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nyheder2019september16

Drilling Could Cause Extinctions in Alaskan Refuge, Government Plan Says

Oil and gas development could exacerbate the impacts to species in the rapidly warming Arctic National Wildlife Refuge — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Just add water—Chemists uncover a mechanism behind doping organic semiconductors

Semiconductors—and our mastery of them—have enabled us to develop the technology that underpins our modern society. These devices are responsible for a wide range of electronics, including circuit boards, computer chips and sensors.

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New technology allows fleets to double fishing capacity—and deplete fish stocks faster

Technological advances are allowing commercial fishing fleets to double their fishing power every 35 years and put even more pressure on dwindling fish stocks, new research has found.

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Large transnational corporations play critical role in global natural resource management

Researchers have identified six corporate actions that, combined with effective public policy and improved governmental regulations, could help large transnational corporations steer environmental stewardship efforts around the world, a new paper suggests.

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New technology allows fleets to double fishing capacity—and deplete fish stocks faster

Technological advances are allowing commercial fishing fleets to double their fishing power every 35 years and put even more pressure on dwindling fish stocks, new research has found.

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This Video Shows Horrifying Devastation of US-Russia Nuclear War

Plan A A new simulation by researchers at Princeton University paints a terrifying picture of what a nuclear war between the U.S. and Russia might look like: 90 million “immediate casualties,” followed by countless more from fallout and radiation poisoning. “This project is motivated by the need to highlight the potentially catastrophic consequences of current U.S. and Russian nuclear war plans,”

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Can sex trafficking be prevented?

The high-profile case of Jeffrey Epstein has shined a light on the reality that minors are being commercially sexually exploited, and that sexual exploitation can happen in any neighborhood, city, state, or country.

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NASA finds Kiko weakening in the Eastern Pacific

NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters at the National Hurricane Center with infrared data and cloud top temperature information on Hurricane Kiko. Wind shear was affecting the storm and had closed the eye.

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NASA finds Humberto strengthening off the Florida Coast

NASA's Aqua Satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Humberto as it was strengthening off the Florida coast on Sept. 15. Humberto became a hurricane late in the day.

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Why This Scientist Keeps Receiving Packages of Serial Killers’ Hair

Getting sufficient DNA out of a rootless hair has long been considered impossible. A scientist, better known for work with ancient fossils, has figured it out. It’s a game-changer for crime and surveillance.

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Pre-salvage RT PSA predictive of hormone therapy benefit with salvage RT for recurrent prostate cancer

Initial results of NRG Oncology Clinical Trial RTOG 9601 in men with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer receiving salvage radiotherapy (SRT) demonstrated improvement in OS from the addition of long-term hormone therapy to SRT. However, a secondary analysis indicates that all patients do not benefit and the addition of long-term anti-androgen therapy did not improve overall survival (OS) rates

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Compounds extracted from Cerrado plant combat fungus that causes candidiasis

Four substances isolated from Mimosa caesalpiniifolia were found to be more effective against thrush and candida than was fluconazole. Brazilian researchers are developing an ointment.

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Biogen, Eisai End Two Late-Stage Trials for Alzheimer’s Treatment

The widely expected move comes months after the companies scrapped trials of another Alzheimer’s drug.

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How climate change could make our food less nutritious | Kristie Ebi

Rising carbon levels in the atmosphere can make plants grow faster, but there's another hidden consequence: they rob plants of the nutrients and vitamins we need to survive. In a talk about global food security, epidemiologist Kristie Ebi explores the potentially massive health consequences of this growing nutrition crisis — and explores the steps we can take to ensure all people have access to s

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Chemist Christopher Dobson Dies

The University of Cambridge scholar’s research on folding proteins advanced scientists’ understanding of illnesses, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and type 2 diabetes.

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Running—or sitting—can change the shape of your heart

Being a couch potato makes your heart look more like an ape’s

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NASA finds Kiko weakening in the Eastern Pacific

NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters at the National Hurricane Center with infrared data and cloud top temperature information on Hurricane Kiko. Wind shear was affecting the storm and had closed the eye.

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NASA finds Humberto strengthening off the Florida Coast

NASA's Aqua Satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Humberto as it was strengthening off the Florida coast on Sept. 15, 2019. Humberto became a hurricane late in the day.

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Meatballs might wreck the anti-cancer perks of tomato sauce

Some of the anti-cancer benefits of tomatoes, specifically those from a compound called lycopene, could disappear when they're eaten with iron-rich foods, according to a new study from The Ohio State University.

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Giving legal rights to nature could reduce public health threats like toxic algae

A severe blue-green algae bloom spreads across western Lake Erie on July 30, 2019. (NASA Earth Observatory/) August and September are peak months for harmful blooms of algae in western Lake Erie. This year's outbreak covered more than 620 square miles by mid-August. These blooms, which can kill fish and pets and threaten public health , are driven mainly by agricultural pollution and increasingly

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Kids Are Not Hurt by Screen Time

A study finds no deleterious effects on mental health when kids spend their leisure time texting and engaging in other online activities. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Kids Are Not Hurt by Screen Time

A study finds no deleterious effects on mental health when kids spend their leisure time texting and engaging in other online activities. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New sample holder for protein crystallography

A research team has developed a novel sample holder that considerably facilitates the preparation of protein crystals for structural analysis. New research shows how proteins in solution can be crystallized directly onto the new sample holders themselves, then analyzedd using the MX beamlines at BESSY II. A patent has already been granted and a manufacturer found.

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New sample holder for protein crystallography

A research team has developed a novel sample holder that considerably facilitates the preparation of protein crystals for structural analysis. New research shows how proteins in solution can be crystallized directly onto the new sample holders themselves, then analyzedd using the MX beamlines at BESSY II. A patent has already been granted and a manufacturer found.

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Needle-free flu vaccine patch effective in early study

A new needle-free flu vaccine patch revved up the immune system much like a traditional flu shot without any negative side effects. The research represents an important step toward a technology that could replace needle-based vaccination methods that are difficult to deploy in developing countries.

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At-home blood pressure tests more accurate for African Americans

At-home measurements are more accurate, less expensive, and easier to obtain than blood pressure screenings done in medical settings.

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Study: Americans would rather drive themselves than have an autonomous vehicle drive them

Are you willing to ride in a driverless car? Researchers at the University of Washington studied how Americans' perceived cost of commute time changes depending on who's driving.

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Groundbreaking study targets one of Canada's most deadly medical conditions

Scientists have shown for the first time evidence that early sampling of blood for microorganisms in sepsis is critical to treating the common and potentially fatal condition.

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Researchers build microscopic biohybrid robots propelled by muscles, nerves

Researchers have developed soft robotic devices driven by neuromuscular tissue that triggers when stimulated by light — bringing mechanical engineering one step closer to developing autonomous biobots.

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How gut bacteria negatively influences blood sugar levels

A world first study reveals how gut bacteria impact blood sugar levels.In a study published in the leading international journal Proceedings of the National Academicy of Sciences (PNAS) today, researchers from Flinders, SAHMRI, and McMaster University in Canada show exactly how bacteria living in the guts of mice, the microbiome, communicate with cells producing serotonin to influence blood sugar

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Taking evolution to heart

An international research group at UBC, Harvard University and Cardiff Metropolitan University has discovered how the human heart has adapted to support endurance physical activities. This research examines how the human heart has evolved and how it adapts in response to different physical challenges, and will bring new ammunition to the international effort to reduce hypertensive heart disease–o

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Renegade genes caught red handed

Potentially dangerous genes embedded within human DNA were once thought to be locked down by helpful DNA structures called heterochromatin. A University of Arizona researcher disputes that belief and hopes to change the paradigm even further.

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Community policing and police legitimacy: A field experiment

In a recent study, MIT Sloan Professor David Rand, in collaboration with Kyle Peyton of Yale University and Professor Michael Sierra-Arévalo of the Rutgers School of Criminal Justice, provide the strongest evidence to date in support of the use of Community Oriented Policing (COP).

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Study finds community-oriented policing improves attitudes toward police

A field experiment conducted in New Haven, Conn., found that positive contact with police — delivered via brief door-to-door nonenforcement community policing visits — substantially improved residents' attitudes toward police, including legitimacy and willingness to cooperate with law enforcement.

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Genetic mutation appears to protect some people from deadly MRSA

An inherited genetic tendency appears to increase the likelihood that a person can successfully fight off antibiotic-resistant staph infections, according to a study led by Duke Health researchers.

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Are existing laws enough to cope with accelerating environmental change?

Do you think that major statutory reform is necessary address global environmental challenges? Think again.Newly published research published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by a group of environmental law scholars explores the untapped capacity of existing environmental and natural resources management statutes to address accelerating environmental change in the absen

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Economists find mixed values of 'thoughts and prayers'

Christians who suffer from natural and human-caused disasters value thoughts and prayers from religious strangers, while atheists and agnostics believe they are worse off from such gestures.

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Flu vaccine patch ditches needles and side effects

A new needle-free flu vaccine patch revs up the immune system much like a traditional flu shot without any negative side effects, a study with mice shows. While the patch is in the early stages and researchers have not yet tested it in humans, it’s an important step toward a technology that could replace needle-based vaccination methods that require health care workers to administer and the remov

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Former Google Engineer: Killer Bots Could Commit “Mass Atrocities”

Warning Signs If governments turn control of their weapons systems over to fully-autonomous machines, we may face devastating, unintentional calamities or acts of war. So warns Laura Nolan, a former Google software engineer who left the company in protest of Project Maven , Google’s since-abandoned AI development program for military drones. She told The Guardian this week that there should alway

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12 Children with Autism Were Conceived from One Donor's Sperm. Is There an 'Autism Gene'?

A single sperm donor is the biological father of at least 12 children who all developed autism.

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Economists calculate monetary value of 'thoughts and prayers'

US study finds Christians are willing to pay for prayers – but atheists will pay to avoid them All things have a price – and if not, economists will find one. Researchers have calculated the going rate for thoughts and prayers offered in hard times. Rather than settling on one price for all, the study found the value of a compassionate gesture depended overwhelmingly on a person’s beliefs. While

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Jojo Rabbit, Joker, and 5 More Movies to Look for This Fall

Jojo Rabbit was one of the most hyped entries at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival, but looking at the initial reviews that greeted its premiere, you might have figured it was dead on arrival. A high-energy, extremely goofy satire of Nazi Germany from the acclaimed director Taika Waititi ( Thor: Ragnarok ), the film drew a meager score on the review aggregator Metacritic and negativ

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Taking evolution to heart

An international research group at UBC, Harvard University and Cardiff Metropolitan University has discovered how the human heart has adapted to support endurance physical activities. This research examines how the human heart has evolved and how it adapts in response to different physical challenges, and will bring new ammunition to the international effort to reduce hypertensive heart disease—on

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Taking evolution to heart

An international research group at UBC, Harvard University and Cardiff Metropolitan University has discovered how the human heart has adapted to support endurance physical activities. This research examines how the human heart has evolved and how it adapts in response to different physical challenges, and will bring new ammunition to the international effort to reduce hypertensive heart disease—on

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Study finds community-oriented policing improves attitudes toward police

Brief, friendly door-to-door visits by uniformed police officers substantially improve people's attitudes toward the police and increase their trust in law enforcement, according to a new study of community-oriented policing in New Haven.

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Are existing laws enough to cope with accelerating environmental change?

Do you think that major statutory reform is necessary address global environmental challenges? Think again.

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Economists find mixed values of 'thoughts and prayers'

Groundbreaking research by a University of Wyoming economist has shed new light on the controversial topic of the value of "thoughts and prayers" in response to natural and human-caused disasters.

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New technology allows fleets to double fishing capacity — and deplete fish stocks faster

Technological advances are allowing commercial fishing fleets to double their fishing power every 35 years and put even more pressure on dwindling fish stocks, new research has found.

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Chemists uncover a mechanism behind doping organic semiconductors

Semiconductors — and our mastery of them — have enabled us to develop the technology that underpins our modern society. These devices are responsible for a wide range of electronics, including circuit boards, computer chips and sensors.

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For kids who face trauma, good neighbors or teachers can save their longterm health

New research shows just how important positive childhood experiences are for long-term health, especially for those who experience significant adversity as a child. Studies over the past 20 years have found a correlation between adverse childhood events (such as death or divorce) and worse health outcomes later in life. A new study discovers that positive childhood experiences, like having good ne

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Vineyards Facing An Insect Invasion May Turn To Aliens For Help

A stowaway from China, the spotted lanternfly, is eating its way across Pennsylvania, killing trees and grapevines. Scientists are considering importing the bug's natural enemies from back home. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)

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Uncovering the hidden 'noise' that can kill qubits

MIT and Dartmouth College researchers have demonstrated, for the first time, a tool that detects new characteristics of environmental 'noise' that can destroy the fragile quantum state of qubits, the fundamental components of quantum computers. The advance may provide insights into microscopic noise mechanisms to help engineer new ways of protecting qubits.

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How those researching adaptation to climate change might reduce their own carbon footprints

Nature, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02778-z Scientists who work with communities most affected by climate change might find it hard to adjust their air-travel habits, but they can still make meaningful changes, says David Samuel Williams.

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A Shadowy Industry Group Shapes Food Policy Around the World

The International Life Sciences Institute, with branches in 17 countries, is funded by giants of the food and drug industries.

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Scientists are investigating the secrets of smelly cat butts

This cat is basically a tiny leopard you're allowing to live in your house. (Caleb Woods/Unsplash/) Butts smell, and there's not much we can do about it. Clean that tuchus all ya want—the stank will return. We can thank microbes for these miraculously persistent odors, and though we humans might not want to thank them for it (pretty rude of us, to be honest), plenty of mammals have reason to be g

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Are the vaping risks real? 3 questions for an expert

Young people face special health risks when vaping, according to a tobacco dependence expert. Federal health officials have so far identified 450 possible cases of severe respiratory illnesses reported after use of e-cigarette products in 33 states, with 5 deaths. Although more information is needed to determine the cause of the illnesses, there is speculation that least some are due to contamina

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When the Scam Is the American Dream

This article contains spoilers through the fifth episodes of On Becoming a God in Central Florida and The Righteous Gemstones. T he Showtime series On Becoming a God in Central Florida is a curio of a television show. Set in 1992 in an Orlando suburb, the pitch-black comedy about desperation, anxiety, and self-delusion is not afraid to be deeply weird: Its heroine, Krystal (Kirsten Dunst), is a s

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Secret Message Discovered in Milton's Epic 'Paradise Lost'

An undergraduate student has discovered a secret message in John Milton's epic poem "Paradise Lost."

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Florida Man Discovers Decades-Old Dead Body Using Google Earth

ecades after a man in Florida mysteriously disappeared, Google Earth revealed the location of his skeletal remains — inside a submerged car.

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Just add water

Chemists uncover a mechanism behind doping organic semiconductors

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Harnessing tomato jumping genes could help speed-breed drought-resistant crops

Once dismissed as 'junk DNA' that served no purpose, a family of 'jumping genes' found in tomatoes has the potential to accelerate crop breeding for traits such as improved drought resistance.

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Optimized placement of defibrillators may improve cardiac arrest outcomes

Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are often placed in areas of low risk and may be unavailable during certain times of the day. Determining the optimal location for AEDs may lead to increased defibrillation by bystanders and increased survival in those experiencing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), according to research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiolo

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ACC issues principles for overcoming compensation, opportunity inequity

The American College of Cardiology today published its first health policy statement on cardiologist compensation and opportunity equity, recognizing that both are critical to the health and future of the cardiovascular workforce and achieving ACC's mission to transform cardiovascular care and improve heart health.

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Rock Climbing, Climate Science and Leadership

In situations where lives are at stake, you need to be rigorously honest with yourself and with others—not take out your Sharpie to distort the truth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fires in Indonesia Blanket Islands and Cities in Smog

Over the past month, the annual slash-and-burn efforts to create agricultural land across Indonesia’s Sumatra and Borneo islands have led to nearly 1,000 wildfires that are generating thick clouds of smoke and haze now blanketing parts of Southeast Asia. Most of the blazes are illegal fires set to clear land for palm oil and pulpwood industries. Malaysia is pressuring neighboring Indonesia to add

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Talk to People on the Telephone

In the past year, I’ve been on a mission to pester as many people in my life as possible. The first victim was my editor, whom I abruptly asked one morning to stop messaging me about story ideas on our office’s chat platform, Slack. Instead, I said, let’s talk the ideas out over the phone. I soon did the same thing to a friend who’d texted to discuss a job offer he’d just received. A few weeks la

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Acute chikungunya infection studied at the molecular level in Brazilian patients

Using a systems biology approach, Brazilian researchers identified several genes that can be explored as therapeutic targets and as biomarkers of predisposition to chronic joint pain.

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Minty vape flavors have high levels of banned carcinogen

Pulegone, a potential carcinogen banned as a food additive, is present in high levels in some e-cigarette liquids and smokeless tobacco products, according to a new study. Pulegone (pronounced pju-leh-goan) is in menthol and mint flavored e-cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products. Because of its carcinogenic properties, the US Food and Drug Administration banned pulegone as a food additive last

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Harnessing tomato jumping genes could help speed-breed drought-resistant crops

Researchers from the University of Cambridge's Sainsbury Laboratory (SLCU) and Department of Plant Sciences have discovered that drought stress triggers the activity of a family of jumping genes (Rider retrotransposons) previously known to contribute to fruit shape and colour in tomatoes. Their characterisation of Rider, published today in the journal PLOS Genetics, revealed that the Rider family

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Harnessing tomato jumping genes could help speed-breed drought-resistant crops

Researchers from the University of Cambridge's Sainsbury Laboratory (SLCU) and Department of Plant Sciences have discovered that drought stress triggers the activity of a family of jumping genes (Rider retrotransposons) previously known to contribute to fruit shape and colour in tomatoes. Their characterisation of Rider, published today in the journal PLOS Genetics, revealed that the Rider family

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Climate Change Is Having Widespread Health Impacts

Children, pregnant people and the elderly are the most at risk from extreme weather and heat—but the impact is already felt across every specialty of medicine — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rock Climbing, Climate Science and Leadership

In situations where lives are at stake, you need to be rigorously honest with yourself and with others—not take out your Sharpie to distort the truth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Amazon is said to have been tweaking its search algorithm to boost profits

Amazon has been under fire lately for its anticompetitive practices and is also the subject of a broad antitrust probe led by the House Judiciary Subcommittee which could turn ugly for the Big …

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Seinfeld coming to Netflix in 2021, yada yada yada – CNET

The classic Emmy-winning show about nothing will be a big something on the streaming service.

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Astronomers Just Spotted the Most Massive Neutron Star Ever

Mad Dense A team of astronomers from West Virginia University claim they’ve discovered the most massive neutron star to date, packing in more than double the mass of the Sun into a sphere that’s only 15 miles across. Neutron stars are directly observable from Earth mostly in pulsar form — radiating neutron stars that emit powerful radio waves — and are the densest observable objects in the univer

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Gene-Hacking Mosquitoes to Be Infertile Backfired Spectacularly

Best-Laid Plans On its surface, the plan was simple: gene-hack mosquitoes so their offspring immediately die, mix them with disease-spreading bugs in the wild, and watch the population drop off . Unfortunately, that didn’t quite pan out. The genetically-altered mosquitoes did mix with the wild population, and for a brief period the number of mosquitoes in Jacobino, Brazil did plummet, according t

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Hvad i alverden er HitClips og MiniDiscs? Her er fem musikmedier, der floppede

Vinylpladen hitter igen, men de her sære musik-formater gør nok næppe comeback.

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How The Cars Upgraded Rock and Roll

A 1979 Rolling Stone feature on The Cars opened with an image from Ric Ocasek’s Ohio adolescence that seemed out of American Graffiti or some other idealization of post–World War II suburbia: a teenager souping up his dad’s car to race against his friends. In secret, Ocasek had tweaked the exhaust pipe of his family’s Mercury Comet so as to at least make a louder vroom , if not a faster ride. Whe

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Large transnational corporations play critical role in global natural resource management

Researchers have identified six corporate actions that, combined with effective public policy and improved governmental regulations, could help large transnational corporations steer environmental stewardship efforts around the world.

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Success story or artificial inflation? Hospital performance in CAUTIs

A new study links changes in the way catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are defined and artificially improved hospital performance scores.

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Study shows not only do e-cigarette ads influence adolescents, young people don't question them

University of Kansas researchers found that youths who don't smoke reported e-cigarette ads were appealing and memorable, and they accepted the information they presented without question.

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Can sex trafficking be prevented?

The high-profile case of Jeffrey Epstein has shined a light on the reality that minors are being commercially sexually exploited, and that sexual exploitation can happen in any neighborhood, city, state, or country.

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Social isolation derails brain development in mice

Female mice housed alone during adolescence show atypical development of the prefrontal cortex and resort to habitual behavior in adulthood, according to new research published in eNeuro. These findings show how social isolation could lead to an over-reliance on habit-like behaviors that are associated with addiction and obesity.

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Potential target for diabetes-associated Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have identified a protein that may contribute to the progression of Alzheimer's disease pathology in type-2 diabetes, reports a new study of male mice and human brain tissue. The research, published in JNeurosci, could have implications for future drug development.

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Genetically engineered plasmid can be used to fight antimicrobial resistance

Researchers have engineered a plasmid to remove an antibiotic resistance gene from the Enterococcus faecalis bacterium, an accomplishment that could lead to new methods for combating antibiotic resistance.

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Robotic fish predator strikes fear into invasive species

Robotic fish can be a valuable tool in the fight against one of the world’s most problematic invasive species, the mosquitofish, researchers report. Invasive species control is notoriously challenging , especially in lakes and rivers where native fish and other wildlife have limited options for escape. Soaring mosquitofish populations in freshwater lakes and rivers worldwide have decimated native

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Detecting patients’ pain levels via their brain signals

Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have developed a system that measures a patient's pain level by analyzing brain activity from a portable neuroimaging device. The system could help doctors diagnose and treat pain in unconscious and noncommunicative patients, which could reduce the risk of chronic pain that can occur after surgery. Pain management is a surprisingly challenging, complex balancing

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'Trollbots' Swarm Twitter with Attacks on Climate Science Ahead of UN Summit

This is a re-post from Inside Climate News by Marianne Lavelle CNN's seven-hour climate change town hall for presidential candidates was not a TV ratings bonanza, but it set off a marked surge of activity on Twitter aimed at ridiculing the Democrats and dismissing the science. "Climate change" became the top two-word trending topic on Twitter for several hours after the event among the accounts b

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Army research looks at pearls for clues on enhancing lightweight armor for soldiers

Round, smooth and iridescent, pearls are among the world's most exquisite jewels; now, these gems are inspiring a U.S. Army research project to improve military armor.

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Geochemists measure new composition of Earth's mantle

What is the chemical composition of the Earth's interior? Because it is impossible to drill more than about ten kilometres deep into the Earth, volcanic rocks formed by melting Earth's deep interior often provide such information. Geochemists at the Universities of Münster (Germany) and Amsterdam (Netherlands) have investigated the volcanic rocks that build up the Portuguese island group of the Az

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Why the U.S. Census Bureau could have trouble complying with Trump’s order to count citizens

Effort to using existing records faces both technical and political challenges

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Genetically engineered plasmid can be used to fight antimicrobial resistance

Researchers have engineered a plasmid to remove an antibiotic resistance gene from the Enterococcus faecalis bacterium, an accomplishment that could lead to new methods for combating antibiotic resistance. The research is published this week in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

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Genetically engineered plasmid can be used to fight antimicrobial resistance

Researchers have engineered a plasmid to remove an antibiotic resistance gene from the Enterococcus faecalis bacterium, an accomplishment that could lead to new methods for combating antibiotic resistance. The research is published this week in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

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Finding your niche

Researchers find a new way to explain population differences in personality structure among humans

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Gene-targeted cancer drugs, slow release overcome resistance

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a method to address failures in a promising anti-cancer drug, bringing together tools from genome engineering, protein engineering and biomaterials to improve the efficacy, accuracy and longevity of certain cancer therapies.

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Stor skillnad på svensk och dansk mediebevakning av #MeToo

Efter avslöjanden om sexuella övergrepp i Hollywood spreds hashtagg-fenomenet #MeToo som en löpeld över världen. Danmark och Sverige anses vara några av världens mest jämställda länder, men mediebevakningen av #MeToo visar stora skillnader i danskarnas och svenskarnas inställning till fenomenet. I en ny studie, publicerad i den vetenskapliga tidskriften Nordicom Review, har medieforskarna Tina As

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Why a Rare But Deadly Mosquito-Borne Virus Is Hitting Massachusetts So Hard

A deadly, mosquito-borne virus that causes eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) has infected an eighth person in Massachusetts.

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One step closer future to quantum computers

Physicists at Uppsala University in Sweden have identified how to distinguish between true and 'fake' Majorana states in one of the most commonly used experimental setups, by means of supercurrent measurements. This theoretical study is a crucial step for advancing the field of topological superconductors and applications of Majorana states for robust quantum computers. New experiments testing thi

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The problem of living inside echo chambers

Pick any of the big topics of the day – Brexit , climate change or Trump's immigration policies – and wander online. What one is likely to find is radical polarization – different groups of people living in different worlds, populated with utterly different facts. Many people want to blame the “social media bubble" – a belief that everybody sorts themselves into like-minded communities and hears

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Rare metallic asteroids might have erupted molten iron

The metallic asteroid Psyche has mystified scientists because it is less dense than it should be, given its iron-nickel composition. Now, a new theory could explain Psyche's low density and metallic surface.

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New imaging technology could 'revolutionize' cancer surgery

Cancer treatment could be dramatically improved by an invention at the University of Waterloo to precisely locate the edges of tumors during surgery to remove them.The new imaging technology uses the way light from lasers interacts with cancerous and healthy tissues to distinguish between them in real-time and with no physical contact, an advancement with the potential to eliminate the need for se

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Geochemists measure new composition of Earth's mantle

Geochemists have investigated the volcanic rocks that build up the Portuguese island group of the Azores in order to gather new information about the compositional evolution of the Earth's interior. The results suggest that a larger amount of the Earth's mantle has melted and formed the Earth's crust than previously thought. The study has been published in the journal "Nature Geoscience".

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Watch This Flying Taxi Soar Over a German City

Urban Flight Enough with the renders of futuristic flying taxis — real-life prototypes of flying cars are finally taking to the skies, and we’re here for it. German flying car startup Volocopter just showed off its air taxi taking flight at Stuttgart’s Mercedes-Benz Museum. Its remotely-operated flight over a football field near the museum was a striking preview of urban consumer flight. Safe and

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Palmer amaranth's molecular secrets reveal troubling potential

Corn, soybean, and cotton farmers shudder at the thought of Palmer amaranth invading their fields. The aggressive cousin of waterhemp—itself a formidable adversary—grows extremely rapidly, produces hundreds of thousands of seeds per plant, and is resistant to multiple classes of herbicides, including glyphosate.

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SpaceX Missed Some Urgent Emails About a Satellite Standoff

According to the latest numbers , there are nearly 2,000 working satellites circling Earth right now. Round and round they go, quietly weaving a web of technology that helps power the world. Sometimes they hit a snag. A satellite can find itself on a dangerous collision course with another object—usually a piece of space junk, sometimes another satellite. This is the scenario that played out betw

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New sample holder for protein crystallography

Proteins are huge molecules that often have complex three-dimensional structure and morphology that can include side chains, folds, and twists. This three-dimensional shape is often the determining factor of their function in organisms. It is therefore important to understand the structure of proteins both for fundamental research in biology and for the development of new drugs. To accomplish this

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New sample holder for protein crystallography

Proteins are huge molecules that often have complex three-dimensional structure and morphology that can include side chains, folds, and twists. This three-dimensional shape is often the determining factor of their function in organisms. It is therefore important to understand the structure of proteins both for fundamental research in biology and for the development of new drugs. To accomplish this

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Palmer amaranth's molecular secrets reveal troubling potential

Corn, soybean, and cotton farmers shudder at the thought of Palmer amaranth invading their fields. The aggressive cousin of waterhemp—itself a formidable adversary—grows extremely rapidly, produces hundreds of thousands of seeds per plant, and is resistant to multiple classes of herbicides, including glyphosate.

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The best apps for reading books on your phone

Yeah, that seems like a real nail-biter, but… wasn't that your stop we just passed? Never mind. (Victoriano Izquierdo via Unsplash/) Besides fulfilling the roles of phone, digital camera , music player, alarm clock, and many more, your smartphone is also a window into the limitless world of ebooks. You can browse, buy, and read books in digital form right from your device whenever you want, whe

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Look out, invasive species: The robots are coming

Researchers published the first experiments to gauge whether biomimetic robotic fish can induce fear-related changes in mosquitofish, aiming to discover whether the highly invasive species might be controlled without toxicants or trapping methods harmful to wildlife. Their findings indicate that even brief exposure to a robotic replica of the mosquitofish's primary predator can provoke meaningful

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Daily briefing: It’s time to save the world

Nature, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02780-5 An unprecedented worldwide collaboration to report on climate change, how to make conferences human-centered and Earth-friendly, and the finalists in our first caption competition.

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How Long Before These Salmon Are Gone? ‘Maybe 20 Years’

Warming waters and a series of dams are making the grueling migration of the Chinook salmon even more deadly — and threatening dozens of other species.

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The sleep neuron in threadworms is also a stop neuron

Wagner Steuer Costa in the team of Alexander Gottschalk, Professor for Molecular Cell Biology and Neurobiochemistry, discovered the sleep neuron RIS a few years ago by coincidence—simultaneously with other groups. To understand the function of individual neurons in the plexus, the researchers use genetic engineering to cause them to produce light-sensitive proteins. With these "photo-switches," th

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Engineers hone our ability to map storm flooding

In major storms such as Hurricane Dorian, which initially posed grave threats to the southeastern United States before devastating the Bahamas, massive flooding can occur within a matter of hours.

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The sleep neuron in threadworms is also a stop neuron

Wagner Steuer Costa in the team of Alexander Gottschalk, Professor for Molecular Cell Biology and Neurobiochemistry, discovered the sleep neuron RIS a few years ago by coincidence—simultaneously with other groups. To understand the function of individual neurons in the plexus, the researchers use genetic engineering to cause them to produce light-sensitive proteins. With these "photo-switches," th

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Anemia may contribute to the spread of dengue fever

Mosquitoes are more likely to acquire the dengue virus when they feed on blood with low levels of iron, researchers report in the 16 September issue of Nature Microbiology. Supplementing people's diets with iron in places where both iron deficiency anemia and dengue fever are a problem could potentially limit transmission of the disease, but there are risks.

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A novel tool to probe fundamental matter

The origin of matter remains a complex and open question. A novel experimental approach — described in Nature Physics — could be exploited to better test the theories of physicists.

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Palmer amaranth's molecular secrets reveal troubling potential

Corn, soybean, and cotton farmers shudder at the thought of Palmer amaranth invading their fields. The aggressive cousin of waterhemp – itself a formidable adversary – grows extremely rapidly, produces hundreds of thousands of seeds per plant, and is resistant to multiple classes of herbicides. Pat Tranel from the University of Illinois was the first to discover key mutations in both weed species.

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For kids who face trauma, good neighbors or teachers can save their longterm health

New research shows just how important positive childhood experiences are for long-term health, especially for those who experience significant adversity as a child.Studies over the past 20 years have found a correlation between adverse childhood events (such as death or divorce) and worse health outcomes later in life. A new study discovers that positive childhood experiences, like having good nei

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MIT Scientist Says He Doesn’t Think Pedophilia Is Okay Any More

Take Two Prominent MIT computer scientist Richard Stallman shared a bold opinion on Saturday: perhaps adults shouldn’t have sex with children. Stallman got widely roasted last week when he made some appalling comments about Jeffrey Epstein’s sex crimes, suggesting that the financier’s victims somehow consented to the sex trafficking scheme. But now, in the face of near-universal backlash — and sc

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5G Is Coming: How Worried Should We Be about the Health Risks?

So far, at least, there’s little evidence of danger — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Starwatch: equinox marks the changing of the seasons

Night and day will be of equal length at the end of this week as the sun crosses the celestial equator from north to south The September equinox takes place this week. Occurring on 23 September, it marks the end of summer and the beginning of autumn for the northern hemisphere and is called the autumnal equinox at northern latitudes. In the southern hemisphere, the situation is reversed and the m

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Look out, invasive species: The robots are coming

Researchers published the first experiments to gauge whether biomimetic robotic fish can induce fear-related changes in mosquitofish, aiming to discover whether the highly invasive species might be controlled without toxicants or trapping methods harmful to wildlife. Their findings indicate that even brief exposure to a robotic replica of the mosquitofish's primary predator can provoke meaningful

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How happy couples argue: Focus on solvable issues first

In marriage, conflict is inevitable. Even the happiest couples argue. And research shows they tend to argue about the same topics as unhappy couples: children, money, in-laws, intimacy. So, what distinguishes happy couples? According to a new study, it is the way happy couples argue that may make a difference.

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Pearls: New light on enhancing lightweight armor for soldiers

By mimicking the outer coating of pearls (nacre, or as it's more commonly known, mother of pearl), researchers have created a lightweight plastic that is 14 times stronger and eight times lighter (less dense) than steel and ideal for absorbing the impact of bullets and other projectiles.

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Climate signature identified in rivers globally

For decades geoscientists have been trying to detect the influence of climate on the formation of rivers, but up to now there has been no systematic evidence. A new study discovers a clear climatic signature on rivers globally that challenges existing theories.

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Brain activity intensity drives need for sleep

The intensity of brain activity during the day, notwithstanding how long we've been awake, appears to increase our need for sleep, according to a new study in zebrafish.

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New sample holder for protein crystallography

An HZB research team has developed a novel sample holder that considerably facilitates the preparation of protein crystals for structural analysis. A short video by the team shows how proteins in solution can be crystallised directly onto the new sample holders themselves, then analysed using the MX beamlines at BESSY II. A patent has already been granted and a manufacturer found.

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UCI scientists project northward expansion of Valley fever by end of 21st century

Valley fever is endemic to hot and dry regions such as the southwestern United States and California's San Joaquin Valley, but scientists at the University of California, Irvine predict that climate change will cause the fungal infection's range to more than double in size this century, reaching previously unaffected areas across the western U.S.

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KATRIN cuts the mass estimate for the elusive neutrino in half

An international team of scientists has announced a breakthrough in its quest to measure the mass of the neutrino, one of the most abundant, yet elusive, elementary particles in our universe. At the 2019 Topics in Astroparticle and Underground Physics conference in Toyama, Japan, leaders from the KATRIN experiment reported Sept. 13 that the estimated range for the rest mass of the neutrino is no l

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More than Lyme: Tick study finds multiple agents of tick-borne diseases

In a study published in mBio, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology, Jorge Benach and Rafal Tokarz, and their co-authors at Stony Brook University and Columbia University, reported on the prevalence of multiple agents capable of causing human disease that are present in three species of ticks in Long Island.

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Eating cheese may offset blood vessel damage from salt

Antioxidants naturally found in cheese may help protect blood vessels from damage from high levels of salt in the diet, according to a new Penn State study.

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NIH-funded study suggests teen girl 'night owls' may be more likely to gain weight

Teen girls — but not boys — who prefer to go to bed later are more likely to gain weight, compared to same-age girls who go to bed earlier, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.

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Hospital-wide use of high-risk antibiotics associated with more C. difficile infections

Higher hospital-wide use of four classes of antibiotics thought to increase the risk of the dangerous intestinal illness Clostridioides difficile were associated with increased prevalence of hospital-associated C. difficile, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

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New study shows common carp aquaculture in Neolithic China dating back 8,000 years

In a recent study, an international team of researchers analyzed fish bones excavated from the Early Neolithic Jiahu site in Henan Province, China. By comparing the body-length distributions and species-composition ratios of the bones with findings from East Asian sites with present aquaculture, the researchers provide evidence of managed carp aquaculture at Jiahu dating back to 6200-5700 BC.

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New study shows common carp aquaculture in Neolithic China dating back 8,000 years

In a recent study, an international team of researchers analyzed fish bones excavated from the Early Neolithic Jiahu site in Henan Province, China. By comparing the body-length distributions and species-composition ratios of the bones with findings from East Asian sites with present aquaculture, the researchers provide evidence of managed carp aquaculture at Jiahu dating back to 6200-5700 BC.

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Misperceptions about racial economic progress are pervasive

The vast majority of Americans underestimate the magnitude of economic inequality between Whites and racial minorities, particularly Black and Latinx people, new data indicate.

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5G Is Coming: How Worried Should We Be about the Health Risks?

So far, at least, there’s little evidence of danger — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New microscopes unravel the mysteries of brain organization

The secret of capturing exquisite brain images with a new generation of custom-built microscopes has been revealed. The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons that are five times thinner than a human hair, and can uncover the 3D anatomy of entire small organs, faster than ever before.

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Tomorrow's coolants of choice

Later during this century, around 2060, a paradigm shift in global energy consumption is expected: we will spend more energy for cooling than for heating. Meanwhile, the increasing penetration of cooling applications into our daily lives causes a rapidly growing ecological footprint. New refrigeration processes such as magnetic cooling could limit the resulting impact on the climate and the enviro

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James Gunn Tweeted 'The Suicide Squad' Cast and It's Insane

Also: J.J. Abrams just signed a multimillion-dollar deal, and RIP, MoviePass.

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Amazon deeply discounts Fire 7 Tablet, 4K Fire TV Stick and other branded hardware

Amazon on Monday has slashed the cost of its Fire 7 Tablet down to holiday / Prime Day levels. For the next 12 hour or so, you can snag a 16GB Fire 7 Tablet with special offers in your choice …

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The Price of Ascending America’s Class Ladder

Jennifer Morton was born in Lima, Peru, raised in a household that she considers “somewhere between working class and middle class,” and—thanks in part to the generosity of some extended-family members—went to a premier private school. Her education there catapulted her to Princeton, where she became the first person in her family to get a bachelor’s degree. She’s now a professor herself, teachin

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The sleep neuron in threadworms is also a stop neuron

The nervous system of the threadworm C. elegans is simple at first sight: it consists of 302 neurons, some of which, however, have several functions. The neuron 'RIS,' known as a sleep neuron, can therefore put the worm into a long sleep — or also just briefly stop its locomotion, as a group of scientists led by Goethe University have now discovered.

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Misperceptions about racial economic progress are pervasive

The vast majority of Americans underestimate the magnitude of economic inequality between Whites and racial minorities, particularly black and Latinx people, new data indicate.

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Climate change expected to accelerate spread of sometimes-fatal fungal infection

Valley fever is endemic to hot and dry regions like the southwestern United States and California's San Joaquin Valley, but a new study predicts climate change will cause the fungal infection's range to more than double in size this century, reaching previously unaffected areas across the western U.S.

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Army research looks at pearls for clues on enhancing lightweight armor for soldiers

By mimicking the outer coating of pearls (nacre, or as it's more commonly known, mother of pearl), researchers at University at Buffalo, funded by the Army Research Office (ARO), created a lightweight plastic that is 14 times stronger and eight times lighter (less dense) than steel and ideal for absorbing the impact of bullets and other projectiles.

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New research sheds light on how happy couples argue

In marriage, conflict is inevitable. Even the happiest couples argue. And research shows they tend to argue about the same topics as unhappy couples: children, money, in-laws, intimacy. So, what distinguishes happy couples? According to a study published this August in Family Process, it is the way happy couples argue that may make a difference.

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Deaths halved among infarct patients attending Heart School

Patients who attend 'Heart School', as almost every patient in Sweden is invited to do after a first heart attack, live longer than non-participating patients.

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Starting HIV treatment in ERs may be key to ending HIV spread worldwide

Researchers say they have evidence that hospital emergency departments (EDs) worldwide may be key strategic settings for curbing the spread of HIV infections in hard-to-reach populations if the EDs jump-start treatment and case management as well as diagnosis of the disease.

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Measuring ethanol's deadly twin

Researchers have developed an inexpensive, handheld measuring device that can distinguish between methanol and potable alcohol. It offers a simple, quick method of detecting adulterated or contaminated alcoholic beverages and is able to diagnose methanol poisoning in exhaled breath.

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New microscopes unravel the mysteries of brain organization

The secret of capturing exquisite brain images with a new generation of custom-built microscopes has been revealed. The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons that are five times thinner than a human hair, and can uncover the 3D anatomy of entire small organs, faster than ever before.

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Doctors are prescribing kids more ‘off label’ meds

US physicians are increasingly ordering medications for children “off label,” research finds. Many drugs prescribed for children have not been rigorously tested in children, according to the Food and Drug Administration. “Off-label medications—meaning medications used in a manner not specified in the FDA’s approved packaging label—are legal. We found that they are common and increasing in childre

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Electric toothbrushes that will leave you smiling

Electric toothbrushes for better oral hygiene. (Samia Liamni via Unsplash/) Electric toothbrushes make brushing your teeth more fun. The American Dental Association recommends you brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes each time, so you might as well try to make the most of it. The basic features of an electric toothbrush are pretty standard, but they vary in style, battery life, and functi

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New observations help explain the dimming of Tabby's Star

For years, astronomers have looked up at the sky and speculated about the strange dimming behavior of Tabby's Star.

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Ingeniørstuderende: Ingeniørløftet skal ikke være en tvang

Lorena Nigro vil have frit valg med plads til fortolkning. For hvad vil det sige at bygge en bedre verden?

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Device sniffs out deadly methanol in tainted alcohol

A new, affordable handheld device can detect tainted alcohol in two minutes by distinguishing between methanol and ethanol vapors in a beverage, researchers report. Researchers say the device can also analyze a patient’s breath to diagnose methanol poisoning, ensuring that health workers take appropriate measures in an emergency without delay. Some refer to methanol as ethanol’s deadly twin. The

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Aridity is expressed in river topography globally

Nature, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1558-8 A global dataset of river longitudinal profiles shows that river profiles become straighter with increasing aridity and numerical modelling suggests that this can be explained by rainfall–runoff regimes in different climate zones.

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Debating the bedrock of climate-change mitigation scenarios

Nature, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02744-9 Researchers and policymakers rely on computer simulations called integrated assessment models to determine the best strategies for tackling climate change. Here, scientists present opposing views on the suitability of these simulations.

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A 'practical starting point' on the route to carbon-neutral fuels

Researchers raise the bar in attempts to convert carbon dioxide.

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Sweet success of parasite survival could also be its downfall

Scientists have discovered how a parasite responsible for spreading a serious tropical disease protects itself from starvation once inside its human host. The findings provide a new understanding of the metabolism of the Leishmania parasite and this new knowledge could potentially be used in its eradication.

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More than every second female homicide is committed by the partner

Intimate partner homicide – that is women who are killed by their partner – constitutes a significant proportion of the homicide statistics.

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Combination of wood fibers and spider silk could rival plastic

The unique material outperforms most of today's synthetic and natural materials by providing high strength and stiffness, combined with increased toughness.

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New algorithm can distinguish cyberbullies from normal Twitter users with 90% accuracy

Researchers have developed machine learning algorithms which can successfully identify bullies and aggressors on Twitter with 90 percent accuracy.

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Hope for coral recovery may depend on good parenting

Scientists discover coral pass beneficial algal symbionts to offspring to help them cope with rising ocean temperatures. The process occurs during reproduction sans nuclear DNA. It's the first time this has been observed.

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One step closer future to quantum computers

Physicists at Uppsala University in Sweden have identified how to distinguish between true and 'fake' Majorana states in one of the most commonly used experimental setups, by means of supercurrent measurements. This theoretical study is a crucial step for advancing the field of topological superconductors and applications of Majorana states for robust quantum computers. New experiments testing thi

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Lack of sleep affects fat metabolism

A restricted-sleep schedule built to resemble an American work week made study participants feel less full after a fatty meal and altered their lipid metabolism. One night of recovery sleep helped, but didn't completely erase the effects of sleep restriction.

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Too much of a good thing: Overactive immune cells trigger inflammation

Scientists describe a previously unknown disorder of the immune system: in a distinct subset of immune cells from patients with primary immunodeficiency, cellular respiration is significantly increased. This cellular metabolic overactivity leads to inflammation, as an international research team led by the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel report in the journal Nature Immunology.

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Tomorrow's coolants of choice

Later during this century, around 2060, a paradigm shift in global energy consumption is expected: we will spend more energy for cooling than for heating. Meanwhile, the penetration of cooling applications into our daily lives causes a rapidly growing ecological footprint. New refrigeration processes such as magnetic cooling could limit the resulting impact. Researchers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresde

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Look out, invasive species: The robots are coming

Researchers published the first experiments to gauge whether biomimetic robotic fish can induce fear-related changes in mosquitofish, aiming to discover whether the highly invasive species might be controlled without toxicants or trapping methods harmful to wildlife. Their findings indicate that even brief exposure to a robotic replica of the mosquitofish's primary predator can provoke meaningful

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New study shows common carp aquaculture in Neolithic China dating back 8,000 years

In a recent study, an international team of researchers analyzed fish bones excavated from the Early Neolithic Jiahu site in Henan Province, China. By comparing the body-length distributions and species-composition ratios of the bones with findings from East Asian sites with present aquaculture, the researchers provide evidence of managed carp aquaculture at Jiahu dating back to 6200-5700 BC.

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New observations help explain the dimming of Tabby's Star

The overall brightness of Tabby's Star has been gradually dimming for years. A new Columbia study suggests chunks of an exomoon's dusty outer layers of ice, gas and carbonaceous rock may be accumulating in a disk, blocking the star's light and making it appear to slowly fade.

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Catch-22 in graphene based molecular devices resolved

The conductivity of Graphene has made it a target for many researchers seeking to exploit it to create molecular scale devices and now a research team jointly led by University of Warwick and EMPA have found a way past a frustrating catch 22 issue of stability and reproducibility that meant that graphene based junctions were either mechanically stable or electrically stable but not both at the sam

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Brain activity intensity drives need for sleep

The intensity of brain activity during the day, notwithstanding how long we've been awake, appears to increase our need for sleep, according to a new UCL study in zebrafish, published in Neuron.

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In human cells and mice, a cure for the common cold, Stanford-UCSF study reports

Temporarily disabling a single protein inside our cells might be able to protect us from the common cold and other viral diseases, according to a study led by researchers at Stanford University and University of California-San Francisco.

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Atlantic Ocean may get a jump-start from the other side of the world

A key question for climate scientists in recent years has been whether the Atlantic Ocean's main circulation system is slowing down, a development that could have dramatic consequences for Europe and other parts of the Atlantic rim. But a new study suggests help may be on the way from an unexpected source — the Indian Ocean.

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Most massive neutron star ever detected, almost too massive to exist

Astronomers using the GBT have discovered the most massive neutron star to date, a rapidly spinning pulsar approximately 4,600 light-years from Earth. This record-breaking object is teetering on the edge of existence, approaching the theoretical maximum mass possible for a neutron star.

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WVU astronomers help detect the most massive neutron star ever measured

West Virginia University researchers have helped discover the most massive neutron star to date, a breakthrough uncovered through the Green Bank Telescope. The neutron star, called J0740+6620, is a rapidly spinning pulsar that packs 2.17 times the mass of the sun (which is 333,000 times the mass of the Earth) into a sphere only 20-30 kilometers, or about 15 miles, across.

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Biological mechanism explained: How lymphoma cells metastasize to the brain

Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center have now discovered which molecular mechanism leads to lymphomas forming metastases in the central nervous system. Using a mouse model, they showed that chronic inflammatory processes in aging brains lead to lymphoma cells that have entered the brain tissue being retained instead of being released directly back into the blood. They also identified ke

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Like an instruction manual, the genome groups genes together for convenience

Scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona shed light on how the genome organizes groups of genes linked to specific processes, like the release of toxins.

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Nanoparticles used to transport anti-cancer agent to cells

Scientists from the University of Cambridge have developed a platform that uses nanoparticles known as metal-organic frameworks to deliver a promising anti-cancer agent to cells.

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The stellar nurseries of distant galaxies

Star clusters are formed by the condensation of molecular clouds. An international team led by UNIGE has been able to detect molecular clouds in a Milky Way progenitor, thanks to the unprecedented spatial resolution achieved in such a distant galaxy. These observations show that the distant clouds have a higher mass, density and internal turbulence than the clouds hosted in nearby galaxies and tha

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Most American adults do not know that HPV causes oral, anal, and penile cancers

More than 70% of US adults are unaware that human papillomavirus (HPV) causes anal, penile, and oral cancers, according to an analysis led by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health and published in the current issue of JAMA Pediatrics.

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Is headache from anesthesia after childbirth associated with risk of bleeding around brain?

This study examined whether postpartum women with headache from anesthesia after neuraxial anesthesia (such as epidural) during childbirth had increased risk of being diagnosed with bleeding around the brain (intracranial subdural hematoma).

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Chronotype, social jet lag associated with higher waist size, fat mass in adolescent girls

For adolescent girls but not boys, bigger waistlines and greater fat mass were associated with being an evening chronotype who prefers going to bed and waking up later and greater social jet lag because of later sleep timing on weekends versus weekdays, independent of sleep duration and other lifestyle factors.

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Flavoring ingredient exceeds safety levels in e-cigarettes and smokeless tobacco

A potential carcinogen that has been banned as a food additive is present in concerningly high levels in electronic cigarette liquids and smokeless tobacco products, according to a new study from Duke Health.

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How common are forced first sexual intercourse experiences among US women?

This study estimates 1 in 16 US women had an unwanted first sexual intercourse experience that was physically forced or coerced. In an analysis of nationally representative survey data for 13,310 women, 6.5% of the respondents reported a forced first sexual intercourse encounter, which is equivalent to more than 3.3 million women between the ages of 18 and 44.

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Study shows the importance of when adolescents sleep to obesity and cardiometabolic health

New study finds adolescent sleep timing preferences and patterns should be considered risk factors for obesity and cardiometabolic health.

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New route to carbon-neutral fuels from carbon dioxide discovered by Stanford-DTU team

A new way to convert carbon dioxide into the building block for sustainable liquid fuels was very efficient in tests and did not have the reaction that destroys the conventional device.

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New microscopes unravel the mysteries of brain organization

The secret of capturing exquisite brain images with a new generation of custom-built microscopes is revealed today in Nature Methods. The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons that are five times thinner than a human hair, and can uncover the 3D anatomy of entire small organs, faster than ever before.

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New research identifies a climate signature in rivers globally

For decades geoscientists have been trying to detect the influence of climate on the formation of rivers, but up to now there has been no systematic evidence. A new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol and published today in the journal Nature, discovers a clear climatic signature on rivers globally that challenges existing theories.

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Some Flavored E-Cigarettes Contain Cancer-Causing Chemical

Electronic cigarettes flavored with mint and menthol may contain high levels of the carcinogen pulegone.

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One in 16 US women were forced into having sex for the first time

One in 16 US girls and women were forced into having sex for the first time, either physically or through other kinds of pressure

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Girl songbirds like a guy who can really sing

Research adds a new piece to the evolutionary puzzle. Tanya Loos reports.

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A 'practical starting point' on the route to carbon-neutral fuels

Researchers raise the bar in attempts to convert carbon dioxide.

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Study shows importance of tailoring treatments to clearly defined weed control objectives

A new study in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management shows that working smarter, not harder, can lead to better control of invasive weeds. And the first step is to clearly define your weed control objectives.

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International survey finds researchers want research outputs to be accompanied by better quality indicators

Ten years on from the influential peer review survey of 2009, new findings show researchers have confidence in peer review, but strains on the system—including the increasing volume of research outputs and platforms to access research—are causing them to worry about quality and reliability.

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Study shows importance of tailoring treatments to clearly defined weed control objectives

A new study in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management shows that working smarter, not harder, can lead to better control of invasive weeds. And the first step is to clearly define your weed control objectives.

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Vitamin E found to prevent muscle damage after heart attack

Early studies have found Vitamin E could be used to save the muscle from dying during a heart attack.

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Scanning the lens of the eye could predict type 2 diabetes and prediabetes

New research shows that specialist analysis of the lens in the eye can predict patients with type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) (also known as prediabetes, a condition that often leads to full blown of type 2 diabetes).

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James Cameron disputes Victor Vescovo's record for deepest ocean dive

Limiting Factor Seven miles down in the Mariana Trench with Victor Vescovo's submersible Limiting Factor . (Courtesy Five Deeps Expedition/) When explorer Victor Vescovo completed his Five Deeps expedition at the end of August, few people questioned the lengths he'd gone to break multiple diving records. Vescovo's goal was to visit the deepest point of each ocean , and he succeeded in nine short

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Like an instruction manual, the genome groups genes together for convenience

Every living organism's cell has a complete copy of DNA, which is condensed tightly in chromosomes. Every time the cell needs to perform a function, it activates genes that open or close different regions in the DNA. Like following an instruction manual with consecutive pages, it's easier to activate two genes that are closer together to complete a function.

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The magic wavelength of cadmium

Researchers experimentally determined a property of cadmium called the magic wavelength which is considered essential for the development of the most accurate clocks ever envisaged. The researchers hope this may permit simple and robust atomic clocks so accurate they could be used to improve our understanding of current theories and even test for new physics.

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The stellar nurseries of distant galaxies

Star clusters are formed by the condensation of molecular clouds, masses of cold, dense gas that are found in every galaxy. The physical properties of these clouds in our own galaxy and nearby galaxies have been known for a long time. But are they identical in distant galaxies that are more than 8 billion light-years away? For the first time, an international team led by the University of Geneva (

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New research identifies a climate signature in rivers globally

For decades geoscientists have been trying to detect the influence of climate on the formation of rivers, but up to now there has been no systematic evidence.

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Astronomers detect the most massive neutron star ever measured

West Virginia University researchers have helped discover the most massive neutron star to date, a breakthrough uncovered through the Green Bank Telescope in Pocahontas County.

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Like an instruction manual, the genome groups genes together for convenience

Every living organism's cell has a complete copy of DNA, which is condensed tightly in chromosomes. Every time the cell needs to perform a function, it activates genes that open or close different regions in the DNA. Like following an instruction manual with consecutive pages, it's easier to activate two genes that are closer together to complete a function.

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Nanoparticles used to transport anti-cancer agent to cells

Scientists from the University of Cambridge have developed a platform that uses nanoparticles known as metal-organic frameworks to deliver a promising anti-cancer agent to cells.

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New microscopes unravel the mysteries of brain organization

The secret of capturing exquisite brain images with a new generation of custom-built microscopes is revealed today in Nature Methods. The new microscopes, known as mesoSPIMs, can image the minute detail of brain tissue down to individual neurons, and can uncover the 3-D anatomy of entire small organs faster than ever before. MesoSPIMs provide new insights into brain and spinal cord organization fo

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Atlantic Ocean may get a jump-start from the other side of the world

A key question for climate scientists in recent years has been whether the Atlantic Ocean's main circulation system is slowing down, a development that could have dramatic consequences for Europe and other parts of the Atlantic rim. But a new study suggests help may be on the way from an unexpected source—the Indian Ocean.

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New route to carbon-neutral fuels from carbon dioxide discovered

If the idea of flying on battery-powered commercial jets makes you nervous, you can relax a little. Researchers have discovered a practical starting point for converting carbon dioxide into sustainable liquid fuels, including fuels for heavier modes of transportation that may prove very difficult to electrify, like airplanes, ships and freight trains.

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Catch-22 in graphene based molecular devices resolved

The conductivity of Graphene has made it a target for many researchers seeking to exploit it to create molecular scale devices and now a research team jointly led by University of Warwick and EMPA have found a way past a frustrating catch 22 issue of stability and reproducibility that meant that graphene based junctions were either mechanically stable or electrically stable but not both at the sam

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Origin-of-Life Study Points to Chemical Chimeras, Not RNA

Scientists studying how life arose from the primordial soup have been too eager to clean up the clutter. Four billion years ago, the prebiotic Earth was a messy place, a chaotic mélange of diverse starting materials. Even so, certain key molecules still somehow managed to emerge from that chemical mayhem — RNA, DNA and proteins among them. But in the quest to understand how that happened, accordi

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Immune response and the mathematics of narrow escapes

Shape of cells important in recognising invaders, research shows.

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Megafauna more mega than we thought

Research sheds new light on an ancient Australian marsupial giant. Natalie Parletta reports.

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A neutron star almost too massive to exist

Astronomers make good use of the Shapiro Delay.

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Comet captured in colour

Gemini scrambles to grab a photo opportunity.

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Welcome indoors, solar cells

Scientists have developed organic solar cells optimized to convert ambient indoor light to electricity. The power they produce is low, but is probably enough to feed the millions of products that the internet of things will bring online.

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Measuring ethanol's deadly twin

ETH Zurich researchers have developed an inexpensive, handheld measuring device that can distinguish between methanol and potable alcohol. It offers a simple, quick method of detecting adulterated or contaminated alcoholic beverages and is able to diagnose methanol poisoning in exhaled breath.

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Starting HIV treatment in ERs may be key to ending HIV spread worldwide

In a follow-up study conducted in South Africa, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have evidence that hospital emergency departments (EDs) worldwide may be key strategic settings for curbing the spread of HIV infections in hard-to-reach populations if the EDs jump-start treatment and case management as well as diagnosis of the disease. A report on the findings was published in August in E

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Deaths halved among infarct patients attending Heart School

Patients who attend 'Heart School', as almost every patient in Sweden is invited to do after a first heart attack, live longer than non-participating patients. This is shown in a new study, by researchers at Uppsala University, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

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What streaming means for the future of entertainment | Emmett Shear

In a talk and demo, Twitch cofounder Emmett Shear shares his vision for the future of interactive entertainment — and explains how video game streaming is helping people build communities online. "I am excited for a world where our entertainment could connect us instead of isolating us — a world where we can bond with each other over our shared interests and create real, strong communities," She

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EU electric car sales to pass 1 million next year

submitted by /u/SirT6 [link] [comments]

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Facebook Live is now available in the Lite app

Facebook Live is now available in the social network's Lite app, giving creators a way to reach new audiences that don't have access to pricier phones or strong mobile networks. …

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Using smart sensor technology in building design

Have lights turned on automatically when you walk into a room? Does the air conditioner in the conference room turn on when a certain number of people enter the room?

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How to find and access peer-reviewed studies (for free)

The peer-reviewed literature is where scientists publish their research, and it is the source for scientific information. As a result, I spend a lot of time on this blog talking about it. I have explained how the peer-review system works (also here). I have provided advice on how to evaluate studies and how not to […]

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Here’s a Pic of That Mysterious Object From Beyond Solar System

Interstellar Visitor Amateur astronomer Gennady Borisov made a wild discovery on August 30: an object moving too fast to be captured by the Sun’s gravity — and which probably came from outside our solar system. And now, thanks to the Gemini Observatory, we’ve gotten a closer look at the object — the first interstellar comet ever to be observed, according to the Observatory. “This image was possib

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Sweet success of parasite survival could also be its downfall

University of York scientists from the Department of Chemistry are part of an international team which has discovered how a parasite responsible for spreading a serious tropical disease protects …

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Algae and bacteria team up to increase hydrogen production

A University of Cordoba research group combined algae and bacteria in order to produce biohydrogen, fuel of the future

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Vitamin E found to prevent muscle damage after heart attack

Early studies from scientists at the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia and Jena University in Germany have found Vitamin E could be used to save the muscle from dying during a heart attack.

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The best rechargeable batteries for every device

Rechargeable AA and AAA batteries. (Hilary Halliwell via Pexels/) Tired of throwing away old batteries? Consider switching to rechargeable batteries, which provide the same power with less waste. They’re easy to recharge at home, and most are designed to last for hundreds (to thousands) of charge cycles, and maintain their charge for years. While disposable batteries start at 1.5 volts of energy

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Welcome indoors, solar cells

Scientists have developed organic solar cells optimized to convert ambient indoor light to electricity. The power they produce is low, but is probably enough to feed the millions of products that the internet of things will bring online.

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The magic wavelength of cadmium

Researchers experimentally determined a property of cadmium called the magic wavelength which is considered essential for the development of the most accurate clocks ever envisaged. The researchers hope this may permit simple and robust atomic clocks so accurate they could be used to improve our understanding of current theories and even test for new physics.

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Alzheimer's disease risk gene APOE4 impairs function of brain immune cells

A study carried out with a new human stem cell-derived model reveals that the most prevalent genetic risk factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4), impairs the function of human brain immune cells, microglia. These findings pave the way for new, effective treatment approaches for AD.

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A modelling tool to rapidly predict weed spread risk

A new statistical modelling tool will enable land management authorities to predict where invasive weed species are most likely to grow so they can find and eliminate plants before they have time to spread widely.

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Study shows importance of tailoring treatments to clearly defined weed control objectives

A new study shows that working smarter, not harder, can lead to better control of invasive weeds. And the first step is to clearly define your weed control objectives.

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Childhood behavior linked to taking paracetamol in pregnancy

A new study adds to evidence that links potential adverse effects of taking paracetamol (also known as acetaminophen) during pregnancy.

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3 in 5 parents say their teen has been in a car with a distracted teen driver

More than 1/2 of parents say their child has probably been in an unsafe situation as a passenger with a teen driver.

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Bone marrow stem cells may be vital for pregnancy

A woman’s bone marrow may determine her ability to start and sustain a pregnancy, according to new research. The study shows that when an egg is fertilized, stem cells leave the bone marrow and travel via the bloodstream to the uterus, where they help transform the uterine lining for implantation. If the lining fails to go through this essential transformation, the embryo cannot implant, and the

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This company wants to deal with space junk by… sending more stuff into space

Canadian company NorthStar wants to track space debris with a constellation of 40 satellites. It’s not the craziest idea.

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Online learning: What's in it for you?

Taking courses online has made it easier for thousands of college students to meet their degree requirements, but this type of learning may hold the most benefit for people who are interested in continuing education throughout their lives.

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New research: More than every second female homicide is committed by the partner

Out of the 536 women who were killed from 1992-2016 in Denmark, 300 were killed by their partner. This figure corresponds to 57 per cent of all homicides with female victims.

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Ministerium overvejer at fjerne stavnsbinding til fossil gas

PLUS. Forældet lov tvinger kommuner og virksomheder til at fyre naturgas af til opvarmning. Men nu ser Klimaministeriet på mulighederne for at omlægge fra naturgas til varmepumper.

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Gutsy effort to produce comprehensive study of intestinal gases

Chemical engineers have traced the journey of gases through the gut while further developing a non-invasive, gas-capturing capsule.

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Seven Questions That Need Answers Before Any Attack on Iran

President Donald Trump says the United States is “locked and loaded” to retaliate against whoever struck Saudi Arabia’s oil refineries on Saturday. But before American forces rain “fire and fury” on Iran, some urgent questions must be answered. Are we quite sure that Iran is the culprit? Iranian culpability certainly seems the most plausible explanation for the refinery attack. But given the utte

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Cats mark territory with microbe-made stink

Cats may owe their stinky way of marking territory to resident bacteria, research shows. Domestic cats, like many other mammals, use smelly secretions from anal sacs to mark territory and communicate with other animals. The new study shows that many odiferous compounds from a male cat are actually made by a community of bacteria living in the anal sacs. “Cats use a lot of volatile chemicals for s

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How to find and access peer-reviewed studies

The peer-reviewed literature is where scientists publish their research, and it is the source for scientific information. As a result, I spend a lot of time on this blog talking about it. I have explained how the peer-review system works (also here). I have provided advice on how to evaluate studies and how not to […]

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Techathlon podcast: iPhone 11, a lie detector, and a streaming content quiz

This innocent-looking device will expose all of our terrible tech secrets. (Hasbro/) We’ve been living in a world with the internet for long enough now that we mostly know how to act. There are lots of things we should be doing, like replying to text messages in a timely fashion and avoiding the urge to post cryptic statuses on social media in an effort to get precious attention and human interac

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Don't make major decisions on an empty stomach, research suggests

A new study from the University of Dundee suggests that people might want to avoid making any important decisions about the future on an empty stomach.

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Welcome indoors, solar cells

Swedish and Chinese scientists have developed organic solar cells optimised to convert ambient indoor light to electricity. The power they produce is low, but is probably enough to feed the millions of products that the internet of things will bring online.

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Alzheimer's disease risk gene APOE4 impairs function of brain immune cells

A study carried out with a new human stem cell-derived model reveals that the most prevalent genetic risk factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4), impairs the function of human brain immune cells, microglia. These findings pave the way for new, effective treatment approaches for AD.

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Study shows importance of tailoring treatments to clearly defined weed control objectives

A new study in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management shows that working smarter, not harder, can lead to better control of invasive weeds. And the first step is to clearly define your weed control objectives.

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Sweet success of parasite survival could also be its downfall

University of York scientists are part of an international team which has discovered how a parasite responsible for spreading a serious tropical disease protects itself from starvation once inside its human host.The findings provide a new understanding of the metabolism of the Leishmania parasite and this new knowledge could potentially be used in its eradication.

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Why more companies are going dog friendly

Bringing pet dogs into the workplace is becoming increasingly common. Large companies like Google, Ticketmaster and challenger bank Monzo are just a few that have joined companies in the pet sector (like Pets at Home) that allow employees to bring their dogs to work. Dogs are even being labeled as a new "must-have accessory" in smart offices.

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Science fiction offers a useful way to explore China-Africa relations

In 2007 the then President of China, Hu Jintao, delivered a speech to South Africans acknowledging the benefits of a strategic partnership. He also stressed that the connection is not merely pragmatic. It must, he argued, serve to honour and deepen the countries' long abiding friendship in the future.

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Winston Churchill's Thoughts on Evolution

His essay on alien life was uncovered in 2016; now we have a second example of his previously unpublished thoughts about science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Winston Churchill's Thoughts on Evolution

His essay on alien life was uncovered in 2016; now we have a second example of his previously unpublished thoughts about science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Just bad luck? Cancer patients nominate 'fate' as third most likely cause

What role does fate play when it comes to the 145,000 people diagnosed with cancer each year in Australia and 125,000 people in Vietnam?

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Gutsy effort to produce comprehensive study of intestinal gases

Chemical engineers have traced the journey of gases through the gut while further developing a non-invasive, gas-capturing capsule.

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What neuroscientists are learning about our brains in space by launching themselves into zero gravity flight

More than 500 people have travelled into space to date and, while we know a little about how life without gravity affects our physical health, we know almost nothing about how it affects our minds.

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Efficient organic solar cells with a low energy loss enabled by a quinoxaline-based acceptor

Recently, a research team led by Prof. Xiaozhang Zhu from Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has designed and synthesized an electron acceptor AQx by fusing the quinoxaline moiety with the quinoid-resonance effect to the D-A system. By matching with a middle-bandgap polymer donor, AQx-based devices show high PCEs of up to 13.31% with a low Eloss of 0.45 eV, which is the smallest

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MIT Future of Work Report: We Shouldn’t Worry About Quantity of Jobs, But Quality

Robots aren’t going to take everyone’s jobs , but technology has already reshaped the world of work in ways that are creating clear winners and losers. And it will continue to do so without intervention, says the first report of MIT’s Task Force on the Work of the Future. The supergroup of MIT academics was set up by MIT President Rafael Reif in early 2018 to investigate how emerging technologies

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LastPass fixes a major exploit – CNET

Make sure you have version 4.33.0.

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New algorithm can distinguish cyberbullies from normal Twitter users with 90% accuracy

A team of researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, have developed machine learning algorithms which can successfully identify bullies and aggressors on Twitter with 90 percent …

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Veterinarian says bats can be problem for pets, humans this time of year

With fall approaching, a Kansas State University veterinarian says homeowners and pet owners need to be cautious of bats, which are a leading transmitter of rabies.

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Veterinarian says bats can be problem for pets, humans this time of year

With fall approaching, a Kansas State University veterinarian says homeowners and pet owners need to be cautious of bats, which are a leading transmitter of rabies.

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Measuring ethanol's deadly twin

ETH researchers have developed an inexpensive, handheld measuring device that can distinguish between methanol and potable alcohol. It offers a simple, quick method of detecting adulterated or contaminated alcoholic beverages and is able to diagnose methanol poisoning in exhaled breath.

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Researchers use laser light to transform metal into magnet

Pioneering physicists from the University of Copenhagen and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have discovered a way to get non-magnetic materials to make themselves magnetic by way of laser light. The phenomenon may also be used to endow many other materials with new properties.

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Transplanted brain stem cells survive without anti-rejection drugs in mice

In experiments in mice, researchers say they have developed a way to successfully transplant certain protective brain cells without the need for lifelong anti-rejection drugs.

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Violent video games blamed more often for school shootings by white perpetrators

People are more likely to blame violent video games as a cause of school shootings by white perpetrators than by African-American perpetrators, possibly because of racial stereotypes that associate minorities with violent crime, according to new research.

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Using smart sensor technology in building design

In today's world, spaces with motion and temperature 'smart sensors' are common and generally improve our overall well-being. However, research indicated that while the information and technology exists to assist architects in designing structures that offer more efficient space and energy management, they seldom take advantage of those available resources.

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Light and sound in silicon chips: The slower the better

Acoustics is a missing dimension in silicon chips because acoustics can complete specific tasks that are difficult to do with electronics and optics alone. For the first time researchers have added this dimension to the standard silicon photonics platform. The concept combines the communication and bandwidth offered by light with the selective processing of sound waves.

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A modelling tool to rapidly predict weed spread risk

A new statistical modelling tool will enable land management authorities to predict where invasive weed species are most likely to grow so they can find and eliminate plants before they have time to spread widely.

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Combination of wood fibers and spider silk could rival plastic

Combination of wood fibres and spider silk could rival plasticThe unique material outperforms most of today's synthetic and natural materials by providing high strength and stiffness, combined with increased toughness

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New research: More than every second female homicide is committed by the partner

Intimate partner homicide – that is women who are killed by their partner – constitutes a significant proportion of the homicide statistics in Denmark. A new and extensive research study from the Department of Forensic Medicine at Aarhus University examines all homicides in Denmark over a quarter of a century.

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The magic wavelength of cadmium

Researchers experimentally determined a property of cadmium called the magic wavelength which is considered essential for the development of the most accurate clocks ever envisaged. The researchers hope this may permit simple and robust atomic clocks so accurate they could be used to improve our understanding of current theories and even test for new physics.

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Vikings probably hunted Iceland's walruses to extinction for ivory

Iceland had a unique population of walruses that disappeared after people first settled there – probably because the Vikings hunted them to extinction

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When One Big Cat Is Almost Like the Other

In 1947, as India was gaining independence from Britain, a maharaja in the mountainous state of present-day Chhattisgarh is said to have hunted down the last three Indian cheetahs. These cats have cultural links to the region dating back hundreds, if not thousands, of years: The word cheetah derives from the Sanskrit word citraka —“spotted one”—and in the 16th and early 17th centuries, the revere

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Seize some seeds from the garden for planting next year

As the gardening season winds down and you pick the season's last vegetables let some plants go to seed and harvest them for planting next year.

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KATRIN cuts the mass estimate for the elusive neutrino in half

An international team of scientists has announced a breakthrough in its quest to measure the mass of the neutrino, one of the most abundant, yet elusive, elementary particles in our universe.

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Seize some seeds from the garden for planting next year

As the gardening season winds down and you pick the season's last vegetables let some plants go to seed and harvest them for planting next year.

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Grøn klimaskærm kan opsuge vand og bremse trafikstøj

En ny type klimaskærm kan både håndtere regnvand og skåne beboere for trafikstøj….

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10 droner omgår forældede forsvarssystemer

Weekendens store droneangreb har halveret den saudiske olieproduktion og viser, hvor sårbar kritisk infrastruktur er for angreb fra selv små droner.

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When the Norse settled Iceland, its walrus disappeared

A unique population of Icelandic walrus went extinct shortly after Norse settlement about 1,100 years ago, research finds. Walrus hunting for the ivory trade was probably the cause of extinction. It’s one of the earliest examples of commercially driven overexploitation of marine resources. The presence of walruses in Iceland in the past and its apparent disappearance as early as in the Settlement

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Winston Churchill's Thoughts on Evolution

His essay on alien life was uncovered in 2016; now we have a second example of his previously unpublished thoughts about science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Gravity surveys using a mobile atom interferometer

Mobile gravimetry is an important technique in metrology, navigation, geodesy and geophysics. Although atomic gravimeters are presently used for accuracy, they are constrained by instrumental fragility and complexity. In a new study, Xuejian Wu and an interdisciplinary research team in the departments of physics, the U.S. Geological Survey, molecular biophysics and integrated bio-imaging, demonstr

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Study unveils a route to high hole mobility in gallium nitride

Gallium nitride (GaN) is a material often used to build semiconductor power devices and light emitting diodes (LEDs). In the past, researchers have explored the possibility of realizing GaN p-channel transistors, which could aid the development of better performing computers.

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Biosphere 2 rainforest closed during drought experiment

Drought will soon descend on the University of Arizona's Biosphere 2 rain forest, and an international research team will be ready with an array of instruments to record what unfurls under the glass.

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Trump Administration Overturns Clean Water Regulation

The repeal will return the US to water standards from 1986.

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New algorithm can distinguish cyberbullies from normal Twitter users with 90% accuracy

A team of researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, have developed machine learning algorithms which can successfully identify bullies and aggressors on Twitter with 90 percent accuracy.

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Using smart sensor technology in building design

In today's world, spaces with motion and temperature 'smart sensors' are common and generally improve our overall well-being. However, research conducted by Dr. Maryam Abhari ( who a registered architect) and Dr. Kaveh Abhari of San Diego State University, indicated that while the information and technology exists to assist architects in designing structures that offer more efficient space and ene

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Violent video games blamed more often for school shootings by white perpetrators

People are more likely to blame violent video games as a cause of school shootings by white perpetrators than by African-American perpetrators, possibly because of racial stereotypes that associate minorities with violent crime, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Subgroup of colorectal cancer patients ID'd: Do poorly, could benefit from immunotherapy

While the medical community agrees immune cells inside a tumor leads to improved health outcome, for a subset of colorectal cancer patients, having too much of a good thing is a strong predictor of disease recurrence and reduced chances of survival. City of Hope scientists identify patients who could benefit from immunotherapy. This is the first report of immune infiltrated tumors with poor health

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Gutsy effort to produce comprehensive study of intestinal gases

UNSW Sydney chemical engineers have traced the journey of gases through the gut while further developing a non-invasive, gas-capturing capsule.

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Just bad luck? Cancer patients nominate 'fate' as third most likely cause

What role does fate play when it comes to the 145,000 people diagnosed with cancer each year in Australia and 125,000 people in Vietnam?

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Extinct Canary Island bird was not a unique species after all, DNA tests prove

DNA tests have proven an extinct bird species unique to the Canary Islands—whose loss was considered a sizeable blow for genetic diversity—is actually almost identical to types commonly found in the UK and throughout Europe.

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Nanoantennas help detectors see more heat, less noise

Sandia National Laboratories researchers have developed tiny, gold antennas to help cameras and sensors that "see" heat deliver clearer pictures of thermal infrared radiation for everything from stars and galaxies to people, buildings and items requiring security.

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Extinct Canary Island bird was not a unique species after all, DNA tests prove

DNA tests have proven an extinct bird species unique to the Canary Islands—whose loss was considered a sizeable blow for genetic diversity—is actually almost identical to types commonly found in the UK and throughout Europe.

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A combination of wood fibres and spider silk could rival plastic

Achieving strength and extensibility at the same time has so far been a great challenge in material engineering: increasing strength has meant losing extensibility and vice versa. Now Aalto University and VTT researchers have succeeded in overcoming this challenge, with inspiration from nature.

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Using wood's natural ability to flex when drying to create curved structures

A team of researchers from Laboratory for Cellulose & Wood Materials and the Institute for Building Materials, ETH Zurich in Switzerland and the University of Stuttgart, in Germany, has found that modeling the contraction of wood while drying can be used to create curved structures. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their simulations and a test structure

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New approach to track returning animals at rehabilitated mine sites

A new approach to setting benchmarks for the return of fauna will allow rehabilitation managers to better assess the success of their restoration efforts on mine sites across Australia's north.

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New contrast agent combination could usher in a new era of vascular systems biology

A new contrast agent combination for imaging tumor samples enhances imaging and data extraction and thus benefits image-based modeling of tumor processes. The discovery will be presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) Interface of Mathematical Models and Experimental Biology: Role of the Microvasculature Conference in Scottsdale, Ariz.

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New approach to track returning animals at rehabilitated mine sites

A new approach to setting benchmarks for the return of fauna will allow rehabilitation managers to better assess the success of their restoration efforts on mine sites across Australia's north.

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New contrast agent combination could usher in a new era of vascular systems biology

A new contrast agent combination for imaging tumor samples enhances imaging and data extraction and thus benefits image-based modeling of tumor processes. The discovery will be presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) Interface of Mathematical Models and Experimental Biology: Role of the Microvasculature Conference in Scottsdale, Ariz.

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Researchers think small to make progress towards better fuel cells

As renewable sources such as wind and solar are quickly changing the energy landscape, scientists are looking for ways to better store energy for when it's needed. Fuel cells, which convert chemical energy into electrical power, are one possible solution for long-term energy storage, and could someday be used to power trucks and cars without burning fuel. But before fuel cells can be widely used,

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Working memory may play role in teen car crash risk

Brain development may play a critical role in whether teenagers are more likely to get into a car crash, a new study suggests. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of injury and death among 16- to 19-year-olds in the United States. While previous studies have focused on driving experience and skills, the new study finds that slower growth in the development of working memory is associated

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Climate and crisis: what survives

Nature, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02740-z Kathleen Jamie’s lens on human and planetary crossroads bends time and illuminates place, finds Barbara Kiser.

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'Climigration': When communities must move because of climate change

Climate change increasingly threatens communities all over the world. News of fires, floods and coastal erosion devastating lives and livelihoods seems almost constant. The latest fires in Queensland and New South Wales mark the start of the earliest bushfire season the states have ever seen.

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Don’t Let Humans Pick the Experimental Conditions?

When chemists have a wide range of reactants to choose from to make new compounds, how do they choose which ones to use? “Not randomly” is the answer, even when perhaps it should be. This effect has been noted in medicinal chemistry, where the choice of building blocks (not to mention reactions ) for analog synthesis is influenced both by what people tend to usually use and by the related issues

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The 11 Best New TV Shows Coming This Fall—From 'Watchmen' to 'Mandalorian'

In the streaming age, there are always new shows. But this fall in particular has some unique treats. (Hello, Disney+!)

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The connection between video games and mass shootings isn’t just wrong—it’s racist

When a perpetrator is a young white man, people blame video games. If he’s black, people make up a troublingly racist narrative.

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OnePlus’ next flagship smartphone launches September 26

We'll know all about the OnePlus 7T soon, with OnePlus 7T Pro info coming October 10.

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Apple embarks on EU court battle over 13-bn-euro tax bill

Apple embarks on an epic court battle with the EU on Tuesday, fighting the commission's landmark order that the iPhone-maker reimburse Ireland 13 billion euros ($14 billion) in back taxes.

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Borderlands 3 has twice as many players as its predecessor

Borderlands 3’s PC version, which is available exclusively on the Epic Games Store until April 2020, saw almost twice the number of concurrent launch day players as the all-time peak player …

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Research advances noise cancelling for quantum computers

The characterization of complex noise in quantum computers is a critical step toward making the systems more precise.

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A modeling tool to rapidly predict weed spread risk

In the study, published in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution, the researchers developed the tool that uses information about the features of a weed species and the geography of the area in which it has been reported to predict specific locations where the weed is likely to spread to first.

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Help track 4 billion bogong moths with your smartphone–and save pygmy possums from extinction

Each year, from September to mid-October, the tiny and very precious mountain pygmy-possums arise from their months of hibernation under the snow and begin feasting on billions of bogong moths that migrate from Queensland to Victoria's alpine region.

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Researchers find new way to find antibiotics in dirt

Researchers at McMaster have designed a new way to rapidly identify antibiotics hidden in common dirt.

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Black boys, grief, and guns in urban schools

In 2008, a group of Chicago Public Schools students were on a leadership retreat for Black male students roughly 40 miles outside the city. Ignoring the cold of the fall night, 16 of those students left their bunks to take paddle boats onto the river nearby, not knowing that the floor plugs had been removed for the season.

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A modeling tool to rapidly predict weed spread risk

In the study, published in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution, the researchers developed the tool that uses information about the features of a weed species and the geography of the area in which it has been reported to predict specific locations where the weed is likely to spread to first.

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Dusty vacuums may be astronauts' biggest health risk

Human lungs have proven to be remarkably adaptable to life in space, but dust may their biggest challenge, even greater than the lack of gravity, according to a leading aerospace medicine expert, writing in the Medical Journal of Australia.

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Psychotherapist: What I've learned from listening to children talk about climate change

Eco-anxiety is likely to affect more and more people as the climate destabilizes. Already, studies have found that 45% of children suffer lasting depression after surviving extreme weather and natural disasters. Some of that emotional turmoil must stem from confusion – why aren't adults doing more to stop climate change?

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Researchers study young stellar objects population in NGC 6822

Using NASA's Spitzer spacecraft, astronomers have conducted a comprehensive study of massive young stellar objects (YSOs) in the metal-poor galaxy NGC 6822. The research, detailed in a paper published September 9 on the arXiv pre-print repository, resulted in identifying hundreds of new YSOs in this galaxy.

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Help track 4 billion bogong moths with your smartphone–and save pygmy possums from extinction

Each year, from September to mid-October, the tiny and very precious mountain pygmy-possums arise from their months of hibernation under the snow and begin feasting on billions of bogong moths that migrate from Queensland to Victoria's alpine region.

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Researchers find new way to find antibiotics in dirt

Researchers at McMaster have designed a new way to rapidly identify antibiotics hidden in common dirt.

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Apple's Amazing New Screen

It will revamp our ideas of what a display can do — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The visible spectrum of C/2019 Q4 (Borisov), the first confirmed interstellar comet

Shortly before dawn on September 13th, Julia de León, Miquel Serra-Ricart, Javier Licandro, all members of IAC's solar system Group, and Carlos Raúl de la Fuente Marcos, from the Complutense University of Madrid, obtained high resolution images and visible spectra of comet C/2019 Q4 (Borisov) using the OSIRIS instrument at the 10.4m GTC, installed in the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Garafía

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2050 is too late – we must drastically cut emissions much sooner

One of the last things that Theresa May did before she left office as the UK prime minister in July 2019 was to commit the country to a net zero carbon target in 2050. Weaning the entire economy off carbon-based fuels on this sort of timescale sounds ambitious, but several advanced economies have set targets considerably sooner than this.

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Meet the weather observers on climate change’s front lines

Nature, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02632-2 From Death Valley to Antarctica, the science of temperature records is hotting up as the planet warms.

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Immune response depends on mathematics of narrow escapes

The way immune cells pick friends from foes can be described by a classic maths puzzle known as the 'narrow escape problem'.

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Reduce, reuse, recycle: The future of phosphorus

When Hennig Brandt discovered the element phosphorus in 1669, it was a mistake. He was really looking for gold. But his mistake was a very important scientific discovery. What Brandt couldn't have realized was the importance of phosphorus to the future of farming.

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Heart-healthy forager-farmers in lowland Bolivia are changing diets and gaining weight

A group of forager-farmers in Bolivia's tropical forests — known for having remarkable cardiovascular health and low blood pressure — experienced changes in body mass and diet over a nine-year period, with increased use of cooking oil being the most notable dietary change.

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We need more realistic experiments on the impact of climate change on ecosystems

When it comes to the impact of climate change on ecosystems, we still have large knowledge gaps. Most experiments are unrealistic because they do not correspond to projected climate scenarios for a specific region. Thus, we lack reliable data on what ecosystems might look like in the future, as a team of biodiversity researchers show.

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Physicians report high refusal rates for the HPV vaccine and need for improvement

Despite its proven success at preventing cancer, many adolescents are still not getting the HPV vaccine. A new study from shows that physicians' delivery and communication practices must improve to boost vaccination completion rates.

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Den första kometen från ett annat stjärnsystem

Den enda himlakropp som som tidigare har observerats efter en färd från något annat stjärnsystem är asteroiden 'Oumuamua som först skymtades i oktober 2017. Den nya kometen C/2019 Q4, som upptäcktes av den ryske amatörastronomen Gennady Borisov den 30 augusti 2019, har en hastighet och en bana som avslöjar att även den troligtvis har sitt ursprung någonstans långt bortom vårt solsystem.

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Alpha brain waves are even more complex than we thought

Alpha brain waves related to selective attention and working memory may stem from two different processes in the brain, according to new research. Imagine you need to dial a phone number you just looked up. You might jot it down on a piece of paper so you can reference it as you dial. Alternatively, you could repeat the digits in your head as you call, forgetting the number shortly thereafter. Th

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Do all those encouraging news about new therapies make you wish that you were a mouse ?

Then you could actually experience it working submitted by /u/Mewto1k [link] [comments]

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Lower carbon dioxide emissions on the horizon for cement

Concrete is the most widely used building material in the world. As a key component of concrete, cement—and more specifically its production process—is a significant contributor to climate change. Every year, over 4 billion tonnes of cement are produced, and this activity is responsible for around 8 percent of global CO2 emissions. Surprisingly, around 60 percent of the CO2 emissions associated wi

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Seven steps to make travel to scientific conferences more sustainable

Nature, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02747-6 Researchers should learn to travel better to mitigate their climate impacts. Institutions can help by facilitating and rewarding sustainable travel behaviour, rather than fuelling the pressure to attend conferences, say Olivier Hamant, Timothy Saunders and Virgile Viasnoff.

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Five climate change science misconceptions debunked

The science of climate change is more than 150 years old and it is probably the most tested area of modern science. However the energy industry, political lobbyists and others have spent the last 30 years sowing doubt about the science where none really exists. The latest estimate is that the world's five largest publicly-owned oil and gas companies spend about US$200m each year on lobbying to con

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Peatlands trap carbon dioxide, even during droughts

Although peatlands make up only 3 percent of the Earth's surface, they store one third of the soil carbon trapped in soils globally. Preserving peatlands is therefore of paramount importance for mitigating climate change, provided that these vulnerable environments are not themselves threatened by global warming.

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Cultivating Emotion Regulation and Mental Health

Susanne Schweizer is a neuroscientist investigating the development of emotional regulatory processes and their role in mental health across the life span — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Snaphots freezing a nanoswing: Accurate position measurement overcomes thermal fluctuations

Physicists at AMOLF have managed to cool a swinging, nanosized string to near-zero temperature without using external refrigeration. In their experiment, the cooling is an intrinsic result of a 'snapshot' position measurement they conducted on a specially designed nanostructure. The snapshot method, developed in AMOLF's Photonic Forces group, offers opportunities for new applications in quantum se

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NASA funds CubeSat Pathfinder mission to unique lunar orbit

The pathfinder mission represents a rapid lunar flight demonstration and could launch as early as December 2020. CAPSTONE will demonstrate how to enter into and operate in this orbit as well as test a new navigation capability. This information will help reduce logistical uncertainty for Gateway, as NASA and international partners work to ensure astronauts have safe access to the moon's surface. I

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SOFIA in Stuttgart: First scientific research flight over Europe

On 16 September 2019 at 04:14 CEST, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is expected to land at Stuttgart Airport. The airborne observatory is a joint project by the US space agency NASA and the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR). SOFIA is scheduled to take off from Stuttgart at 19:40 CEST on 18 September for its first scientific resear

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New research combines sound and light waves in silicon chips to create a new type of signal processing

The capabilities of electronic circuits have been extended with the introduction of photonics: components for the generation, guiding and detection of light. Together, electronics and photonics support entire systems for data communication and processing, all on a chip. However, there are certain things that even electrical and optical signals can't do simply because they move too fast.

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In mice: Transplanted brain stem cells survive without anti-rejection drugs

In experiments in mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have developed a way to successfully transplant certain protective brain cells without the need for lifelong anti-rejection drugs.

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Ekonomiska klyftor som går i arv

Inkomstskillnaderna har ökat i stora delar av världen sedan 1980-talet. Fler och fler studier har sedan dess visat att det även finns ett samband mellan stora ekonomiska klyftor och liten social rörlighet. Detta samband kan även visas i form av ett diagram som brukar kallas för Gatsbykurvan, efter romanen från 1925 av Scott Fitzgerald. I länder eller områden med stora inkomstskillnader går alltså

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Mass extinctions made life on Earth more diverse, and might again

In the past half-billion years, Earth has been hit again and again by mass extinctions, wiping out most species on the planet. And every time, life recovered and ultimately went on to increase in diversity.

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Mass extinctions made life on Earth more diverse, and might again

In the past half-billion years, Earth has been hit again and again by mass extinctions, wiping out most species on the planet. And every time, life recovered and ultimately went on to increase in diversity.

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Research team developing Indigenous languages app

"If we are going to work to revitalize Indigenous languages, we need to engage the community and we need to make this knowledge as open and accessible as possible."

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How can evolutionary biology help to get rid of antibiotic resistant bacteria?

Craig MacLean, Professor of Evolution and Microbiology at Oxford's Department of Zoology, explains how evolutionary biology can help us to get rid of antibiotic resistant bacteria.

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Study probes interplay of proteins in type 2 diabetes

A hallmark of age-related diseases such as Parkinson's disease, type 2 diabetes, or Alzheimer's disease is the abnormal clumping of proteins in cells. In people with these conditions, these protein clumps can result in irregular deposits known as amyloids that disrupt normal cell behaviors. A Yale pathologist recently discovered that these interactions can be dramatically reduced in type 2 diabete

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How can evolutionary biology help to get rid of antibiotic resistant bacteria?

Craig MacLean, Professor of Evolution and Microbiology at Oxford's Department of Zoology, explains how evolutionary biology can help us to get rid of antibiotic resistant bacteria.

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How alpine ecosystems are responding to climate change: It all comes down to the soil

Alpine flora is changing rapidly as a result of climate change. Soils are a vital but largely unexplored factor in this process. They also store the biggest amounts of CO2. However, how alpine soils will change in a warmer climate is largely unknown, according to researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL), writing in the journal Science.

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Sweet success of parasite survival could also be its downfall

University of York scientists from the Department of Chemistry are part of an international team which has discovered how a parasite responsible for spreading a serious tropical disease protects itself from starvation once inside its human host.

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More accurate detection of hotspot clusters provides new insights into the behavior of air pollution

A more reliable method for identifying regions with different relationships between air pollution and weather conditions improves the detection of pollution hotspots.

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How alpine ecosystems are responding to climate change: It all comes down to the soil

Alpine flora is changing rapidly as a result of climate change. Soils are a vital but largely unexplored factor in this process. They also store the biggest amounts of CO2. However, how alpine soils will change in a warmer climate is largely unknown, according to researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL), writing in the journal Science.

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Breakthrough in harnessing the power of biological catalysts

The power of nature could soon be used to create day-to-day materials such as paints, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals in a much more environmentally friendly way, thanks to a new breakthrough from scientists.

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Study probes interplay of proteins in type 2 diabetes

A hallmark of age-related diseases such as Parkinson's disease, type 2 diabetes, or Alzheimer's disease is the abnormal clumping of proteins in cells. In people with these conditions, these protein clumps can result in irregular deposits known as amyloids that disrupt normal cell behaviors. A Yale pathologist recently discovered that these interactions can be dramatically reduced in type 2 diabete

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Sweet success of parasite survival could also be its downfall

University of York scientists from the Department of Chemistry are part of an international team which has discovered how a parasite responsible for spreading a serious tropical disease protects itself from starvation once inside its human host.

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Study on stability of highly energetic materials

Understanding the physical and chemical characteristics of energetic materials under extreme conditions is crucial for their safe and efficient use. High-pressure phase transitions in such materials can cause significant changes in their initiation properties and detonation performance necessitating detailed structural studies.

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6 Best Smartphones That Still Have a Headphone Jack (2019)

3.5-mm audio jacks are endangered, but they're not extinct yet. Some of our favorite smartphones still have them.

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Researchers call for more realistic experiments on the impact of climate change on ecosystems

The impact of climate change on ecosystems is still not fully understood. Most experiments are unrealistic because they do not correspond to projected climate scenarios for a specific region. As a result, scientists lack reliable data on what ecosystems might look like in the future, as a team of biodiversity researchers from Central Germany show in the journal Global Change Biology. The team revi

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Image: North polar dunes on Mars

This captivating image was taken in the north polar region of Mars by the ESA/Roscosmos ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter's CaSSIS camera.

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The galaxy cluster Abell 959

Most galaxies lie in clusters containing from a few to thousands of objects. Our Milky Way, for example, belongs to the Local Group, a cluster of about fifty galaxies whose other large member is the Andromeda galaxy about 2.3 million light-years away. Clusters are the most massive gravitationally bound objects in the universe and form (according to current ideas) in a "bottoms-up" fashion with sma

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Researchers call for more realistic experiments on the impact of climate change on ecosystems

The impact of climate change on ecosystems is still not fully understood. Most experiments are unrealistic because they do not correspond to projected climate scenarios for a specific region. As a result, scientists lack reliable data on what ecosystems might look like in the future, as a team of biodiversity researchers from Central Germany show in the journal Global Change Biology. The team revi

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Eco-friendly method for the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles

A team of scientists from Ural Federal University (Yekaterinburg), Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology and other collaborator have published an article about a new method for the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles. Today nanoparticles are used in various fields, from biomedicine to magnetic resonance imaging, data storage systems, environmental reclamation technologies, magnetical

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Image of the Day: Root Pottery

An agroecology grad student creates rhizosphere-inspired art.

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Fokus på ämnesinnehåll främjar kritiskt tänkande

Undervisning i samhällskunskap har ofta som mål att eleverna ska våga uttrycka sin åsikt och delta i diskussioner. Men då riskerar undervisningen att motverka ett av syftena med ämnet – att utveckla elevernas kritiska omdöme och förtrolighet med samhällsanalytiskt tänkande. Granska förslag snarare än att tycka Tillsammans med fem lärarlag har doktoranden Malin Tväråna undersökt elevers uppfattnin

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Borderlands 3 Graphics Benchmark: 60 Nvidia and AMD GPUs Tested

We nearly lost count of how many graphics cards we put down for this test, but let's say it was roughly sixty GPUs from both camps to check out Borderlands 3 performance. We've tested this new …

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Fires devastating Australia’s east coast have arrived unusually early

Bush fires across Australia’s east coast have arrived uncharacteristically early in the year, prompting fears for the upcoming summer

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Mind the Gap Between Science and Religion – Facts So Romantic

Scientists should respect the limits of their discipline. Photo illustration by Triff / Shutterstock Have you heard that we may be living in a computer simulation? Or that our universe is only one of infinitely many parallel worlds in which you live every possible variation of your life? Or that the laws of nature derive from a beautiful, higher-dimensional theory that is super-symmetric and expl

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After Sexual Assault, Some Survivors Seek Healing in Self-Defense

Though the self-defense classes vary depending on who is offering them, they share some commonalities, including the use of a female instructor who teaches the techniques, and a male instructor who dons a padded suit and simulates attack scenarios. Researchers say this approach is not unlike exposure therapy.

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Därför kunde enbart mannen vara präst

Frågan om prästämbete och kön kan beskrivas som en olöst – och ständigt närvarande – icke-fråga i Svenska kyrkan. En gemensam nämnare, både för de grupper som förespråkat respektive motsatt sig tanken på ett prästämbete reserverat för män, har varit att argumenten främst uppmärksammat kvinnor. – Kvinnans könade synlighet och den könade mannens osynlighet har varit ett mönster i den svenska debatt

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What a Waste! Frozen Poop Knives Are Crappy Cutters, Scientists Find

Scientists ponder a wide variety of probing questions in pursuit of knowledge. One of those questions — can a knife made of frozen feces cut flesh? — has just been answered.

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Why Some People Have Endless Thoughts of Death. They May Be 'Existentially Isolated'

Feeling as though nobody gets you may be linked to persistent thoughts of death.

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Inside the Race to Discover a Water Vapor World

Water vapor, and likely clouds that rain liquid water, have been discovered on an exoplanet that lies in the habitable zone of its star. But there's an issue.

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Long-Sought Village Jesus Visited After Crucifixion Possibly Found

Archaeologists may have discovered the village where Jesus is said to have appeared after he was crucified.

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Fires devastating Australia’s east coast have arrived worryingly early

Bush fires across Australia’s east coast have arrived uncharacteristically early in the year, prompting fears for the upcoming summer

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After 6 Years in Exile, Edward Snowden Explains Himself

In a new memoir and interview, the world’s most famous whistle-blower elucidates as never before why he stood up to mass surveillance—and his love for an internet that no longer exists.

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Flirty or Friendzone? New AI Scans Your Texts for True Love

A new class of apps can use machine intelligence to determine if your text conversations are imbued with hidden romantic sparks.

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Today’s Cartoon: Clean Energy

Seems like an easy choice.

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Artificial Intelligence Confronts a 'Reproducibility' Crisis

Machine-learning systems are black boxes even to the researchers that build them. That makes it hard for others to assess the results.

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Industriens plan: Sådan skærer vi 65 pct. af Danmarks CO2-udslip

Flere vindmøller til lands og til vands, tilskud til at grøn omstilling af virksomhederne og et nationalt center for energilagring er mellem ingredienserne.

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Downton, Downton, Revolution

The new Downton Abbey movie is a drug, a delight, a palliative for the pain of being, a balm for battered emotions, a cure for cynicism. Well, almost. After two hours mainlining Carson’s beetling eyebrows, the Dowager Countess’s caustic comebacks, Mr. Molesley’s quivering histrionics every time aristocracy enters his airspace, and Lady Mary’s phlegmatic disdain, I left the movie as elated as Edit

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2019 ozone hole could be smallest in three decades

The deep thinning in Earth's protective atmospheric layer is not as extensive as it normally is.

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New Proof Solves 80-Year-Old Irrational Number Problem

Mathematicians have finally proved a conjecture on approximating numbers with fractions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New Proof Solves 80-Year-Old Irrational Number Problem

Mathematicians have finally proved a conjecture on approximating numbers with fractions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Telekonsulent: Kritisk sårbar sim-kodestump skulle tillade fjernopsætning

Hvis det lykkes en hacker at misbruge kodestumpen, kan hackeren de facto overtage telefonnummeret.

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Neural interfaces should upgrade, not degrade, humans

Elon Musk’s vision of a merging of man and machine is startling, if not downright scary

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ANALYSE: Grøn forskningsmilliard giver ikke ekstra penge til forskningen

Regeringens udspil til finanslov vil forventelig fastholde et offentligt forskningsbudget på en procent af bruttonationalproduktet, men der vil ske en omfordeling til fordel for forskning i grøn teknologi.

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Techtopia #123: Bæredygtig dansk teknologi viser verden vejen

Græsprotein, røntgen til affaldssortering, enzymer i fødevarer, batterier til husets vindenergi og mikroorganismer til rens af olie. De gode ideer falder over hinanden, når HI Messen uddeler sin hi Sustainable Development Award.

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‘The problem is that there is no IL-26 gene in the mouse’ — an exasperated letter leads to a retraction

A group of ophthalmology researchers in China got caught trying to pull the wool over the eyes of readers by falsely claiming to have used a therapy that doesn’t exist. As its title would indicate, the article, “Anti-angiogenic effect of Interleukin-26 in oxygen-induced retinopathy mice via inhibiting NFATc1-VEGF pathway,” by a team from Jinhua Municipal … Continue reading

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AI: Our New Best Friend

We're entering the fourth wave of the Industrial Revolution, says Genevieve Bell, cultural anthropologist and fellow at Intel. You can chart humanity's progress through four disruptive stages: Steam engine, electricity, computers, and now AI. AI is already all around us, but what will it look like at scale? What will life be like when "suddenly all the objects around us are capable of action with

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Truth vs Reality: How we evolved to survive, not to see what’s really there

Galileo was quite controversial, in part, because he argued that Earth moved around the sun, despite people's senses deluding them that the world was static. Evolution may have primed us to see the world in terms of payoffs rather than absolute reality — this has actually helped us survive. Those who win payoffs are more likely to pass on their genes, which encode these strategies to get to the "

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The Michael Bennet Problem

Michael Bennet walked into a classroom at the Jesse Taylor Early Education Center on the north side of Des Moines carrying a box of school supplies. It was the first day of school. Around a table sat 10 Iowans—nine women and one man—teachers, school administrators, education experts. Bennet set the box down and took a chair. Jacketless and tieless, medium height, medium build, slight hunch, blue

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Running for President When Nothing and Everything Is Presidential

Donald Trump has changed the presidency—but has he changed it forever? One undercurrent in the Democratic presidential race is an implicit debate over just that question. Some Democrats seem to want to fight Trump’s fire with fire, outrage with outrage, vulgarity with vulgarity. Beto O’Rourke courts the cameras by barking out the F-word—and selling T-shirts displaying his vulgar quote. At the Aug

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Trapped in Juárez: Life in the Migrant Limbo

CIUDAD JUÁREZ, Mexico—I met Dana outside the Little Habana restaurant, where she was hunched over a cellphone, struggling to understand a series of prompts in English, directions from a U.S. immigration detention contractor, on how to deposit enough money to call her husband. Dana and her husband left Ciego de Ávila, Cuba, in March and crossed the Mexico-U.S. border in June. (Dana, like the other

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Augmented 2030: the Apps, Headsets, and Lenses Getting Us There

submitted by /u/Professional-Dragon [link] [comments]

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Få alle nyheder fra den store diabeteskongres i Barcelona

Dagens Medicin har to videnskabsjournalister klar til rapportere om ny forskning, når EASD-kongressen åbner i Barcelona.

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EASD giver helikopterblikket

»Vi har jo en gammel og stærk tradition for at levere diabetesforskning af høj kvalitet, hvilket også smitter af på de mange danske bidrag til årets kongres, siger direktør Lise Tarnow fra Steno Sjælland.

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Stærk dansk tilstedeværelse på EASD

Det er svært at være andet end begejstret for det store antal danske bidrag til kongressen, og den energi i dansk diabetesforskning, de er udtryk for, siger professor Troels Krarup Hansen.

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Dansker modtager international diabetespris: »En stor ære«

Professor Filip Krag Knop, Herlev og Gentofte Hospital, modtager torsdag den prestigefulde ‘Minkowski-pris’ på EASD-kongressen.

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Computing a hard limit on growth

Nature, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02716-z Vaclav Smil’s latest book investigates the cost of energy use on a planet with finite resources. Melanie Moses praises the result.

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Recurrent GNAQ mutation encoding T96S in natural killer/T cell lymphoma

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12032-9 Natural killer/T cell lymphoma (NKTCL) is a rare and aggressive disease. Here, the authors identify recurrent somatic mutations of GNAQ in NKTCL, and model how this mutation contributes to NKTCL pathogenesis.

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A phyB-PIF1-SPA1 kinase regulatory complex promotes photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12110-y SPA proteins repress plant photomorphogenesis by promoting the E3 ligase activity of COP1. Here the authors show that SPAs also act as serine/threonine kinase and are required for phyB-mediated light-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of the PIF1 transcription factor.

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Derailing the aspartate pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to eradicate persistent infection

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12224-3 Amino acid biosynthetic pathways are an attractive alternative to treat chronic infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here, the authors investigate the metabolic response to disruption of the aspartate pathway in persistent Mtb and identify essential enzymes as potential new targets for drug

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Repurposing DNA-binding agents as H-bonded organic semiconductors

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12248-9 To unlock the potential of biological semiconductors for printed flexible electronics, experimental evidence that reveals the material’s charge transport mechanism is required. Here, the authors report the charge transport mechanism in hydrogen-bonded DNA topoisomerase inhibitors.

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Non-Gaussian noise spectroscopy with a superconducting qubit sensor

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11699-4 Accurately characterizing the noise influencing quantum devices is instrumental to improve coherence properties and design more robust control protocols. Sung et al. demonstrate non-Gaussian noise spectroscopy with a superconducting qubit, enabling the detection and characterization of dephasing noise witho

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Sulphur isotopes of alkaline magmas unlock long-term records of crustal recycling on Earth

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12218-1 Sulphur isotopes track recycling of subducted crustal material, yet few igneous rocks preserve these signals over Earth history. Here, the authors investigate a billion-year-old alkaline province in Greenland and are able to reconstruct a recycled mantle source, thus alkaline rocks can be used to reveal cru

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Learning the pattern of epistasis linking genotype and phenotype in a protein

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12130-8 Epistasis underlies the complexity of genotype-phenotype maps. Here, the authors analyze 8,192 mutants that link two phenotypically distinct variants of the Entacmaea quadricolor fluorescent protein, and show the existence, but also the sparsity, of high-order epistatic interactions.

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Identification of proteins and miRNAs that specifically bind an mRNA in vivo

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12050-7 The entire mRNA interactome capture has been established but identification of specific mRNA-binding proteins has been challenging. Here, the authors developed an in vivo RNA–protein crosslinking and RNA pulldown approach and characterized novel interactors of the C. elegans gld-1 mRNA, including DAZ-1 and

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Dozens of tigers dead after confiscation from Thai temple

More than half of the 147 tigers confiscated from a controversial Thai temple have died, park officials said Monday, blaming genetic problems linked to in-breeding at the once money-spinning tourist attraction.

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Subterranean blaze: Indonesia struggles to douse undergound fires

Thousands of Indonesian firefighters are locked in an around-the-clock game of Whack-a-Mole as they battle to extinguish an invisible enemy—underground fires that aggravate global warming.

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Dozens of tigers dead after confiscation from Thai temple

More than half of the 147 tigers confiscated from a controversial Thai temple have died, park officials said Monday, blaming genetic problems linked to in-breeding at the once money-spinning tourist attraction.

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Hope for coral recovery may depend on good parenting

The fate of the world's coral reefs could depend on how well the sea creatures equip their offspring to cope with global warming.

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Researchers advance noise cancelling for quantum computers

A team from Dartmouth College and MIT has designed and conducted the first lab test to successfully detect and characterize a class of complex, "non-Gaussian" noise processes that are routinely encountered in superconducting quantum computing systems.

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Hope for coral recovery may depend on good parenting

USC scientists discover coral pass beneficial algal symbionts to offspring to help them cope with rising ocean temperatures. The process occurs during reproduction sans nuclear DNA. It's the first time this has been observed.

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Dartmouth research advances noise cancelling for quantum computers

The characterization of complex noise in quantum computers is a critical step toward making the systems more precise.

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Light and sound in silicon chips: The slower the better

Acoustics is a missing dimension in silicon chips because acoustics can complete specific tasks that are difficult to do with electronics and optics alone. For the first time researchers have added this dimension to the standard silicon photonics platform. The concept combines the communication and bandwidth offered by light with the selective processing of sound waves.

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So You Think You Dove the Deepest? James Cameron Doesn’t.

Victor Vescovo claims to have set the record for the deepest ocean descent by a human. The director of ‘Titanic’ demands to differ.

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Clinical Value of Lymph Node Ratio Integration with the 8th Edition of the UICC TNM Classification and 2015 ATA Risk Stratification Systems for Recurrence Prediction in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50069-4 Clinical Value of Lymph Node Ratio Integration with the 8 th Edition of the UICC TNM Classification and 2015 ATA Risk Stratification Systems for Recurrence Prediction in Papillary Thyroid Cancer

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Study of vertebral fracture and Scanographic Bone Attenuation Coefficient in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis vs. controls

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49712-x Study of vertebral fracture and Scanographic Bone Attenuation Coefficient in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis vs . controls

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CXCL16 positively correlated with M2-macrophage infiltration, enhanced angiogenesis, and poor prognosis in thyroid cancer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49613-z

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Automatic choroidal segmentation in OCT images using supervised deep learning methods

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49816-4

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FGF5 methylation is a sensitivity marker of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma to definitive chemoradiotherapy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50005-6

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Storm Humberto strengthens but moves away from Bahamas and US

Tropical storm Humberto gained strength Sunday and was expected to return to hurricane force by evening, but its track now puts it far from the Bahamas and the US coast, the US National Hurricane Center said.

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Sætter sit fingeraftryk på kongresprogrammet

Professor Tina Vilsbøll vil blandt meget andet bruge EASD-kongressen til at tage hul på planlægningen af næste års kongres i Wien. Som medlem af programkomiteen for kongressen har hun også været med til at planlægge dette års kongres.

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Stigende interesse for området mellem diabetologi og kardiologi

Peter Rossing fra Steno København forudser, at nye kardiologiske guidelines for behandling af diabetespatienter vil blive anledning til diskussion på EASD-kongressen.

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A Daily Baby Aspirin Could Help Many Pregnancies And Save Lives

Pregnant women at high or even moderate risk of developing the life-threatening condition preeclampsia should consider taking a very small dose of aspirin daily to prevent it, doctors say. (Image credit: Ryan Kellman/NPR)

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Membrane adsorbers with ultrahigh metal-organic framework loading for high flux separations

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12114-8 Mixed matrix membranes have shown great promise for separation applications, but low filler loading typically leads to low selectivity. Here the authors use a thermally induced phase separation-hot-pressing strategy to fabricate 10 distinct metal-organic framework-based membrane adsorbers with up to 86 wt%

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Polar and phase domain walls with conducting interfacial states in a Weyl semimetal MoTe2

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11949-5 Domain walls of topological materials may be good candidates to study topological interfacial states. Here, Huang et al. discover polar domain walls which can be manipulated by electron beams and phase domain walls where possible signature of a conducting hinge state is detected in Weyl semimetal MoTe2.

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Gastroesophageal reflux GWAS identifies risk loci that also associate with subsequent severe esophageal diseases

Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11968-2 Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a major risk factor for Barret’s esophagus (BE) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). Here, An et al. report 25 genetic loci for GERD, many of which associate with BE and EA or with other traits such as BMI.

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The Question Dividing Democratic Socialists

Last weekend, hundreds of members of the Democratic Socialists of America across the country kicked off local efforts to elect Senator Bernie Sanders as president of the United States. But not every DSA chapter is campaigning for the Vermont senator. With just five months to go until the Iowa caucuses, chapters in the state have chosen to focus on local projects and tenants’-rights work rather th

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Forsker i opgør med AI-forskning: »Jeg kan ikke vente 300 år på en velfungerende AI«

PLUS. Ifølge professor Kristinn R. Thórisson satser traditionel AI-forskning helt forkert, når den vil udvikle en nøjagtig model af en hjerne. Han vil skabe maskiner, der selv kan blive klogere.

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Reduce, reuse, recycle: The future of phosphorus

When Hennig Brandt discovered the element phosphorus in 1669, it was a mistake. He was really looking for gold. But his mistake was a very important scientific discovery. What Brandt couldn't have realized was the importance of phosphorus to the future of farming.

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Vinduespudsere, ejendomsmæglere og robotvirksomheder: 50 mio. gange har virksomheder kigget på skråfotos

Danske virksomheder har på et år søgt 50 millioner gange efter skråfotos af bygninger. Styrelsen for Dataforsyning og Effektivisering, der står bag skråfotos, er overrasket over kreativiteten hos de mange forskellige virksomheder, der dagligt bruger skråfotos som værktøj. Retten til privatliv blo…

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Study: We need more realistic experiments on the impact of climate change on ecosystems

When it comes to the impact of climate change on ecosystems, we still have large knowledge gaps. Most experiments are unrealistic because they do not correspond to projected climate scenarios for a specific region. Thus, we lack reliable data on what ecosystems might look like in the future, as a team of biodiversity researchers from Central Germany show in the journal 'Global Change Biology'.

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Russia's first sea-borne nuclear power plant

submitted by /u/AlbertVonMagnus [link] [comments]

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Science and Mind Uploading: An overview

Mind Uploading has been one of the most speculative and interesting parts of Science, in general. Let's get some insights on it in this thread. As we all know, Consciousness is a Mathematical pattern and hence it is possible to resume it and reinstate it irrespective of the medium. We can discuss about the various Physical processes that we need to figure out in the Physical World. Surely, there'

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Federal “right-to-try” over a year later: Still a failure and still about the money (and weakening the FDA)

Federal "right-to-try" legislation was passed and signed into law by President Trump over a year ago. Advocates promised that lots of terminally ill people who were dying then would be saved by having the right to "try" experimental therapies outside of the context of clinical trials. That has not happened. This should come as no surprise, because right-to-try was never about getting experimental

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Indonesia haze: Why do forests keep burning?

A smoky haze has blanketed the region, an annual phenomenon that affects millions of people.

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Studie: Bättre kondition minskar risk för hjärt-kärlsjukdom – oavsett ålder och kön

Bättre kondition minskar risken för hjärt-kärlsjukdom och en för tidig död – oavsett ålder och kön. Det visar en ny stor svensk studie från Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan (GIH).

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Alfonsina Desiderio and her pathological Bully Boys

Smut Clyde and Clare Francis studied the works of Milanese cancer researchers around Maria Alfonsina Desiderio. There are even ideas for T-shirts!

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US investigates escort and massage sites over human trafficking

Backpage is no more, but US authorities are still determined to crack down on sites that enable human trafficking and other crimes. Wall Street Journal sources say Homeland Security, …

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Ric Ocasek dead at 75: The Cars lead singer remembered as gift to new wave – CNET

The rock frontman was best known for The Cars, as well as for producing albums for bands Weezer, Bad Brains and more.

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A neural network dreams up this text adventure game as you play

submitted by /u/dorash [link] [comments]

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HMI Design

Hey guys, this is probably a lot different to what you'd usually expect on the sub. I am currently doing an assignment which requires myself to design a new human-machine interface that will improve some aspect of modern work task. However, it does not need to be focused on improving safety, but it must not have a negative impact on safety. I'm really struggling with coming up with any potential

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Reduce, reuse, recycle: The future of phosphorus

Societies celebrate the discovery of this important element in 1669.

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Heart-healthy forager-farmers in lowland Bolivia are changing diets and gaining weight

A group of forager-farmers in Bolivia's tropical forests — known for having remarkable cardiovascular health and low blood pressure — experienced changes in body mass and diet over a nine-year period, with increased use of cooking oil being the most notable dietary change.

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Eco-friendly method for the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles

Environmentally Friendly Way of Synthesizing Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Was Developed.UrFU scientists, together with their colleages (Bangladesh Engineering University), described a new method of obtaining magnetic nanoparticles. The substances contained in natural materials are unstable and enter into redox reactions with environmental components, which leads to the need to look for suitable stabil

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Immune response depends on mathematics of narrow escapes

The way immune cells pick friends from foes can be described by a classic maths puzzle known as the 'narrow escape problem'.

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Physicians report high refusal rates for the HPV vaccine and need for improvement

Despite its proven success at preventing cancer, many adolescents are still not getting the HPV vaccine. A new study from the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus shows that physicians' delivery and communication practices must improve to boost vaccination completion rates.

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Commonly used drug for Alzheimer's disease doubles risk of hospitalization

A drug commonly used to manage symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias — donepezil — is associated with a two-fold higher risk of hospital admission for rhabdomyolysis, a painful condition of muscle breakdown, compared with several other cholinesterase inhibitors, found a study in CMAJ.

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Off-label medication orders on the rise for children, Rutgers study finds

US physicians are increasingly ordering medications for children for conditions that are not approved by the Food and Drug Administration, according to a Rutgers study. The findings highlight the need for more education, research and policies addressing effective, safe pediatric drug prescribing.

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3 in 5 parents say their teen has been in a car with a distracted teen driver

More than 1/2 of parents say their child has probably been in an unsafe situation as a passenger with a teen driver.

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'How We Respond' spotlights how US communities are addressing climate change impacts

Communities across the United States are working with scientists to respond to climate change impacts, shows a new report and multimedia resources developed by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). How We Respond shares details and perspectives from 18 communities using scientific information to adapt to climate change impacts and/or reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

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Purdue Pharma, Maker of OxyContin, Files for Bankruptcy

The filing is a centerpiece of an agreement to settle thousands of cases against the company for its role in the opioids crises. But it is expected to be vigorously contested by many states.

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Pas på faldgruberne ved 'standardsystemer'

Vær omhyggelig inden standardsystemet vælges. Det er ofte billigere end egenudvikling, men hvis du ikke er påpasselig med valget af standardsystem, kan det koste dyrt.

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Eksperter: Danmark mangler en kyst- og klimaplan

PLUS. Vi kan ikke beskytte alle boligområder, der trues af det nye klima – tusinder bør flytte, siger eksperter. KL opfordrer staten til at hjælpe med prioriteringen, og miljøministeren lover stærkere koordination.

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Nissan envisions car-themed esports gaming chairs

Nissan's connection to gaming might extend beyond the occasional car in a racing sim. The automaker has joined with FaZe Clan and OpTic Gaming to design a trio of "esports …

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #37

Story of the Week… Editorial of the Week… Toon of the Week… Coming Soon on SkS… Climate Feedback Reviews… SkS Week in Review… Poster of the Week… Story of the Week… 'Going to the streets again': what you need to know about Friday's climate strike Organisers expect a stronger presence from unions, workers and companies as student activists reach out to adults Australian school stud

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #37

A chronological listing of news articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, Sep 8 through Sat, Sep 14, 2019 Editor's Pick Greta Thunberg To U.S.: 'You Have A Moral Responsibility' On Climate Change Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, 16, attends a protest outside the White House on Friday. She launched the Friday school strikes last year, and since then

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First commercial space hotel to have low-gravity basketball, rock climbing

submitted by /u/tocreatewebsite [link] [comments]

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Will Space Tourism Take Off? – BBC Click

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Robotic surgeons set to spark 'revolution in healthcare'

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

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Skinny home in Toronto as prototype for parking-space homes?

submitted by /u/Chispy [link] [comments]

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The delightful Oshawott arrives in Pokemon Go today – CNET

Unova region Pokemon — that's Generation 5 — are joining the game Monday.

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Two philosophers' views on California's homelessness epidemic

The housing crisis in California has reached new heights, with more than 100,000 people without homes. To some, the dichotomy between the innovation the state is known for and its denizens ongoing inability to solve the problem is boggling. A couple of famous philosophers can show us how this problem isn't actually as odd as it seems. In cast you haven't been paying much attention lately, there i

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Prescription drug misuse can predict this trajectory

The frequency and age at which older teens and young adults misuse prescription drugs can predict substance use disorders later in life, especially alcohol misuse, according to a new study. In the past year, more than 17 million Americans misused prescription drugs—a behavior most common during late adolescence and young adulthood. Researchers examined annual misuse patterns for prescription opio

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Faster pace of climate change is 'scary', former chief scientist says

The UK should advance its climate targets by 10 years, says the UK’s former chief scientist.

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Childhood behavior linked to taking paracetamol in pregnancy

A new study by the University of Bristol adds to evidence that links potential adverse effects of taking paracetamol (also known as acetaminophen) during pregnancy.

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Heathrow drone protest: Five arrested over planned disruption

The co-founder of activist group Extinction Rebellion is among those held in "pre-emptive" raids.

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Act now and avert a climate crisis

Nature, Published online: 15 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02734-x Nature joins more than 250 media outlets in Covering Climate Now, a unique collaboration to focus attention on the need for urgent action.

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Is Jordan running out of water?

Jordan is one of the countries most affected by rising temperatures – and it’s predicted to get worse.

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Free BotSlayer tool fights bad info online

There’s a new tool in the fight against online disinformation called BotSlayer. The software, which is free and open to the public , scans social media in real time to detect evidence of automated Twitter accounts—or “bots”—pushing messages in a coordinated manner. The use of bots is an increasingly common practice to manipulate public opinion by creating the false impression that many people are

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Why the illusory truth effect works

Two recent studies looked at the illusory truth effect. The effect describes our propensity to start believing untrue statements if they are repeated. The phenomenon is a universal bias linked to cognitive fluency but can be counterbalanced. None In an age already beset by rampant misinformation and personality-driven realities imposed upon large segments of the global population, come new studie

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