamic, in contrast to the kinetic argument, from both theoretical and computational perspectives.

45min

Paramagnetic spins take electrons for a ride, produce electricity from heat

Local thermal perturbations of spins in a solid can convert heat to energy even in a paramagnetic material — where spins weren't thought to correlate long enough to do so. This effect, which the researchers call 'paramagnon drag thermopower,' converts a temperature difference into an electrical voltage.

45min

New health monitors are flexible, transparent and graphene enabled

ICFO researchers develop low-power wearable devices that can monitor multiple humans' vital signs. New form factors enabled by conformable sensors that measure heart rate, respiration rate, blood pulse oxygenation, and exposure to UV radiation. Scalable fabrication process of graphene and quantum dots shows that mass-production of low-cost devices are within reach in the near future.

45min

Paramagnon drag in high thermoelectric figure of merit Li-doped MnTe

Local thermal magnetization fluctuations in Li-doped MnTe are found to increase its thermopower α strongly at temperatures up to 900 K. Below the Néel temperature ( T N ~ 307 K), MnTe is antiferromagnetic, and magnon drag contributes α md to the thermopower, which scales as ~ T 3 . Magnon drag persists into the paramagnetic state up to >3 x T N because of long-lived, short-range antiferromagnet-l

46min

Albumin-chaperoned cyanine dye yields superbright NIR-II fluorophore with enhanced pharmacokinetics

NIR-II fluorescence imaging greatly reduces scattering coefficients for nearly all tissue types at long wavelengths, benefiting deep tissue imaging. However, most of the NIR-II fluorophores suffer from low quantum yields and/or short circulation time that limit the quality of NIR-II imaging. Here, we engineered a supramolecular assembly of protein complex with lodged cyanine dyes to produce a bri

46min

Biomimetic composites with enhanced toughening using silk-inspired triblock proteins and aligned nanocellulose reinforcements

Silk and cellulose are biopolymers that show strong potential as future sustainable materials. They also have complementary properties, suitable for combination in composite materials where cellulose would form the reinforcing component and silk the tough matrix. A major challenge concerns balancing structure and functional properties in the assembly process. We used recombinant proteins with tri

46min

Size-dependent thermodynamic structural selection in colloidal crystallization

Nucleation and growth of crystalline phases play an important role in a variety of physical phenomena, ranging from freezing of liquids to assembly of colloidal particles. Understanding these processes in the context of colloidal crystallization is of great importance for predicting and controlling the structures produced. In many systems, crystallites that nucleate have structures differing from

46min

Flexible graphene photodetectors for wearable fitness monitoring

Wearable health and wellness trackers based on optical detection are promising candidates for public health uses due to their noninvasive tracking of vital health signs. However, so far, the use of rigid technologies hindered the ultimate performance and form factor of the wearable. Here, we demonstrate a new class of flexible and transparent wearables based on graphene sensitized with semiconduc

46min

Quantum Hall-based superconducting interference device

We present a study of a graphene-based Josephson junction with dedicated side gates carved from the same sheet of graphene as the junction itself. These side gates are highly efficient and allow us to modulate carrier density along either edge of the junction in a wide range. In particular, in magnetic fields in the 1- to 2-T range, we are able to populate the next Landau level, resulting in Hall

46min

Optical generation of high carrier densities in 2D semiconductor heterobilayers

Controlling charge density in two-dimensional (2D) materials is a powerful approach for engineering new electronic phases and properties. This control is traditionally realized by electrostatic gating. Here, we report an optical approach for generation of high carrier densities using transition metal dichalcogenide heterobilayers, WSe 2 /MoSe 2 , with type II band alignment. By tuning the optical

46min

Analysis of hygroscopic self-shaping wood at large scale for curved mass timber structures

The growing timber manufacturing industry faces challenges due to increasing geometric complexity of architectural designs. Complex and structurally efficient curved geometries are nowadays easily designed but still involve intensive manufacturing and excessive machining. We propose an efficient form-giving mechanism for large-scale curved mass timber by using bilayered wood structures capable of

46min

3D-printed automation for optimized PET radiochemistry

Reproducible batch synthesis of radioligands for imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) in a manner that maximizes ligand yield, purity, and molar activity, and minimizes cost and exposure to radiation, remains a challenge, as new and synthetically complex radioligands become available. Commercially available automated synthesis units (ASUs) solve many of these challenges but are costly to

46min

Unfolding adsorption on metal nanoparticles: Connecting stability with catalysis

Metal nanoparticles have received substantial attention in the past decades for their applications in numerous areas, including medicine, catalysis, energy, and the environment. Despite these applications, the fundamentals of adsorption on nanoparticle surfaces as a function of nanoparticle size, shape, metal composition, and type of adsorbate are yet to be found. Herein, we introduce the first u

46min

Heartburn Drug Found to Contain Traces of Cancer-Causing Chemical

U.S. health officials have found low levels of a potentially cancer-causing chemical in the popular heartburn drug Zantac.

47min

Saturday Night Live Made a Mistake Hiring Shane Gillis

“I’m happy to apologize to anyone who’s actually offended by anything I’ve said.” That was new Saturday Night Live cast member Shane Gillis’s attempt at a mea culpa, posted to Twitter at 10:45 p.m. last night, for the trove of racist and homophobic remarks that was being newly circulated and dissected online hours after his hiring was announced. Even by the standards of the self-serving “ phantom

47min

Anesthetic drug sevoflurane improves sepsis outcomes, animal study reveals

Patients with sepsis often require surgery or imaging procedures under general anesthesia, yet there is no standard regimen for anesthetizing septic patients. Of volatile (inhaled) anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane are the most commonly used drugs, despite their undetermined mechanisms of action. A novel study suggests that the type of drug used in general anesthesia could be critical to the

1h

1h

Paramagnetic spins take electrons for a ride, produce electricity from heat

An international team of researchers has observed that local thermal perturbations of spins in a solid can convert heat to energy even in a paramagnetic material—where spins weren't thought to correlate long enough to do so. This effect, which the researchers call "paramagnon drag thermopower," converts a temperature difference into an electrical voltage. This discovery could lead to more efficien

1h

1h

Displaying different material used in real time

submitted by /u/MrJames_CEO [link] [comments]

1h

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1h

MIT scientists accidentally create the blackest material ever

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

1h

The coolest and wildest planes at the Reno air races

At the National Championship Air Races in Reno, Nevada, over 100 small aircraft zoom around in races at hundreds of miles per hour over the high desert floor, maneuvering around giant courses. These aircraft range from tiny, home-built planes in the “sport” category, to full-on jets, to biplanes. All told, there are six different types of planes that compete. The pits at Reno/Stead airport are wh

1h

A Skyscraper-Size Asteroid Will Zoom Past Earth Tonight

Astronomers are working to track space rocks like these.

1h

Options don’t boost rates of colorectal cancer screening

Offering people the choice between home tests or a colonoscopy doesn’t increase rates of colorectal cancer screening participation, research finds. The findings, published in JAMA Network Open , show the proportion of colonoscopies—the gold standard for colorectal cancer screening—fell when doctors presented home screening as an available option. “As clinicians, we should think carefully about th

1h

MIT Team “Accidentally” Invents Blackest Material in Existence

On Thursday, a team of MIT engineers reported that they’d created a material that absorbs 99.995 percent of light that reaches it — making it even blacker than Surrey NanoSystems’ mind-bending Vantablack , which absorbs 99.965 percent of light. But perhaps even more remarkable than the light-absorbing capabilities of the new super black material is how the MIT team discovered it: by accident. In

1h

Black hole reverberations suggest the cosmic beasts are as ‘bald’ as cue balls

For the first time, gravitational wave data fathom the structure of a black hole

1h

This sulfur-spewing Russian volcano is turning sunsets purple

Sulfur in the stratosphere splits light to make a violet glow

1h

Captain Cook's 'Endeavour' Shipwreck Possibly Discovered Off Rhode Island

One of the most famous science research ships in history — the Endeavour, commanded by Captain James Cook on his first voyage around the world — is now thought to lie at the bottom of Newport Harbor in Rhode Island.

1h

How can doctors tell if you wake up during surgery?

Waking up during surgery – it's terrifying to think about. But it does happen. There is evidence that around 5 percent of people may experience so-called anaesthesia awareness at some point on the operating table, though not everyone remembers it. Living through such an event can be traumatic and painful (read our related story, 'This is what it's like waking up during surgery' ). So, what can be

1h

African nations push UN to improve drought research

Nature, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02760-9 Early-warning systems to identify areas at risk top countries’ wishlist.

1h

How Tech Firms Like Uber Hide Behind the ‘Platform Defense’

If you insist that drivers aren’t key to your business, apparently you end up making some bizarre U-turns.

1h

The Conversation

The Stock-Buyback Swindle American corporations are spending trillions of dollars to repurchase their own stock, Jerry Useem reported in August . The practice is enriching CEOs—at the expense of everyone else. I was an institutional investor in the 1980s and ’90s. Share repurchases were a fraud then and they are a fraud now. When companies take cash away from good investment opportunities, it is

1h

A Driver Tricked Uber’s Algorithm, Sexually Assaulted a Passenger

Terrifying Flaws In December 2018, a man driving an authorized Uber vehicle picked up an intoxicated woman leaving a Christmas party — and then brought her to his home and raped her. But the man, who The Age reports was sentenced to five and a half years in prison on Wednesday, was not an authorized Uber driver. Rather, he was able to easily fool Uber’s verification system by holding up a photo o

1h

The Bold and Bewildering Curiosity of Alexander von Humboldt

Doing dangerous things in pursuit of new knowledge was par for the course for this Prussian polymath, born 250 years ago this month. Humboldt_topNteaser.jpg Portrait of Alexander von Humboldt by Julius Schrader. Image credits: Metropolitan Museum of Art Culture Friday, September 13, 2019 – 12:45 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) — Around 1780 — so the story goes — the Italian scientis

1h

Science Under Maximum Pressure in Iran

From travel restrictions and publishing bans to currency collapse, the restoration of US sanctions has left researchers in Iran reeling.

2h

Toni Slabas obituary

My friend Toni Slabas, who has died aged 70, was an internationally renowned plant biochemist. He came from humble beginnings and quietly made a positive impact on the lives of many others. At Durham University, where he was professor of plant sciences from 1990 to 2013, Toni established a world-leading group in plant biochemistry with a particular interest in seed oil production and cell wall bi

2h

Super Planetary-Motion Smackdown: Kepler v. Newton

In science, progress is all about building a better model—explaining more with less.

2h

The problem with the push for more college degrees

In a 2009 speech, President Barack Obama proclaimed that by 2020, the United States will “once again have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world." As we near 2020, it is worth asking how close are we to reaching that lofty goal and what have been the results of focusing so intently on college graduation rates as a sign of success. Based on my work as a historian of education and

2h

This is one way Uber and Lyft want to get around making drivers employees

The ride-hailing companies want to create a third category of workers. That’s had mixed results in other countries.

2h

Using an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions

A team of researchers from Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology has found that they could use an optical tweezer array of laser-cooled molecules to observe ground state collisions between individual molecules. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their work with cooled calcium monofluoride molecules trapped by optical tweezers, and what they

2h

2h

Everything you need to know about the UN's upcoming climate summit

The UN climate action summit on 23 September will be the most important event since the Paris climate deal, but a lack of ambition could hold efforts back

2h

Toyota Wants to Slather Solar Panels All Over Its Prius Hybrid

Going Solar As electric cars become increasingly popular worldwide, there’s one renewable source of energy that could make them even more convenient and environmentally friendly: the Sun. Japanese auto giant Toyota has partnered with a local energy company to test a Prius hybrid that’s almost entirely covered in solar panels, according to Bloomberg . The ambitious goal is to one day end the car’s

2h

Speeding up the drug discovery process to help patients

An international research team is perfecting a method to predict the potential clinical implications of new drugs before clinical trials even start.

2h

Nanomaterial created that is both twisted and untwisted at the same time

A new nanomaterial could solve a conundrum faced by scientists probing some of the most promising types of future pharmaceuticals.

2h

Peanut Allergy Drug Will Protect Children, Experts Tell F.D.A.

One in 50 American children is allergic to peanuts. Palforzia does not cure the condition, but it can blunt life-threatening reactions.

2h

Focus points to reduce opioid overdose deaths identified

A new study identifies specific locations where medication and harm reduction services for people with opioid use disorder should be available in order to have the greatest impact on reducing opioid overdose deaths. The data show that more than half of those who died of an opioid overdose in Massachusetts encountered the health care, public health and/or criminal justice systems within the 12 mont

2h

The enigma of bronze age tin

The origin of the tin used in the Bronze Age has long been one of the greatest enigmas in archaeological research. Now researchers have solved part of the puzzle. They were able to proof that tin ingots found at archaeological sites in Israel, Turkey, and Greece do not come from Central Asia, as previously assumed, but from tin deposits in Europe.

2h

Few people with peanut allergy tolerate peanut after stopping oral immunotherapy

Studies have shown that peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) — ingesting small, controlled amounts of peanut protein — can desensitize adults and children and prevent allergic reactions, but the optimal duration and dose is unknown. In a study that followed participants after successful OIT, discontinuing OIT or continuing OIT at a reduced dose led to a decline in its protective effects. The study al

2h

How new loops in DNA packaging help us make diverse antibodies

It's long been known that our immune cells mix and match bits of genetic code to make new kinds of antibodies to fight newly encountered threats. But how these different gene segments come together has been a mystery. A study provides the answer, showing how the classic process of V(D)J recombination makes use of chromatin looping to gather the segments to be spliced.

2h

Speeding up the drug discovery process to help patients

An international research team is perfecting a method to predict the potential clinical implications of new drugs before clinical trials even start.

2h

Addressing serious illness with a serious question to clinicians

A question: 'Would you be surprised if this patient died in the next month?' — posed to elicit a clinician's overall impression of a patient — produced a strong correlation. If a clinician answered that they would not be surprised, the patient was twice as likely to die in the next month.

2h

LH dipeptide may improve mental health

Researchers have made discoveries regarding the effect of the dipeptide Leucine-Histidine (LH) in suppressing microglial activation and depression-associated emotional disturbances. LH dipeptide is found in fermented foods such as blue cheese and natto (fermented soy beans). Foods rich in LH dipeptide may be a safe, preventive method for maintaining good mental health.

2h

Researchers identify focus points to reduce opioid overdose deaths

A new study identifies specific locations where medication and harm reduction services for people with opioid use disorder should be available in order to have the greatest impact on reducing opioid overdose deaths. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction, the data show that more than half of those who died of an opioid overdose in Massachusetts encountered the h

2h

How Do You Know Which Emotion a Facial Expression Represents?

A group of researchers has created a short test to see just how misleading the look on a person's face can be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Nanomaterial created that is both twisted and untwisted at the same time

A new nanomaterial could solve a conundrum faced by scientists probing some of the most promising types of future pharmaceuticals.

2h

Extinction of Icelandic walrus coincides with Norse settlement

An international collaboration of scientists has for the first time used ancient DNA analyses and C14-dating to demonstrate the past existence of a unique population of Icelandic walrus that went extinct shortly after Norse settlement some 1100 years ago. Walrus hunting and ivory trade was probably the principal cause of extinction, being one of the earliest examples of commercially driven overexp

2h

Disabled people in UK marginalized by paperwork and programs which aim to help them

Research shows disabled people face being marginalized by the very programs that are designed to help them. Projects and welfare systems established to provide support are normalizing disabled people, and unintentionally contributing to their further marginalization.

2h

Low sea-ice cover in the Arctic

The sea-ice extent in the Arctic is nearing its annual minimum at the end of the melt season in September. Only circa 3.9 million square kilometers of the Arctic Ocean are covered by sea ice any more, according to researchers.

2h

Waterhemp has evolved resistance to 4 herbicide sites of action

When a waterhemp biotype in eastern Nebraska survived a post-emergent application of the PPO inhibitor fomesafen, scientists decided to take a close look. They discovered the population was resistant to four distinct herbicide sites of action, including PPO inhibitors, ALS inhibitors, EPSPS inhibitors and PS II inhibitors.

2h

Male Trinidad guppies find food thanks to females

For male Trinidad Guppies applies: if you are hungry, seek female company. A recent study provides evidence that male guppy fish in the presence of females more often ended up at novel food patches. In contrast, female food discovery was independent of male presence.

2h

The U.S. Health-Care System Found a Way to Make Peanuts Cost $4,200

Peanuts are a uniquely dangerous legume. A small fragment of one can kill an allergic person. Even if that person is resuscitated, it’s possible to have permanent brain damage . These severe allergic reactions are relatively rare but difficult to predict. One time, you accidentally eat a bit of a peanut and get a little itchy; the next time, your airways close up and someone has to jam a needle f

2h

Netflix’s Unbelievable Is a Different Sort of Drama About Sexual Assault

I n the summer of 2008, a teenager woke up to find a man in her Lynnwood, Washington, apartment, standing over her with a knife. He tied her up, raped her, and took photos of her before leaving. She reported the rape, spoke with detectives, underwent a clinical sexual-assault examination, and cried as she warned her fellow participants in Project Ladder—a program helping young adults transition f

2h

Diet of worms has to be right for compost success | Letters

Readers respond to Adrian Chiles’s report of his struggle to create compost from his organic waste using a wormery Along with, no doubt, many other vermophiles, I’d like to reassure Adrian Chiles that wormeries do work and that his worms will handsomely reward his efforts if he persists ( The worm has turned – but where’s my compost? , G2, 12 September). Having decided that a wormery would be a go

2h

Against compulsory MMR vaccination and for looking after new mothers | Letters

Prof Arne Akbar , president of the British Society for Immunology, says compulsory vaccination is a blunt tool which could increase health inequities and alienate parents. Plus Prof Helen Stokes-Lampard and others call for a funded postnatal medical appointment at six to eight weeks specifically to assess new mothers’ physical and mental health The recent drop in childhood vaccination uptake is a

2h

Samverkan med, snarare än för, bäst för ensamkommande

I en ny antologi har MDH-forskare Mehrdad Darvishpour, docent i socialt arbete tillsammans med Niclas Månson professor i pedagogik vid Södertörn högskola samlat den senaste forskningen kring ensamkommande barn och unga. Boken ger för första gången en riksomfattande bild av ensamkommandes inträde på arbetsmarknaden samt deras hälsa, både genom kvantitativ och kvalitativ forskning. Fokus ligger fra

2h

Speeding up the drug discovery process to help patients

An international research team is perfecting a method to predict the potential clinical implications of new drugs before clinical trials even start.

3h

Trapped by a flexible schedule

A flexible schedule is one of the main advantages of freelance work. But don't rejoice in your freedom just yet: self-employment often disrupts the balance between life and work and takes up more time than traditional office work. HSE University researchers Denis Strebkov and Andrey Shevchuk investigated the downsides of independent work.

3h

Climate change: Electrical industry's 'dirty secret' boosts warming

It's the most powerful greenhouse gas you've never heard of, and levels in the atmosphere are soaring.

3h

Why mountains are such biodiversity hotspots

Mountain regions—especially those in the tropics—are hotspots of extraordinary and baffling biodiversity, according to new research. Life on Earth is amazingly diverse, and exhibits striking geographical global patterns in biodiversity. Although mountain regions cover only 25% of Earth’s land area, they are home to more than 85% of the world’s species of amphibians, birds, and mammals, and many o

3h

Daily briefing: Old genes in new species

Nature, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02769-0 Hybrids might turbocharge speciation with old gene variants, scientists use gene-edited stem cells to treat HIV and Mission Mangal dramatizes India’s journey to Mars.

3h

Sticks and stones may break your bones, but this reaction edits skeletons

Since Friedrich Wohler synthesized urea (by accident) back in 1828, chemical synthesis—and organic synthesis for that—has been a driving force in pharmaceutical innovation. Improving the lives of people worldwide, the medicines available nowadays are only possible thanks to the continuous advancement of synthetic chemistry, allowing scientists to design and build new molecules. Now, Marcos G. Suer

3h

How Do You Know Which Emotion a Facial Expression Represents?

A group of researchers has created a short test to see just how misleading the look on a person's face can be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

How Do You Know Which Emotion a Facial Expression Represents?

A group of researchers has created a short test to see just how misleading the look on a person's face can be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

The enigma of bronze age tin

The origin of the tin used in the Bronze Age has long been one of the greatest enigmas in archaeological research. Now researchers from Heidelberg University and the Curt Engelhorn Centre for Archaeometry in Mannheim have solved part of the puzzle. Using methods of the natural sciences, they examined the tin from the second millennium BCE found at archaeological sites in Israel, Turkey, and Greece

3h

How new loops in DNA packaging help us make diverse antibodies

Diversity is good, especially when it comes to antibodies. It's long been known that a gene assembly process called V(D)J recombination allows our immune system to mix and match bits of genetic code, generating new antibodies to conquer newly encountered threats. But how these gene segments come together to be spliced has been a mystery. A new study in Scientific Reports provides the answer.

3h

Lab-Grown Human Mini Brains Show Brainy Activity

As the little structures grow, their constituents specialize into different types of brain cells, begin to form connections and emit brain waves. They could be useful models for development and neurological conditions.

3h

Arctic sea ice is at a near-record low — but that’s just one of the north’s problems

Nature, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02653-x From raging wildfires to melting ice in Greenland, the top of the world is screaming for help.

3h

Cluster hiring a ready-made collaboration

Nature, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02767-2 One institute has netted a cohort of researchers with a pre-designed project. A member of the hiring committee and a successful candidate explain how it works.

3h

‘Ecological grief’ grips scientists witnessing Great Barrier Reef’s decline

Nature, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02656-8 Studying ecosystems affected by climate change takes an emotional toll on researchers.

3h

‘Toe maps’ in the brain guide painters born without hands

Nature, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02709-y People who can manipulate objects with their feet illustrate the brain’s adaptability.

3h

A Runaway Star Is Escaping a Black Hole at 1.2 Million MPH

It Follows Back in the 1980s, astronomers spotted a runaway star speeding across the night sky at upwards of 1.2 million miles per hour. Now, decades later, scientists say they’ve finally figured out which pocket of the galaxy the star once called home — and what it’s fleeing from: a giant black hole. Home is Nowhere The star, dubbed PG1610+062, has probably spent all this time escaping from a bl

3h

Putin Critic Uses Drone to Save Hard Drives Before Police Raid

Police State On Thursday, Russian police targeted the home of Sergey Boyko, a known critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, as part of a widespread raid. But Boyko was determined to prevent the officers from confiscating his electronics — so he used a drone to fly them out of his high-rise apartment via an open window. Extraction Point A companion in Boyko’s home at the time of the Russian ra

3h

Environmental pollution in China begins decreasing

For decades pollution in China has paralleled economic growth. But this connection has been weakened in recent years, according to a new international research study.

3h

'Communities that Care' prevention system helps to protect youth

Students in Pennsylvania school districts that participated in Communities that Care (CTC) coalitions were significantly less likely to use alcohol or marijuana, or to engage in delinquent behavior than those in non-CTC districts, according to a recent study.

3h

Slower growth in working memory linked to teen driving crashes

Research into why adolescent drivers are involved in motor vehicle crashes, the leading cause of injury and death among 16- to 19-year-olds in the United States, has often focused on driving experience and skills. But a new study suggests that development of the adolescent brain — in particular, working memory — may play a critical role in whether a teenager is more likely to crash.

3h

Tiny bubbles in our body could fight cancer better than chemo

Healthy cells in our body release nano-sized bubbles that transfer genetic material such as DNA and RNA to other cells. It's your DNA that stores the important information necessary for RNA to produce proteins and make sure they act accordingly. These bubbly extracellular vesicles could become mini treatment transporters, carrying a combination of therapeutic drugs and genes that target cancer cel

3h

Parasitology: Mother cells as organelle donors

Microbiologists have discovered a recycling process in the eukaryotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii that plays a vital role in the organism's unusual mode of reproduction.

3h

How new loops in DNA packaging help us make diverse antibodies

Diversity is good, especially when it comes to antibodies. It's long been known that a gene assembly process called V(D)J recombination allows our immune system to mix and match bits of genetic code, generating new antibodies to conquer newly encountered threats. But how these gene segments come together to be spliced has been a mystery. A new study in Scientific Reports provides the answer.

3h

Researchers find waterhemp has evolved resistance to four herbicide sites of action

A research study featured in the journal Weed Science provides worrisome new details about the evolution of herbicide resistance in waterhemp—an annual weed that represents a significant threat to Midwest corn and soybean crops.

3h

Land restoration in Latin America shows big potential for climate change mitigation

Land restoration in Latin America and the Caribbean is picking up pace and scaling up projects will help the region meet its pledges under the Bonn Challenge, which aims to restore 350 million hectares of degraded and deforested land worldwide by 2030. A new study led by the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) and Wageningen University supplies a first map of restoration projects

3h

Communities that Care prevention system helps to protect youth

Students in Pennsylvania school districts that participated in Communities that Care (CTC) coalitions were significantly less likely to use alcohol or marijuana, or to engage in delinquent behavior than those in non-CTC districts, according to a recent study published in Prevention Science.

3h

Researchers find waterhemp has evolved resistance to four herbicide sites of action

A research study featured in the journal Weed Science provides worrisome new details about the evolution of herbicide resistance in waterhemp—an annual weed that represents a significant threat to Midwest corn and soybean crops.

3h

Nye, dramatiske NASA-billeder: Så meget af Arktis er forsvundet siden 1984

To danske forskere forklarer, hvorfor det sker, og hvad det betyder.

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Forskare: Interstellär komet observerades vid Mars

En komet som troligtvis inte hör hemma i vårt solsystem har nyligen observerats nära Mars bana, enligt forskare vid Hawaii universitet. Det kan vara andra gången någonsin som den här typen av komet utifrån syns till i vårt solsystem. – Det är väldigt ovanligt att man observerar den, säger astronomen Bengt Edvardsson vid Uppsala universitet.

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Sticks and stones may break your bones, but this reaction edits skeletons

Marcos G. Suero and his research group at the Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ) present a new reaction that allows for the edition of organic molecule's skeletons, opening up new avenues of research.

3h

How new loops in DNA packaging help us make diverse antibodies

It's long been known that our immune cells mix and match bits of genetic code to make new kinds of antibodies to fight newly encountered threats. But how these different gene segments come together has been a mystery. A study in Nature provides the answer, showing how the classic process of V(D)J recombination makes use of chromatin looping to gather the segments to be spliced.

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The enigma of bronze age tin

The origin of the tin used in the Bronze Age has long been one of the greatest enigmas in archaeological research. Now researchers from Heidelberg University and the Curt Engelhorn Centre for Archaeometry in Mannheim have solved part of the puzzle. They were able to proof that tin ingots found at archaeological sites in Israel, Turkey, and Greece do not come from Central Asia, as previously assume

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A molecular string phone at work

Researchers from the Department of Atomically Resolved Dynamics of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg, the University of Potsdam (both in Germany) and the University of Toronto (Canada) have pieced together a detailed time-lapse movie revealing all the major steps during the catalytic cycle of an enzyme.

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Giggles and 'joy jumps': rats love games of hide and squeak, scientists find

Rodents enjoyed being found by humans and would hide again to keep the game going The next time you see a rat darting for cover, consider this: it might just want to have a playful game of hide-and-seek. A group of neuroscientists in Germany spent several weeks hanging out with rodents in a small room filled with boxes, and found the animals were surprisingly adept at the childhood game – even wi

3h

Environmental pollution in China decreases

For decades pollution in China has paralleled economic growth. But this connection has been weakened in recent years, according to a new international research study published in the Science Advances journal.

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A molecular string phone at work

Researchers from the Department of Atomically Resolved Dynamics of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg, the University of Potsdam (both in Germany) and the University of Toronto (Canada) have pieced together a detailed time-lapse movie revealing all the major steps during the catalytic cycle of an enzyme.

3h

NASA's WFIRST will help uncover the universe's fate

Scientists have discovered that a mysterious pressure dubbed "dark energy" makes up about 68% of the total energy content of the cosmos, but so far we don't know much more about it. Exploring the nature of dark energy is one of the primary reasons NASA is building the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), a space telescope whose measurements will help illuminate the dark energy puzzle. Wi

3h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor ser tidevandet forskelligt ud rundt om i verden?

Et par læsere undrer sig over, hvorfor ebbe og flod ikke ser mere ens ud rundt om i verden, når Månen og Solens tiltrækningskraft vel burde være den samme overalt. Det svarer DMI på.

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The key to bigger quantum computers could be to build them like Legos

A startup called Quantum Circuits is networking mini quantum devices together to create computers it will claims will be easier to scale up than rival machines.

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Study finds certain drugs used to treat eye diseases excreted into human breast milk

Ranibizumab and aflibercept are medications used to treat several retinal diseases. They contain an agent called anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF), which blocks the eye's production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) – a protein associated with retinal diseases in high quantities. VEGF is also present in breast milk and plays an important role in infant development. A f

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Predictable esports: Amateurs and professionals sit differently in a chair

A group of scientists from Skoltech, the MIPT, and the State University of Aerospace Instrumentation in St. Petersburg has won the Best Paper Award at the prestigious fifth IEEE International Conference on Internet of People (IoP 2019) for research on artificial intelligence, which established a connection between an esports player's movements and skill level. The research findings show that machi

3h

Land restoration in Latin America shows big potential for climate change mitigation

Land restoration in Latin America and the Caribbean is picking up pace and scaling up projects will help the region meet its pledges under the Bonn Challenge, which aims to restore 350 million hectares of degraded and deforested land worldwide by 2030. A new study supplies a first map of restoration projects in Latin America and shows their potential to mitigate climate change through restoring fo

3h

Tiny bubbles in our body could fight cancer better than chemo

Healthy cells in our body release nano-sized bubbles that transfer genetic material such as DNA and RNA to other cells. It's your DNA that stores the important information necessary for RNA to produce proteins and make sure they act accordingly. These bubbly extracellular vesicles could become mini treatment transporters, carrying a combination of therapeutic drugs and genes that target cancer cel

3h

Slower growth in working memory linked to teen driving crashes

Research into why adolescent drivers are involved in motor vehicle crashes, the leading cause of injury and death among 16- to 19-year-olds in the United States, has often focused on driving experience and skills. But a new study suggests that development of the adolescent brain — in particular, working memory — may play a critical role in whether a teenager is more likely to crash.

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Are differences in working memory development associated with crashes involving young drivers?

This study of 84 young drivers looked at the association between motor vehicle crashes and differences in the development of working memory, which is critical to awareness of hazards while driving.

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Accounting for influencing factors when estimating suicide rates among US youth

Using unadjusted suicide rates to describe trends may be skewed because they are affected by differences in age and year of birth. This secondary analysis of data included total population and suicide deaths by single year of age from 10 to 19 and by sex from 1999 to 2017 and accounted for those factors.

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Study examines patterns of violence among young urban males

This observational study of adolescent men in urban neighborhoods examined associations between social support, patterns of violence, and violence-related risk behaviors or protective factors that might mitigate them. The analysis included data from a recently completed randomized clinical trial that included 866 male adolescents from lower-resource neighborhoods in Pittsburgh who were enrolled at

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Addressing serious illness with a serious question to clinicians

A question: 'Would you be surprised if this patient died in the next month?' — posed to elicit a clinician's overall impression of a patient — produced a strong correlation. If a clinician answered that they would not be surprised, the patient was twice as likely to die in the next month.

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High social support associated with less violence among male teens in urban neighborhoods

UPMC Children's researchers find that the presence of adult social support is linked to less violence among at-risk teen boys.

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Daniel Johnston, the Folk Poet of Devil Town

In 1990, the songwriter Daniel Johnston called into a radio show in New Jersey from his parents’ bedroom in West Virginia to perform one of his songs, “Speeding Motorcycle.” Yo La Tengo, which had recorded its own version of the track, was set up to play with him, but live in the studio. “Daniel, first of all, I think I better introduce you to this band,” the DJ said as the musicians were gearing

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Readers Respond: The Case Against Paper Straws

The Case Against Paper Straws Paper straws are still a single-use, disposable consumer item, Annie Lowrey wrote last month —a greener option than plastic, but not a green one. Annie Lowrey’s article on the shortcomings of paper straws provides a nuanced look at an issue that has captured the public’s attention. She’s right: Paper straws are not going to solve the ocean plastics crisis. Changing o

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Panic might be triggered by signals from your bones

Them bones do more than you give them credit for. (Camilo Jimenez via Unsplash/) In a stressful situation, your hands may sweat and your heart may pound . But a new paper published Thursday in Cell Metabolism suggests that a less obvious organ—your skeletal system—is what starts the fight-or-flight response that gets you out of harm's way. "It's a revolutionary study," says Ernestina Schipani , a

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Feds finalize plan to open Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling

The Trump administration announced Thursday its final plan to open Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling, giving the petroleum industry access to the pristine wildland for the first time.

3h

”Vi letar ständigt efter vatten på andra planeter”

Markus Janson, docent på Stockholms Universitet, berättar varför upptäckten av vattenånga på exoplaneten är av stor betydelse.

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Lab-Grown Human Mini Brains Show Brainy Activity

As the little structures grow, their constituents specialize into different types of brain cells, begin to form connections and emit brain waves. They could be useful models for development and… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Women also competed for status superiority in mid-Republican Rome

Purple clothing, gold trimmings, earrings and two- or four-wheeled carriages. Among the elite, competition for status superiority was just as vital to women as it was to men in Rome around 2000 years ago. This has been demonstrated in a thesis that investigates the domains and resources women had access to for status competition and how these were regulated by law.

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Low sea ice cover in the Arctic

The sea ice extent in the Arctic is nearing its annual minimum at the end of the melt season in September. Only circa 3.9 million square kilometres of the Arctic Ocean are covered by sea ice anymore, according to researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute and the University of Bremen. This is only the second time that the annual minimum has dropped below four million square kilometres since sat

4h

Airbus Planes Will Track How Often Passengers Go to the Bathroom

Bathroom Break In the future, airplane bathrooms will never run out of toilet paper again. At least, that’s Airbus’s excuse for a cursed-sounding new Internet of Things platform that collects a large amount of data about passengers, according to Bloomberg — including how often they go to the bathroom and how long they have to wait to pee. Pee Tape Airbus says it’s testing its “Airspace Connected

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Climate change is hurting Philadelphians' health, and the worst is yet to come

The day they found Lee Odgers, it was so hot that the wax candles inside her Northeast Philadelphia apartment had started to melt.

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Communities that Care prevention system helps to protect youth

Students in Pennsylvania school districts that participated in Communities that Care (CTC) coalitions were significantly less likely to use alcohol or marijuana, or to engage in delinquent behavior than those in non-CTC districts, according to a recent study published in Prevention Science.

4h

Patient survey highlights challenges for the 1 in 4 living with rheumatic disease

Americans living with rheumatic disease face significant healthcare challenges, according to a national patient survey released this week by the American College of Rheumatology and its Simple Tasks™ public awareness campaign.

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The dirty secret of capitalism — and a new way forward | Nick Hanauer

Rising inequality and growing political instability are the direct result of decades of bad economic theory, says entrepreneur Nick Hanauer. In a visionary talk, he dismantles the mantra that "greed is good" — an idea he describes as not only morally corrosive, but also scientifically wrong — and lays out a new theory of economics powered by reciprocity and cooperation.

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Better device tracking with Wifi could help indoor navigation

A new technique uses a novel combination of WiFi signals and accelerometer technology to track devices in near-real time, researchers report. The technique, which can measure speed and distance in indoor environments, could help improve navigation technologies for robots, drones, or pedestrians trying to find their way around an airport . “We call our approach WiFi-assisted Inertial Odometry (WIO

4h

Lab-Grown Human Mini Brains Show Brainy Activity

As the little structures grow, their constituents specialize into different types of brain cells, begin to form connections and emit brain waves. They could be useful models for development and… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Lab-Grown Human Mini Brains Show Brainy Activity

As the little structures grow, their constituents specialize into different types of brain cells, begin to form connections and emit brain waves. They could be useful models for development and… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Male Trinidad guppies find food thanks to females

For male Trinidad Guppies applies: if you are hungry, seek female company. A recent study led by scientists of the the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) together with other research institutions provides evidence that male guppy fish in the presence of females more often ended up at novel food patches. I

4h

Male Trinidad guppies find food thanks to females

For male Trinidad Guppies applies: if you are hungry, seek female company. A recent study led by scientists of the the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) together with other research institutions provides evidence that male guppy fish in the presence of females more often ended up at novel food patches. I

4h

VISTA unveils a new image of the Large Magellanic Cloud

The Large Magellanic Cloud, or LMC, is one of our nearest galactic neighbors, at only 163,000 light years from Earth. With its sibling the Small Magellanic Cloud, these are among the nearest dwarf satellite galaxies to the Milky Way. The LMC is also the home of various stellar conglomerates and is an ideal laboratory for astronomers to study the processes that shape galaxies.

4h

Environmental pollution in China begins decreasing

For decades pollution in China has paralleled economic growth. But this connection has been weakened in recent years, according to a new international research study published in the Science Advances journal.

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Physical activity may attenuate menopause-associated atherogenic changes

Leisure-time physical activity is associated with a healthier blood lipid profile in menopausal women, but it doesn't seem to entirely offset the unfavorable lipid profile changes associated with the menopausal transition.

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Children of refugees with PTSD are at higher risk of developing psychiatric disorders

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have studied what it means for children to have parents who are refugees and have PTSD. The study shows that these children have a significantly higher risk of contact with the psychiatric system. The researchers believe that there should be focus on the problem and that early measures and treatment options should be developed.

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Researchers have identified areas of the retina that change in mild Alzheimer's disease

Finding biomarkers that enable early detection of Alzheimer's disease is one of medicine's biggest challenges, and the retina is one of the most promising candidates. For the first time, a research team at the Complutense University of Madrid has identified the exact shape, size and location of the areas affected by the disease in each retinal layer, analysing changes in thickness that occur in mi

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Gymnasieklasse har fanget uhyre sjælden fisk: 'Det er noget af et scoop'

En krumsnudet næbsnog er fanget i Øresund for første gang i flere år.

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Social workers are trying new ways to keep teenagers safe

Over the past four decades the child protection system in England has increasingly concentrated on preventing the abuse and neglect of young children in their homes. In response to multiple government inquiries, such as those following the killing of eight-year-old Victoria Climbié and 17-month-old, Peter Connelly (known as "Baby P"), the focus has been to reduce risk and prevent the abuse and neg

4h

Could fungi save the fashion world?

Environmental action group Extinction Rebellion is disrupting London Fashion Week to highlight the harms of throwaway culture and the concurrent climate emergency that the clothing market contributes to. Calling for the cancellation of future fashion weeks in acknowledgment of the crisis, it plans to target show venues and hold a funeral procession called "London Fashion Week: Rest in Peace".

4h

‘How Are You Going to Pass That?’ Befuddled Democrats at the Debate

HOUSTON—Overhead, the little red plane with the white stripe went around and around, circling and droning, circling and droning—impossible to ignore, pointless to pay attention to. It was a stunt, and by this mention alone, the Trump campaign may feel it got a return on its investment, reportedly $7,500 . SOCIALISM WILL KILL HOUSTON’S ECONOMY! VOTE TRUMP 2020 read the big blue banner trailing the

4h

The Books Briefing: Campus Life Is Full of Plot Twists

College libraries may be reducing the number of books stored on their shelves , but plenty of novel-worthy plots and fascinating characters still play out on campus and congregate in the classroom. After all, challenging assignments like the drama-class trust exercises in Susan Choi’s most recent novel can influence students’ thinking for years to come. Academic characters in John Williams’s Ston

4h

The Democrats Aren’t Talking About Education Issues They Can Change

All of the ingredients seemed right. The Democratic 2020 hopefuls were lined up onstage in the gymnasium at Texas Southern University, a historically black university in Houston, Texas, for the third debate. Several of the candidates had announced plans to pump billions of dollars into HBCUs—institutions founded primarily after the Civil War to educate black people shut out of the rest of higher

4h

Kids are surrounded by AI. They should know how it works.

A new curriculum that helps children understand how algorithms are designed will keep them safe and motivate them to help shape the technology’s future.

4h

Quick test measures parent perceptions of school

A new tool can measure parent perceptions of how they engage with their children’s education, researchers report. The tool also offers school administrators a quick, economical, and efficient alternative to the often expensive and cumbersome measures currently available. A study explaining the development and testing of the Parent Perceptions of Overall School Experiences Scale (P-OSE), one of th

4h

Volcanoes kill more people long after eruptions – those deaths are avoidable

You may think of volcanic eruptions as spectacular but brief explosions. But in reality, these destructive forces wreak havoc before headlines are made and continue long after they fade. As our new research shows, it is the drawn-out nature of volcanic eruptions that can be most fatal—and understanding why is the key to saving lives.

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Why carbon dioxide has such outsized influence on Earth's climate

I am often asked how carbon dioxide can have an important effect on global climate when its concentration is so small—just 0.041% of Earth's atmosphere. And human activities are responsible for just 32% of that amount.

4h

Patienter med MS får ikke umiddelbart kognitiv gavn af højintens træning

Træning er rigtig gavnligt for patienter med multipel sklerose, men forskere mangler viden om, hvorvidt det også gavner kognition.

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Parasitology: Mother cells as organelle donors

Microbiologists at LMU and UoG have discovered a recycling process in the eukaryotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii that plays a vital role in the organism's unusual mode of reproduction.

4h

Researchers find waterhemp has evolved resistance to 4 herbicide sites of action

When a waterhemp biotype in eastern Nebraska survived a post-emergent application of the PPO inhibitor fomesafen, a team of university scientists decided to take a close look. They discovered the population was resistant to four distinct herbicide sites of action, including PPO inhibitors, ALS inhibitors, EPSPS inhibitors and PS II inhibitors.

4h

Low sea-ice cover in the Arctic

The sea-ice extent in the Arctic is nearing its annual minimum at the end of the melt season in September. Only circa 3.9 million square kilometres of the Arctic Ocean are covered by sea ice any more, according to researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute and the University of Bremen.

4h

Scientists create a nanomaterial that is both twisted and untwisted at the same time

A new nanomaterial developed by scientists at the University of Bath could solve a conundrum faced by scientists probing some of the most promising types of future pharmaceuticals.

4h

Disabled people marginalized by paperwork and programs that aim to help them

Disabled people face being marginalized by the very programs that are designed to help them.

4h

Weather Radars Reveal an 80 Percent Chance of … Dragonflies?

More and more often, it seems, massive clouds of insects are being picked up by increasingly advanced radar technology.

4h

Amazon facing antitrust probe over its marketplace, report says

Amazon is reportedly facing a potential investigation of its marketplace by antitrust officials examining whether it's using its influence to hurt competition.

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Largest ever polar expedition will soon be frozen in drifting sea ice

An icebreaker ship is about to deliberately let itself be frozen into the drifting Arctic ice as part of the largest ever scientific Arctic expedition

4h

Extinction of Icelandic walrus coincides with Norse settlement

An international collaboration of scientists in Iceland, Denmark and the Netherlands has for the first time used ancient DNA analyses and C14-dating to demonstrate the past existence of a unique population of Icelandic walrus that went extinct shortly after Norse settlement some 1100 years ago. Walrus hunting and ivory trade was probably the principal cause of extinction, being one of the earliest

4h

Philippine capital jolted by quake

An earthquake that struck east of the Philippine capital Manila on Friday set buildings swaying and sent scores into the streets, but authorities said they did not expect any damage.

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Extinction of Icelandic walrus coincides with Norse settlement

An international collaboration of scientists in Iceland, Denmark and the Netherlands has for the first time used ancient DNA analyses and C14-dating to demonstrate the past existence of a unique population of Icelandic walrus that went extinct shortly after Norse settlement some 1100 years ago. Walrus hunting and ivory trade was probably the principal cause of extinction, being one of the earliest

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Befriending the Queen of Chess

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two Hungarian master chess players: Judit Polgár, who is widely considered the best female chess player of all time , and Anna Rudolf, who grew up idolizing Judit as a child. Anna became an elite

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New Delhi announces plan to combat winter toxic air

A plan to combat air pollution in New Delhi was announced by authorities Friday, as the Indian capital looks to lighten the toxic smog blanket that chokes the city, especially in winter.

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Black hole at centre of galaxy is getting hungrier, say scientists

Scientists say Milky Way’s Sagittarius A* has been more active in recent months Unseeable and inescapable, black holes already rank among the more sinister phenomena out in the cosmos. So it may come as disconcerting news that the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way appears to be growing hungrier. Astronomers monitoring the colossal object, called Sagittarius A* , found that in

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A.I. could help predict when blood tests aren’t necessary

An algorithm that can predict whether a given blood test will come back “normal” could help cut needless medical tests, researchers report. Being thorough in medicine is a must—but doctors concerned about over-testing are raising a new question: Is it possible to be too thorough? Jonathan Chen, assistant professor of medicine at Stanford University, says the answer is yes, particularly in the con

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Menthol cigarette restrictions could hike cost, cut use

Restricting the sale of menthol cigarettes to tobacco specialty shops may reduce the number of retailers and increase the cost of smoking, a new study suggests. “Targeting the tobacco retail environment is rapidly emerging as the next frontier in tobacco control,” says Todd Combs, research assistant professor at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis and lead author of the paper i

4h

Siemens Gamesa klar med verdens største vingetest-stand

Teststanden er nabo til virksomhedens vinge-produktionshal i Aalborg og skal som første opgave teste de 94 meter lange vinger til Siemens Gamesas 10 MW offshore vindmølle.

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The bizarre social history of beds

Groucho Marx once joked, "Anything that can't be done in bed isn't worth doing at all." You might think he was referring to sleeping and sex. But humans, at one time or another, have done just about everything in bed.

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Mother cells as organelle donors

Microbiologists at LMU and UoG have discovered a recycling process in the eukaryotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii that plays a vital role in the organism's unusual mode of reproduction.

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Mother cells as organelle donors

Microbiologists at LMU and UoG have discovered a recycling process in the eukaryotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii that plays a vital role in the organism's unusual mode of reproduction.

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Augmented 2030: the Apps, Headsets, and Lenses Getting Us There

Today, adults in the US spend over 11 hours a day looking at screens. That counts for more than a third of our livelihoods. Yet even though they serve as a portal to 90 percent of our media consumption, screens continue to define and constrain how and where we consume content, and they may very soon become obsolete. Riding new advancements in hardware and connectivity, augmented reality (AR) is s

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Disabled people marginalised by paperwork and programmes which aim to help them

Research from Lancaster University Management School (LUMS), published in Organization Studies shows disabled people face being marginalized by the very programs that are designed to help them. Projects and welfare systems established to provide support are normalizing disabled people, and unintentionally contributing to their further marginalization.

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Scientists create a nanomaterial that is both twisted and untwisted at the same time

A new nanomaterial developed by scientists at the University of Bath could solve a conundrum faced by scientists probing some of the most promising types of future pharmaceuticals.

5h

Sudden warming over Antarctica to prolong Australia drought

A rare phenomenon causing "the strongest Antarctic warming on record" is set to deliver more pain to dought-stricken Australia, scientists said Friday.

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What you might have missed

A new approach to 3D printing human organs, finding the ocean’s missing plastic and the brain’s ability to forge new connections – here are some highlights from a week in science.

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BIA Separations introduces Cornerstone AAV Process Development Service to accelerate gene therapy production

CORNERSTONE program integrates process development expertise and novel technology to remove development bottlenecks in the manufacture of Gene Therapy Medicinal Products (GTMPs). Portfolio includes novel CIMasphere™ technology for higher yielding processes and safer products in AAV-based programs

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Alder spiller rolle for valg af behandling til patienter med MS

Dansk forskning viser den bekymrende tendens, at sklerosepatienter over 40 år ikke i samme grad som deres yngre medpatienter bliver tilbudt de nyeste og mest aktive behandlinger for deres sygdom.

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Nyt middel mod sklerose vækker begejstring på ECTRIMS

Ofatumumab slår konkurrenten på alle parametre.

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Forskere kortlægger RNA-signaturerne i MS

Forskellige læsioner i hjernen ved multiple sklerose har forskellige molekylære signaturer. Nu har forskere lavet et atlas over sammenhængen mellem de to.

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Watch a Robot Fish Fly by Shooting Water out of Its Rear

Fish out of Water For environmental researchers, using robots to collect much-needed water samples can be tricky. The bot might have trouble navigating around trash while collecting samples from polluted waters, for example, or avoiding ice. Now, researchers from Imperial College London have created a robot fish that can get around such obstacles — by propelling itself over them using a stream of

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Early whales swam doggy paddle across the ocean from India to Africa

Rare fossils of early whales show they may have swam doggy paddle style. It may not have been elegant, but they still managed to spread across vast oceans

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Breeding single-sex animal populations could help prevent disease and poverty

The creation of all-male or all-female groups of animals, known as monosex populations, has become a potentially useful approach in aquaculture and livestock rearing.

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Breeding single-sex animal populations could help prevent disease and poverty

The creation of all-male or all-female groups of animals, known as monosex populations, has become a potentially useful approach in aquaculture and livestock rearing.

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VISTA unveils a new image of the Large Magellanic Cloud

ESO's VISTA telescope reveals a remarkable image of the Large Magellanic Cloud, one of our nearest galactic neighbors. VISTA has been surveying this galaxy and its sibling the Small Magellanic Cloud, as well as their surroundings, in unprecedented detail. This survey allows astronomers to observe a large number of stars, opening up new opportunities to study stellar evolution, galactic dynamics, a

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Extinction of Icelandic walrus coincides with Norse settlement

An international collaboration of scientists in Iceland, Denmark and the Netherlands has for the first time used ancient DNA analyses and C14-dating to demonstrate the past existence of a unique population of Icelandic walrus that went extinct shortly after Norse settlement some 1100 years ago. Walrus hunting and ivory trade was probably the principal cause of extinction, being one of the earliest

5h

Researchers use light to control high-speed chemical reactions in a new way

Many natural and synthetic chemical systems react and change their properties in the presence of certain kinds of light. These reactions can occur too quickly for ordinary instruments to see. For the first time, researchers adopted a novel technique to observe the high-speed reactions. A special kind of reaction observed with this method could lead to new optical nanotechnology.

5h

Inspired by natural signals in living cells, researchers design artificial gas detector

A cube one-fortieth the size of a human red blood cell can glow when it detects flammable gas. The nanocube is part of a research project to develop artificial systems that mimic the complex chain of events inside living cells.

5h

'Soft tactile logic' tech distributes decision-making throughout stretchable material

Inspired by octopuses, researchers have developed a structure that senses, computes and responds without any centralized processing — creating a device that is not quite a robot and not quite a computer, but has characteristics of both. The new technology holds promise for use in a variety of applications, from soft robotics to prosthetic devices.

5h

A denim fix that's better than a patch

If you cherish your jeans, you want to keep them wearable as long as possible. (Ricardo Gomez Angel via Unsplash/) There’s a particular sick stomach lurch that happens when you rip a favorite pair of jeans, not unlike the feeling of losing a beloved pet or fumbling a fragile family heirloom. For many of us, the denim we live in becomes an inextricable part of our lives. But a tear doesn't have to

5h

Operationssnittet avslöjar risk för nya cellförändringar

Målet vid kirurgisk behandling av höggradiga cellförändringar är att få med en marginal av frisk vävnad runt den förändrade vävnaden som opereras bort. I en långtidsstudie från Karolinska Institutet ville forskarna undersöka hur långtidsrisken för återkomst av cellförändringar påverkas av förekomsten av cellförändringar i ”operationsmarginalen”, den så kallade resektionsranden. Flera riskfaktorer

5h

'Yank': A new term in biophysics

Biologists and biomedical engineers are proposing to define the term "yank" for changes in force over time, something that our muscles and nerves can feel and respond to.

5h

'Yank': A new term in biophysics

Biologists and biomedical engineers are proposing to define the term "yank" for changes in force over time, something that our muscles and nerves can feel and respond to.

5h

The first observation of a stable torus of fluid's resonance frequencies

A team of researchers at Laroche Laboratory, Université Paris Diderot and Université de Lyon has recently collected the first measurements of the resonance frequencies of a stable torus of fluid. The method they used to collect these observations, outlined in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, could enable the modeling of a variety of large-scale structures that transiently arise in vor

5h

Researchers develop an optical sensor that detects very low glucose concentrations

The Optical Research Group of the Universitat Jaume I (GROC-UJI) has developed an optical nanoparticle sensor capable of detecting very low glucose concentrations such as those present in tears by means of fluorescent carbon quantum dots.

5h

Residents Are Trying to Flee Russian Town Where Snow Turned Black

Escape Residents of the Russian town of Kiselyovsk have a simple request for Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau: let us in. That’s because the town, infamous for gray-black, coal-polluted snow has proven inhospitable for residents who now seek status as environmental refugees, according to CBC News . But because of complicated legal technicalities — fleeing pollution is seen differently from

5h

Male Trinidad guppies find food thanks to females

For male Trinidad Guppies applies: if you are hungry, seek female company. A recent study led by scientists of the the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) together with other research institutions provides evidence that male guppy fish in the presence of females more often ended up at novel food patches. I

5h

Research discoveries suggest that LH dipeptide improves mental health

A research group led by Professor Tomoyuki Furuyashiki and Associate Professor Shiho Kitaoka (Graduate School of Medicine) in collaboration with researcher Yasuhisa Ano of Kirin Holdings have made discoveries regarding the effect of the dipeptide Leucine-Histidine (LH) in suppressing microglial activation and depression-associated emotional disturbances. LH dipeptide is found in fermented foods su

5h

The Gut Microbiome Could Speed Up the Progression of Alzheimer’s Disease

The microbes in the gastrointestinal tract influence the immune system and the brain, possibly playing a role in the development of Alzheimer’s

5h

Salmon Tales: Sex, myth and molecular genetics of an iconic fish

A sockeye salmon's life ends right back where it began, culminating in an anadromous drama of sex, decay and sacrifice.

5h

Salmon Tales: Sex, myth and molecular genetics of an iconic fish

A sockeye salmon's life ends right back where it began, culminating in an anadromous drama of sex, decay and sacrifice.

5h

Cancer cells prefer a 'comfort cruise,' follow predictable paths of least resistance

New research from biomedical engineers reveals that while cancer cells move quickly in metastasis, they're rather lazy in which paths they choose — opting to move through wider, easier to navigate spaces rather than smaller, confined spaces to reduce energy requirements during movement.

5h

Researchers use light to control high-speed chemical reactions in a new way

Many natural and synthetic chemical systems react and change their properties in the presence of certain kinds of light. These reactions can occur too quickly for ordinary instruments to see. For the first time, researchers adopted a novel technique to observe the high-speed reactions. A special kind of reaction observed with this method could lead to new optical nanotechnology.

5h

'Soft tactile logic' tech distributes decision-making throughout stretchable material

Inspired by octopuses, researchers have developed a structure that senses, computes and responds without any centralized processing — creating a device that is not quite a robot and not quite a computer, but has characteristics of both. The new technology holds promise for use in a variety of applications, from soft robotics to prosthetic devices.

5h

Abnormal gut bugs tied to worse cognitive performance in vets with PTSD and cirrhosis

A study involving military veterans with PTSD and cirrhosis of the liver points to an abnormal mix of bacteria in the intestines as a possible driver of poor cognitive performance — and as a potential target for therapy.

5h

Breaking the 'stalemate' in the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children

Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children. A phase II clinical trial is the first to show improved outcomes in rhabdomyosarcoma in 45 years.

5h

Superficially satisfying spending

The overuse of packaging is a growing environmental problem in terms of resource use and waste production. Unfortunately, interesting and intriguing packaging is a crucial part of the modern approach to marketing and is perceived by many consumers, particularly those buying high-end goods, such as smartphones and other electronic gadgets as an essential part of the purchase experience.

5h

The History of Opium, Facing Up to Quantum Mechanics and Other New Science Books

Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Mere etik i ingeniørfaget: Behold ingeniørkasketten på, lyder gammelt råd

PLUS. Det er allernemmest at handle etisk forsvarligt, hvis man som ingeniør holder fast i sin faglighed. Challengerkatastrofen kunne måske være undgået, hvis chefingeniøren IKKE havde fulgt sin chefs råd om at tage lederhatten på, mener amerikansk professor.

5h

Top 10 Cars, SUVs of the 2019 Frankfurt Auto Show

Audi AI:TRAIL quattro It’s a pity the world’s most important auto show is only held every other year. The Frankfurt Motor Show 2019 — IAA, or Internationale Automobil-Ausstellung (International Auto Show) to the locals — had a laser focus on the future. In particular, all-out electrification, and the stepping-stones: hybrids, 48-volt hybrids, plug-in hybrids. How big is the Frankfurt auto show? I

5h

Titan’s Lakes May Have Been Formed By Underground Explosions, Not Erosion

There are only two objects in the solar system with sustained pools of liquid on their surface: Earth and Titan. On Earth, we have a well-understood water cycle that keeps liquid water flowing on the surface of our planet. On Titan, the process is believed to be conceptually similar but based on liquid methane rather than water. There are signs that Titan has an alkanological cycle similar to the

5h

Why acute kidney injury strikes marathon runners

Fluid volume and sweat sodium losses, rather than a rise in core body temperature, are the key contributors to post-race acute kidney injury, according to a new study of marathon runners. Legend states that after the Greek army defeated the invading Persian forces near the city of Marathon in 490 BCE, the courier Pheidippides ran to Athens to report the victory and then immediately dropped dead.

6h

The History of Opium, Facing Up to Quantum Mechanics and Other New Science Books

Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

The Danger of Thinking We’re All ‘Addicted’ to Tech

Opinion: Telling ourselves that devices and platforms “hijack” our brains plays right into Big Tech’s hands.

6h

Mass Graves in Russia Tell the Grim Story of Mongol Invasion

After years of digging, archaeologists discover nine medieval graves holding the remains of at least 300 people.

6h

Lightning flashes illuminate storm behavior

Anybody who has ever tried to photograph lightning knows that it takes patience and special camera equipment. Now, a new study is using those brief but brilliant flashes to illuminate cloud structures and shed light on storm cell behavior, giving weather forecasters new tools for predicting lightning hazards.

6h

Green with rage: Women climate change leaders face online attacks

Women leaders who support climate action are being attacked online with increasing regularity. These attacks should be viewed as a problem not only for the planet, but also to the goals of achieving gender equality and more inclusive, democratic politics.

6h

Researchers use light to control high-speed chemical reactions in a new way

Many natural and synthetic chemical systems react and change their properties in the presence of certain kinds of light. These reactions can occur too quickly for ordinary instruments to see. For the first time, researchers adopted a novel technique to observe the high-speed reactions. A special kind of reaction observed with this method could lead to new optical nanotechnology.

6h

Boney armor protects Komodo dragons in battle

The boney armor that Komodo dragons have just beneath their scales helps protect the dominant predator from other Komodo dragons, researchers report. Tiny bones cover the dragons from head to tail, creating a “chain mail” that protects them, but researchers hadn’t known what the world’s largest lizards would need protection from. The scientists came to their conclusion by using computed tomograph

6h

Blink and you'll miss it

Many natural and synthetic chemical systems react and change their properties in the presence of certain kinds of light. These reactions can occur too quickly for ordinary instruments to see. For the first time, researchers adopted a novel technique to observe the high-speed reactions. A special kind of reaction observed with this method could lead to new optical nanotechnology.

6h

Cancer cells prefer a 'comfort cruise,' follow predictable paths of least resistance

New research from a group of Vanderbilt biomedical engineers reveals that while cancer cells move quickly in metastasis, they're rather lazy in which paths they choose — opting to move through wider, easier to navigate spaces rather than smaller, confined spaces to reduce energy requirements during movement.

6h

The History of Opium, Facing Up to Quantum Mechanics and Other New Science Books

Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

What the Right Doesn’t Understand About Black Colleges

In a recent piece in The Atlantic , I urged top black athletic recruits to attend historically black colleges. One of the more absurd criticisms I received afterward was that Martin Luther King Jr.—a graduate of Morehouse College —wouldn’t approve of such a suggestion. Bad enough that I was called a racist . A segregationist . Even a black supremacist —whatever that is. Worse still, by daring to

6h

Testing quantum mechanics in a non-inertial reference frame using a rotating interferometer

A team of researchers from the University of Glasgow and the University of Southampton has devised a novel way to test quantum mechanics in a non-inertial reference frame by using a rotating interferometer. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes studying the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference using fiber coils on a rotating disk, and what they found.

6h

Image: Hubble glimpses faint galaxy

This image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, focuses on an object named UGC 695, which is located 30 million light-years away within the constellation Cetus (the Sea Monster), also known as the Whale. A bounty of diverse background galaxies is also visible in this image.

6h

Significant progress made in inverse photoconductance

Valencia University (UV) researchers have modified the photoconductance of nanoparticles of tungsten oxide (WO3) in a controlled manner. This has potential applications in photonics and optomechanics. The results have been published in Advanced Science.

6h

Google will promote original reporting with algorithm change

Original reporting will be highlighted in Google's search results, the company said as it announced changes to its algorithm.

6h

X-ray experiments contribute to studies of a drug now approved to combat tuberculosis

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new antibiotic that, in combination with two existing antibiotics, can tackle one of the most formidable and deadly treatment-resistant forms of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis. The new antibiotic, called pretomanid (PA-824), can work with the other drugs like a deadly cocktail—triggering the bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) to relea

6h

16 things you probably didn't know about cephalopod sex

If you've ever seen the Monterey Bay Aquarium's "Tentacles" exhibit, you know that cephalopods (squids, octopuses, and their kin) are awesome creatures. They can change the texture and color of their skin in the blink of an eye and "taste" things using suckers on their arms. They also have developed a variety of complex social and survival behaviors.

6h

Image: Baja California

This Copernicus Sentinel-1 image takes us just south of the US border, to the region of Baja California in northwest Mexico. Its capital city, Mexicali, is visible top left of the image.

6h

16 things you probably didn't know about cephalopod sex

If you've ever seen the Monterey Bay Aquarium's "Tentacles" exhibit, you know that cephalopods (squids, octopuses, and their kin) are awesome creatures. They can change the texture and color of their skin in the blink of an eye and "taste" things using suckers on their arms. They also have developed a variety of complex social and survival behaviors.

6h

Tropical mountain rivers are where the magic happens

Large tropical mountain river systems aren't getting the respect they deserve—at least not when it comes to research and conservation.

6h

New report takes in-depth look at three factors contributing to sea level rise along the U.S. East Coast

Sea levels in many areas across the global ocean are rising. Since the turn of the 20th century, the seas have risen between six and eight inches globally.

6h

X-ray experiments contribute to studies of a drug now approved to combat tuberculosis

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new antibiotic that, in combination with two existing antibiotics, can tackle one of the most formidable and deadly treatment-resistant forms of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis. The new antibiotic, called pretomanid (PA-824), can work with the other drugs like a deadly cocktail—triggering the bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) to relea

6h

6h

The rare molecule weighing in on the birth of planets

Astronomers using one of the most advanced radio telescopes have discovered a rare molecule in the dust and gas disc around a young star — and it may provide an answer to one of the conundrums facing astronomers.

6h

Battery icons shape perceptions of time and space and define user identities

Research finds battery icons on mobile phones shape how people view time and space, and how battery conservation practices define user identities.

6h

Over one-fifth of injured US adult cyclists were not wearing a helmet

Men and ethnic minorities are less likely to wear cycle helmets and more likely to suffer from head and neck injuries in accidents, according to new research.

6h

B cells linked to immunotherapy for melanoma

Immunotherapy uses our body's own immune system to fight cancer. Many current immunotherapies focus on T cells, but new research shows that another type of cell, B cells, might also play an important part in immunotherapies for cancer.

6h

Brain-inspired computing could tackle big problems in a small way

While computers have become smaller and more powerful and supercomputers and parallel computing have become the standard, we are about to hit a wall in energy and miniaturization. Now, researchers have designed a 2D device that can provide more than yes-or-no answers and could be more brain-like than current computing architectures.

6h

Inspired by natural signals in living cells, researchers design artificial gas detector

A cube one-fortieth the size of a human red blood cell can glow when it detects flammable gas. The nanocube is part of a research project to develop artificial systems that mimic the complex chain of events inside living cells.

6h

Polymer kills 99.9% of MRSA in just 5 minutes

Researchers report that a new self-sterilizing polymer can kill a range of viruses and drug-resistant bacteria in just minutes—including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). “We were exploring a different approach for creating antimicrobial materials when we observed some interesting behavior from this polymer and decided to explore its potential in greater depth,” says Rich Sponta

6h

Study casts doubt on accuracy of mobile drug testing devices

New research conducted by the Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics at the University of Sydney calls into question the reliability of the two devices that are currently being used for mobile drug testing (MDT) in NSW and other Australian states. These devices were used in the prosecution of almost 10,000 cannabis users for drug driving in NSW in 2016 (the last year for which data are av

6h

SLIPS and pitfalls: Synthetic surfaces inspired by a pitcher pitfall trap

Our understanding of how to manipulate and control liquids in technology has been transformed by the functional surfaces evolved by living organisms to interact with their environment. Water-repellent lotus leaves, water-collecting wing-cases of desert beetles, and water-removing gecko skin are some of the many organisms that have inspired solutions to challenges in liquid manipulating technologie

6h

The rare molecule weighing in on the birth of planets

Astronomers using one of the most advanced radio telescopes have discovered a rare molecule in the dust and gas disc around a young star — and it may provide an answer to one of the conundrums facing astronomers.

6h

Electron Diffraction Comes Through Again

Here’s more evidence of the power of the MicroED electron diffraction technique: this new paper reports the structure of two reactive organometallic species whose structures could not be determined by either NMR methods or conventional X-ray crystallography. One of them is the zirconium hydride species known as Schwartz’s reagent (zirconcene chloride hydride) – its problem is that it’s not solubl

6h

Verdict for China's efforts on coal emissions

Researchers from China, France and the USA have evaluated China's success in stemming emissions from its coal-fired power plants (CPPs). CPPs are one of the main contributors to air pollution in China, and their proliferation over the last 20 years has had significant impacts on air quality and public health. These impacts led authorities to introduce measures to control emissions from CPPs and re

6h

Engineers develop 'blackest black' material to date

Engineers have cooked up a material made of carbon nanotubes that is 10 times blacker than anything that has previously been reported.

6h

Same but different: Unique cancer traits key to targeted therapies

Researchers have discovered that the key to personalized therapies for some types of lung cancers may be to focus on their differences, not their similarities.

6h

Multidrug resistance: Not as recent as we thought

Researchers have found that the ancient RND-type multidrug efflux pump AcrB from Haemophilus influenzae targets the same drugs as its more evolved counterpart from Escherichia coli, showing that multidrug resistance is an ancient trait. The more ancient protein is unaffected by efflux pump inhibitors, which were designed to target the evolved pumps. Understanding these evolutionary differences wil

6h

Engineers' new topological insulator reroutes photonic 'traffic' on the fly

Photonic chips promise even faster data transfer speeds and information-dense applications, but the components necessary for building them remain considerably larger than their electronic counterparts, due to the lack of efficient data-routing architecture. A photonic topological insulator with edges that can be dynamically redefined, however, would help solve this problem. Being able to route the

6h

6h

In need of a good resource for news related to autonomous vehicles

Does anyone know of a good resource if I want to check out the latest news on autonomous vehicle technology? I'm interested in current trends, particularly when it comes to ride shares like Waymo. submitted by /u/BigBadBob113 [link] [comments]

6h

AI-Powered News Service Radar Publishes 200,000th News Story

(scroll down landing page for story) The upstart news agency, initially underwritten with funds from Google’s Digital News Initiative, recently published its 200,000th news story generated by artificial intelligence writing tools. The UK-based service is squired by six journalists, who create story templates that AI uses to write highly localized stories – based on data from government and other

6h

6h

The EPA's roll back of the Clean Water Act could impact drinking water for millions of Americans

Small streams could be in danger (Joao Branco/Unsplash/) The Trump Administration just announced yet another blow to the country's environmental protections. On Thursday, officials from the EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers repealed an Obama administration update to the 1972 Clean Water Act, which had expanded protection to wetlands and streams that are disconnected from navigable rivers.

6h

Smarta fåglar delade oftare upp sig i nya arter

Det är en grupp forskare vid Göteborgs universitet och vid forskningsinstitutet CREAF-CSIC i Barcelona som har jämfört fågelkranier från muséer runtom i världen. Forskarna kom fram till att fåglar med större hjärnor oftare delar upp sig i nya arter jämfört med arter med mindre hjärnor. Inte enbart slumpen styr Den fysiska omgivningen och hur arterna använder den har betydelse när man ska förklara

7h

Decoding messages in the body's microscopic metropolises

A study aimed at identifying and examining the small messenger proteins used by microbes living on and inside humans has revealed an astounding diversity of more than 4,000 families of molecules – many of which have never been described previously.

7h

Method to customize microbes for better biofuel production

Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated a method to insert genes into a variety of microorganisms that previously would not accept foreign DNA, with the goal of creating custom microbes to break down plants for bioenergy.

7h

Decoding messages in the body's microscopic metropolises

A study aimed at identifying and examining the small messenger proteins used by microbes living on and inside humans has revealed an astounding diversity of more than 4,000 families of molecules – many of which have never been described previously.

7h

New technology gives a glimpse of solar fuel generation in action

Electrochemical devices that use sunlight to generate fuel represent a promising means of harvesting sustainable energy; but currently, none are efficient enough for real-world applications. One of the main reasons for the slow development is the difficulty in observing and measuring what is happening at the liquid-catalyst interface—the location in the cell where the fuel-producing chemical react

7h

Method to customize microbes for better biofuel production

Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated a method to insert genes into a variety of microorganisms that previously would not accept foreign DNA, with the goal of creating custom microbes to break down plants for bioenergy.

7h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Unpacking Apple’s Big iPhone Launch Event

We ask WIRED senior writer Lauren Goode to give her impressions of the iPhone launch in Cupertino this week.

7h

'Remnant: From the Ashes' Makes Post-Apocalyptic Feel Real

Living in the aftermath is a common trope in games. This one makes it beautiful.

7h

Image of the Day: Fish that Eat Fish

Researchers categorize the different jaws of piscivorous fishes.

7h

Roman bronze cauldron unearthed in central Norway burial cairn

Sometime around 150-300 CE a person died at the place now called Gylland in the Gaula River valley, in southern Trøndelag county. After the body was cremated, the remains were laid in a bronze vessel. This was then covered or wrapped in birch bark before being buried under several hundred kilos of stone.

7h

Quantum computers could arrive sooner if we build them with traditional silicon technology

Quantum computers have the potential to revolutionize the way we solve hard computing problems, from creating advanced artificial intelligence to simulating chemical reactions in order to create the next generation of materials or drugs. But actually building such machines is very difficult because they involve exotic components and have to be kept in highly controlled environments. And the ones w

7h

Mathematicians proposed an express method for calculation of the propagation of light

Mathematicians from RUDN University and the Nuclear Safety Institute of the RAS (NSI RAS) have proposed a numerical method for solving equations describing the propagation of light in a medium. They used the nonlinear eikonal equation with boundary conditions as the basis. Such a problem cannot be solved directly, so the mathematicians developed a numerical method, performed calculations, and prod

7h

Initial repulsion in chemical bonding does not rule out subsequent attraction

The philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer formulated a metaphor called the porcupine dilemma, which explains a certain optimal distance between people. People feel alone at too large a spacing and uneasy at too close a proximity. Schopenhauer explained the ideal spacing using the following parable: "A number of porcupines huddled together for warmth on a cold day in winter; but as they began to prick on

7h

Inspired by natural signals in living cells, researchers design artificial gas detector

A cube one-40th the size of a human red blood cell can glow when it detects flammable gas. The nanocube, designed by chemists at the University of Tokyo, is part of a research project to develop artificial systems that mimic the complex chain of events inside living cells.

7h

Multidrug resistance: Not as recent as we thought

Researchers from Osaka University have made the striking discovery that multidrug-resistant bacteria may have been around longer than we thought. In findings published this month in Communications Biology, the researchers investigated the evolutionary relationships among hundreds of RND-type efflux pumps—specialized proteins that pump multiple different types of antibiotics out of a bacterial cell

7h

Multidrug resistance: Not as recent as we thought

Researchers from Osaka University have made the striking discovery that multidrug-resistant bacteria may have been around longer than we thought. In findings published this month in Communications Biology, the researchers investigated the evolutionary relationships among hundreds of RND-type efflux pumps—specialized proteins that pump multiple different types of antibiotics out of a bacterial cell

7h

Trafikstyrelsen: Amerikansk flyvetilladelse får ikke 737 Max på vingerne i Danmark

PLUS. Skandalen om inhabil amerikansk godkendelse har gravet dybe tillidskløfter mellem de europæiske og amerikanske flyvemyndigheder.

7h

On Friday the 13th, Don't Be Freaked Out by the 'Micromoon'

The full moon of September 2019 is poised to provide some eerie atmosphere.

7h

7h

Omfattende sårbarhed lader angribere overtage sim-kort kun med en sms

Katastrofal sikkerhedsbrist har i årevis tilladt efterretningstjenester at følge med i borgeres privatliv.

7h

2nd-Known Interstellar Visitor May Have Breezed Through Our Solar System

A bright speck in the night sky may be the second known object to hurtle through our solar system after leaving another.

7h

A Woman’s AncestryDNA Test Revealed a Medical Secret

In 2017, Holly Becker took an AncestryDNA test, and the results, she would only later learn, exactly matched those of a young man in New York. This was strange, but the test was not wrong. She really did have his DNA inside her . Two decades ago, she had undergone an umbilical-cord-blood transplant to treat her non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The anonymous donor’s cells became her cells, and they still c

7h

Welding Won’t Make You Rich

A few years ago, a strange phenomenon began to appear in polls that asked Americans for their opinions about higher education: People’s responses suddenly started to diverge along partisan lines. Democrats have continued to describe higher education as a mostly positive force in American life, but Republicans’ opinions of college, beginning around 2015, took a sharp turn toward the negative. This

7h

How to find life beyond Earth – Science Weekly podcast

As scientists at University College London announce the discovery of water in the atmosphere of a potentially habitable ‘super Earth’, Ian Sample explores our prospects for finding life beyond our own planet Continue reading…

7h

Women 'better than men at disguising autism symptoms'

GPs would miss fewer diagnoses if ‘camouflaging’ was better understood, say researchers Women may not be diagnosed with autism as frequently as men because they are better at hiding the common signs of the condition, according to new research. Some autistic people use strategies to hide traits associated with the condition during social interactions, a phenomenon called social camouflaging. Scien

7h

Professor Brian Cox review – science and hair combine in arena spectacular

First Direct Arena, Leeds Universal: Adventures in Space and Time is a jaw-dropping reminder that human life is both irrelevant and hugely precious There are loads of mind-boggling facts in Brian Cox’s two-and-a-half-hour arena show. That our nearest neighbouring galaxy, Andromeda, is 2.5m light years away. Or that super-massive black holes may be colliding as regularly as every couple of months.

7h

How to find life beyond Earth – Science Weekly podcast

As scientists at University College London announce the discovery of water in the atmosphere of a potentially habitable ‘super Earth’, Ian Sample explores our prospects for finding life beyond our own planet. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

7h

We may have a basic form of sign language in common with chimpanzees

People seem to be able to understand gestures made by chimpanzees, suggesting the signals may be remnants of a basic sign language used by our last common ancestors

7h

Meet a Mad Scientist Who Flies Into Hurricanes

A hurricane bounces NOAA's sensor-packed plane around with such violence, the crew spends a good amount of time in zero G.

8h

Giant explosions sculpted a moon’s peculiar scenery

Nature, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02706-1 Craters on Saturn’s largest moon could have resulted from nitrogen blasting from below ground.

8h

How cells ‘know’ to stop growing

Nature, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02720-3 A protein called YAP might help to convey messages from a cell’s internal framework.

8h

Italy’s rise in research impact pinned on ‘citation doping’

Nature, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02725-y Citation of Italian-authored papers by Italian researchers rose after the introduction of metrics-based thresholds for promotions.

8h

Toyota's Solar Car

submitted by /u/Camoes [link] [comments]

8h

My week at the end-of-the-world summit

Dizzyingly tiny numbers, late-night parties, cold-war secrets: Jemima Kelly attends the International Seminars on Planetary Emergencies

8h

Why Amazon Trees Are Especially Vulnerable to This Year's Fires

Even trees that look as if they survived will die in the coming years, because they did not evolve fire-resistant features — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Why Amazon Trees Are Especially Vulnerable to This Year's Fires

Even trees that look as if they survived will die in the coming years, because they did not evolve fire-resistant features — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

A new methodology for sequencing viruses

NUS scientists have developed a more efficient method to sequence the complete genomes of infectious diseases carried by mosquitoes directly from patient samples.

8h

A new methodology for sequencing viruses

NUS scientists have developed a more efficient method to sequence the complete genomes of infectious diseases carried by mosquitoes directly from patient samples.

8h

NASA's Mars 2020 comes full circle

Engineers took NASA's Mars 2020 for a spin on Aug. 29, 2019. The 2,300-pound (1,040-kilogram) Martian vehicle was rotated clockwise and counterclockwise at about 1 revolution per minute on what is called a spin table in the clean room of the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. (The rotation was sped up in the video above.) The engineers were lo

8h

Newly discovered comet is likely interstellar visitor

A newly discovered comet has excited the astronomical community this week because it appears to have originated from outside the solar system. The object—designated C/2019 Q4 (Borisov) – was discovered on Aug. 30, 2019, by Gennady Borisov at the MARGO observatory in Nauchnij, Crimea. The official confirmation that comet C/2019 Q4 is an interstellar comet has not yet been made, but if it is interst

8h

How Gene Editing Is Changing the World

In this brisk, accessible primer on a technology that is driving major scientific advances — and raising complex ethical questions — biologist Nessa Carey shows how new gene editing techniques like Crispr are giving us the power to transform the genome with unprecedented speed and precision.

8h

Metrocityringen indsætter vagter efter hærværk

De tekniske installationer, der styrer rulletrapper og elevatorer er blevet ødelagt på flere metrostationer. Metroselskabet har sat ekstra vagter på byggepladserne og bemander stationerne

8h

Origin of synergistic effects in bicomponent cobalt oxide-platinum catalysts for selective hydrogenation reaction

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11970-8 The development of catalysts with high activity and selectivity for hydrogenation remains a challenge. Here the authors report cobalt oxide-platinum catalysts with increased oxygen vacancy resulting from the promoted hydrogen spillover with platinum-oxygen vacancies as active sites.

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Pre- and peri-implantation Zika virus infection impairs fetal development by targeting trophectoderm cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12063-2 Here, using human cells and mouse models, the authors show that Zika virus can infect preimplantation trophectoderm. Pre-implantation infection can affect nervous system development and survival of neural progenitors, and can result in miscarriage or spontaneous abortion.

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Giant valley splitting in monolayer WS2 by magnetic proximity effect

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11966-4 Valley degree of freedom promises the additional control of electrons in 2D materials but is limited by small valley splitting. Here the authors show heavily enhanced valley splitting in monolayer WS2 on EuS substrate due to competing ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions for Eu- and S-t

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Ubiquitination of RIPK1 suppresses programmed cell death by regulating RIPK1 kinase activation during embryogenesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11839-w RIPK1 integrates signals that drive both NF-κB activation and cell death pathways. Here Zhang et al. generate RIPK1 knock-in mice lacking a major ubiquitination site and demonstrate that this modification is important to suppress cell death during embryogenesis and inflammation postnatally.

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Energetic costs regulated by cell mechanics and confinement are predictive of migration path during decision-making

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12155-z Migrating cells tune their energy utilization in response to their microenvironment, but how cellular energetics direct navigation remains unclear. Here, the authors report that energetic costs for motility, regulated by cell mechanics and confinement, predict the probability of migration choice.

8h

The paleoclimatic footprint in the soil carbon stock of the Tibetan permafrost region

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12214-5 There was extensive degradation during the warm middle Holocene and permafrost area was reduced substantially. Here the authors synthesize data across the Tibetan permafrost region and find that paleoclimate is more important than modern climate in shaping current permafrost carbon distribution, and its imp

8h

Gaussian synapses for probabilistic neural networks

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12035-6 Designing large-scale hardware implementation of Probabilistic Neural Network for energy efficient neuromorphic computing systems remains a challenge. Here, the authors propose an hardware design based on MoS2/BP heterostructures as reconfigurable Gaussian synapses enabling EEG patterns recognition.

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Cell type-specific transcriptional programs in mouse prefrontal cortex during adolescence and addiction

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12054-3 Cognitive behaviours are encoded and regulated by coordinated activity-induced transcriptional changes. Through single-cell RNA sequencing, the authors classify diverse cell types in mouse prefrontal cortex and analyze their transcriptional adaptations in adolescence and drug addiction.

8h

How Democrats Conquered the City

It might be the most ironclad law of politics in 2019. Democrats win cities—period. They win in big cities, like New York, and small cities, like Ames, Iowa; in old cities, like Boston, and new cities, like Las Vegas. They win in midwestern manufacturing cores and coastal tech hubs, in dense cities connected by subway and in sprawling metros held together by car and tar. If you Google-image-searc

8h

When the Culture War Comes for the Kids

1. To be a parent is to be compromised. You pledge allegiance to justice for all, you swear that private attachments can rhyme with the public good, but when the choice comes down to your child or an abstraction—even the well-being of children you don’t know—you’ll betray your principles to the fierce unfairness of love. Then life takes revenge on the conceit that your child’s fate lies in your h

8h

Dansk forsker hyldes af Google i dag

Hans Christian Gram opfandt en måde at inddele bakterier i forskellige grupper. I dag ville han være fyldt 166.

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A publisher just retracted 22 articles. And the whistleblower is just getting started.

SAGE Publishing is today retracting 22 articles by a materials science researcher who published in two of their journals — but the anonymous reader who brought the problems to their attention says the author’s duplication affects more than 100 articles. Ali Nazari, now of Swinburne University of Technology in Australia, had five papers retracted earlier … Continue reading

8h

Machines probably aren’t interested in global takeover. Here’s why.

When someone says they fear artificial intelligence, what are they imagining? Robots taking over the world is the stuff of science-fiction fantasy. Despite decades of beating humans at the game of Go, AI has never developed the desire to take over actual territory. The reality is that machines are not resourceful and have no interest in us. Although AI plays an increasingly important role in our

9h

Betalat för att bevara viktig natur

Tillsammans med forskare från Brasilien, Tyskland och USA har Nils Droste tagit fram en modell för hur rika länder skulle kunna bidra till bevarande av natur utan att lägga sig i andra länders självbestämmande. En grundprincip är att regioner ska få ersättning i förhållande till hur stor andel skyddad mark de har, och ju starkare skydd desto mer betalt.

9h

Research on postmen's testicle warmth wins Ig Nobel

Fertility experts find that the left testicle is warmer, but only when a man has his clothes on.

9h

PODCAST: Stemmestyrede assistenter sladrer. Danmark mangler en klimaplan

Stemmestyrede assistenter indsamler dine stemmedata. Mangler vi en kyst- og klimaplan for at sikre Danmarks kyster mod oversvømmelser? Efter 77 dage med den nye regering venter vi stadig på et udspil til en reel reform af klima- og energipolitikken.

9h

Patientsikkerhed skal styre videreudvikling af elektroniske journaler

Debatten viser, at der er behov for at flytte fokus fra for eller imod de enkelte elektroniske patientjournaler til hvordan en elektronisk patientjournal skal skrues sammen.

9h

Science on safety of chlorinated chicken 'misunderstood'

Government’s assurances that there are no health problems are misleading, say food policy experts The government has misunderstood the science on the safety of chlorinated chicken , a group of senior food policy experts has said. It has also failed to give watertight commitments that it would not be sold here after a no-deal Brexit, they warn. Continue reading…

9h

Quick question about amazon warehouse part-time job

So I’m potentially lookin into getting a part time job at amazon. It would be 615 am to 1015 am. Would I only be working those 4 hours? I’ve seen people say you will be working 10 hours.. do they just force you to work 10 hours or something? submitted by /u/Thirubius [link] [comments]

9h

Halverad dödlighet bland infarktpatienter som deltar i hjärtskola

Patientutbildning utgör en viktig aspekt av rehabiliteringen efter en hjärtinfarkt. Individuell rådgivning och gruppsessioner fokuserade på livsstilsrelaterade påverkbara risker, som vikten av att bibehålla en hälsosam diet, fysisk aktivitet, och rökstopp är kärnkomponenter i vad som kallas “Hjärtskola” i Sverige. Nästan alla patienter med en förstagångsinfarkt erbjuds deltagande i Hjärtskolan. D

9h

Utsläpp från sibiriska vatten större än befarat

Med ökad global uppvärmning tinar mark som tidigare varit frusen året runt. När permafrosten tinar frigörs kol som legat fryst i tusentals år. När detta kol hamnar i floder och sjöar omvandlas det till växthusgaser och stiger från vattenytan till atmosfären. − Jag såg klimatförändringen framför mina egna ögon. På många av mina studieytor blev sjöarna fler för varje år på grund av all permafrost so

9h

Brain-inspired computing could tackle big problems in a small way

While computers have become smaller and more powerful and supercomputers and parallel computing have become the standard, we are about to hit a wall in energy and miniaturization. Now, Penn State researchers have designed a 2D device that can provide more than yes-or-no answers and could be more brainlike than current computing architectures.

9h

B cells linked to immunotherapy for melanoma

Immunotherapy uses our body's own immune system to fight cancer. Many current immunotherapies focus on T cells, but new research shows that another type of cell, B cells, might also play an important part in immunotherapies for cancer.

9h

Same but different: unique cancer traits key to targeted therapies

Melbourne researchers have discovered that the key to personalised therapies for some types of lung cancers may be to focus on their differences, not their similarities.

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Multidrug resistance: Not as recent as we thought

Researchers from Osaka University found that the ancient RND-type multidrug efflux pump AcrB from Haemophilus influenzae targets the same drugs as its more evolved counterpart from Escherichia coli, showing that multidrug resistance is an ancient trait. The more ancient protein is unaffected by efflux pump inhibitors, which were designed to target the evolved pumps. Understanding these evolutionar

9h

Inspired by natural signals in living cells, researchers design artificial gas detector

A cube one-fortieth the size of a human red blood cell can glow when it detects flammable gas. The nanocube, designed by chemists at the University of Tokyo, is part of a research project to develop artificial systems that mimic the complex chain of events inside living cells. 'People automatically think about devices when we talk about sensors. But there are many examples of natural sensors in th

9h

'Soft tactile logic' tech distributes decision-making throughout stretchable material

Inspired by octopuses, researchers have developed a structure that senses, computes and responds without any centralized processing — creating a device that is not quite a robot and not quite a computer, but has characteristics of both. The new technology holds promise for use in a variety of applications, from soft robotics to prosthetic devices.

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Association of Maternal Preeclampsia with Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Very-Low-Birth-Weight Infants

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49561-8

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A Regularized Stochastic Block Model for the robust community detection in complex networks

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49580-5

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Fluxomic Analysis Reveals Central Carbon Metabolism Adaptation for Diazotroph Azotobacter vinelandii Ammonium Excretion

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49717-6

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Differential brain mechanisms during reading human vs. machine translated fiction and news texts

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49632-w

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Longitudinal study of wild koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) reveals chlamydial disease progression in two thirds of infected animals

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49382-9 Longitudinal study of wild koalas ( Phascolarctos cinereus ) reveals chlamydial disease progression in two thirds of infected animals

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Blood pressure characteristics in patients with acute basilar artery occlusion undergoing endovascular thrombectomy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49769-8

9h

Italy’s Populists Lost Power—And Now the Press

“Italians,” the great 20th-century Italian writer Ennio Flaiano once remarked, “always rush to the aid of the victor.” But what happens when there’s no clear victor? Or no coherent ideological line between government and opposition? Then where do you run? Flaiano’s line has come to mind lately as we’ve watched Italy shift its tone and focus to adjust to a new reality: its recent switch from a rig

9h

Bløde robotter reparerer sig selv

Robotforskere udvikler bløde robotter der kan reparere sig selv uden menneskelig indblanding – selv hvis de er blevet skåret midt over. Ambitionen er at forlænge robotternes levetid og undgå arbejdsulykker

9h

Etablering af et behandlingsråd skal tænkes godt igennem

Man kan ikke trække ret meget på erfaringerne fra Medicinrådet, når ny teknologi og medicinsk udstyr skal vurderes i behandlingsrådet.

10h

How fast is the universe expanding? The mystery endures

Scientists have known for decades that the universe is expanding, but research in the past few years has shaken up calculations on the speed of growth—raising tricky questions about theories of the cosmos.

10h

Skin-crawling discovery: 'body farm' scientists find corpses move

An Australian scientist has proved that human bodies move around significantly for more than a year after death, in findings that could have implications for detectives and pathologists around the world.

10h

Death toll from Spain floods rises to three

The death toll from torrential rain and floods in southeastern Spain rose to three on Friday after a man drowned when his car became trapped in a tunnel, local authorities said.

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Skin-crawling discovery: 'body farm' scientists find corpses move

An Australian scientist has proved that human bodies move around significantly for more than a year after death, in findings that could have implications for detectives and pathologists around the world.

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NASA's Mars 2020 Comes Full Circle

submitted by /u/arathipadmanabhan [link] [comments]

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Svindeltiltalt læge: »Vi er i et klima, hvor det går ud på at fange sådan nogle som mig.«

Andet retsmøde i sagen mod den svindelmistænkte 53-læge fandt sted torsdag i Københavns Byret. Her tilbragte tiltalte stort set hele retsmødet i vidneskranken.

10h

Den islandske hvalros uddøde kort efter vikingernes ankomst

Et internationalt hold af forskere fra Danmark, Island og Holland viser ved brug af DNA-analyser og kulstof…

10h

Børn af flygtninge med PTSD har højere risiko for at udvikle psykiske sygdomme

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har undersøgt, hvad det betyder for børn at have forældre,…

10h

Editorial gatekeepers mind their own goals

This guest post by "Morty" will show you some useful life hacks to boost your publication output. To qualify however, you must be Editor-in-Chief or at least editorial board member, preferably with Elsevier.

10h

Tvivlsom lettisk kræftbehandling blåstemplet af dansk hospitalslæge

Danskere med prostatacancer er via hjemmeside med støtte fra dansk læge blevet lokket til lettisk klinik til behandling med teknikken cyberknife. Dansk Multidisciplinær Prostatacancer Gruppe har via Michael Borre meldt det til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed.

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Næsten magisk: Forskere forvandler metaller til magneter med laserlys

Som de første har fysikere fra Københavns Universitet og Nanyang Technological University i…

11h

Google Earth leads to remains of missing Florida man in lake

It took 22 years, but a missing man's remains were finally found thanks to someone who zoomed in on his former Florida neighborhood with Google satellite images and noticed a car submerged in …

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Forskere om byernes diesel-forbud: Det er ikke specielt ambitiøst

Danmarks fire største byer vil forbyde de ældste dieselbiler i centrum. Men først i 2022 og 2025.

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Bizarre Discovery Shows Your Bones Could Be Triggering The 'Fight-or-Flight' Response

This could have a huge impact on our understanding of stress response.

11h

Priser til special-indsats for lungepatienter

Et medicinsk afsnit på Regionshospitalet Viborg har sammen med hjemmesygeplejerskerne i Skive og Viborg fået en pris for deres samarbejde om lokale KOL-patienter. Læs her, hvad de har gjort

11h

Ny lungeformand: Vores medlemmer skal prioriteres højere

KOL og andre lungesygdomme skal have et større politisk fokus, påpeger Torben Mogensen, der er ny tiltrådt formand for bestyrelsen i Lungeforeningen. Han har tre klare fokusområder for sit kommende arbejde.

11h

Her er sundhedsvæsenets 26 mest magtfulde personer

Læs små portrætter af de 26 personer med mest indflydelse i det danske sundhedsvæsen.

11h

'Demon oil' on the defensive over climate change

At the dawn of an era scientists have dubbed the Anthropocene, driven by human impact on the planet, the energy industry's four-yearly gathering was forced onto the defensive on climate change.

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UK cancer survival rates are too low – our priorities are all wrong | Mark Dayan

Short-termism has hampered investment in equipment and staffing that could help the NHS keep people alive • Mark Dayan is a policy analyst at the Nuffield Trust Cancer survival rates in the UK have long lagged behind those in other countries of comparable wealth and income levels. And an international study published this week shows that while the UK is making rapid progress, there’s still a big g

11h

Forest fires destroying vital buffer against climate change

With fierce blazes raging in jungles from the Amazon to Indonesia, concerns are mounting about the impact as rainforests play a vital role in protecting the planet against global warming.

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Indonesians choked by forest fire haze pray for rain

Hundreds of people held a mass prayer for rain in a smoke-filled Indonesian city on Friday, desperately hoping that downpours will extinguish forest fires and wash away the toxic haze covering wide swathes of the country.

12h

WarnerMedia signs J.J. Abrams to a massive exclusive deal

WarnerMedia has emerged as the ultimate winner in a battle waged by several internet-focused companies to lock J.J. Abrams' Bad Robot into an overall content creation deal. The …

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Training surgeons like dogs, icky money win 2019 Ig Nobels

Training surgeons is as easy as training dolphins or dogs.

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Hvorfor er der så mange arter på Jorden? Svaret gemmer sig i bjergene

Fordelingen af Jordens mange livsformer danner en række globale mønstre. Hvilke forhold, der…

12h

Big Butterfly Count: Fine weather boosts species in UK

Survey finds many common species of butterfly enjoyed a good summer this year.

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'Cocktail of pollutants' found in dolphins in English Channel

One of Europe's largest dolphin populations needs special protection from marine pollution, say scientists.

12h

Plastic packaging: How are supermarkets doing?

The UK needs to move away from all single-use packaging, say MPs. But have supermarkets got the message?

12h

New topological insulator reroutes photonic 'traffic' on the fly

Topological insulators are a game-changing class of materials; charged particles can flow freely on their edges and route themselves around defects, but can't pass through their interiors. This perfect surface conduction holds promise for fast and efficient electronic circuits, though engineers must contend with the fact that the interiors of such materials are effectively wasted space.

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Battery icons shape perceptions of time and space and define user identities

New research from Cass Business School has found that battery icons on mobile phones shape how people view time and space, and how battery conservation practices define user identities.

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Studying flames in microgravity is helping make combustion on Earth cleaner, and space safer

Understanding how fire spreads and behaves in space is crucial for the safety of future astronauts and for understanding and controlling fire here on Earth.

13h

Engineers develop 'blackest black' material to date

With apologies to "Spinal Tap," it appears that black can, indeed, get more black.

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US Military demonstrates hypersonic weapon capabilities

submitted by /u/jlmeredith [link] [comments]

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America can learn from China’s amazing high-speed rail network

submitted by /u/savuporo [link] [comments]

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Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2019 – winning images

László Francsics has been named the overall winner in the Royal Observatory Greenwich’s Insight Investment Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2019 competition, for his composition showing the 35 phases of January’s total lunar eclipse. Other winners include a panorama of the aurora borealis over the Lofoten Islands in Norway by Nicolai Brügger, an atmospheric image of the photographer Ben Bush wi

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Dansk forskning overrasker: Mange flere dyrearter i Andesbjergene end i Amazonas

Bjergene er fyldt med arter. Det kan ændre på den måde, vi forstår klimaforandringerne på.

14h

MAGTPORTRÆT: »Heldigvis har jeg skaffet mine børn verdens bedste far«

Inge Marie Svane har aldrig haft som mål at kravle til tops på karriererangstigen. Men nu er hun en af landets mest indflydelsesrige kræftforskere og tilhører en udddøende race – læger der arbejder for to og lidt til, og ofrer meget på den konto.

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MAGTPORTRÆT: Skrabkage + skakmester + skydeskive = Svend

Som ung ville koncerndirektør i Region Hovedstaden Svend Hartling absolut ikke være politiker. Det blev han alligevel, siger hans kritikere, som mener, at han politiserer. Det har gjort ham kontroversiel, til tider forhadt, men også til en af de mest magtfulde i sundhedsvæsenet.

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MIT engineers develop 'blackest black' material to date

MIT engineers have cooked up a material made of carbon nanotubes that is 10 times blacker than anything that has previously been reported. They are showcasing the cloak-like material as part of a new exhibit at the New York Stock Exchange, titled 'The Redemption of Vanity.'

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More severe OSA leads to higher blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension

In patients with high blood pressure resistant to treatment who also have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the more severe their OSA, the higher their blood pressure, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Over one-fifth of injured US adult cyclists were not wearing a helmet — new study

Men and ethnic minorities are less likely to wear cycle helmets and more likely to suffer from head and neck injuries in accidents, according to new research published in Brain Injury.

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It’s time to face the true future

submitted by /u/BadTabloid [link] [comments]

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Aeroengines investigated in circular economy study

submitted by /u/thinkB4WeSpeak [link] [comments]

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Poo scoop snares an Ig Nobel

Australian shares the glory for outstanding work in physics.

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Are animals ‘persons’?

As we learn more about our similarities, the battle for non-human rights grows

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What’s killing us now?

How life, death and disease have changed over the past 180 years

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Entrepreneurs hope microbes will feed the world

Start-ups are utilising bacteria and fungi to generate protein and boost agriculture

15h

Myndigheder afviser at granske teleselskaber trods simkort-afsløringer

Hverken Datatilsynet eller Erhvervsstyrelsen har planer om at føre tilsyn med telebranchen efter Ingeniørens og Version2's afsløringer af lemfældig omgang med simkort-udstedelse i danske telebutikker.

15h

Biden’s Broken-Record Moment

Joe Biden had to know the question was coming. In each Democratic debate so far, the former vice president has faced tough questions about his position on desegregating schools via busing, and tonight in Houston was no different. The moderator Linsey Davis noted that Biden had told a reporter in 1975 that he did not feel responsible for what people did 300 years ago. “As you stand here tonight, w

15h

Oversvømmelser og skybrud koster langt mere, end vi tror

PLUS. Fornuftige klimaprojekter risikerer at falde, fordi de ifølge mangelfulde beregningsmetoder ikke kan betale sig. Kommunernes Landsforening erkender problemet og vil opgradere kommunernes viden.

16h

Could gut microbes be the key to overcoming muscle loss in older age?

A new mouse study reveals that gut microbes can influence skeletal muscle mass and function and sheds light on some underlying mechanisms.

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Has a small trial stumbled upon a way to reverse biological aging?

A small clinical trial has found that an experimental treatment meant to reverse the aging of a key player in the immune system achieved a lot more.

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Beto O’Rourke’s Attempt to Shift the Overton Window on Guns

They’re coming to take your guns away . That’s the line conservatives have long used as a scare tactic in the United States gun debate. (It’s the go-to hyperbole for the National Rifle Association.) Democrats have always contorted themselves to dodge this specific claim, afraid of legal challenges in the long term and, in the near term, alienating moderate voters who care about their Second Amend

16h

The Health-Care Debate Gets Nasty

Those who thought the Democrats resembled an undifferentiated mass of nice people who love low deductibles were treated to some fireworks during tonight’s debate. It was the first time the Democrats started seriously attacking one another since the debates first began, in June. And the ground they chose to do battle on was an expected one: health care. The evening struck an early snarky note when

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The Question Elizabeth Warren Doesn’t Want to Answer

For the fourth time in three presidential debates, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts in Houston on Thursday faced a variation of the same question from a moderator: Will she raise taxes on the middle class to fund Medicare for All? And for the fourth time, Warren deployed what in politics is known as an artful dodge. She didn’t say yes, and she didn’t say no. “Those at the very top, the r

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Spotify Cracks Down on Family Plan Misuse By Periodically Vetting Where You Live

To make sure subscribers aren’t abusing Spotify’s family plan, the streaming music giant has started checking in on where they live. Over and over again.Read more…

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Automatic Phone Backups Are Now Included In Google One Plans

There are many ways to backup your phone and Google Drive is one of them. However, if you need more storage than what Google Drive has to offer by default, then you might want to check out …

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This machine creates artificial vision for the blind

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Amazing: watch SpaceX test its Crew Dragon's escape system

submitted by /u/centriciti [link] [comments]

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Google settles with labor board over employee speech

Google says it's reached a settlement over employees' ability to speak out about workplace issues.

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Fast-diffusing p75NTR monomers support apoptosis and growth cone collapse by neurotrophin ligands [Cell Biology]

The p75 neurotrophin (NT) receptor (p75NTR) plays a crucial role in balancing survival-versus-death decisions in the nervous system. Yet, despite 2 decades of structural and biochemical studies, a comprehensive, accepted model for p75NTR activation by NT ligands is still missing. Here, we present a single-molecule study of membrane p75NTR in…

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Physiological signaling in the absence of amidated peptides [Commentaries]

Peptidergic signaling is an ancient manner of intertissue communication in multicellular organisms. Even the early eukaryote Trichoplax, with its limited 6-tissue repertoire, uses peptides to communicate between its tissues (1). Humans use peptidergic communication not only to transfer signals between tissues, but also to employ peptide signals in brain and…

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A network of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding sites regulates gating of the Ca2+-activated Cl- channel ANO1 (TMEM16A) [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

ANO1 (TMEM16A) is a Ca2+-activated Cl− channel that regulates diverse cellular functions including fluid secretion, neuronal excitability, and smooth muscle contraction. ANO1 is activated by elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ and modulated by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Here, we describe a closely concerted experimental and computational study, including electrophysiology, mutagene

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Thermalization and possible signatures of quantum chaos in complex crystalline materials [Physics]

Analyses of thermal diffusivity data on complex insulators and on strongly correlated electron systems hosted in similar complex crystal structures suggest that quantum chaos is a good description for thermalization processes in these systems, particularly in the high-temperature regime where the many phonon bands and their interactions dominate the thermal…

17h

Saliv och pizza ledde till Ig Nobel-priser

Orsakar pizza verkligen cancer, hur mycket saliv producerar ett femårigt barn och vilken – om någon – temperaturskillnad finns det mellan mannens vänstra och högra pungkula? Årets mottagare av Ig Nobel-priset har gett mänskligheten svaren.

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Eavesdropping Puts Anxious Squirrels at Ease

Squirrels constantly scan their surroundings for hawks, owls and other predators. But they also surveil for threats by eavesdropping on bird chatter. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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California could become the largest state to ban facial recognition in body cameras

The legislation has earned praise from privacy and civil rights advocates.

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A Ban on Flavored E-Cigarettes Would Sharply Cut Sales

Companies and trade groups are weighing the risks of fighting a proposed ban on most flavored vaping products, to protect mint and menthol varieties.

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Eavesdropping Puts Anxious Squirrels at Ease

Squirrels constantly scan their surroundings for hawks, owls and other predators. But they also surveil for threats by eavesdropping on bird chatter. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Eavesdropping Puts Anxious Squirrels at Ease

Squirrels constantly scan their surroundings for hawks, owls and other predators. But they also surveil for threats by eavesdropping on bird chatter. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Eavesdropping Puts Anxious Squirrels at Ease

Squirrels constantly scan their surroundings for hawks, owls and other predators. But they also surveil for threats by eavesdropping on bird chatter. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Protesters suspended from a bridge in Houston

The group staged a protest from a bridge in Texas ahead of the Democratic debate.

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Insecticides May Be Giving Songbirds Anorexia and Delaying Their Migrations

An experiment with white-crowned sparrows shows that insecticides may be impacting songbirds. (Credit: Phil Lowe/Shutterstock) Some migrating songbirds may be starving thanks to agricultural pesticides. Neonicotinoids are popular insecticides used in industrial agriculture across the U.S. But the chemicals' are controversial because of their detrimental impact on bees and other pollinators. Now, a

19h

Adrenaline Doesn't Actually Cause the Fight-or-Flight Response, New Study Says

When you're overcome with fear, it's not adrenaline making you want to fight or flee. (Credit: Master1305/Shutterstock) A thrilling high when you’re faced with danger, a boost of energy when you’re going for an intense run – we tend to associate these rushes with adrenaline, a hormone synonymous with our fight-or-flight response. But it turns out adrenaline might not be what activates our brains'

19h

Battery icons shape perceptions of time and space and define user identities

Research from Cass Business School finds battery icons on mobile phones shape how people view time and space, and how battery conservation practices define user identities.

19h

Study offers verdict for China's efforts on coal emissions

Researchers from China, France and the USA have evaluated China's success in stemming emissions from its coal-fired power plants (CPPs). CPPs are one of the main contributors to air pollution in China, and their proliferation over the last 20 years has had significant impacts on air quality and public health. These impacts led authorities to introduce measures to control emissions from CPPs and re

19h

Study of French postmen's testicles is an Ig Nobel winner

Nappy-changing machine and saliva calculation also triumph in annual science prize There comes a time in a scientist’s life when the surest route to global fame involves a bevy of naked French postmen with thermometers taped to their testicles. At least that is the case for Roger Mieusset, a fertility specialist at the University of Toulouse, whose unlikely studies have earned him one of the most

19h

The Atlantic Politics Daily: Welcome to the Electability Primary

We’re trying something new with The Atlantic ’s signature politics newsletter. Comments or questions? Send us an email anytime. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We appreciate your continued support for our journalism. Today in Politics (Mike Blake / Reuters) Welcome to the electability primary. As pundits would have you think, Democratic voters this cycle are turning Poli Sci

19h

Study offers verdict for China's efforts on coal emissions

Researchers from China, France and the U.S. have evaluated China's success in stemming emissions from its coal-fired power plants (CPPs).

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With thousands missing and displaced after Dorian, the Bahamas may soon get hit by a tropical storm

September 12. (NOAA/) Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center (NHC) issued a Tropical Storm warning for residents of the Bahamas and the southeastern US on Thursday evening. Within the next 36 hours, this disturbance is expected to escalate and bring tropical-storm force winds to the northeastern Bahamas and the east coast of Florida. Heavy winds and rainfall are expected regardless of furth

20h

Innovative treatment to prevent common brain infection could save NHS £7 million per year

An innovative solution used to prevent common brain infections in patients having surgery for hydrocephalus has been found to significantly reduce infection rates according to a report published in The Lancet today.

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Few people with peanut allergy tolerate peanut after stopping oral immunotherapy

Studies have shown that peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) — ingesting small, controlled amounts of peanut protein — can desensitize adults and children and prevent allergic reactions, but the optimal duration and dose is unknown. In a study that followed participants after successful OIT, discontinuing OIT or continuing OIT at a reduced dose led to a decline in its protective effects. The study al

20h

Tuna Steaks Recalled Because They May Cause This Weird Type of Food Poisoning

Yellowfin tuna products sold in 16 U.S. states are being recalled because they have the potential to cause an odd type of food poisoning that resembles an allergic reaction.

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Understanding the industrial contribution to pollution offers opportunities to further improve air quality in the United States [Commentaries]

The quality of the air in the United States has improved substantially (1). The risks, however, remain high for several populations, and there is still much to learn about the sources and impacts of air pollution. Increasing our understanding of the sources of environmental damage can help us design policies…

20h

Mechanism of activation of the human cysteine desulfurase complex by frataxin [Biochemistry]

The function of frataxin (FXN) has garnered great scientific interest since its depletion was linked to the incurable neurodegenerative disease Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA). FXN has been shown to be necessary for iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biosynthesis and proper mitochondrial function. The structural and functional core of the Fe-S cluster assembly complex…

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The nucleosome core particle remembers its position through DNA replication and RNA transcription [Genetics]

Nucleosomes are the fundamental structural unit of chromatin. In addition to stabilizing the DNA polymer, nucleosomes are modified in ways that reflect and affect gene expression in their vicinity. It has long been assumed that nucleosomes can transmit memory of gene expression through their covalent posttranslational modifications. An unproven assumption…

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Revisiting the protomotive vectorial motion of F0-ATPase [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The elucidation of the detailed mechanism used by F0 to convert proton gradient to torque and rotational motion presents a major puzzle despite significant biophysical and structural progress. Although the conceptual model has advanced our understanding of the working principles of such systems, it is crucial to explore the actual…

20h

What network motifs tell us about resilience and reliability of complex networks [Engineering]

Network motifs are often called the building blocks of networks. Analysis of motifs has been found to be an indispensable tool for understanding local network structure, in contrast to measures based on node degree distribution and its functions that primarily address a global network topology. As a result, networks that…

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Nucleosomes remember where they were [Commentaries]

A central postulate in chromatin biology is that nucleosomes are inherited through replication, and evidence for the recycling of nucleosomes from ahead of the replication fork to behind goes back more than 40 y (1, 2). Early electron microscopic observations of chromatin fibers revealed that nucleosomes form directly behind the…

20h

A giant star’s ‘fingerprint’ reveals a closely held secret

Nature, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02729-8 The age of a giant star is one of its most difficult traits to measure, but a new method tells all.

20h

Can you solve the mystery of Brazil’s time-traveling capital?

"Forensic cartography" is dating a map by the age of its borders. All evidence points to this undated map of South America to be from the 1920s. So why does it feature Brasilia, the new capital of Brazil, which was only built in the 1950s? An un-German continent Like all good adventure stories, this one starts with a map. Some time ago, Rob Cornelissen blew the dust off this one in a second-hand

20h

Publisher Correction: Asymmetric lysosome inheritance predicts activation of haematopoietic stem cells

Nature, Published online: 13 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1587-3

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A ban on flavored vaping products could help signal to teens that vaping isn't as safe as they think

The ban would be grounded in a rule that requires electronic nicotine delivery systems, including vaporizers and e-cigarettes, file applications for approval before they’re allowed to be marketed. (Flickr/) The White House and the Department of Health and Human Services announced this week that they’re readying a ban on flavored e-cigarettes, which are seen as a major culprit behind the rise of t

20h

A Super-Powered iPhone Chip, a Potential HIV Treatment, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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California bans private prisons – including Ice detention centers

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America's richest could afford this investment to fight climate change

submitted by /u/itsmyfirstmemedad [link] [comments]

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Mountains hidden in the deep sea are biological hot spots. Will mining ruin them?

Researchers are starting to document the biological and mineral riches of seamounts

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'Ringing' black hole validates Einstein's general relativity 10 years ahead of schedule

For the first time, astrophysicists have heard a black hole ringing like a bell. By reanalyzing the first black hole merger ever detected, the astrophysicists measured the gravitational wave 'tones' emitted following the event. The breakthrough comes 10 years earlier than expected and confirms that the properties of black holes are just as Einstein predicted in his theory of general relativity in

21h

The rare molecule weighing in on the birth of planets

Astronomers using one of the most advanced radio telescopes have discovered a rare molecule in the dust and gas disc around a young star — and it may provide an answer to one of the conundrums facing astronomers.

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Hepatitis C-infected kidneys function as well as uninfected organs after transplant

Kidneys from donors who were infected with the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) function just as well as uninfected kidneys throughout the first year following transplantation, according to a new Penn Medicine study. The analysis of kidney transplant recipients across the United States also revealed a threefold increase in the number of transplant centers using HCV-infected kidneys and a major change in ho

21h

Kidney transplants from donors with HCV safe and functional 1 year post-transplantation

There has been a substantial increase in the number of transplants using HCV-infected kidneys across the United States. Since September 2018, most HCV-infected kidneys were transplanted into patients without the infection. HCV-infected kidneys function just as well as uninfected kidneys throughout the year after transplantation.

21h

Astronomers May Have Just Discovered an Interstellar Comet Visiting Our Solar System

Astronomers first found Comet C/2019 Q4 on August 30. The past week of observations, including this image taken by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Hawaii's Big Island, have increased astronomers confidence that the comet started life in another solar system. (Credit: Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) A newly discovered comet has astronomers excited. Formally named C/2019 Q4 (Borisov), the obje

21h

This Startup Will Send DNA From Your Spit to the Moon for $99

Sticker Shock A private trip to the Moon’s orbit could cost you anywhere from $35 million to $150 million. But now, one startup is saying it’ll charge just $99 to put you on the Moon. Part of you, anyway. In a newly published IEEE Spectrum story , LifeShip founder Ben Haldeman shares his startup’s plan to send human DNA to the Moon — a whimsical undertaking that could also ensure humanity lives o

22h

FBI Investigation Targets Trump Booster Peter Thiel’s VC Firm

Heightened Scrutiny The FBI has turned its all-seeing eye toward Mithril Capital, the venture capital firm co-founded by Silicon Valley tycoon Peter Thiel — an industry kingmaker who’s one of the most prominent supporters of the Trump administration in tech. It’s unclear specifically what prompted the FBI to scrutinize the firm’s business practices, but Recode reports a host of possibilities rang

22h

The rare molecule weighing in on the birth of planets

Astronomers using one of the most advanced radio telescopes have discovered a rare molecule in the dust and gas disc around a young star—and it may provide an answer to one of the conundrums facing astronomers.

22h

Penn engineers' new topological insulator reroutes photonic 'traffic' on the fly

Photonic chips promise even faster data transfer speeds and information-dense applications, but the components necessary for building them remain considerably larger than their electronic counterparts, due to the lack of efficient data-routing architecture.A photonic topological insulator with edges that can be dynamically redefined, however, would help solve this problem. Being able to route thes

22h

Smart sleepwear: Introducing 'phyjama,' a physiological-sensing pajama

Scientists expect that in the future, electronically active garments containing unobtrusive, portable devices for monitoring heart rate and respiratory rhythm during sleep, for example, will prove clinically useful in health care. Now researchers have developed physiological-sensing textiles that can be woven or stitched into sleep garments they have dubbed 'phyjamas.'

22h

Finding Meaning At Work: How We Shape And Think About Our Jobs

Finding a new job may be the solution to your woes at work. But there may also be other ways to get more out of your daily grind. This week on Hidden Brain , we explore ways to find meaning at work. (Image credit: Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop)

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Breaking the 'stalemate' in the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children

Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children. A phase II clinical trial, led by Leo Mascarenhas, M.D., at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, is the first to show improved outcomes in rhabdomyosarcoma in 45 years.

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Abnormal gut bugs tied to worse cognitive performance in vets with PTSD and cirrhosis

A study involving military veterans with PTSD and cirrhosis of the liver points to an abnormal mix of bacteria in the intestines as a possible driver of poor cognitive performance — and as a potential target for therapy.

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To overthrow a tyrant, try the 3.5 Percent Solution

No democracy movement has ever failed when it was able to mobilize at least 3.5 percent of the population to protest over a sustained period At that scale, most soldiers have no desire to suppress protesters. Why? Because the crowd includes their family members, friends, coworkers, and neighbors. With a population of 327 million, the U.S. would need to mobilize about 11.5 million people to assert

22h

The masquerade that helps ruinous microbes to invade

Nature, Published online: 12 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02718-x A bacterial protein in disguise works to squelch an infected host’s immune system.

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Newly discovered comet is likely interstellar visitor

A newly discovered comet has excited the astronomical community this week because it appears to have originated from outside the solar system. The official confirmation that comet C/2019 Q4 is an interstellar comet has not yet been made, but if it is interstellar, it would be only the second such object detected.

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Breath test to reduce overprescribing of antibiotics

‘Electronic nose’ can tell difference between bacterial and viral illness within five minutes

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Your Mind on Trial

The British television series Black Mirror has, at times, been disturbingly prophetic. In season 2’s The Waldo Moment, a crude comedian runs for Parliament to disparage the system only to find himself a front-runner. In April 2019 Volodymyr Zelensky, a comedian who had previously played the role of Ukranian President on a popular TV show, […]

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This distant world is a lot like Earth, but you wouldn't want to live there

An artistic representation of the exoplanet K2-18b. (Alex Boersma/) If you could pack a hot air balloon onto an interstellar spaceship and travel 110 light years to a certain planet orbiting a dim star in the constellation Leo, you'd have an experience not entirely unlike ballooning on Earth. The temperature, pressure, and moist air could feel quite pleasant, though you'd need an oxygen mask—and

22h

YouTube Influencers Are Mentally Collapsing From Stress

Dark Underbelly It’s easy to see why so many people — particularly kids — long to be YouTube influencers. Make a living just by posting videos of yourself on the internet? Sounds great! But popular YouTuber Christine Sydelko wants people to know the job isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. In fact, she’s decided to quit the influencer game altogether, calling it “trivial,” “unfulfilling,” and the “ma

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Introducing 'phyjama,' a physiological-sensing pajama

Scientists expect that in the future, electronically active garments containing unobtrusive, portable devices for monitoring heart rate and respiratory rhythm during sleep, for example, will prove clinically useful in health care. Now researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have developed physiological-sensing textiles that can be woven or stitched into sleep garments they have dubb

23h

Community-powered criminal justice reform | Raj Jayadev

Community organizer Raj Jayadev wants to transform the US court system through "participatory defense" — a growing movement that empowers families and community members to impact their loved ones' court cases. He shares the remarkable results of their work — including more than 4,000 years of "time saved" from incarceration — and shows how this new model could shift the landscape of power in th

23h

How breast cancer uses exosomes to metastasize to the brain

In breast cancer, metastases to the brain often spell a death sentence; many women survive for less than a year after diagnosis. A new study reveals how the cancer is able to cross the blood-brain-barrier: by sending out exosomes that hijack the natural cell process of transcytosis, tricking the cells in the BBB into taking them up. The researchers now hope to identify therapeutic targets that cou

23h

Humans more unique than expected when it comes to digesting fatty meals

People have very individualized inflammatory responses to eating a high-fat meal. These were the unexpected results of a study. They looked at the inflammatory reactions of volunteers at 0, three and six hours after eating a standardized meal containing 38% fat and their responses were completely unique. Like snowflakes, no two were exactly the same.

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Study finds the universe might be 2 billion years younger

The universe is looking younger every day, it seems.

23h

Neanderthal Footprints Found in France Offer Clues to Group Behavior

The 80,000-year-old prints fill in gaps left by fossils and artifacts.

23h

Stir it up with these next-level woks

Who doesn't love stir-fry? (Clem Onojeghuo via Unsplash/) If you're serious about cooking Chinese food , you need a wok in your kitchen. Traditional Chinese stir-fry requires high heat, fast cook times, and minimal oil. The shape and design of a traditional wok (with a small, round bottom and tall, sloping sides) helps bring out the intensity of the herbs and seasoning of each dish—and prevents y

23h

Watch SpaceX Test Its Crew Dragon’s Escape System

Abort! Abort! SpaceX just posted dramatic footage of its commercial space taxi Crew Dragon undergoing rigorous tests of its emergency abort system. The idea is that if something goes wrong with the rocket carrying the Crew Dragon to orbit, the module can engage its own thrusters to quickly escape the danger — and then coast down safely on a parachute. Ahead of our in-flight abort test for @Commer

23h

Molecular biologists reveal new insights into tumor progression

University of Delaware molecular biologist Mona Batish and collaborators at Harvard Medical School and University of California, Los Angeles, have identified a new circular ribonucleic acid (RNA) that increases tumor activity in soft tissue and connective tissue tumors.

23h

Hide and squeak: scientists reveal the playful lives of rats

The next time you come across a rat darting furtively for cover, consider this: It might just want to have a playful game of hide-and-seek.

23h

Molecular biologists reveal new insights into tumor progression

University of Delaware molecular biologist Mona Batish and collaborators at Harvard Medical School and University of California, Los Angeles, have identified a new circular ribonucleic acid (RNA) that increases tumor activity in soft tissue and connective tissue tumors.

23h

Hide and squeak: scientists reveal the playful lives of rats

The next time you come across a rat darting furtively for cover, consider this: It might just want to have a playful game of hide-and-seek.

23h

A Tainted Skin Cream Gave a Woman Mercury Poisoning. She's Now Semi-Comatose.

A California woman is in a semi-comatose state after using an imported anti-wrinkle cream that was tainted with mercury.

23h

Ford bows out of car-subscription biz with sale of Canvas – Roadshow

Ford has sold the Canvas business to Fair, another subscription company.

23h

Network of leading forest restoration experts features new website

As tropical forests around the world go up in smoke, the urgent need to stop deforestation is a growing global concern. Halting deforestation, reducing forest degradation, and protecting intact forests are essential, but alone these actions are not sufficient to reduce biodiversity loss, mitigate climate change, and improve sustainable land use and livelihoods for millions of people whose lives di

23h

Trump to ban flavored e-cigarettes amid vaping 'epidemic'

The ban aims to remove most flavors of e-cigarettes from the market, while allowing only tobacco flavors. Recently, more than 450 people have been hospitalized and at least six people have died from vaping-related incidents. Health officials say these cases seem to be caused by black-market vaping products, not those like Juul. None The Trump administration said it plans to ban flavored e-cigaret

23h

UMass Amherst researchers release new findings in groundbreaking gambling study

New findings released Sept. 12 from a groundbreaking gambling study by a University of Massachusetts Amherst research team show that out-of-state casino gambling among Massachusetts residents decreased significantly after the Commonwealth's first slot parlor, Plainridge Park Casino, opened in Plainville in the summer of 2015.

23h

Lucy in the Sky review – Natalie Portman orbits a nervous breakdown

Noah Hawley’s intriguing film, based on a true story, is about the effects on those who go to space of coming back to Earth’s quotidian reality Astronaut movies about the “classic” era, such as Ron Howard’s Apollo 13 or Damien Chazelle’s First Man , have men in buzzcuts doing the heroism up above while the womenfolk are relegated to gathering anxiously around TV sets back on Earth. More contempor

23h

How people judge your personality based on your name

Extraversion, thy name is Katie. And Jack. And Carter. But not, it turns out, Joanna, Owen, or Lauren: these individuals instead embody different traits, like emotionality and agreeableness. At least, that's how people rated the personalities of those names in a recent paper published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General . According to the study, we associate the sounds in names wit

23h

Migrating Birds May Be Collateral Damage for a Popular Pesticide

Neonicotinoids may be partly responsible for declines in songbird populations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

How breast cancer uses exosomes to metastasize to the brain

In breast cancer, metastases to the brain often spell a death sentence; many women survive for less than a year after diagnosis. A new study reveals how the cancer is able to cross the blood-brain-barrier: by sending out exosomes that hijack the natural cell process of transcytosis, tricking the cells in the BBB into taking them up. The researchers now hope to identify therapeutic targets that cou

23h

Migrating Birds May Be Collateral Damage for a Popular Pesticide

Neonicotinoids may be partly responsible for declines in songbird populations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

A Distant Black Hole Brightens Every 9 Hours, and No One Knows Why

Something's disrupting the distant black hole's accretion disk, but no one knows what it is.

23h

The Welcome Rise of the Stripper Ensemble Film

In Hustlers , the new movie about a group of strippers who orchestrate an ethically dubious scheme to line their pockets at the expense of male patrons, Jennifer Lopez plays a scheming vixen, but she’s also a tender mentor. As Ramona, she takes Constance Wu’s Destiny under her wing—or, more accurately, into the warmth of her massive fur coat. The younger woman is awestruck by Ramona’s moves and h

23h

Black hole ‘ringing’ confirms Einstein’s theory of relativity

A new method allows researchers to detect multiple tones from a black hole ringing like a bell—something that most astrophysicists thought would not be possible for a decade or more. The finding confirms Einstein’s theory of general relativity and may help to revolutionize scientists’ understanding of black holes. Black holes emerge in an agitated state from the violent astrophysical processes th

23h

Robotic gripper is gentle enough to handle eggs

A new robotic gripper can alter its grip depending on what it’s holding. Human hands have remarkable skills that allow manipulation of a range of objects. We can pick up an egg or a strawberry without smashing it. We can hammer a nail. One reason our hands can perform such a variety of tasks has to do with our ability to alter the firmness of our grip. Researchers designed the new two-fingered ro

23h

Newly discovered architecture of copper-nitrenoid complex could revolutionize chemical synthesis

For the first time, researchers have discovered exactly how a reactive copper-nitrene catalyst works, a finding that could revolutionize how chemical industries produce everything from pharmaceuticals to household goods. The team describes how the catalyst performs its magic and how to bottle the tool to break stubborn carbon-hydrogen bonds and make products like solvents, detergents, and dyes wit

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The dreaded "blob" may be back in the Pacific Ocean

A gigantic area of super-warm water has formed again off the U.S. West Coast, threatening impacts on weather and wildlife A map of sea surface temperature anomalies shows a blob of very warm water off the West Coast of the North America. (Source: Climate Reanalyzer, University of Maine) Five years ago, a gigantic cauldron of abnormally warm water in the Pacific Ocean wreaked havoc on marine ecosys

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Molecular biologists reveal new insights into tumor progression

A research team has identified a new circular RNA (ribonucleic acid) that increases tumor activity in soft tissue and connective tissue tumors. It's a discovery that may help improve how cancer is identified and treated.

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Cause of congenital nystagmus found

Researchers have overturned the long held view that congenital nystagmus, a condition where eyes make repetitive involuntary movements, is a brain disorder by showing that its cause is actually retinal. Deficits in just a few proteins involved in one of the retina's earliest light-signal processing steps result in the eye sending an erroneous movement signal to the brain rhythmically.

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Cells that make bone marrow also travel to the womb to help pregnancy

Bone marrow-derived cells play a role in changes to the mouse uterus before and during pregnancy, enabling implantation of the embryo and reducing pregnancy loss, according to new research.

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Newly discovered architecture of copper-nitrenoid complex could revolutionize chemical synthesis

For the first time, researchers have discovered exactly how a reactive copper-nitrene catalyst works, a finding that could revolutionize how chemical industries produce everything from pharmaceuticals to household goods. The team describes how the catalyst performs its magic and how to bottle the tool to break stubborn carbon-hydrogen bonds and make products like solvents, detergents, and dyes wit

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Gem-like nanoparticles of precious metals shine as catalysts

Researchers have developed a new method for making highly desirable catalysts from metal nanoparticles that could lead to better fuel cells, among other applications. The researchers also discovered the method can take spent catalysts and recycle them into active catalysts. Made mainly of precious metals, these coveted catalysts are shaped like gems. Each particle has 24 different faces that prese

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Simple model captures almost 100 years of measles dynamics in London

A simple epidemiological model accurately captures long-term measles transmission dynamics in London, including major perturbations triggered by historical events.

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DARPA Wants Benefits of Psychedelics but Without Hallucinations

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Artificial leaf turns sunlight into medicine

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How a Mysterious Manuscript Keeps Confounding AI

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Here’s how Aristotle can help you master the power of persuasion

Persuasion is about so much more than just getting someone to see things your way. It can actually be a great tool to ease workplace stress — you can use it to get your team aligned around a goal. The main principles behind persuasion can be traced back to ancient times. In fact, Aristotle developed three categories for this essential skill over 2,000 years ago in Rhetoric , his treatise dedicate

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Michigan plants 1,000 'happy trees' to honor Bob Ross

Michigan state parks have partnered with the Bob Ross artist's estate for its reforestation efforts. The trees were grown by prisoners in the correctional facilities' educational program. Hundreds of volunteers have planted them in state parks denoted with signs of Ross' likeness and famous tag lines. An eclectic combination between a cultural icon and prisoner reforestation efforts has led to a

1d

Your Bed Is a Bacterial Breeding Ground. But These High-Tech Bed Sheets Can Help.

Are you washing your towels and bed sheets as often as you’re supposed to? Conventional wisdom says you’re supposed to wash your sheets and pillowcases at least once every couple of weeks, and the towels you keep in that bacteria-ridden hothouse you call a bathroom are supposed to get washed even more often than that. So if you aren’t very good at following these guidelines, but you still don’t l

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Survey gauges support for using ‘gene drives’ to fight pests

A survey of more than 1,000 American adults indicates more support for using specific genetic modification techniques called “gene drives” against insect pests if they’re limited in scope and aimed at non-native insects. The survey inquires about attitudes toward agricultural gene drives, which can “drive” a genetic trait or characteristic through a given insect pest population to help commercial

1d

The world needs carbon-neutral flying. Here’s how to bring it one step closer.

In the year when the Swedish word " flygskam " (flight-shaming) hit the news in Europe, public concern about carbon emissions from aviation is endangering the sector's social license to operate. Aviation is a critical sector that connects travelers and businesses across the globe, fosters economic growth and supports humanitarian missions. It is therefore important for the sector, in collaboratio

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This Ancient Belt Buckle Retrieved from ‘Russian Atlantis’ Looks Like a Bedazzled iPhone Case

Around 2,100 years ago, a woman was buried in a site now known as the "Russian Atlantis" with an unusual accessory resembling a modern iPhone.

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Trump Claims Kids Are Saying “Mom, I Want to Vape!”

When the Trump Administration called for a ban on all flavored vape products on Wednesday, the President also shared an eyebrow-raising rationale: protecting hypothetical, vape-crazed children. In a press conference, Trump conjured an image of “innocent children” begging their parents for some sweet, sweet Juul pods, according to video shared online by Vox ‘s Aaron Rupar. Children, Trump told the

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The Maybe Comet From Another Star

Now zinging through Cancer: a glob of light from interstellar space?

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