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nyheder2019september17

Earth to warm more quickly, new climate models show

Greenhouse gases thrust into the atmosphere by burning fossil fuels are warming Earth's surface more quickly than previously understood, according to new climate models set to replace those used in current UN projections, scientists said Tuesday.

11h

Trump to Revoke California’s Authority to Set Stricter Auto Emissions Rules

The move, expected Wednesday, would strip California of its special authority to set tougher rules on car emissions.

2h

Rekord: Søndag producerede vindmøller 30 pct. mere strøm, end vi brugte

Under søndagens blæsevejr satte de danske vindmøller hele tre rekorder. Og så kunne det være blevet til endnu mere, hvis ikke en del møller af kommercielle grunde var lukket ned.

10h

Fruit flies' microbiomes shape their evolution

In just five generations, an altered microbiome can lead to genome-wide evolution in fruit flies, according to new research led researchers at the University of Pennsylvania. 'The fact that we can see this effect in experiments done over such a short time scale suggests that the magnitude of the fitness effects the microbes have is incredible,' says Schmidt.

9min

The Corey Lewandowski Show Comes to Capitol Hill

From the moment Corey Lewandowski filibustered the first question he received from a member of the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, his goals for the afternoon were readily apparent. Lewandowski, President Donald Trump’s close ally and erstwhile campaign manager, wanted to make a mockery of a congressional hearing; to frustrate and embarrass his Democratic interlocutors; to demonstrate his l

26min

Google employees plan to join Global Climate Strike walkout

A Twitter account claiming to represent Google employees interested in the strike says more than 400 workers have so far pledged to join the protests. Global Climate Strike is a global protest against calling for urgent action on climate change. Google has recently faced criticism for its partnerships with oil and gas companies. None Google employees plan to join fellow tech workers from Amazon a

30min

Microbiome may be involved in mechanisms related to muscle strength in older adults

New study suggests the gut microbiome has a role in mechanisms related to muscle strength in older adults. Researchers found differences in bacterial profiles of older adults with high and low physical function, bacterial and strength differences in mice colonized with fecal samples from the adults.

30min

Study supports taking blood cultures before beginning treatment for sepsis

In a new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, a team performed a prospective study in seven centers across North America and found that blood cultures drawn after antimicrobial administration resulted in a loss of almost 50 percent of available clinical information. The team reports these findings, which provide a basis for clinical guidelines for the care of patients with

30min

Study on DNA spread by genetically modified mosquitoes prompts backlash

Company and some scientists dispute suggestion that released strain may have made local mosquitoes fitter

32min

Plantwatch: England's carnivorous sundew makes a comeback

Sticky-tentacled species returns to boglands but introducing meat-eating varieties is not without risk The great sundew ( Drosera anglica ) is a carnivorous plant with leaves covered in red tentacles that ooze sticky slime to kill and digest insects, giving the plant extra nutrition in the boglands where it grows. It was once common in England but was almost wiped out as wetlands and peat bogs we

43min

The U.S. Says China is Stealing Military Spacecraft Technology

Tech Theft China’s space industry is still in its early stages compared to the U.S., but the Department of Homeland Security suspects that China is trying to get ahead by stealing military space technology. Pengyi Li, a Chinese national, attempted to smuggle sensitive spacecraft and missile components out of the U.S. according to documents obtained by Quartz — and got caught red-handed, thanks to

44min

NASA's Terra Satellite sees the birth of Tropical Storm Imelda

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the western Gulf of Mexico during the early afternoon of Sept. 17, 2019 and captured a visible image of the newly formed Tropical Depression 11.

44min

Atlas Antibodies Presents QPrEST Standards for Absolute Quantification of Proteins using Mass Spectrometry

Atlas Antibodies AB, a leading supplier of advanced research reagents, announced today the introduction of pre-quantified QPrEST™ Protein Standards for absolute quantification of proteins in biological samples such as cell lysate and plasma using liquid chromatography (LC)–mass spectrometry (MS).

45min

Skeptical Science New Research for Week #37, 2019

63 articles with 10 freely available as open access Pitch in! In the abstract for Unlocking pre-1850 instrumental meteorological records: A global inventory (an open access article) , Stefan Brönnimann tells us: Instrumental meteorological measurements from periods prior to the start of national weather services are designated “early instrumental data”. They have played an important role in clima

51min

A new sickle cell drug could soon get U.S. approval. But does it work?

Critics note there’s no proof it reduces painful “crises” or other disease symptoms

53min

Using AI In Malawi To Save Elephants

Poachers killed almost a third of the African elephant population between 2007 and 2014, a recent census found. Researchers hope artificial intelligence can help stop poachers and other threats, too.

58min

Rare 10 million-year-old fossil unearths new view of human evolution

Near an old mining town in Central Europe, known for its picturesque turquoise-blue quarry water, lay Rudapithecus. For 10 million years, the fossilized ape waited in Rudabánya, Hungary, to add its story to the origins of how humans evolved. What Rudabánya yielded was a pelvis — among the most informative bones of a skeleton, but one that is rarely preserved.

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Is ‘The Blob’ back? New marine heat wave threatens Pacific

Researchers fear repeat of damaging ocean warming

1h

A Derelict Space Habitat May Crash Into an Old Russian Satellite

Crash Course There’s a small chance that two derelict satellites, still orbiting the Earth, could crash into each other on Wednesday morning. On Tuesday, the space habitat development company Bigelow Aerospace tweeted some troubling news . The Air Force sent them a heads up that their long-retired experimental habitat, Genesis II, might collide with an old Russian satellite named Cosmos 1300. Whi

1h

How we use astrophysics to study earthbound problems | Federica Bianco

To study a system as complex as the entire universe, astrophysicists need to be experts at extracting simple solutions from large data sets. What else could they do with this expertise? In an interdisciplinary talk, TED Fellow and astrophysicist Federica Bianco explains how she uses astrophysical data analysis to solve urban and social problems — as well as stellar mysteries.

1h

The Most Powerful Lightning Bolts Strike in Unexpected Places

Superbolts are extremely rare, and thousands of times more powerful than the tendrils in the typical electrical storm.

1h

Asteroid crater sheds light on first day of dinosaur extinction

Evidence found in the hundreds of feet of rocks that filled the impact crater within the first 24 hours after the asteroid strike that wiped out the dinosaurs confirms hypotheses about what happened that day. The prevailing hypothesis suggests that when the asteroid slammed into the planet, the impact set wildfires, triggered tsunamis, and blasted so much sulfur into the atmosphere that it blocke

1h

Radiation may lower potential for side effects of CAR T therapy in non-hodgkin's lymphoma

Treating non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients with radiation therapy as an additional treatment while they wait for their CAR T cells to be manufactured may reduce the risk of CAR T therapy side effects once it is administered.

1h

Bizarre Fossil Mammal Was an Ice Age Treehugger

A new analysis finds extinct wombat cousins were heftier, and stranger, than previously thought. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Rare 10 million-year-old fossil unearths new view of human evolution

Near an old mining town in Central Europe, known for its picturesque turquoise-blue quarry water, lay Rudapithecus. For 10 million years, the fossilized ape waited in Rudabánya, Hungary, to add its story to the origins of how humans evolved.

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Splitting water to make cement could clean up a dirty industry

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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FarmWise raises $14.5M Series A for sustainable robotic farming

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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China develops permanent magnet motor for 400 kph high-speed train

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Optical lace could make a 'nervous system' for robots

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Scientists are scrambling to take more photos of this seemingly alien comet

The image was taken using the Gemini North Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) from Hawaii’s Maunakea. (Gemini Observatory/NSF/AURA/) Astronomers have snapped a shot of what could be a comet visiting us from another solar system—only the second interstellar object we've ever spotted in our own cosmic neighborhood. The fact that it showed up so hot on the tail of 'Oumuamua, an infamous (and still lar

2h

Can an AI Scan Your Messages to Detect if Someone’s Flirting?

Overanalyzing For those who can never tell when someone’s flirting, some new AI apps might be able to help. Apps are popping up to help romantics determine whether they’re actually compatible with a prospective partner, according to Wired . But using AI to scrutinize texts is a risky move, since reading comprehension is historically one of AI’s weaker subject areas — a problem Wired ‘s Arielle Pa

2h

Några få företag kan rädda klimatet – de har makten över störst utsläpp

Planetens framtid ligger i en handfull multinationella företags händer. De har förmågan att påverka jordens klimat och samlade ekosystem, visar en ny sammanställning.

2h

Så mange millioner får fyret hospitalsdirektør

Klaus Lunding får et pænt millionbeløb med sig, efter han i dag blev fyret som hospitalsdirektør Herlev og Gentofte Hospital.

2h

Programmable swarmbots make flexible biological tools

Biomedical engineers have developed a new platform to create biological drugs using specially engineered bacteria that burst and release useful proteins when they sense that their capsule is becoming too crowded.

2h

Tesla’s Model S Just Crushed Porsche’s Lap Time in Germany

20 Seconds Faster The battle between Tesla and German automaker Porsche is heating up. According to German magazine Auto Motor und Sport , a special variant of Tesla’s Model S just sliced an impressive 20 seconds off of Porsche’s all-electric Taycan sportscar’s lap time at Germany’s Nürburgring race track — escalating a high-profile spat in the world of electric cars. Beat Down Witnesses surveyin

2h

Special journal issue brings focus to importance of studying landscape pattern

A new special issue of the journal Landscape Ecology organized by scientists at the USDA Forest Service and North Carolina State University assesses the state of the science of landscape pattern analysis. Appearing three decades after the first scientific papers on landscape patterns were published, the special issue includes 14 articles by scientists tackling current problems in the field, introd

2h

Rare 10 million-year-old fossil unearths new view of human evolution

Near an old mining town in Central Europe, known for its picturesque turquoise-blue quarry water, lay Rudapithecus. For 10 million years, the fossilized ape waited in Rudabánya, Hungary, to add its story to the origins of how humans evolved. What Rudabánya yielded was a pelvis — among the most informative bones of a skeleton, but one that is rarely preserved.

2h

The other self-actualization: What's the difference between Maslow and Rogers?

Along with Maslow, Carl Rogers helped pioneer the field of humanistic psychology. Although most associate the term "self-actualization" with Maslow, it's a concept that's frequently found in humanistic psychological literature. What's the difference between Maslow's and Rogers' versions of self-actualization, and what can we learn from Rogers? None One could be forgiven for thinking that the term

2h

Saturn's Rings May Be Ancient After All

Against earlier studies estimating an age of just 100 million years, new research suggests the planet’s rings could be as old as the solar system itself — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Stevens researchers to develop handheld device to diagnose skin cancer

Using shortwave rays installed in cellphones and airport security scanners, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed a technique that detects skin lesions and determines whether they are cancerous or benign — a technology that could ultimately be incorporated into a handheld device that could rapidly diagnose skin cancer without a scalpel in sight.

2h

Why Isn’t Trump Helping the Autoworkers?

It’s a sign of the diminished role of both manufacturing and organized labor in American society that a strike by autoworkers at General Motors hasn’t been the dominant news story this week. Still, the story should pique President Donald Trump’s interest. Many of the strikers work at factories in states that Trump carried in 2016, some of them narrowly. And their concerns—including dignified pay

2h

Devastated by Dorian: Photos From the Bahamas

Two weeks have passed since Hurricane Dorian finally moved away from the Bahamas, after pummeling the island nation for days with sustained winds reaching 185 mph (295 kph). The official death toll has reached 50, but hundreds remain listed as missing, and search-and-rescue teams continue to comb through widespread wreckage. Thousands of residents evacuated in the days following the storm, but ma

2h

Therapy creates new neurons for faster stroke recovery

A new gene therapy turns glial cells—abundant support cells in the brain—into neurons, repairing damage that results from stroke and significantly improving motor function in mice. Once researchers further develop the NeuroD1-based gene therapy, it could potentially help to treat stroke, which is a leading cause of disability in the US, with 800,000 new stroke patients every year. “The current tr

2h

UM study abroad students fuel understanding of gaps in conservation data

Animals around the globe face rising extinction rates, but there is often a lack of data about the causes of population declines, as well as ecological and biological considerations for conservation.

3h

RNA-DNA Chimeras Might Have Supported the Origin of Life on Earth

A new study finds mixtures of nucleotide types, rather than pure systems, are more likely to yield the building blocks of life.

3h

UM study abroad students fuel understanding of gaps in conservation data

Animals around the globe face rising extinction rates, but there is often a lack of data about the causes of population declines, as well as ecological and biological considerations for conservation.

3h

The Silenced: Meet the Climate Whistle-Blowers Muzzled by the Trump Administration

Six whistleblowers and ex-government scientists describe how the Trump administration made them bury climate science—and why they won’t stay quiet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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UM study abroad students fuel understanding of gaps in conservation data

A new collaborative study between students from University of Montana and the Universidad de Concepcion in Chile seeks to understand the type and magnitude of gaps in scientific information as a way to improve conservation planning.

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Emphasizing social play in kindergarten improves academics, reduces teacher burnout

Emphasizing more play, hands-on learning, and students helping one another in kindergarten improves academic outcomes, self-control and attention regulation, finds new UBC research.

3h

New piece of Alzheimer's puzzle found

Scientists found two short peptides, or strings of amino acids, that when injected into mice with Alzheimer's disease daily for five weeks, significantly improved the mice's memory. The treatment also reduced some of the harmful physical changes in the brain that are associated with the disease.

3h

North Atlantic haddock use magnetic compass to guide them

A new study found that the larvae of haddock, a commercially important type of cod, have a magnetic compass to find their way at sea. The findings showed that haddock larvae orient toward the northwest using Earth's magnetic field.

3h

Study changes guidelines for sepsis management

A researcher ends the debate among physicians regarding sepsis management.

3h

Programmable swarmbots make flexible biological tools

Biomedical engineers have developed a new platform to create biological drugs using specially engineered bacteria that burst and release useful proteins when they sense that their capsule is becoming too crowded.

3h

Peatlands trap CO2, even during droughts

Scientists studied the two species of moss that make up the peatland. They discovered that in hot weather and drought conditions, one species resists, whereas the other is negatively impacted. In wet weather conditions the opposite takes place. Peatland however survives in the end. Although peatlands make up only 3% of the Earth's surface, they store one third of CO2 present in soil. Preserving pe

3h

Machine learning used to help tell which wildfires will burn out of control

Scientists have developed a new technique for predicting the final size of a wildfire from the moment of ignition.

3h

Deeper understanding of early life experiences can help combat chronic obesity and frequent bingeing

According to a new study, dysfunctional eating patterns and habits in overweight and obese adults can be triggered by early life experiences that are deeply rooted within patients' personality features.

3h

Hyperbolic paraboloid origami harnesses bistability to enable new applications

Researchers are looking the 'hypar' origami for ways to leverage its structural properties.

3h

Electric pill bottles and text messaging not enough to affect blood pressure control

Blood pressure levels in patients with hypertension did not improve when patients took part in automated texting or were given electronic pill bottles.

3h

Genomic migration analysis shows antibiotic resistance moving from humans to animals

New results show that human-acquired antibiotic resistance genes are being transmitted to livestock, companion animals and wildlife. Researchers analyzed a global set of 901 genome sequences of the bacteria Streptococcus agalactiae (aka group B Strep) from nine different host species — humans, cows, dogs, fish, frogs, gray seals, dolphins, goats and a camel — to better understand the transmissio

3h

New pathway that controls fat formation

In work suggesting new therapeutic targets to fight obesity, researchers have identified a novel mechanism that regulates the creation of fat in mammals.

3h

How do 80-year-old 'super-agers' have the brains of 20-somethings?

"Super-agers" seem to escape the decline in cognitive function that affects most of the elderly population. New research suggests this is because of higher functional connectivity in key brain networks. It's not clear what the specific reason for this is, but research has uncovered several activities that encourage greater brain health in old age. None At some point in our 20s or 30s, something s

3h

Perhaps we need to explain climate change to politicians as we would to very small children

Here, let me try. The sun is very, very hot When I was an undergrad learning geology, the maxim that was thumped into me wasn’t how to build a mine or drill for oil and gas, it was simply: “the present is the key to the past”. The thing that took a while to accept was that the past was really, really, long. It’s hard to comprehend the scale of geologic time: the timespan for continents to crash t

3h

A Newly Identified Protein May Be the Key to Vanquishing the Common Cold

Inactivating this protein in human cells and mice provided immunity to a range of viruses, but an effective treatment is still a long way off — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Gene editing enables researchers to correct mutation in muscle stem cells in DMD model

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rare but devastating genetic disorder that causes muscle loss and physical impairments. Researchers have shown in a mouse study that the powerful gene editing technique known as CRISPR may provide the means for lifelong correction of the genetic mutation responsible for the disorder.

3h

The effects of variation in T6SS and bacteria on competition in host environment

A group of scientists studying the ways plant-associated bacteria interact were surprised to find that strains predicted to be more sensitive to bacteria were able to coexist with aggressor strains.

3h

Crucial role of recycling in the evolution of life in our universe

New research by astrophysicists reveals how the gas and energy expelled by stars are returned to the universe, and in what forms. It also found that the elements produced by dying stars are transferred through a process of fragmentation and recycled into new stars and planets.

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Feeling depressed? Mahjong might be the answer

When it comes to boosting mental health among older Chinese, it might be as simple as a game of mahjong, according to a new study.

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Inside Conservative Groups’ Effort to ‘Make Dishwashers Great Again’

Of all the efforts to persuade the Trump administration to weaken environmental rules, the Make Dishwashers Great Again lobby might be the most peculiar.

3h

Emphasizing social play in kindergarten improves academics, reduces teacher burnout

Emphasizing more play, hands-on learning, and students helping one another in kindergarten improves academic outcomes, self-control and attention regulation, finds new UBC research.

3h

A New Kind of Climate Leadership

Climate change is an opportunity to envision a new world—but in whose image? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Married CEOs are more committed to social issues than non-married peers

If a company wants a leader who is committed to corporate social responsibility, it would be wise to hire a married man. Married men in the top leadership jobs typically have greater concern for their employees' well-being, and are more accepting of diverse employees, than are their non-married peers.

3h

‘I’ll have what she’s having’ – how and why we copy the choices of others

Imagine you're dining out at a casual restaurant with some friends. After looking over the menu, you decide to order the steak. But then, after a dinner companion orders a salad for their main course, you declare: “I'll have the salad too." This kind of situation – making choices that you probably otherwise wouldn't make were you alone – probably happens more often than you think in a wide variet

3h

Google Fi gets a cheaper “unlimited” plan, bundled cloud storage

With the cloud storage, you'll save about $12 over the old Fi unlimited plan.

3h

A Giant Volcano on One of Jupiter’s Moons Is About to Erupt

Space Volcano Loki, a volcano on Jupiter’s moon Io named after the Norse trickster god, is probably going to erupt within the next few days. Io is a volatile world, pockmarked by active volcanos , the largest of which is Loki. If new calculations reported by Europlanet Society are correct, it’s due to go off any day now. If the scientists are correct, the findings could bring about a better under

3h

Genomic migration analysis shows antibiotic resistance moving from humans to animals

A Clemson University professor's research has documented the movement of antibiotic resistance in humans into animal species.

3h

Hundreds of sea turtle nests lost after Hurricane Dorian: 'It could have been worse'

Strong tropical winds and high tides associated with Hurricane Dorian unearthed hundreds of sea turtle nests on beaches along the Space Coast, officials said.

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Youth activism is on the rise around the globe, says author

Greta and Malala get the headlines, but for every young leader pictured on a magazine cover, thousands more are working tirelessly for causes like climate justice, racial and gender equality, LGBTQ rights, and economic change.

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Team uses machine learning to help tell which wildfires will burn out of control

An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the University of California, Irvine has developed a new technique for predicting the final size of a wildfire from the moment of ignition.

3h

North Atlantic haddock use magnetic compass to guide them

A new study found that the larvae of haddock, a commercially important type of cod, have a magnetic compass to find their way at sea. The findings showed that haddock larvae orient toward the northwest using Earth's magnetic field.

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'Flight shaming' could help unleash billions in airline cash to protect the Amazon and other tropical forests

Concerns about the carbon footprint of air travel have taken off around the globe with "flight shaming" the latest cultural battleground set up by the escalating climate crisis.

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Homo heidelbergensis: The Answer to a Mysterious Period in Human History?

Cranium 5, a skull found at Sima de los Huesos and thought to be either a late Homo heidelbergensis or an early Neanderthal. (Credit: Rept0n1x/Wikimedia Commons) There’s a murky chapter in human evolution, one that occurs right before our species entered the scene. Over 1 million years ago our ancestors belonged to the primitive-looking species Homo erectus. Jump to 300,000 years ago and Earth is

3h

Genomic migration analysis shows antibiotic resistance moving from humans to animals

A Clemson University professor's research has documented the movement of antibiotic resistance in humans into animal species.

3h

Hundreds of sea turtle nests lost after Hurricane Dorian: 'It could have been worse'

Strong tropical winds and high tides associated with Hurricane Dorian unearthed hundreds of sea turtle nests on beaches along the Space Coast, officials said.

3h

North Atlantic haddock use magnetic compass to guide them

A new study found that the larvae of haddock, a commercially important type of cod, have a magnetic compass to find their way at sea. The findings showed that haddock larvae orient toward the northwest using Earth's magnetic field.

3h

A Newly Identified Protein May Be the Key to Vanquishing the Common Cold

Inactivating this protein in human cells and mice provided immunity to a range of viruses, but an effective treatment is still a long way off — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

A Newly Identified Protein May Be the Key to Vanquishing the Common Cold

Inactivating this protein in human cells and mice provided immunity to a range of viruses, but an effective treatment is still a long way off — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Huge volcano on Jupiter's moon Io erupts on regular schedule

Volcanic eruptions are difficult to predict, but observations have shown the largest and most powerful volcano on Io, a large moon of Jupiter, has been erupting on a relatively regular schedule.

3h

New piece of Alzheimer's puzzle found

In a study published in Scientific Reports, University of Alberta researcher Jack Jhamandas and his team found two short peptides, or strings of amino acids, that when injected into mice with Alzheimer's disease daily for five weeks, significantly improved the mice's memory. The treatment also reduced some of the harmful physical changes in the brain that are associated with the disease.

3h

North Atlantic haddock use magnetic compass to guide them

A new study found that the larvae of haddock, a commercially important type of cod, have a magnetic compass to find their way at sea. The findings showed that haddock larvae orient toward the northwest using Earth's magnetic field.

3h

Study changes guidelines for sepsis management

University of Arizona Health Sciences researcher ends debate among physicians regarding sepsis management.

3h

Programmable swarmbots make flexible biological tools

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a new platform to create biological drugs using specially engineered bacteria that burst and release useful proteins when they sense that their capsule is becoming too crowded.

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Clues to the origin of Huntington's disease, and a new way to find drugs

Using a new technique to study brain development, scientists were able to trace the causes of Huntington's back to early developmental stages when the brain has only just begun to form.

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Potential target for cardiac fibrosis treatment

A research team has identified a potential target for treating heart failure related to fibrosis. The study looked at an epigenetic 'reader' protein known as BRD4, showing that it serves a central role in regulating the activation of cardiac fibroblasts. They also found that chemical inhibitors of BRD4 potently block cardiac fibroblast activation.

3h

Radiation therapy effective against deadly heart rhythm

A single high dose of radiation aimed at the heart significantly reduces episodes of a potentially deadly rapid heart rhythm, according to results of a phase one/two study.

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Scientists create fully electronic 2-dimensional spin transistors

Physicists have constructed a two-dimensional spin transistor, in which spin currents were generated by an electric current through graphene. A monolayer of a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) was placed on top of graphene to induce charge-to-spin conversion in the graphene.

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Elusive compounds of greenhouse gas isolated

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent atmospheric pollutant. Although naturally occurring, anthropogenic N2O emissions from intensive agricultural fertilization, industrial processes, and combustion of fossil fuels and biomass are a major cause for concern. Researchers have isolated elusive transition metal compounds of N2O that provide clues into how it could be used in sustainable chemical technologie

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One way childhood trauma leads to poorer health for women

Researchers have long known that childhood trauma is linked to poorer health for women at midlife. A new study shows one important reason why. The national study of more than 3,000 women is the first to find that those who experienced childhood trauma were more likely than others to have their first child both earlier in life and outside of marriage – and that those factors were associated with po

3h

How much of corals' nutrition comes from hunting?

When it comes to feeding, corals have a few tricks up their sleeve. Most of their nutrients come from microscopic algae living inside of them, but if those algae aren't creating enough sustenance, corals can use their tentacles to grab and eat tiny prey swimming nearby.

3h

Fungicides as an underestimated hazard for freshwater organisms

Large amounts of fungicides, used in agriculture, leak into nearby surface waters. The effects of it on aquatic organisms are poorly understood and not specifically addressed in the EU regulatory frameworks with respect to the protection of surface waters. Scientists have found that pollution by fungicides can have unforeseen but far-reaching consequences for the functioning of aquatic systems —

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2019 Festival Albertine to Take On Climate Change

Bill McKibben will be the curator of the festival, dedicated to fostering French-American intellectual exchange, which this year focuses on the environment.

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Astronomers Capture Image of Second Known Interstellar Object

Astronomers around the world were elated in 2017 when ‘Oumuamua appeared in the sky, becoming the very first confirmed alien object to visit our solar system. Sadly, ‘Oumuamua was already on its way out of the solar system before its discovery by the Pan-STARRS observatory, and we couldn’t capture an image. Now, astronomers have successfully snapped a photo of the second known interstellar visito

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How Brett Kavanaugh Got the Last Laugh

On Sunday morning, Senator Ted Cruz made an appearance on This Week . The interview’s first question, given the shape the weekend’s news cycle had taken, was unsurprising: The host asked the senator about the new book The Education of Brett Kavanaugh , an adaptation of which had been published the day before in The New York Times . The essay—written, as was the book itself, by the Times reporters

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Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Laurene Powell Jobs Interviewing Bob Iger, and Kirstjen Nielsen To Appear at The Atlantic Festival September 24-26

The Atlantic Festival will open next Tuesday with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi in conversation with The Atlantic’s editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg , kicking off three full days of events from September 24-26, 2019, at the Harman Center for the Arts and venues across Washington, D.C.’s Penn Quarter neighborhood. Also just announced: Kirstjen Nielsen , former Secretary of Homeland Security; a

4h

UTSW researchers identify new pathway that controls fat formation

In work suggesting new therapeutic targets to fight obesity, UT Southwestern researchers have identified a novel mechanism that regulates the creation of fat in mammals.

4h

Married CEOs are more committed to social issues than non-married peers

Firms led by married CEOs were associated with significantly higher scores on a respected corporate social responsibility index.

4h

Genomic migration analysis shows antibiotic resistance moving from humans to animals

Clemson professor Vince Richards has published results showing that human-acquired antibiotic resistance genes are being transmitted to livestock, companion animals and wildlife. In the study, he and his collaborators analyzed a global set of 901 genome sequences of the bacteria Streptococcus agalactiae (aka group B Strep) from nine different host species — humans, cows, dogs, fish, frogs, gray s

4h

UCI team uses machine learning to help tell which wildfires will burn out of control

An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the University of California, Irvine has developed a new technique for predicting the final size of a wildfire from the moment of ignition.

4h

Electric pill bottles and text messaging not enough to affect blood pressure control

Blood pressure levels in patients with hypertension did not improve when patients took part in automated texting or were given electronic pill bottles.

4h

Acoustic energy harnessed to soften shear-thickening fluids

Researchers are using ultrasonic waves to manipulate the viscosity of shear-thickening materials, turning solids to slush — and back again.

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GM Mosquito Progeny Not Dying in Brazil: Study

The biotech Oxitec had released the genetically engineered insects with the hope that they would breed with wild populations and produce offspring that die young. But that's not always happening.

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Theory: Odd metallic asteroid spewed molten iron

The metallic asteroid Psyche has mystified scientists because it is less dense than it should be, given its iron-nickel composition. A new theory offers an explanation. Unlike most asteroids, Psyche appears composed largely of iron and nickel instead of rocky rubble. Researchers think metal-rich asteroids formed when primordial planetesimals collided, stripping away much of the outer material and

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A safer way for police to test drug evidence

Scientists have demonstrated a way for police to quickly and safely test whether a baggie or other package contains illegal drugs without having to handle any suspicious contents directly. The new technique can limit the risk of accidental exposure to fentanyl and other highly potent drugs that can be dangerous if a small amount is accidentally inhaled.

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A Matter of concentration

Researchers are studying how proteins regulate the stem cells of plants.

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Contacting aliens would be madness on a galactic scale

Our species has never been more invested in the scientific hunt for life elsewhere in the universe

4h

Deeper understanding of early life experiences can help combat chronic obesity and frequent bingeing

According to a new study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier, dysfunctional eating patterns and habits in overweight and obese adults can be triggered by early life experiences that are deeply rooted within patients' personality features.

4h

The market in your head

When bidding in a competitive market, our brains use a special type of heuristic to adjust the price depending on the success of previous attempts to buy goods. Moreover, this learning mechanism involves not only the cerebral cortex, but the evolutionary ancient brain area of the striatum. This was the conclusion reached by neuroscientists from the HSE University and the Research Center of Neurolo

4h

Hyperbolic paraboloid origami harnesses bistability to enable new applications

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Tokyo are looking the 'hypar' origami for ways to leverage its structural properties.

4h

Peatlands trap CO2, even during droughts

French scientists studied the two species of moss that make up the peatland. They discovered that in hot weather and drought conditions, one species resists, whereas the other is negatively impacted. In wet weather conditions the opposite takes place. Peatland however survives in the end. Although peatlands make up only 3% of the Earth's surface, they store one third of CO2 present in soil. Preser

4h

‘Traffic light’ stops quantum waves in their tracks

A “traffic light” that can bring quantum waves to a halt could be key to harnessing the potential of the atomic world, researchers report. Their findings could eventually lead to breakthroughs in computing , medicine, cryptography, materials science, and other applications. “It’s an area of research of immense importance,” says Jon Bird, professor and chair in the electrical engineering departmen

4h

Elizabeth Warren’s Fans Aren’t Naive About Her Plans

NEW YORK —The tens of thousands of people who crowded into Washington Square Park and waited through a light rain to hear Elizabeth Warren speak yesterday evening already knew her as the 2020 candidate with the plans . That much was clear when the first big roar of the night went up about a third of the way into the senator from Massachusetts’s 40-minute speech. “I know what’s broken. I’ve got a

4h

Structural insight into multistage inhibition of CRISPR-Cas12a by AcrVA4 [Biochemistry]

Prokaryotes possess CRISPR-Cas systems to exclude parasitic predators, such as phages and mobile genetic elements (MGEs). These predators, in turn, encode anti-CRISPR (Acr) proteins to evade the CRISPR-Cas immunity. Recently, AcrVA4, an Acr protein inhibiting the CRISPR-Cas12a system, was shown to diminish Lachnospiraceae bacterium Cas12a (LbCas12a)-mediated genome editing in human…

4h

Hydrophobic gasket mutation produces gating pore currents in closed human voltage-gated proton channels [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The hydrophobic gasket (HG), a ring of hydrophobic amino acids in the voltage-sensing domain of most voltage-gated ion channels, forms a constriction between internal and external aqueous vestibules. Cationic Arg or Lys side chains lining the S4 helix move through this “gating pore” when the channel opens. S4 movement may…

4h

Leveraging protein dynamics to identify cancer mutational hotspots using 3D structures [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Large-scale exome sequencing of tumors has enabled the identification of cancer drivers using recurrence-based approaches. Some of these methods also employ 3D protein structures to identify mutational hotspots in cancer-associated genes. In determining such mutational clusters in structures, existing approaches overlook protein dynamics, despite its essential role in protein function….

4h

Historical records reveal the distinctive associations of human disturbance and extreme climate change with local extinction of mammals [Ecology]

Accelerated anthropogenic impacts and climatic changes are widely considered to be responsible for unprecedented species extinction. However, determining their effects on extinction is challenging owing to the lack of long-term data with high spatial and temporal resolution. In this study, using historical occurrence records of 11 medium- to large-sized mammal…

4h

Weak warning signals can persist in the absence of gene flow [Evolution]

Aposematic organisms couple conspicuous warning signals with a secondary defense to deter predators from attacking. Novel signals of aposematic prey are expected to be selected against due to positive frequency-dependent selection. How, then, can novel phenotypes persist after they arise, and why do so many aposematic species exhibit intrapopulation signal…

4h

Cooption of the pteridine biosynthesis pathway underlies the diversification of embryonic colors in water striders [Evolution]

Naturalists have been fascinated for centuries by animal colors and color patterns. While widely studied at the adult stage, we know little about color patterns in the embryo. Here, we study a trait consisting of coloration that is specific to the embryo and absent from postembryonic stages in water striders…

4h

Medullary thymic epithelial NF-kB-inducing kinase (NIK)/IKK{alpha} pathway shapes autoimmunity and liver and lung homeostasis in mice [Immunology and Inflammation]

Aberrant T cell development is a pivotal risk factor for autoimmune disease; however, the underlying molecular mechanism of T cell overactivation is poorly understood. Here, we identified NF–κB-inducing kinase (NIK) and IkB kinase α (IKKα) in thymic epithelial cells (TECs) as essential regulators of T cell development. Mouse TEC-specific ablation…

4h

Comprehensive genomic profiling of glioblastoma tumors, BTICs, and xenografts reveals stability and adaptation to growth environments [Medical Sciences]

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most deadly brain tumor, and currently lacks effective treatment options. Brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) and orthotopic xenografts are widely used in investigating GBM biology and new therapies for this aggressive disease. However, the genomic characteristics and molecular resemblance of these models to GBM tumors remain…

4h

On the evolution and physiology of cable bacteria [Microbiology]

Cable bacteria of the family Desulfobulbaceae form centimeter-long filaments comprising thousands of cells. They occur worldwide in the surface of aquatic sediments, where they connect sulfide oxidation with oxygen or nitrate reduction via long-distance electron transport. In the absence of pure cultures, we used single-filament genomics and metagenomics to retrieve…

4h

Discovery of novel bacterial queuine salvage enzymes and pathways in human pathogens [Microbiology]

Queuosine (Q) is a complex tRNA modification widespread in eukaryotes and bacteria that contributes to the efficiency and accuracy of protein synthesis. Eukaryotes are not capable of Q synthesis and rely on salvage of the queuine base (q) as a Q precursor. While many bacteria are capable of Q de…

4h

Subgenomic flavivirus RNA binds the mosquito DEAD/H-box helicase ME31B and determines Zika virus transmission by Aedes aegypti [Microbiology]

Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne flavivirus predominantly transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and poses a global human health threat. All flaviviruses, including those that exclusively replicate in mosquitoes, produce a highly abundant, noncoding subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) in infected cells, which implies an important function of sfRNA during mosquito…

4h

Oxidative stress drives the selection of quorum sensing mutants in the Staphylococcus aureus population [Microbiology]

Quorum sensing (QS) is the central mechanism by which social interactions within the bacterial community control bacterial behavior. QS-negative cells benefit by exploiting public goods produced by the QS-proficient population. Mechanisms to keep the balance between producers and nonproducers within the population are expected but have not been elucidated for…

4h

The default-mode network represents aesthetic appeal that generalizes across visual domains [Neuroscience]

Visual aesthetic evaluations, which impact decision-making and well-being, recruit the ventral visual pathway, subcortical reward circuitry, and parts of the medial prefrontal cortex overlapping with the default-mode network (DMN). However, it is unknown whether these networks represent aesthetic appeal in a domain-general fashion, independent of domain-specific representations of stimulus content

4h

Nmnat restores neuronal integrity by neutralizing mutant Huntingtin aggregate-induced progressive toxicity [Neuroscience]

Accumulative aggregation of mutant Huntingtin (Htt) is a primary neuropathological hallmark of Huntington’s disease (HD). Currently, mechanistic understanding of the cytotoxicity of mutant Htt aggregates remains limited, and neuroprotective strategies combating mutant Htt-induced neurodegeneration are lacking. Here, we show that in Drosophila models of HD, neuronal compartment-specific accumulatio

4h

Phosphorylated claudin-16 interacts with Trpv5 and regulates transcellular calcium transport in the kidney [Physiology]

Familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) was previously considered to be a paracellular channelopathy caused by mutations in the claudin-16 and claudin-19 genes. Here, we provide evidence that a missense FHHNC mutation c.908C>G (p.T303R) in the claudin-16 gene interferes with the phosphorylation in the claudin-16 protein. The claudin-16 protein…

4h

Extracellular RNA in a single droplet of human serum reflects physiologic and disease states [Systems Biology]

Extracellular RNAs (exRNAs) are present in human serum. It remains unclear to what extent these circulating exRNAs may reflect human physiologic and disease states. Here, we developed SILVER-seq (Small Input Liquid Volume Extracellular RNA Sequencing) to efficiently sequence both integral and fragmented exRNAs from a small droplet (5 μL to…

4h

Plant evolution and environmental adaptation unveiled by long-read whole-genome sequencing of Spirodela [Agricultural Sciences]

Aquatic plants have to adapt to the environments distinct from where land plants grow. A critical aspect of adaptation is the dynamics of sequence repeats, not resolved in older sequencing platforms due to incomplete and fragmented genome assemblies from short reads. Therefore, we used PacBio long-read sequencing of the Spirodela…

4h

Genome-wide identification of Pseudomonas syringae genes required for fitness during colonization of the leaf surface and apoplast [Agricultural Sciences]

The foliar plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae can establish large epiphytic populations on leaf surfaces before apoplastic colonization. However, the bacterial genes that contribute to these lifestyles have not been completely defined. The fitness contributions of 4,296 genes in P. syringae pv. syringae B728a were determined by genome-wide fitness profiling with…

4h

Bioluminescence chemistry of fireworm Odontosyllis [Biochemistry]

Marine polychaetes Odontosyllis undecimdonta, commonly known as fireworms, emit bright blue-green bioluminescence. Until the recent identification of the Odontosyllis luciferase enzyme, little progress had been made toward characterizing the key components of this bioluminescence system. Here we present the biomolecular mechanisms of enzymatic (leading to light emission) and nonenzymatic (dark)…

4h

Photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex photoassembly displays an inverse H/D solvent isotope effect under chloride-limiting conditions [Biochemistry]

Photosystem II (PSII) performs the solar-driven oxidation of water used to fuel oxygenic photosynthesis. The active site of water oxidation is the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), a Mn4CaO5 cluster. PSII requires degradation of key subunits and reassembly of the OEC as frequently as every 20 to 40 min. The metals for…

4h

Structural basis for transcription activation by Crl through tethering of {sigma}S and RNA polymerase [Biochemistry]

In bacteria, a primary σ-factor associates with the core RNA polymerase (RNAP) to control most transcription initiation, while alternative σ-factors are used to coordinate expression of additional regulons in response to environmental conditions. Many alternative σ-factors are negatively regulated by anti–σ-factors. In Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, and many other γ-proteobacteria,…

4h

P2Y2 purinergic receptor modulates virus yield, calcium homeostasis, and cell motility in human cytomegalovirus-infected cells [Cell Biology]

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) manipulates many aspects of host cell biology to create an intracellular milieu optimally supportive of its replication and spread. Our study reveals that levels of several components of the purinergic signaling system, including the P2Y2 and P2X5 receptors, are elevated in HCMV-infected fibroblasts. Knockdown and drug treatment…

4h

Transient induction of telomerase expression mediates senescence and reduces tumorigenesis in primary fibroblasts [Cell Biology]

Telomerase is an enzymatic ribonucleoprotein complex that acts as a reverse transcriptase in the elongation of telomeres. Telomerase activity is well documented in embryonic stem cells and the vast majority of tumor cells, but its role in somatic cells remains to be understood. Here, we report an unexpected function of…

4h

A tryptophan synchronous and normal fluorescence study on bacteria inactivation mechanism [Chemistry]

The UV photodissociation kinetics of tryptophan amino acid, Trp, attached to the membrane of bacteria, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, have been studied by means of normal and synchronous fluorescence. Our experimental data suggest that the fluorescence intensity of Trp increases during the first minute of irradiation with 250 nm…

4h

Single-molecule and -particle probing crystal edge/corner as highly efficient photocatalytic sites on a single TiO2 particle [Chemistry]

The exposed active sites of semiconductor catalysts are essential to the photocatalytic energy conversion efficiency. However, it is difficult to directly observe such active sites and understand the photogenerated electron/hole pairs’ dynamics on a single catalyst particle. Here, we applied a quasi-total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and laser-scanning confocal microscopy…

4h

Rational construction of a library of M29 nanoclusters from monometallic to tetrametallic [Chemistry]

Exploring intermetallic synergy has allowed a series of alloy nanoparticles with prominent chemical–physical properties to be produced. However, precise alloying based on a maintained template has long been a challenging pursuit, and little has been achieved for manipulation at the atomic level. Here, a nanosystem based on M29(S-Adm)18(PPh3)4 (where S-Adm…

4h

The Drosophila Trpm channel mediates calcium influx during egg activation [Developmental Biology]

Egg activation is the process in which mature oocytes are released from developmental arrest and gain competency for embryonic development. In Drosophila and other arthropods, eggs are activated by mechanical pressure in the female reproductive tract, whereas in most other species, eggs are activated by fertilization. Despite the difference in…

4h

Deliberate enhancement of rainfall using desert plantations [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Large-scale afforestation is increasingly being considered as a negative emissions method for sequestering large quantities of atmospheric CO2. At the same time, regional weather modification methods, like cloud seeding, are being used to counteract increasing water scarcity in arid regions. Large-scale sustainable desert agroforestry plantations can contribute to climate change…

4h

Land-atmosphere feedbacks exacerbate concurrent soil drought and atmospheric aridity [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Compound extremes such as cooccurring soil drought (low soil moisture) and atmospheric aridity (high vapor pressure deficit) can be disastrous for natural and societal systems. Soil drought and atmospheric aridity are 2 main physiological stressors driving widespread vegetation mortality and reduced terrestrial carbon uptake. Here, we empirically demonstrate that strong…

4h

Global atmospheric oxygen variations recorded by Th/U systematics of igneous rocks [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Atmospheric oxygen has evolved from negligible levels in the Archean to the current level of about 21% through 2 major step rises: The Great Oxidation Event (GOE) in the early Proterozoic and the Neoproterozoic Oxygenation Event (NOE) during the late Proterozoic. However, most previous methods for constraining the time of…

4h

A unifying model for the accretion of chondrules and matrix [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The so far unique role of our Solar System in the universe regarding its capacity for life raises fundamental questions about its formation history relative to exoplanetary systems. Central in this research is the accretion of asteroids and planets from a gas-rich circumstellar disk and the final distribution of their…

4h

Multidecadal observations of the Antarctic ice sheet from restored analog radar records [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Airborne radar sounding can measure conditions within and beneath polar ice sheets. In Antarctica, most digital radar-sounding data have been collected in the last 2 decades, limiting our ability to understand processes that govern longer-term ice-sheet behavior. Here, we demonstrate how analog radar data collected over 40 y ago in…

4h

Seawater-buffered diagenesis, destruction of carbon isotope excursions, and the composition of DIC in Neoproterozoic oceans [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Carbonate sediments of nonglacial Cryogenian (659 to 649 Ma) and early Ediacaran (635 to 590 Ma) age exhibit large positive and negative δ13Ccarb excursions in a shallow-water marine platform in northern Namibia. The same excursions are recorded in fringing deep-sea fans and in carbonate platforms on other paleocontinents. However, coeval…

4h

Many human RNA viruses show extraordinarily stringent selective constraints on protein evolution [Evolution]

How negative selection, positive selection, and population size contribute to the large variation in nucleotide substitution rates among RNA viruses remains unclear. Here, we studied the ratios of nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution rates (dN/dS) in protein-coding genes of human RNA and DNA viruses and mammals. Among the 21 RNA viruses studied, 18…

4h

Widespread male sex bias in mammal fossil and museum collections [Evolution]

A recent study of mammoth subfossil remains has demonstrated the potential of using relatively low-coverage high-throughput DNA sequencing to genetically sex specimens, revealing a strong male-biased sex ratio [P. Pečnerová et al., Curr. Biol. 27, 3505–3510.e3 (2017)]. Similar patterns were predicted for steppe bison, based on their analogous female herd-based…

4h

tartan underlies the evolution of Drosophila male genital morphology [Evolution]

Male genital structures are among the most rapidly evolving morphological traits and are often the only features that can distinguish closely related species. This process is thought to be driven by sexual selection and may reinforce species separation. However, while the genetic bases of many phenotypic differences have been identified,…

4h

Extreme heterogeneity in sex chromosome differentiation and dosage compensation in livebearers [Evolution]

Once recombination is halted between the X and Y chromosomes, sex chromosomes begin to differentiate and transition to heteromorphism. While there is a remarkable variation across clades in the degree of sex chromosome divergence, far less is known about the variation in sex chromosome differentiation within clades. Here, we combined…

4h

Homozygous NLRP1 gain-of-function mutation in siblings with a syndromic form of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis [Genetics]

Juvenile-onset recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (JRRP) is a rare and debilitating childhood disease that presents with recurrent growth of papillomas in the upper airway. Two common human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV-6 and -11, are implicated in most cases, but it is still not understood why only a small proportion of children develop…

4h

The genetic landscape of Scotland and the Isles [Genetics]

Britain and Ireland are known to show population genetic structure; however, large swathes of Scotland, in particular, have yet to be described. Delineating the structure and ancestry of these populations will allow variant discovery efforts to focus efficiently on areas not represented in existing cohorts. Thus, we assembled genotype data…

4h

Decreased humoral immunity to mumps in young adults immunized with MMR vaccine in childhood [Immunology and Inflammation]

In the past decade, multiple mumps outbreaks have occurred in the United States, primarily in close-contact, high-density settings such as colleges, with a high attack rate among young adults, many of whom had the recommended 2 doses of mumps-measles-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Waning humoral immunity and the circulation of divergent wild-type…

4h

Molecular basis for retinol binding by serum amyloid A during infection [Immunology and Inflammation]

Serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are strongly induced in the liver by systemic infection and in the intestine by bacterial colonization. In infected mice, SAA proteins circulate in association with the vitamin A derivative retinol, suggesting that SAAs transport retinol during infection. Here we illuminate a structural basis for the…

4h

Phenotypically distinct neutrophils patrol uninfected human and mouse lymph nodes [Immunology and Inflammation]

Neutrophils play a key role in innate immunity. As the dominant circulating phagocyte, they are rapidly recruited from the bloodstream to sites of infection or injury to internalize and destroy microbes. More recently, neutrophils have been identified in uninfected organs, challenging the classical view of their function. Here we show…

4h

On the bounded generation of arithmetic SL2 [Mathematics]

Let K be a number field and S be a finite set of primes of K containing the archimedean valuations. Let 𝒪 be the ring of S-integers in K. Morgan, Rapinchuck, and Sury [A. V. Morgan et al., Algebra Number Theory 12, 1949–1974 (2018)] have proved that if the group…

4h

The Ramsey property implies no mad families [Mathematics]

We show that if all collections of infinite subsets of N have the Ramsey property, then there are no infinite maximal almost disjoint (mad) families. The implication is proved in Zermelo–Fraenkel set theory with only weak choice principles. This gives a positive solution to a long-standing problem that goes back…

4h

Cryo-EM structure of pleconaril-resistant rhinovirus-B5 complexed to the antiviral OBR-5-340 reveals unexpected binding site [Microbiology]

Viral inhibitors, such as pleconaril and vapendavir, target conserved regions in the capsids of rhinoviruses (RVs) and enteroviruses (EVs) by binding to a hydrophobic pocket in viral capsid protein 1 (VP1). In resistant RVs and EVs, bulky residues in this pocket prevent their binding. However, recently developed pyrazolopyrimidines inhibit pleconaril-resistant…

4h

Assemblies of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II with actin and their dynamic regulation by calmodulin in dendritic spines [Physics]

Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) plays a key role in the plasticity of dendritic spines. Calcium signals cause calcium−calmodulin to activate CaMKII, which leads to remodeling of the actin filament (F-actin) network in the spine. We elucidate the mechanism of the remodeling by combining computer simulations with protein array experiments and…

4h

Autophagy controls reactive oxygen species homeostasis in guard cells that is essential for stomatal opening [Plant Biology]

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as key signaling molecules to inhibit stomatal opening and promote stomatal closure in response to diverse environmental stresses. However, how guard cells maintain basal intracellular ROS levels is not yet known. This study aimed to determine the role of autophagy in the maintenance of basal…

4h

Cross-national evidence of a negativity bias in psychophysiological reactions to news [Social Sciences]

What accounts for the prevalence of negative news content? One answer may lie in the tendency for humans to react more strongly to negative than positive information. “Negativity biases” in human cognition and behavior are well documented, but existing research is based on small Anglo-American samples and stimuli that are…

4h

GeneFishing to reconstruct context specific portraits of biological processes [Statistics]

Rapid advances in genomic technologies have led to a wealth of diverse data, from which novel discoveries can be gleaned through the application of robust statistical and computational methods. Here, we describe GeneFishing, a semisupervised computational approach to reconstruct context-specific portraits of biological processes by leveraging gene–gene coexpression information. GeneFishing…

4h

Market-mediated responses confound policies to limit deforestation from oil palm expansion in Malaysia and Indonesia [Sustainability Science]

The global demand for palm oil has grown rapidly over the past several decades. Much of the output expansion has occurred in carbon- and biodiversity-rich forest lands of Malaysia and Indonesia (M&I), contributing to record levels of terrestrial carbon emissions and biodiversity loss. This has led to a variety of…

4h

Correction for Miehlbradt et al., Data-driven body-machine interface for the accurate control of drones [Corrections]

ENGINEERING, NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “Data-driven body–machine interface for the accurate control of drones,” by Jenifer Miehlbradt, Alexandre Cherpillod, Stefano Mintchev, Martina Coscia, Fiorenzo Artoni, Dario Floreano, and Silvestro Micera, which was first published July 16, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1718648115 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 115, 7913–7918). The authors note that the following…

4h

Correction to Supporting Information for Caro et al., Analysis of lipoprotein transport depletion in Vibrio cholerae using CRISPRi [SI Correction]

MICROBIOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for “Analysis of lipoprotein transport depletion in Vibrio cholerae using CRISPRi,” by Florence Caro, Nicole M. Place, and John J. Mekalanos, which was first published August 1, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1906158116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 17013–17022). The authors note that Fig. S14 in the SI…

4h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Embryonic colors in water striders Embryos of L. franciscanus showing ocular and extraocular color patterns. Color in the animal kingdom serves crucial functions, including protection against UV, heat regulation, camouflage, and mate signaling. However, the origin and role of embryonic color in animals are poorly understood. Aidamalia Vargas-Lowman et al….

4h

Effects of grazing livestock on grassland functioning may depend more on grazing intensity than livestock diversity [Biological Sciences]

Disentangling the effects of livestock diversity on ecosystem functioning and underlying mechanisms in managed ecosystems is important for distilling an integrated biodiversity−ecosystem functioning relationship theory (BEF) across multitrophic cascades in ecology, biodiversity conservation, and ecosystem management. In PNAS, Wang et al. (1) present fascinating results with a 5-y manipulated mixed

4h

Reply to Hu et al.: Whether grazer diversity or grazing intensity really accounts for grassland functioning [Biological Sciences]

Hu et al. (1) question the robustness that livestock diversity is that causally influential in shaping biodiversity and ecosystem multifunctionality (EMF), in our recent published paper (2) entitled “Diversifying livestock promotes multidiversity and multifunctionality in managed grasslands,” on the basis that maintaining all of the plots at an anticipated same…

4h

Potential upside of high initial visual acuity? [Biological Sciences]

Vogelsang et al. (1) argue that high initial visual acuity in children, who underwent late treatment of congenital blindness, may be responsible for subsequent impairments in configural face analysis. This hypothesis offers an exciting alternative to the standard explanation of a critical period for the ensuing impairment, which could have…

4h

Response to Katzhendler and Weinshall: Initial visual degradation during development may be adaptive [Biological Sciences]

We thank Katzhendler and Weinshall for their thought-provoking comment (1) on our paper (2). They argue that the computational simulations are insufficient to suggest that initially poor acuity may be an adaptive feature of visual development. The logic of their argument is this: Our evaluation of DNN performance is based…

4h

Richard V. Kadison (1925-2018) [Retrospectives]

Richard “Dick” V. Kadison, who died on August 22, 2018, almost single-handedly carried the torch for the subject of operator algebras during the 1950s. During the next decades Dick remained among the foremost leaders in the subject, nurturing it both by his deep scientific contributions and by attracting and energetically…

4h

Time crystal minimizes its energy by performing Sisyphus motion [Applied Mathematics]

We all know about ordinary space crystals, which are often beautiful objects and also useful in various practical applications. Briefly speaking, they consist of atoms which due to mutual interactions are able to self-organize their distribution in a regular way in space if certain conditions are fulfilled—ideally they form in…

4h

Mechanical stimulation activates Drosophila eggs via Trpm channels [Developmental Biology]

At fertilization, the terminally differentiated egg begins a new life as a totipotent zygote. Egg activation is an important process in this transformation to totipotency, as activation represents the time when immature oocytes develop from a state of cellular quiescence into one ready for embryogenesis. In PNAS, Hu and Wolfner…

4h

Cable bacteria, living electrical conduits in the microbial world [Microbiology]

Microorganisms spend their lives searching for chemical reactants that yield metabolically usable energy, one reactant providing electrons and the other accepting them in a redox reaction. In PNAS, Kjeldsen et al. (1) provide a comprehensive genomic and physiological analysis of bacteria that have evolved an ingenious solution to the persistent…

4h

Potential energy landscape activations governing plastic flows in glass rheology [Applied Physical Sciences]

While glasses are ubiquitous in natural and manufactured materials, the atomic-level mechanisms governing their deformation and how these mechanisms relate to rheological behavior are still open questions for fundamental understanding. Using atomistic simulations spanning nearly 10 orders of magnitude in the applied strain rate we probe the atomic rearrangements associated…

4h

Multiplexed protein force spectroscopy reveals equilibrium protein folding dynamics and the low-force response of von Willebrand factor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Single-molecule force spectroscopy has provided unprecedented insights into protein folding, force regulation, and function. So far, the field has relied primarily on atomic force microscope and optical tweezers assays that, while powerful, are limited in force resolution, throughput, and require feedback for constant force measurements. Here, we present a modular…

4h

Regularizations of time-crystal dynamics [Applied Mathematics]

We demonstrate that nonconvex Lagrangians, as contemplated in the theory of time crystals, can arise in the effective description of conventional, physically realizable systems. Such embeddings resolve dynamical singularities which arise in the reduced description. Microstructure featuring intervals of fixed velocity interrupted by quick resets—“Sisyphus dynamics”—is a generic consequence. In…

4h

Distortion-free inside-out imaging for rapid diagnostics of rechargeable Li-ion cells [Applied Physical Sciences]

Safety risks associated with modern high energy-dense rechargeable cells highlight the need for advanced battery screening technologies. A common rechargeable cell exposed to a uniform magnetic field creates a characteristic field perturbation due to the inherent magnetism of electrochemical materials. The perturbation pattern depends on the design, state of charge,…

4h

News Feature: “Celestial snowman” starts to reveal its secrets [Astronomy]

The distant rock has offered clues about planet formation and the state of the early solar system. Within the cloud of icy rocks at the edge of the solar system lie objects that have remained virtually untouched since their formation more than four billion years ago. Last January, NASA’s New…

4h

Metamaterial architecture from a self-shaping carnivorous plant [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

As meticulously observed and recorded by Darwin, the leaves of the carnivorous plant Drosera capensis L. slowly fold around insects trapped on their sticky surface in order to ensure their digestion. While the biochemical signaling driving leaf closure has been associated with plant growth hormones, how mechanical forces actuate the…

4h

SuFEx-enabled, agnostic discovery of covalent inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase [Chemistry]

Sulfur fluoride exchange (SuFEx) has emerged as the new generation of click chemistry. We report here a SuFEx-enabled, agnostic approach for the discovery and optimization of covalent inhibitors of human neutrophil elastase (hNE). Evaluation of our ever-growing collection of SuFExable compounds toward various biological assays unexpectedly revealed a selective and…

4h

High-performance all-solid-state batteries enabled by salt bonding to perovskite in poly(ethylene oxide) [Chemistry]

Flexible and low-cost poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-based electrolytes are promising for all-solid-state Li-metal batteries because of their compatibility with a metallic lithium anode. However, the low room-temperature Li-ion conductivity of PEO solid electrolytes and severe lithium-dendrite growth limit their application in high-energy Li-metal batteries. Here we prepared a PEO/perovskite Li3/8Sr7/

4h

Overproduction of H2S, generated by CBS, inhibits mitochondrial Complex IV and suppresses oxidative phosphorylation in Down syndrome [Pharmacology]

Down syndrome (DS) is associated with significant perturbances in mitochondrial function. Here we tested the hypothesis that the suppression of mitochondrial electron transport in DS cells is due to high expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and subsequent overproduction of the gaseous transmitter hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Fibroblasts from DS individuals showed higher…

4h

Microplastics in Fresh Water Are Mostly Laundry Lint

Microplastic particles are everywhere, but in freshwater systems, 60 percent of particles are clothing lint from laundry.

4h

Reply to Sahle and Gossa: Technology and geochronology at the earliest known Oldowan site at Ledi-Geraru, Ethiopia [Letters (Online Only)]

Sahle and Gossa (1) identify 2 components of our paper with which they disagree. Their concerns are based on misunderstandings of our paleomagnetic data and the published details of the Bokol Dora 1 (BD 1) artifact assemblage. The normal paleomagnetic sequence at BD 1 cannot represent the Reunion subchron [2.128…

4h

Ca2+-independent but voltage-dependent quantal catecholamine secretion (CiVDS) in the mammalian sympathetic nervous system [Neuroscience]

Action potential-induced vesicular exocytosis is considered exclusively Ca2+ dependent in Katz’s Ca2+ hypothesis on synaptic transmission. This long-standing concept gets an exception following the discovery of Ca2+-independent but voltage-dependent secretion (CiVDS) and its molecular mechanisms in dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons. However, whether CiVDS presents only in sensory cells remains.

4h

Forgetting memories through distinct actin remodeling mechanisms [Commentaries]

After an event takes place, we may memorize different aspects of the experience, such as visual details or the general context. Empirically, these memory components appear to fade away at different rates, suggesting different cellular and/or molecular mechanisms underlying such memory decay. Drosophila, a pioneering animal model for discovering genetic…

4h

Proliferation-competent Tcf1+ CD8 T cells in dysfunctional populations are CD4 T cell help independent [Immunology and Inflammation]

T cell maintenance in chronic infection and cancer follows a hierarchical order. Short-lived effector CD8 T cells are constitutively replaced from a proliferation-competent Tcf1-expressing progenitor population. This occurs spontaneously at low levels and increases in magnitude upon blocking PD-1 signaling. We explore how CD4 T cell help controls transition and…

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The beginning of an era of functional genomics in Rickettsiology is steeped in history [Commentaries]

Human diseases caused by bacteria in the genus Rickettsia, commonly referred to as typhus or spotted fevers, are among the oldest and most severe scourges of humankind. All of the diseases’ agents utilize blood-sucking arthropods as vectors, which influences disease epidemiology. Epidemic typhus continues to cause outbreaks today in situations…

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More data needed for claims about the earliest Oldowan artifacts [Letters (Online Only)]

Recent claims about early tool making and use have proved controversial (1–4). In PNAS, Braun et al. (5) report Oldowan artifacts from Ledi-Geraru, Ethiopia. The claimed minimum age of 2.581 Ma for these artifacts would, even if accurate, imply a marginally older beginning for the Oldowan than the ∼2.58 Ma…

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Knocking out 1 protein may cure the common cold

Temporarily disabling a single protein inside our cells might be able to protect us from the common cold and other viral diseases, according to a new study. “Our grandmas have always been asking us, ‘If you’re so smart, why haven’t you come up with a cure for the common cold?'” says Jan Carette, associate professor of microbiology and immunology at Stanford University. “Now we have a new way to d

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AI learns to defy the laws of physics to win at hide-and-seek

Bots built by artificial intelligence lab OpenAI worked together to find solutions to problems that humans hadn't thought of

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Researchers mix RNA and DNA to study how life's process began billions of years ago

RNA World is a fascinating theory but it may not hold true. The problem is that the ingredients, such as enzymes, to make RNA World work just didn't exist on early Earth.

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World's biggest amphibian 'discovered' in museum

DNA from historical museum specimens may help save the giant salamander from extinction in the wild.

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How to use your phone with one hand

Are your thumbs having a hard time keeping up today's ever-bigger phones? (dhe haivan via Unsplash/) Remember back in the era of the iPhone 4 and 5, when Apple’s phones seemed diminutive compared to their growing competitors? The company claims they did so to keep the phones usable with one hand. They eventually caved, though, and even today’s smaller phones (like the iPhone 8 and Pixel 3a) are h

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Check out the year's best research on cube-shaped poop, magnetic cockroaches, and toasty scrotums

what They studied what ? (Pixabay/) Where can you go to find magnetic cockroaches, cube-shaped poop, and the toasty scrotums of French postmen? The Ig Nobels, of course. Last Thursday, a crowd of science aficionados dressed up in silly costumes and had, just, the best time. The occasion? The 29th First Annual Ig Nobel Prize Ceremony. The objective? To honor "research that makes people laugh, and

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First measurements of 'interstellar comet'

Astronomers report measurements from a presumed interstellar comet, providing clues about its chemical composition.

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A matter of concentration

Plants can grow whole new organs with the help of pluripotent stem cells throughout their entire lives. When necessary, these stem cells can develop into any type of cell within an organism. The biologist Prof. Dr. Thomas Laux and his plant genetics research group at the University of Freiburg, who are studying how the balance between stem cells and specialized cells is regulated in plants, have d

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Bat influenza viruses possess an unexpected genetic plasticity

Bat-borne influenza viruses enter host cells by utilizing surface exposed MHC-II molecules of various species, including humans. Now, an international research team from Germany (Medical Center—University of Freiburg and Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, island of Riems) and the United States (Colorado State University, Fort Collins and Kansas State University, Manhattan) addressed concerns about the z

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Programmable swarmbots help make flexible biological tools

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a new platform to create biologic drugs using specially engineered bacteria that burst and release useful proteins when they sense that their capsule is becoming too crowded.

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Scientists create fully electronic 2-D spin transistors

Physicists from the University of Groningen constructed a two-dimensional spin transistor, in which spin currents were generated by an electric current through graphene. A monolayer of a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) was placed on top of the graphene to induce charge-to-spin conversion in the graphene. This experimental observation was described in the issue of the journal Nano Letters pub

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A matter of concentration

Plants can grow whole new organs with the help of pluripotent stem cells throughout their entire lives. When necessary, these stem cells can develop into any type of cell within an organism. The biologist Prof. Dr. Thomas Laux and his plant genetics research group at the University of Freiburg, who are studying how the balance between stem cells and specialized cells is regulated in plants, have d

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A reusable catalyst for the synthesis of esters

A chemist from RUDN University has developed a tin silicate catalyst for the production of esters—flavourings, plasticisers, and biofuel components. Unlike existing catalysts, the new material can be made active again and reused. The results are published in the journal Microporous and Mesoporous Materials.

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Bat influenza viruses possess an unexpected genetic plasticity

Bat-borne influenza viruses enter host cells by utilizing surface exposed MHC-II molecules of various species, including humans. Now, an international research team from Germany (Medical Center—University of Freiburg and Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, island of Riems) and the United States (Colorado State University, Fort Collins and Kansas State University, Manhattan) addressed concerns about the z

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Programmable swarmbots help make flexible biological tools

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a new platform to create biologic drugs using specially engineered bacteria that burst and release useful proteins when they sense that their capsule is becoming too crowded.

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How Hustlers Captured the Excesses of Prerecession Fashion

Midway through Hustlers , the new Lorene Scafaria film that follows a group of New York City strippers who defraud their lunkhead patrons after the 2008 recession, Destiny (played by Constance Wu) receives a gift that shocks her with its weight. At a gilded holiday celebration, her friend and mentor Ramona (Jennifer Lopez) presents the younger woman with a box containing a formidable fur coat. “W

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The Power of Fear in the Thawing Arctic

How long did I walk in the footsteps of the bear? It was a warm day, 20 years ago and 80 miles north of the Arctic Circle, the sky translucent blue behind low mountains. The tundra, just starting to turn autumn crimson and saffron, held all my attention. Eventually, I looked down at the trail. And there: the ovoid front paw prints, claws puncturing a constellation into the mud inches above each t

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Exercise could slow withering effects of Alzheimer's

Exercising several times a week may delay brain deterioration in people at high risk for Alzheimer's disease, according to a study that scientists say merits further research to establish whether fitness can affect the progression of dementia.

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Environmental toxin produced by algae may lead to ALS

A computer generated-simulation allowed researchers to see how a toxin produced by algal blooms in saltwater might cause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).

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The Air Force Is Inviting Hackers to Breach a Satellite

Welcome! The Air Force will soon issue an unusual invitation to white-hat hackers : infiltrate and take control of a military satellite orbiting the Earth. The news comes one month after the Air Force invited hackers — under close supervision — to ransack the F-15 fighter jet’s flimsily-secured software for vulnerabilities, Wired reports . The Air Force was reportedly so pleased with the results

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Kortvarig farmakologisk behandling af prædiabetes opvejer ikke bivirkninger

13 ugers behandling af forstadier til type 2-diabetes havde kun begrænset effekt på langtidsblodsukkeret blandt patienter med prædiabetes.

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Hunt for Cause of Vaping Illness Suggests Multiple Mechanisms of Damage

The leading hypothesis for deadly lung problems does not fit with all presentations of the illness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hunt for Cause of Vaping Illness Suggests Multiple Mechanisms of Damage

The leading hypothesis for deadly lung problems does not fit with all presentations of the illness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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‘Close Friends,’ for a Monthly Fee

Gabi Abrao, better known as @sighswoon on Instagram, is “developing a language with the invisible.” Her page is half memes , half photos of her— eating fresh fruit , or trying out a metal detector, or posing in a museum bathroom wearing an incredible maxi dress, or staring sleepily into the middle distance in a satin pollution mask —often accompanied by poetic text about the past, the present, an

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The Closure of a Historic Hospital Is an Ominous Warning Sign

Hahnemann University Hospital has been serving Philadelphia's poorest residents since 1848; its demise is a harbinger of worse to come — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Havets läskigheter på menyn

Begreppet ”scary seafood” börjar få fäste bland krögare och besöksnäring i den rika världen. Det är ett samlingsnamn för mat från havet som vi i västvärlden av olika skäl inte anser vara ätbar. Den kan bli en bland många upplevelser på turistmål, men framför allt ett alternativ till kött, av miljö-, hälso- och försörjningsskäl. – Vi måste ändra beteende kring vad vi äter. I den rika delen av värl

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Navy Confirms That Three UFO Encounter Videos Are Real

Close Encounters Three U.S. military videos that show footage of “unidentified aerial phenomenon” are authentic, according to U.S. Navy statements obtained by The Black Vault , a blog dedicated to exposing government secrets. “The Navy designates the objects contained in these videos as unidentified aerial phenomena,” Joseph Gradisher, official spokesperson for the Deputy Chief of Naval Operation

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AI learned to use tools after nearly 500 million games of hide and seek

OpenAI’s agents evolved to exhibit complex behaviors, suggesting a promising approach for developing more sophisticated artificial intelligence.

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The Closure of a Historic Hospital Is an Ominous Warning Sign

Hahnemann University Hospital has been serving Philadelphia's poorest residents since 1848; its demise is a harbinger of worse to come — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A safer way for police to test drug evidence

Scientists have demonstrated a way for police to quickly and safely test whether a baggie or other package contains illegal drugs without having to handle any suspicious contents directly. The new technique can limit the risk of accidental exposure to fentanyl and other highly potent drugs that can be dangerous if a small amount is accidentally inhaled.

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NASA-NOAA satellite catches Hurricane Kiko at night

Hurricane Kiko continued to track west through the Eastern Pacific Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and provided a view of the storm. Satellite imagery revealed an elongated shape, which indicated wind shear was still affecting Kiko.

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Elusive compounds of greenhouse gas isolated

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent atmospheric pollutant. Although naturally occurring, anthropogenic N2O emissions from intensive agricultural fertilisation, industrial processes, and combustion of fossil fuels and biomass are a major cause for concern. Researchers at the University of Warwick have isolated elusive transition metal compounds of N2O that provide clues into how it could be used in sus

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New study measures how much of corals' nutrition comes from hunting

When it comes to feeding, corals have a few tricks up their sleeve. Most of their nutrients come from microscopic algae living inside of them, but if those algae aren't creating enough sustenance, corals can use their tentacles to grab and eat tiny prey swimming nearby.

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Fungicides as an underestimated hazard for freshwater organisms

Scientists at the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have found that pollution by fungicides can have unforeseen but far-reaching consequences for the functioning of aquatic systems.

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NASA satellite provides a view of a large hurricane Humberto

NASA's Terra Satellite provided a visible image of Hurricane Humberto when it was off the coast of the Carolinas and slowly moving north. The satellite image revealed that Humberto is a very large storm.

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Happy hour for time-resolved crystallography

Researchers from the Department of Atomically Resolved Dynamics of the Max Planck institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg, the University of Hamburg and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) outstation in Hamburg have developed a new method to watch biomolecules at work. This method dramatically simplifies starti

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Researchers see need for action on forest fire risk

How do humans affect forest fires? And what can we learn from forest fires in the past for the future of forestry? An international team of researchers led by Elisabeth Dietze, formerly at the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ in Potsdam and now at the Alfred Wegener Institute—Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, now provides new answers to these questions. The research team ha

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Wild wheat genetics offer climate hope for food crops

Wild relatives of food crops, such as wheat, host an abundant array of genetic material to help the plants cope with a changing climate.

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Acoustic energy harnessed to soften shear-thickening fluids

Researchers are using ultrasonic waves to manipulate the viscosity of shear-thickening materials, turning solids to slush—and back again.

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Daily briefing: How the tools developed to sequence ancient DNA are helping solve cold cases

Nature, Published online: 17 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02798-9 A palaeogeneticist turns crime fighter, the US plan to strengthen research security and a top UN climate adviser who has chosen civil disobedience.

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End the drought in drought research

Nature, Published online: 17 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02782-3 Policymakers battling water shortages and land degradation need independent scientific advice.

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The effects of variation in T6SS and bacteria on competition in host environment

A group of scientists studying the ways plant-associated bacteria interact were surprised to find that strains predicted to be more sensitive to bacteria were able to coexist with aggressor strains.

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Why businesses underestimate the need to adapt to extreme climate events

What the Stern Report did in 2006 for climate mitigation and the need to reduce carbon emissions, former UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon now tries to do for climate adaptation: Show the numbers! This week, the Global Commission on Adaptation that Ban Ki-moon founded together with Bill Gates and Kristalina Georgieva of the World Bank, published its Adapt Now report, stating that investing $1.8 tri

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The effects of variation in T6SS and bacteria on competition in host environment

A group of scientists studying the ways plant-associated bacteria interact were surprised to find that strains predicted to be more sensitive to bacteria were able to coexist with aggressor strains.

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Fysisk træning reducerer diabetespatienters muskel-skeletsmerter

Færre smerter kan være en vigtig motiverende faktor til at få type 2-diabetespatienter i gang med fysisk træning, antyder dansk undersøgelse præsenteret på EASD.

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Tre stærke indikatorer for smerter ved diabetisk neuropati

Undersøgelse fra DD2-kohorten leverer evidens for, hvilke faktorer hos patienter med type 2-diabetes, som i særlig grad disponerer for smerter ved diabetisk neuropati – central fedme, dyslipidæmi og rygning.

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Melatonin kan ramme insulinfølsomheden

Brug af melatonin er udbredt blandt type 2-diabetespatienter med søvnproblemer, men øger samtidig risikoen for nedsat insulinfølsomhed, viser dansk studie præsenteret på EASD.

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Trump’s New Mexico Rally Teased His 2020 Strategy

RIO RANCHO, N.M. —Long before Air Force One even touched down here, the line of Donald Trump supporters snaked around the suburban Santa Ana Star Center, with thousands of red-capped fans happy and impatient to see the president live and in person. Traffic in the vicinity of the venue had been snarled for miles and hours. And while many of the president’s signature promises—namely a proposed bord

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Shark pups lose gains in stressed environments

A prominent JCU shark researcher is part of an international team that found shark babies can't reach their physical peak if they're born into environments degraded by human-induced stressors, including climate change.

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Shark pups lose gains in stressed environments

A prominent JCU shark researcher is part of an international team that found shark babies can't reach their physical peak if they're born into environments degraded by human-induced stressors, including climate change.

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Suicide risk factors vary by ethnic group

A University of Houston professor of psychology is reporting that suicide risk factors vary by ethnic group. The newly published research provides a window into new suicide risk profiles needed for a rapidly changing America.

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A safer way for police to test drug evidence

Scientists have demonstrated a way for police to quickly and safely test whether a baggie or other package contains illegal drugs without having to handle any suspicious contents directly. The new technique can limit the risk of accidental exposure to fentanyl and other highly potent drugs that can be dangerous if a small amount is accidentally inhaled.

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A Matter of concentration

Researchers are studying how proteins regulate the stem cells of plants.

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Study gives clues to the origin of Huntington's disease, and a new way to find drugs

Using a new technique to study brain development, scientists were able to trace the causes of Huntington's back to early developmental stages when the brain has only just begun to form.

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Research suggests how environmental toxin produced by algae may lead to ALS

A computer generated-simulation allowed researchers to see how a toxin produced by algal blooms in saltwater might cause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).

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CU researchers identify potential target for cardiac fibrosis treatment

A research team led by scientists at the University of Colorado School of Medicine has identified a potential target for treating heart failure related to fibrosis. The study looked at an epigenetic 'reader' protein known as BRD4, showing that it serves a central role in regulating the activation of cardiac fibroblasts. They also found that chemical inhibitors of BRD4 potently block cardiac fibrob

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Acoustic energy harnessed to soften shear-thickening fluids

Researchers are using ultrasonic waves to manipulate the viscosity of shear-thickening materials, turning solids to slush — and back again.

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NASA satellite provides a view of a large hurricane Humberto

NASA's Terra Satellite provided a visible image of Hurricane Humberto when it was off the coast of the Carolinas and slowly moving north. The satellite image revealed that Humberto is a very large storm.

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Helium shortage: 'Prices just keep going up and up'

Why is there a shortage of the precious gas and how is it affecting firms?

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Study Finds Air Pollution Particles Can Get Inside the Placenta

Particles of black carbon have been found inside the placenta, raising questions of health risks to fetuses. (Credit: Africa Studio/Shutterstock) Many of us don’t give much thought to the air we breathe. But if you live in a city, near a major road, next to an industrial plant or even just have a wood burning stove, that air is often laced with miniscule pollutants. After we inhale, those particle

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Rotteforsøg bekræfter: Parkinson opstår måske i tarmen

Ny dansk viden om sygdommen bekræfter årelang tese og kan føre til bedre behandling.

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Statistical inference to mimic the operating manner of highly-experienced crystallographer

A research team has developed a novel data analysis method for prior evaluation of single crystal structure analysis. Their proposed method is based on precise estimation of a parameter inherent in preliminary-collected small data set. They demonstrated application of it to guest distinction in host-guest crystals before single crystal structure analysis and measurement design for precise crystall

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Novel mechanism of electron scattering in graphene-like 2D materials

Suggesting an unconventional way to manipulate the properties of 2D materials in the presence of a Bose-Einstein condensate, and an alternative strategy to design high-temperature superconductors.

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Novel anti-cancer nanomedicine for efficient chemotherapy

Researchers have developed a new anti-cancer nanomedicine for targeted cancer chemotherapy. This new nano-tool provides a new approach to use cell-based nanomedicines for efficient cancer chemotherapy.

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The best smart doorbell cameras for your home

Smart doorbell upgrades. (Amazon/) We’ve all heard of them. They tell you who is at your door, whether your Amazon package has arrived yet, and even if something suspicious is occurring on your block. But which doorbell cam is the best for your home? These convenient options can all be voice-controlled through Alexa and have features that will make your life at home simpler. The Ring Video Doorbe

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Meat Is Murder. But You Know That Already.

In his new essay collection, “We Are the Weather,” Jonathan Safran Foer turns his attention to the climate crisis. Mark Bittman weighs in.

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He’s Evangelical. He’s Progressive. And He Wants Your Vote.

“I’m running as a Republican because I am a Republican,” says Robb Ryerse in the short documentary True Believer . Confusion, though, is understandable—Ryerse, who ran for the Republican House seat in Arkansas’s Third Congressional District last year, isn’t his party’s boilerplate candidate. His beliefs could be perceived as dichotomous: He’s an evangelical Christian who supports gay rights. He b

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The world is watching as California weighs controversial plan to save tropical forests

Smoke is still rising from the Amazon as fires smolder in the world's largest rain forest. The blazes triggered a wave of global outrage over the loss of precious trees. But California says it has a plan to keep tropical forests standing.

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Floodwaters Diverted from New Orleans Killed Off Marine Life

Water from the swollen Mississippi River fueled algae blooms and reduced salinity in the Gulf of Mexico — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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MIT Researcher Who Defended Sex With Children Resigns

Stepping Back Richard Stallman — the famous computer scientist who defended the idea of having sex with children and suggested that one of Jeffrey Epstein’s victims was “ entirely willing ” — has resigned from his position at MIT . Stallman announced his resignation on his website on Monday. Startlingly, he used the post to double down on his previous assertion that the backlash against him was “

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Novel mechanism of electron scattering in graphene-like 2-D materials

Understanding how particles behave at the twilight zone between the macro and the quantum world gives us access to fascinating phenomena—interesting from both the fundamental and application-oriented physics perspectives. For example, ultra-thin graphene-like materials are a fantastic playground to examine electrons' transport and interactions. Recently, researchers at the Center for Theoretical P

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OnePlus 7T's Sleek Final Design Revealed Ahead Of September 26th Launch

When it comes to unreleased smartphones, leaks are inevitable prior to launch. OnePlus hasn’t been shy about revealing images, videos and even specifications for its unreleased smartphones …

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Are personality traits products of our location?

Many behaviors may not be a product of who you are, but where you are, according to new research with children from four countries. “We tend to think of qualities like patience as an innate part of who we are but virtually all of what we know about how these behaviors develop comes from children in industrialized societies,” says lead author Dorsa Amir, an anthropologist at Yale University. The t

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Researchers see need for action on forest fire risk

How do humans affect forest fires? An international team of researchers has now shown for a region in north-eastern Poland that forest fires increasingly occurred there after the end of the 18th century with the change to organized forestry. The increased number of fires subsequently made it necessary to manage and maintain the forests differently. In the wake of climate change, the researchers su

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Alzheimer's memory loss reversed by new head device using electromagnetic waves

Phoenix, AZ (September 17, 2019) – There is finally some encouraging news for the millions of Americans suffering from Alzheimer's Disease. NeuroEM Therapeutics today announced findings from an open label clinical trial showing reversal of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's Disease patients after just two months of treatment using the company's wearable head device for in-home treatment.

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Scientists create fully electronic 2-dimensional spin transistors

Physicists from the University of Groningen constructed a two-dimensional spin transistor, in which spin currents were generated by an electric current through graphene. A monolayer of a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) was placed on top of graphene to induce charge-to-spin conversion in the graphene. This experimental observation was described in an article in Nano Letters on Sept. 11, 2019.

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Tortillas tell the story of folate deficiency in Mexico: study

A new study hat accounts for folic acid fortification in staple foods made from wheat and corn, such as bakery bread and tortillas, found that large proportion of women of childbearing age have FA intake below levels recommended by the World Health Organization, potentially raising the risk for neural tube defects in their offspring. The study is one of a few to investigate FA intake after fortifi

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Feeling depressed? Mahjong might be the answer

When it comes to boosting mental health among older Chinese, it might be as simple as a game of mahjong, according to a new study from the University of Georgia.

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NASA-NOAA satellite catches Hurricane Kiko at night

Hurricane Kiko continued to track west through the Eastern Pacific Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and provided a view of the storm. Satellite imagery revealed an elongated shape, which indicated wind shear was still affecting Kiko.

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Elusive compounds of greenhouse gas isolated by Warwick chemists

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent atmospheric pollutant. Although naturally occurring, anthropogenic N2O emissions from intensive agricultural fertilisation, industrial processes, and combustion of fossil fuels and biomass are a major cause for concern. Researchers at the University of Warwick have isolated elusive transition metal compounds of N2O that provide clues into how it could be used in sus

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One way childhood trauma leads to poorer health for women

Researchers have long known that childhood trauma is linked to poorer health for women at midlife. A new study shows one important reason why.The national study of more than 3,000 women is the first to find that those who experienced childhood trauma were more likely than others to have their first child both earlier in life and outside of marriage – and that those factors were associated with poo

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The effects of variation in T6SS and bacteria on competition in host environment

A group of scientists studying the ways plant-associated bacteria interact were surprised to find that strains predicted to be more sensitive to bacteria were able to coexist with aggressor strains. 'Our findings are not consistent with a 'winner-take-all' result,' says Jeff Chang, 'and may cause researchers to think differently about bacterial behaviors that are generally assumed to be hostile an

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New study measures how much of corals' nutrition comes from hunting

When it comes to feeding, corals have a few tricks up their sleeve. Most of their nutrients come from microscopic algae living inside of them, but if those algae aren't creating enough sustenance, corals can use their tentacles to grab and eat tiny prey swimming nearby.

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Fungicides as an underestimated hazard for freshwater organisms

Large amounts of fungicides, used in agriculture, leak into nearby surface waters. The effects of it on aquatic organisms are poorly understood and not specifically addressed in the EU regulatory frameworks with respect to the protection of surface waters. Scientists at the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have found that pollution by fungicides can have unforesee

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Gene editing enables researchers to correct mutation in muscle stem cells in DMD model

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rare but devastating genetic disorder that causes muscle loss and physical impairments. Researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have shown in a mouse study that the powerful gene editing technique known as CRISPR may provide the means for lifelong correction of the genetic mutation responsible for the disorder.

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HTA in the European network: Osteoporosis screening without proof of benefit

For the first time, IQWiG was in charge of a health technology assessment for the European network EUnetHTA. According to the conclusion, the benefit of osteoporosis screening is not proven.

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Miniaturizing medical imaging, sensing technology

Scientists have used a microchip to map the back of the eye for disease diagnosis. The interference technology used in the microchip has been around for a little while. This is the first time technical obstacles have been overcome to fabricate a miniature device able to capture high quality images.

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Studying drivers behind cardiac arrhythmias

Despite advances in medical imaging, the mechanisms leading to the irregular contractions of the heart during rhythm disorders remain poorly understood. Research suggests existing data from ultrasound imaging can be used to work backwards to reconstruct underlying electrical causes of arrhythmias.

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Hysterectomy and mesh support may have similar outcomes in repairing vaginal prolapse

Two surgical procedures used to repair vaginal prolapse — hysterectomy and employing mesh support that preserves the uterus — have comparable clinical outcomes after three years, according to new data from researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine.

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Kaleidoscope mirror symmetry inspires new design for optical tools, technologies

In a kaleidoscope, mirrors are placed at angles to create a visual illusion of multiple, symmetric images from one object. Researchers started with a cylindrical vector optical field and introduce a kaleidoscope structure to the polarization states by assigning a parameter for mirror-symmetric axes.

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Every step a cell takes, every move they make — scientists will be watching

An interdisciplinary team has found a solution to a problem plaguing developmental biology — long-term cell tracking and manipulation. Researchers painstakingly developed an automated microfluidic device for the stable imaging of mice embryonic stem cells over a three-day period.

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Comparing effectiveness of 2 surgical methods for uterine prolapse

Uterine prolapse happens when weakened muscles and ligaments no longer provide enough support for the uterus, which then protrudes into or out of the vagina. This randomized clinical trial compared the effectiveness of two surgical methods to treat women: a vaginal hysterectomy to remove the uterus with ligament suspension to support remaining tissue or uterus-sparing suspension techniques, known

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Does adding therapy before, after surgery for urinary incontinence help?

Adding behavioral and physical therapy before and after surgery for women with stress and urgency urinary incontinence resulted in a small improvement in symptoms compared to women who just had surgery but that difference in symptoms may not be clinically important. There have been a lack of studies examining treatments for women with both stress and urgency urinary incontinence also called mixed

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Brain may not need body movements to learn virtual spaces

A new study advances our understanding of how the brain learns in virtual reality, and shows that visual input, without body movement, is sufficient for learning virtual environments.

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Mutant live attenuated Ebola virus immunizes non-human primates

Inoculation with an Ebola virus that has mutations in a protein called VP35 does not cause disease and elicits protection in monkeys, researchers show Sept. 17, 2019 in the journal Cell Reports. The findings suggest that the immune-evasion function of VP35 is a potential drug target, and it may be possible to develop a live attenuated Ebola virus vaccine in the future if precautions are taken to p

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Researchers find building mutations into Ebola virus protein disrupts ability to cause disease

Creating mutations in a key Ebola virus protein that helps the deadly virus escape from the body's defenses can make the virus unable to produce sickness and activate protective immunity in the infected host, according to a study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.

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Another vital forest at risk: Scientists fear warming water could be killing off Puget Sound's kelp beds

Dozens of healthy bull kelp off Owen Beach stretched to the surface, trailing a moppish tangle of algae. It looked like overgrown clumps of pad thai had gone out to sunbathe.

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Northern France was already inhabited more than 650,000 years ago

The first evidence of human occupation in northern France has been put back by 150,000 years, thanks to the findings of a team of scientists from the CNRS and the Musée National d'Histoire Naturelle at the emblematic site of Moulin Quignon in the department of the Somme. The site, now located in the gardens of a housing estate in Abbeville, was rediscovered in 2017 after falling into oblivion for

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California lawmakers vote to block Trump's environmental rollbacks, defying Newsom

California lawmakers, over Gov. Gavin Newsom's objections, passed sweeping legislation early Saturday allowing the state to impose strict endangered species protections and water pumping restrictions for the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta.

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Statistical inference to mimic the operating manner of highly-experienced crystallographer

A research team from Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), RIKEN, and the University of Tokyo developed a novel data analysis method for prior evaluation of single crystal structure analysis. Their proposed method is based on precise estimation of a parameter inherent in preliminary-collected small data set. They demonstrated its application to guest distinction in host-guest crystals before

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Air pollution particles found on foetal side of placentas – study

Research finds black carbon breathed by mothers can cross into unborn children Air pollution particles have been found on the foetal side of placentas, indicating that unborn babies are directly exposed to the black carbon produced by motor traffic and fuel burning. The research is the first study to show the placental barrier can be penetrated by particles breathed in by the mother. It found tho

6h

Sweet juicers to help you get your daily nutrients

A tasty way to get your nutrients. (Joanna Kosinka via Unsplash/) Juicing can be a fun way to pack vegetables and fruits into your diet (though it shouldn't be a substitute for eating whole fruits and veggies ). A green juice in the morning will also give you a boost of energy. Whether you are new to juicing, or you're looking to upgrade your machine, homemade beverages are almost always fresher

6h

New method reveals how damage occurs in human biological cells due to mechanical fatigue

Researchers have developed a novel way to measure how mechanical fatigue affects biological cells. They also have established the important role of this effect in influencing physical properties of biological cells such as red blood cells (RBCs). This new technique assesses the mechanical integrity and fatigue behavior of RBCs using a general microfluidics method that incorporates amplitude-modula

6h

Hello, world! A new approach for physics in de Sitter space

For decades, physicists have been attempting to reconcile quantum mechanics, the physics of the very small, with gravity, the physics of the very large. While many academics are working on quantum gravity, they often use models that don't consider certain aspects of our own universe, like its accelerated expansion. A team at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST

6h

Is Western culture balancing on a tightrope between science and humanities?

Pseudoscience is on the rise and so is the constant clamour of 'fake news.' Should we, therefore, be questioning the West's grip on rational, empirical evidence-based reason? While the West is fending off resurgent claims of a flat Earth—last dispelled by Magellan and Elcano's circumnavigation in the early 16th century—as well as persistent climate change deniers, Asia is making rapid technologica

6h

Complexity of plastics make it impossible to know which are dangerous

A lot of people worry about microplastics and plastic pollution, but not as many of us are aware of the large number of chemicals we encounter in plastic products that we use every day.

6h

Heat-resistant coral could help rescue threatened reefs

But it needs to survive climate change first. Mark Bruer reports.

6h

The free market at work: thoughts and prayers hit $7.17 each

Economic analysis finds the value of prayer depends on whether there’s a deity to hear them. Barry Keily reports.

6h

When the river runs dry

New global-scale river research reveals a clear climate signature and challenges existing thinking. Ian Connellan reports.

6h

That old question about the age of Saturn’s rings

New study suggests dust may be hiding their age.

6h

Mother of pearl inspires mother of all armours

Researchers develop a plastic that’s much tougher than steel.

6h

Cancer cells turn to cannibalism

It helps them survive chemotherapy, study suggests.

6h

Statistical inference to mimic the operating manner of highly-experienced crystallographer

A research team has developed a novel data analysis method for prior evaluation of single crystal structure analysis. Their proposed method is based on precise estimation of a parameter inherent in preliminary-collected small data set. They demonstrated application of it to guest distinction in host-guest crystals before single crystal structure analysis and measurement design for precise crystall

6h

Novel mechanism of electron scattering in graphene-like 2D materials

Suggesting an unconventional way to manipulate the properties of 2D materials in the presence of a Bose-Einstein condensate, and an alternative strategy to design high-temperature superconductors.

6h

Novel anti-cancer nanomedicine for efficient chemotherapy

Researchers have developed a new anti-cancer nanomedicine for targeted cancer chemotherapy. This new nano-tool provides a new approach to use cell-based nanomedicines for efficient cancer chemotherapy.

6h

Not the hairstyle, but the content: Hair indicates whether wild animals were 'stressed'

Scientists have now demonstrated that the 'stress' hormone cortisol is deposited in hair of wild mongooses in Portugal and determined baselines for cortisol in these carnivores. It is now possible to investigate whether different habitats and changed living conditions, such as the return of the Iberian lynx, place a particular burden on the mongooses.

6h

Shark pups lose gains in stressed environments

Scientists compared the growth and body condition of one species of shark in two different environments. They found larger shark pups on degraded reefs grow less and perform worse than smaller pups on pristine reefs. Human-induced stressors, including climate change, put shark populations at risk — they may not be able to adapt fast enough to keep pace with the changes that are happening in their

6h

Novel approach to ultrasound raises possibility of new medical applications

A new ultrasound technique provides a non-invasive way of assessing bone structure on the microscale. Researchers hope to fine-tune the technique for use in assessing osteoporosis risk and treatment.

6h

Cause of rare, fatal disorder in young children pinpointed

Scientists appear to have solved a decades-long mystery regarding the precise biochemical pathway leading to a fatal genetic disorder in children that results in seizures, developmental regression and death, usually around age 3. Studying a mouse model with the same human illness — called Krabbe disease — the researchers also identified a possible therapeutic strategy.

6h

Screening mammography could benefit men at high risk of breast cancer

Selective mammography screening can provide potentially lifesaving early detection of breast cancer in men who are at high risk for the disease, according to a new landmark study.

6h

Diamonds are forever: New foundation for nanostructures

Researchers have fabricated a novel glass and synthetic diamond foundation that can be used to create miniscule micro — and nanostructures. This new substrate is low cost and leaves minimal waste, the researchers say.

6h

Breakthrough for transparent conductors: Touch screen coatings

Researchers have made an important design discovery that could dramatically improve the performance of a key material used to coat touch screens and other devices.

6h

New method for detecting quantum states of electrons

Researchers have devised a new method — called image charge detection — to detect electrons' transitions to quantum states. Electrons can serve as quantum bits, the smallest unit of quantum information; these bits are foundational to larger computational systems. Quantum computers may be used to understand the mechanism of superconductivity, cryptography, artificial intelligence, among other app

6h

Researchers unlock cancer-causing mechanism of E. coli toxin with synthetic biology approach

An inter-disciplinary team of researchers has unraveled how a toxin released by Escherichia coli (E. coli) – a human gut bacteria, is connected to colorectal cancer, offering new insights to the health impact of this prevalent bacteria and facilitating future research on the prevention of this third most common cancer worldwide.

6h

Ethanol fuels large-scale expansion of Brazil's farming land

A new study has revealed that future demand for ethanol biofuel could potentially expand sugarcane farming land in Brazil by 5 million hectares by 2030.

6h

Large transnational corporations play critical role in global natural resource management

Researchers have identified six corporate actions that, combined with effective public policy and improved governmental regulations, could help large transnational corporations steer environmental stewardship efforts around the world.

6h

Did microbes assist life in colonizing land?

The microbiome of terrestrial organisms, regardless of their kinship relationships, differs significantly from those of aquatic organisms. Organisms living on land have a lower diversity of microorganisms contained in their microbiome.

6h

Research reveals the crucial role of recycling in the evolution of life in our universe

New research by astrophysicists at the University of Kent reveals how the gas and energy expelled by stars are returned to the universe, and in what forms. It also found that the elements produced by dying stars are transferred through a process of fragmentation and recycled into new stars and planets.

6h

Global warming makes it harder for birds to mate, study finds

New research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and University of Porto (CIBIO-InBIO) shows how global warming could reduce the mating activity and success of grassland birds. The study examined the threatened grassland bird Tetrax tetrax, or little bustard, classified as a 'Vulnerable' species in Europe, in order to test how rising temperatures could affect future behavior.

6h

Familial hypercholesterolemia patients at high risk for cardiovascular events

Individuals with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) were able to lower their cholesterol under FH specialty care, but many are still not meeting LDL-cholesterol targets, according to the FH Foundation's CASCADE FH® Registry. In new research published in the October issue of Atherosclerosis, 52 percent of adults with FH still had LDL-cholesterol over 100 mg/dL despite being on multiple cholesterol-

6h

Bat influenza viruses possess an unexpected genetic plasticity

Bat-borne influenza viruses enter host cells by utilizing surface exposed MHC-II molecules of various species, including humans. Now, an international research team from Germany (Medical Center — University of Freiburg and Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, island of Riems) and the United States (Colorado State University, Fort Collins and Kansas State University, Manhattan) addressed concerns about th

6h

Why you should avoid making decisions when you’re hungry

A new study suggests that people seek instant gratification when they have an empty stomach – which means they are more likely to settle for less Name: Empty stomach stupidity syndrome. Age: As old as the first missed breakfast. Continue reading…

6h

Every step a cell takes, every move they make—scientists will be watching

An interdisciplinary team has found a solution to a problem plaguing developmental biology—long-term cell tracking and manipulation.

6h

Ultrasound ‘flaw’ could give us better bone scans

A new ultrasound technique promises a non-invasive way of assessing bone structure on the microscale, report researchers. They hope to fine-tune the technique for use in assessing osteoporosis risk and treatment. The researchers have also demonstrated that a variation of the same technique can distinguish between tumors and healthy tissue in a study using laboratory rats. “One thing that’s exciti

6h

Scientists' design discovery doubles conductivity of indium oxide transparent coatings

Researchers at the University of Liverpool, University College London (UCL), NSG Group (Pilkington) and Diamond Light Source have made an important design discovery that could dramatically improve the performance of a key material used to coat touch screens and other devices.

6h

Every step a cell takes, every move they make—scientists will be watching

An interdisciplinary team has found a solution to a problem plaguing developmental biology—long-term cell tracking and manipulation.

6h

Kaleidoscope mirror symmetry inspires new design for optical tools, technologies

In a kaleidoscope, mirrors are placed at angles to create a visual illusion of multiple, symmetric images from one original object. The number of symmetric axes in the kaleidoscope depends on the number of mirrors and angles inside.

6h

Miniaturizing medical imaging, sensing technology

Scientists in Christine Hendon's and Michal Lipson's research groups at Columbia University, New York, have used a microchip to map the back of the eye for disease diagnosis.

6h

Visualizing electrical patterns underlying abnormal heart contractions and deformations

Despite advances in medical imaging, the mechanisms leading to the irregular contractions of the heart during heart rhythm disorders remain poorly understood.

6h

Mapping HIV Prevalence in Sub-Saharan Africa

Having more localized data on infection rates within countries could help health authorities better target treatment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

A free world needs political cartoons | Patrick Chappatte

We need humor like we need the air we breathe, says editorial cartoonist Patrick Chappatte. In a talk illustrated with highlights from a career spent skewering everything from dictators and ideologues to selfies and social media mobs, Chappatte makes a resounding, often hilarious case for the necessity of satire. "Political cartoons were born with democracy, and they are challenged when freedom is

6h

HBO Max will be the only place to stream ‘Big Bang Theory’

HBO Max is snatching up content ahead of its launch in the spring of 2020. After announcing that Friends — one of Netflix's most-streamed shows — would become an HBO Max exclusive, …

6h

Where climate cash is flowing and why it’s not enough

Nature, Published online: 17 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02712-3 Investments need to ramp up to keep global warming within safe thresholds.

6h

Black hole that 'rings' like a bell shows Einstein was right

Astronomers have looked at the way a black hole 'rings' like a bell to test a prediction of Einstein’s general relativity. Turns out Einstein is still right

6h

We may have spotted an interstellar comet flying towards Earth

Astronomers have found a comet that seems to have come from beyond our solar system, which would make it the second interstellar object that we’ve ever spotted

6h

Elon Musk’s Legal Defense: “Pedo Guy” Doesn’t Mean “Pedophile”

Pedo Guy Remember last year, when eccentric entrepreneur Elon Musk got mad at a diver who was helping rescue children trapped in a cave — and called him a “pedo guy” on Twitter ? Now the diver, Vernon Unsworth, is suing Musk for defamation. And Musk’s legal team has an eyebrow-raising defense: “pedo guy” didn’t actually mean Unsworth was a pedophile. Slang Game Yeah, you read that right. In fact,

6h

Novel approach to ultrasound raises possibility of new medical applications

A new ultrasound technique provides a non-invasive way of assessing bone structure on the microscale. Researchers hope to fine-tune the technique for use in assessing osteoporosis risk and treatment.

6h

Shark pups lose gains in stressed environments

Scientists compared the growth and body condition of one species of shark in two different environments. They found larger shark pups on degraded reefs grow less and perform worse than smaller pups on pristine reefs. Human-induced stressors, including climate change, put shark populations at risk–they may not be able to adapt fast enough to keep pace with the changes that are happening in their e

6h

Northern France was already inhabited more than 650,000 years ago

The first evidence of human occupation in northern France has been put back by 150,000 years, thanks to the findings of a team of scientists from the CNRS and the Musée National d'Histoire Naturelle at the emblematic site of Moulin Quignon. This also makes Moulin Quignon the oldest site in north-western Europe where bifaces have been found. The discovery confirms the central position of the Somme

6h

Not the hairstyle, but the content: Hair indicates whether wild animals were 'stressed'

Scientists of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) have now demonstrated that the 'stress' hormone cortisol is deposited in hair of wild mongooses in Portugal and determined baselines for cortisol in these carnivores. It is now possible to investigate whether different habitats and changed living conditions, such as the return of the Iberian lynx, place a particular bu

6h

Microplastics in Fresh Water Are Mostly Laundry Lint

Microplastic particles are everywhere, but in freshwater systems, 60 percent of particles are clothing lint from laundry. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Method treats chronic neuropathic pain without surgery

Researchers have come up with an effective, minimally invasive way to treat the intractable and growing problem of chronic neuropathic pain. “Our preclinical research findings suggest an entirely new procedure and novel target in the brain to alleviate chronic pain in humans,” says Tracey Ignatowski, assistant professor in the pathology and anatomical sciences department at the University at Buff

6h

Ny kræftbehandling i Danmark: Er mere præcis og skånsom for patienten

Vi er det første land i verden, der tager ny strålebehandling i brug.

6h

Play equipment that gets kids moving

Parents will be pleased to know that more is not always better when it comes to play equipment for their children.

6h

The happiest introverts may be extraverts

If you are an introvert, force yourself to be an extravert. You'll be happier. That's the suggestion of the first-ever study asking people to act like extraverts for a prolonged period. The benefits of extraversion have been reported before, including those of "forced extraversion," but usually only for brief intervals.

6h

New method reveals how damage occurs in human biological cells due to mechanical fatigue

Researchers have developed a novel way to measure how mechanical fatigue affects biological cells. They also have established the important role of this effect in influencing physical properties of biological cells such as red blood cells (RBCs). This new technique assesses the mechanical integrity and fatigue behavior of RBCs using a general microfluidics method that incorporates amplitude-modula

6h

Victorian hog deer genetics revealed

Australian researchers looking for a genetic lifeline to endangered hog deer species endemic to Pakistan, northern India and mainland southeast Asia have found widespread hybridization of the species in Victoria.

6h

Hello, world! A new approach for physics in de sitter space

For decades, physicists have been attempting to reconcile quantum mechanics, the physics of the very small, with gravity, the physics of the very large. While many academics are working on quantum gravity, they often use models that don't consider certain aspects of our own universe, like its accelerated expansion. A team reports a new approach to quantum gravity using a model that more closely ma

6h

Maskine til automatisk bleskift vinder endelig eftertragtet pris

Automatiseret bleskift og forklaringen på vombattens kubiske afføring er blandt årets modtagere af den satiriske Ig-nobelpris

6h

Universities 'failing' victims of sexual misconduct

Dozens of students say they were "traumatised" by investigations that left them feeling unsafe on campus.

7h

A New Bioreactor Captures as Much Carbon as an Acre of Trees

Gas Guzzling A new algae bioreactor can suck as much carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere as roughly an acre of forest — potentially giving dense cities a new weapon in the fight against catastrophic climate change. Development firm Hypergiant Industries used AI systems to make its newly-announced Eos Bioreactor prototype, a 63-cubic foot box which is filled with algae. The startup says it takes

7h

From primordial black holes new clues to dark matter

Moving through cosmic forests and spider webs in deep space in search of answers on the origin of the Cosmos. 'We have tested a scenario in which dark matter is composed by non-stellar black holes, formed in the primordial Universe,' says Riccardo Murgia, lead author of the study published in Physical Review Letters. The research was carried out together with his colleagues Giulio Scelfo and Matte

7h

Novel anti-cancer nanomedicine for efficient chemotherapy

Researchers have developed a new anti-cancer nanomedicine for targeted cancer chemotherapy. This new nano-tool provides a new approach to use cell-based nanomedicines for efficient cancer chemotherapy.

7h

Novel mechanism of electron scattering in graphene-like 2D materials

Suggesting an unconventional way to manipulate the properties of 2D materials in the presence of a Bose-Einstein condensate, and an alternative strategy to design high-temperature superconductors.

7h

Researchers see need for action on forest fire risk

How do humans affect forest fires? An international team of researchers has now shown for a region in north-eastern Poland that forest fires increasingly occurred there after the end of the 18th century with the change to organised forestry. The increased number of fires subsequently made it necessary to manage and maintain the forests differently. In the wake of climate change, the researchers su

7h

Statistical inference to mimic the operating manner of highly-experienced crystallographer

A research team from Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), RIKEN, and the University of Tokyo developed a novel data analysis method for prior evaluation of single crystal structure analysis. Their proposed method is based on precise estimation of a parameter inherent in preliminary-collected small data set. They demonstrated application of it to guest distinction in host-guest crystals befor

7h

Pros and cons of genetic scissors

Crispr technology has greatly facilitated gene editing. Associate Professor Thorsten Müller from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Dr. Hassan Bukhari from Harvard Medical School discuss its pros and cons in a review article in the journal "Trends in Cell Biology" from 12 September 2019. They believe Crispr technology has future potential primarily if it can be rendered usable in the field of stem cell r

7h

New method for detecting quantum states of electrons

Researchers in the Quantum Dynamics Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) devised a new method — called image charge detection — to detect electrons' transitions to quantum states. Electrons can serve as quantum bits, the smallest unit of quantum information; these bits are foundational to larger computational systems. Quantum computers may be used to

7h

Scientists' design discovery doubles conductivity of indium oxide transparent coatings

esearchers at the University of Liverpool, University College London (UCL), NSG Group (Pilkington) and Diamond Light Source have made an important design discovery that could dramatically improve the performance of a key material used to coat touch screens and other devices.

7h

Diamonds are forever: New foundation for nanostructures

Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have fabricated a novel glass and synthetic diamond foundation that can be used to create miniscule micro — and nanostructures. This new substrate is low cost and leaves minimal waste, the researchers say, in a study published in Diamond and Related Materials.

7h

Breast cancer screening found effective in men at high risk for the disease

Men at high risk of developing breast cancer may benefit from mammography, or breast X-ray, screening for the disease, a new study shows.

7h

Screening mammography could benefit men at high risk of breast cancer

Selective mammography screening can provide potentially lifesaving early detection of breast cancer in men who are at high risk for the disease, according to a new landmark study.

7h

NBC Peacock adds to streaming glut next April with “15,000 hours” of shows

Exclusive series, classic TV reboots, and Saved By The Bell with a possible new Zack.

7h

Why the global Red List mislabels the risk to many species

When we talk about how threatened animals or plants are, we will almost always reference their statuses on the Red List. Created by the International Union for Conservation of Nature – a global organisation that seeks to direct and shape conservation efforts—the Red List uses a set of criteria to evaluate the extinction risk of thousands of species and subspecies.

7h

Invasive tadpoles can recognize potential predators in new environments

Invasive species have become an increasingly big threat to indigenous ones as the spread of alien animals and plants has accelerated with the growth of global trade. Some can be very destructive, while some live in close proximity without posing any sort of threat.

7h

Why the global Red List mislabels the risk to many species

When we talk about how threatened animals or plants are, we will almost always reference their statuses on the Red List. Created by the International Union for Conservation of Nature – a global organisation that seeks to direct and shape conservation efforts—the Red List uses a set of criteria to evaluate the extinction risk of thousands of species and subspecies.

7h

Invasive tadpoles can recognize potential predators in new environments

Invasive species have become an increasingly big threat to indigenous ones as the spread of alien animals and plants has accelerated with the growth of global trade. Some can be very destructive, while some live in close proximity without posing any sort of threat.

7h

New method reveals how damage occurs in human biological cells due to mechanical fatigue

Human red blood cells (RBCs) are extremely resilient and have the capacity to undergo cellular deformation as they navigate across various micro-vessels and capillaries. Over their 120-day normal lifespan, RBCs must undergo significant cyclic deformation through large elastic stretching and relaxation. Pathological deformations in RBCs are associated with various diseases such as malaria, sickle c

7h

New method reveals how damage occurs in human biological cells due to mechanical fatigue

Human red blood cells (RBCs) are extremely resilient and have the capacity to undergo cellular deformation as they navigate across various micro-vessels and capillaries. Over their 120-day normal lifespan, RBCs must undergo significant cyclic deformation through large elastic stretching and relaxation. Pathological deformations in RBCs are associated with various diseases such as malaria, sickle c

7h

The First Evidence That Drugs Could Turn Back the Clock on Our Biological Age

After decades of research, here it is: the first promising evidence in humans, albeit imperfect and early, that a cocktail of three drugs is enough to reverse the epigenetic clock—a measure of someone’s biological age and health. The results came as a surprise to even the research team, who originally designed the trial for something a little less dazzling: to look at human growth hormone’s effec

7h

The economic case for fighting pollution

Dirty air drags down everything from student test results to football passing

7h

Did microbes assist life in colonizing land?

All living organisms exist and function only in cooperation with an abundance of symbiotic microorganisms, and have developed together with them over the course of the earth's history. This central finding of modern life sciences has led researchers worldwide to analyze the highly complex interactions and long-term bonds of host organisms and microbes in ever greater detail. Gradually, they want t

7h

Pros and cons of genetic scissors

Crispr technology has greatly facilitated gene editing. Associate Professor Thorsten Müller from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Dr. Hassan Bukhari from Harvard Medical School discuss its pros and cons in a review article in the journal Trends in Cell Biology. They believe Crispr technology has future potential primarily if it can be rendered usable in the field of stem cell research.

7h

Got What It Takes to Compete in Speed Climbing?

Let's compute the power output required to sprint up a vertical wall.

7h

Spend more on transitional housing and teens in foster care are less likely to be homeless, jailed

State spending on transitional housing supports for youth "aging out" of foster care can make a big difference in preventing homelessness, incarceration, substance abuse and early childbirth, according to a new study by social work researchers at Case Western Reserve University.

7h

The Arctic is browning

Professor Gareth Phoenix has been visiting Abisko, in the Arctic circle of Sweden, for years. He's been there in the depths of winter when the snow is several feet deep, and in the height of summer when mosquitoes are buzzing around every person (and reindeer) in sight. If there's one thing he's learnt from his years of research in the Arctic circle, it's to be prepared for extremes.

7h

Did microbes assist life in colonizing land?

All living organisms exist and function only in cooperation with an abundance of symbiotic microorganisms, and have developed together with them over the course of the earth's history. This central finding of modern life sciences has led researchers worldwide to analyze the highly complex interactions and long-term bonds of host organisms and microbes in ever greater detail. Gradually, they want t

7h

Pros and cons of genetic scissors

Crispr technology has greatly facilitated gene editing. Associate Professor Thorsten Müller from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Dr. Hassan Bukhari from Harvard Medical School discuss its pros and cons in a review article in the journal Trends in Cell Biology. They believe Crispr technology has future potential primarily if it can be rendered usable in the field of stem cell research.

7h

Is huge volcano on Jupiter's moon Io about to erupt this month?

Volcanic eruptions are difficult to predict, but observations have shown the largest and most powerful volcano on Io, a large moon of Jupiter, has been erupting on a relatively regular schedule.

7h

Computers and Humans ‘See’ Differently. Does It Matter?

When engineers first endeavored to teach computers to see, they took it for granted that computers would see like humans. The first proposals for computer vision in the 1960s were “clearly motivated by characteristics of human vision,” said John Tsotsos , a computer scientist at York University. Things have changed a lot since then. Computer vision has grown from a pie-in-the-sky idea into a spra

7h

Ethanol fuels large-scale expansion of Brazil's farming land

A University of Queensland-led study has revealed that future demand for ethanol biofuel could potentially expand sugarcane farming land in Brazil by 5 million hectares by 2030.

7h

HKUST researchers unlock cancer-causing mechanism of E. coli toxin with synthetic biology approach

An inter-disciplinary team of researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) unraveled how a toxin released by Escherichia coli (E. coli) – a human gut bacteria, is connected to colorectal cancer, offering new insights to the health impact of this prevalent bacteria and facilitating future research on the prevention of this third most common cancer worldwide*.

7h

Hello, world! A new approach for physics in de sitter space

For decades, physicists have been attempting to reconcile quantum mechanics, the physics of the very small, with gravity, the physics of the very large. While many academics are working on quantum gravity, they often use models that don't consider certain aspects of our own universe, like its accelerated expansion. A team at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST

7h

AI-guided robotics enable automation of complex synthetic biological molecules

This article describes a platform that combines artificial intelligence-driven synthesis planning, flow chemistry and a robotically controlled experimental platform to minimize the need for human intervention in the synthesis of small organic molecules. An AI-guided approach is being used to address similar challenges with peptide synthesis and purification at Mytide Therapeutics. AI is enabling e

7h

Researchers mix RNA and DNA to study how life's process began billions of years ago

RNA World is a fascinating theory, says Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy, PhD, an associate professor of chemistry at Scripps Research, but it may not hold true. The problem is that the ingredients, such as enzymes, to make RNA World work just didn't exist on early Earth.

7h

Cause of rare, fatal disorder in young children pinpointed

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis appear to have solved a decades-long mystery regarding the precise biochemical pathway leading to a fatal genetic disorder in children that results in seizures, developmental regression and death, usually around age 3. Studying a mouse model with the same human illness — called Krabbe disease — the researchers also identified a

7h

Play equipment that gets kids moving

Parents will be pleased to know that more is not always better when it comes to play equipment for their children.

7h

Research suggests the happiest introverts may be extraverts

If you are an introvert, force yourself to be an extravert. You'll be happier. That's the suggestion of the first-ever study asking people to act like extraverts for a prolonged period. The benefits of extraversion have been reported before, including those of "forced extraversion," but usually only for brief intervals. UC Riverside researcher Sonja Lyubomirsky wanted to extend the faux extraversi

7h

We’ve been transforming Earth for at least 10,000 years

Thousands of years before humans began burning fossil fuels, human activity had indelibly altered the natural world through foraging, herding animals, and farming, according to a new study. The study synthesizes data from 255 archaeologists to provide the first global survey of the Earth’s transformation through human land use over the past 10,000 years. The findings challenge the commonly held v

7h

New Lasers May Be Powerful Enough to Drill a Hole in Reality

Paper Cutter The prestigious academic physics journal Physical Review Letters published a paper this week about cutting-edge laser tech — and, if bloggers are to be believed, it could have juicy ramifications. The paper itself is dry and technical, but the prominent tech blog Ars Technica ‘s interpretation of its findings is anything but. According to Ars , in fact, the tech it describes could pu

7h

From the archive

Nature, Published online: 17 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02743-w How Nature reported hominid remains in 1969 and sea-fishery investigations in 1919.

7h

Why I welcome a climate emergency

Nature, Published online: 17 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02735-w Now maybe we’ll mobilize technology and policy at the necessary scale, says Paul Gilding.

7h

Quietly Another Drug Candidate Disappears

I wanted to note something today that won’t make many headlines outside of biopharma, but it’s just the sort of story that I wish more people knew about. Let’s start with this: there’s a terrible disease called IPF, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis . Anyone with any medical background knows to beware the word “idiopathic”, since it’s a shorthand for “we don’t understand much of anything about this”.

7h

1-minute video: How to choose a toothbrush

Here’s how to choose a toothbrush, one that won’t cause gum recession or other oral health hazards. “One of the most important things about choosing a toothbrush is to make sure that your toothbrush has soft bristles,” says Deborah Foyle, clinical assistant professor and director of pre-doctoral periodontics at the Texas A&M College of Dentistry. “You’re much less likely to do damage to both your

7h

Are the Amazon fires a crime against humanity?

Fires in the Brazilian Amazon have jumped 84% during President Jair Bolsonaro's first year in office and in July 2019 alone, an area of rainforest the size of Manhattan was lost every day. The Amazon fires may seem beyond human control, but they're not beyond human culpability.

7h

Novel approach to ultrasound raises possibility of new medical applications

A new ultrasound technique provides a non-invasive way of assessing bone structure on the microscale. Researchers hope to fine-tune the technique for use in assessing osteoporosis risk and treatment.

7h

7h

Field adult plant disease resistance can be assessed in young oilseed rape plants

New research into crop disease resistance in oilseed rape by a research team at the University of Hertfordshire has been published online this week by journal PLOS ONE.

7h

Research reveals vital clues about recycling in the evolution of life in our universe

New research by Kent astrophysicists reveals vital clues about the role recycling plays in the formation of life in our universe.

7h

Field adult plant disease resistance can be assessed in young oilseed rape plants

New research into crop disease resistance in oilseed rape by a research team at the University of Hertfordshire has been published online this week by journal PLOS ONE.

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We Spent 10 Months Investigating Kavanaugh. Here’s What We Found.

Years ago, when she was practicing her closing arguments at the family dinner table, Martha Kavanaugh often returned to her signature line as a state prosecutor. “Use your common sense,” she’d say. “What rings true? What rings false?” Those words made a strong impression on her young son, Brett. They also made a strong impression on us, as we embarked on our 10-month investigation of the Supreme

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Victorian hog deer genetics revealed

Australian researchers looking for a genetic lifeline to endangered hog deer species endemic to Pakistan, northern India and mainland southeast Asia have found widespread hybridisation of the species in Victoria.

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Cosmetic changes are equivalent after WBI vs PBI for women with early stage breast cancer

Results from the Quality of Life substudy of the NRG Oncology clinical trial NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 indicate that women rated post-lumpectomy partial breast irradiation (PBI) as equivalent to whole breast irradiation (WBI) in terms of cosmetic outcomes and satisfaction from baseline to three years following radiotherapy treatment.

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Reduced-dose IMRT w/ cisplatin meets predetermined benchmarks for PFS and swallowing-related QOL

Results of the NRG Oncology clinical trial NRG-HN002 indicated that the combination of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and cisplatin was able to meet acceptability criteria for progression-free survival (PFS) and swallowing-related quality of life for patients who have p16-positive, non-smoking-associated oropharyngeal cancer.

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Sesame yields stable in drought conditions

Texas has a long history of growing cotton. It's a resilient crop, able to withstand big swings in temperature fairly well. However, growing cotton in the same fields year after year can be a bad idea. Nutrients can get depleted. Disease can lurk in the ground during the winter season, only to attack the following year. Thus, rotating cotton with other crops could be a better system.

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Discovery of rare Roman cattle bones sheds new light on ancient farming

The "incredibly rare" discovery of Roman cattle bones by archaeologists has shed new light on how ancient farmers butchered and sold meat.

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Indonesia's toxic haze affecting Borneo's orangutans—rescuers

Massive forest fires in Indonesia that have caused a toxic haze to spread as far as Singapore and peninsular Malaysia are also seriously affecting endangered orangutans and their habitat, a rescue foundation said Tuesday.

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UN hosts drive to suck back carbon and reverse climate change

New York forum aims to ‘restore’ the climate by reducing atmospheric levels of carbon to those of a century ago A new effort to rally governments and corporations behind technologies that suck greenhouse gases from the atmosphere to help stave off disastrous global heating will be launched at the United Nations on Tuesday. The first annual Global Climate Restoration Forum, held in New York, aims

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Sesame yields stable in drought conditions

Texas has a long history of growing cotton. It's a resilient crop, able to withstand big swings in temperature fairly well. However, growing cotton in the same fields year after year can be a bad idea. Nutrients can get depleted. Disease can lurk in the ground during the winter season, only to attack the following year. Thus, rotating cotton with other crops could be a better system.

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Indonesia's toxic haze affecting Borneo's orangutans—rescuers

Massive forest fires in Indonesia that have caused a toxic haze to spread as far as Singapore and peninsular Malaysia are also seriously affecting endangered orangutans and their habitat, a rescue foundation said Tuesday.

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Make a knife sharp enough to shave

Sharpen a knife so well you can shave with it. (Dan Saelinger/) This story was originally published on Field & Stream By now just about everyone has heard of 127 Hours , the critically acclaimed movie inspired by Aron Ralston, the climber who was pinned by a boulder in Utah and spent an hour sawing his arm off with a dull knife blade. It's a dramatic film, but I don't think moviegoers would have

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Will Drone Strike, Oil Shortage Fears Move Us Toward EVs, High-MPG Cars?

Oil refinery at Sunset – factory – petrochemical plant When a drone strike knocked out a Saudi Aramco oil facility producing 5 percent of the world’s oil supply, the shockwaves were nearly instantaneous. Crude oil prices jumped almost 20 percent Monday and could spike higher, depending on how fearful the markets are that the strike could be replicated this week, this month or this year. In the ov

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Hur plasten är uppbyggd påverkar återvinningen

Plast är ett samlingsnamn för en stor grupp material med olika egenskaper och användningsmöjligheter. Plast kan vara allt från hårt och starkt, till mjukt och böjligt och kan även anpassas till att tåla extrem värme eller kyla. Plast består huvudsakligen av en eller flera polymerer som har blandats med tillsatser. En polymer är uppbyggd av en eller flera olika små byggstensmolekyler. Majoriteten

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Biohackers Got Scammed by a Company Selling “Hydrogen Water”

A bizarre startup called Trusii is under fire for scamming its customers — a mix of curious biohackers and people with medical conditions desperate for a cure. Trusii’s pitch was a $6,700 machine that infuses water with additional hydrogen, according to CNBC . According to promotional social media posts — more on those later — hydrogen water can help with conditions ranging from muscle pain and c

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Amazon's New Music HD Streaming Tier Delivers Higher Quality Tunes Than Spotify Or Apple

Amazon just rolled out a new streaming music tier that it hopes will draw users away from competing services such as Spotify and Apple Music. The advantage of the new Amazon Music HD subscription …

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Pterosaurs Were Monsters of the Mesozoic Skies

Fossils and mathematical modeling are helping to answer long-standing questions about these bizarre animals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Complexity of plastics make it impossible to know which are dangerous

A recent study found that 3 out of 4 plastic consumer products contain harmful chemicals. Bioplastics contained toxicants, too.

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Imaging reveals new results from landmark stem cell trial for stroke

Researchers led by Sean I. Savitz, M.D., at UTHealth Houston reported today in the journal Stem Cells that bone marrow cells used to treat ischemic stroke in an expanded Phase I trial were not only safe and feasible, but also resulted in enhanced recovery compared to a matched historical control group.

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Cancer cells turn to cannibalism to survive chemotherapy, study suggests

Researchers from the Tulane University School of Medicine have discovered that some cancer cells survive chemotherapy by eating their neighboring tumor cells. The study, which will be published Sept. 17, 2019 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that this act of cannibalism provides these cancer cells with the energy they need to stay alive and initiate tumor relapse after the course of treatm

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New method reveals how damage occurs in human biological cells due to mechanical fatigue

Researchers have developed a novel way to measure how mechanical fatigue affects biological cells. They also have established the important role of this effect in influencing physical properties of biological cells such as red blood cells (RBCs). This new technique assesses the mechanical integrity and fatigue behavior of RBCs using a general microfluidics method that incorporates amplitude-modula

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Philips' new Hue Play box syncs your lights with your TV

It's been a long time coming, but there's now an easy way to sync your Hue lights with your TV no matter what's on-screen. Signify has introduced a Philips Hue Play …

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Electric car owners could choose their vehicle's low-speed alert sounds

The NHTSA finalized rules in 2018 requiring all newly manufactured EVs and hybrids to emit alert sounds at speeds under 18.6 mph to warn pedestrians. In the agency’s updated proposal, drivers …

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Global warming makes it harder for birds to mate, study finds

New research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and University of Porto (CIBIO-InBIO) shows how global warming could reduce the mating activity and success of grassland birds.

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Colloidal nanotweezers are new tool for advanced particle manipulation

Tools for manipulating small suspended particles such as cells, micro-particles and nanoparticles play an essential role in the advancement of fundamental science and discovery of new technologies. Especially, manipulation of materials with light has led to significant breakthroughs in diverse field from atomic physics to microbiology and molecular medicine. More than 30 years ago, Arthur Ashkin f

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Global warming makes it harder for birds to mate, study finds

New research led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) and University of Porto (CIBIO-InBIO) shows how global warming could reduce the mating activity and success of grassland birds.

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The Navy Says Those UFO Videos Are Real

submitted by /u/tocreatewebsite [link] [comments]

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Shenzhen to Make All New Ride-Hailing Vehicles Fully Electric

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Ny vicedirektør: Når jeg får mulighed for at få indflydelse, griber jeg chancen

Jakob W. Hendel, der fra 1. september har sat sig i vicedirektør-stolen på Amager og Hvidovre Hospital, ser ikke noget modsætningsforhold mellem læger og økonomer. Han oplever, at økonomerne har meget godt at byde ind med.

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Klaus Lunding stopper som hospitalsdirektør

Klaus Lunding er færdig som direktør på Herlev og Gentofte Hospital.

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Families fight against toxic dust from Italy's Ilva steelworks

A steel plant in Taranto moves to tackle pollution, but locals say it is too little, too late.

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Two-dimensional chiral fluid mostly follows hydrodynamics theories

A team of researchers with members from several institutions in the U.S. and one in France has created a two-dimensional chiral fluid that mostly follows hydrodynamics theories. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the group describes their fluid, many of its properties, and the ways it differs from other fluids. Alexander Abanov with Stony Brook University has published a News

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Ancient volcanoes reveal Earth's recycled crust

Ancient volcanoes dating back billions of years could provide new insights into how the Earth's surface is recycled, according to scientists at the University of St Andrews.

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Ethanol fuels large-scale expansion of Brazil's farming land

A University of Queensland-led study has revealed that future demand for ethanol biofuel could potentially expand sugarcane farming land in Brazil by five million hectares by 2030.

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Scientists find new class of flavonoid pigments in liverworts

Scientists at Plant & Food Research, along with colleagues at Lincoln University and overseas, have recently discovered a brand new class of flavonoid pigments called "auronidins."

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Victorian hog deer genetics revealed

Australian researchers looking for a genetic lifeline to endangered hog deer species endemic to Pakistan, northern India and mainland southeast Asia have found widespread hybridization of the species in Victoria.

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The future of work will still include plenty of jobs

There is now widespread anxiety over the future of work, often accompanied by calls for a basic income to protect those displaced by automation and other technological changes.

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Everyone Is Getting Sucked Into the Iran Morass

After a summer of escalations between the United States and Iran, the past few weeks seemed almost civil. President Donald Trump was openly suggesting that he could meet with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. But just as quickly, the pendulum swung back, with an attack on a critical Saudi oil facility over the weekend that temporarily knocked out about half the country’s oil capacity or 5 percent

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Scientists find new class of flavonoid pigments in liverworts

Scientists at Plant & Food Research, along with colleagues at Lincoln University and overseas, have recently discovered a brand new class of flavonoid pigments called "auronidins."

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Victorian hog deer genetics revealed

Australian researchers looking for a genetic lifeline to endangered hog deer species endemic to Pakistan, northern India and mainland southeast Asia have found widespread hybridization of the species in Victoria.

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Her er de danske virksomheder, der genanvender plast

PLUS. Flere danske affaldsfirmaer har succes med at genanvende plastaffald, men det er næsten udelukkende erhvervsaffald.

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DTU-forsker: Brænd den dårlige plast af herhjemme

PLUS. En stor del af husholdningsaffaldet er blød, forurenet plast, der er ubrugeligt til genanvendelse, og lige så godt kan brændes af, mener professor.

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Stroke patients relearning how to walk with peculiar shoe

Clinical trials have been completed on a therapeutic shoe engineered to improve stroke recovery. They've proven successful, allowing for the patented product to hit the market by the end of the year.

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How to prep for (and recover from) natural disasters

In the wake of Hurricane Dorian, which the National Weather Service called one of the most powerful to make landfall in modern history, two experts discuss how to prepare for—and recover from—a storm. The hurricane’s 185 mph winds and rampant flooding devastated the Bahamas, left scores dead, and more than 70,000 without food or shelter. We’ll likely see more tropical storms and hurricanes this f

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Mass extinctions made life on Earth more diverse—and might again

tk (Ton Bangkeaw/Shutterstock/) In the past half-billion years, Earth has been hit again and again by mass extinctions, wiping out most species on the planet. And every time, life recovered and ultimately went on to increase in diversity. Is life just incredibly resilient, or is something else going on? Could mass extinctions actually help life diversify and succeed—and if so, how? Given that we'

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Därför dukar yrkesfiskarna under

Det är redan tufft som det är, att lyckas vara lönsam i en hårt konkurrensutsatt och stundom kritiserad bransch. En yrkesfiskare ska numera också vara välkomnande, flexibel, pedagogisk och miljömedveten. Det senare till följd av att flera periodvis även arbetar inom besöksnäringen, med allt med allt från att ordna fisketurer och driva restaurang till att ordna festivaler. År 1938 arbetade totalt

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Radiation therapy effective against deadly heart rhythm

A single high dose of radiation aimed at the heart significantly reduces episodes of a potentially deadly rapid heart rhythm, according to results of a phase one/two study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

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One Very Specific Reason Rami Malek Deserved His 'Bohemian Rhapsody' Oscar

It has to do with how the actor playing Freddie Mercury managed those prosthetic teeth.

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Why We Need Brain Scan Data Guidelines

Opinion: Aided by AI, brain scans know your past and future as well as your DNA. Determining their ethical implications is vital to scientific integrity.

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Introducing the October 2019 Issue

Monsters of the Mesozoic skies, the quest for a room-temperature superconductor and more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A climate change curriculum to empower the climate strike generation

It's too late to protect them from it, so how do teachers tell children about climate change without scaring them? The good news is that young people are already engaged—the students taking part in climate strikes show that young people want action and are willing to skip school to show how serious they are. But while in class, children shouldn't feel their time is wasted. Primary school teachers

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Testing fluoride levels in Indian wells

In the hilly part of Central India, the Alirajpur and Jhabua districts in Madhya Pradesh are known for the high fluoride levels in their underground water. The government has done a great job of drilling and providing handpumps in most locations. However, many of the handpumped wells have high levels of fluoride in their water. Long-term ingestion of large amounts of fluoride can lead to dental an

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Next-generation anvils for the Paris-Edinburgh cell

One of the goals of Task 7.3 of SINE2020's Sample Environment work package is to develop better high-pressure cells for neutron scattering. A cell commonly used to put a sample under high pressure is the Paris-Edinburgh (PE) press which exerts the pressure with anvils onto a sample hold in gaskets. However, the existing equipment produces an important neutron background which prevents the measurem

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Finding the missing pieces in the puzzle of an antineutrino's energy

Charged particles, like protons and electrons, can be characterized by the trails of atoms these particles ionize. In contrast, neutrinos and their antiparticle partners almost never ionize atoms, so their interactions have to be pieced together by how they break nuclei apart.

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Researchers suggest RNA and DNA got their start from RNA-DNA chimeras

A pair of researchers with the Scripps Research Institute has suggested that RNA and DNA got their start billions of years ago from RNA-DNA chimeras that contained RNA and DNA building blocks. In their paper published in the journal Nature Chemistry, Subhendu Bhowmik and Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy outline their theory and argue that it makes more sense than the traditional explanation for how lif

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Apple pours another $250 million into iPhone glass supplier Corning

Apple has announced that it's investing $250 million into display glass supplier Corning, on top of the $200 million it put in in 2017. The money will help Corning develop glass …

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Snapchat makes your selfies more animated with new 3D effects

Get ready for your selfies to have a little more pop on Snapchat. Today, the company is introducing 3D Camera Mode, a new feature which lets you take Snaps that can change perspective …

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Elephant seal 'supermoms' produce most of the population, study finds

Most of the pups born in an elephant seal colony in California over a span of five decades were produced by a relatively small number of long-lived "supermoms", according to a new study by researchers …

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Researchers suggest RNA and DNA got their start from RNA-DNA chimeras

A pair of researchers with the Scripps Research Institute has suggested that RNA and DNA got their start billions of years ago from RNA-DNA chimeras that contained RNA and DNA building blocks. In their paper published in the journal Nature Chemistry, Subhendu Bhowmik and Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy outline their theory and argue that it makes more sense than the traditional explanation for how lif

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Hair indicates whether wild animals were 'stressed'

While hair analysis has become routine in humans—for example for the detection of prolonged drug or medication abuse—it has been little used in animals to date. Scientists led by Alexandre Azevedo and Katarina Jewgenow of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) have now demonstrated that the stress hormone cortisol is deposited in hair of wild mongooses in Portugal and de

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What happens when magnetic north and true north align?

At some point in recent weeks, a once-in-a-lifetime event happened for people at Greenwich in the United Kingdom.

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Diamonds are forever: New foundation for nanostructures

Devices smaller than the width of a human hair are key to technologies for drug delivery, semiconductors, and fuel production. But current methods for fabricating these micro- and nanostructures can be expensive and wasteful.

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Hair indicates whether wild animals were 'stressed'

While hair analysis has become routine in humans—for example for the detection of prolonged drug or medication abuse—it has been little used in animals to date. Scientists led by Alexandre Azevedo and Katarina Jewgenow of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) have now demonstrated that the stress hormone cortisol is deposited in hair of wild mongooses in Portugal and de

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Some people have better genetic protection from MRSA

An inherited genetic mutation appears to increase the likelihood that a person can successfully fight off MRSA infections, according to a new study. The finding adds important insights into the genetic factors that predispose some people to persistent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections and could lead to the development of better treatment options. “The increasing preval

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New method for detecting quantum states of electrons

Quantum computing harnesses enigmatic properties of small particles to process complex information. But quantum systems are fragile and error-prone, and useful quantum computers have yet to come to fruition.

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Researchers simulate processes prevailing in early magma oceans

The reason why the Earth's atmosphere has contained so much oxygen since about two billion years ago compared to the atmospheres of other known planets has for a long time remained a mystery. Researchers at the Bavarian Research Institute of Experimental Geochemistry & Geophysics (BGI) at the University of Bayreuth recently used high-pressure experiments to substantiate a hitherto unproven suspici

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Researchers: Loss of genetic variation means species are less adaptable to climate change

Queen's University researcher Vicki Friesen (Biology) and former postdoctoral fellow Debbie Leigh are sounding the alarm over the increasing loss of the genetic variation that allows species to adapt to the rapid and drastic environmental changes being generated by human activity.

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Women grossly underrepresented in the music industry

Don't let the success of Beyonce and Taylor Swift fool you. Females are still grossly underrepresented in the music industry, reports a recent Northwestern University study.

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Researchers: Loss of genetic variation means species are less adaptable to climate change

Queen's University researcher Vicki Friesen (Biology) and former postdoctoral fellow Debbie Leigh are sounding the alarm over the increasing loss of the genetic variation that allows species to adapt to the rapid and drastic environmental changes being generated by human activity.

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Genomics provides evidence of glacial refugia in Scandinavia

Evolutionary research on a grass-like, flowering perennial called the northern single-spike sedge has offered some of the first proof of ice-free locations, or glacial refugia, in Northern Europe during Earth's most recent ice age.

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Invite consumers to pop-up, and pop goes the spending—offline and online

To lure customers, online retailer Alibaba often targeted existing customers when marketing resources were limited. Then along came a research project with a novel question: What if you pursued prospective customers, and then tracked their offline and online spending habits compared to frequent customers?

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Genomics provides evidence of glacial refugia in Scandinavia

Evolutionary research on a grass-like, flowering perennial called the northern single-spike sedge has offered some of the first proof of ice-free locations, or glacial refugia, in Northern Europe during Earth's most recent ice age.

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New UN report to reveal staggering human climate footprint on water and ice

Governments are meeting in the Principality of Monaco from Friday to approve a new U.N. report that outlines the impacts and risks to nature and humans of dramatically changing oceans, polar regions and glaciers. The report will underscore the crisis we face, with already seen climate impacts increasing in scale, frequency and intensity.

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Stroke patients relearning how to walk with peculiar shoe

Clinical trials have been completed on a therapeutic shoe engineered to improve stroke recovery. They've proven successful, allowing for the patented product to hit the market by the end of the year.

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Scientists identify previously unknown 'hybrid zone' between hummingbird species

We usually think of a species as being reproductively isolated — that is, not mating with other species in the wild. Occasionally, however, closely related species do interbreed. New research documents the existence of a previously undiscovered hybrid zone along the coasts of California and Oregon where two related bird hummingbirds are blurring species boundaries, and researchers hope that study

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Nature documentaries increasingly talk about threats to nature, but still don't show them

Researchers analyzing recent BBC and Netflix nature documentaries found that although they increasingly mention threats to nature, visual depictions of these threats remain scarce, potentially misleading audiences on the state of the natural world.

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Short-term study suggests vegan diet can boost gut microbes related to body weight, body composition and blood sugar control

New research suggests that a 16-week vegan diet can boost the gut microbes that are related to improvements in body weight, body composition and blood sugar control.

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Light drinking may be beneficial in type 2 diabetes: Further research needed

An meta-analysis of studies shows that recommendations to moderate alcohol consumption for people with type 2 diabetes may need to be reviewed, since low-to-moderate consumption could have a positive effect on blood glucose and fat metabolism.

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Overgrowth of baby in womb may begin weeks before women are tested for maternal diabetes

The excessive growth of a baby in the womb, a common complication of gestational diabetes, begins weeks before women are tested for the disease, according to new research.

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Later puberty and later menopause associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women

New research shows that use of the contraceptive pill and longer menstrual cycles are associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D), while later puberty and later menopause are associated with lower risk.

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Don't make major decisions on an empty stomach

A new study suggests that people might want to avoid making any important decisions about the future on an empty stomach.

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Novel use of laser technology reveals interactions between roots, soil organisms

A novel use of a custom laser system—developed in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences eight years ago—allows researchers to see how soil organisms affect plant roots. The discovery has implications for future breeding of more resilient and productive crops, according to an international team of scientists.

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Disrupting key protein alters biological rhythms in water flea

Researchers from North Carolina State University have shown that the E75 protein is a key regulator of some biological rhythms through interactions with nitric oxide. Suppression of E75 results in longer molt cycles and reduced numbers of offspring in the water flea, Daphnia magna. The work also raises questions about the ability of nitric oxide from environmental sources to disrupt biological rhy

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Blast sparks fire at Russian laboratory housing smallpox virus

Facility know as Vector is one of only two sites holding virus, and also houses Ebola samples A gas explosion has sparked a fire at a Russian laboratory complex stockpiling viruses ranging from smallpox to Ebola, authorities have said. The State Research Centre of Virology and Biotechnology denied that the fire had exposed the public to the pathogens stored inside, some of the deadliest on Earth.

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Novel use of laser technology reveals interactions between roots, soil organisms

A novel use of a custom laser system—developed in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences eight years ago—allows researchers to see how soil organisms affect plant roots. The discovery has implications for future breeding of more resilient and productive crops, according to an international team of scientists.

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Disrupting key protein alters biological rhythms in water flea

Researchers from North Carolina State University have shown that the E75 protein is a key regulator of some biological rhythms through interactions with nitric oxide. Suppression of E75 results in longer molt cycles and reduced numbers of offspring in the water flea, Daphnia magna. The work also raises questions about the ability of nitric oxide from environmental sources to disrupt biological rhy

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Transformative power of local initiatives to address environmental health inequities

A new book details the insights learned from communities that came together to overcome long-standing and seemingly insurmountable environmental public health challenges. Using three case studies, including efforts to reduce childhood lead poisoning in the City of Rochester, the book demonstrates how low-income and marginalized urban communities built successful systems-change approaches to addres

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Stroke patients relearning how to walk with peculiar shoe

Clinical trials have been completed on a therapeutic shoe engineered to improve stroke recovery. They've proven successful, allowing for the patented product to hit the market by the end of the year.

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Female athletes seek specialty care for concussion later than males

Female athletes seek specialty medical treatment later than male athletes for sports-related concussions (SRC), and this delay may cause them to experience more symptoms and longer recoveries.

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Synthetic cells capture and reveal hidden messages of the immune system

New research is highly relevant to how antibodies are made in response to infections, vaccines and in autoimmunity due to the its analysis of a signal that is associated with hyper IgM syndrome, a genetic deficiency of CD40 ligand (CD40L) that results in profound immunodeficiency.

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How nitrogen-fixing bacteria sense iron

New research reveals how nitrogen-fixing bacteria sense iron – an essential but deadly micronutrient. The findings are an important piece in the puzzle of how life deals with iron, a nutrient it cannot do without but one it must also avoid having in excess.

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Elephant seal 'supermoms' produce most of the population, study finds

Most of the pups born in an elephant seal colony in California over a span of five decades were produced by a relatively small number of long-lived 'supermoms,' according to a new study.

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Indoor Solar Cells

Sometimes technology is developed for a specific function. At other times, however, technology is developed simply because it is possible, and then uses are found for the technology later. Most often, however, it seems that technology is developed with some specific application in mind, but once it exists out in the world many new functions are developed. In fact the “killer app” may have nothing

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The First Hurricane Relief Drone Was Ready to Fly—Then Dorian Hit

A drone company on Great Abaco, in the Bahamas, was prepared to deliver emergency supplies if the hurricane struck. Dorian had other plans.

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A novel tool to probe fundamental matter

The origin of matter remains a complex and open question. A novel experimental approach could be exploited to better test the theories of physicists.

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One step closer future to quantum computers

Physicists have identified how to distinguish between true and 'fake' Majorana states in one of the most commonly used experimental setups, by means of supercurrent measurements. This theoretical study is a crucial step for advancing the field of topological superconductors and applications of Majorana states for robust quantum computers. New experiments testing this approach are expected next.

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Combination of wood fibers and spider silk could rival plastic

The unique material outperforms most of today's synthetic and natural materials by providing high strength and stiffness, combined with increased toughness.

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Image of the Day: Actin Assembly

Microtubules need actin to disassemble focal adhesions, allowing for cell movement.

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Hidden Gravitational Wave Reveals Black Holes Are 'Bald' ⁠— Not 'Hairy'

Are black holes bald or hairy? It all depends on the details of a fleeting overtone.

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Why I broke the law for climate change

Nature, Published online: 17 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02736-9 Lawyer Farhana Yamin explains what drove her to civil disobedience after three decades of environmental advocacy for the IPCC, the United Nations and more.

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Tree cover is not enough: Keeping cities cool calls for a commons-based climate response

A recent report by the Greater Sydney Commission singles out urban heat as one of four priority areas given our coming climate. It identifies tree canopy as the top response for reducing city temperatures and delivering amenity. However, the public conversation about urban heat often misses the complex relationship between trees, people and the built environment, which challenges this response.

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Green growth that works

Economic development plans often overlook a crucial detail—ecosystems that provide essential services to people. Increasingly, though, leaders in academia, finance, sustainable development and the private sector agree that nature is a key engine of economic prosperity. Now, they're looking for reliable tools and guidance to implement green growth.

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Scientists shave estimate of neutrino's mass in half

An international team of scientists, including researchers at MIT, has come closer to pinning down the mass of the elusive neutrino. These ghost-like particles permeate the universe and yet are thought to be nearly massless, streaming by the millions through our bodies while leaving barely any physical trace.

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From primordial black holes new clues to dark matter

Primordial black holes (PBHs) are objects that formed just fractions of a second after the Big Bang, considered by many researchers among the principal candidates in explaining the nature of dark matter, above all following direct observations of gravitational waves by the VIRGO and LIGO detectors in 2016. "We have tested a scenario in which dark matter is composed of non-stellar black holes, form

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3-D models of Mars to aid Rosalind Franklin rover in quest for ancient life

Scientists at TU Dortmund University have generated high-accuracy 3-D models of terrain within the landing ellipse of the ESA/Roscosmos ExoMars rover Rosalind Franklin. The Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) have a resolution of about 25 cm per pixel and will help scientists to understand the geography and geological characteristics of the region and to plan the path of the rover around the site.

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ARIEL exoplanet mission celebrates machine learning challenge and citizen science launch

ARIEL, an ESA mission to make the first large-scale survey of exoplanet atmospheres, has announced the winners of its first international Machine Learning Data Challenge and has launched a new project, ExoClocks, aimed at amateur astronomers and citizen scientists.

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Stony-iron meteor caused August impact flash at Jupiter

Analysis of a bright flash in Jupiter's atmosphere observed by an amateur astronomer in August 2019 has revealed that the likely cause was a small asteroid with a density typical of stony-iron meteors. The impact is estimated to have released energy equivalent to an explosion of 240 kilotons of TNT—around half the energy released in the 2013 Chelyabinsk event at Earth. The results have been presen

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Painting the molecular canvas in super-resolution

To understand how individual molecules play their roles in biological processes inside the cells they are synthesized in, researchers have developed super-resolution microscopy methods to visualize them at the single-molecule level. However, to investigate their functions, ultimately, they would also like to be able to modify them individually at this high resolution. While the visualization of si

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Madtype og portionen afgørende for kalorieberegning

Italiensk undersøgelsen understreger behovet for bedre information til patienter med type 1-diabetes, så de kan forbedre præcisionen i deres kalorieberegninger og reducere risikoen for for lavt blodsukker.

9h

Researchers unlock cancer-causing mechanism of E. coli toxin with synthetic biology approach

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) unraveled how a toxin released by Escherichia coli (E. coli) – a human gut bacteria, is connected to colorectal cancer, offering new insights to the health impact of this prevalent bacteria and facilitating future research on the prevention of this third most common cancer worldwide.

9h

Real-time imaging for use in medicine

A new paper in Nature Photonics from researchers at CU Boulder details impressive improvements in the ability to control the propagation and interaction of light in complex media such as tissue—an area with many potential applications in the medical field.

9h

Researchers say the age of Saturn's rings is difficult to determine

A team of researchers has reignited the debate about the age of Saturn's rings with a study that dates the rings as most likely to have formed early in the Solar System.

9h

Painting the molecular canvas in super-resolution

To understand how individual molecules play their roles in biological processes inside the cells they are synthesized in, researchers have developed super-resolution microscopy methods to visualize them at the single-molecule level. However, to investigate their functions, ultimately, they would also like to be able to modify them individually at this high resolution. While the visualization of si

9h

Researchers unlock cancer-causing mechanism of E. coli toxin with synthetic biology approach

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) unraveled how a toxin released by Escherichia coli (E. coli) – a human gut bacteria, is connected to colorectal cancer, offering new insights to the health impact of this prevalent bacteria and facilitating future research on the prevention of this third most common cancer worldwide.

9h

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Biohacking: The Art and Science of Upgrading the Human Being

submitted by /u/Professional-Dragon [link] [comments]

10h

Elephant seal 'supermoms' produce most of the population, study finds

Most of the pups born in an elephant seal colony in California over a span of five decades were produced by a relatively small number of long-lived 'supermoms,' according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

10h

Veganerkost giver gavnlige tarmmikrober

16 ugers veganerkost kan booste tarmenes indhold af tarmmikrober, som er koblet til vægttab, sundhedsfremmende kropskomposition og bedre blodsukkerkontrol.

10h

Fostret vokser voldsomt allerede fire uger inden screening for graviditetsdiabetes

Hos kvinder, som senere fik konstateret graviditetsdiabetes, voksede fostrene allerede voldsomt mellem 20. og 24. graviditetsuge, hvilket er fire uger inden det anbefalede screeningstidspunkt for graviditetsdiabetes, viser forskning fra Sydkorea.

10h

Remote Russian Volcano Turns the Skies Purple

The eruption of a remote Russian volcano in June has been tingeing sunrises and sunsets the world over a gorgeous purple hue.

10h

"Dogwood Winter," Meet "Curb Appeal"

Language and the U.S.’s relationship with the outdoors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Derfor ligger projektet stille: 17 kritiske fejl har lammet nyt sygesikringssystem

KL og regionerne har identificeret 17 kritiske fejl i sygesikringssystemet Praksys.

10h

Fler operationer bokas in om läkaren är utvilad

– Vår studie visar att också medicinskt beslutsfattande påverkas vid upprepade beslut. Om det är så att viktiga medicinska prioriteringsbeslut påverkas av när på dagen man träffar en läkare, bör detta kanske tänkas över. Vi vill ju ha ett så effektivt och rättvist nyttjande av samhällets resurser som möjligt, säger Gustav Tinghög, biträdande professor vid Linköpings universitet. Han tillhör också

10h

Elephant seal 'supermoms' produce most of the population, study finds

Most of the pups born in an elephant seal colony in California over a span of five decades were produced by a relatively small number of long-lived "supermoms", according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

10h

New approach suggests path to emissions-free cement

It's well known that the production of cement—the world's leading construction material—is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions, accounting for about 8 percent of all such releases. If cement production were a country, it would be the world's third-largest emitter.

10h

Common drug source of insights into formation of 'butterfly' crystals

Experiments at ANSTO's Australian Centre for Neutron Scattering and the Australian Synchrotron have revealed the growth mechanism behind an unusual twin crystal that forms conjoined "wings" in the most commonly prescribed antihypertensive and diuretic drug, hydrochlorothiazide (HCT).

10h

The Air Force Will Let Hackers Try to Hijack an Orbiting Satellite

At the Defcon hacking conference next year, the Air Force will bring a satellite for fun and glory.

10h

The Shift to Electric Vehicles Propels a Strike Against GM

Like other automakers, General Motors is preparing for a mostly electric future. The catch is that building those cars requires a lot fewer workers.

10h

Marketers Wanted a New Generation to Target, Hence Alphas

Members of the latest age group to emerge are barely out of diapers, and the internet is already serving them ads.

10h

James Cameron, Victor Vescovo, and the Saga of the Deepest* Solo Dive Ever

Vescovo says he dove deeper than Cameron. Cameron says not so fast. Perhaps only Poseidon knows for sure.

10h

Elephant seal 'supermoms' produce most of the population, study finds

Most of the pups born in an elephant seal colony in California over a span of five decades were produced by a relatively small number of long-lived "supermoms", according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

10h

"Dogwood Winter," Meet "Curb Appeal"

Language and the U.S.’s relationship with the outdoors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Long-Standing Problem of 'Golden Ratio' and Other Irrational Numbers Solved with 'Magical Simplicity'

Mathematicians have finally proved a conjecture on approximating numbers with fractions

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Sex clouds queen bees’ vision

Nature, Published online: 17 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02771-6 Semen that impairs a female’s eyesight is one weapon in the sexual arms race between male honeybees and queens.

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Physicists close in on elusive neutrino’s mass

Nature, Published online: 17 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02786-z Experiment produces best laboratory estimate yet of super-light particle’s maximum mass.

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Bioengineering organ-specific tissues with high cellular density and embedded vascular channels

Bioengineers study the development of organ-specific tissues in the lab for therapeutic applications. However, the process is highly challenging, since it requires the fabrication and maintenance of dense cellular constructs composed of approximately 108 cell/mL. Research teams have used organ building blocks (OBBs) composed of patient-specific-induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived organoid

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Bioengineering organ-specific tissues with high cellular density and embedded vascular channels

Bioengineers study the development of organ-specific tissues in the lab for therapeutic applications. However, the process is highly challenging, since it requires the fabrication and maintenance of dense cellular constructs composed of approximately 108 cell/mL. Research teams have used organ building blocks (OBBs) composed of patient-specific-induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived organoid

10h

A novel tool to probe fundamental matter

Identifying elementary constituents of matter including quarks, bosons and electrons, and the manner by which these particles interact with each other, constitutes one of the greatest challenges in modern physical sciences. Resolving this outstanding problem will not only deepen our understanding of the early days of the universe, but will also shed light on exotic states of matter, such as superc

10h

Sammenhæng mellem pubertet, overgangsalder, p-piller og diabetes

Brug af p-piller og længere menstruationscyklusser er associeret med højere risiko for at udvikle type 2-diabetes. Senere pubertet og senere overgangsalder er derimod associeret med lavere risiko, viser ny forskning.

10h

Marooned: Researchers Will Freeze Their Ship into Arctic Ocean Ice for a Year

Scientists setting sail to the North Pole will become stranded in slowly migrating sea ice to investigate climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Varumärke i harmoni med hjälp av våra sinnen

Andreas Eklund har i sin avhandling studerat hur sinnesmarknadsföring kan bidra till att göra att ett varumärke anses vara mer premium, vilket skapar värde både för företaget och dess konsumenter. Han förklarar: – Jag har koncentrerat mig på upplevelsen av miljön inuti bilen via interiören, den som föraren tar del av. Jag har studerat hur ett företag planerar och designar en upplevelse och hur de

11h

Columbia historian stepping down after plagiarism finding

A tenured professor of history at Columbia University will be stepping down at the end of next year after an investigating committee at the school found “incontrovertible evidence of research misconduct” in his controversial 2013 book. Charles King Armstrong, the Korea Foundation Professor of Korean Studies in the Social Sciences, was found to have “cited … Continue reading

11h

School strikes are changing the world, says UN climate science advisor

Students and adults all over the world will strike to protest climate change this Friday. UN science advisor Petteri Taalas says such action could help make progress at next week's climate summit

11h

The hackable technology that worries even a legendary con man

Right now cybercrime is basically a financial crime — it's a business of stealing people's money or stealing their data. Data has value. We develop a lot of technology — we need to always ask the question how the new innovation can be misused and make safeguards so that it cannot be done. Because we currently don't do these things, we have hackable vehicles, pacemakers, and laptops. Scam Me If Yo

11h

Hurricanes May Kill Some Birds, but Humans Are the Real Threat

When the time comes to assess the environmental damage from Hurricane Dorian, one species may be extinct, but it's not Dorian's fault

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Novosibirsk: 'No risk' after blast and fire at Russian lethal virus lab

A major research centre says no biological agents have been released from a blast and fire at a lab.

11h

It May Take Years to Uncover All of Vaping’s Health Risks

Marketing that claimed vaping to be a “safer” alternative to smoking may have led millions of teenagers to believe e-cigarettes are “safe.” But as new cases of lung illnesses emerge, it has become apparent how little we know about the health risks associated with their use, particularly over the long term.

11h

American Migration Patterns Should Terrify the GOP

Liberals in America have a density problem. Across the country, Democrats dominate in cities , racking up excessive margins in urban cores while narrowly losing in suburban districts and sparser states. Because of their uneven distribution of votes, the party consistently loses federal elections despite winning the popular vote. The most famous case was in 2016, when Hillary Clinton lost the elec

11h

Let Them Fight

During the Democratic primary debate at the Felt Forum in New York City, in April of 1988, Al Gore pointed out that Michael Dukakis had a big problem. The senator from Tennessee mentioned that the Massachusetts governor, who had leapt to the front of the Democratic primary field, had sustained a furlough program that involved “weekend passes for convicted criminals,” one of whom had committed rap

11h

The Library That’s Also an Art Gallery

When it came to planning the new public library for downtown Winston-Salem, North Carolina, the people of the city had a lot to say, from the visionary to the practical. The library should “make an important statement” and “be a place for the public to be together,” Nan La Rosee, the central operations manager of the Forsyth County Public Library , told me during a recent visit. She went on to ra

11h

The Corruption of ‘Privilege’

A leading British newspaper was forced to check its callousness this week when readers objected to the best example yet of how “privilege” discourse has spun out of control. Understanding The Guardian ’s error in judgment requires some background information. Thirty years ago, when the feminist academic Peggy McIntosh published White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack , she hoped the boo

11h

We Need a More Targeted Approach to Combatting Global Inequality

The global economic system works very well for some people, including us. It hardly works at all for millions of others. Those for whom it doesn’t work are robbed of the opportunity to lead the life they want, and that is unjust. We believe that every life has equal value. That’s why we believe in progressive taxes and paying our fair share to support government programs, and it’s why we are givi

11h

Apple iPhone 11 Review: The iPhone for Nearly Everybody

It’s not the best iPhone you can buy, but it’s an excellent phone for the price.

11h

A Brutal Murder, a Wearable Witness, and an Unlikely Suspect

Karen Navarra was a quiet woman in her sixties who lived alone. She was found beaten to death. The neighbors didn't see anything. But her Fitbit did.

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