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nyheder2019september23

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Empathy (The Science Of, A Model For)

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6 tasks you can easily outsource online

Maybe don't hire this person, though—that planner shows they're still working on stuff from four years ago. (Avel Chuklanov via Unsplash/) There never seems to be enough hours in the day, and if that's a feeling you experience often, you've got two options: Somehow warp space and time to extend each day beyond 24 hours, or delegate out some of your most time-consuming and energy-draining tasks. W

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No end in sight: Mass exodus of Venezuelan refugees flood into neighboring countries

Millions of Venezuelan refugees are taxing their destination countries' infrastructures. About 4 million Venezuelans have already fled from their home country. Countries such as Peru and Ecuador are trying to stem the flow, while Colombia welcomes more in. Latin America is suffering one of the largest refugee crises in its history. Venezuela's outpouring of refugees is only second to that of Syri

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Ukraine-Run Pro-Trump Facebook Page Has Over 1.1 Million Followers

Ya Lyublyu Ameryku A gigantic pro-Trump Facebook page called “I Love America,” with 1.1 million fans, is being managed by a small group of people based in Ukraine, Popular Information reports . The pages represent a massive endeavor to manipulate Americans with false and misleading claims — and they’re a sign of how easy it is to do that at scale on social media. Troll Farm And that’s just the be

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Pathway found for treatment-resistant lung cancer

A big way chemotherapy works is by prompting cancer cells to commit suicide, and scientists have found a pathway the most common lung cancer walks to avoid death. Scientists have found a first step appears to be lung cancer cells expressing high levels of the molecule TIMP-1, classically considered a tumor inhibitor but at high levels already associated with a poor prognosis for patients.

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Microplastics in the Great Lakes: Becoming benthic

From the Great Pacific garbage patch to inland rivers, plastics are among the most widespread contaminants on Earth. Microplastics — particles of plastic smaller than five millimeters — are especially pervasive. As they build up in Earth's waters, microplastics are also becoming a permanent part of the planet's sedimentary layers.

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Earth, wind, flora sway Trinidad sulfur levels

Geologists get a glimpse into the power of wind, rain, coastal proximity and climate on coastal environments.

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Saw but forgot: Drivers' memory lapses puts motorcyclists at risk

There are an estimated 90 fatalities a year in the UK caused by drivers pulling out into the path of an oncoming motorcycle. New research by psychologists suggests this sort of crash may often be the result of a short-term memory failure rather than the driver not seeing an approaching motorcycle.

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Diving birds follow each other when fishing

Diving seabirds watch each other to work out when to dive, new research shows.

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Bee biodiversity barometer on Fiji

The biodiversity buzz is alive and well in Fiji, but climate change, noxious weeds and multiple human activities are making possible extinction a counter buzzword. Just as Australian researchers are finding colourful new bee species, some of them are already showing signs of exposure to environmental changes.

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Want your government to increase funding for research? Here is what you can do

Nature, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02889-7 Joe Luchsinger shares his advice on advocating for science investment.

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Today's obesity epidemic may have been caused by childhood sugar intake decades ago

Current obesity rates in adults in the United States could be the result of dietary changes that took place decades ago, according to a new study.

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Onion and garlic consumption may reduce breast cancer risk

In the first population-based study to examine the association between onion and garlic consumption and breast cancer in Puerto Rico, researchers found that women who ate sofrito more than once per day had a 67 percent decreased breast cancer risk.

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Cell-based therapies for arthritis and osteoporosis

A new report highlights the latest advances in cell-based therapies for the treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system, such as arthritis and osteoporosis, and it identifies key unanswered questions that should be addressed through ongoing research.

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Scientists track frog-killing fungus to help curb its spread

With the help of advanced genetic testing and hundreds of frog skin swabs, an international team of researchers has created the most complete map to date of when and where different genetic variants of the frog-killing Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis have infected frog populations around the world. The investigation also uncovered a whole new genetic lineage of the fungus, one that appears to have

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Context may explain why dads are happier and less stressed than moms

Dads are often happier, less stressed and less tired than moms when taking care of kids, and researchers say these differences may come down to how and when childcare activities are split between parents.

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Archaeologists Find Evidence for a Biblical Siege of Jerusalem

A model of ancient Jerusalem. (Credit: Dennis Jarvis/Flickr) (Inside Science) — In the 6th century B.C., the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar II, fearful that the Egyptians would cut off the Babylonian trade routes to the eastern Mediterranean region known as the Levant, invaded and laid siege to Jerusalem to block them. His army destroyed the temple the Hebrew king Solomon built there, and forced

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Earth, wind, flora sway Trinidad sulfur levels

UC geologists get a glimpse into the power of wind, rain, coastal proximity and climate on coastal environments.

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Up-close and personal with neuronal networks

Researchers have developed an electronic chip that can perform high-sensitivity intracellular recording from thousands of connected neurons simultaneously. This breakthrough allowed them to map synaptic connectivity at an unprecedented level, identifying hundreds of synaptic connections.

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Can You See Me Now? Injectable Night Vision Could Kill Need for Bulky Goggles

An aircrewman on an HH-60H Black Hawk helicopter scans the ground with night vision lenses during an air assault mission to search for insurgents and weapons caches in Taji, Iraq, July 3, 2006. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Michael Larson) (Released) In the future, night vision capability might be a superpower delivered via injection rather than something that requir

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Microplastics in the Great Lakes: Becoming benthic

From the Great Pacific garbage patch to inland rivers, plastics are among the most widespread contaminants on Earth. Microplastics — particles of plastic smaller than five millimeters — are especially pervasive. As they build up in Earth's waters, microplastics are also becoming a permanent part of the planet's sedimentary layers.

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Up-close and personal with neuronal networks

Researchers have developed an electronic chip that can perform high-sensitivity intracellular recording from thousands of connected neurons simultaneously. This breakthrough allowed them to map synaptic connectivity at an unprecedented level, identifying hundreds of synaptic connections.

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Deepfake Pioneer: “Perfectly Real” Fake Vids Are Six Months Away

Deepfake technology is advancing so rapidly, even Hao Li — one of the leading experts in the field — is having trouble keeping up. Li has watertight credentials. When he isn’t teaching classes as a professor of computer science at the University of Southern California, he’s the creator of some of the most convincing deepfakes out there. And he’s in a predictive mood. On Wednesday, he told attende

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An unlikely savior for California’s coastal ecosystems: orphaned sea otters

Surrogate otter moms at the Monterey Bay Aquarium raised the stranded pups

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NASA finds heavy rain potential in Tropical Storm Hikaa

The Northern Indian Ocean has generated a new tropical cyclone. NASA provided an infrared look a recently formed Tropical Storm Hikaa, moving through the Arabian Sea.

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Pregnant women with obesity may not require additional calories for healthy pregnancies

Guidelines for weight gain and caloric intake during pregnancy are not tailored to women with obesity, 2/3 of whom gain excessive weight during pregnancy that poses a risk to mother and child. Most et al.'s study of 54 pregnant women with obesity contradicts current guidelines, showing that increased caloric intake is not required to support a healthy pregnancy. Their report, published this week i

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‘Howdy, Modi!’ Was a Display of Indian Americans’ Political Power

HOUSTON, Texas—The morning twilight was still shifting to daylight as throngs of Indians and Indian Americans assembled in a giant parking lot in Sugar Land, Texas, yesterday. A line of 14 buses was waiting to charter them free of charge to Houston’s NRG Stadium, where they would soon catch sight of both Narendra Modi and Donald Trump at “Howdy, Modi!,” the Indian prime minister’s latest address

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This U.S. lawmaker wants greater scrutiny of algorithms used in criminal trials

Representative Mark Takano (D–CA) explains why Congress needs to open up “black boxes”

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NASA finds heavy rain potential in Tropical Storm Hikaa

The Northern Indian Ocean has generated a new tropical cyclone. NASA provided an infrared look a recently formed Tropical Storm Hikaa, moving through the Arabian Sea.

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California, China to team up on climate research institute

As tensions between China and the United States ratchet up, former California Gov. Jerry Brown sees a way to bring together the world's largest carbon emitter and a U.S. state that's leading the way in energy standards: climate change.

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Climate experts say they hear talk at UN but not much action

Leader after leader told the United Nations on Monday that they will do more to prevent a warming world from reaching even more dangerous levels. But as they made their pledges at the Climate Action Summit, they and others conceded it was not enough.

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Today's obesity epidemic may have been caused by childhood sugar intake decades ago

Current obesity rates in adults in the United States could be the result of dietary changes that took place decades ago, according to a new study published by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

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Context may explain why dads are happier and less stressed than moms

Dads are often happier, less stressed and less tired than moms when taking care of kids, and researchers say these differences may come down to how and when childcare activities are split between parents.

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Kid Chess Champions Share Their Secrets

The benefits of teaching chess to children are manifold. Studies suggest that the cognitive-boosting board game, which has endured around the world for more than 15 centuries, improves a child’s visual memory, attention span, spatial-reasoning ability, critical thinking, mental discipline, creativity, math skills, and logical reasoning. One study found that children who played chess scored an ave

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Software Company Chef Won’t Renew ICE Contact After All

CEO Barry Crist last week defended a contract with US Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Now he says he's changed his mind.

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2019 Arctic sea ice minimum tied for second lowest on record

The extent of Arctic sea ice at the end of this summer was effectively tied with 2007 and 2016 for second lowest since modern record keeping began in the late 1970s. An analysis of satellite data by NASA and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder shows that the 2019 minimum extent, which was likely reached on Sept. 18, measured 1.60 million square miles

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Did mosasaurs do the breast stroke?

Mosasaurs were true sea monsters of late Cretaceous seas. These marine lizards—related to modern snakes and monitor lizards—grew as long as fifty feet, flashed two rows of sharp teeth, and shredded their victims with enormous, powerful jaws.

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New report deepens understanding of wind-wildlife interactions

The Ecological Society of America (ESA) announces the publication of a new report, "Impacts to Wildlife of Wind Energy Siting and Operation in the United States," in ESA's Issues in Ecology publication.

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Machu Picchu: Ancient Incan sanctuary intentionally built on faults

The ancient Incan sanctuary of Machu Picchu is considered one of humanity's greatest architectural achievements. Built in a remote Andean setting atop a narrow ridge high above a precipitous river canyon, the site is renowned for its perfect integration with the spectacular landscape. But the sanctuary's location has long puzzled scientists: Why did the Incas build their masterpiece in such an ina

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New report deepens understanding of wind-wildlife interactions

The Ecological Society of America (ESA) announces the publication of a new report, "Impacts to Wildlife of Wind Energy Siting and Operation in the United States," in ESA's Issues in Ecology publication.

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Researcher urges use of microbes for space colonization

With the recent celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo program's first landing of humans on the moon, the eyes and hopes of the world turn skyward again.

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How to cope under pressure, according to psychology

You're preparing for an important meeting, and the pressure's on. If it's bad now, how will you cope when you actually have to perform? Will you fly? Or will you sink? Psychologists have a lot to say about how to cope under pressure… both the chronic kind, which might involve ongoing high expectations at work, for example; and the acute, single-event variety such as a vital meeting, a make-or-bre

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Can 'math trauma' hurt people's finances?

As much as 17 percent of the American population may suffer from math trauma. Math trauma prevents people from engaging in financial activities and may harm their career prospects. Experts agree that developing growth mindsets in students is critical to prevent further harm. None No subject terrorizes more students than math. A major reason for this is how we teach it. There's the intense memoriz

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Researcher urges use of microbes for space colonization

With the recent celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo program's first landing of humans on the moon, the eyes and hopes of the world turn skyward again.

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Antibody testing reveals dogs can suffer from same autoimmune encephalitis as humans

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that dogs can suffer from the same type of autoimmune encephalitis that people do. The finding could lead to better screening methods for diagnosis and possibly more effective treatments for canine encephalitis.

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Tiny, biocompatible laser could function inside living tissues

Researchers have developed a tiny nanolaser that can function inside of living tissues without harming them.

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Antibody testing reveals dogs can suffer from same autoimmune encephalitis as humans

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that dogs can suffer from the same type of autoimmune encephalitis that people do. The finding could lead to better screening methods for diagnosis and possibly more effective treatments for canine encephalitis.

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NASA satellite data shows Tapah becoming extra-tropical

Tropical Storm Tapah had taken on an elongated shape as it moved through the Sea of Japan, between South Korea and Japan. When the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over Tapah, it measured rainfall as the storm was becoming extra-tropical.

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NASA catches Tropical Storm Lorena's landfall approach

As Tropical Storm Lorena was nearing landfall in northwestern Mexico, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with an image of the storm. By Monday, Sept. 23, Lorena's remnants were affecting the southern U.S. and bringing heavy rainfall to Arizona.

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NASA satellite identified a less-organized Caribbean Tropical Storm Karen

Satellite imagery can be used to peer inside a storm as well as assess the storm's outside shape to give forecasters understanding of what's happening to it. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of a less-organized Karen after it moved into the Caribbean Sea and encountered wind shear.

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NASA satellite imagery shows wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Jerry

Forecasters use a variety of satellite imagery to understand what's happening in a storm, and sometimes just a visible picture can tell a lot. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the storm that showed wind shear was pushing clouds away from the storm's center.

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NASA-NOAA satellite sees a tight circulation in Tropical Storm Kiko

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite imagery revealed that Tropical Storm Kiko had a tight circulation center.

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Heavy rainfall found in Tropical Storm Lorenzo by NASA

NASA calculated the rainfall rates in the Atlantic Ocean's newest tropical cyclone, Lorenzo.

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Lopsided microcapsules release cargo at lower osmotic pressures required for drug delivery

Cracking an egg to release its yolk requires applying external force (like being smacked against the edge of a bowl) to overcome the strength of the eggshell. Similarly, delivering microcapsule-contained therapeutic biomolecules into the human body requires that their containers be broken after they are injected, so that the cargo can be delivered in the right place at the right time. A number of

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Why Greta Makes Adults Uncomfortable

In a very short time, Greta Thunberg—with her searing stare, Pippi Longstocking braids, and hand-painted sign reading SKOLSTREJK FOR KLIMATET — has become a global icon. A year ago, the 16-year-old Swedish climate activist began striking from school each Friday to protest climate inaction; last Friday, she gave a speech to hundreds of thousands of people in New York, at the Global Climate Strike,

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NASA-NOAA satellite sees a tight circulation in Tropical Storm Kiko

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite imagery revealed that Tropical Storm Kiko had a tight circulation center.

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Obesity alert for October 2019

All print, broadcast and online journalists who receive the Obesity embargo alert agree to abide by the embargo and may not publish, post, broadcast or distribute embargoed news releases or details of the embargoed studies before the embargo date and time.When writing about these studies, journalists are asked to attribute the source as the journal Obesity and to include the online link to the Obe

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Researchers create first three-photon color-entangled W state

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have constructed a quantum-mechanical state in which the colors of three photons are entangled with each other. The state is a special combination, called a W state, that retains some entanglement even if one of the three photons is lost, which makes it useful for quantum communication. Such entangled states also enable novel quantum ap

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How Anti-Vaccine Sentiment Took Hold in the United States

As families face back-to-school medical requirements this month, the country feels the impact of a vaccine resistance movement decades in the making.

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Focus on one sport boosts injury risk for kids

Kids who specialize in one sport may have a higher risk of injury, a new study suggests. The findings, which draw from a multi-year, ongoing study of 10,138 older children and teens living throughout the United States, show that volume of vigorous activity strongly predicts injury for both boys and girls. In other words, those who engage in the most hours of intense activity per week are the most

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Heavy rainfall found in Tropical Storm Lorenzo by NASA

NASA calculated the rainfall rates in the Atlantic Ocean's newest tropical cyclone, Lorenzo.

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Task force provides insights and direction on cell-based therapies

A new report published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research and concurrently in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research highlights the latest advances in cell-based therapies for the treatment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system, such as arthritis and osteoporosis, and it identifies key unanswered questions that should be addressed through ongoing research.

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Spanish researchers find a new promising therapeutic target for glioblastoma

Glioblastoma is the most frequent and aggressive brain cancer due to its ability to escape the immune system. However, the way in which this tumor manages to induce this immune tolerance was not known in detail. A research published in PNAS carried out at the Instituto de Neurociencias UMH-CSIC, in Alicante (Spain), and the IMIB-Arrixaca in Murcia (Spain), has find out in detail how this tumor inv

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Uncovering hidden intelligence of collectives

Research team including scientists from Konstanz discovers that information processing in animal groups occurs not only in the brains of animals but also in their social network.

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Scientists track frog-killing fungus to help curb its spread

With the help of advanced genetic testing and hundreds of frog skin swabs, an international team of researchers has created the most complete map to date of when and where different genetic variants of the frog-killing Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis have infected frog populations around the world. The investigation also uncovered a whole new genetic lineage of the fungus, one that appears to have

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How molecular footballs burst in an x-ray laser beam

An international research team has observed in real time how football molecules made of carbon atoms burst in the beam of an X-ray laser. The study shows the temporal course of the bursting process, which takes less than a trillionth of a second, and is important for the analysis of sensitive proteins and other biomolecules, which are also frequently studied using bright X-ray laser flashes.

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Serious Discussion About the Viability of Gateway Foundation's Von Braun Station

So, The Gateway Foundation has put out a press release about their proposed massive rotating space station concept. They claim that it will be ready by 2025 . Those in the space industry are incredibly skeptical about this, yet this seems to be getting a lot of traction in the media. Other companies have or are proposing solutions that are at least within the scope of actual capabilities, such as

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Can seaweed help curb global warming? | Tim Flannery

It's time for planetary-scale interventions to combat climate change — and environmentalist Tim Flannery thinks seaweed can help. In a bold talk, he shares the epic carbon-capturing potential of seaweed, explaining how oceangoing seaweed farms created on a massive scale could trap all the carbon we emit into the atmosphere. Learn more about this potentially planet-saving solution — and the work

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A Simple Regimen Can Prevent TB. Why Aren’t More People on It?

Two antibiotics, taken for a month, can stop a leading killer. But “when it’s for TB, people just sort of shrug.”

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Against Washington’s ‘Great Power’ Obsession

Shortly after signing the Declaration of Independence, Benjamin Franklin, a Founder of the republic and America’s first diplomat, famously told his fellow revolutionaries: “We must, indeed, all hang together or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately.” This week, leaders and diplomats, activists and CEOs from around the world will gather in New York for the annual UN General Assembly. From

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The ‘Forest Guardians’ of Brazil’s Amazon

In the Amazon rainforest, on Araribóia indigenous land in Brazil’s Maranhão state, groups of Guajajara tribesmen patrol their remote tribal land, seeking to protect it from illegal logging in places with little police presence. They call themselves the “forest guardians,” and some recently took Ueslei Marcelino, a photographer with Reuters, along on patrol. Marcelino was with a group of six men w

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Curiosity Stream Is an Amazing Streaming Service Made Specifically for Science Lovers

As you probably already know, we’re in the midst of a massive avalanche of new streaming services , including high-profile ones from Apple and Disney, all vying for not just your entertainment dollar but your precious time as well. And if you’re tired of megadosing your brain on endless hours of serialized dramas and old sitcoms, it’s possible you have a taste for the kind of educational entertai

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Scientists track frog-killing fungus to help curb its spread

From habitat loss to climate change, amphibians around the world face immense threats to their survival. One emerging and sinister threat is the chytrid fungus, a mysterious pathogen that kills amphibians by disrupting the delicate moisture balance maintained by their skin, and that is decimating frog populations around the world.

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Scientists track frog-killing fungus to help curb its spread

From habitat loss to climate change, amphibians around the world face immense threats to their survival. One emerging and sinister threat is the chytrid fungus, a mysterious pathogen that kills amphibians by disrupting the delicate moisture balance maintained by their skin, and that is decimating frog populations around the world.

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Researchers recreate living 3D displays

A research team is developing a smart skin inspired by the cephalopod which can be used in 3D displays, as interfaces for the visually impaired, and to help reduce drag on marine vehicles.

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New report deepens understanding of wind-wildlife interactions

An increase in the generation of wind energy is a key component of the U.S. strategy to reduce carbon emissions from the power sector. Approximately 97 gigawatts of wind energy production capacity are currently installed in the U.S., and in 2018, wind energy supplied about 6.5% of the nation's electricity. Scenarios developed by various groups, including U.S. Department of Energy, indicate that a

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Machu Picchu: Ancient Incan sanctuary intentionally built on faults

The ancient Incan sanctuary of Machu Picchu is considered one of humanity's greatest architectural achievements. Built in a remote Andean setting atop a narrow ridge high above a precipitous river canyon, the site is renowned for its perfect integration with the spectacular landscape. But the sanctuary's location has long puzzled scientists: Why did the Incas build their masterpiece in such an ina

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Did mosasaurs do the breast stroke?

Mosasaurs were true sea monsters of late Cretaceous seas. These marine lizards — related to modern snakes and monitor lizards — grew as long as fifty feet, flashed two rows of sharp teeth, and shredded their victims with enormous, powerful jaws.

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Nonverbal signals can create bias against larger groups

If children are exposed to bias against one person, will they develop a bias against that person's entire group? The answer is yes, according to new research.

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Tiny, biocompatible nanolaser could function inside living tissues

Researchers have developed a tiny nanolaser that can function inside of living tissues without harming them.

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New report deepens understanding of wind-wildlife interactions

An increase in the generation of wind energy is a key component of the U.S. strategy to reduce carbon emissions from the power sector. Approximately 97 gigawatts of wind energy production capacity are currently installed in the U.S., and in 2018, wind energy supplied about 6.5% of the nation's electricity. Scenarios developed by various groups, including U.S. Department of Energy, indicate that a

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Tiny, biocompatible nanolaser could function inside living tissues

Researchers have developed a tiny nanolaser that can function inside of living tissues without harming them.

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Study finds onion and garlic consumption may reduce breast cancer risk

In the first population-based study to examine the association between onion and garlic consumption and breast cancer in Puerto Rico, UB and University of Puerto Rico researchers found that women who ate sofrito more than once per day had a 67% decreased breast cancer risk.

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NASA satellite identified a less-organized Caribbean Tropical Storm Karen

Satellite imagery can be used to peer inside a storm as well as assess the storm's outside shape to give forecasters understanding of what's happening to it. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of a less-organized Karen after it moved into the Caribbean Sea and encountered wind shear.

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Up-close and personal with neuronal networks

Researchers from Harvard University have developed an electronic chip that can perform high-sensitivity intracellular recording from thousands of connected neurons simultaneously. This breakthrough allowed them to map synaptic connectivity at an unprecedented level, identifying hundreds of synaptic connections.

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Antonio Brown Has Only Himself to Blame

Hours before week three of the NFL season got under way, the recently unemployed wide receiver Antonio Brown took to Twitter, unloading a series of self-destructive tweets that may finally dissuade teams from taking him on. The demise of Brown’s career has been stunningly swift. Here’s a brief synopsis of his past two weeks: He’s been accused of rape and sexual misconduct by two women. He’s been

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Fat-shaming only makes the obesity epidemic worse

Feeling ashamed of your weight doesn't make you healthier. (Unsplash/) Roughly 70 percent of American adults are considered overweight or obese by BMI standards , yet a 2016 Gallup poll found only 37 percent actually realize it. Stats like these have inspired many pundits and armchair physicians (and more than a few actual physicians) to suggest we should, as a society, make fat people more aware

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Visible climate change action can spur friends to act

Taking visible action against climate change may make our friends and neighbors more likely to take similar steps, according to new research. “Despite the global dimension of climate change, we found local social norms effective in battling it, much like they promote specific behaviors among those ‘keeping up with the Joneses’—or now, the Kardashians,” says lead investigator Stefano Carattini, an

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*Untitled Goose Game*—From a Goose’s Point of View

Being a goose isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. But when these lists magically appear under one of my wings, I revert to a simpler time—it feels like being a gosling again.

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Electrostimulation Study Gets Alzheimer's Patients to Recall Vivid Memories

Participants in a recent trial experienced old memories, vividly. Halfpoint/Shutterstock.com Alzheimer’s disease is one of the most dreaded diagnoses, and the fear is particularly acute among older people. This complex brain disorder, which usually affects older individuals, can cause many cognitive disabilities, most notably memory impairment. About 5.7 million Americans are living with Alzheimer

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Why Do Women Get Alzheimer's More Than Men?

MRI scans of patients show patients with Alzheimer's disease. (Credit: Atthapon Raksthaput/Shutterstock) Scientists are still unraveling why Alzheimer’s disease affects men and women disproportionately. Out of the 5 million Americans who have it, about 64 percent are women. Once in their 60s, women are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s than breast cancer, and more than twice as likely to deve

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How fungal biofilm structure impacts lung disease

Findings from an innovative new study reveal that the way in which human fungal pathogens form colonies can significantly impact their ability to cause disease. Understanding how these colonies form could lead to new therapies that target these infections in critically ill patients.

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Mummy study: Heart disease was bigger issue for human ancestors than initially thought

A new imaging study of the mummified arteries of people who lived thousands of years ago revealed that their arteries were more clogged than originally thought, according to a proof-of-concept study.

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Antibody testing reveals dogs can suffer from same autoimmune encephalitis as humans

Researchers have found that dogs can suffer from the same type of autoimmune encephalitis that people do. The finding could lead to better screening methods for diagnosis and possibly more effective treatments for canine encephalitis.

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When it comes to robots, reliability may matter more than reasoning

What does it take for a human to trust a robot? That is what researchers are uncovering in a new study into how humans and robots work together. Research into human-agent teaming, or HAT, has examined how the transparency of agents — such as robots, unmanned vehicles or software agents — influences human trust, task performance, workload and perceptions of the agent.

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'Brilliant exposé' of gender data gap wins Royal Society science book prize

Invisible Women by Caroline Criado Perez, which reveals bias towards men in measures of human life, hailed as vital work The deadly truth about a world built for men – from stab vests to car crashes Caroline Criado Perez’s exposé of the gender data gap that has created a world biased against women has won her the Royal Society science book prize. Criado Perez’s Invisible Women, which explores how

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Coffee grounds offer greener way to dye fabric brown

Researchers have found a natural way to add color to clothing with coffee grounds. The textile industry uses more than 2 million tons of chemicals and synthetic dyes annually, which is why researchers are interested in finding sustainable alternatives. Changhyun “Lyon” Nam of Iowa State University, says his coffee habit inspired him to experiment with the grounds. He started by brewing a pot at h

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Corals need a lot of help from their friends

Research reveals how reefs depend on microscopic life forms. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Trust in science wavers because of messaging, not method

Finding ways to signal reliability is a crucial challenge, researchers say. Barry Keily reports.

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Your cat could just be playing hard to get

Research shows they bond more with humans than we thought. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Clean energy technology is drawing inspiration from nature

By observing how plants, animals and even mud behave, renewable energy innovators are uncovering new ideas. Shweta Narayan reports.

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Don’t axe forests – make them edible

Jagannath Adhikari from The University of New South Wales explains how a traditional Himalayan practice offers food security without land clearing.

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Mars up close and personal

Spacecraft images reveal rock formations created over millions of years.

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2018 Health of Houston Survey sheds light on residents

A snapshot of health conditions revealing the disparities across 38 neighborhood areas in Harris County has been published in the 2018 Health of Houston Survey by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health.

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Researchers recreate living 3D displays

A research team from the University of Iowa and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is developing a smart skin inspired by the cephalopod which can be used in 3D displays, as interfaces for the visually impaired, and to help reduce drag on marine vehicles.

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NASA satellite imagery shows wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Jerry

Forecasters use a variety of satellite imagery to understand what's happening in a storm, and sometimes just a visible picture can tell a lot. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the storm that showed wind shear was pushing clouds away from the storm's center.

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Hypertension during pregnancy can increase later risk of heart disease

Research published today in the journal Circulation has found that women with high blood pressure in pregnancy, including conditions such as preeclampsia, have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disorders later in life, including stroke and heart failure.

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Study identifies cardiovascular toxicities associated with ibrutinib

After a recent study showed that chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients who received ibrutinib as a frontline treatment had a 7% death rate, a new study offers a clearer picture on the reasons for the deaths.

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Saw but forgot — drivers' memory lapses puts motorcyclists at risk

There are an estimated 90 fatalities a year in the UK caused by drivers pulling out into the path of an oncoming motorcycle.New research by psychologists at the University of Nottingham suggests this sort of crash may often be the result of a short-term memory failure rather than the driver not seeing an approaching motorcycle.

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Diving birds follow each other when fishing

Diving seabirds watch each other to work out when to dive, new research shows.

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Children exposed to secondhand smoke at higher risk for atrial fibrillation

Children of parents who smoke had a significantly increased chance of developing atrial fibrillation later in life, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The findings highlight a new association between secondhand smoke exposure and heart rhythm disorder risk.

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NASA to build telescope for detecting asteroids that threaten Earth

Plan for infrared sensor comes after a close call this summer

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Doctors Without Borders Calls For More Transparency In Distribution Of Ebola Vaccine

The international humanitarian group says the World Health Organization is restricting access to the vaccine in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the current outbreak has killed more than 2,100. (Image credit: Jerome Delay/AP)

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Dogs can get the same autoimmune encephalitis we do

Dogs can suffer from the same type of autoimmune encephalitis that people do, according to new research. The finding could lead to better screening methods for diagnosis and possibly more effective treatments for canine encephalitis. Autoimmune encephalitis—an immune system reaction against the brain—is common in dogs, with smaller breeds and young adult dogs being most susceptible. The disease i

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Researchers create first three-photon color-entangled W state

Researchers have constructed a quantum-mechanical state in which the colors of three photons are entangled with each other. The state is a special combination, called a W state, that retains some entanglement even if one of the three photons is lost, which makes it useful for quantum communication. Such entangled states also enable novel quantum applications and tests of fundamental physics.

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Flaws in leading security lie detection training tool

The Micro-Expressions Training Tool, inspired the hit TV show Lie to Me, is being used to train airport personnel to spot people who pose potential security risks.

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Probes shed new light on Alzheimer's cause

Researchers have found a way to track the formation of soluble amyloid beta peptide aggregates in lab samples. The aggregates are implicated in the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

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Cracking the ethylene code

Separating pure ethylene from ethane is a difficult and costly process, but one that new research is poised to streamline. The technique would avoid liquefaction and distillation by designing a material that only binds ethylene molecules, thus separating them from ethane.

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'Valley states' in this 2D material could potentially be used for quantum computing

New research on 2-dimensional tungsten disulfide (WS2) could open the door to advances in quantum computing. Scientists report that they can manipulate the electronic properties of this super-thin material in ways that could be useful for encoding quantum data.

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'Push-pull' dynamic in brain network is key to stopping seizures

Researchers have discovered that the spreading of seizures through the brain can be suppressed depending on the amount of pressure within the brain, an important discovery that may revolutionize the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy.

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No clear link between local food and cancer risk in glassworks areas

There is no clear link between cancer incidence and locally produced food from an area with a history of glass manufacture with contaminated soil, according to a new study. A high consumption of certain local foods seems to be linked to an increased risk of certain cancers, but this probably reflects that the exposure to contaminants was higher in the past.

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New augmented reality head mounted display offers unrivaled viewing experience

Engineers have developed a new augmented reality (AR) head-mounted display (HMD) that delivers a realistic 3D viewing experience, without the commonly associated side effects of nausea or eyestrain.

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Scientists enlist tiny biomagnets for faster drug discovery

A new platform brings together CRISPR genome editing with magnetic cell sorting to reveal new drug targets for cancer and regenerative medicine.

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NASA satellite data shows Tapah becoming extra-tropical

Tropical Storm Tapah had taken on an elongated shape as it moved through the Sea of Japan, between South Korea and Japan. When the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over Tapah, it measured rainfall as the storm was becoming extra-tropical.

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AGA releases guideline on the evaluation of chronic diarrhea

Diagnosing patients with chronic watery diarrhea can be difficult for health care providers, since several causes with specific therapies, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), microscopic colitis and chronic infection, need to be ruled out. A new clinical guideline1 from the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the AGA Institute

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Did Mosasaurs Do The Breast Stroke?

Mosasaurs were true sea monsters of late Cretaceous seas. These marine lizards — related to modern snakes and monitor lizards — grew as long as fifty feet, flashed two rows of sharp teeth, and shredded their victims with enormous, powerful jaws.

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Diving birds follow each other when fishing

Diving seabirds watch each other to work out when to dive, new research shows.

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Diving birds follow each other when fishing

Diving seabirds watch each other to work out when to dive, new research shows.

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Google says won't pay media firms to display content

Google will not pay French news companies to show excerpts of their articles, pictures or videos in search results, a top executive said Wednesday, though it will not display the excerpts without …

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Hyundai Motor Group, Aptiv to set up $4 billion self-driving car venture

Hyundai Motor Group will invest $1.6 billion in a joint venture to develop self-driving vehicle technologies with Aptiv , the biggest overseas investment by the South Korean carmaker to catch …

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Louis Vuitton is now designing outfits for League of Legends characters

One of the world's most popular video games gets the luxury brand treatment.

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Moral distress and moral strength among clinicians in health care systems

Nurse burnout impacts both nurses and patients, and significantly influences the retention of nurses in the healthcare setting, research shows. But could burnout be a symptom of something larger?

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Thinner shells for delivering gentler therapeutic bursts

Releasing drugs that are packaged into microcapsules requires a significant amount of force, and the resulting burst can cause damage to human tissues or cause blood clots. A new technique creates lopsided microcapsule 'shells' that can burst and release their cargo at much lower pressure, making them safer for use in the body.

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Thinner shells for delivering gentler therapeutic bursts

Releasing drugs that are packaged into microcapsules requires a significant amount of force, and the resulting burst can cause damage to human tissues or cause blood clots. A new technique creates lopsided microcapsule 'shells' that can burst and release their cargo at much lower pressure, making them safer for use in the body.

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Amazon's *Fleabag* and Many Others Won the Emmys They Deserved

Sadly the biggest loser of the night was the Emmys telecast itself.

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Machu Picchu: Ancient Incan sanctuary intentionally built on faults

The ancient Incan sanctuary of Machu Picchu is considered one of humanity's greatest architectural achievements. Built in a remote Andean setting atop a narrow ridge high above a precipitous river canyon, the site is renowned for its perfect integration with the spectacular landscape. But the sanctuary's location has long puzzled scientists: Why did the Incas build their masterpiece in such an ina

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2019 Arctic sea ice minimum tied for second lowest on record

The extent of Arctic sea ice at the end of this summer was effectively tied with 2007 and 2016 for second lowest since modern record keeping began in the late 1970s. An analysis of satellite data by NASA and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder shows that the 2019 minimum extent, which was likely reached on Sept. 18, measured 1.60 million square miles

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NASA catches Tropical Storm Lorena's landfall approach

As Tropical Storm Lorena was nearing landfall in northwestern Mexico, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with an image of the storm. By Monday, Sept. 23, Lorena's remnants were affecting the southern U.S. and bringing heavy rainfall to Arizona.

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Mummy study: Heart disease was bigger issue for human ancestors than initially thought

A new imaging study of the mummified arteries of people who lived thousands of years ago revealed that their arteries were more clogged than originally thought, according to a proof-of-concept study led by a researcher with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). It is in the October print edition of the American Heart Journal.

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Tiny, biocompatible laser could function inside living tissues

Researchers have developed a tiny nanolaser that can function inside of living tissues without harming them.

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Nonverbal signals can create bias against larger groups

If children are exposed to bias against one person, will they develop a bias against that person's entire group? The answer is yes, according to new research from University of Georgia social psychologist Allison Skinner.

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New report deepens understanding of wind-wildlife interactions

The Ecological Society of America (ESA) announces the publication of a new report, 'Impacts to Wildlife of Wind Energy Siting and Operation in the United States,' in ESA's Issues in Ecology publication.

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Dartmouth study reveals how fungal biofilm structure impacts lung disease

Findings from an innovative new study led by researchers at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and published this week in Nature Microbiology reveal that the way in which human fungal pathogens form colonies can significantly impact their ability to cause disease. Understanding how these colonies form could lead to new therapies that target these infections in critically ill patients.

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How College Changes the Parent-Child Relationship

College is a formative time, not only for students’ minds but for their life skills as well. For the hundreds of thousands of undergrads in the United States who enroll as teens, college may mark the first time they have to manage their own schedules and master a laundry routine. College is also a formative time for students’ relationship with their parents. Many undergrads, especially those who

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‘Hormone diets’ might work—but not for the reason you think

There’s currently no peer-reviewed research published in any major scientific journals backing up the hormone diet’s claims. (Shutterstock/Gts/) When it comes to losing weight and getting healthy, there never seems to be a shortage of diet and fitness crazes claiming to hold the secret to easy, sustainable weight loss. Some of the most recent popular diet crazes include the ketogenic diet (low ca

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Mentoring and networks are crucial for student mental health | Letters

It is very important to emphasise the importance of prevention, writes former mentor Constantine Louis. And get rid of freshers’ week, writes Jackie Sherman You rightly bring to your readers’ attention the suffering of students with mental health problems ( Report , 16 September). It is outrageous that students have to wait between two and three months for help – and tragically, in some cases, it

6d

Amazon Workers Win Climate Dispute, But It Is "Not Enough"

The global retailer has pledged to reduce its emissions and fund reforestation efforts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6d

Scientists Are Testing a Herpes Vaccine on Humans

Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania think they’ve finally developed a vaccine that could prevent you from catching genital herpes. The team will begin clinical trials on human participants after promising tests on lab mice and guinea pigs, according to New Scientist . While pharmaceuticals that cure disease in animals often fail to do the same for humans, a vaccine for genital herpes would

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Aid group says Ebola vaccine is not reaching enough people

Nature, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02879-9 Médecins Sans Frontiéres is criticizing the World Health Organization’s vaccination strategy in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

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Climate Protesters Snarl Traffic but Washington Still Goes to Work

A coalition of climate protesters tried to shut down the streets of Washington.

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Nova Southeastern University Researcher urges use of microbes for space colonization

Before we go colonizing other planets, NSU researcher says we should drop in some microbes first — they are essential for human survival.

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Antibody testing reveals dogs can suffer from same autoimmune encephalitis as humans

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that dogs can suffer from the same type of autoimmune encephalitis that people do. The finding could lead to better screening methods for diagnosis and possibly more effective treatments for canine encephalitis.

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When it comes to robots, reliability may matter more than reasoning

What does it take for a human to trust a robot? That is what Army researchers are uncovering in a new study into how humans and robots work together. Research into human-agent teaming, or HAT, has examined how the transparency of agents–such as robots, unmanned vehicles or software agents–influences human trust, task performance, workload and perceptions of the agent.

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Study casts doubt on effectiveness of named GP scheme

An NHS scheme to give every patient aged 75 and over in England a named GP responsible for their care has failed to deliver hoped-for improvements, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol's Centre for Academic Primary Care.

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How the brain repurposes unused regions

In adults that are born blind, the 'visual' cortex is activated in a similar way during a listening task, according to new research in JNeurosci. The results answer questions about how development can override anatomy to influence brain function.

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After federal break, Apple will keep Mac Pro made in the USA – CNET

Apple’s powerful, premium computer will still be manufactured in the US.

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Disney Plus: Launch dates, prices, preorders, movies and shows to expect – CNET

Disney's $7 rival to Netflix will stream its big-budget movies and exclusive original shows from Marvel, Star Wars, Pixar and its own studios.

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No Plan B: The Climate-Conscious Voter

As temperatures rise, voters are making the climate a central issue in this presidential campaign.

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Get 5 Issues of 'All About Space' or 'How It Works' for $5 in Our Fall 2019 Sale!

With the autumnal equinox of 2019, the fall season has officially landed in the Northern Hemisphere, and with it comes an amazing deal from Live Science's partner magazines "All About Space" and "How It Works."

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Daily briefing: Why 300 scientists are going adrift in the Arctic

Nature, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02883-z They’re going wherever the ice takes them. Plus: highly impractical advice from XKCD’s Randall Munroe and a quiz to test your green-lab credentials.

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What would Jesus do? Quite possibly, recycle

Fundamentalist Christians tap into their willingness to sacrifice to conserve water and energy, shop environmentally and protect the Earth, according to a Michigan State University (MSU) study.

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Illinois researchers create first three-photon color-entangled W state

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have constructed a quantum-mechanical state in which the colors of three photons are entangled with each other. The state is a special combination, called a W state, that retains some entanglement even if one of the three photons is lost, which makes it useful for quantum communication. Such entangled states also enable novel quantum ap

6d

Thinner shells for delivering gentler therapeutic bursts

Releasing drugs that are packaged into microcapsules requires a significant amount of force, and the resulting burst can cause damage to human tissues or cause blood clots. A new technique creates lopsided microcapsule 'shells' that can burst and release their cargo at much lower pressure, making them safer for use in the body.

6d

Moral distress and moral strength among clinicians in health care systems

Nurse burnout impacts both nurses and patients, and significantly influences the retention of nurses in the healthcare setting, research shows. But could burnout be a symptom of something larger?

6d

Federal Agency Proposes Rule Against Graduate Student Unions

The National Labor Relations Board has gone back-and-forth on whether graduate students at private universities can form unions three times in the past 19 years.

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12 Bizarre Medieval Trends

From pigs on trial to hairless faces, discover what went viral in the Middle Ages.

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Newfound Cosmic 'Gateway' Funnels Small, Icy Objects to the Inner Solar System

Beginning as small, icy bodies on the outskirts of the solar system, comets turn into spectacular streaks of light when they pass through a "gateway" near Jupiter.

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US Military Threatened to Bomb “Millennials” Storming Area 51

Joke Bombed On Friday, approximately 75 alien-enthusiasts gathered in the Nevada desert for Storm Area 51, a jokey Facebook event that went viral back in June. But just before those folks met up for what ended up being a far smaller event than expected, a public relations unit within the U.S. military took to Twitter to share a “joke” of its own — threatening to kill attendees with a stealth bomb

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Severe brain tumors ‘plug into’ healthy neurons to grow

Severe brain tumors called high-grade gliomas integrate into the brain’s wiring, according to new research. The tumors form synapses that hijack electrical signals from healthy nerve cells to drive their own growth. Experiments demonstrated that interrupting these signals with an existing anti-epilepsy drug greatly reduced the cancers’ growth in human tumors in mice, providing the first evidence

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Older adults with COPD more likely to use synthetic cannabinoids, study finds

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease that's often associated with a variety of health problems, including chronic muscle pain and insomnia. Psychoactive drug classes, like cannabinoids, are often prescribed to help reduce pain, promote sleep and decrease breathlessness. A study published today in Drugs & Aging found that older adults with COPD were twice as li

6d

What would Jesus do? Quite possibly, recycle

A team of social scientists and sustainability scientists worked to peel off the layers of understanding about how Christianity and environmentalism mix.

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No clear link between local food and cancer risk in glassworks areas

There is no clear link between cancer incidence and locally produced food from an area with a history of glass manufacture with contaminated soil, according to a new study from, among others, Linköping University in Sweden. A high consumption of certain local foods seems to be linked to an increased risk of certain cancers, but this probably reflects that the exposure to contaminants was higher in

6d

Why Today Is the 1st Day of Autumn in Earth's Northern Hemisphere

This morning (Sept. 23) at 3:49 a.m. EDT (0749 GMT) marked the official celestial beginning of autumn in the Northern Hemisphere.

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The Most Dangerous Moment of the Trump Presidency

For all of the uncertainty of the Trump administration’s nearly three years in power, genuine international crises have been rare. That’s changing right now. The attack a week ago on Saudi Arabia’s massive Abqaiq oil field took offline half of the country’s oil production—some 5 percent of global output. The drone and missile salvo has the hallmarks of Tehran, and with top administration official

6d

Greta Thunberg: You have stolen my childhood with your empty words

World leaders are at a UN summit in New York to discuss more ambitious plans to curb carbon emissions just days after the biggest ever climate change protest

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Russia: We Know Cause of Space Station Leak but Haven’t Told NASA

Not Telling In August 2018, flight controllers detected a tiny, easily-plugged hole in the International Space Station. Now, the head of Russia’s space agency is claiming it has finally figured out the cause of the mysterious puncture — but it’s keeping the information under wraps. “We know exactly what happened, but we won’t tell you anything,” Roscosmos Director Dmitry Rogozin told attendees at

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Chinese researchers developed handheld plasma jet

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Google Claims First Ever Quantum Processor Computation

submitted by /u/Staormin [link] [comments]

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Physicists Accomplish Crucial Step for Advancing Quantum Computers

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Make every photo a potential profile pic by learning how to pose

Once you know how to pose, you won't even need colors. (Harry Guinness/) In an era when most people carry a camera in their pockets, and a large amount of the pictures taken of us will eventually be posted on the internet forever, posing properly for a photo is an important skill everyone should have. You don't have to look like a runway model, you just have to make sure you portray yourself in a

6d

Artificial intelligence can improve sales by four times compared to some human employees

Chatbots, which use artificial intelligence to simulate human conversation through voice commands or text chats, incur almost zero marginal costs and can outsell some human employees by four times, so why aren't they used more often? According to new research, the main contributor is customer pushback.

6d

Engineering the meniscus

Damage to the meniscus is common, but there remains an unmet need for improved restorative therapies that can overcome poor healing in the avascular regions.

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Artificial intelligence can improve sales by four times compared to some human employees

Chatbots, which use artificial intelligence to simulate human conversation through voice commands or text chats, incur almost zero marginal costs and can outsell some human employees by four times, so why aren't they used more often? According to new research, the main contributor is customer pushback.

6d

'Valley states' in this 2D material could potentially be used for quantum computing

New research on 2-dimensional tungsten disulfide (WS2) could open the door to advances in quantum computing. In a paper published Sept. 13 in Nature Communications, scientists report that they can manipulate the electronic properties of this super-thin material in ways that could be useful for encoding quantum data.

6d

Did you solve it? Maths on the back of an envelope

The solutions to today’s puzzles and the results of the pint mnemonic challenge Earlier today I set you four puzzles, and a challenge to devise a rhyme about a pint being 568ml. The solutions first and the best pint-sized poems afterwards. 1) A piece of paper is folded to make a shape that looks a bit like the back of an envelope, illustrated below. If the paper is unfolded again to make a flat s

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For World Rhino Day, UMass Amherst and Australia's Perth Zoo team create 3-D rhino model

The Digital Life team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by evolutionary biologist Duncan Irschick and other colleagues released the world's first accurate, publicly available three-dimensional (3-D) model of the rare Southern white rhino in collaboration with Perth Zoo in Australia.

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How molecular footballs burst in an x-ray laser beam

An international research team has observed in real time how football molecules made of carbon atoms burst in the beam of an X-ray laser. The study shows the temporal course of the bursting process, which takes less than a trillionth of a second, and is important for the analysis of sensitive proteins and other biomolecules, which are also frequently studied using bright X-ray laser flashes.

6d

NASA’s Mars Lander Detects Mysterious Magnetic Pulses

Local Time NASA’s InSight Mars Lander detected a series of strange magnetic pulses that occurred exactly at midnight, Mars time. Scientists have yet to figure out the source of the strange natural phenomenon, according to National Geographic — a finding that upends years of thought about the Red Planet. Night Shift In 1997, NASA’s Mars Global Surveyor found that Mars once had a global magnetic fi

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For World Rhino Day, UMass Amherst and Australia's Perth Zoo team create 3-D rhino model

The Digital Life team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by evolutionary biologist Duncan Irschick and other colleagues released the world's first accurate, publicly available three-dimensional (3-D) model of the rare Southern white rhino in collaboration with Perth Zoo in Australia.

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Rare forecasted climate event under way in the Southern Hemisphere

Nature, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02858-0

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AI is learning to diagnose schizophrenia from a smartphone video

An app that analyses facial expressions and speech may be able to diagnose schizophrenia

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Weird galaxies suggest our best understanding of the cosmos is wrong

We have found two weird galaxies that either have no dark matter or are travelling insanely fast. Our best models of the cosmos can't explain how they exist

6d

Women in Cybersecurity: Where We Are and Where We're Going

Here’s how to bring gender equality to a thoroughly male-dominated field — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How We Can Avert Climate Apocalypse

An alarming book provokes a vision of a world that has solved the problems of global warming and war — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Trump Admits Everything

By the end of last week, rumors were swirling about what President Donald Trump might or might not have done to elicit a whistle-blower complaint about his conversations with a foreign leader. A rough outline had emerged : Trump had pressured Ukraine’s president to investigate business dealings of the Democratic presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden’s son. The president was r

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'Push-pull' dynamic in brain network is key to stopping seizures

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have discovered that the spreading of seizures through the brain can be suppressed depending on the amount of pressure within the brain, an important discovery that may revolutionize the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy.

6d

New augmented reality head mounted display offers unrivalled viewing experience

Cambridge engineers have developed a new augmented reality (AR) head-mounted display (HMD) that delivers a realistic 3D viewing experience, without the commonly associated side effects of nausea or eyestrain.

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Climate Protesters Snarl Traffic but Washington Still Goes to Work

A coalition of climate protesters tried to shut down the streets of Washington.

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Cats bond with their people too, study finds

Scientists say felines display similar ‘attachment styles’ with caregivers as dogs and children – but not everyone is convinced Cats may sometimes seem aloof, contrary and utterly nonplussed by humans, but it turns out that might not be the full story. Researchers say they have found that, like children and dogs, cats form emotional attachments to their caregivers including something known as “se

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Researchers find new, lower-cost way to separate valuable ethylene from ethane gas

From soda bottles to polyester clothing, ethylene is part of many products we use every day. In part to meet demand, the Shell Oil Company is building an ethane cracker plant in Beaver County, Pa., specifically to produce ethylene molecules from the abundant ethane found in natural gas. However, the chemical reaction used to convert ethane into valuable ethylene is incomplete, so such plants produ

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Women in Cybersecurity: Where We Are and Where We're Going

Here’s how to bring gender equality to a thoroughly male-dominated field — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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To cope with stress, change how you think about it

We tend to think of stress as a bad thing that affects our health and well-being. But is that always the case? The way we think about stress makes a huge difference in how stress affects us, says Bridgette Hard, associate professor of the practice of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University. Reframing our ideas about stress can reduce its harmful impacts. “We’ve been told for decades that s

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Pregnant Moms' Air Pollution Exposure May Affect Babies' Health

A number of epidemiological studies support a link between air quality and poor health outcomes, and researchers are searching for explanations in the lab.

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For young athletes, sport specialization means increased risk of injury

Specialization in a chosen sport is associated with a higher volume of activity — and it could increase young athletes' risk of sustaining both traumatic- and overuse-based injuries, new study says.

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Even mother's mild depressive symptoms affect the child's emotional well-being

Even mild long-term depressive symptoms among mothers are connected with emotional problems among small children such as hyperactivity, aggressiveness and anxiety.

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Is theory on Earth's climate in the last 15 million years wrong?

A key theory that attributes the climate evolution of the Earth to the breakdown of Himalayan rocks may not explain the cooling over the past 15 million years, according to a new study. The study could shed more light on the causes of long-term climate change. It centers on the long-term cooling that occurred before the recent global warming tied to greenhouse gas emissions from humanity.

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Graphene is 3D as well as 2D

Graphene is actually a 3D material as well as a 2D material, according to a new study.

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New study on sharing shows social norms play a role in decision making

A child's desire to share becomes influenced by social norms around the age of 8, new research has revealed. The extensive study — conducted on eight diverse societies across the world — examined children and adults' behavior when asked to respond to a set of specific sharing tasks.

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Empowering cancer patients to shift their mindsets could improve care, researchers argue

A cancer diagnosis can cause a significant emotional burden for patients and their families. This may persist years into survivorship. As a result, depression and anxiety are two to three times more common in cancer patients than the general population. Experts propose that targeting cancer patients' mindsets could have an impact on their health, functioning, and well-being, and they call for more

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Soap from straw: Scientists develop eco friendly ingredient from agricultural waste

A scientist has discovered a way of using one of the world's most abundant natural resources as a replacement for humanmade chemicals in soaps and thousands of other household products.

6d

Probes shed new light on Alzheimer's cause

Rice University researchers have found a way to track the formation of soluble amyloid beta peptide aggregates implicated in the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

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Probes shed new light on Alzheimer's cause

Rice University researchers have found a way to track the formation of soluble amyloid beta peptide aggregates implicated in the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

6d

Can a new space race connect the world to the internet?

Tech giants and billionaires hope a new, cheaper crop of internet-beaming satellites and balloons can get internet to those who don't have it.

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Better samples, better science: New study explores integrity of research specimens

Biological samples can be highly susceptible to changes over time, which often occur when they are removed from deep refrigeration. Degraded samples can produce spurious results in research. To address these concerns, scientists have designed a highly sensitive test that can be used to establish the integrity of blood plasma and serum, the most common biosamples used in medical research.

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Cracking the ethylene code

Separating pure ethylene from ethane is a difficult and costly process, but one that new research from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering is poised to streamline. The technique investigated in two new papers, published in the Journal of the American Chemical Association and Organometallics, would avoid liquefaction and distillation by designing a material that only binds

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Probes shed new light on Alzheimer's cause

Rice University researchers have found a way to track the formation of soluble amyloid beta peptide aggregates in lab samples. The aggregates are implicated in the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

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Better samples, better science: New study explores integrity of research specimens

Biological samples can be highly susceptible to changes over time, which often occur when they are removed from deep refrigeration. Degraded samples can produce spurious results in research. To address these concerns, scientists have designed a highly sensitive test that can be used to establish the integrity of blood plasma and serum, the most common biosamples used in medical research.

6d

A new way to turn heat into useful energy

Scientists have figured out how to capture heat and turn it into electricity. The discovery could create more efficient energy generation from heat in things like car exhaust, interplanetary space probes and industrial processes.

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Cats are securely bonded to their people, too

Cats have a reputation for being aloof and independent. But a study of the way domestic cats respond to their caregivers suggests that their socio-cognitive abilities and the depth of their human attachments have been underestimated. The findings show that, much like children and dogs, pet cats form secure and insecure bonds with their human caretakers.

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Gasoline Fiends Blocked Every Single Tesla Charger in This Town

Mass ICEing On Sunday, gas guzzlers blocked every single Tesla Supercharger in Yorktown Heights, New York in an event they called a “car show.” Blocking a Tesla charging dock with a vehicle is called ICEing — short for “internal combustion engine” — sometimes intended to troll electric vehicle owners. It’s unclear what motivated the impromptu mass-ICEing in Yorktown, which was shared on a Tesla F

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As Major Summit Convenes, U.N. Secretary-General Has Hope on Averting Warming

The summit begins just as new data show 2014–2019 was the warmest five-year period on record — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study confirms Monterey Bay Aquarium surrogate-reared sea otters helped restore threatened population

The population of threatened southern sea otters in Elkhorn Slough, an estuary in Central California, has made a significant comeback as a result of Monterey Bay Aquarium's Sea Otter Program. …

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The First Personality Test Was Developed During World War I

Long before online quizzes and Myers-Briggs, Robert Woodworth’s “Psychoneurotic Inventory” tried to assess recruits' susceptibility to shell shock

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Da B&O gemte teknologien bag design

PLUS. Hvorfor overlevede B&O, når de andre måtte give op? Det giver en ny temaudstilling i Den Gamle By et bud på gennem en fortælling om Struer-virksomheden.

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Croc-like carnivores terrorized Triassic dinosaurs in southern Africa 210 million years ago

Giant, predatory croc-like animals that lived during the Triassic period in southern Africa preyed on early dinosaurs and mammal relatives 210 million years ago. These predators, known as 'rauisuchians' preyed on early herbivore dinosaurs and their mammal relatives living at the time.

6d

Discovery of novel cancer signaling mechanism and design of new anticancer compound

Active mutations of a certain signaling receptor protein called KIT tyrosine kinase are found in several cancers, such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the different locations in the AML cells where KIT induces cancer-specific signaling remain unclear. Now, a group of scientists has aimed to answer this question by using a newly synthesized compound (along with other existing ones) that t

6d

Cancer protocols: A new approach to predicting treatment outcomes

Weizmann Institute of Science research shows heterogeneity in melanoma tumors prevents effective immune responses.

6d

Better samples, better science: new study explores integrity of research specimens

Biological samples can be highly susceptible to changes over time, which often occur when they are removed from deep refrigeration. Degraded samples can produce spurious results in research. To address these concerns, Borges and his colleagues have designed a highly sensitive test that can be used to establish the integrity of blood plasma and serum, the most common biosamples used in medical rese

6d

Light-activated metal catalyst destroys cancer cells' vital energy source

A space-age metal that formed part of the asteroid that destroyed the dinosaurs could provide a new method of treating cancer tumors selectively using light.

6d

Scientists hone in on DNA differences behind immune diseases

Scientists are one step closer to discovering the causes of immune diseases such as asthma, multiple sclerosis and arthritis. Research from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, GSK and Biogen, under the Open Targets initiative, has shown that thousands of differences in DNA between individuals, associated with immune diseases, are linked with the switching-on of a specific subtype of immune cells. Publi

6d

Method discovered to reactivate tumour fighting genes 'silenced' by cancer

Scientists at UCL have developed a method to reactivate 'tumour suppressor' genes, which are switched off by cancer cells — a finding which could lead to new targeted biotherapies for cancer.

6d

UCI study reveals critical role of brain circuits in improving learning and memory

A University of California, Irvine-led team of scientists has discovered how newly identified neural circuits in the brain's hippocampal formation play a critical role in object-location learning and memory.

6d

Is theory on Earth's climate in the last 15 million years wrong?

A key theory that attributes the climate evolution of the Earth to the breakdown of Himalayan rocks may not explain the cooling over the past 15 million years, according to a Rutgers-led study. The study in the journal Nature Geoscience could shed more light on the causes of long-term climate change. It centers on the long-term cooling that occurred before the recent global warming tied to greenho

6d

Gene regulators work together for oversized impact on schizophrenia risk

Researchers have discovered that gene expression regulators work together to raise an individual's risk of developing schizophrenia. Such synergistic interactions seen with schizophrenia-like gene expression changes in modeled induced human neurons matched changes found in patients' brains.

6d

Study shows MRI can help remove DOUBT when diagnosing minor strokes

A University of Calgary study is highlighting the importance of magnetic resonance imaging in helping to diagnose minor stroke and transient ischemic attacks. The six-year study included researchers in Canada, Australia and the Czech Republic, involved 1028 patients who experienced a number of symptoms that aren't always associated with stroke. In 30 per cent of patients in the study, the physicia

6d

Researchers resolve how fungi produce compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications

Research led by the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute has solved a nearly 50-year-old mystery of how nature produces a large class of bioactive chemical compounds.

6d

Doctors are not using tools to help youths quit smoking

At a time when the rapid growth in electronic cigarette "vaping" among young people threatens to reverse decades of progress in reducing tobacco use, a large study published today in JAMA Pediatrics finds that medical professionals are largely failing to use existing tools to help young people quit smoking.

6d

How molecular footballs burst in an x-ray laser beam

An international research team has observed in real time how football molecules made of carbon atoms burst in the beam of an X-ray laser. The study shows the temporal course of the bursting process, which takes less than a trillionth of a second, and is important for the analysis of sensitive proteins and other biomolecules, which are also frequently studied using bright X-ray laser flashes.

6d

New CRISPR class expands genetic engineering toolbox

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have used a previously unexplored CRISPR technology to accurately regulate and edit target genes in human cells. With this new approach, the researchers hope to dramatically expand the CRISPR-based tools available to biomedical engineers, opening up a new and diverse frontier of genome engineering technologies.

6d

Changes in internal medicine subspecialty choices of women, men

This study used enrollment data to examine changes in the internal medicine subspecialty choices of women and men from 1991 to 2016. Data were examined for 9 internal medicine subspecialties: cardiovascular disease, endocrinology, gastroenterology, geriatric medicine, hematology and oncology, infectious disease, nephrology, pulmonary disease and critical care, and rheumatology.

6d

Perturbed genes regulating white blood cells linked to autism genetics and severity

Researchers at UC San Diego say they are getting closer to identifying the mechanisms of autism spectrum disorder, revealing a critical gene network that is disrupted and which helps predict severity of symptoms.

6d

Use, discontinuation of insulin treatment among older adults

Whether insulin treatment was used less frequently and discontinued more often among older adults (ages 75 to 79) in poor health compared with those in good health was the focus of this observational study that included more than 21,000 adults with type 2 diabetes.

6d

Does being younger than classmates increase likelihood of childhood depression, ADHD, intellectual disability

This observational study included 1 million children in the United Kingdom and looked at the association between children who are younger than their classmates and the likelihood of depression, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and intellectual disability.

6d

Loss of automatic reenrollment option associated with enrollment decrease in California marketplace

This research letter analyzed enrollment data from California's health insurance marketplace, Covered California, and study authors report losing the option to automatically reenroll because some insurers exited the marketplace was associated with a decrease in enrollment.

6d

Discontinuing insulin for older adults with type 2 diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes who were in poor health were more likely to continue taking insulin after age 75 than their counterparts in better health, according to Kaiser Permanente research published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. As people with type 2 diabetes age, the risks of insulin use can outweigh its benefits, creating the need for increased provider and patient education.

6d

Is overall screen time associated with academic performance in kids, teens?

Screen time overall wasn't associated with the academic performance of children and adolescents in this observational study. Called a systematic review and meta-analysis, this research consisted of a review of 58 studies from 23 countries (involving 480,000 participants ages 4 to 18) and a meta-analysis that combined the results of 30 of those studies involving 106,000 participants.

6d

Strip steak: Bacterial enzyme removes inflammation-causing meat carbohydrates

When we eat red meat, the animal carbohydrate Neu5Gc is incorporated in our tissues, where it generates inflammation. UC San Diego researchers discovered how gut bacteria enzymes strip our cells of Neu5Gc, introducing the possibility of using the enzymes to reduce the risk of inflammatory diseases.

6d

Cats, like children and dogs, develop attachments to their caregivers, study shows

Pet cats form attachments with their human owners that are similar to the bonds formed by children and dogs with their caretakers.

6d

Graphene is 3D as well as 2D

Graphene is actually a 3D material as well as a 2D material, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.

6d

New study on sharing shows social norms play a role in decision making

A child's desire to share becomes influenced by social norms around the age of 8, new research has revealed. The extensive study — conducted on eight diverse societies across the world — examined children and adults' behavior when asked to respond to a set of specific sharing tasks.

6d

Discovery of sorghum gene that controls bird feeding could help protect crops

A single gene in sorghum controls bird feeding behavior by simultaneously regulating the production of bad-tasting molecules and attractive volatiles, according to a study publishing Sept. 23 in the journal Molecular Plant. This gene, called Tannin1, controls the synthesis of bird-deterring astringent polyphenols called tannins, as well as bird-attracting fatty-acid-derived volatile organic compou

6d

One species, many origins

In a paper published in Nature Ecology and Evolution, a group of researchers argue that our evolutionary past must be understood as the outcome of dynamic changes in connectivity, or gene flow, between early humans scattered across Africa. Viewing past human populations as a succession of discrete branches on an evolutionary tree may be misleading, they said, because it reduces the human story to

6d

Empowering cancer patients to shift their mindsets could improve care, researchers argue

A cancer diagnosis can cause a significant emotional burden for patients and their families. This may persist years into survivorship. As a result, depression and anxiety are two to three times more common in cancer patients than the general population. In the journal Trends in Cancer, experts propose that targeting cancer patients' mindsets could have an impact on their health, functioning, and w

6d

Cats are securely bonded to their people, too

Cats have a reputation for being aloof and independent. But a study of the way domestic cats respond to their caregivers suggests that their socio-cognitive abilities and the depth of their human attachments have been underestimated. The findings reported in the journal Current Biology on Sept. 23 show that, much like children and dogs, pet cats form secure and insecure bonds with their human care

6d

UNC93B1 recruits syntenin-1 to dampen TLR7 signalling and prevent autoimmunity

Nature, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1612-6

6d

Constraints on the superconducting order parameter in Sr2RuO4 from oxygen-17 nuclear magnetic resonance

Nature, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1596-2 17O nuclear magnetic resonance measurements on Sr2RuO4 reveal a drop of the Knight shift in the superconducting state, contradicting previous work and imposing tight constraints on the order parameter symmetry of the system.

6d

Release from UNC93B1 reinforces the compartmentalized activation of select TLRs

Nature, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1611-7

6d

Balance of power: The Economic Consequences of the Peace at 100

Nature, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02850-8 Ann Pettifor finds astonishing contemporary resonance in John Maynard Keynes’s critique of globalization and inequity.

6d

Study finds flaws in leading security lie detection training tool

Developed by an influential U.S. psychologist, the Micro-Expressions Training Tool, or METT, inspired the hit TV show Lie to Me, which revolved around the uncanny ability of its lead character to tell truth from falsehood by analysing minute facial tics. And in the real world, METT is being used to train airport personnel to spot people who pose potential security risks.

6d

These factors influence which teens start hacking

Video games and social connections are among the factors that could lead teens to get involved in cybercrime, according to new research. “We know much about the scope of hacking and its threat, but the problem is that we don’t know exactly when and how hacking behavior starts,” says lead author Thomas Holt, cybercrime expert in the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University. “There i

6d

Even Huge Molecules Follow the Quantum World's Bizarre Rules

A record-breaking experiment shows an enormous molecule is also both a particle and a wave—and that quantum effects don't only apply at tiny scales.

6d

Even mother's mild depressive symptoms affect the child's emotional well-being

Even mild long-term depressive symptoms among mothers are connected with emotional problems among small children such as hyperactivity, aggressiveness and anxiety.

6d

For young athletes, sport specialization means increased risk of injury

Specialization in a chosen sport is associated with a higher volume of activity — and it could increase young athletes' risk of sustaining both traumatic- and overuse-based injuries, new study says.

6d

Study finds flaws in leading security lie detection training tool

Developed by an influential US psychologist, the Micro-Expressions Training Tool, or METT, inspired the hit TV show Lie to Me, is being used to train airport personnel to spot people who pose potential security risks. But a research project involving a University of Huddersfield lecturer has concluded that METT training fails to improve lie detection rates beyond levels that can be achieved by gue

6d

A new way to turn heat into energy

An international team of scientists has figured out how to capture heat and turn it into electricity. The discovery, published last week in the journal Science Advances, could create more efficient energy generation from heat in things like car exhaust, interplanetary space probes and industrial processes.

6d

New CRISPR class expands genetic engineering toolbox

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have used a previously unexplored CRISPR technology to accurately regulate and edit genomes in human cells.

6d

Strip steak: Bacterial enzyme removes inflammation-causing meat carbohydrates

Most mammals naturally produce a carbohydrate known as Neu5Gc—humans do not. However, when we eat red meat, animal Neu5Gc is incorporated in our tissues. As the carbohydrate builds up, our immune systems treat Neu5Gc as a foreign invader, generating antibodies against it. That's why red meat-rich diets are associated with chronic inflammation and related diseases, such as colon cancer and atherosc

6d

Discovery of sorghum gene that controls bird feeding could help protect crops

A single gene in sorghum controls bird feeding behavior by simultaneously regulating the production of bad-tasting molecules and attractive volatiles, according to a study publishing September 23 in the journal Molecular Plant. This gene, called Tannin1, controls the synthesis of bird-deterring astringent polyphenols called tannins, as well as bird-attracting fatty-acid-derived volatile organic co

6d

Cats, like children and dogs, develop attachments to their caregivers, study shows

A new Oregon State University study finds that pet cats form attachments with their human owners that are similar to the bonds formed by children and dogs with their caretakers.

6d

Modern humans: One species, many origins

In a paper published in Nature Ecology and Evolution, a group of researchers argues that our evolutionary past must be understood as the outcome of dynamic changes in connectivity, or gene flow, between early humans scattered across Africa. Viewing past human populations as a succession of discrete branches on an evolutionary tree may be misleading, they said, because it reduces the human story to

6d

New CRISPR class expands genetic engineering toolbox

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have used a previously unexplored CRISPR technology to accurately regulate and edit genomes in human cells.

6d

Researchers resolve how fungi produce compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications

Research led by the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute has solved a nearly 50-year-old mystery of how nature produces a large class of bioactive chemical compounds.

6d

How molecular footballs burst in an X-ray laser beam

An international research team has observed in real time how football molecules made of carbon atoms burst in the beam of an X-ray laser. The study shows the temporal course of the bursting process, which takes less than a trillionth of a second, and is important for the analysis of sensitive proteins and other biomolecules, which are also frequently studied using bright X-ray laser flashes. The f

6d

Strip steak: Bacterial enzyme removes inflammation-causing meat carbohydrates

Most mammals naturally produce a carbohydrate known as Neu5Gc—humans do not. However, when we eat red meat, animal Neu5Gc is incorporated in our tissues. As the carbohydrate builds up, our immune systems treat Neu5Gc as a foreign invader, generating antibodies against it. That's why red meat-rich diets are associated with chronic inflammation and related diseases, such as colon cancer and atherosc

6d

New study on sharing shows social norms play a role in decision making

A child's desire to share becomes influenced by social norms around the age of eight, new research has revealed.

6d

Is theory on earth's climate in the last 15 million years wrong?

A key theory that attributes the climate evolution of the Earth to the breakdown of Himalayan rocks may not explain the cooling over the past 15 million years, according to a Rutgers-led study.

6d

Discovery of sorghum gene that controls bird feeding could help protect crops

A single gene in sorghum controls bird feeding behavior by simultaneously regulating the production of bad-tasting molecules and attractive volatiles, according to a study publishing September 23 in the journal Molecular Plant. This gene, called Tannin1, controls the synthesis of bird-deterring astringent polyphenols called tannins, as well as bird-attracting fatty-acid-derived volatile organic co

6d

Cats, like children and dogs, develop attachments to their caregivers, study shows

A new Oregon State University study finds that pet cats form attachments with their human owners that are similar to the bonds formed by children and dogs with their caretakers.

6d

Graphene is 3-D as well as 2-D

Graphene is actually a 3-D material as well as a 2-D material, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.

6d

Light-activated metal catalyst destroys cancer cells' vital energy source

A space-age metal that formed part of the asteroid that destroyed the dinosaurs could provide a new method of treating cancer tumors selectively using light.

6d

Modern humans: One species, many origins

In a paper published in Nature Ecology and Evolution, a group of researchers argues that our evolutionary past must be understood as the outcome of dynamic changes in connectivity, or gene flow, between early humans scattered across Africa. Viewing past human populations as a succession of discrete branches on an evolutionary tree may be misleading, they said, because it reduces the human story to

6d

A new way to turn heat into energy

An international team of scientists has figured out how to capture heat and turn it into electricity.

6d

Researchers resolve how fungi produce compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications

Research led by the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute has solved a nearly 50-year-old mystery of how nature produces a large class of bioactive chemical compounds.

6d

Light-activated metal catalyst destroys cancer cells' vital energy source

A space-age metal that formed part of the asteroid that destroyed the dinosaurs could provide a new method of treating cancer tumors selectively using light.

6d

What do Israel’s elections mean for Netanyahu?

While the ultimate outcome of Israeli elections earlier this week remains unsettled, it seems certain that Benjamin Netanyahu, the nation’s longest-serving prime minister, faces serious trouble. Netanyahu’s Likud party failed to win enough seats to form a majority in the Israeli parliament. Though the main opposition party, Blue and White, also fell short, its leader, Benny Gantz, is forming a un

6d

A bold plan to empower 1.6 million out-of-school girls in India | Safeena Husain

"Girls' education is the closest thing we have to a silver bullet to help solve some of the world's most difficult problems," says social entrepreneur Safeena Husain. In a visionary talk, she shares her plan to enroll a staggering 1.6 million girls in school over the next five years — combining advanced analytics with door-to-door community engagement to create new educational pathways for girls

6d

'Valley states' in this super-thin material could potentially be used for quantum computing

New research on two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (WS2) could open the door to advances in quantum computing.

6d

Report: MIT Violated Law By Dumping Dangerous Chemicals

Total Dump According to documents obtained by ProPublica and Boston-area radio station WBUR , researchers at MIT’s Media Lab have been dumping toxic wastewater underground, violating state environmental laws and endangering local waterways, wildlife and even young children and pets. “I took every action I could, to go through the right channels to address it,” former MIT researcher Babak Babakine

6d

If world leaders choose to fail us, my generation will never forgive them | Greta Thunberg

We are in the middle of a climate breakdown, and all they can talk about is money and fairytales of eternal economic growth This is all wrong. I shouldn’t be standing here. I should be back in school on the other side of the ocean. Yet you all come to me for hope? How dare you! You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words. And yet I’m one of the lucky ones. People are suffering

6d

New Research Promises Electric Car Batteries That Last For a Million Miles

Electric motors guzzle electricity, which can be especially hard on a rechargeable battery. The power cells used in electric vehicles, like Teslas, have an expected lifespan of around 300,000 …

6d

Can machine learning reveal geology humans can't see?

Identifying geological features in a densely vegetated, steep, and rough terrain can be almost impossible. Imagery like LiDAR can help researchers see through the tree cover, but subtle landforms …

6d

Soap from straw—scientists develop eco friendly ingredient from agricultural waste

A scientist has discovered a way of using one of the world's most abundant natural resources as a replacement for manmade chemicals in soaps and thousands of other household products.

6d

New framework for nanoantenna light absorption

Harnessing light's energy into nanoscale volumes requires novel engineering approaches to overcome a fundamental barrier known as the 'diffraction limit.' However, researchers have breached this barrier by developing nanoantennas that pack the energy captured from light sources.

6d

Green tea could hold the key to reducing antibiotic resistance

Scientists have discovered that a natural antioxidant commonly found in green tea can help eliminate antibiotic resistant bacteria.

6d

Promoting earth's legacy delivers local economic benefits

For iconic landscapes such as Grand Canyon or the Appalachian Mountains, geological features are an integral part of their appeal. Yet despite the seeming permanence of cliffs, caves, fossils, and other geological highlights, these features are surprisingly vulnerable to damage or destruction.

6d

Grand ideas, global reverberations: Grand Canyon at its 6 millionth anniversary

Etched onto the steep walls of Arizona's 6,000-foot-deep, 277-mile-long Grand Canyon are clues that chronicle the sweeping changes the region has experienced during the past two billion years. The canyon's colorful layers narrate tales of ancient environments come and gone, from lofty mountain ranges and tropical seas to a Saharan-scale desert that once stretched across much of western North Ameri

6d

En enda aminosyra avgör bildandet av nya blodkärl

Ett fungerande nätverk av blodkärl, som transporterar syre och näringsämnen till vävnaderna, är nödvändigt för att överleva. Blodkärlens insida täcks av så kallade endotelceller som behövs för att skapa de ihåliga kärl där blodet leds ut till alla vävnader. I den nya studien kan forskarna visa på mekanismen för hur nya endotelceller bildas genom delning av existerande celler. Om denna mekanism in

6d

Improvements to rheology measurements in reservoirs proposed by Kazan Federal University

The development and implementation of innovative integrated methods to increase oil recovery is one of the key approaches to solving existing problems in the oil industry. Residual oil in the water-filled formations is kept stationary by surface capillary forces on the scale of individual pores and low permeability inclusions, as well as viscous forces on the scale of low-permeability differences

6d

Soap from straw — Scientists develop eco friendly ingredient from agricultural waste

A scientist has discovered a way of using one of the world's most abundant natural resources as a replacement for manmade chemicals in soaps and thousands of other household products.

6d

Discovery of novel cancer signaling mechanism and design of new anticancer compound

Active mutations of a certain signaling receptor protein called KIT tyrosine kinase are found in several cancers, such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the different locations in the AML cells where KIT induces cancer-specific signaling remain unclear. Now, a group of scientists from Japan has aimed to answer this question by using a newly synthesized compound (along with other existing o

6d

Croc-like carnivores terrorised Triassic dinosaurs in southern Africa 210 million years ago

Giant, predatory croc-like animals that lived during the Triassic period in southern Africa preyed on early dinosaurs and mammal relatives 210 million years ago. These predators, known as 'rauisuchians' preyed on early herbivore dinosaurs and their mammal relatives living at the time, according to Wits Masters student Rick Tolchard.

6d

At U.N. Climate Summit, a Call for Action Yields Few Commitments

China made no new commitiments at United Nations climate talks to take stronger action. The United States said nothing at all, and a host of other countries made incremental promises at best.

6d

Promoting earth's legacy delivers local economic benefits

For iconic landscapes such as Grand Canyon or the Appalachian Mountains, geological features are an integral part of their appeal. Yet despite the seeming permanence of cliffs, caves, fossils, and other geological highlights, these features are surprisingly vulnerable to damage or destruction. Across the U.S., there is a growing awareness that America's geological resources represent a common heri

6d

New evidence of the Sahara's age

The Sahara Desert is vast, generously dusty, and surprisingly shy about its age. New research looking into what appears to be dust that the Sahara blew over to the Canary Islands is providing the first direct evidence from dry land that the age of the Sahara matches that found in deep-sea sediments: at least 4.6 million years old.

6d

On Your Mark, Get Set, Multiply

This summer, battle lines were drawn over a simple math problem: 8 ÷ 2(2 + 2) = ? If you divide 8 by 2 first, you get 16, but if you multiply 2 by (2 + 2) first, you get 1. So, which answer is right? The conflict grew so heated that it made the pages of The New York Times . And as the comments section shows, even a professional mathematician weighing in on the matter wasn’t enough to bring the tw

6d

Grand ideas, global reverberations: Grand Canyon at its 6 millionth anniversary

Etched onto the steep walls of Arizona's 6,000-foot-deep, 277-mile-long Grand Canyon are clues that chronicle the sweeping changes the region has experienced during the past two billion years. The canyon's colorful layers narrate tales of ancient environments come and gone, from lofty mountain ranges and tropical seas to a Saharan-scale desert that once stretched across much of western North Ameri

6d

Can machine learning reveal geology humans can't see?

Identifying geological features in a densely vegetated, steep, and rough terrain can be almost impossible. Imagery like LiDAR can help researchers see through the tree cover, but subtle landforms can often be missed by the human eye.

6d

New evidence of the Sahara's age

The Sahara Desert is vast, generously dusty, and surprisingly shy about its age. New research looking into what appears to be dust that the Sahara blew over to the Canary Islands is providing the first direct evidence from dry land that the age of the Sahara matches that found in deep-sea sediments: at least 4.6 million years old.

6d

Green tea could hold the key to reducing antibiotic resistance

Scientists at the University of Surrey have discovered that a natural antioxidant commonly found in green tea can help eliminate antibiotic resistant bacteria.

6d

Affordable Care Act slashed the uninsured rate among people with diabetes

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) provided health insurance for an estimated 1.9 million people with diabetes, according to a newly published study. Coverage gains were particularly strong among people whose diabetes was undiagnosed.

6d

The long-term effects of disasters on seniors with diabetes: evidence from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

Older individuals with diabetes impacted by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita had a 40% higher one-month mortality rate than those who lived in unaffected counties and a 6% increase ten years later.

6d

Grand ideas, global reverberations: Grand Canyon at its 6 millionth anniversary

Etched onto the steep walls of Arizona's 6,000-foot-deep, 277-mile-long Grand Canyon are clues that chronicle the sweeping changes the region has experienced during the past two billion years. The canyon's colorful layers narrate tales of ancient environments come and gone, from lofty mountain ranges and tropical seas to a Saharan-scale desert that once stretched across much of western North Ameri

6d

Promoting earth's legacy delivers local economic benefits

For iconic landscapes such as Grand Canyon or the Appalachian Mountains, geological features are an integral part of their appeal. Yet despite the seeming permanence of cliffs, caves, fossils, and other geological highlights, these features are surprisingly vulnerable to damage or destruction.

6d

New evidence of the Sahara's age

The Sahara Desert is vast, generously dusty, and surprisingly shy about its age. New research looking into what appears to be dust that the Sahara blew over to the Canary Islands is providing the first direct evidence from dry land that the age of the Sahara matches that found in deep-sea sediments: at least 4.6 million years old.

6d

182,000 Indians clean sewers largely by hand. These robots could help.

In India, discrimination among social classes, or castes, forces those with lesser means to take dangerous, reviled jobs such as sewer cleaning. (Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images/) The Indian government defines a "manual scavenger" as a person who physically carries human excreta. Often without safety gear—no helmets, masks, or gloves—these workers plumb the manholes of Mumbai, waist-deep in grey

6d

PlayStation 5 to increase energy efficiency—but only if users opt in

Sony declares its ongoing commitment to energy-efficiency and climate awareness.

6d

Samsung's folding phone hits the US

Samsung's folding phone is finally hitting the U.S.

6d

GoPro teases next-generation action camera announcement for October 1

GoPro’s successor to the Hero 7 is likely coming on October 1, as the action camera maker has posted a teaser with the date to its official website. The tagline “This is Action” …

6d

Russia joins Paris climate accord

Russia's prime minister on Monday gave formal support to the Paris climate agreement, just hours ahead of a key summit trying to tackle ever increasing gas emissions.

6d

New research looks at gamma-ray bursts

Astrophysicists Jon Hakkila of the College of Charleston and Robert Nemiroff of the Michigan Technological University have published research indicating that blasts that create gamma-ray bursts may actually exceed the speed of light in surrounding gas clouds, but do so without violating Einstein's theory of relativity.

6d

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor er fuger så svære at rengøre?

En læser er træt af, at det skal være så svært at rengøre fuger, hvis ikke de samtidig skal være miljøskadelige. Produktchef i LIP giver et overblik.

6d

New framework for nanoantenna light absorption

Harnessing light's energy into nanoscale volumes requires novel engineering approaches to overcome a fundamental barrier known as the 'diffraction limit.' However, researchers have breached this barrier by developing nanoantennas that pack the energy captured from light sources.

6d

Can machine learning reveal geology humans can't see?

Identifying geological features in a densely vegetated, steep, and rough terrain can be almost impossible. Imagery like LiDAR can help researchers see through the tree cover, but subtle landforms can often be missed by the human eye.

6d

Why the lettuce mitochondrial genome is like a chopped salad

The mitochondrion, "the powerhouse of the cell." Somewhere back in the very distant past, something like a bacterium moved into another cell and never left, retaining some of its own DNA. For billions of years, mitochondria have passed from mother to offspring of most eukaryotic organisms, generating energy for the cell and playing roles in metabolism and programmed cell death.

6d

Why the lettuce mitochondrial genome is like a chopped salad

The mitochondrion, "the powerhouse of the cell." Somewhere back in the very distant past, something like a bacterium moved into another cell and never left, retaining some of its own DNA. For billions of years, mitochondria have passed from mother to offspring of most eukaryotic organisms, generating energy for the cell and playing roles in metabolism and programmed cell death.

6d

Capturing extreme close-ups of cellular gene expression

Scientists studying genetic transcription are gaining new insights into a process that is fundamental to all life. Transcription is the first step in gene expression, the process taking place within all living cells by which the DNA sequence of a gene is copied into RNA, which in turn (most generally speaking) serves as the template for assembling protein molecules, the basic building blocks of li

6d

Want to Boost Mental Output? Don’t Stimulate Your Brain. Feed It.

Are you looking for a way to improve cognitive function that does not involve pumping your brain full of stimulants? If so, it’s time to consider nootropics . And when it comes to nootropics, no one does it better than TruBrain . Every day, over 200 million Americans rely on stimulants in order to feel more alert. For most, the stimulant of choice is caffeine. It’s estimated that about 196 millio

6d

Capturing extreme close-ups of cellular gene expression

Scientists studying genetic transcription are gaining new insights into a process that is fundamental to all life. Transcription is the first step in gene expression, the process taking place within all living cells by which the DNA sequence of a gene is copied into RNA, which in turn (most generally speaking) serves as the template for assembling protein molecules, the basic building blocks of li

6d

West African camera survey details human pressures on mammals in protected areas

When University of Michigan wildlife ecologist Nyeema Harris started her multiyear camera survey of West African wildlife, she sought to understand interactions between mammals and people in protected areas such as national parks.

6d

Researchers develop new framework for nanoantenna light absorption

Harnessing light's energy into nanoscale volumes requires novel engineering approaches to overcome a fundamental barrier known as the "diffraction limit." However, University of Illinois researchers have breached this barrier by developing nanoantennas that pack the energy captured from light sources, such as LEDs, into particles with nanometer-scale diameters, making it possible to detect individ

6d

West African camera survey details human pressures on mammals in protected areas

When University of Michigan wildlife ecologist Nyeema Harris started her multiyear camera survey of West African wildlife, she sought to understand interactions between mammals and people in protected areas such as national parks.

6d

Ep. 39: Solving the Deadly Transplantable Kidney Shortage

Join freelance audio producer Kaitlin Benz and podcast host Lydia Chain as they take a penetrating look at the challenging paths of patients diagnosed with kidney failure, and chat with the doctors working to make more transplants possible by re-examining the criteria that disqualify some organs.

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A raccoon cafe and the Rugby World Cup: Monday's best photos

The Guardian’s picture editors select photo highlights from around the world, including the Emmy awards, the Milky Way and Corbyn in a wicker car at the Labour party conference Continue reading…

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Can machine learning reveal geology humans can't see?

Identifying geological features in a densely vegetated, steep, and rough terrain can be almost impossible. Imagery like LiDAR can help researchers see through the tree cover, but subtle landforms can often be missed by the human eye.

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Why are mountains so high?

Over millions of years, Earth's summits and valleys have moved and shifted, resulting in the dramatic landscapes of peaks and shadows we know today. Mountains often form when pressure under Earth's surface pushes upward, yet many factors impact their ultimate height, including the erosion of the areas between mountains, known as channels.

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Wildfire can pose risks to reservoirs

Over the past 30 years, wildfires have gotten bigger, stronger, and occurred more often. As climates continue to warm, this trend will likely continue, causing disruption to landscapes and water systems alike.

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Faults' hot streaks and slumps could change earthquake hazard assessments

For more than a century, a guiding principle in seismology has been that earthquakes recur at semi-regular intervals according to a "seismic cycle." In this model, strain that gradually accumulates along a locked fault is completely released in a large earthquake. Recently, however, seismologists have realized that earthquakes often occur in clusters separated by gaps, and one research group now a

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Building resilience in Vieques, Puerto Rico

Two years ago today, Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico with winds as fast as 155 miles per hour. Heavy rains caused flooding and landslides. The storm destroyed homes and entire neighborhoods, knocked out electricity, and left people with limited food and water supplies for months. It is estimated that Hurricane Maria caused nearly 3,000 deaths. Puerto Rico is still struggling to recover to this

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Maybe Dangling a Space Elevator Off the Moon Isn’t as Ludicrous as It Sounds

When astronaut Chris Hadfield serenaded the Earth with Bowie’s Space Oddity , many of us got cracking with back-of-the-envelope calculations attempting to figure out how much the guitar cost to send up: probably around $75,000 . On balance, it seems like money well spent—but the prohibitive cost of sending stuff into space is one of the many reasons the moon bases and Mars landings envisioned by

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Bald eagles have found themselves a new home: Suburbia

For much of the spring, a constant flow of people arrived at a dirt pullout on a mountain road a few miles above Azusa, each craving a glimpse of 10-pound celebrities with 7-foot wingspans and the charisma that politicians can only dream of.

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Bald eagles have found themselves a new home: Suburbia

For much of the spring, a constant flow of people arrived at a dirt pullout on a mountain road a few miles above Azusa, each craving a glimpse of 10-pound celebrities with 7-foot wingspans and the charisma that politicians can only dream of.

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UN chief sees cities, companies filling US void on climate

The head of the United Nations said he believes the U.S. can still pull its weight on climate change, even though President Donald Trump is skipping a U.N. climate summit on Monday and has worked to roll back restrictions on everything from vehicle to power plant emissions.

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Google Assistant updates seek to calm privacy concerns over human review – CNET

Changes include requiring users to opt-in for review and improvements on accidental triggerings of the Assistant.

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AI to bring sharper focus to eye testing

QUT researchers have applied artificial intelligence (AI) deep learning techniques to develop a more accurate and detailed method for analyzing images of the back of the eye to help clinicians …

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Judge to hear arguments in challenge to Georgia abortion law

A federal judge is set to hear arguments over whether Georgia's restrictive new abortion law should be allowed to take effect while a legal challenge is pending.

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Vaccine prevents genital herpes in animal tests

A new vaccine offers protection against genital herpes in animal tests, report researchers. The immunizations led to “mostly sterilizing immunity”—the strongest type of immunity—from the virus. As reported in Science Immunology , researchers delivered the vaccine to 64 mice and then exposed them to genital herpes . After 28 days, they found 63 of the mice had sterilizing immunity, meaning there w

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Capturing extreme close-ups of cellular gene expression

Scientists studying genetic transcription are gaining new insights into a process that is fundamental to all life. Transcription is the first step in gene expression, the process taking place within all living cells by which the DNA sequence of a gene is copied into RNA, which in turn (most generally speaking) serves as the template for assembling protein molecules, the basic building blocks of li

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Why are mountains so high? It doesn't add up

Researchers have analyzed mountain ranges worldwide to show that a theory relating erosion and mountain height doesn't always add up.

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Why the lettuce mitochondrial genome is like a chopped salad

The genomes of mitochondria are usually depicted as rings or circles. But in plants, 1 ring does not rule them all. A new study of lettuce shows that the mitochondrial genome often forms branching structures with elements that can be swapped around like a chopped salad.

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New reaction will make indoline scaffolds available for pharmaceutical development

New approach to producing indolent scaffolds could streamline development and production of small-molecule pharmaceuticals, which comprise the majority of medicines in use today.

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Dagens Medicin sætter projektøren på Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed

Nyt debatpanel vil i efteråret endevende Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed. Deltag selv i debatten.

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Karla crater confirmed to be an impact structure

The Karla crater, one of the about 150 large impact structures on Earth, is situated near the border of the Republic of Tatarstan and Chuvash Republic, about 163 kilometers from Kazan Federal University.

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Synchronised or independent neurons: this is how the brain encodes information

'Like a group of people who whistle a very similar tune': It is the phenomenon of 'co-relation', in which individual neurons do not always act as independent units in receiving and transmitting information but as groups of individuals with similar and simultaneous actions. A new study has shed light for the first time on the cellular mechanisms behind these correlations adding a new piece to the u

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Illinois researchers develop new framework for nanoantenna light absorption

Harnessing light's energy into nanoscale volumes requires novel engineering approaches to overcome a fundamental barrier known as the 'diffraction limit.' However, University of Illinois researchers have breached this barrier by developing nanoantennas that pack the energy captured from light sources.

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Exploring the future of coal power in water scarce Asia

Many aspects of modern energy systems necessitate access to reliable water resources. The findings of a new study involving IIASA researchers shows that Developing Asia's long-term electricity generation plans — which relies heavily on coal power generation — could be significantly impacted by regional changes in the availability of water under climate change.

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Capturing extreme close-ups of cellular gene expression

Scientists studying genetic transcription are gaining new insights into a process that is fundamental to all life. Transcription is the first step in gene expression, the process taking place within all living cells by which the DNA sequence of a gene is copied into RNA, which in turn (most generally speaking) serves as the template for assembling protein molecules, the basic building blocks of li

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QUT researchers use AI to bring sharper focus to eye testing

Researchers at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Australia have applied artificial intelligence (AI) deep learning techniques to develop a more accurate and detailed method for analysing images of the back of the eye to help clinicians better detect and track eye diseases, such as glaucoma and aged-related macular degeneration.

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Fullerene compounds knock out virus infections

Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Energy Science and Technology and the Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of RAS in collaboration with researchers from four other Russian and foreign research centers have discovered a new reaction that helps obtain water-soluble fullerene derivatives which effectively combat flu viruses, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV),

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Why are mountains so high?

Stanford researchers have analyzed mountain ranges worldwide to show that a theory relating erosion and mountain height doesn't always add up.

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Wildfire can pose risks to reservoirs

Over the past 30 years, wildfires have gotten bigger, stronger, and occurred more often. As climates continue to warm, this trend will likely continue, causing disruption to landscapes and water systems alike.

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Why the lettuce mitochondrial genome is like a chopped salad

The genomes of mitochondria are usually depicted as rings or circles. But in plants, 1 ring does not rule them all. A new study of lettuce shows that the mitochondrial genome often forms branching structures with elements that can be swapped around like a chopped salad.

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UTA, University of Maryland team up to better understand sleep apnea treatment in children

Gautam Das, a professor in UTA's Computer Science and Engineering Department, worked with University of Maryland School of Medicine physicians to understand whether sleep studies predicted the improved outcomes following surgery for sleep apnea in children. For their analysis, they re-analyzed the data collected during the Childhood Adenotonsillectomy Trial (CHAT), a randomized trial published in

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How bathroom scales could monitor heart failure

An experimental device uses machine learning tools—and a bathroom scale—to monitor heart failure. Researchers envision this scenario: The user steps onto a the scale and touches metal pads. The device records an electrocardiogram from their fingers and—more importantly—circulation pulsing that makes the body subtly bob up and down on the scale. Machine learning tools compute that heart failure sy

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Unfolding adsorption on metal nanoparticles: Connecting stability with catalysis

Metal nanoparticles have received substantial attention due to their applications in diverse fields from medicine, catalysis, energy and the environment. However, the fundamental properties of nanoparticle adsorption on a surface remain to be understood. James Dean and an interdisciplinary research team in the department of Chemical Engineering, in the U.S. introduced a universal adsorption model

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Ørsted vælger verdens største møller til havvindparker i USA

PLUS. GE Renewables tager kampen op med Vestas og Siemens om havvindmarkedet.

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Greta Thunberg: 'Leaders failed us on climate change'

The Swedish teenage activist makes an emotional plea at a special UN climate summit in New York.

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Human pressures on mammals in protected areas of West Africa

When a wildlife ecologist started her multiyear camera survey of West African wildlife, she sought to understand interactions between mammals and people in protected areas such as national parks.

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Compound extends survival in mice with certain pediatric brain tumors

Versions of an antibiotic drug called DON first isolated from soil bacteria more than 60 years ago have shown promising signs of extending survival in mice models of especially lethal pediatric brain tumors marked by the high expression of a cancer-causing gene known as the MYC oncogene.

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New reaction will make indoline scaffolds available for pharmaceutical development

New approach to producing indolent scaffolds could streamline development and production of small-molecule pharmaceuticals, which comprise the majority of medicines in use today.

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Faults' hot streaks and slumps could change earthquake hazard assessments

For more than a century, a guiding principle in seismology has been that earthquakes recur at semi-regular intervals according to a 'seismic cycle.' In this model, strain that gradually accumulates along a locked fault is completely released in a large earthquake. Recently, however, seismologists have realized that earthquakes often occur in clusters separated by gaps, and one research group now a

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Techathlon podcast: Look ahead to iPhone 12, ruin TV shows with texts, and ace our tech trivia game

Listen to the latest episode in the player below or wherever you find totally awesome podcasts. (Apple/) The iPhone 11 is brand new . In fact, if you bought a packet of deli meat and an iPhone 11 on release day, you'd still have a couple more days to finish your cold cuts before things got sketchy. But the tech world never stops, so, of course in this week's episode of Techathlon, we're diving in

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Läkemedel minskar risk för funktionshinder vid ms

Årligen insjuknar omkring 650 svenskar i sjukdomen multipel skleros, MS, men för de flesta drabbar inte sjukdomen lika skoningslöst som tidigare varit fallet. En stor, svensk registerstudie omfattande drygt 7 300 svenskar som insjuknade mellan 1995 och 2010, slår fast att den som drabbas av MS idag löper mindre risk att få bestående men, än vad som var fallet för 25 år sedan.

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Theory proposes that LIGO/Virgo black holes originate from a first order phase transition

A few years ago, the LIGO/Virgo collaboration detected gravitational waves arising from a binary black hole merger using the two detectors of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). This eventually led to the observation of black holes with masses that are roughly 30 times the mass of the sun. Since then, researchers worldwide have been investigating these black holes, spec

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Faults' hot streaks and slumps could change earthquake hazard assessments

For more than a century, a guiding principle in seismology has been that earthquakes recur at semi-regular intervals according to a 'seismic cycle.' In this model, strain that gradually accumulates along a locked fault is completely released in a large earthquake. Recently, however, seismologists have realized that earthquakes often occur in clusters separated by gaps, and one research group now a

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Building on UD, Nobel legacy

New approach to producing indolent scaffolds could streamline development and production of small-molecule pharmaceuticals, which comprise the majority of medicines in use today.

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Compound extends survival in mice with certain pediatric brain tumors

Versions of an antibiotic drug called DON first isolated from soil bacteria more than 60 years ago have shown promising signs of extending survival in mice models of especially lethal pediatric brain tumors marked by the high expression of a cancer-causing gene known as the MYC oncogene, according to results of two studies from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

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West African camera survey details human pressures on mammals in protected areas

When University of Michigan wildlife ecologist Nyeema Harris started her multiyear camera survey of West African wildlife, she sought to understand interactions between mammals and people in protected areas such as national parks.

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‘STAMP’ gets more cancer info from least invasive biopsies

A new technology could accurately detect and classify cancer cells, and determine the aggressiveness of the disease from the least invasive biopsies, researchers report. With the technology, called STAMP (Sequence-Topology Assembly for Multiplexed Profiling), it’s possible to get comprehensive disease information faster, at a much earlier stage of the clinical workflow, which means doctors can de

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Victoria's threatened species lose out to logging

Victoria's conservation reserves are failing to protect threatened species such as the Leadbeater's possum and the Greater Glider with the best areas for survival instead allocated to logging, new research from The Australian National University (ANU) warns.

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Do the costs of cancer drugs receive enough attention?

A recent analysis from Canada found that information on health-related quality of life is often not collected for investigational cancer drugs or used to calculate the balance of costs and benefits of these drugs when they are submitted for reimbursement.

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Fat mass index, not BMI, associated with cardiovascular events in people with diabetes

In people with diabetes, fat mass index, not body mass index (BMI), is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events, according to new research.

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DNA is held together by hydrophobic forces

Researchers have disproved the prevailing theory of how DNA binds itself. It is not, as is generally believed, hydrogen bonds which bind together the 2 sides of the DNA structure. Instead, water is the key. The discovery opens doors for new understanding in research in medicine and life sciences.

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US pediatric heart transplant waitlist policy change falls short of intended benefits

In March 2016, the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network revised its criteria for prioritizing children awaiting heart transplantation in the US with the intention of reducing the number of deaths on the waitlist, but a new study suggests unintended consequences.

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Researchers perform thousands of mutations to understand amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Researchers have used a technique called high-throughput mutagenesis to study Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), with unexpected results. Results showed that aggregation of TDP-43 is not harmful but actually protects cells, changing our understanding of ALS and opening the door to radically new therapeutic approaches.

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Surrogate-reared sea otters helped restore threatened population

The population of threatened southern sea otters in Elkhorn Slough, an estuary in Central California, has made a significant comeback as a result of Monterey Bay Aquarium's Sea Otter Program. A newly-published study documents 15 years of research showing how the program helped restore the population in the coastal estuary.

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US universities see decline in students from China

After a decade of booming enrollment by students from China, American universities are starting to see steep declines as political tensions between the two countries cut into a major source of tuition revenue.

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Victoria's threatened species lose out to logging

Victoria's conservation reserves are failing to protect threatened species such as the Leadbeater's possum and the Greater Glider with the best areas for survival instead allocated to logging, new research from The Australian National University (ANU) warns.

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New reaction will make indoline scaffolds available for pharmaceutical development

Almost 50 years since the late Richard Heck discovered the powerful chemical reaction that led to the University of Delaware professor's 2010 Nobel Prize, chemists are still finding new and valuable ways to use the Heck Reaction.

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Combining cheap and safe black and white materials creates colorful pigments

In response to worldwide concern over the adverse effects of chemical substances on human health and the environment, most developed countries have legally restricted the use of dyes containing heavy metals or carcinogenic organic compounds; thus, replacing such color materials with safer substances is an urgent issue. Motivated by this, a Nagoya University research group has found that pigments o

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New evidence shows that school poverty shapes racial achievement gaps

Fifty years ago, communities across America began efforts to make school districts more racially integrated, believing it would ease racial disparities in students' educational opportunities. But new evidence shows that while racial segregation within a district is a very strong predictor of achievement gaps, school poverty—not the racial composition of schools—accounts for this effect.

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Solar orbiter cleared to study the sun after extensive spacecraft testing

An Imperial-built instrument will study the sun's magnetic field aboard the Solar Orbiter spacecraft following its launch in early 2020.

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Daylight levels affect our thermal perception

A pioneering study carried out at EPFL shows that the amount of daylight in a room can influence our thermal comfort and how well we tolerate heat or cold. The findings could be used to improve existing building standards and decrease energy consumption.

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Climate change created today's large crocodiles

What does the term crocodylian bring to mind? A big reptile with a chomping jaw?

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Bättre hockey med alternativ åkteknik

En forskningsstudie från Lunds universitet presenterar en ny teknik för skridskoåkning som är mer energieffektiv än traditionell skärteknik. Studien kom till genom en fråga från skridskotekniktränaren Nina Nässén som har utvecklat den alternativa tekniken som kallas Easyskating. Energieffektiv skridskoåkning Easyskating är en skridskoteknik där man åker i en cirkelbåge, snarare än tar skär i olik

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The New BMW X6 Has Light-Absorbing ‘Vantablack’ Paint

A good — no, great — show car is one that is beyond impractical and approaches the impossible (to execute). Think of a car with a 375/20R21 tire with a 20-aspect ratio, the sidewall one-fifth as high as the tire is wide: Pebbles, not just potholes, would break the rim. BMW just raised the bar for amazing concept vehicles with the BMW X6 Vantablack. It absorbs 99-plus percent of light. There are v

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Fullerene compounds knock out virus infections like HIV and HSV

Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Energy Science and Technology and the Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of RAS in collaboration with researchers from four other Russian and foreign research centers have discovered a new reaction that helps obtain water-soluble fullerene derivatives which effectively combat flu viruses, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV),

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Climate change created today's large crocodiles

What does the term crocodylian bring to mind? A big reptile with a chomping jaw?

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The ocean's plastic problem is closer to home than scientists first thought

You're probably used to hearing that the ocean is full of plastic, but scientists are puzzled by a rather different problem—there actually appears to be a lot less of it than there should be. Most large plastic debris floats, but observations of it on the sea surface offshore are far lower than what would be expected, considering that 8m metric tonnes of plastic is estimated to empty into the ocea

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Croc-like carnivores terrorized Triassic dinosaurs in southern Africa 210 million years ago

Giant, predatory croc-like animals that lived during the Triassic period in southern Africa preyed on early dinosaurs and mammal relatives 210 million years ago. These predators, known as "rauisuchians" preyed on early herbivore dinosaurs and their mammal relatives living at the time, according to Wits Masters student Rick Tolchard.

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Turning up the heat for weed control

Weeds are thieves. They steal nutrients, sunlight and water from our food crops. In the case of sugarcane, yield refers to the amount of biomass and the sucrose concentration of the cane, which ultimately determines the amount of sugar produced. Two weedy culprits, namely itchgrass and divine nightshade, reduce cane biomass and sucrose yield.

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Fullerene compounds knock out virus infections like HIV and HSV

Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Energy Science and Technology and the Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics of RAS in collaboration with researchers from four other Russian and foreign research centers have discovered a new reaction that helps obtain water-soluble fullerene derivatives which effectively combat flu viruses, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV),

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Ultra-rare kaon decay could lead to evidence of new physics

Scientists searching for evidence of new physics in particle processes that could explain dark matter and other mysteries of the universe have moved one step closer, with the new result of the NA62 experiment reported today at CERN.

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Turning up the heat for weed control

Weeds are thieves. They steal nutrients, sunlight and water from our food crops. In the case of sugarcane, yield refers to the amount of biomass and the sucrose concentration of the cane, which ultimately determines the amount of sugar produced. Two weedy culprits, namely itchgrass and divine nightshade, reduce cane biomass and sucrose yield.

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Star Wars News: Is This the Opening Sequence of 'Rise of Skywalker'?

Rumors are circulating that it'll begin with a pretty epic lightsaber battle. But those are just rumors.

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The Google Feature Magnifying Disinformation

Martin John Bryant was lying on his bed in his parents’ house in Britain when he heard on the radio that Martin John Bryant had just committed mass murder . His first reaction was disbelief, he told me recently, more than two decades later. He lay there waiting for another hour to see whether he would hear his name again, and he did: Indeed, Martin John Bryant had just shot 58 people, killing 35,

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Hubble takes closer look at not-so-'dead' neighbor

Many of the best-loved galaxies in the cosmos are remarkably large, close, massive, bright, or beautiful, often with an unusual or intriguing structure or history. However, it takes all kinds to make a universe—as demonstrated by this Hubble image of Messier 110.

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Understanding domestic violence against young rural women

One in four Australian women over the age of 15 years have experienced violence at the hands of an intimate partner, and 92 percent of women who report being assaulted by a male, know the perpetrator.

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Studying ancient architectural artifacts in Greece

An architecture major who also has a talent for drawing, Penn junior Zahra Elhanbaly is helping her history of art professor pursue the mystery of surprisingly large architectural artifacts found at the bottom of the Aegean Sea.

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Astronomers detect an extraordinary calcium-rich transient

An international team of astronomers has detected a new transient event as part of the ATLAS survey. The newly discovered transient, designated ATLAS19dqr/SN 2019bkc, turns out to be an extraordinary rapidly evolving calcium-rich event. The finding is detailed in a paper published September 12 on arXiv.org.

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Scientists Tripped People for Science

An elaborate setup allowed researchers to study how people stumble and recover — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Charlotte Moore Sitterly Wrote The Encyclopedia of Starlight

The "world’s most honored woman astrophysicist" worked tirelessly for decades to measure the makeup of the sun and the stars

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The latest version of Yahoo Mail helps users find attachments and deals

Yahoo Mail is getting a mobile update, with new versions of the iOS and Android app launching today. Many of you probably haven’t tried out Yahoo Mail in years, but Senior Director of …

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Roofing drone nails down shingles

An octocopter capable of attaching asphalt shingles to roofs with a nail gun has been demonstrated at the University of Michigan.

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The period-correct perfection of the 2019 Goodwood Revival – Roadshow

Bask in the glory of the world's premier historic motorsports event.

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New Arlo Pro 3 security camera lets you see more of your backyard – CNET

The Arlo Pro 3 has a wider viewing angle than previous Pro cameras.

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Eat your heart out: Native water rats have worked out how to safely eat cane toads

Australia's water rats, or Rakali, are one of Australia's beautiful but lesser-known native rodents. And these intelligent, semi-aquatic rats have revealed another talent: they are one of the only Australian mammals to safely eat toxic cane toads.

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Five Songs That Explain the Cars’ Influence

When news of Ric Ocasek’s death broke earlier this month, the range of artists who grieved publicly—Beck, Ice T, Nile Rodgers—showed the wide influence the Cars achieved as one of the most popular new-wave bands ever. One of the sharpest and most apt tributes came from A. C. Newman of the Canadian indie-rock band the New Pornographers. “I don’t even need to listen to the first Cars album, just pr

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Can Three Numbers Stem the Tide of American Suicides?

Suicide hotlines are based on the simple idea that a conversation with a sympathetic stranger can save a life. Historically, most suicide hotlines have been run by volunteers without advanced degrees in counseling or related fields, and there’s research to suggest that nonexperts are at least as effective, if not more so, than professionals at helping suicidal callers. Today, volunteers are an in

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A diamond’s quantum memory sets a glittering record

Nature, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02766-3 Tiny device holds an unprecedented number of quantum units of information.

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China’s tree-planting drive could falter in a warming world

Nature, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02789-w Researchers warn that the country’s push to hold back its deserts could strain water resources.

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Eat your heart out: Native water rats have worked out how to safely eat cane toads

Australia's water rats, or Rakali, are one of Australia's beautiful but lesser-known native rodents. And these intelligent, semi-aquatic rats have revealed another talent: they are one of the only Australian mammals to safely eat toxic cane toads.

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Possums bounce back from Devils on Maria Island

The recent introduction of healthy Tasmanian Devils to Maria Island was initially bad news for the local possum population, a species blissfully ignorant of the predator's existence.

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Possums bounce back from Devils on Maria Island

The recent introduction of healthy Tasmanian Devils to Maria Island was initially bad news for the local possum population, a species blissfully ignorant of the predator's existence.

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New report lays out strategies to curb emissions from government-owned enterprises

Policy makers, academics, and others have devoted significant effort over the past three decades to considering how best to incentivize households and private companies to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. There has been much less discussion about how best to incentivize state-owned enterprises—companies that are either wholly or majority owned by a government—to cut emissions. Yet when it co

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We've learned a great deal since South Africa's biggest quake 50 years ago

Fifty years ago I was a teenager growing up in Cape Town. At about 10pm on 29 September 1969, our house started to shake violently. Alarmed, my family and I fled out of doors; our neighbors did the same.

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More cases of mysterious disease found in dogs in Norway

Norwegian authorities have recorded six new cases of a mysterious and potentially fatal canine disease that has now affected at least 173 dogs across the country, killing 43 of them.

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More cases of mysterious disease found in dogs in Norway

Norwegian authorities have recorded six new cases of a mysterious and potentially fatal canine disease that has now affected at least 173 dogs across the country, killing 43 of them.

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Biochemists reveal insights into extraordinary regenerative ability

Planarians are flatworms with the extraordinary ability to restore wounded or missing parts of their body. It has long been known that a particular group of proteins—known as PIWI proteins—are essential for this ability to regenerate. A team of researchers at the University of Bayreuth led by biochemist Dr. Claus Kuhn now reveals insights into the mode of action of these proteins in more detail. I

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Ancient humans may have made patterns and sculptures on South Africa's beaches

One of the first things many kids—or even adults—may do when they are on a beach or dune is to make patterns in the sand, or sculptures in the form of sandcastles.

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Looking for lurkers —a new way to do SETI

The most recently discovered group of rocky bodies nearby Earth are termed co-orbital objects. These may have been an attractive location for extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) to locate a probe to observe Earth throughout our deep past. Co-orbital objects approach Earth very closely every year at distances much shorter than anything except the moon. They have the same orbital period as Earth. Th

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The topology of disordered 3-D graphenes: Rosalind Franklin's pre-DNA problem untangled

Disordered three-dimensional graphenes are carbon materials present in batteries, water filters, gas masks, high-temperature ceramics, electrochemical sensors and insulation. They also have more specialised uses, such as protecting the Parker solar probe spacecraft from burning up on its approach to the sun.

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Biochemists reveal insights into extraordinary regenerative ability

Planarians are flatworms with the extraordinary ability to restore wounded or missing parts of their body. It has long been known that a particular group of proteins—known as PIWI proteins—are essential for this ability to regenerate. A team of researchers at the University of Bayreuth led by biochemist Dr. Claus Kuhn now reveals insights into the mode of action of these proteins in more detail. I

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In­sects, algae still far from be­ing favorite foods in Eu­rope

Algae and insects are rich sources of protein for humans and livestock alike. Getting them on restaurant menus and into animal diet formulations still requires a lot of work—but it's worth the effort.

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Do DNA Databases Make Would-Be Criminals Think Twice?

The power of DNA databases as a preventative crime tool is best understood through the lens of behavioral economics, which considers criminal behavior as a rational response to competing incentives — a calculus of “should I, shouldn’t I” based on potential benefits and costs to the would-be offender.

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Efter ti års grønne tiltag: Verdens CO2-udledning ligner 'business as usual'

Et tilbageblik på FN´s første 'Emission Gap'-rapport viser, at verdens CO2-udledning har fulgt en udvikling svarende til, at vi intet har gjort.

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In­sects, algae still far from be­ing favorite foods in Eu­rope

Algae and insects are rich sources of protein for humans and livestock alike. Getting them on restaurant menus and into animal diet formulations still requires a lot of work—but it's worth the effort.

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Microvilli in motion: Live cell imaging to visualize early steps of brush border formation

Microvilli are protrusions on the surface of epithelial cells that are dedicated to mechanosensation in the inner ear, and chemosensation and solute uptake in the lungs, gut, intestine and urinary tract. Epithelial cells assemble dense arrays of microvilli called "brush borders" that protect against infections and injury.

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New AI app predicts climate change stress for farmers in Africa

A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool available for free in a smartphone app can predict near-term crop productivity for farmers in Africa and may help them protect their staple crops — such as maize, cassava and beans — in the face of climate warming, according to Penn State researchers.

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Microvilli in motion: Live cell imaging to visualize early steps of brush border formation

Microvilli are protrusions on the surface of epithelial cells that are dedicated to mechanosensation in the inner ear, and chemosensation and solute uptake in the lungs, gut, intestine and urinary tract. Epithelial cells assemble dense arrays of microvilli called "brush borders" that protect against infections and injury.

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6 percent of seminarians report sexual misconduct; 90 percent report none

According to new research from the University of Notre Dame's McGrath Institute for Church Life, 6 percent of Catholic seminarians across the country say they have experienced some form of sexual harassment, abuse or misconduct, while 90 percent report none. Another 4 percent said they might have experienced misconduct but were not sure, and 84 percent of seminarians believe their administration a

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Why These Geese Wear Tiny Backpacks and Fly in a Wind Tunnel

The bar-headed goose flies 26,000 feet high during its migration. To find out how, scientists devised an adorable experiment.

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Peex Review: I Remixed Elton John's Live Show Using my Phone

These app-controlled headphones pipe a live feed of personalized concert audio directly from the stage and into your ears.

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Uncorking champagne creates under-expanded supersonic carbon dioxide freezing jets

A trio of researchers from the University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne and the University of Rennes has found that when a champagne bottle is uncorked, the CO2 and water that is released creates under-expanded supersonic CO2 freezing jets. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Gérard Liger-Belair, Daniel Cordier and Robert Georges describe their study of what happens when a bottl

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Study targets graduate student stress

Rebecca Fried readily acknowledges her doctoral research addressing stress among graduate students was, well, stressful. "The irony was never lost on me."

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'Edible forests' can fight land clearing and world hunger at the same time

Reducing emissions from deforestation and farming is an urgent global priority if we want to control climate change. However, like many climate change problems, the solution is complicated. Cutting down forests to plant edible crops feeds some of the world's hungriest people.

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Antarctic marine protection treaty offers lessons for global conservation

A landmark multinational agreement protecting Antarctica's Ross Sea offers valuable lessons for similar global conservation pacts in the future, according to a new analysis coauthored by a CU Boulder researcher.

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Sustainable dairy project finds ways to lower emissions, boost profits

A six-year-long, nationwide research project has concluded with solutions to help the dairy industry reduce greenhouse gas emissions while boosting profitability.

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Content lacking in children's book-sharing experiences in low-income, ethnic-minority households

The lack of content in books that children can access—and not merely the total number of books—has profound implications for efforts to narrow long-term language and achievement gaps in low-income, ethnic-minority households, according to new Rutgers University–Camden research.

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'Edible forests' can fight land clearing and world hunger at the same time

Reducing emissions from deforestation and farming is an urgent global priority if we want to control climate change. However, like many climate change problems, the solution is complicated. Cutting down forests to plant edible crops feeds some of the world's hungriest people.

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Antarctic marine protection treaty offers lessons for global conservation

A landmark multinational agreement protecting Antarctica's Ross Sea offers valuable lessons for similar global conservation pacts in the future, according to a new analysis coauthored by a CU Boulder researcher.

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New AI app predicts climate change stress for farmers in Africa

A new artificial intelligence (AI) tool available for free in a smartphone app can predict near-term crop productivity for farmers in Africa and may help them protect their staple crops—such as maize, cassava and beans—in the face of climate warming, according to Penn State researchers. The team will unveil the new tool—which will work with their existing AI assistant, called "PlantVillage Nuru"—t

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Outrage, Bias, and the Instability of Truth

One experience I have had many times is with colleagues or friends who are not aware of the problem of pseudoscience in medicine. At first they are in relative denial – “it can’t be that bad.” “Homeopathy cannot possibly be that dumb!” Once I have had an opportunity to explain it to them sufficiently and they see the evidence for themselves, they go from denial to outrage. They seem to go from on

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“Based on the literature, we have no reason not to believe to the authors.”

If you’re a fan of the post hoc fallacy, this post is for you. If not, we hope you’ll bear with us anyway. In June, we reported on an expression of concern in the Journal of Cell Science for a 2006 paper “several bands…in Fig. 5 look very similar.” At the time, we noted that … Continue reading

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Google claims it has finally reached quantum supremacy

Has Google achieved quantum supremacy? The firm says its quantum chip can perform a calculation that is practically impossible for our best supercomputer

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Hypersexual disorder linked to genes that regulate love hormone

People with excessive sexual fantasies and urges have different gene expressions that seem to affect how the “love hormone” oxytocin is regulated

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Game of Thrones’ Muted Victory Lap at the Emmys

LOS ANGELES—“Soph! Soph!” a man shouted from inside the HBO Emmys party at the Pacific Design Center as he tried to help the Game of Thrones actress Sophie Turner navigate the throngs of people surrounding their reserved section. So many well-wishers showed up to congratulate the Thrones team on their Outstanding Drama win—among them the Veep cast members Tony Hale and Timothy Simons, as well as

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Dna hålls ihop för att molekylens inre skyr vatten

Vår arvsmassa består av dna, som i sin utgörs av två strängar med sockermolekyler och fosfatgrupper. Mellan dessa sitter kvävebaser, alltså de atomföreningar som utgör organismens gener, med vätebindningar mellan sig. Hittills har den rådande uppfattningen varit att de båda strängarna hålls samman i en spiralformad ”repstege” genom vätebindningar som sitter mellan de så kallade kvävebaserna på re

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Mysterious Mineral from Earth's Mantle Discovered in South African Diamond

The mineral contains an unusual mix of elements for a rock from Earth's mantle.

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How gliding animals fine-tuned the rules of evolution

A study of gliding animals has challenged the idea that evolutionary innovations—adaptations that bring new abilities and advantages—spur the origin of other new body types and other characteristics in descendant species.

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DNA is held together by hydrophobic forces

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have disproved the prevailing theory of how DNA binds itself. It is not, as is generally believed, hydrogen bonds which bind together the two sides of the DNA structure. Instead, water is the key. The discovery opens doors for new understanding in research in medicine and life sciences. The findings are published in PNAS.

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Dear Therapist: I Can’t Stop Thinking About My Therapist’s Grindr Profile

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I am an out gay man in my late 20s. Last weekend, while scrolling through Grindr, I came across my therapist's profile. Although his profile pictures don’t show his face, I was able to tell that the profile be

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How gliding animals fine-tuned the rules of evolution

A study of gliding animals has challenged the idea that evolutionary innovations—adaptations that bring new abilities and advantages—spur the origin of other new body types and other characteristics in descendant species.

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The Prisoner's Dilemma: Exploring a strategy that leads to mutual cooperation without non-cooperative actions

A research team led by Hitoshi Yamamoto from Rissho University has analyzed which strategies would be effective in the prisoner's dilemma game, into which a new behavior of non-participation in the game was introduced. The study was carried out in collaboration with colleagues Isamu Okada (Soka University), Takuya Taguchi (Shibaura Institute of Technology), and Masayoshi Muto (Shibaura Institute o

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DNA is held together by hydrophobic forces

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have disproved the prevailing theory of how DNA binds itself. It is not, as is generally believed, hydrogen bonds which bind together the two sides of the DNA structure. Instead, water is the key. The discovery opens doors for new understanding in research in medicine and life sciences. The findings are published in PNAS.

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Cleaner Ships May Mean More Expensive Holidays

New rules designed to reduce sulfur pollution from ocean-going ships will increase demand for low-sulfur fuel, boosting the cost of some imported goods.

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This Week’s Cartoons: VR Pets, Gamma Rays, and Emotions

Pictographs walked so emojis could run.

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No, the Exoplanet K2-18b Is Not Habitable

News outlets that said otherwise are just crying wolf—but they’re not the only ones at fault — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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No, the Exoplanet K2-18b Is Not Habitable

News outlets that said otherwise are just crying wolf—but they’re not the only ones at fault — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study confirms Monterey Bay Aquarium surrogate-reared sea otters helped restore threatened population

The population of threatened southern sea otters in Elkhorn Slough, an estuary in Central California, has made a significant comeback as a result of Monterey Bay Aquarium's Sea Otter Program. A newly-published study in Oryx—The International Journal of Conservation documents 15 years of research showing how the program helped restore the population in the coastal estuary, with surrogate-reared ott

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Flytrafikkens CO2-udledning stiger langt mere end forudset

Selv om fly per passagerkilometer i dag udleder halvt så meget som i 1990, betyder trafikstigningerne, at branchens udledninger er på himmelfart og langt overstiger effektivitetsgevinsten.

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Study confirms Monterey Bay Aquarium surrogate-reared sea otters helped restore threatened population

The population of threatened southern sea otters in Elkhorn Slough, an estuary in Central California, has made a significant comeback as a result of Monterey Bay Aquarium's Sea Otter Program. A newly-published study in Oryx—The International Journal of Conservation documents 15 years of research showing how the program helped restore the population in the coastal estuary, with surrogate-reared ott

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Nu kommer sol- og vindparker med batterilagring

PLUS. Både USA og Australien vil udbygge store vindparker med batterilagring. Det kan løse VE-industriens store problem.

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Are We at a Climate Change Turning Point? Obama's EPA Chief Thinks So

Gina McCarthy talks about the intersection of climate and health and the Trump administration’s environmental rollbacks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study confirms Monterey Bay Aquarium surrogate-reared sea otters helped restore threatened population

The population of threatened southern sea otters in Elkhorn Slough, an estuary in Central California, has made a significant comeback as a result of Monterey Bay Aquarium's Sea Otter Program. A newly-published study in Oryx–The International Journal of Conservation documents 15 years of research showing how the program helped restore the population in the coastal estuary.

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Dutch reinforce major dike as seas rise, climate changes

Rising up in a thin line through the waters separating the provinces of North Holland and Friesland, the 87-year-old Afsluitdijk is one of the low-lying Netherlands' key defenses against its ancient enemy, the sea. With climate change bringing more powerful storms and rising sea levels , the dike is getting a major makeover.

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Evaluering af Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed er for snæver

Sundhedsministeriet har sendt kommissoriet for evalueringen af Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed i høring. Desværre er det en alt for snæver evaluering, der lægges op til, skriver Andreas Rudkjøbing..

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Hjärnans oxytocinsystem kan kopplas till sexmissbruk

Studien har gjorts av forskare vid Umeå och Uppsala universitet samt Karolinska Institutet och är publicerad i tidskriften Epigenetics. – Vi kunde bland patienter som söker för hypersexualitet se en påverkan på gener som reglerar hormonet oxytocin i hjärnan. Det kan medföra förhöjda oxytocinnivåer, säger Adrian Boström vid Institutionen för neurovetenskap vid Uppsala universitet. Hypersexuell stö

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W. Antarctica's crumbling ice sheet to redraw global coastline

The fate of the world's coastal regions and the hundreds of millions of people who inhabit them depend on a block of ice atop West Antarctica on track to lift global oceans by at least three metres.

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UK families in buyers club fly to Argentina for cystic fibrosis drugs

The NHS in England won’t provide a new treatment for cystic fibrosis, so families have formed a buyers club and travelled to South America to buy a version

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Techtopia #124: Oprør mod techgiganter

Techfolket gør nu oprør mod de store amerikanske techmonopoler. Nu skal vi tænke menneske og samfund før apps og data.

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How Cities Reshape the Evolutionary Path of Urban Wildlife

If researchers can figure out how pigeons and rats evolve to thrive in hostile city habitats, it could help other beasts—including us—adapt to climate change.

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The Emmys Tried to Have 30 Hosts

Last year, when the Emmy Awards were emceed by the very sleepy duo of Colin Jost and Michael Che , it felt like the show had no host at all. Over the course of the evening, the two Saturday Night Live comedians would occasionally saunter onstage, stand listlessly, and recite jokes as if they were being held hostage. This year’s Emmys, perhaps as a reaction to that lethargic affair, dispensed with

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What’s Different About the Impossible Burger?

Recently, like thousands of other Americans, I went to Burger King to get a Whopper for lunch. There it was: perfect, juicy, glistening. And, without mayo, vegan. This year, the fast-food giant is rolling out the plant-based Impossible Burger at its 7,200 U.S. locations, joining White Castle, Carl’s Jr., Del Taco, and TGI Fridays in serving vegan “meat.” KFC offered vegan fried chicken at one of

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House Democrats Are Ignoring This Key Lesson of Watergate

For the past nine months, President Donald Trump’s strategy of obfuscation and delay has successfully denied the House of Representatives the witnesses and evidence it needs to document and publicize the mounting case for maladministration and malfeasance within the Trump administration. The Democratic majority in the House has simply acquiesced to Trump’s use of protracted litigation and his unp

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Myndigheder og virksomheder gik i phishing-fælden under CFCS-øvelse

30 myndigheder og virksomheder har deltaget i en frivillig phishing-øvelse under en national kriseøvelse. Omkring halvdelen af dem hoppede i med begge ben.

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Massively parallel RNA device engineering in mammalian cells with RNA-Seq

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12334-y Synthetic RNA-based devices can dynamically control a wide range of processes. Here the authors develop a quantitative and high-throughput mammalian cell-based RNA-seq assay to efficiently engineer ribozyme switches.

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Publisher Correction: Shared heritability and functional enrichment across six solid cancers

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12095-8

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Munc18-1 is crucial to overcome the inhibition of synaptic vesicle fusion by αSNAP

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12188-4 Munc18-1 and Munc13-1 are key for the exquisite regulation of neurotransmitter release. Here biophysical experiments show how αSNAP inhibits liposome fusion mediated by the neuronal SNAREs and how Munc18-1 overcomes this inhibition, ensuring that release depends on Munc18-1 and Munc13-1.

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Pioglitazone attenuates kidney injury in an experimental model of gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49835-1

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Printed, Flexible Lactate Sensors: Design Considerations Before Performing On-Body Measurements

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49689-7

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Mutation profiling of cancer drivers in Brazilian colorectal cancer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49611-1

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Identification of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4 (Foc TR4) responsive miRNAs in banana root

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50130-2 Identification of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4 ( Foc TR4) responsive miRNAs in banana root

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Biochemical and biophysical characterization of purified native CD20 alone and in complex with rituximab and obinutuzumab

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50031-4

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Circulation of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses in wild birds and poultry in the Netherlands, 2006–2016

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50170-8

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Pb nanospheres in ancient zircon yield model ages for zircon formation and Pb mobilization

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49882-8

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The importance of the quaternary structure to represent conformational ensembles of the major Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug target

Scientific Reports, Published online: 23 September 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50213-0

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Where Theory Meets Chalk, Dust Flies

A photo survey of the blackboards of mathematicians.

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The 4 ingredients to create consciousness could explain our own minds

Despite decades of effort, we have been unable to understand how our brains create consciousness. An engineering approach could bring a breakthrough

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Your dead palm is a woodpecker home—and that's good

At the very edges of urbanization, Northern Flicker woodpeckers live in dead palm trees raising their young. Their populations are on the decline throughout the state, especially South Florida. But Joshua Diamond was lucky enough to capture a few on film, along with other species of woodpeckers.

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Your dead palm is a woodpecker home—and that's good

At the very edges of urbanization, Northern Flicker woodpeckers live in dead palm trees raising their young. Their populations are on the decline throughout the state, especially South Florida. But Joshua Diamond was lucky enough to capture a few on film, along with other species of woodpeckers.

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U.N. Climate Summit Sets Stage For New National Emissions Promises

Humanity is not on track to avoid the most catastrophic impacts of climate change. Delegations from nearly 200 countries are meeting to discuss promises they made to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. (Image credit: Czarek Sokolowski/AP)

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Exercising To Ease Pain: Taking Brisk Walks Can Help

Never mind a runner's high — the buzz some people say they get after a run. Neuroscientist Benedict Kolber was more interested in how to generate pain relief via a brisk walk. It can really work. (Image credit: Eamon Queeney for NPR)

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Indtrængende vand og for lidt kapacitet: Norsk atomlagring bryder internationale krav

PLUS. Direktoratet for strålevern og atomsikkerhet (DSA) i Norge kræver, at der bygges et nyt atomlager. Ejeren af anlæggene har brudt flere tidsfrister.

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Thailand Shuttered a Notorious Tiger Zoo, but the Problem Has Only Gotten Worse

Activists say Thailand’s tiger zoos amount to little more than farms, which produce animal parts for a thriving black market.

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Researchers perform thousands of mutations to understand amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Researchers from IBEC and CRG in Barcelona use a technique called high-throughput mutagenesis to study Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), with unexpected results. Results showed that aggregation of TDP-43 is not harmful but actually protects cells, changing our understanding of ALS and opening the door to radically new therapeutic approaches.

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Scientists prepare to drill for million-year-old ice in Antarctica

Researchers hope to use bubbles trapped in ice to help predict effect of CO2 on the Earth’s climate Million-year-old ice buried deep in Antarctica could hold crucial information about the planet’s past and help climate predictions. And scientists with the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) are a step closer to unearthing it. Continue reading…

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Tesla May Soon Have a Battery That Can Last a Million Miles

Elon Musk promised Tesla would soon have a million-mile battery, more than double what drivers can expect today. A new paper suggests he wasn't exaggerating.

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Bee biodiversity barometer on Fiji

The biodiversity buzz is alive and well in Fiji, but climate change, noxious weeds and multiple human activities are making possible extinction a counter buzzword.

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Markant kvantegennembrud: Google har opnået 'quantum supremacy'

Kvantecomputer udfører en beregning på 200 sekunder, som vil tage 10.000 år på verdens største supercomputere. »Det er en af de største videnskabelige nyheder i dette årti,« bemærker uafhængig amerikansk ekspert.

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Bee biodiversity barometer on Fiji

The biodiversity buzz is alive and well in Fiji, but climate change, noxious weeds and multiple human activities are making possible extinction a counter buzzword.

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Lingering Pacific heat wave threatens Hawaii coral

At the edge of an ancient lava flow where jagged black rocks meet the Pacific, small off-the-grid homes overlook the calm blue waters of Papa Bay on Hawaii's Big Island—no tourists or hotels in sight. Here, one of the islands' most abundant and vibrant coral reefs thrives just below the surface.

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Early Van Gogh works auctioned in Belgium

Two early works by Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh were auctioned in the Belgian city of Ghent on Sunday, fetching near estimate prices that the organiser said were bargains.

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A world-renowned placebo researcher asks, “Does placebo research boost pseudoscience?”

Professor Fabrizio Benedetti is the most famous and almost certainly also the most influential researcher investigating the physiology of placebo effects. In a recent commentary, he asks whether placebo research is fueling quackery, as quacks co-opt its results. The answer to that question is certainly yes. A better question is: How do supporters of science counter the placebo narrative promoted b

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Google Tightens Its Voice Assistant Rules Amid Privacy Backlash

Following Apple, Amazon, and others, Google will put in new safeguards against accidental voice assistant collection and transcription.

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'Moment of truth' at key UN climate summit

Some 60 world leaders convene on Monday for a UN summit on "climate emergency" aimed at reinvigorating the faltering Paris agreement, at a time when mankind is releasing more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere than at any time in history.

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Who is going to plug in to Elon Musk’s Neuralink AI experiment when it is available?

Let’s talk about Elon Musk’s plan to offer humans a chance to achieve symbiosis with an AI (his words, not mine, watch Rogan interview or other interviews he has done about Neuralink). If I understand correctly humans will be able to have a direct interface with an AI which will presumably dwarf us in IQ. He has mentioned that we will be “like leaves on a tree”. Elon does not seem too enthused ab

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New lasers may be powerful enough to drill a hole in reality

submitted by /u/dorash [link] [comments]

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Can you solve it? Maths on the back of an envelope

Stationery puzzles to get your brain moving UPDATE: Solutions now up and the winners of the mnemonic challenge announced Today, we’re pushing the envelope. 1) A piece of paper is folded to make a shape that looks a bit like the back of an envelope, illustrated below. If the paper is unfolded again to make a flat sheet, what shape will it be? Prove it. Continue reading…

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A brief guide to the impacts of climate change on food production

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Daisy Simmons with input from from Dana Nuccitelli on the latest IPCC report Food may be a universal language – but in these record-breaking hot days, so too is climate change. With July clocking in as the hottest month on Earth in recorded history and extreme weather ramping up globally, farmers are facing the brunt of climate change in cropland

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Emmys 2019 memes: Big Game of Thrones win has some fans in a fiery rage – CNET

Plus, Bob Newhart heckles Ben Stiller and Don Cheadle gets renamed Dan Chowder.

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UN secretary general hails 'turning point' in climate crisis fight

United Nations hosts climate summit in New York on Monday New data shows 2014-19 warmest five-year period on record The world may have hit a hopeful “turning point” in the struggle to tackle the climate crisis despite escalating greenhouse gas emissions and the recalcitrance of major emitters Brazil and the US, according to the United Nations secretary general. Continue reading…

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Jeremy Corbyn’s Britain Would Reshape Western Alliances

BRIGHTON, England—Things are not all right here in Britain. Boris Johnson’s ruling Conservatives have lost their majority, and with it their ability to govern; Parliament has been suspended; and the country is weeks away from crashing out of the European Union, its closest neighbor and largest trading partner, without a withdrawal deal. In normal times, this moment would present a prime opportuni

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Influenzavaccine under graviditet beskytter barnet i et halvt år

En nyfødt kan være beskyttet af mors vaccine i de første seks måneder.

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I’m kinda disappointed in how far we’ve gotten

Sure we’ve gone far with fixing the environment, but have we really? I remember in having projects in school where we learned about something that we thought we could fix and offer solutions to it. In 6th grade me and a group did a project on hydraulic fracturing and how it’s hurting the environment. In 8th grade, we wrote a letter (didn’t have to send) to someone in the government about a soluti

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DNA is held together by hydrophobic forces

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, disprove the prevailing theory of how DNA binds itself. It is not, as is generally believed, hydrogen bonds which bind together the 2 sides of the DNA structure. Instead, water is the key. The discovery opens doors for new understanding in research in medicine and life sciences. The researchers' findings are presented in the journal PNAS.

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Bee biodiversity barometer on Fiji

The biodiversity buzz is alive and well in Fiji, but climate change, noxious weeds and multiple human activities are making possible extinction a counter buzzword. Just as Australian researchers are finding colourful new bee species, some of them are already showing signs of exposure to environmental changes.

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Opioid use disorder in pregnancy: 5 things to know

Opioid use is increasing in pregnancy as well as the general population. A 'Five things to know about' practice article on opioid disuse in pregnancy in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides information on how to manage this vulnerable population.

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Fat mass index, not BMI, associated with cardiovascular events in people with diabetes

In people with diabetes, fat mass index, not body mass index (BMI), is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

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New national guideline sets out best practices for delivering injectable opioid agonist treatment

A new Canadian guideline lays out the optimal strategies for providing injectable opioid agonist treatment with prescription heroin and hydromorphone for people with severe opioid use disorder. The clinical guideline was created for a wide range of health care providers to address an urgent need for evidence-based treatment of opioid use causing overdose and death, and is published in CMAJ (Canadi

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Do the costs of cancer drugs receive enough attention?

A recent analysis from Canada found that information on health-related quality of life is often not collected for investigational cancer drugs or used to calculate the balance of costs and benefits of these drugs when they are submitted for reimbursement, according to findings published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.

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US pediatric heart transplant waitlist policy change falls short of intended benefits

In March 2016, the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network revised its criteria for prioritizing children awaiting heart transplantation in the US with the intention of reducing the number of deaths on the waitlist, but a new study suggests unintended consequences.

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The Future of African Healthcare

Healthcare systems across Africa are underfunded and understaffed. But clinicians and politicians are campaigning to secure more funds, improve medical training, widen access to vaccines, tackle counterfeit drugs and develop more affordable medicines

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African scientists seek slice of global pharmaceutical industry

Local pioneers are working to right an imbalance in how drugs are developed

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Drones deployed in Africa’s ‘leapfrog’ vaccine drive

21st century technology is helping close gaps in curing disease

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Donerat hjärta på väg genom Sverige i ny uppfinning – hjärtboxen

Nu testas hjärtboxen i skarpt läge. Det är en svensk uppfinning som gör att hjärtan kan hämtas över mycket större områden än tidigare. Boxen ger hjärtat blod och syrgas under transport och styr temperaturen, vilket gör att hjärtat klarar sig längre utanför kroppen än förut.

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”Vår son donerade fem organ”

Axel Tidblom dog i en cykelolycka när han var 14 år. Efter sin död räddade han livet på fem svårt sjuka personer. Nu uppmanar Axels mamma alla att berätta för sina närstående om hur man ställer sig till att donera sina organ.

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“Organdonation ger mening åt den meningslösa döden”

Organdonatorer dör ofta hastigt. Chockade närstående måste ta ställning till donation när de befinner sig mitt uppe i en stor sorg. Nu har forskare undersökt hur de upplever vården när den övergår från att rädda liv till att rädda organ. Många uppgav att organdonationen ger mening åt den meningslösa döden.

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Sådan skaber vi en journalist-robot

Vores research-robot møder journalist-robotten, som skal skrive jobtrends-artikler for Version2.

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Femern-selskab tav om dårlig trafikprognose: Ikke et ord til tyske myndigheder

PLUS. Selv om Femern A/S skulle give de tyske godkendelsesmyndigheder alle relevante oplysninger, oplyste selskabet det ikke, at en trafikprognose i april 2017 viste, at mindre trafik ville flytte fra Storebæltsforbindelsen end forventet.

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The Plea in Michelle Williams’s Emmys Speech

Until Michelle Williams took to the stage tonight at the 2019 Emmy Awards, the evening was shaping up to be relatively apolitical. (Patricia Arquette briefly championed transgender rights in her acceptance speech for The Act , while the Black Mirror creator Charlie Brooker made a joke about assuming 52 percent of the audience had voted not for Bandersnatch , but for Brexit.) But then the star of

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A ‘Ridiculous’ Emmys Night for Fleabag

Updated at 11:14 p.m. ET on September 22, 2019. Phoebe Waller-Bridge has had a wild year. In May, the second and final season of her dark-comedy series, Fleabag , was released to widespread critical acclaim. Months later, she performed the one-woman play on which the Amazon show was based for the final time at London’s 760-seat Wyndham’s Theatre. Just last week, the theater company announced it w

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Diagnostic Tattoos Could Detect and Alert to Metabolic Changes

submitted by /u/krwalks [link] [comments]

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