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nyheder2019september20

Offentlig transports sidste bastion: Nu flygter også hovedstadens pendlere over i bilerne

Selv landets bedst udbyggede offentlige transportsystem må se sig slået af danskernes stigende hang til at sætte sig bag ­rattet. Både busser og S-tog taber terræn.

17h

Climate strike: global climate change protest kicks off in Australia and Pacific – live updates

On Friday 20 September, millions of people led by Greta Thunberg and students from Sydney to Delhi, Melbourne to London and New York, will march for urgent action on climate change. Follow for all the latest school strike 4 climate news Climate strike in Australia: everything you need to know about Friday’s protest Why the Guardian is changing the language it uses about the environment Young stri

21h

Tre milliarder fugle er forsvundet i USA og Canada: Det sker også i Danmark

Fuglebestanden er skrumpet med mere end fjerdedel siden 1970'erne, fordi levesteder ødelægges.

13h

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Adding a mutation to Ebola could sap its infectious power

Creating mutations in a key protein that helps Ebola escape the body’s defenses can keep the virus from making its hosts sick and activate protective immunity, researchers report. The mutated virus even works as a vaccine to protect animals from infection with the Ebola virus, researchers say. The study suggests that VP35, a protein that enables Ebola virus to block early immune responses to infe

2min

Global climate strikes: millions take to the streets to demand action

Hundreds of thousands of adults and children from Sydney to London have taken to the streets today as part of a global strike against governments’ inaction on climate change

6min

Leukemia drug shows promise for treating a childhood brain cancer

Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of California San Diego researchers describe new use of leukemia drug, nilotinib, to treat subtype of medulloblastoma, a deadly pediatric brain cancer.

14min

EPA Administrator Weighs In On California Emissions Decision

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler about the administration's plans to revoke California's authority to set its own vehicle emissions standards.

15min

Four of the best printers for your home office

Print your boarding pass, your photos, your calendars, and more. (BUMIPUTRA via Unsplash/) A home printer can save time and money at the print shop, but there are a mind-numbing number of printers on the market. How can you know which makes sense for your use case? Below, find our favorite printers for almost every at-home printing need. An easy way to print 50 pages of reading. (Amazon/) The Bro

19min

Low on Juice: How Phone Batteries Shape the Rhythms of Our Daily Lives

Feeling stressed yet? (Credit: boyhey/Shutterstock) It's happened to all of us. You're out and about when you notice that your phone is running low on battery. For many, the realization sparks a sense of urgency, and lends new meaning to plans we may have already laid. Edging that battery icon back up becomes a goal of singular urgency, a task that lends a frisson of unease to our everyday lives.

32min

Gadgets that make pet owners’ lives easier

Keep your best friend happy. (Alexander Puffer via Unsplash/) Having a pet can often feel like having a small child — they depend on us and need constant attention. If you live a busy life (and who doesn’t?), you might find it a little difficult to give your dogs or cats everything they need. Luckily these five gadgets allow you to live your active life and still provide for your pets in the best

40min

AMD’s Ryzen 9 3950X, Threadripper on hold until November

The delay on Ryzen 9 3950X's launch makes sense, given Ryzen 9 3900X's scarcity.

47min

Millions said they would 'storm' Area 51 but only 75 party-goers showed up

A call to "storm" the secretive US military base in the Nevada desert known as Area 51 attracts a few dozen revellers to its heavily guarded entrance early Friday, …

47min

Facebook suspends tens of thousands of apps following data investigation

Facebook said they had investigated millions of apps based on "signals associated with an app's potential to abuse our policies."

47min

Twitter closes thousands of fake news accounts worldwide

Twitter said Friday it has closed down thousands of accounts across the world for spreading fake news as well as pro-government propaganda including in places like the United Arab Emirates, …

47min

Two Studies Fail to Replicate Magnetogenetics Research

The new work calls into question the idea that neurons can be genetically engineered to fire in response to magnetic fields, a setback for the budding technique.

48min

Lab develops novel approach to study sound recognition in acoustically orienting animals

A new study by Dr. Norman Lee, in collaboration with St. Olaf College students Alexander Kirtley '19, Isaiah Pressman '19, and Karina (Kari) Jirik '20, and University of Toronto collaborators Dean Koucoulas and Dr. Andrew C. Mason, show a novel approach that can be used to study song recognition in O. ochracea.

50min

Diagnostic radiologists with lifetime ABR certificates less likely to participate in MOC

An ahead-of-print article from AJR discovers lifetime-certified diagnostic radiologists whose Maintenance of Certification was not mandated by the American Board of Radiology were far less likely to participate in ABR MOC programs–especially general radiologists and those working in smaller, nonacademic practices in states with lower population densities 'Many opinions have been expressed regardi

50min

Daily rainfall over Sumatra linked to larger atmospheric phenomenon

In a new study led by atmospheric scientist Giuseppe Torri at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), researchers revealed details of the connection between a larger atmospheric phenomenon, termed the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), and the daily patterns of rainfall in the Maritime Continent.

50min

Global climate strike: Scenes from the #ClimateMarch protests

Millions of people around the world are taking to the streets to demand more urgent action on climate change. The protests come just days ahead of the 2019 UN Climate Action Summit. Although it's unclear exactly how many people are participating, it's likely to be the largest climate protest ever. None The global climate strikes kicked off in full force on Friday, September 20. Millions of people

56min

New doctors face widespread sexual harassment in residency

Sexual harassment in academic medicine is widespread, a new study finds. Female residents in surgery and internal medicine reported the highest rates and those in pediatrics reporting the lowest, according to the research. The results come from a survey of roughly 1,700 residents at 14 academic medical centers across the country. About half the respondents were women. Nearly 12% of women doing th

59min

Study: Many Tennesseans are misinformed about tornado protection

More people die during tornadoes in the Southeast than anywhere else in the United States. And still, a lot of people have misconceptions about their risk of being impacted by tornadoes, according to a new study published in PLOS One by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

1h

A Major Legal Battle May Change How Digital Game Sales Work

Valve's Steam platform is currently appealing a case in France over consumers' ability to resell games.

1h

Man's 'Bug Bite' Was Really a Sign of Leukemia

The man was stunned to find out that a swollen lump on his foot was actually a sign of leukemia.

1h

Millennials and the rise of tiny homes

The tiny home movement has been popular on social media sites, often portraying an idyllic lifestyle that's cheaper and better for the environment without sacrificing aesthetics. But tiny homes may become the answer to a growing population and growing inequality. As the movement continues to build up steam, one has to wonder whether it's a housing crisis solution with a new coat of paint. None Ti

1h

Aggressive Cancers Feed Off the Brain’s Nerves

Three studies show that tumor cells can behave like neurons.

1h

Underground Continents May Be As Old As Earth

New analyses of volcanic rocks fill gaps in Earth's ancient history.

1h

A Washington Whistle-Blower Tops This Week's Internet News Roundup

Last week, a whistle-blower raised concerns about Trump's phone calls. Also, *Saturday Night Live*'s Shane Gillis saga took over Twitter.

1h

Climate strike: Protests in cities across the world

Millions of people join a global environmental strike led by schoolchildren.

1h

Customize your iPhone by ditching these boring default settings

Still got that default wallpaper, I see. Maybe… change things up a bit? (Alvaro Reyes on Unsplash/) You can't customize an iPhone as much as you can an Android phone, but there are still ways to make it yours. Serious personalization such as installing a totally new home screen is off the table, but we can show you how to get the next best thing. Set the wallpaper on your home and lock screens

1h

Three soothing facial sprays for an instant refresh

Face mists for an instant pick-me-up. (Amplitude Magazin via Unsplash/) On a hot and humid day, a spritz of facial spray can completely turn your mood around. In colder climes, it also provides a quick dose of moisture. Many facial sprays come with skin-loving ingredients like aloe vera or rose water, and come in travel sizes so you can give yourself a quick refresher wherever you go. Refreshing

1h

High speeds and low altitudes rule at Reno's annual airplane races

A jet rounds outer pylon eight on Saturday, September 14. (Rob Verger/) On Saturday, I stood in the high, hot, dusty, dry desert of Nevada and watched small jets zoom past a pylon on a hill at low altitude as they flew their way through a race course in the sky. If you’ve ever watched stock cars compete around a track, you get the general idea of what goes on at the National Championship Air Race

1h

Madonna at War

Madonna has banned cameras and phones from her performances at the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Howard Gilman Opera House, but images will live on in attendees’ nightmares. They’ll not forget the traumatizing intro segment of chest-shaking gunshots and big onscreen bullet holes and a slain dancer. Or the apocalypse pangs later: a pianist in a gas mask, some riot-gear-clad ballerinas, pictures of b

2h

Cancer Cells Have "Unsettling" Ability to Hijack the Brain's Nerves

Startling discovery could open up avenues for treating some aggressive tumors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Thousands of Tech Workers Join Global Climate Change Strike

Employees in Silicon Valley want their companies to do more to help the planet. Will this activism make a difference?

2h

Herpes vaccine to be tested in humans after best result yet in animals

Hopes for a genital herpes vaccine have been raised by a trial treatment that stops genital lesions and low-lying infections in guinea pigs and mice

2h

Glowing DNA label illuminates a cell’s fine details

Nature, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02819-7 Fluorescent tag can be affixed to proteins or genetic structures of interest.

2h

An uncorked champagne bottle imitates a fighter jet

Nature, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02829-5 On opening, a bottle of bubbly releases a carbon dioxide plume that travels faster than the speed of sound.

2h

IBM Preps 53-Qubit Quantum Computer for Launch in October

IBM plans to make a 53-qubit quantum computer available to clients of its IBM Q Network next month. The new system, which should go online by the middle of October, will be the largest universal quantum computer that’s available for general commercial use. Google announced a 72-qubit quantum computer in 2018, but IBM’s machine will be available for use by commercial clients. Google continues to e

2h

Climate change study finds that maple syrup season may come earlier

Once winter nights dip below freezing and the days warm up above freezing sap begins to flow in sugar maples marking the start of the syrup season. With climate change, daily temperatures are on the rise, which affects sap flow and sugar content. By 2100, the maple syrup season in eastern North America may be one month earlier than it was during 1950 and 2017, according to a study published in For

2h

New Penn-developed vaccine prevents herpes in mice, guinea pigs

A novel vaccine developed at Penn Medicine protected almost all mice and guinea pigs exposed to the herpes virus. This may lead to the vaccine being tested in human studies.

2h

SCAI stages of cardiogenic shock stratify mortality risk

A new shock classification scheme released by the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) and endorsed by the American College of Cardiology (ACC), American Heart Association, the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons was recently applied in a retrospective study analyzing patients in the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) at the Mayo Clinic

2h

Cancer Cells Have "Unsettling" Ability to Hijack the Brain's Nerves

Startling discovery could open up avenues for treating some aggressive tumors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Cancer Cells Have "Unsettling" Ability to Hijack the Brain's Nerves

Startling discovery could open up avenues for treating some aggressive tumors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

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‘Something I’m Always Trying to Do Is Get You to Hang Out With Dead Bodies’

Caitlin Doughty, the mortician, self-described death activist and “funeral industry rabble-rouser,” has a new book, “Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs?”

2h

A Global Climate Strike, a Dangerous Huawei Move, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

2h

Under-expanded supersonic CO2 freezing jets during champagne cork popping

During champagne cork popping, the CO 2 /H 2 O gas mixture initially under pressure in the bottleneck freely expands into ambient air and experiences adiabatic cooling. A comparison between the condensation phenomena accompanying cork popping from bottles stored at 20° and 30°C was made. The initial headspace-to-ambient-pressure ratio much exceeded the critical ratio needed for the gas mixture to

2h

Nanoscale stacking fault-assisted room temperature plasticity in flash-sintered TiO2

Ceramic materials have been widely used for structural applications. However, most ceramics have rather limited plasticity at low temperatures and fracture well before the onset of plastic yielding. The brittle nature of ceramics arises from the lack of dislocation activity and the need for high stress to nucleate dislocations. Here, we have investigated the deformability of TiO 2 prepared by a f

2h

Multiplicity conversion based on intramolecular triplet-to-singlet energy transfer

The ability to convert between molecular spin states is of utmost importance in materials chemistry. Förster-type energy transfer is based on dipole-dipole interactions and can therefore theoretically be used to convert between molecular spin states. Here, a molecular dyad that is capable of transferring energy from an excited triplet state to an excited singlet state is presented. The rate of c

2h

Experimental test of local observer independence

The scientific method relies on facts, established through repeated measurements and agreed upon universally, independently of who observed them. In quantum mechanics the objectivity of observations is not so clear, most markedly exposed in Wigner’s eponymous thought experiment where two observers can experience seemingly different realities. The question whether the observers’ narratives can be

2h

Experimental and theoretical evidence for molecular forces driving surface segregation in photonic colloidal assemblies

Surface segregation in binary colloidal mixtures offers a simple way to control both surface and bulk properties without affecting their bulk composition. Here, we combine experiments and coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations to delineate the effects of particle chemistry and size on surface segregation in photonic colloidal assemblies from binary mixtures of melanin and silica pa

2h

Multimodal x-ray and electron microscopy of the Allende meteorite

Multimodal microscopy that combines complementary nanoscale imaging techniques is critical for extracting comprehensive chemical, structural, and functional information, particularly for heterogeneous samples. X-ray microscopy can achieve high-resolution imaging of bulk materials with chemical, magnetic, electronic, and bond orientation contrast, while electron microscopy provides atomic-scale sp

2h

Electrostatically controlled surface boundary conditions in nematic liquid crystals and colloids

Differing from isotropic fluids, liquid crystals exhibit highly anisotropic interactions with surfaces, which define boundary conditions for the alignment of constituent rod-like molecules at interfaces with colloidal inclusions and confining substrates. We show that surface alignment of the nematic molecules can be controlled by harnessing the competing aligning effects of surface functionalizat

2h

The Feds Need to 'Grow a Set and Do Their Jobs'

Lawmakers are busy building their case against Silicon Valley's giants, but they're less optimistic about the agencies in charge of antitrust enforcement.

2h

Euclid space telescope to study 'dark Universe' makes progress

Europe's space mission to uncover the secrets of dark matter and dark energy reaches a key milestone.

2h

Four products to secure your most precious possessions

Lock it up. (CMDR Shane via Unsplash/) It’s easy to get lax about storing physical objects when so much of our assets are digital. Don’t. Shielding your treasures from theft or harm doesn’t have to be expensive, bulky, or involve lasers (unless you want them). Below, find some secure vessels for family heirlooms or documents you can’t afford to lose. Protection made of steel. (Amazon/) It's impor

2h

An End to Pornography, Sophistry, and Panty Raids

How I stopped being polite to the self-styled Great Men of the Edge Organization.

2h

New method for the measurement of nano-structured light fields

Physicists and chemists have jointly succeeded in developing a so-called nano-tomographic technique which is able to detect the typically invisible properties of nano-structured fields in the focus of a lens. Such a method may help to establish nano-structured light landscapes as a tool for material machining, optical tweezers, or high-resolution imaging.

2h

Archaeologists Find Evidence of the Iron Age Siege of Jerusalem

Recently uncovered archaeological evidence matches the Bible's account of Babylonian invasion 2,600 years ago. Temple_topNteaser.jpg Model of Ancient Jerusalem. Image credits: Dennis Jarvis via flickr Culture Friday, September 20, 2019 – 12:30 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — In the 6th century B.C., the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar II , fearful that the Egyptians would cut off th

2h

Team pinpoints cause of fatal disorder in kids

Scientists appear to have solved a decades-long mystery regarding the precise biochemical pathway leading to Krabbe disease, a fatal genetic disorder in children. Studying a mouse model with the same human illness, the researchers also identified a possible therapeutic strategy. Patients with infantile globoid cell leukodystrophy, also known as Krabbe disease, gradually lose the protective coveri

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Canada Now Has Psilocybin Dispensaries

submitted by /u/MichaelTen [link] [comments]

2h

How to predict crucial plasma pressure in future fusion facilities

Feature describes improved model for forecasting the crucial balance of pressure at the edge of a fusion plasma.

3h

Long-acting injectable multi-drug implant shows promise for HIV prevention and treatment

UNC researchers have created an injectable multi-drug delivery system that is removable, biodegradable and effective for up to a year in some cases. The author says the ability to administer multiple drugs with this implant is an important advancement in this research.

3h

Anthropologist contributes to major study of large animal extinction

Anthropologist contributed a large, multi-institutional study explaining how the human-influenced mass extinction of giant carnivores and herbivores of North America fundamentally changed the biodiversity and landscape of the continent.

3h

Three keypad locks that let you ditch your keys

Considering keypad entry to your home? Read on. (Dil via Unsplash/) Keypad locks let you open your door using a code rather than a key. It’s a convenient option for people who often misplace their keys, but also handy for Airbnb hosts, dog owners who need to grant walkers access, or home owners who want to let their friends crash at their place when they're out of town. Here are three popular key

3h

Evolution of learning is key to better artificial intelligence

Since "2001: A Space Odyssey," people have wondered: could machines like HAL 9000 eventually exist that can process information with human-like intelligence? Researchers say that true, human-level intelligence remains a long way off, but a new article explores how computers could begin to evolve learning in the same way as natural organisms did — with implications for many fields, including artif

3h

Americans would rather drive than commute in self-driving cars

Americans would rather drive themselves or use a ride-hailing service than have a self-driving car drive them, a new study focused on cost perceptions suggests. Researchers studied how Americans’ perceived cost of commute time changes depending on who’s driving. Through a survey, the team found that people considered a ride-hailing service like Uber or Lyft at least 13% “less expensive,” in terms

3h

Germany Unveils $60 Billion Climate Package

Angela Merkel’s government is seeking to meet the country’s climate-protection goals with new measures.

3h

World's first gene therapy for glycogen storage disease produces remarkable results

The rare and deadly genetic liver disorder, GSD type Ia, affects children from infancy through adulthood, causing dangerously low blood sugar levels and constant dependence on glucose consumption in the form of cornstarch every few hours for survival. If a cornstarch dose is missed, the disease can lead to seizures and even death. A clinical trial originally set out to simply test the safety and d

3h

Water may be scarce for new power plants in Asia

Climate change and over-tapped waterways could leave developing parts of Asia without enough water to cool power plants in the near future, new research indicates. The study found that existing and planned power plants that burn coal for energy could be vulnerable.

3h

Evolution of learning is key to better artificial intelligence

Since "2001: A Space Odyssey," people have wondered: could machines like HAL 9000 eventually exist that can process information with human-like intelligence? Researchers say that true, human-level intelligence remains a long way off, but a new article explores how computers could begin to evolve learning in the same way as natural organisms did — with implications for many fields, including artif

3h

NASA catches Tropical Storm Tapah by the tail

Tropical Storm Tapah has a huge "tail" on NASA satellite imagery. NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the northwestern Pacific Ocean storm that revealed a large band of thunderstorms that resemble a large tail. The NASA imagery also indicated that the storm is getting better organized.

3h

Water may be scarce for new power plants in Asia

Climate change and over-tapped waterways could leave developing parts of Asia without enough water to cool power plants in the near future, new research indicates.

3h

NASA finds a tiny tropical storm Kiko

NASA's Terra satellite is one in a fleet of NASA satellites that provide data for research. Terra captured an image of Tropical Storm Kiko in the Eastern Pacific Ocean which showed the extent of the small storm.

3h

Could Eating Sea Urchins Help Revive Kelp Forests?

A Norwegian 'urchin ranching' company wants to take the echinoderms from the wild, fatten them up and sell them to restaurants

3h

How the New Movie 'Ad Astra' Offers a Plausible Vision of Late-21st Century Space Travel

Shuttle astronaut Garrett Reisman helped writer-director James Gray make his space adventure authentic(ish)

3h

Trapped: why 300 scientists are locking themselves in Arctic ice

Nature, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02823-x For one year, a research ship will drift while frozen in sea ice — and give scientists their closest look at the rapid changes gripping the polar north.

3h

Alarm as antimicrobial resistance surges among chickens, pigs and cattle

Nature, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02861-5 Drug-resistant bacteria are gaining a stronghold in developing countries where meat production has soared.

3h

The ecologist who wants to map everything

Nature, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02846-4 Thomas Crowther wants to restore the planet, but first he needs to know how many trees, fungi, worms and microbes live on it.

3h

For India’s Caste-Based Sewer Cleaners, an Uncertain Robot Rescue

To help end the lethal practice, some researchers and companies are building sewer robots and other technological solutions that can sweep out debris and keep tunnels clear. In July 2018, the Indian government launched a “Technology Challenge,” inviting innovators to devise additional tech-based alternatives.

3h

NASA catches Tropical Storm Tapah by the tail

Tropical Storm Tapah has a huge 'tail' on NASA satellite imagery. NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the northwestern Pacific Ocean storm that revealed a large band of thunderstorms that resemble a large tail. The NASA imagery also indicated that the storm is getting better organized.

3h

Immediate Climate Action Is Needed to Avoid "Grim" Future, Scientists Warn

Global warming is already taking a higher toll than researchers projected, a new study says — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Confirmation: Some dinosaurs nested in colonies

Normal geological evidence isn't precise enough to confirm paleontologists' suspicions. The new fossils find is covered by a fine veneer of red sand deposited in a single season. Scientists can infer whose eggs they were. None Paleontologists suspected that some dinosaurs nested in colonies, but it was impossible to know for sure. Yes, they'd often found what appeared to be groups of fossilized e

3h

Google Previews New Chrome Browser Features Coming This Fall Including Refreshed Tab View

Google is putting the final touches on a handful of new features headed to its Chrome browser, and today we get a glimpse of a few of them. For power surfers, the most interesting changes are …

3h

Untitled Goose Game is a honkin’ good time

House House The idea for Untitled Goose Game was hatched when developer Michael McMaster dropped a stock photo of a goose into Slack and half-jokingly said, “Let’s make a game …

3h

Google Celebrates 25 Years of ‘Friends’ With Throwback Easter Eggs

Pivot! Google is celebrating 25 years of 'Friends' with nostalgic Easter eggs. (Photo Credit: NBC Universal / Getty Images) Google is celebrating the …

3h

NASA finds a tiny tropical storm Kiko

NASA's Terra satellite is one in a fleet of NASA satellites that provide data for research. Terra captured an image of Tropical Storm Kiko in the Eastern Pacific Ocean which showed the extent of the small storm.

3h

Evolution of learning is key to better artificial intelligence

Researchers at Michigan State University say that true, human-level intelligence remains a long way off, but their new paper published in The American Naturalist explores how computers could begin to evolve learning in the same way as natural organisms did — with implications for many fields, including artificial intelligence.

3h

Water may be scarce for new power plants in Asia

Climate change and over-tapped waterways could leave developing parts of Asia without enough water to cool power plants in the near future, new research indicates. The study found that existing and planned power plants that burn coal for energy could be vulnerable. The work was published today in the journal Energy and Environment Science.

3h

World's first gene therapy for glycogen storage disease produces remarkable results

The clinical trial originally set out to simply test the safety and dosage of the gene therapy for three patients with GSD Type Ia. The dramatic improvement in their lives was unexpected.

3h

Anthropologist contributes to major study of large animal extinction

University of Arkansas anthropology assistant professor Amelia Villaseñor contributed a large, multi-institutional study explaining how the human-influenced mass extinction of giant carnivores and herbivores of North America fundamentally changed the biodiversity and landscape of the continent.

3h

Long-acting injectable multi-drug implant shows promise for HIV prevention and treatment

UNC researchers have created an injectable multi-drug delivery system that is removable, biodegradable and effective for up to a year in some cases. First author Rahima Benhabbour, PhD, MSc, says the ability to administer multiple drugs with this implant is an important advancement in this research.

3h

NASA estimates Imelda's extreme rainfall

NASA estimated extreme rainfall over eastern Texas from the remnants of Tropical Depression Imelda using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations.

3h

Hurricane Jerry gets its temperature taken by NASA-NOAA satellite

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the North Atlantic Ocean and used infrared light to obtain temperature information about Hurricane Jerry's cold cloud tops.

3h

Why turkeys circle dead things—the creepy vigil, explained

They're not the brightest. (Unsplash/) Back in 2017, the 'net became briefly obsessed with a video of turkeys holding a strange, circular vigil around the corpse of an unfortunate cat in the street. Two years later, the video has started circulating again—those death birds are back, baby, and they're better than ever. turkeys walking in a circle around a dead cat in the middle of the road pic.twi

3h

Amazon Buys 100,000 Electric Trucks from Rivian (Total EV SUVs, Pickups Built to Date: 0)

Talk about a startup coming out of nowhere: Amazon this week announced it’s buying 100,000 electric delivery vans from startup Rivian. Prototypes may reach Amazon next year, with deliveries from 2021 to 2024. The Amazon order rockets Rivian from amusing curiosity (“hey, one more EV startup, like Fisker for trucks?”) to a company getting considerable attention at the November 2018 LA Auto Show (wi

4h

The Life of a Jacked Guy in 2019

Bro, I definitely lift. A decade ago, after years of amateur wrestling, I got into competitive powerlifting. As my form improved, the lean, strapping muscle of my youth thickened into the carapace of a latter-day Farnese Hercules . Now, at 37, I’m 6 feet tall, I weigh 240 pounds, and my entire basement serves as a well-appointed gym . Depending on where I am in my training cycle, I can usually fi

4h

New method for the measurement of nano-structured light fields

Structured laser light has already opened up various different applications: it allows for precise material machining, trapping, manipulating or defined movement of small particles or cell compartments, as well as increasing the bandwidth for next-generation intelligent computing.

4h

NASA data shows Humberto now post-tropical

Satellite data has confirmed that Humberto, once a major hurricane is now a post-tropical cyclone. NASA's Terra Satellite provided a visible image of Post-Tropical Cyclone Humberto as it continued moving in an easterly direction through the North Atlantic Ocean.

4h

California Sues the Trump Administration in Its Escalating War Over Auto Emissions

California, joined by 23 other states, sued to block the administration’s unprecedented reversal of the state’s authority to set its own rules on climate-warming car emissions.

4h

Untapped resource, or greenhouse gas threat, found below rifting axis off Okinawa coast

Using an automated method to create a high-resolution map of the seismic velocity below the seafloor, researchers found a large-scale gas reservoir in an area where the Earth's upper layers are being separated. This reservoir, the first of its kind, and the potential for others like it could have implications from natural resource or environmental standpoints depending on whether the trapped gas i

4h

Super-resolution microscopy better than ever

They can make tiny cell structures visible: cutting-edge light microscopes offer resolutions of a few tenths of a nanometer — in other words, a millionth of a millimeter. Until now, super-resolution microscopes were much slower than conventional methods, because more or finer image data had to be recorded.

4h

Daily briefing: Should we make a Green New Deal?

Nature, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02866-0 Michael Mann reviews Naomi Klein’s new book, DNA reveals what Denisovans looked like and scientists worldwide join strikes for climate change.

4h

Today's forecast: How to predict crucial plasma pressure in future fusion facilities

A key requirement for future facilities that aim to capture and control on Earth the fusion energy that drives the sun and stars is accurate predictions of the pressure of the plasma—the hot, charged gas that fuels fusion reactions inside doughnut-shaped tokamaks that house the reactions. Central to these predictions is forecasting the pressure that the scrape-off layer, the thin strip of gas at t

4h

Video: Can Google help you get the stains out?

Stained your shirt but don't have time for a spin cycle?

4h

NASA analyzes rainfall rates Hurricane Lorena over Mexico, and Mario nearby

Two tropical cyclones are very close together near the coast of western Mexico. Hurricane Lorena was moving over the southern tip of Baja California, and Tropical Storm Mario was south of Lorena over the Eastern Pacific Ocean. NASA calculated the rainfall rates happening in both of those tropical cyclones.

4h

Today's forecast: How to predict crucial plasma pressure in future fusion facilities

Feature describes improved model for forecasting the crucial balance of pressure at the edge of a fusion plasma.

4h

New method for the measurement of nano-structured light fields

Physicists and chemists at the University of Münster (Germany) have jointly succeeded in developing a so-called nano-tomographic technique which is able to detect the typically invisible properties of nano-structured fields in the focus of a lens. Such a method may help to establish nano-structured light landscapes as a tool for material machining, optical tweezers, or high-resolution imaging. The

4h

NASA data shows Humberto now post-tropical

Satellite data has confirmed that Humberto, once a major hurricane is now a post-tropical cyclone. NASA's Terra Satellite provided a visible image of Post-Tropical Cyclone Humberto as it continued moving in an easterly direction through the North Atlantic Ocean.

4h

journal of Dental Research centennial featured article: Tooth bioengineering and regene

Over the past 100 years, tremendous progress has been made in the fields of dental tissue engineering and regenerative dental medicine. The October 2019 JDR Centennial article, 'Tooth Bioengineering and Regenerative Dentistry' discusses key successes that have contributed most to current knowledge and understanding of regenerative dentistry.

4h

Controlling methane is a fast and critical way to slow global warming, say experts

In independent studies, 2 Princeton University research teams recently identified surprisingly large sources of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, being leaked into the atmosphere.

4h

Real-Life Zombies

A zombie takeover is science fiction, right? Well, it turns out some zombies already exist in nature and “life” after brain death might not be so far-fetched — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Of Animal Germs and Pachyderms

A novel approach for making Africa’s largest transfrontier conservation area a success — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

DHS Is Finally Going After White Supremacists. It’s Not Going to Be Simple.

Kevin McAleenan took the El Paso shooting personally. The acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security had visited the city more than a dozen times. He recalled in an interview yesterday that among his first thoughts were the safety of the DHS workforce, which numbers some 4,000 people there, many of them Hispanic. The shooter’s motivation quickly became clear, with 22 people dead in a

4h

Engineered bacterial biofilms immobilizing nanoparticles enable diverse catalytic applications

Immobilization is considered a feasible strategy for addressing toxicity and nanomaterial pollution confronted by nano-catalysts in practical applications. A research team from ShanghaiTech University harvested genetically engineered Escherichia coli biofilms as living substrates to immobilize nanoscale catalysts. The biofilm matrix provides a benign and robust interface between nano-catalysts and

4h

Engineered bacterial biofilms immobilizing nanoparticles enable diverse catalytic applications

Immobilization is considered a feasible strategy for addressing toxicity and nanomaterial pollution confronted by nano-catalysts in practical applications. A research team from ShanghaiTech University harvested genetically engineered Escherichia coli biofilms as living substrates to immobilize nanoscale catalysts. The biofilm matrix provides a benign and robust interface between nano-catalysts and

4h

Greek archaeologists uncover riches overlooked by robbers

Archaeologists in northern Greece have explored more than 200 new graves in a vast ancient cemetery that was plundered in antiquity but still retained rich finds, including a gold mask and bronze helmets.

4h

City gardens, public produce stands ease 'food desert' woes

On his way home, Darnell Eleby paused before boarding the commuter train in Atlanta's Five Points station and maneuvered his wheelchair to a stop not seen on many mass transit platforms: a fresh food stand stocked with colorful fruits and vegetables. Aided by a volunteer, he filled a basket with bananas, apples, corn and squash and paid with a health program voucher.

4h

Malawi study confirms lasting impact of life-saving technology

The Malawi Ministry of Health's national adoption of affordable, rugged, neonatal CPAP technology resulted in sustained improvements in the survival of babies with respiratory illness. The three-year study was conducted at 26 Malawi government hospitals that adopted Pumani CPAP devices as a part of routine hospital care between 2013 and 2016.

4h

Untapped resource, or greenhouse gas threat, found below rifting axis off Okinawa coast

Using an automated method to create a high-resolution map of the seismic velocity below the seafloor, researchers found a large-scale gas reservoir in an area where the Earth's upper layers are being separated. This reservoir, the first of its kind, and the potential for others like it could have implications from natural resource or environmental standpoints depending on whether the trapped gas i

4h

The best of two worlds: Magnetism and Weyl semimetals

Imagine a world in which electricity could flow through the grid without any losses or where all the data in the world could be stored in the cloud without the need for power stations. This seems unimaginable, but a path towards such a dream has opened with the discovery of a new family of materials with magical properties.

4h

Why is the brain disturbed by harsh sounds?

Neuroscientists have analyzed how people react when they listen to a range of different sounds, the aim being to establish the extent to which repetitive sound frequencies are considered unpleasant. Their results showed that the conventional sound-processing circuit is activated but that the cortical and sub-cortical areas involved in the processing of salience and aversion are also solicited. Thi

4h

Real-Life Zombies

A zombie takeover is science fiction, right? Well, it turns out some zombies already exist in nature and “life” after brain death might not be so far-fetched — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Solved: the mystery of Brazil's time-traveling capital city

Why does Brasilia, built in the 1950s, pop up on a 1920s map of South America? We put the question out there, and the answers — some more credible than others — came flooding back. Thank you, internet hive mind: you've solved a cartographic mystery! Cartographic mystery Last week, we reported on a cartographic mystery that had us baffled: a map of South America, dateable to the 1920s, showing Bra

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Oral health effects of tobacco products: Science and regulatory policy proceedings

AADR held the 'Oral Health Effects of Tobacco Products: Science and Regulatory Policy' meeting. The papers resulting from this conference are published in the latest issue of Advances in Dental Research, an e-Supplement to the Journal of Dental Research.

4h

NASA estimates Imelda's extreme rainfall

NASA estimated extreme rainfall over eastern Texas from the remnants of Tropical Depression Imelda using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations.

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Malawi study confirms lasting impact of life-saving technology

A study in the journal Pediatrics finds that the Malawi Ministry of Health's national adoption of affordable, rugged, neonatal CPAP technology resulted in sustained improvements in the survival of babies with respiratory illness. The three-year study was conducted at 26 Malawi government hospitals that adopted Pumani CPAP devices as a part of routine hospital care between 2013 and 2016. Pumani was

4h

Hurricane Jerry gets its temperature taken by NASA-NOAA satellite

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the North Atlantic Ocean and used infrared light to obtain temperature information about Hurricane Jerry's cold cloud tops.

4h

NASA analyzes rainfall rates Hurricane Lorena over Mexico, and Mario nearby

Two tropical cyclones are very close together near the coast of western Mexico. Hurricane Lorena was moving over the southern tip of Baja California, and Tropical Storm Mario was south of Lorena over the Eastern Pacific Ocean. NASA calculated the rainfall rates happening in both of those tropical cyclones.

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Of Animal Germs and Pachyderms

A novel approach for making Africa’s largest transfrontier conservation area a success — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Lamar Jackson and the NFL’s Quarterback Double Standard

You’d be hard-pressed to find a player in the NFL who has had a better game this season than the Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson. In a 59–10 victory over the Miami Dolphins to kick off the Ravens’ schedule earlier this month , Jackson completed 17 of 20 passes for 324 yards and five touchdowns. He zipped the ball to receivers on slant routes. He stepped into 80-plus-yard bombs. Maybe h

4h

A New Way Of Paying For Maternity Care Aims To Reduce C-Sections

Instead of paying doctors piecemeal for prenatal appointments and delivery of the baby, some insurers now offer medical practices one lump sum to cover it all. (Image credit: Adene Sanchez/Getty Images)

4h

Area 51 Raid: They Come in Peace, So Far, in Search for Aliens

What started as a joke has attracted visitors from all over the world to tiny, desolate Nevada towns.

4h

Researchers find way to kill pathogen resistant to antibiotics

Researchers have demonstrated a new strategy in fighting antibiotics resistance: the use of artificial haem proteins as a Trojan horse to selectively deliver antimicrobials to target bacteria, enabling their specific and effective sterilization. The technique killed 99.9% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a potentially deadly, antibiotic-resistant bacterium present in hospitals. The strategy should also

4h

Rethinking how cholesterol is integrated into cells

Cholesterol is best known in connection with cardiovascular disease, but cholesterol is also vital for many fundamental processes in the body. Researchers have now presented a completely new, ground-breaking model for the integration and incorporation of cholesterol into cells, with great impact on our understanding of this important process.

4h

Super-resolution microscopy better than ever

They can make tiny cell structures visible: cutting-edge light microscopes offer resolutions of a few tenths of a nanometer — in other words, a millionth of a millimeter. Until now, super-resolution microscopes were much slower than conventional methods, because more or finer image data had to be recorded.

4h

Clarification of a new synthesis mechanism of semiconductor atomic sheet

Researchers have succeeded in clarifying a new synthesis mechanism regarding transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD), which are semiconductor atomic sheets having thickness in atomic order. Because it is difficult to directly observe the aspect of the growing process of TMD in a special environment, the initial growth process remained unclear, and it has been desirable to elucidate a detailed mecha

4h

Dengue virus becoming resistant to vaccines and therapeutics due to mutations in specific protein

Researchers have discovered that the dengue virus changes its shape through mutations in Envelope protein to evade vaccines and therapeutics. The study also gives insights on the types of treatment strategies to use at different stages of infection. This could give rise to new approaches in vaccine development and treatment for dengue disease.

4h

Best performance of organic material for lithium battery anode using materials informatics

A research group established a new design strategy for organic materials for the anode of lithium-ion secondary cells through the use of Materials Informatics (MI). A high-capacity and high-stability material was successfully obtained via an extremely small number of experiments.

4h

New insight as to how cells maintain their identity

In the body's cells, some proteins are of vital importance as to which genes are active or turned off. Now, researchers have discovered which proteins are necessary in order to maintain the proper genetic regulation.

4h

When natural disasters strike, men and women respond differently

Women tend to take cover or prepare to evacuate sooner, but often have trouble convincing the men in their life to do so, suggests a new study exploring how gender influences disaster response.

4h

Researchers revolutionize 3D printed products with data-driven design method

Scientists have demonstrated a new cost-effective, data-driven approach by designing and 3D printing an ankle brace that has varying degrees of rigidity to provide both comfort and support for the user.

4h

Here's proof that bowel cancer screening reduces deaths

New research shows just how effective bowel cancer screening is in helping to reduce the number of bowel cancer deaths by up to 45%.

4h

Multicultural millennials respond positively to health 'edutainment'

Storytelling that educates and entertains — aka 'edutainment' — is a powerful communications tool that can lead to positive health-related changes among multicultural millennials, according to a new marketing study.

4h

Mystery of why humans walk upright may be explained by surprise fossil

We thought that walking on all fours like a gorilla is more primitive than walking on two legs as humans do. But new fossils suggest even very ancient apes walked upright

4h

Ocean robots take the pulse of our planet by measuring microbes

It looks like a trashcan bobbing in the waters off the California coast. But it's hardly garbage. In fact, it may play a key role in monitoring the health of our oceans.

4h

It’s Happening in Plain Sight

Washington is a place where incredible amounts of time and effort are spent to prove what’s already obvious. This week’s drama over a whistle-blower complaint about President Donald Trump is only the latest example. The House Intelligence Committee is embroiled in a fight with the acting director of national intelligence, and by extension the White House, over the complaint. While the complaint a

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New insight as to how cells maintain their identity

In the body's cells, some proteins are of vital importance as to which genes are active or turned off. Now, researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have discovered which proteins are necessary in order to maintain the proper genetic regulation.

5h

Surface melting causes Antarctic glaciers to slip faster towards the ocean

Study shows for the first time a direct link between surface melting and short bursts of glacier acceleration in Antarctica. During these events, Antarctic Peninsula glaciers move up to 100% faster than average. Scientists call for these findings to be accounted for in sea level rise predictions.

5h

Personality feature could predict how often you exercise

Individuals who make concrete plans to meet their goals may engage in more physical activity, including visits to the gym, compared to those who don't plan quite so far ahead, research shows. These findings suggest that self-reported levels of a trait called 'planfulness' may translate into real world differences in behavior.

5h

Sponge-like action of circular RNA aids heart attack recovery

Circular RNAs, like other noncoding RNAs, were thought to be nonfunctional, but recent evidence suggests otherwise. Circular RNAs may in fact act like sponges to 'soak up,' or bind, other molecules, including microRNAs and proteins, and new work supports this idea. They describe, for the first time, a circular RNA that fills a critical role in tissue repair after heart attack, thanks to its abilit

5h

Saving lives faster: World-first laser incubator for blood

Researchers have developed the world's first blood incubator using laser technology. This could prevent fatal blood transfusions in critically ill patients, and can detect antibodies in pregnant women that can kill a fetus.

5h

For the first time walking patterns identify specific types of dementia

Walking may be a key clinical tool in helping medics accurately identify the specific type of dementia a patient has, pioneering research has revealed.

5h

A bathroom scale could monitor millions with heart failure

Millions of heart failure patients are readmitted to hospitals every few months to adjust medications. It sends medical costs sky-high and patients suffer unnecessarily. A new bathroom scale could give clinicians the data they need to cut hospitalizations and treat patients remotely before they suffer too much.

5h

The next agricultural revolution is here

By using modern gene-editing technologies to learn key insights about past agricultural revolutions, two plant scientists are suggesting that the next agricultural revolution could be at hand.

5h

Alzheimer's drug also treats parasitic Chagas disease

The drugs currently used to treat Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease, have serious side effects and limited use in those with chronic disease. Now, researchers have reported that memantine, a drug currently used to treat Alzheimer's disease, can diminish the number of parasites in mice with Chagas disease, and increase the survival rate of the animals.

5h

Introducing 'mesh,' memory-saving plug-in to boost phone and computer performance

Applications like web browsers or smartphone apps often use a lot of memory. To address this, a research group has developed a system they call Mesh that can automatically reduce such memory demands.

5h

Woman's Blood Turns a Shocking Shade of Blue After She Used Tooth-Numbing Gel

Her nails and skin appeared bluish and her blood oxygen level was dangerously low.

5h

The best of two worlds: Magnetism and Weyl semimetals

Imagine a world in which electricity could flow through the grid without any losses or where all the data in the world could be stored in the cloud without the need for power stations. This seems unimaginable but a path towards such a dream has opened with the discovery of a new family of materials with magical properties.

5h

New insight as to how cells maintain their identity

In the body's cells, some proteins are of vital importance as to which genes are active or turned off. Now, researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have discovered which proteins are necessary in order to maintain the proper genetic regulation.

5h

Best performance of organic material for lithium battery anode using materials informatics

At JST Strategic Basic Research Programs, the research group led by associate professor Yuya Oaki and graduate student (at the time) Hiromichi Numazawa of the Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University established a new design policy for organic materials for the anode of lithium-ion secondary cells in a joint work with research associate Yasuhiko Igarashi of Graduate School of Frontier Sc

5h

What's behind the youth movement to tackle climate change? Fear but also hope

Ella Shriner doesn't remember learning about climate change. It was always just there—a somber backdrop to her young life.

5h

Untapped resource, or greenhouse gas threat, found below rifting axis off Okinawa coast

Analyzing reflections of seismic pressure waves by the subseafloor geology off southwestern Japan, researchers at Kyushu University have found the first evidence of a massive gas reservoir where the Earth's crust is being separated. Depending on its nature, the trapped gas could be a potential untapped natural resource or a source of greenhouse gases waiting to escape, raising the need for awarene

5h

"Tumba La Nyama" / "Mulema" | Richard Bona

In a mesmerizing performance, multi-instrumentalist and singer-songwriter Richard Bona weaves beautiful vocal loops into a mesh of sound, powered by his "magic voodoo machine."

5h

Drillminister's new song Choke highlights air pollution

Speaking on BBC Victoria Derbyshire Drillminister called for the government to act faster with air pollution.

5h

Robot made with smaller bots has a funky way of getting around

Researchers have made a new robot entirely of smaller robots known as “smarticles” to unlock the principles of a potentially new locomotion technique. Building conventional robots typically requires carefully combining components like motors, batteries, actuators, body segments, legs, and wheels. The 3D-printed smarticles—short for smart active particles—can do just one thing: flap their two arms

5h

Trädplantering – ingen universallösning för klimatet

Hållbarhetsforskaren Wim Carton vid Lunds universitet förklarar vad det finns för nackdelar med storskaliga trädplanteringar. Är trädplantering som klimatlösning en växande trend? – Ja. Forskningsstudien som publicerades i somras kan ses som den senaste i en lång rad studier och miljökampanjer som visar potentialen för metoder som avlägsnar koldioxid från atmosfären. Just trädplantering lyfts upp

5h

Twitter's new 'hide replies' feature helps you moderate responses from trolls

Twitter said “Hide Replies” was built to encourage users to be thoughtful about what they tweet.

5h

Rekonstruktion giver os første glimt af, hvordan mystisk fortids-menneske så ud

Ung denisova-kvinde havde både ligheder med neandertalerne og vores art, homo sapiens.

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HD microscopy in milliseconds

They can make tiny cell structures visible: cutting-edge light microscopes offer resolutions of a few tenths of a nanometre–in other words, a millionth of a millimeter. Until now, super-resolution microscopes were much slower than conventional methods, because more or finer image data had to be recorded.

5h

Open Medicare data helps uncover potential hidden costs of health care

Indiana University scientists have found an association between health care industry payments to medical providers for non-research expenses and what these providers charge for medical services — shedding new light on potential hidden costs to the public.

5h

Fewer lymph node operations for breast cancer patients with new prediction models

In recently published studies, researchers at Lund University and Skåne University Hospital in Sweden have produced new prediction models for improved personalised treatment of lymph nodes in breast cancer patients. The latest results that have now been published in Clinical Cancer Research and BMC Cancer show that up to one in every three operations could be avoided.

5h

Rethinking how cholesterol is integrated into cells

Cholesterol is best known in connection with cardiovascular disease, but cholesterol is also vital for many fundamental processes in the body. In an international collaboration, researchers from Aarhus University have now presented a completely new, ground-breaking model for the integration and incorporation of cholesterol into cells, with great impact on our understanding of this important proces

5h

New family of drugs which could combat prostate cancer identified at University of Bath

A new family of drugs which inhibit the activity of a protein associated with prostate and other cancers has been reported by scientists from the University of Bath.

5h

Undocumented immigrants' transplant survival rates on par with US citizens'

Unauthorized immigrants who receive liver transplants in the United States have comparable three-year survival rates to US citizens, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco. Yet access to life-saving organs for this population varies widely by state, in part due to a medical misperception that undocumented migrants face a higher risk of transplant failure.

5h

Marijuana use among US adults with, without medical conditions

National survey data was used in this study to examine how common marijuana use was among adults with and without medical conditions.

5h

Fractal patterns in growing bacterial colonies

As many people will remember from school science classes, bacteria growing on solid surfaces form colonies that can be easily visible to the naked eye. Each of these is a complex biological system in its own right; colonies display collective behaviours that indicate a kind of 'social intelligence' and grow in fractal patterns that can resemble snowflakes. Despite this complexity, colony growth ca

5h

Where to park your car, according to math

In a world where the best parking space is the one that minimizes time spent in the lot, physicists compare parking strategies and settle on a prudent approach.

5h

Hurricane Nicole sheds light on how storms impact deep ocean

2016's Hurricane Nicole had a significant effect on the ocean's carbon cycle and deep sea ecosystems.

5h

'Nanochains' could increase battery capacity, cut charging time

A new method could allow better materials to make up battery electrodes by converting them into a nanochain structure, extending battery lifetime and increasing stability.

5h

Sound of the future: A new analog to quantum computing

Researchers have demonstrated the possibility for acoustic waves in a classical environment to do the work of quantum information processing without the time limitations and fragility.

5h

Descendants of early Europeans and Africans in US carry Native American genetic legacy

Many people in the US do not belong to Native American communities but still carry bits of Native American DNA, inherited from European and African ancestors who had children with indigenous individuals during colonization and settlement. In a new study researchers investigate this genetic legacy and what it can tell us about how non-natives migrated across the US.

5h

US and Canada have lost more than 1 in 4 birds in the past 50 years

Data show that since 1970, the US and Canada have lost nearly 3 billion birds, a massive reduction in abundance involving hundreds of species, from beloved backyard songbirds to long-distance migrants.

5h

Quiz: how green is your lab?

Nature, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02830-y Is your lab full of sustainability champions or single-use scientists? Use our quiz to find out.

5h

Partisan divide creates different Americas, separate lives

When people try to explain why the United States is so politically polarized now, they frequently refer to the concept of "echo chambers."

5h

A shot of hope in the face of climate despair

Hope, like a slinky, springs eternal. While rage, fear and disgust are all appropriate responses to the realities of climate change (which we have explored extensively this week), we must move from despair to action.

5h

Why midday might be a golden hour for vaccinations

Nature, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02813-z Immune cells’ built-in timepieces affect response to inoculation.

5h

State Marijuana Legalization Aids Research Very Little

Recent federal announcements serve as reminders that in the US policy continues to outpace science when it comes to cannabis.

5h

The best of two worlds: Magnetism and Weyl semimetals

Imagine a world in which electricity could flow through the grid without any losses or where all the data in the world could be stored in the cloud without the need for power stations. This seems unimaginable but a path towards such a dream has opened with the discovery of a new family of materials with magical properties.

5h

Researchers find way to kill pathogen resistant to antibiotics

Nagoya University researchers and colleagues in Japan have demonstrated a new strategy in fighting antibiotics resistance: the use of artificial haem proteins as a Trojan horse to selectively deliver antimicrobials to target bacteria, enabling their specific and effective sterilization. The technique killed 99.9% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a potentially deadly, antibiotic-resistant bacterium prese

5h

We need to track the world's water like we track the weather | Sonaar Luthra

We need a global weather service for water, says entrepreneur and TED Fellow Sonaar Luthra. In a talk about environmental accountability, Luthra shows how we could forecast water shortages and risks with a global data collection effort — just like we monitor the movement of storms — and better listen to what the earth is telling us.

5h

The asteroid collision that changed life on Earth forever—without killing the dinosaurs

Trilobites evolved following the massive collision 466 million years ago. (Birger Schmidtz/) Something mysterious happened nearly half a billion years ago that triggered one of the most important changes in the history of life on Earth. Suddenly, there was an explosion of species, with the biodiversity of invertebrate animals increasing from a very low level to something similar to what we see to

5h

Probes For Everything

In case you don’t know, there’s officially an effort to try to develop chemical probes for basically every protein in the human proteome. The “Target 2035” initiative has been looking through the literature and finding what you’d expect: power-law distributions that have most people working on proteins that other people have worked on. And that’s natural enough, since many of those have evidence

5h

Corrosion resistance of steel bars in concrete when mixed with aerobic microorganisms

Dissolved oxygen in pore solution is often a controlling factor determining the rate of the corrosion process of steel bars in concrete. This study reports on the corrosion resistance and polarization properties of steel bars in a mortar specimen mixed with aerobic microorganisms. The addition of the microorganisms in mortar mixtures led to higher corrosion resistance, which was confirmed by the r

5h

Netflix chief: $125M for The Crown? That's a bargain – CNET

With Apple, Disney and others about to launch streaming services, content costs are bound to rise, says Reed Hastings.

5h

Autonomous killer drones set to be used by Turkey in Syria

Turkey is to become the first nation to use drones able to find, track and kill people without human intervention, when it deploys them in Syria in a few months

5h

Why is the brain disturbed by harsh sounds?

Neuroscientists (UNIGE) analysed how people react when they listen to a range of different sounds, the aim being to establish the extent to which repetitive sound frequencies are considered unpleasant. Their results showed that the conventional sound-processing circuit is activated but that the cortical and sub-cortical areas involved in the processing of salience and aversion are also solicited.

5h

Untapped resource, or greenhouse gas threat, found below rifting axis off Okinawa coast

Using an automated method to create a high-resolution map of the seismic velocity below the seafloor, researchers from Kyushu University found a large-scale gas reservoir in an area where the Earth's upper layers are being separated. This reservoir, the first of its kind, and the potential for others like it could have implications from natural resource or environmental standpoints depending on wh

5h

Surface melting causes Antarctic glaciers to slip faster towards the ocean

Study shows for the first time a direct link between surface melting and short bursts of glacier acceleration in Antarctica. During these events, Antarctic Peninsula glaciers move up to 100% faster than average. Scientists call for these findings to be accounted for in sea level rise predictions.

5h

Engineered bacterial biofilms immobilizing nanoparticles enable diverse catalytic applications

Immobilization is considered a feasible strategy for addressing toxicity and nanomaterial pollution confronted by nano-catalysts in practical applications. A research team from ShanghaiTech University harvested genetically engineered Escherichia coli biofilms as living substrates to immobilize nanoscale catalysts. The biofilm matrix provides a benign and robust interface between nano-catalysts and

5h

Chinese scientists develop novel biophotovoltaics system

Researchers from the Institute of Microbiology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have reported a novel biophotovoltaics (BPV) system based on a synthetic microbial consortium with constrained electron flow. This BPV system can stably operate for more than 40 days, setting a new BPV longevity milestone.

5h

Fractal patterns in growing bacterial colonies

Lautaro Vassallo and his co-workers in Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Argentina have modelled the growth and sliding movement of bacterial colonies using a novel method in which the behaviour of each bacterium is simulated separately. This work has now been published in the journal EPJ B.

5h

Shocking embryonic limbs into shape

In a new study published in EPJ E, Vincent Fleury and Ameya Vaishnavi Murukutla from Universite Paris Diderot, Paris, France use the stimulation of chicken embryos with electric shocks to propose a mechanism for vertebrate limb formation.

5h

Wearable brain-machine interface could control a wheelchair, vehicle or computer

Combining new classes of nanomembrane electrodes with flexible electronics and a deep learning algorithm could help disabled people wirelessly control an electric wheelchair, interact with a computer or operate a small robotic vehicle without donning a bulky hair-electrode cap or contending with wires.

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The Books Briefing: Where Books and TV Intersect

The past decade’s reappraisal of the television series as a major artistic medium for storytelling has expanded the overlap between books and TV. Many showrunners, including those adapting novels and nonfiction into episodic formats, have been recognized as narrative innovators and titans of influence in the creative entertainment industry—worthy of as much renown as filmmakers and novelists. Sun

5h

Ping-Pong for Introverts

Or should that be Ping-Pong for narcissists? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Some cancer cells turn cannibal to survive chemotherapy

To survive chemotherapy, some cancer cells eat their neighboring tumor cells, a new study shows. The findings suggest that this act of cannibalism gives the cancer cells the energy they need to stay alive and initiate tumor relapse after the course of treatment is completed. Chemotherapy drugs such as doxorubicin damage cancer cells’ DNA to kill them, but cells that survive initial treatment can

5h

Weathering Antarctic storms: Weather balloon data boost forecasting skill

Observational data from radiosondes deployed in Antarctica improve the forecasting accuracy for severe Antarctic cyclones, according to a Japanese research team led by the Kitami Institute of Technology, Hokkaido, Japan.

5h

Byggeskadefond advarer: Massivtræ revner i flere byggerier

Store svindrevner, mangelfuld tætning af samlinger og skimmelvækst plager ifølge Byggeskadefonden en del byggerier, hvor man har brugt massivtræelementer.

6h

Clarification of a new synthesis mechanism of semiconductor atomic sheets

In Japan Science and Technology Agency's Strategic Basic Research Programs, Associate Professor Toshiaki Kato and Professor Toshiro Kaneko of the Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University succeeded in clarifying a new synthesis mechanism regarding transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD), which are semiconductor atomic sheets having thickness in atomic o

6h

Gut bacteria prefer to chow down on certain dietary fibers

Certain human gut bacteria thrive when they feed on specific types of ingredients in dietary fibers, according to a new study. The work—conducted in mice colonized with human gut bacteria and using new technologies for measuring nutrient processing—is a step toward developing more nutritious foods based on a strategy of targeted enrichment of key members of gut microbial communities. The research

6h

Pembrolizumab in metastatic NSCLC: Now added benefit for subpopulations

After a methodological uncertainty has been resolved, the analyses on overall survival are now usable. Two addenda now show an added benefit for specific patients.

6h

New insight as to how cells maintain their identity

In the body's cells, some proteins are of vital importance as to which genes are active or turned off. Now, researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have discovered which proteins are necessary in order to maintain the proper genetic regulation.

6h

Best performance of organic material for lithium battery anode using materials informatics

A research group established a new design strategy for organic materials for the anode of lithium-ion secondary cells through the use of Materials Informatics (MI). A high-capacity and high-stability material was successfully obtained via an extremely small number of experiments.

6h

Dengue virus becoming resistant to vaccines and therapeutics due to mutations in specific protein

Researchers from Duke-NUS Medical School, in collaboration with the Agency for Science, Technology and Research's Bioinformatics Institute, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, USA, have discovered that the dengue virus changes its shape through mutations in Envelope protein to evade vaccines and therapeutics. The study also gives insights on the types of treatment strategies to use at diff

6h

Corrosion resistance of steel bars in concrete when mixed with aerobic microorganisms

Dissolved oxygen in pore solution is often a controlling factor determining the rate of the corrosion process of steel bars in concrete. This study reports on the corrosion resistance and polarization properties of steel bars in a mortar specimen mixed with aerobic microorganisms. The addition of the microorganisms in mortar mixtures led to higher corrosion resistance, which was confirmed by the r

6h

Celebrate Batman's 80th anniversary with six free games courtesy of Epic

From now through September 26, users can nab Batman: Arkham Asylum, Batman: Arkham City and Batman: Arkham Knight absolutely free of charge. Developed using Unreal Engine 3, this trio of highly …

6h

Instagram is cracking down on questionable weight-loss ads and cosmetic surgery

Instagram doesn't want teens seeing questionable weightloss product ads on its platform, so it's doing something about it.

6h

Whom Would You Trust If You Were Trapped in the Airport During a Coup?

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two women—one American, one French—who were supposed to be on the same flight out of Turkey on the day of the July 2016 military coup , but who got trapped in Istanbul’s Atatürk Airport overnight

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Smoking abstinence doesn’t really make us want to eat more

Some people think that smokers who can’t light up will reach for food in lieu of cigarettes. But a new study suggests smoking abstinence doesn’t greatly affect our motivation for food. For the study in Drug and Alcohol Dependence , researchers used cues and actual money to learn how much smokers might spend for cigarettes, food, and water during abstinence. The results provide new insights for ho

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Oil futures volatility and the economy

The drone strike on Saudi Arabia's oil infrastructure has highlighted the fragile and interconnected relationship between crude oil supply and the global economy, with new research bringing these economic ties into greater focus.

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Making math relevant to the climate strikes

One of the key demands of the UK's school climate-strike movement is that more attention is paid to climate change in the curriculum. To help address this, researchers at Oxford's Environmental Change Institute and Department of Physics have today launched a new website, mathsforplanetearth.org, providing GCSE and A-level maths problems based on topics in climate change and sustainability.

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Image: Clarence Strait, Australia

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Clarence Strait, a narrow body of water in Australia's Northern Territory.

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Economists are downplaying many major climate risks, says report

In a new report, an international group of researchers warns that top-level policymakers have been receiving economic assessments of future climate-change impacts that largely omit some of the biggest physical risks. The researchers point to major potential problems that have been documented by scientists, but which they say are routinely excluded or downplayed by economists. The report was produc

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It’s not your fault? That doesn’t mean you’re off the hook | Oliver Burkeman

Evading liability feels comfortable, but turns out to be a prison, while stepping up feels unpleasant, but ends up being freeing Back in 1964, in his book Games People Play , the psychiatrist Eric Berne described a pattern of conversation he called “Why Don’t You – Yes But”, which remains one of the most teeth-grindingly irritating aspects of everyday social life. The person adopting the strategy

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'Nature is quantum from the start': Sean Carroll, many worlds, and a new theory of spacetime – Science Weekly podcast

Ian Sample speaks to the theoretical physicist Sean Carroll about his mission to demystify quantum mechanics. It won’t be easy, though, as Carroll’s favoured interpretation of this fundamental theory – the ‘many worlds’ interpretation – results in a possibly infinite number of parallel universes Continue reading…

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Surface melting causes Antarctic glaciers to slip faster towards the ocean, new research shows

Surface meltwater draining through the ice and beneath Antarctic glaciers is causing sudden and rapid accelerations in their flow towards the sea, according to new research.

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New app to assess agricultural soil and improve its quality

The Environmental Soil Science group (GEA-UMH) of the Miguel Hernández University in Elche (Spain) has created an application to assess and improve the quality of agricultural soil. This tool is the result of a global project that analyses the quality of soil destined to agricultural production, as well as sustainable agricultural methods in Europe and China.

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HD microscopy in milliseconds

They can make tiny cell structures visible: cutting-edge light microscopes offer resolutions of a few tenths of a nanometer—in other words, a millionth of a millimeter. Until now, super-resolution microscopes were much slower than conventional methods, because more or finer image data had to be recorded. Together with partners from Jena, researchers from "Bielefeld" University have now developed t

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A dissertation brought new hi-precision mass measurements for atomic masses of isotopes heavier than iron

A large portion of elements surrounding us are produced in fusion reactions in stars. However, elements heavier than iron require more complex processes taking place in a variety of astrophysical environments to be produced. Modeling these processes requires knowledge on properties of the nuclides taking part in the reactions, such as atomic mass. In his doctoral thesis in the field of nuclear phy

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What you might have missed

A first glimpse of our ancient cousins, the link between caesareans and microbiome disruption and that old question about the age of Saturn’s rings – here are some highlights from a week in science.

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Oil futures volatility and the economy

The drone strike on Saudi Arabia's oil infrastructure has highlighted the fragile and interconnected relationship between crude oil supply and the global economy, with new research bringing these economic ties into greater focus.

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Clarification of a new synthesis mechanism of semiconductor atomic sheet

Researchers at Tohoku University in Japan succeeded in clarifying a new synthesis mechanism regarding transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD), which are semiconductor atomic sheets having thickness in atomic order. Because it is difficult to directly observe the aspect of the growing process of TMD in a special environment, the initial growth process remained unclear, and it has been desirable to e

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'Always sticking to your convictions' sounds like a good thing, but it isn't

There is nothing wrong with strong opinions. They are healthy in a democracy—an apathetic electorate is an ineffective electorate.

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What to Expect From a Pooch on a Paddleboard

Sharing your deck with a dog is risky, but knowing about conservation of momentum might help you stay dry.

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The Four Converging Technologies Giving Rise to the Spatial Web

How each of us sees the world is about to change dramatically. For all of human history, the experience of looking at the world was roughly the same for everyone. But boundaries between the digital and physical are beginning to fade. The world around us is gaining layer upon layer of digitized, virtually overlaid information—making it rich, meaningful, and interactive. As a result, our respective

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'Nature is quantum from the start': Sean Carroll, many worlds, and a new theory of spacetime – Science Weekly podcast

Ian Sample speaks to the theoretical physicist Sean Carroll about his mission to demystify quantum mechanics. It won’t be easy, though, as Carroll’s favoured interpretation of this fundamental theory – the ‘many worlds’ interpretation – results in a possibly infinite number of parallel universes. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

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Greta Thunberg Is Right to Panic

I used to think that one of the gifts of growing older was that anxiety slowly abated with time. When the mind gravitates to the worst-case scenario, the years suggest that it rarely arrives. Experience teaches the brain to stave off its tendency to catastrophize. This is the wisdom that a parent whispers into a child’s ear after a nightmare. Everything will be all right. Sixteen-year-old Greta T

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What is the cryosphere? Hint: It's vital to farming, fishing and skiing

More than 100 scientists from 30 countries will soon release a special report examining climate change impacts on the oceans and a less familiar but critically important part of the Earth: the cryosphere.

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An origin story for the queer community

I came out to a Christian counselor during a therapy session in 2001 when I was 14. He convinced me to engage in conversion therapy, a pseudoscientific practice to change an individual's sexual orientation based in the assumption that such behaviors are "unnatural." He produced an article describing a talk at that year's American Psychological Association conference that indicated the therapy work

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An origin story for the queer community

I came out to a Christian counselor during a therapy session in 2001 when I was 14. He convinced me to engage in conversion therapy, a pseudoscientific practice to change an individual's sexual orientation based in the assumption that such behaviors are "unnatural." He produced an article describing a talk at that year's American Psychological Association conference that indicated the therapy work

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It's high time someone studied marijuana taxes—so we did

Consumers don't seem to mind paying sales taxes on things like food and clothing. Marijuana may be a different story.

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Here's proof that bowel cancer screening reduces deaths

New research led by the University of South Australia shows just how effective bowel cancer screening is in helping to reduce the number of bowel cancer deaths by up to 45%.

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Innovative data and analytics platform to accelerate drug development for rare diseases

C-Path and NORD launched the Rare Disease Cures Accelerator-Data and Analytics Platform (RDCA-DAP) in Rockville, MD on Tuesday, Sept. 17. The platform, funded by a cooperative agreement through the Food and Drug Administration, [Critical Path Public-Private Partnerships Grant Number U18 FD005320], will provide data and analytics to aid in the understanding of rare diseases and to inform long-term

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When natural disasters strike, men and women respond differently

Women tend to take cover or prepare to evacuate sooner, but often have trouble convincing the men in their life to do so, suggests a new study exploring how gender influences disaster response.

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Evolution of learning is key to better artificial intelligence

Since "2001: A Space Odyssey," people have wondered: could machines like HAL 9000 eventually exist that can process information with human-like intelligence?

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News cutting-edge laser technology that gets under your skin

A highly specialist laser capable of analyzing potentially deadly diseases as never before is under development at Heriot-Watt University.

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Evolution of learning is key to better artificial intelligence

Since "2001: A Space Odyssey," people have wondered: could machines like HAL 9000 eventually exist that can process information with human-like intelligence?

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Researchers build a quantum dot energy harvester

Over the past few years, thermoelectric generators have become the focus of a growing number of studies, due to their ability to convert waste heat into electrical energy. Quantum dots, semiconductor crystals with distinctive conductive properties, could be good candidates for thermoelectric generation, as their discrete resonant levels provide excellent energy filters.

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Staying at elementary school for longer associated with higher student attainment

A new study has discovered that US students achieve better results in reading and mathematics tests when they stay in elementary school for grades 6 (age 11-12) and 7 (age 12-13), rather than transfer to middle school. In contrast, students in grade 8 (age 13-14) achieve better results in middle school than high school.

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Hub linking movement and motivation in brain identified

Detailed observations in the lateral septum indicate that the well-connected region processes movement, and reward information to help direct behavior.

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Cellular hitchhikers may hold a key to understanding ALS

RNA molecules get around nerve cells by hitching a ride on lysosomes. Mutations frequently seen in ALS patients disrupt the process.

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Researchers hone in on the elusive receptor for sour taste

Sour is the taste of summer, a taste that evokes lemonade stands and vine-ripe tomatoes. Among the five basic tastes — the others being bitter, sweet, salty and umami — it is arguably the most subtle. In small amounts, it adds a critical tang to an otherwise bland dish. At higher concentrations and on its own, it's unpleasant or even painful.

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Division by subtraction: Extinction of large mammal species likely drove survivors apart

A new study suggests that the extinctions of mammoths, dire wolves and other large mammal species in North America drove surviving species to distance themselves from their neighbors, reducing interactions as predators and prey, territorial competitors or scavengers. The discovery could preview the ecological effects of future extinctions, the researchers say.

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23 ways alcohol could save your life

When you're trying to survive, your alcohol won't look this fancy, but it'll sure feel like it. (Prem Pal Singh/Pexels/) This article was originally featured on Outdoor Life . For more than 200 years, American bourbon has spread from its birthplace in the mountains of Kentucky throughout the country and beyond. Though the details of this liquor’s origin story are often conflicting, original bourb

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SUTD researchers revolutionize 3D printed products with data-driven design method

SUTD demonstrated this new cost-effective, data-driven approach by designing and 3D printing an ankle brace that has varying degrees of rigidity to provide both comfort and support for the user.

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Weathering Antarctic storms — Weather balloon data boost forecasting skill

Strong cyclones over the Southern Ocean and Antarctica can be very dangerous, and are relatively difficult to predict accurately because of the sparsity of observational data from this region. To investigate the importance of collecting radiosonde observations to address this problem, researchers compared the forecast accuracy between two experiments based on datasets that included and excluded ad

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Vampire bats help unravel the mystery of smell

The sense of smell is one of the most poorly understood of the five major senses. But now an international team of scientists led by Laurel Yohe of Stony Brook University suggests a new method to quantify olfactory receptors by sequencing them in vampire bats may hold the key to unraveling the mysteries of smell. Their findings are published this week in Molecular Ecology Resources.

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Global climate strikes: Here's what's happening on the ground

Hundreds of thousands of adults and children from Sydney to London have taken to the streets today as part of a global strike against governments’ inaction on climate change

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Vampire bats help unravel the mystery of smell

The sense of smell is one of the most poorly understood of the five major senses. But now an international team of scientists led by Laurel Yohe of Stony Brook University suggests a new method to quantify olfactory receptors by sequencing them in vampire bats may hold the key to unraveling the mysteries of smell. Their findings are published this week in Molecular Ecology Resources.

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Etik-blogger på ing.dk: »Vi drømmer alle om at ligge på stranden med en drink i hånden«

PLUS. Dummere og sløvere. Det er prisen, vi betaler for bevidstløst at sige ja til al ny teknologi, mener IBM’s Kim Escherich, der er ny blogger på ing.dk.

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Migrating Birds Provide Surprising Snacks for Sharks

Meticulous work reveals the identity of sharks’ feathered prey — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Companies on 'strike' for the climate: action or advertising?

"Strike for climate action" is the watchword coming not from the shop steward but the C-suite as many companies publicise their support for Friday's mobilisation, but positioning to capture consumers that isn't translated into action carries risks.

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Multicultural millennials respond positively to health 'edutainment'

Storytelling that educates and entertains—aka "edutainment"—is a powerful communications tool that can lead to positive health-related changes among multicultural millennials, according to a new marketing study from Baylor University.

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Social scientist questions methodology of climate services technology firms

Jesse Keenan, a social scientist at Harvard University, who also specializes in climate risk and adaptation strategies, is publicly calling out climate services technology (CST) firms for their questionable methodologies. He has published a Policy Forum piece in the journal Science in which he claims the work done by CST firms lack transparency.

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Computer simulations show human ancestors would have had an easier time giving birth than modern women

A trio of researchers with Boston University and Dartmouth College has found that one of our ancient ancestors likely had a much easier time giving birth than modern humans. In their paper published on the open-access site PLOS ONE, Natalie Laudicina, Frankee Rodriguez and Jeremy DeSilva describe how they created 3-D computer models of some of our ancient ancestors and compared them with modern hu

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Färre lymfkörteloperationer vid bröstcancer

Forskare vid Lunds universitet och Skånes universitetssjukhus har i nyligen publicerade studier tagit fram beräkningsmodeller för bättre anpassad behandling av lymfkörtlar hos bröstcancerpatienter. De senaste resultaten visar att upp till var tredje operation skulle kunna avvaras.

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Perception of musical pitch varies across cultures

Unlike US residents, people in a remote area of the Bolivian rain forest usually do not perceive the similarities between two versions of the same note played at different registers, an octave apart. This discovery may help scientists tease out elements of perception that cannot be seen when examining only a single, homogenous group.

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Key similarities discovered between human and archaea chromosomes

A study has revealed key similarities between chromosomes in humans and archaea. The work could advance use of the single-celled organism in research on cancer.

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Computer simulations show human ancestors would have had an easier time giving birth than modern women

A trio of researchers with Boston University and Dartmouth College has found that one of our ancient ancestors likely had a much easier time giving birth than modern humans. In their paper published on the open-access site PLOS ONE, Natalie Laudicina, Frankee Rodriguez and Jeremy DeSilva describe how they created 3-D computer models of some of our ancient ancestors and compared them with modern hu

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Viral marketing: Message quality, trust, and consumer who share on social media

Writing in the International Journal of Technology Marketing, Georgios Tsekouropoulos of the Hellenic Open University, in Patra, Greece, discusses the notion of viral advertising. Specifically, he addresses the relationship between message quality, trust, and consumer intention to share content on social media.

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Just how much of the Amazon is burning?

You've seen it all over the news: Fires in the Amazon and throughout South America have been raging for weeks, sparking dire predictions about climate change, criticism of the Brazilian government over increased deforestation, and a viral moment of social media grief coalescing around the hashtag #PrayforAmazonia. These are far from the first fires in the region, but they're occurring with record

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To stock or not to stock? 3-D printing and the future of spare parts

In a world where on-demand 3-D printing is the norm, companies will face a choice between keeping spare parts on hand and printing them only when needed.

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Highly sensitive sensors to measure the heart and brain activity

Electrical signals measurements such as the ECG (electrocardiogram) can show how the human brain or heart works. Next to electrical signals magnetic signals also reveal something about the activity of these organs. They could be measured with little effort and without skin contact. But the especially weak signals require highly sensitive sensors. Scientists from the Collaboraive research Center 12

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Ignoring young people's climate change fears is a recipe for anxiety

Thousands of school students across Australia are expected to join in the global protest today calling for action on climate change.

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Fukushima bosses cleared over nuclear disaster

Nature, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02822-y Three former executives of the company that operated the Fukushima Daiichi plant have been acquitted of negligence by a Japanese court.

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Multicultural millennials respond positively to health 'edutainment': Baylor research says

Storytelling that educates and entertains — aka 'edutainment' — is a powerful communications tool that can lead to positive health-related changes among multicultural millennials, according to a new marketing study from Baylor University.

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Open cluster NGC 2345 investigated in detail

European astronomers have performed a comprehensive study of the young open cluster NGC 2345. The new research resulted in determining fundamental parameters of dozens of stars in the cluster and also unveiled the presence of new members. The findings are detailed in a paper published September 11 on arXiv.org.

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Procurement's role in climate change: Putting government money where policy needs to go

For three years in a row, the World Economic Forum's Global Risks Report has identified climate change as the gravest threat for global business and industry.

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Migrating Birds Provide Surprising Snacks for Sharks

Meticulous work reveals the identity of sharks’ feathered prey — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why do men have nipples?

Women's nipples have long been a source of fascination and controversy, from celebrity gossip stories of wardrobe malfunctions and "nip slips" to feminist movements for gender equality. Nipples even became a fashion accessory.

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Engineers create ways to keep stone waste out of landfills

Using polymers and natural stone slurry waste, researchers are manufacturing environmentally friendly stone composites. These new composites are made of previously discarded materials left behind during the cutting of natural structural or ornamental blocks for buildings, construction supplies or monuments. While reusing the waste material of natural stone production is common in cement, tile and

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Möjligt minska allvarliga cykelolyckor

I Sverige står cyklister för närmare hälften av alla allvarliga trafikskador. När olyckan sker är risken att skadas 29 gånger högre för en cyklist jämfört med när någon krockar i en bil. – Via registerdata har jag kunnat se att omkring 20 procent av de cyklister som skadades blev sjukskrivna under minst två veckor, säger Maria Ohlin, som skrivit en avhandling om cykelsäkerhet vid Göteborgs univer

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Why do men have nipples?

Women's nipples have long been a source of fascination and controversy, from celebrity gossip stories of wardrobe malfunctions and "nip slips" to feminist movements for gender equality. Nipples even became a fashion accessory.

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Climate change: Children are carving out a place in politics, now adults must listen and act

There's no doubt that young people today are driving action on climate change. The #FridaysforFuture school strikes are arguably the most dedicated and sustained direct action in a generation. School pupils have kicked off an international movement committed to addressing the injustices, mass extinctions and environmental damage caused by climate change—while also building global networks, speakin

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In-situ chemistry studies for µSR

Because of the chemical analogy between muonium (a bound muon-electron system) and hydrogen, the muon technique offers a valuable method for exploring many mechanisms in chemistry and chemical physics. The technique provides information on molecular structure, dynamics and reaction kinetics that complement results obtained from other experimental methods. However, additional information can be obt

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Fast-cooling sample environment furnaces furnaces

How long does it take to cool a sample environment furnaces from 1000 degrees C to 80 degrees C? Answer: 4.5 hours. This wastes a lot of precious neutron beam time so what has SINE2020 been doing about it?

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Improving the signal-to-background ratio

A good signal-to-background ratio is essential for a successful outcome to a neutron experiment. Unfortunately, some commonly used sample environment equipment produces unwanted signals that hide those coming from the samples being investigated.

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Improving a piston-cylinder pressure cell for μSR experiments

Zurab Shermadini, Rustem Khasanov, Matthias Elender and Alex Amato at PSI have looked at the design of a double-wall piston-cylinder pressure cell specifically designed for muon-spin rotation (μSR) experiments.

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ZnS scintillation detector with wavelength shifting fiber readout

Detectors for reflectometry need to detect a lot of neutrons in a very short space of time. This means they need to be designed with very high count rate capabilities. Unfortunately, current detectors need to improve to meet the demands of reflectometry experiments so researchers at ISIS Neutron and Muon source have been working on a detector that can.

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Corrosion resistance of steel bars in concrete when mixed with aerobic microorganisms

Dissolved oxygen in pore solution is often a controlling factor determining the rate of the corrosion process of steel bars in concrete. This study reports on the corrosion resistance and polarization properties of steel bars in a mortar specimen mixed with aerobic microorganisms. The addition of the microorganisms in mortar mixtures led to higher corrosion resistance, which was confirmed by the r

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Ways to save the planet: Activating the states

With global temperatures rising and the clock ticking, Fletcher School experts the world over are developing new ways to save the planet. For a series on climate change solutions, Tufts Now talked with several Fletcher alumni and faculty about their efforts. Read about charging extra to drive in congested cities, investing in cooling, steering energy companies beyond oil and gas, saving swamps, an

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New fraud findings and new heart surgery business for Ashutosh Tiwari

Ashutosh Tiwari and his patron Tony Turner were found guilty of research misconduct by Linköping University. Turner is to be sacked as EiC of his Elsevier journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics, a paper he tried to correct there will be retracted. Meanwhile, Tiwari and his LiU colleague Mikael Syväjärvi started a new business: they offer heart surgeries in India.

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The brain may actively forget during dream sleep

In a study of mice, researchers show that REM sleep may be a time when the brain actively forgets. Their results suggest that forgetting during sleep may be controlled by neurons found deep inside the brain that were previously known for making an appetite stimulating hormone.

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New study opens the door to flood resistant crops

Of the major food crops, only rice is currently able to survive flooding. Thanks to new research, that could soon change — good news for a world in which rains are increasing in both frequency and intensity.

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Wild animals' immune systems decline with age, sheep study finds

It is well established that weakened immune systems in old age affect people's health and fitness, but a study suggests that it is also an issue for wild animals.

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Engineers create ways to keep stone waste out of landfills

Using polymers and natural stone slurry waste, researchers are manufacturing environmentally friendly stone composites. These new composites are made of previously discarded materials left behind during the cutting of natural structural or ornamental blocks for buildings, construction supplies or monuments. While reusing the waste material of natural stone production is common in cement, tile and

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Antimicrobial resistance is drastically rising

Researchers have shown that antimicrobial-resistant infections are rapidly increasing in animals in low and middle income countries. They produced the first global of resistance rates, and identified regions where interventions are urgently needed.

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Bukfett betydligt farligare för kvinnor

Forskare vid Uppsala universitet har studerat kopplingen mellan risken för hjärt-kärlsjukdom och metaboliska sjukdomar och mängden bukfett. När de undersökte data från 325 000 personer sågs en tydlig skillnad mellan kvinnor och män: för varje överskottskilo av så kallat visceralt bukfett, alltså fett som omgärdar organ och tarmar i buken, hade män en fördubblad risk för diabetes typ-2. För kvinnor

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Narcissism declines as we get older

Narcissism tends to decline as we age, along with vanity, leadership, and entitlement, a new study suggests. Researchers focused on Generation X college students in 1992 and revisited them when they were around age 41. The research, which will appear in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , surveyed 237 of the original 486 participants and found out how the lives of narcissistic peop

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Fra køkkenaffald til råolie på en halv time: Danske forskere vil lave klimavenligt flybrændstof

På Aalborg Universitet har man allerede vist, at det kan lade sig gøre.

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Stars that eat planets can start spinning so fast they rip apart

When a star engulfs a planet it can end up spinning so fast that it rips apart. The resulting debris could help us learn about exoplanets that were consumed

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Scientists Can't Agree on Whether Genetically Modified-Mosquito Experiment Went Horribly Wrong

Gene-edited mosquitoes were released into the wild in Brazil and some seem to have passed on their genes to the native insects.

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The Next Agricultural Revolution

The current world population is 7.7 Billion. World population will approach 10 billion by 2050. The primary limiting factor on human population is the availability of food. We are already currently using essentially all the available practical arable land . Expanding farmland further at this point would involve using less productive land, cutting down forests, or displacing populations. Convertin

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We’ve lost almost 3 billion birds in the U.S. and Canada since 1970

Blackbirds are one of the 12 bird families that are in steep decline (Bee Calder/Unsplash/) In 1962, Rachel Carlson warned about the dangers of the pesticide DDT in the classic Silent Spring . The book helped launch an environmental movement and stop the use of DDT, which had nearly decimated iconic raptors like the peregrine falcon and the bald eagle. While eagles and falcons have made a remarka

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Solsorte dratter døde om … men serum-institut finder ingen virus

Ornitologer bliver oversvømmet med meldinger om syge og døde solsorte, men den hovedmistænkte, usutu-virus, er ikke konstateret i de indleverede fugle.

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Image of the Day: Mother Machine

Bacteria grow and divide in microfluidic channels.

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Your DNA Belongs on the Blockchain

Guest Megan Molteni tells us about gene-sequencing startup Nebula, and how its privacy practices could positively impact the way we share personal information on the web.

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German govt reaches 100 bn euro climate plan deal as protests heat up

Chancellor Angela Merkel's government reached a deal Friday on a broad climate plan for Germany that commits at least 100 billion euros by 2030 to environmental protection, as tens of thousands of protesters rallied demanding action.

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The Crim Jellies are back: Craspedacusta jellyfish are swarming and looking for mates

Yes, they have stinging tentacles. No, they won't sting you—unless you're a tasty-looking zooplankton.

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A New Pandemic Could Kill 80 Million People, Experts Warn

Are we ready for the next global pandemic? Maybe not. Let’s back up, though. In 2018, the World Health Organization and the World Bank co-convened the Global Preparedness Monitoring Board (GPMB) , an independent group of experts focused on global health emergencies. On Wednesday, the GPMB published a report assessing the world’s current preparedness for a major health crisis and — spoiler alert —

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What is in people's minds when they buy stocks?

When people buy stocks, they tend to have beliefs in place about how well the investments will perform and which ones are riskier bets. Economists would love to know what is going on in people's minds, but because that is not always possible, they instead come up with models to predict how people will behave. The models are acting as if people have certain beliefs in mind.

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The Crim Jellies are back: Craspedacusta jellyfish are swarming and looking for mates

Yes, they have stinging tentacles. No, they won't sting you—unless you're a tasty-looking zooplankton.

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How to get a particle detector on a plane

You may have observed airplane passengers accompanied by pets or even musical instruments on flights. But have you ever been seated next to a particle detector?

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Finding answers and spreading messages of caution and hope on climate

Lamont Associate Research Professor and climatologist Radley Horton is determined. His work—investigating extreme weather events, discerning the limitations of climate models, predicting the current and future ramifications of climate change, and generating adaptation strategies—is matched by his commitment to communicating his findings and the under-appreciated threats associated with global warm

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When natural disaster strikes, men and women respond differently

Women are quicker to take cover or prepare to evacuate during an emergency, but often have trouble convincing the men in their life to do so, suggests a new CU Boulder study of how gender influences natural disaster response.

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Q&A: Upcoming global strikes, rise in youth protests, and the concern over health

Global one-day strikes, driven by young people demanding action against climate change, are planned for Sept. 20 and 27, sandwiched around a meeting next week of world leaders on the issue at the United Nations. The protests grew out of 15-year-old Greta Thunberg's strike last year outside the Swedish Parliament, during which she demanded climate action. The protest caused her to miss classes, whi

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Introducing VPLanet: A virtual planet simulator for modeling distant worlds across time

University of Washington astrobiologist Rory Barnes has created software that simulates multiple aspects of planetary evolution across billions of years, with an eye toward finding and studying potentially habitable worlds.

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Keeping the crunch in low-fat chips

University of Queensland chemical engineers have developed a new method to analyze the physical characteristics of potato chips in a bid to develop a tastier low-fat snack.

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Controlling methane is a fast and critical way to slow global warming, say Princeton experts

In independent studies, two Princeton University research teams recently identified surprisingly large sources of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, being leaked into the atmosphere. Pound for pound, methane causes a far greater warming effect in the atmosphere than does carbon dioxide—86-fold more heating over 20 years, and 35-fold more over the course of a century.

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Climate change: Offshore wind expands at record low price

The UK announces projects to power seven million homes with wind power – and no need for subsidy.

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The race to create a perfect lie detector, and the dangers of succeeding – podcast

AI and brain-scanning technology could soon make it possible to reliably detect when people are lying. But do we really want to know? By Amit Katwala • Read the text version here Continue reading…

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Cuban “Sonic Attacks” May Have Been Caused by Neurotoxins

Scientists may have finally figured out what was behind those mysterious “sonic attacks” that gave U.S. and Canadian embassy staff visiting Cuba bizarre, concussion-like symptoms back in 2016. Was it a powerful futuristic weapon? Probably not — new research suggests that the culprit could have been neurotoxins from pesticides used in the area, according to CBC News . While questions remain, the s

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Post office team picked for Antarctic Port Lockroy base

The team will spend four months franking stamps on tourists' postcards and counting penguins.

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From clouds to craters: Mars Express

This beautiful view from ESA's Mars Express stretches from the bright, cloud-covered north pole of Mars to the contrasting hues of the northern hemisphere and the cratered terrain in the south.

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Comet gateway discovered to inner solar system, may alter fundamental understanding of comet evolution

A new study led by a University of Central Florida researcher may fundamentally alter our understanding of how comets arrive from the outskirts of the solar system and are funneled to the inner solar system coming closer to Earth.

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'Alien Megastructure' Star Not Alone. More Mysteriously Dimming Objects Found.

A mysterious star whose repeated bouts of darkening might be due to "alien megastructures," according to some researchers' conjectures, may now have more than a dozen counterparts that display similarly mystifying behavior.

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Are Conspiracy Beliefs on the Rise?

Do more people believe in conspiracy theories now than in the past?

9h

Mathematician describes movement in a flat strip of plasma for first time

A RUDN University mathematician has for the first time proved the theorem of existence and uniqueness of solutions of the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation in a strip. Such theorems are very rare for partial differential equations. The new results can be applied in fields such as astrophysics, for instance, in describing the propagation of plane waves in plasma. The article is published in the journal N

9h

Drones probe terrestrial dust devils to better understand the atmosphere of Mars

Dust devils, small dusty whirlwinds, have been studied for decades. But, says Brian Jackson, an associate professor in the Department of Physics at Boise State University, the ability of dust devils to lift dust into the atmosphere remains murky. "When we compare theoretical predictions of how much dust a devil should lift to how much it does lift, the numbers just don't add up," says Jackson.

9h

Venus puts on variety show among its cloud tops

Studies of the cloud-tops of Venus by JAXA's Akatsuki spacecraft show striking variety in wind speeds year-on-year and between the planet's northern and southern hemispheres. The first fine-scale observations of cloud-top temperatures have also revealed a tendency for clouds to converge towards the equator at night, in contrast to poleward circulation seen previously in daytime studies.

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Venus takes center stage in October 2020 observation campaign

Next October, Venus will be the focus of an international campaign of coordinated observations involving two space agencies, three missions and multiple ground-based telescopes and planetary scientists around the world. The collaboration aims to shed new light on the thick and complex atmosphere of Venus. Plans for the campaign and a call for astronomers to participate have been announced today by

9h

It’s Too Late for David Cameron to Apologize

Whatever David Cameron may have achieved during his six years as Britain’s prime minister, he’ll likely be remembered for only one thing: Brexit. After all, Cameron was the one who decided to hold the referendum on Britain’s European Union membership—and the one who ultimately lost it. His critics say he shares the blame for the seemingly interminable crisis the country has found itself in for th

9h

Blink-182’s Secret Seriousness

Nine , the new album from Blink-182, a band forever associated with adolescence even though the members’ mean age is now 44, arrives haloed in that great teenage emotion: embarrassment. This summer they kicked off a tour with Lil Wayne, and the hope that it would hit upon a yummy PB&J combo of potty-mouthed-and-past-their-prime performers from different genres was immediately dashed by the horrif

9h

The Real Danger of Booze-Making Gut Bacteria

The man’s troubles began in 2004, when, having moved from China to attend college in Australia, he got really drunk. That would hardly have been a noteworthy event, except that the man hadn’t consumed any alcohol —only fruit juice. The bizarre incident soon turned into a pattern. About once a month, and out of the blue, he’d become severely inebriated without drinking any alcohol. Over time, the

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How These Tiny Homes Are Giving Exonerated Prisoners New Lives

submitted by /u/OkIsland7 [link] [comments]

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Here are new pics of that weird substance China found on the Moon

submitted by /u/ThatCoconut [link] [comments]

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We Deliver Vaccines to the World's Poorest, Hardest-to-Reach Children

The 2019 Lasker-Bloomberg Public Service Award is a gratifying validation of the work we do at Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

The Verdict is In: There is No Justice for Ezekiel Stephan

Ezekiel Stephan died from bacterial meningitis and his parents' failure to seek appropriate medical care in 2012, and now they have been acquitted after the Supreme Court of Canada ordered a new trial. It appears that there may be no justice for Ezekiel.

9h

Researchers show how railroad worms produce red light

A research group comprising Brazilian and Japanese scientists has discovered how luciferase produced by the railroad worm Phrixothrix hirtus emits red light. Luciferase is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of luciferin in fireflies, producing oxyluciferin and enabling fireflies to emit light. Differences in the molecular structures explain the different colors of this bioluminescence in diffe

9h

The Bleak Hopefulness of *Ad Astra*

Brad Pitt goes to space in a new psychodrama from director James Gray—and confronts the idea of home.

9h

Appreciating the classical elegance of time crystals

Structures known as time crystals, which repeat in time the way conventional crystals repeat in space, have recently captured the interest and imagination of researchers across disciplines. The concept has emerged from the context of quantum many-body systems, but ETH physicists have now developed a versatile framework that clarifies connections to classical works dating back nearly two centuries,

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Researchers show how railroad worms produce red light

A research group comprising Brazilian and Japanese scientists has discovered how luciferase produced by the railroad worm Phrixothrix hirtus emits red light. Luciferase is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of luciferin in fireflies, producing oxyluciferin and enabling fireflies to emit light. Differences in the molecular structures explain the different colors of this bioluminescence in diffe

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Let there be light: Synthesizing organic compounds

Every biological reaction is a chemical reaction. The exchange of carbon dioxide for oxygen in our lungs and blood cells, for example, is caused by molecules releasing chemicals and reforming with new ones. The uncontrolled replication of cancerous cells is the result of broken chemical compounds miscommunicating. The appeal of developing improved drugs to promote helpful reactions or prevent harm

9h

We Deliver Vaccines to the World's Poorest, Hardest-to-Reach Children

The 2019 Lasker-Bloomberg Public Service Award is a gratifying validation of the work we do at Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Watery grave for ancient Turkish town of Hasankeyf

In a graveyard beside the doomed town of Hasankeyf, workers are exhuming bodies, carrying them to a new resting place away from the waters that will soon submerge this ancient site.

9h

From Australia to Europe, climate protesters hit the streets

Hundreds of thousands of protesters in Australia, many of them children who skipped school, kicked off a day of demonstrations around the world against climate change in the run-up to a U.N. summit in New York.

9h

Drone equipped with nail gun can fix the roof so you don't have to

A drone equipped with a nail gun can autonomously hover over a roof and fix tiles in place. Tests showed it was highly precise and held steady while firing

9h

Selfie-apps til Android med 1,5 millioner downloads kunne optage lyd og indsamle private oplysninger

To Google Play-apps kunne optage lyd fra enheders mikrofon og indsamle brugeres private oplysninger.

9h

An Inside Look at Hospital Care, Through a Nurse’s Eyes

In her memoir "How to Treat People: A Nurse's Notes," Molly Case interweaves the professional and the personal in presenting a mosaic of vignettes drawn from her work in the “high dependency unit” of a multiethnic London hospital, where patients recover after heart surgery or heart attacks.

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Privata sjukvårdsförsäkringar hotar den svenska välfärdsmodellen

Johan Lapidus som är forskare vid Handelshögskolan i Göteborg skriver i sin nya bok T he Quest for a Divided Welfare State: Sweden in the Era of Privatization bland annat om hur t illiten till offentlig sjukvård minskar när det finns en delvis statligt finansierad snabbkö till samma klinik. Samtidigt sjunker skatteviljan hos dem som upplever sig betala två gånger för vården. Den tudelade välfärde

10h

Billige biler og dyre tog: Giftig cocktail får kollektiv transport til at gispe efter vejret

PLUS. Politikerne har gjort bilerne billigere, mens det er blevet dyrere at bruge kollektiv transport, togene har været ramt af spor­arbejde, og busserne forsinkes af trængsel. Resultat: passager­flugt.

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Saving lives faster: Monash University develops world-first laser incubator for blood

Researchers from BioPRIA, based at Australia's Monash University, together with industry partner Haemokinesis, have developed the world's first blood incubator using laser technology. This could prevent fatal blood transfusions in critically ill patients, and can detect antibodies in pregnant women that can kill a foetus.

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Canada’s Surprising History of Blackface

It is, unfortunately, not all that unusual for an American audience to learn that a politician dressed in blackface. Yet the case of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau manages to surprise. For one thing, there’s Trudeau’s age. He is just 47, and one might expect an ambitious young man of his generation, and especially one whose father was prime minister, to be more politically savvy. Yet Trud

10h

WeWork and the Great Unicorn Delusion

The office-space company WeWork announced that it was postponing its initial public offering this week, a reaction to a sharp decline in its reported valuation from $47 billion a few weeks ago to less than $20 billion today. In many ways, the company’s four-week tailspin has been a one-of-a-kind spectacle. Documents filed in anticipation of its public offering revealed a pattern of behavior from

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Climate protest student: 'I'm here to step up and say no more'

Student Gina Hale is one of the protesters taking part in the day of climate action.

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Fishy data doom paper by USDA aquaculture researcher

A scientist for the U.S. government has lost a 2017 paper on spawning in catfish for problems with the data. The paper, “Effective dose of salmon GnRHa for induction of ovulation in channel catfish,” was written by Nagaraj G. Chatakondi and appeared in the North American Journal of Aquaculture. Chatakondi is a geneticist with the … Continue reading

10h

Young People Take to Streets in Global Climate Strike

Anxious about the future and angry about the failure to curb the crisis, thousands joined an urgent call for action against climate change.

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As Vaping-Related Lung Illnesses Continue, the Culprit Remains a Mystery

People across the U.S. are continuing to fall ill with vaping-related lung disease. In a conference call Thursday, officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 530 probable and confirmed cases, along with seven deaths. Federal investigators are struggling to identify the cause.

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You should be skeptical when it comes to hyped-up AI. Here’s why.

The media often exaggerate and overhype the latest discoveries in artificial intelligence. It's important to add context to new findings by asking questions: Is there a demo available? How narrow was the task the computer performed? A more robust approach to artificial intelligence involves solving problems in generalized situations rather than just laboratory demonstrations. Rebooting AI: Buildi

10h

Mobilen har förändrat hur vi ser på social kompetens

Det pratas mycket i arbetslivet om betydelsen av social kompetens men innebörden i begreppet är inte lika tydligt. Nanna Gillberg forskar om hur digitalisering och medialisering påverkar normer, värderingar och det sociala klimatet. Hon ser en förskjutning av vad som menas med social kompetens. – Vi anses vara socialt kompetenta om vi nätverkar, gillar och delar med våra mobiler. Men vad händer m

10h

Why Andrew Yang Matters

Andrew Yang, the founder of a test-prep company, has never held elective office. Until last year, he was politically unknown. Now, according to the Real Clear Politics average of national polls , he is tied with Beto O’Rourke and leading Cory Booker, Amy Klobuchar, and Julián Castro in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. To understand why, it’s worth looking at how he responded e

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Matematikere løser gåden om 42

PLUS. (-80538738812075974)³ + 80435758145817515³ + 12602123297335631³ = 42

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The cost of subsidising UK wind farms has dropped to an all-time low

Results of a UK government auction on Friday show windfarms will be built in 2025 for as little as £39.65 per megawatt hour, a drop of almost a third since 2017

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Smarta fågelarter blir nya arter

Svenska och spanska forskare har analyserat relativ hjärnstorlek hos 1900 fågelarter och jämfört med deras släktträd. Forskarna förklarar sina resultat med att smarta fåglar är bättre på att förändra beteende, och en ny livsföring kan i förlängningen leda till att en ny art bildas.

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VR lets you fire a virtual employee to practice doing it for real

submitted by /u/FridgeParade [link] [comments]

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Læger over hele landet: Effektiviseringskrav er en bombe under de nye supersygehuse

Læger landet over er bekymrede for, at historien om universitetshospitalet i Aarhus vil gentage sig i takt med nye kvalitetsfondsbyggerier indvies. Hospitalsledelserne erkender at kravet om effektiviseringer udfordrer – læs deres svar her.

11h

Alkohol kan have positiv effekt på type 2-diabetes

Et lavt til moderat indtag af alkohol kan have positiv effekt på blodsukkerniveauer og fedtmetabolisme, viser kinesisk forskning.

11h

Study suggests flavored e-cigarettes may worsen asthma

A study into the impact of flavored e-cigarettes, on allergic airways disease, suggests that some flavors may worsen the severity of diseases such as asthma. For the first time a model of asthma was used to investigate the effect of a range of popular e-cigarette flavors, with and without nicotine.

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Sponge-like action of circular RNA aids heart attack recovery, Temple-led team discovers

Circular RNAs, like other noncoding RNAs, were thought to be nonfunctional, but recent evidence suggests otherwise. Circular RNAs may in fact act like sponges to 'soak up,' or bind, other molecules, including microRNAs and proteins, and new work by Temple researchers and colleagues supports this idea. They describe, for the first time, a circular RNA that fills a critical role in tissue repair aft

11h

Local-to-global signal transduction at the core of a Mn2+ sensing riboswitch

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12230-5 Riboswitches bind intracellular metabolites and control bacterial gene expression. Here, by using X-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, and single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the authors show how a local Mn2+ ion-binding signal is transduced across the yybP-ykoY riboswi

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Nanomechanics and co-transcriptional folding of Spinach and Mango

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12299-y Light-up aptamers are widely used for fluorescence visualization of non-coding RNA in vivo. Here the authors employ single-molecule fluorescence-force spectroscopy to characterize the mechanical responses of the G-Quadruplex based light-up aptamers Spinach2, iMangoIII and MangoIV, which is of interest for t

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Ran pathway-independent regulation of mitotic Golgi disassembly by Importin-α

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12207-4 Golgi disassembly is required for mitosis and occurs by vesicle fusion suppression, although the mechanism is unclear. Here, Chang et al. show, with quantitative analyses and crystallography, that Importin-α regulates this process by blocking GM130-p115 interactions in a Ran pathway-independent way.

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Polarization nano-tomography of tightly focused light landscapes by self-assembled monolayers

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12127-3 The realisation of 4D light fields, where longitudinal polarisation represents the fourth dimension, has been limited by the lack of appropriate analysis techniques. Here, the authors use interaction with self-assembled monolayers of fluorescent molecules, which allow for identification of non-paraxial ligh

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Enhanced CRISPR-based DNA demethylation by Casilio-ME-mediated RNA-guided coupling of methylcytosine oxidation and DNA repair pathways

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12339-7 DNA methylation plays an important role in regulating a wide variety of cellular processes and is implicated in a range of diseases. Here the authors present Casilio-ME to assemble protein complexes to demethylate target loci.

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Ultra-long-acting tunable biodegradable and removable controlled release implants for drug delivery

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12141-5 Patient drug regime compliance is a major issue; sustained release implants could address this. Here, the authors report on a phase inverted in situ forming implant of PLGA for the sustained release of antiretroviral drugs and optimize and demonstrate the release of 6 different drugs over a period of up to

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Uprooting defects to enable high-performance III–V optoelectronic devices on silicon

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12353-9 The use of promising group III-V materials for optoelectronic applications is hindered by the high density of threading dislocations when integrated with silicon technology. Here, the authors present an electrochemical deep etching strategy to drastically reduce the the defect density.

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Tet inactivation disrupts YY1 binding and long-range chromatin interactions during embryonic heart development

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12325-z Tet-mediated DNA demethylation is intimately involved in reguatling embryonic development. Here the authors characterise DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation dynamics during early cardiac development in both human and mice and provide evidence that Tet-mediated DNA demethylation plays a role in regulating

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2-Aminoadipic acid (2-AAA) as a potential biomarker for insulin resistance in childhood obesity

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49578-z

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Upregulation of the chromatin remodeler HELLS is mediated by YAP1 in Sonic Hedgehog Medulloblastoma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50088-1

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Abundant and diverse Tetrahymena species living in the bladder traps of aquatic carnivorous Utricularia plants

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50123-1

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Machine learning for comprehensive forecasting of Alzheimer’s Disease progression

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49656-2

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Light-induced changes of the subretinal space of the temporal retina observed via optical coherence tomography

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50057-8

11h

Google bliver Danmarks største ejer af solceller: Bygger fem nye parker

Søgegiganten opfører fem danske solcelleparker på i alt 160 MW, som matcher forbruget i det kommende datacenter ved Fredericia. Det sker som led i en global milliard-satsning på grøn energi.

11h

A Step Toward Blowing Up the Presidential-Voting System

The 2016 presidential election pitted the two most disliked candidates in the history of public polling against each other. In the race between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, millions of Americans found themselves forced to vote for a major-party nominee they plainly couldn’t stand or to risk electing the candidate they hated even more by casting their ballot for a third-party contender. For t

11h

A Rising Generation Asserts Itself On Climate Change

Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, 16, is calling on young people to skip school Friday and hold rallies to demand more action against climate change. (Image credit: Susan Walsh/AP)

11h

This Picasso painting had never been seen before. Until a neural network painted it.

With help from a neural network, researchers reconstructed an image the artist created and painted over during his Blue Period.

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PODCAST: Teknologisk dannelse skal ruste os til den digitale tidsalder

Digital dannelse er et af de budskaber, som Ingeniørens nye blogger, Kim Escherich, er rejsende i. Som innovationsarkitekt i IBM med en lang karriere inden for digitalisering, AI og machine learning er han langtfra maskinstormer. Alligevel advarer han mod, at vi lader os overrumple af teknologien…

11h

Ketoacidose og hyperglykæmisk koma ved TD1 koblet til øget risiko for selvmordsforsøg

Sundhedspersonale skal være opmærksomme på den højere selvmordsrisiko blandt patienter med ketoacidose og hyperglykæmisk koma, lyder det fra franske forskere.

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ACE-hæmmere sænker risikoen for at udvikle type 2-diabetes

Brugen af brug af ACE-hæmmere til at sænke blodtrykket er forbundet med 24 pct. reduceret risiko for at udvikle type 2-diabetes, viser canadisk forskning.

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Stærk kobling mellem D-vitaminmangel og diabetesrelaterede dødsfald

Resultat styrker rationalet om, at det er en god idé at sørge for bred D-vitamin-dækning i befolkningen, da det kan forhindre tidlige dødsfald og ikke er forbundet med negative effekter ved høje niveauer.

11h

Effekt af drikbare ketoner er jævnbyrdig med IV-anvendelse

Kroppens forbrænding påvirkes på samme måde, når ketonstoffer drikkes, som når de gives intravenøst, viser dansk undersøgelse præsenteret på EASD.

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Suicide Data Reveal New Intervention Spots, Such as Motels and Animal Shelters

Patterns show places where people who intend to kill themselves go—and give health workers better chances to stop them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Suicide Data Reveal New Intervention Spots, Such as Motels and Animal Shelters

Patterns show places where people who intend to kill themselves go—and give health workers better chances to stop them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Suicide Data Reveal New Intervention Spots, Such as Motels and Animal Shelters

Patterns show places where people who intend to kill themselves go—and give health workers better chances to stop them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Accelerating Supply Chain Processes with Next-gen Technologies

submitted by /u/erpintegration [link] [comments]

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Storsælgende diabetesmidler har jævnbyrdig effekt på risiko for hjertekarsygdom

‘Real world’ data for alvorlig hjertekarsygdom og død blandt danske type 2-diabetespatienter, der bruger empagliflozin eller liraglutid, viser kun små forskelle på effekten mellem de to diabetesmidler.

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Risikomarkører for hjertekarsygdom står måske for fald

Hvilepuls eller variationer i hjerterytme over tid kan næppe prædiktere fremtidig risiko for hjertekarsygdom eller død, hverken blandt diabetespatienter eller andre, viser resultater af et kohortestudie præsenteret på EASD.

12h

Metformin kan have en væksthæmmende effekt på brystkræft

Studie med brug af radioaktiv metformin viser, at metformin måske kan have en direkte væksthæmmende effekt på tumorvæv i brystet.

12h

Mulig milliardregning: Danmark skal betale for at redde klimaramt amerikansk eks-base

Forsvaret skal fra 2023 betale for driften af Kangerlussuaq Lufthavn. Det er sandsynligvis en udstrakt hånd til Trump. Men bane og forpladser er ved at synke på grund af smeltende permafrost.

12h

SLS: Nasa's giant 'Moon rocket' takes shape

Nasa finishes assembling the main structural components for its largest rocket since the Apollo-era Saturn V.

12h

Enter the Capitalocene: How Climate Change Will Ruin Capitalism

Capitalism is responsible for climate change—not you and me. But here’s what one economist says we could do about it.

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South Korea reports more suspected swine fever cases

South Korea said Friday that it is investigating more suspected cases of African swine fever in farms near its border with North Korea, as fears grow over the spread of the illness that has decimated pig herds across Asia.

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Forest fire haze clears over Singapore ahead of F1

Singapore's skies cleared Friday and air quality improved as smog from raging Indonesian forest fires drifted away, easing fears that this weekend's Formula One race may be affected.

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Used and abused, oceans key to fighting climate change

Humanity must heal oceans made sick by climate change and pollution to protect marine life and to save itself, experts warned days before the release of a major UN report.

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Climate change takes toll on oceans, ice: UN report

Humanity should brace for blowback from oceans and frozen zones increasingly addled by climate change, a major UN report will warn.

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South Korea reports more suspected swine fever cases

South Korea said Friday that it is investigating more suspected cases of African swine fever in farms near its border with North Korea, as fears grow over the spread of the illness that has decimated pig herds across Asia.

12h

Award for man who stopped a mega-dam and saved Borneo's rainforest

Peter Kallang has been awarded a top environmental prize for a successful campaign to stop a mega-dam being built in Borneo.

12h

Climate change could turn oceans from friend to foe, UN report warns

Global warming and pollution caused by humanity's carbon-heavy footprint are ravaging Earth's oceans and icy regions in ways that could unleash misery on a global scale, a landmark UN report to be unveiled next week will warn.

12h

Ny indsigt i hvordan celler opretholder deres identitet

I kroppens celler har nogle proteiner afgørende betydning for, hvilke gener der er aktive eller…

13h

Psykiater går fælles stuegang med praktiserende læge

De seneste tre år har ​Eric Schaumburg, klinikchef på Psykiatrisk Center Nordsjælland, gået sin månedlige stuegang på bostedet Johannes Hages hus sammen med en praktiserende læge. Det har styrket fagligheden i mødet med patienterne.

13h

Sheet roofs: Puerto Rico reels 2 years after Hurricane Maria

Sixto Marrero shivers every time the skies open in Puerto Rico.

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Scientists prepare for year-long expedition to Arctic center

Researchers from more than a dozen nations prepared Friday to launch the biggest and most complex expedition ever attempted in the central Arctic—a yearlong journey through the ice they hope will improve the scientific models that underpin our understanding of climate change.

13h

Where to park your car, according to math

Just as mathematics reveals the motions of the stars and the rhythms of nature, it can also shed light on the more mundane decisions of everyday life. Where to park your car, for example, is the subject of a new look at a classic optimization problem by physicists Paul Krapivsky (Boston University) and Sidney Redner (Santa Fe Institute) published in this week's Journal of Statistical Mechanics.

13h

The next agricultural revolution is here

As a growing population and climate change threaten food security, researchers around the world are working to overcome the challenges that threaten the dietary needs of humans and livestock. A pair of scientists is now making the case that the knowledge and tools exist to facilitate the next agricultural revolution we so desperately need.

13h

It’s taken years, but at last there’s real hope for meaningful climate action | Caroline Lucas

The young protesters have been inspiring. Politicians have to respond – and our Green New Deal bill will slash carbon emissions It’s been more than 10 years in the making, and is the top demand of the youth strikers gathering on Friday for the UK’s largest ever climate protest – which is why Friday is also the first attempt in Britain to put legislation in place to make a Green New Deal a reality

13h

The next agricultural revolution is here

As a growing population and climate change threaten food security, researchers around the world are working to overcome the challenges that threaten the dietary needs of humans and livestock. A pair of scientists is now making the case that the knowledge and tools exist to facilitate the next agricultural revolution we so desperately need.

13h

The Consensus Handbook: download and translations

Published in March 2018, The Consensus Handbook summarizes research into how opponents of climate action have cast doubt on consensus, why that matters, and how we (including journalists) can respond. It provides answers to questions like these: Why has manufacturing doubt about the scientific consensus been such a priority for opponents of climate action? What kind of strategies have they employ

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The end of aging: Are you ready to live to 150?

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Pre-first world war battleship granted special protection

HMS Montagu awarded heritage status after war veterans surveyed wreck site The wreck of a battleship that ran aground more than a century ago has been granted special protection after wounded military veterans carried out the first full archaeological survey of the remains. HMS Montagu, a pre-first world war Duncan-class British battleship was wrecked in 1906 on Lundy island, off the Devon coast,

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Læger er bekymrede: Vores kræftbehandling er baseret på mangelfuld forskning

Tvivlsomme og spinkle undersøgelser ligger til grund for en stor del af den kræftmedicin, der godkendes i EU.

15h

To Better Understand The Arctic, This Ship Will Spend A Year Frozen Into The Ice

A group of scientists is embarking on a bold plan to better understand an extremely understudied part of the rapidly warming Arctic — the central Arctic Ocean. (Image credit: Ravenna Koenig/NPR)

15h

Photos of the Week: Giant Penguin, Forest Tower, Glacier Battlefield

A hydrofoil water taxi in Paris, a bore tide in China, wildfires in Indonesia and Brazil, the Rugby World Cup in Japan, a cyclocross challenge in England, Independence Day celebrations in Mexico, protests in Ecuador and Honduras, diving championships in Kuala Lumpur, a whale rescue in Argentina, sunflowers in Kansas, and much more.

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To Our Readers: Why Futurism Isn’t Publishing Today

So, Readers — We don’t take the time to address you or editorialize often, as we prefer to let our news-gathering and analysis do the talking for us. Clearly, today’s a little different. We’re gonna talk to you about something important to our team, and then we’re not gonna publish for the rest of the day. [Really, we don’t even consider what we’re about to tell you to be editorializing all that

16h

Scientists identify a personality feature that could predict how often you exercise

Individuals who make concrete plans to meet their goals may engage in more physical activity, including visits to the gym, compared to those who don't plan quite so far ahead, research shows. These findings suggest that self-reported levels of a trait called 'planfulness' may translate into real world differences in behavior.

16h

Pathway found for treatment-resistant lung cancer

A big way chemotherapy works is by prompting cancer cells to commit suicide, and scientists have found a pathway the most common lung cancer walks to avoid death.Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia and Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University have found a first step appears to be lung cancer cells expressing high levels of the molecule TIMP-1, classically considered a tumor inhibitor b

16h

Staying at elementary school for longer associated with higher student attainment

A new study has discovered that US students achieve better results in reading and mathematics tests when they stay in elementary school for grades 6 (age 11-12) and 7 (age 12-13), rather than transfer to middle school. In contrast, students in grade 8 (age 13-14) achieve better results in middle school than high school.

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Staying at elementary school for longer associated with higher student attainment

A new study has discovered that U.S. students achieve better results in reading and mathematics tests when they stay in elementary school for grades six (age 11–12) and seven (age 12–13), rather than transfer to middle school. In contrast, students in grade eight (age 13–14) achieve better results in middle school than high school.

16h

Leder: Stram op, teleselskaber og myndigheder!

Lederen fra dagens udgave af Ingeniøren.

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Tele-svigtet fortsætter: Efter tre uger kan du stadig få andres simkort på dit glatte ansigt

Ny stikprøve afslører, at danske teleselskabers sløsede omgang med simkort stadig kan give adgang til andres telefonnumre og dermed mailkonti og sociale medier. Hos Telia og 3 var det således stadig muligt for Version2’s journalister at få udleveret aktive simkort på det glatte ansigt – og det i …

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Sim-svigtet fortsætter: Efter tre uger kan du stadig få andres simkort på dit glatte ansigt

Ny stikprøve afslører, at danske teleselskabers sløsede omgang med simkort stadig kan give adgang til andres telefonnumre og dermed mailkonti og sociale medier. Hos Telia og 3 var det således stadig muligt for Version2’s journalister at få udleveret aktive simkort på det glatte ansigt – og det i …

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Alcohol-producing gut bacteria could cause liver damage even in people who don't drink

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the build-up of fat in the liver due to factors other than alcohol, but its cause remains unknown. Now, researchers have linked NAFLD to gut bacteria that produce a large amount of alcohol in the body, finding these bacteria in over 60% of NAFLD patients. Their findings could help develop a screening method for early diagnosis and treatment of non-alcoh

18h

Impossible Burger hits grocery stores on Friday

The Impossible Burger will be available in 27 Gelson's Markets stores in Southern California starting Sept. 20. Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods sell plant-based burgers in restaurants, but only Beyond Meat sells products in grocery stores. Tyson could begin to edge out these smaller companies with its unique meat product that contains plant and animal components, appealing to health-conscious "f

18h

CRISPR removes antibiotic resistance gene from bacterium

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

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Researchers alter mouse gut microbiomes by feeding good bacteria their preferred fibers

Humans choose food based on the way it looks, smells, and tastes. But the microbes in our guts use a different classification system — one that is based on the molecular components that make up different fibers. Investigators found particular components of dietary fiber that encourage growth and metabolic action of beneficial microbes in the mouse gut.

19h

Reward prediction tells us less than expected about musical pleasure [Letters (Online Only)]

Gold et al. (1) report a reinforcement-learning experiment where reward prediction errors (RPEs) were elicited by the consonance or dissonance of musical stimuli. They link these RPEs to activation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and to behavioral indices of learning. They conclude that music can function as a reward, that…

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Reply to de Fleurian et al.: Toward a fuller understanding of reward prediction errors and their role in musical pleasure [Letters (Online Only)]

We are pleased that our manuscript on the neural processes underlying musical pleasure and reward (1) has elicited commentary from de Fleurian et al. (2). Their first comment regards the distinction between reward prediction errors (RPEs), which concern predicted values like rewards/punishments, and sensory prediction errors, which concern predicted events…

19h

Messenger RNA therapy as an option for treating metabolic disorders [Commentaries]

The use of messenger RNA (mRNA) therapy by systemic delivery to treat metabolic disorders has long been hampered by poor stability, immunogenicity, inefficient delivery, and hepatic toxicity. In contrast, other molecular therapies such as viral gene and enzyme replacement therapy (Fig. 1) have been effectively employed to successfully treat rare…

19h

Cut air pollution to fight climate change – UN

The global effort to tackle emissions will be debated at the UN Climate Action Summit in New York.

20h

Climate change: Arctic expedition to drift in sea-ice for a year

Germany will embed its Polarstern research ship in sea-ice for a year-long study of the climate.

20h

Tumor resistance is promoted by anti-cancer protein

Areas of solid tumors that have limited access to oxygen, a condition called hypoxia, are highly resilient against chemo and radiation therapy. For years, scientists have wondered why the tumor suppressor protein p53 is also ineffective against hypoxic cells of these tumors. Now, a study reports the discovery of a mechanism that renders p53 ineffective against hypoxic cancer cells and in fact prom

20h

We All Could Pay a Price for the Latest Slap at Huawei

An international cybersecurity group has evicted the Chinese telecom company to comply with US sanctions. That could allow malware to spread more easily.

20h

Trump signs order to improve flu-vaccine development

Nature, Published online: 19 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02831-x The US government wants to develop a universal vaccine, and make seasonal vaccines more effective.

20h

Tænkeboks: Sådan finder man de optimale mål på truget

Her får du løsningen på opgaven fra uge 37!

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Human Hearts Evolved for Endurance — and They Need It to Stay Healthy

(Credit: lzf/Shutterstock) (Inside Science) — Millions of years ago, after the ancestors of humans diverged from the last link they shared with chimpanzees, they began developing the numerous adaptations that made endurance one of the defining traits of our species. By about 2 million years ago, the genus Homo had emerged and the process really took off. Today, humans can run for miles or walk al

20h

A Letter From The Future

Don't give up.

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The Day That I Found Out About Climate Change

Everything the video said was true.

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For the first time walking patterns identify specific types of dementia

Walking may be a key clinical tool in helping medics accurately identify the specific type of dementia a patient has, pioneering research has revealed.

21h

Okay, So Let's Pretend Climate Change Isn't Real

Just a hoax paid for by Big Renewables.

21h

The Atlantic Politics Daily: Just Keep Swimming

We’re trying something new with The Atlantic ’s signature politics newsletter. Comments or questions? Send us an email anytime. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We appreciate your continued support for our journalism. Today in Politics Only one of these candidates remains in the Democratic presidential race. ( The Atlantic ) Why aren’t the minnows getting winnowed? The realiz

21h

An Apple iOS 13 Review, Spying Streaming Devices, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

21h

Amazon Puts a Charge Into Startup Automaker Rivian

The retail giant says it will buy 100,000 electric vans by 2030 from a company that doesn’t yet have a single vehicle on the road.

21h

A single dose of yellow fever vaccine does not offer lasting protection to all children

José Enrique Mejía, Inserm researcher at Unit 1043 Center for Pathophysiology of Toulouse Purpan and Cristina Domingo from the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin have recently shown that around half of children initially protected by the yellow fever vaccination at 9 months of age lose that protection within the next 2 to 5 years, due to disappearance of the neutralizing antibodies. This research has

21h

Purdue Pharma Warns That Sackler Family May Walk From Opioid Deal

The company said the cost of fighting lawsuits brought by states could jeopardize its owners’ ability to contribute $3 billion to a national opioids settlement.

22h

Depth of Field: Hong Kong's Flash Mob for Democracy

In photographer Philip Fong's image, you can almost feel the people of Hong Kong reaching for a future that belongs to them.

22h

New study reveals a strong link between vitamin D deficiency and increased mortality, especially diabetes-related deaths

New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept. 16-20) reveals that vitamin D deficiency is strongly linked to increased mortality, especially in younger and middle-aged people, and is particularly associated with diabetes-related deaths.

22h

Ketoacidosis and high-blood sugar comas in patients with type 1 diabetes linked to increased risk of suicide attempt

New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept. 16-20) shows that in patients with type 1 diabetes, hospitalization for either ketoacidosis or a hyperglycaemic (high blood sugar) coma are both linked to a subsequent increase in the risk of attempting suicide. The study is by Dr. Jean Michel Petit, CHU (Uni

22h

Study shows both natural variation in ACE concentrations and lowering blood pressure with ACE inhibitors are associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes

New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Barcelona, Spain (Sept. 16-20) shows that usage of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors to lower blood pressure, is associated with a 24% reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) when compared with placebo.

22h

Texas Is Drowning Under One of the Wettest Storms in US History

Tropical storm Imelda is bringing historic and devastating flooding to southeastern Texas, just two years after Hurricane Harvey flooded the same part of the state.

22h

C-section babies have a unique microbiome—here's why that matters

Delivery method—vaginal birth or cesarean section—was the most significant driver of the bacterial variation early in life, according to a new study out this week. (Pixabay/) Early in life, babies born by cesarean section have different gut bacteria than babies born vaginally—instead of picking up microbes from their mothers, they take on bacteria from the hospital environment, a new study found.

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Appreciating the classical elegance of time crystals

Structures known as 'time crystals' — which repeat in time as conventional crystals repeat in space — have recently captured the interest and imagination of researchers across disciplines. The concept has emerged from the context of quantum many-body systems, but physicists have now developed a versatile framework that clarifies connections to classical works dating back nearly two centuries, th

22h

Investments to address climate change are good business

New research suggests that over the next few decades, acting to reduce climate change is expected to cost much less than the damage otherwise inflicted by climate change on people, infrastructure and ecosystems.

22h

Physicists discover topological behavior of electrons in 3D magnetic material

Researchers explored a type of material in which the electrons behave according to the mathematical rules of topology. They found topological behaviors of electrons in a three-dimensional magnetic material at room temperature, opening new avenues of future study.

22h

Sonos Move speaker review: Great sound in a semi-portable package

The Sonos Move is right at home in an Adirondack chair. (Stan Horaczek/) On-paper, the Sonos Move speaker doesn’t make a ton of sense. It’s a portable speaker that weighs six pounds and promises just 10 hours of battery life—when some of its competition claim more than double that number. At 10 inches tall and six-inches around, it’s too big to easily stuff into a typical day bag or backpack. And

22h

North America Has 3 Billion Fewer Birds Than it Did in 1970

Population reductions in species such as sparrows and blackbirds reflect a concerning pattern of declining biodiversity across the continent, researchers find.

22h

Electric tech could help reverse baldness

Reversing baldness could someday be as easy as wearing a hat, thanks to a noninvasive, low-cost hair-growth-stimulating technology.

23h

Researchers relate neuropsychological tests with real-life activity in multiple sclerosis

To best serve the clinical needs of individuals with MS, neuropsychological testing needs to be viewed in larger context comprising non-cognitive variables, such as motor ability and demographic values, fatigue and depression, and disease activity and level of disability, as well as person-specific factors such as personality and coping styles.

23h

Clinically silent relapsing malaria may still pose a threat

Nonhuman primates with clinically undetectable Plasmodium relapse infections still harbor parasitic gametocytes that may be infectious to mosquitoes, according to a new study.

23h

Scientists identify a possible new treatment for diabetic retinopathy

About 1 in 3 diabetic patients develops diabetic retinopathy (DR), which can impair vision and lead to blindness. A new study provides clear evidence that high glucose increases the levels of enzymatic precursor — lysyl oxidase propeptide (LOX-PP) — that promotes cell death, which was verified in an animal model of diabetes. These findings may help develop novel DR treatments by targeting LOX-PP

23h

Big cities breed partners in crime

Researchers have long known that bigger cities disproportionately generate more crime. Now a new study explains why: It's easier for criminals to find collaborators.

23h

New protocol to improve gene therapy tool production

A method to create a faster and lower cost alternative for a gene therapy tool.

23h

How Painter Alexa Meade Creates Dimension-Collapsing Art

The Google Artist in Residence is working with the company's AR/VR team to digitally capture her new installation as a rainbow-hued depth map.

23h

Alzheimer's drug also treats parasitic Chagas disease

The drugs currently used to treat Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease, have serious side effects and limited use in those with chronic disease. Now, researchers have reported in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases that memantine, a drug currently used to treat Alzheimer's disease, can diminish the number of parasites in mice with Chagas disease, and increase the survival rate of the animals.

23h

A bathroom scale could monitor millions with heart failure

Millions of heart failure patients are readmitted to hospitals every few months to adjust medications. It sends medical costs sky-high and patients suffer unnecessarily. A new bathroom scale could give clinicians the data they need to cut hospitalizations and treat patients remotely before they suffer too much.

23h

The next agricultural revolution is here

By using modern gene-editing technologies to learn key insights about past agricultural revolutions, two plant scientists are suggesting that the next agricultural revolution could be at hand.

23h

New UW study questions value of fluoride varnish

A new study by 2 University of Washington researchers and their colleagues questions the cost-effectiveness of fluoride varnish for preschoolers and calls its anti-cavity effects 'modest and uncertain' in this age group.

23h

Amazon’s New Climate Pledges Won’t Stop Employee Walkout

CEO Jeff Bezos unveiled ambitious plans to reduce his company’s carbon footprint. But some workers say the efforts don’t go far enough.

23h

European hedgehogs in Denmark carry a secret

Scientists have discovered, that Danish hedgehogs carry mecC-MRSA in their snouts.

23h

Here Are New Pics of That Weird Substance China Found on the Moon

Shiny! China’s Yutu-2 lunar lander just sent back new images of a strange substance it found near a small crater on the far side of the Moon. Last month, the team behind the lunar rover claimed it had found a “ colored mysterious substance ” as described in the rover’s diary , which claimed that the material’s “shape and color is significantly different from the surrounding lunar soil.” A new pos

23h

Battle Lines Drawn Over California Auto Air Rules, EVs

As promised, President Trump this week announced he’s revoking California’s right to set its own auto emissions standards. And as promised, California Gov. Gavin Newsom is headed to court because he doubts the President’s standing to unilaterally undo an act of Congress, the Clean Air Act passed in 1970 and signed by then-President Richard Nixon. So much is riding on the outcome that the case is

23h

Shoe care kits to keep your favorite pairs kicking

A soleful approach to sustainable living. (Radek Skrzypczak via Unsplash/) A good pair of shoes can be hard to find. When you’ve broken in a pair to the perfect level of comfort, you might wish you could keep them forever. After all, they’ve been there for you on the day you started your new job, at the bar where you celebrated your promotion, and at your first big professional presentation. Are

23h

Linkages between flow regime, biota, and ecosystem processes: Implications for river restoration

River ecosystems are highly biodiverse, influence global biogeochemical cycles, and provide valued services. However, humans are increasingly degrading fluvial ecosystems by altering their streamflows. Effective river restoration requires advancing our mechanistic understanding of how flow regimes affect biota and ecosystem processes. Here, we review emerging advances in hydroecology relevant to

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Where to park your car, according to math

In a world where the best parking space is the one that minimizes time spent in the lot, 2 physicists compare parking strategies and settle on a prudent approach.

23h

Greta Thunberg is a painful reminder of decades of climate failures

This is a re-post from the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 300 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story. Sixteen-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg has ignited the climate movement, most recently taking a zero-carbon ocean voyage to America to attend the September 23rd UN climate summit

23h

How to construct a protein factory

The complexity of molecular structures in the cell is amazing. Having achieved great success in elucidating these structures in recent years, biologists are now taking on the next challenge: to find out more about how they are constructed. A new research project now provides insight into a very unusual construction process in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

23h

Instant messaging in proteins discovered

Proteins are essential for every living cell and responsible for many fundamental processes. They are required as biocatalysts in metabolism and for signalling inside and between cells. Many diseases are due to failures in this communication, and the origins of signalling in proteins have been a source of scientific debate. A team has observed the mobile protons that do this job in every living ce

23h

Google plans to invest 3 billion euros in Europe

Google's top boss said Friday the tech giant is planning to invest 3 billion euros to expand its data centers across Europe in the next two years.

23h

YouTube revamps channel verification process

Google is changing the way it verifies channels on YouTube to prioritize those that “have a clear need for proof of authenticity.”

23h

How to construct a protein factory

The complexity of molecular structures in the cell is amazing. Having achieved great success in elucidating these structures in recent years, biologists are now taking on the next challenge: to find out more about how they are constructed. A new research project now provides insight into a very unusual construction process in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

23h

Spacewatch: Japan's Hayabusa 2 targets final asteroid landing

Two target markers deployed around Ryugu ahead of lander’s planned descent next month Japan’s Hayabusa 2 spacecraft has deployed two target markers around asteroid Ryugu. The deployment took place at 5.17pm BST on 17 September from an altitude of 1km. In the minuscule gravity of the asteroid, the unpowered markers are still falling to its surface. They are expected to land sometime over the weeke

23h

Introducing 'mesh,' memory-saving plug-in to boost phone and computer performance

Applications like web browsers or smartphone apps often use a lot of memory. To address this, a research group co-led by Emery Berger, a professor of computer science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, has developed a system they call Mesh that can automatically reduce such memory demands. Berger presented this work today at Cppcon, the C++ conference in Aurora, Colorado.

23h

Smoking abstinence has little impact on the motivation for food

It's sometimes thought that smokers who can't light up are likely to reach for food in lieu of cigarettes. But new research from the University at Buffalo suggests that smoking abstinence doesn't greatly affect the motivation for food. The study, published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence, used cues and actual money to learn how much smokers might spend for cigarettes, food and water dur

23h

Youth To Protest In Manhattan To Stop Climate Change

Thousands of students are expected to skip school Friday to march through Manhattan to demand global action to stop climate change. WNYC's Gwynne Hogan reports the protest has been long in the works.

23h

The world is striking for climate action on Friday, and teens made it happen

Kids are changing the climate conversation—and now it's time for the rest of us to speak up. (Harrison Moore via Unsplash/) The air is crackling with energy and anticipation as we approach the global climate strike set for Friday, September 20. Millions around the world are expected to join the protest and demand immediate climate action. Climate activist Bill McKibbon tweeted on Tuesday that it

23h

Top-notch humidifiers for keeping your home fresh and comfortable

Great for when you have a cold. Also great for when you don't have a cold. (Amazon/) Humidifiers can make dry climes and winters less…parched. They add moisture back into the air, improving your skin, decreasing the risk of airborne illnesses and the spread of bacteria, and helping clear up allergies, sinus troubles, and coughs. Humidity-loving plants will benefit from one, as will your sleep s

23h

Feeling blue: US woman treated by doctors after blood turned navy

Woman, 25, diagnosed with methemoglobinemia Doctors say numbing agent for toothache to blame It turns out that “feeling blue” is not a figure of speech after all. A 25-year-old woman has given new meaning to the expression after she turned up at a Rhode Island hospital with blood that had turned navy blue. Continue reading…

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Proton Channel for Sensing Sour Taste Identified in Mice

Otopetrin-1 was previously only known for its role in the inner ear, but it turns out it also forms a pH-detecting pore in the tongue’s sour taste receptors.

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NASA analyzes rainfall rates in new Tropical Storm Tapah

Tropical Storm Tapah formed quickly in the northwestern Pacific Ocean and as it was strengthening from a depression to a tropical storm, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead from its orbit in space and measured rainfall rates throughout the storm.

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Electric tech could help reverse baldness

Few things on earth strike fear into the hearts of men more profoundly than hair loss. But reversing baldness could someday be as easy as wearing a hat, thanks to a noninvasive, low-cost hair-growth-stimulating technology developed by engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Axolotls: The Adorable, Giant Salamanders of Mexico

Axolotls are cute, charismatic salamanders that have an almost otherworldly ability to regenerate their body parts. But pollution and urbanization critically threaten this species' survival.

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Hurricane Nicole sheds light on how storms impact deep ocean

In early October 2016, a tropical storm named Nicole formed in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. It roamed for six days, reaching Category 4 hurricane status with powerful 140 mile-per hour-winds, before hitting the tiny island of Bermuda as a Category 3.

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Should You Keep Taking Zantac for Your Heartburn?

Versions of the drug have been found to contain low levels of a carcinogen. But it’s still on pharmacy shelves. Here’s what you need to know.

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These Technologists Are Trying to Recreate Psychedelic Trips in VR

Trippy Tech Once most closely associated with ’60s counterculture, hallucinogenic substances such as LSD and magic mushrooms are starting to make their way into mainstream science. Research centers are opening up across the globe , and seemingly countless studies have cropped up espousing the potential benefits of taking a psychedelic trip. Now, New Atlas has published a fascinating story about a

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Electric tech could help reverse baldness

Reversing baldness could someday be as easy as wearing a hat, thanks to a noninvasive, low-cost hair-growth-stimulating technology developed by engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Let there be light: Synthesizing organic compounds

The appeal of developing improved drugs to promote helpful reactions or prevent harmful ones has driven organic chemists to better understand how to synthetically create these molecules and reactions in the laboratory. A team has taken a step toward making this wish a reality with their latest study.

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What kind of researcher did sex offender Jeffrey Epstein like to fund? He told Science before he died

Felon said he liked “rebels” and “rarefied air” in 2017 interview

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Possible Carcinogen Found in a Common Heartburn Medication Is Present in Some Foods

Some forms of the drug ranitidine—including Zantac—have been shown to contain low levels of NDMA, which causes cancer in rats — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Possible Carcinogen Found in a Common Heartburn Medication Is Present in Some Foods

Some forms of the drug ranitidine—including Zantac—have been shown to contain low levels of NDMA, which causes cancer in rats — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Let there be light: Synthesizing organic compounds

The appeal of developing improved drugs to promote helpful reactions or prevent harmful ones has driven organic chemists to better understand how to synthetically create these molecules and reactions in the laboratory. A team has taken a step toward making this wish a reality with their latest study.

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No bones about it, this protein slows down fracture-healing

Broken bones are a bigger deal the older you are: healed bones of older people are weaker and more likely to re-fracture. Scientists found that a certain protein, which is more prevalent in older people, interferes with bone healing. They hope this discovery will lead to new treatments to help people heal after injuries or surgeries.

1d

Australia Is Running out of Drinking Water

Slow Drip Over a dozen towns and cities in eastern Australia are fast approaching Day Zero — the day that the last of the drinking water runs dry. As global climate change intensifies, Australia has been hit hard by an unprecedented wave of droughts and water shortages, according to Agence France-Presse . Some affected towns are already out of water, while authorities say the others only have a f

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Hurricane Nicole sheds light on how storms impact deep ocean

2016's Hurricane Nicole had a significant effect on the ocean's carbon cycle and deep sea ecosystems, reports a team from the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, and the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences.

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NASA analyzes rainfall rates in new Tropical Storm Tapah

Tropical Storm Tapah formed quickly in the northwestern Pacific Ocean and as it was strengthening from a depression to a tropical storm, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead from its orbit in space and measured rainfall rates throughout the storm.

1d

Generation Z Is Making Music With Anti-Radical Tones

Whereas millennial artists embrace experimentation and maximalism, Gen Z finds beauty inside of parameters.

1d

New model could explain mysterious cycle behind sunspots

A new model of plasma motion could explain the 11-year cycle behind sunspots and several other previously mysterious properties of the sun, researchers report. For 400 years people have tracked sunspots, the dark patches that appear for weeks at a time on the sun’s surface. They have observed but been unable to explain why the number of spots peaks every 11 years. “Our model is completely differe

1d

Psykiaterformand i nyt job

Formanden for Dansk Psykiatrisk Selskab Gitte Ahle har fået nyt job.

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