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nyheder2019september30

Ancient scrolls charred by Vesuvius could be read once again

US scientists say it may be possible to decipher words using new x-ray technique When Mount Vesuvius erupted in AD79 it destroyed the towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum, their inhabitants and their prized possessions – among them a fine library of scrolls that were carbonised by the searing heat of ash and gas. But scientists say there may still be hope that the fragile documents can once more be r

36min

How opt-out organ donation could affect US waiting lists

Every year in the United States, about 7,500 people die while waiting for an organ transplant, and that number is expected to increase in coming years as demographics shift.

53min

The Atlantic Politics Daily: Classroom Warfare

Comments or questions? Send us an email anytime. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We appreciate your continued support for our journalism. Today in Politics ( The Atlantic ) Affirmative action has been somewhat of a political football since colleges first started adopting such policies half a century ago. Even after a district court judge ruled in favor of Harvard this week ,

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LATEST

Inventing the world's strongest silver

A team of scientists has made the strongest silver ever — 42 percent stronger than the previous world record. It's part of a discovery of a new mechanism at the nanoscale that can create metals much stronger than any ever made before — while not losing electrical conductivity.

53min

Bowel cancer screening in younger groups may do more harm than good

Screening for bowel cancer has been widely introduced, but the benefits are small and may not outweigh the risks of anxiety and false positives

1h

Experts advise against routine bowel cancer testing for all over-50s

Routine testing for bowel cancer should not be recommended for everyone aged 50-79 years because, for those at very low risk, the benefit is small and uncertain and there are potential harms, say a panel of international experts in The BMJ today.

1h

Substantial variation in uptake of new prescribing guidance by GPs

Substantial variation exists between general practices in uptake of new prescribing guidance, with important implications for patient care and health expenditure, finds the largest analysis of its kind published by The BMJ today.

1h

Environmental cost of formula milk should be a matter of global concern

'The production of unnecessary infant and toddler formulas exacerbates environmental damage and should be a matter of increasing global concern,' argue experts in The BMJ today.

1h

NASA Poised for Record-Breaking Number of Spacewalks

The first in a planned series of 10 spacewalks will kick off on October 6. (Credit: NASA) NASA announced a series of 10 spacewalks happening over the next three months. The complex spacewalks are part of a marathon effort which NASA scheduled to complete repairs and upgrades to the International Space Station. The events could ultimately set a new record for the most spacewalks in a time since 201

1h

Vaping-associated lung injury may be caused by toxic chemical fumes, study finds

Research into the pathology of vaping-associated lung injury is in its early stages, but a study finds that lung injuries from vaping most likely are caused by direct toxicity or tissue damage from noxious chemical fumes.

1h

Cancer data provide insights into occurrence, overdiagnosis, and treatment advances

Investigators analyzed 40 years of cancer burden data and examined patterns of incidence and mortality for various cancers, finding examples for which incidence and mortality moved in concert and examples where discordance in incidence and mortality indicate that overdiagnosis may be at play.

1h

In women with HIV, TB preventive therapy poses greater risk in pregnancy than postpartum

Study results help clarify how to safely prevent tuberculosis (TB) in women living with HIV who are pregnant or have recently given birth, are taking antiretroviral therapy, and live where TB is highly prevalent.

1h

Most kidney transplants between people with HIV have long-term success

People living with HIV who received kidney transplants from deceased donors with HIV had high rates of overall survival and kidney graft survival after five years, according to an observational study. The investigators followed 51 study participants with HIV who received kidney transplants from deceased donors with HIV in South Africa.

1h

Besides hot water, coral bleaching also about location, location, location

A new study revealed a more complex view than current standard predictions of coral bleaching events caused primarily by heat stress; rather, the scientists found that bleaching is driven by a variety of stressors, and each region responds differently.

1h

Combining Live Cell Imaging with Cellular Impedance to Monitor Apoptotic Cell Death in Real Time

Download this application note to learn how to continuously monitor drug-mediated apoptosis over the course of multiple days and quantitatively track early (cell shrinkage) to late (fragmentation) apoptotic events with high analytical sensitivity!

1h

High Sensitivity Flow Cytometry Enables Extracellular Vesicle Immunophenotyping

Watch this webinar to learn more about how the unique Amnis® time delay integration and camera technology inside the CellStream System enables immunophenotyping of extracellular vesicles.

1h

Grouping 'smart cities' into types may help aspiring city planners find a path

A comparative analysis of 'smart cities' worldwide reveals four distinct types, according to researchers. The categories may help city planners to identify and emulate models that are close to their own socio-economic circumstances and policy aspirations.

1h

Metabolic discovery may help in fight against heart disease, diabetes

Researchers have uncovered a key step in how the human body metabolizes sugar, which could lead to better treatment and prevention of heart disease, obesity and Type 2 diabetes.

1h

Bernie Sanders Had Two Stents Put In. Is It Serious?

Sen. Bernie Sanders underwent emergency surgery to have stents placed.

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Author Correction: Chemokines as the modulators of endometrial epithelial cells remodelling

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51009-y

1h

Health care group withdraws rheumatoid arthritis drug report

An influential group that studies the economic burden of medical care has temporarily removed from its website a draft report about the cost-effectiveness of drugs to treat rheumatoid arthritis amid questions about the modeling researchers used in their analysis. The group initially did little to explain the move, despite having issued a press release for … Continue reading

1h

Sugar-coated RNAs could ‘alter the face of biochemistry as we know it’—if they’re real

Never-before-seen chemical modifications set biochemists abuzz

1h

The propensity to hear 'voices' in Schizophrenia may be established by infancy

Findings reveal how auditory hallucinations may arise in patients with schizophrenia and provide potential new targets for early detection and treatment.

2h

Recommendations to prevent secondary fractures in adults 65+ with osteoporosis

A multistakeholder coalition has issued clinical recommendations for the optimal prevention of secondary fracture among people aged 65 years and older with a hip or vertebral fracture — the most serious complication associated with osteoporosis.

2h

Drops in income may not only hurt the wallet, they may harm the brain

Young adults who experience annual income drops of 25% or more may be more at risk of having thinking problems and reduced brain health in middle age, according to a new study.

2h

Toxic Chemical Fumes May Be Causing Mysterious Vaping Illnesses

A new study concludes that vaping-related lung illnesses are most likely due to toxic chemical fumes, which are directly damaging patients' lungs.

2h

ALTA Nootropics Help Your Brain Focus at Work and Relax at Home

Do you find yourself struggling to stay focused while at school or work. Do you feel like you’re not reaching your full mental potential because you are fatigued or battling stress? If so, ALTA’s work-life nootropics and supplements could help. After all, we live at a time when people are willing to spend thousands of dollars a year on products to remove wrinkles, brighten teeth, and reduce belly

2h

Lung Damage From Vaping Resembles Chemical Burns, Report Says

Doctors at the Mayo Clinic examined samples of lung tissue from 17 patients, all of which looked as if the people had been exposed to toxic chemicals, the researchers said.

2h

Researchers repurpose failed cancer drug into printable semiconductor

Many potential pharmaceuticals end up failing during clinical trials, but thanks to new research, biological molecules once considered for cancer treatment are now being repurposed as organic semiconductors for use in chemical sensors and transistors.

2h

Amputees merge with their bionic leg

Scientists have helped three amputees merge with their bionic prosthetic legs as they climb over various obstacles without having to look. The amputees report using and feeling their bionic leg as part of their own body, thanks to sensory feedback from the prosthetic leg that is delivered to nerves in the leg's stump.

2h

Vaping-associated lung injury may be caused by toxic chemical fumes, study finds

Research into the pathology of vaping-associated lung injury is in its early stages, but a Mayo Clinic study published in The New England Journal of Medicine finds that lung injuries from vaping most likely are caused by direct toxicity or tissue damage from noxious chemical fumes.

2h

Cancer data provide insights into occurrence, overdiagnosis, and treatment advances

Investigators analyzed 40 years of cancer burden data and examined patterns of incidence and mortality for various cancers, finding examples for which incidence and mortality moved in concert and examples where discordance in incidence and mortality indicate that overdiagnosis may be at play.

2h

Machine learning predicts behavior of biological circuits

Biomedical engineers have devised a machine learning approach to modeling the interactions between complex variables in engineered bacteria that would otherwise be too cumbersome to predict. Their algorithms are generalizable to many kinds of biological systems.

2h

Aspirin may halve air pollution harms

A new study is the first to report evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin may lessen the adverse effects of air pollution exposure on lung function. The researchers found that the use of any NSAID nearly halved of the effect of PM on lung function, with the association consistent across all four weekly air pollution measurements from same-day to 28 days prior to t

2h

Researchers repurpose failed cancer drug into printable semiconductor

Many potential pharmaceuticals end up failing during clinical trials, but thanks to new research, biological molecules once considered for cancer treatment are now being repurposed as organic semiconductors for use in chemical sensors and transistors.

2h

Mutant cells team up to make an even deadlier blood cancer

Two very different mutations have been identified as unexpected partners in crime for causing the blood cancer acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Expert analysis from CSHL helped reveal how this deadly duo is far more common in AML than thought.

2h

Amputees merge with their bionic leg

Scientists have helped three amputees merge with their bionic prosthetic legs as they climb over various obstacles without having to look. The amputees report using and feeling their bionic leg as part of their own body, thanks to sensory feedback from the prosthetic leg that is delivered to nerves in the leg's stump.

2h

Laser therapy gains credibility as effective option for treating vaginal problems

Nearly 50% of menopausal women complain of vaginal dryness, itching, and burning, among other commonly reported menopause symptoms. Laser therapy is one of the newer techniques for addressing these problems. A new study suggests that it is as effective and safe as vaginal estrogen in improving sexual and urinary functionality.

2h

Talking Health and Energy at UN Climate Action Summit

Scientific American senior editor Jen Schwartz talks with WHO officials Dr. Maria Neira and Dr. Agnès Soucat about climate and health, and with Rachel Kyte, Special Representative to the UN… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Renewable energy now cheaper, reduce emissions faster, than nuclear

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Car Group That ICEd Tesla Superchargers Makes Amends

submitted by /u/ufrname [link] [comments]

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Machine learning predicts behavior of biological circuits

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have devised a machine learning approach to modeling the interactions between complex variables in engineered bacteria that would otherwise be too cumbersome to predict. Their algorithms are generalizable to many kinds of biological systems.

2h

N.Y. Declares That the End of the AIDS Epidemic Is Near

In New York, where the first cases of AIDS were reported in 1981, fewer than 2,500 new cases were reported in 2018, the lowest in many years.

3h

Aspirin may prevent air pollution harms

A new study is the first to report evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin may lessen the adverse effects of air pollution exposure on lung function. The researchers found that the use of any NSAID nearly halved of the effect of PM on lung function, with the association consistent across all four weekly air pollution measurements from same-day to 28 days prior to t

3h

Mutant cells team up to make an even deadlier blood cancer

Two very different mutations have been identified as unexpected partners in crime for causing the blood cancer acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Expert analysis from CSHL helped reveal how this deadly duo is far more common in AML than thought.

3h

Grouping 'smart cities' into types may help aspiring city planners find a path

A comparative analysis of 'smart cities' worldwide reveals four distinct types, according to an international team of researchers. The categories may help city planners to identify and emulate models that are close to their own socio-economic circumstances and policy aspirations.

3h

Five things to know about plastic waste and recycling in India

India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi is pursuing an ambitious project to phase out single-use plastics by 2022 in the vast South Asian nation, which has a population of 1.3 billion.

3h

Inventing the world's strongest silver

A team of scientists has made the strongest silver ever—42 percent stronger than the previous world record. But that's not the important point.

3h

How Monarch Butterflies Evolved to Eat a Poisonous Plant

By engineering mutations into fruit flies, scientists reconstructed how the bright orange butterflies came to tolerate to milkweed toxins — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Ancient Egyptian Temple from Reign of King Ptolemy IV Unearthed Along Nile River

Excavations for a sewer system inadvertently unearthed a 2,200-year-old temple in Egypt from the reign of King Ptolemy IV.

3h

Millions of medical devices using old code are open to attack, FDA says

In July, the security firm Armis Security discovered network protocol bugs in a software component that supports many medical devices operating today. Now, the FDA and security researchers say that these vulnerabilities extend to more devices than initially thought. Fortunately, a large-scale attack seems impossible. None The Food and Drug Administration is warning hospitals and healthcare provid

3h

Ending the “endless growth” fairytale needs moral clarity

Greta Thumberg got it right, the "endless economic growth fairytale" covers up clearly wicked consequences. We're no longer in the same moral world where many of our smart abstract ideas (like "growth") were conceived. We face new material and moral constraints, and their logic requires "degrowth." We have all the tech we need to cope with the climate crisis right now. It's not a technology, it's

3h

A philosopher is running for president

Jerome Segal is a philosopher and social activist from Maryland who's just joined the 2020 presidential race as a third-party candidate. He doesn't hope to win, necessarily, but instead to ignite a political renaissance in the country. Philosophers have a good idea of what a utopian society should look like, but should we elect one as president? None Jerome Segal, a philosopher and social activis

3h

Could Earth have a 'shadow' biosphere?

All life on Earth shares some basic characteristics, such as being carbon-based; using DNA, RNA, and proteins to function; and so on. Many of these characteristics are simply the only ones that could work in Earth's environment, but there are also a surprising number of seemingly arbitrary features of life. Under the shadow biosphere theory, some scientists argue that alternative forms of life ex

3h

Researchers repurpose failed cancer drug into printable semiconductor

Many potential pharmaceuticals end up failing during clinical trials, but thanks to new research from the University of Illinois, biological molecules once considered for cancer treatment are now being repurposed as organic semiconductors for use in chemical sensors and transistors.

3h

Method to change fundamental architecture of polymers

A research team has developed methods to manipulate polymers in a way that changes their fundamental structure, paving the way for potential applications in cargo delivery and release, recyclable materials, shape-shifting soft robots, antimicrobials and more.

3h

Patient cancer cells reliably grow on new 3D scaffold, showing promise for precision medicine

A new 3D structure for growing cell cultures could enable doctors to test medications on model tumors grown from a patient's own cells, according to a team of engineers and cancer researchers.

3h

A radical plan to end plastic waste | Andrew Forrest

Plastic is an incredible substance for the economy — but it's the worst substance possible for the environment, says entrepreneur Andrew Forrest. In a conversation meant to spark debate, Forrest and head of TED Chris Anderson discuss an ambitious plan to get the world's biggest companies to fund an environmental revolution — and transition industry towards getting all its plastic from plastic th

3h

How opt-out organ donation could affect US waiting lists

Every year in the United States, about 7,500 people die while waiting for an organ transplant, and that number is expected to increase in coming years as demographics shift.

3h

CRISPR technology reveals secret in monarchs' survival

New research from Cornell University sheds light on the secret to the survival of monarch butterflies by revealing how the species developed immunity to fatal milkweed toxins.

3h

Besides hot water, coral bleaching also about location, location, location

The WCS-led study revealed a more complex view than current standard predictions of coral bleaching events caused primarily by heat stress; rather, the scientists found that bleaching is driven by a variety of stressors, and each region responds differently.

3h

Inventing the world's strongest silver

A team of scientists has made the strongest silver ever–42 percent stronger than the previous world record. It's part of a discovery of a new mechanism at the nanoscale that can create metals much stronger than any ever made before–while not losing electrical conductivity.

3h

Drops in income may not only hurt the wallet, they may harm the brain

Young adults who experience annual income drops of 25% or more may be more at risk of having thinking problems and reduced brain health in middle age, according to a study published in the Oct. 2, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

3h

Finding the 'magic angle' to create a new superconductor

Researchers have made a discovery that could provide new insights into how superconductors might move energy more efficiently to power homes, industries and vehicles. Their work showed that graphene — a material composed of a single layer of carbon atoms — is more likely to become a superconductor than originally thought possible.

3h

Understanding the genomic signature of coevolution

Limnologists and other researchers show that rapid genomic changes during antagonistic species interactions are shaped by the reciprocal effects of ecology and evolution.

3h

Fungal invasion of pancreas creates cancer risk

Certain fungi move from the gut to the pancreas, expand their population more than a thousand-fold, and encourage pancreatic cancer growth, a new study finds.

3h

Patient cancer cells reliably grow on new 3D scaffold, showing promise for precision medicine

A new 3D structure for growing cell cultures could enable doctors to test medications on model tumors grown from a patient's own cells, according to a team of engineers and cancer researchers.

3h

Hard as ceramic, tough as steel: Newly discovered connection could help design of nextgen alloys

A new way to calculate the interaction between a metal and its alloying material could speed the hunt for a new material that combines the hardness of ceramic with the resilience of metal.

3h

Irrigation For Farming Could Leave Many Of The World's Streams and Rivers Dry

A new study shows many of the world's streams and rivers could dry up because people are draining underground aquifers that sustain streams through dry periods. Climate change won't help matters. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)

3h

How Monarch Butterflies Evolved to Eat a Poisonous Plant

By engineering mutations into fruit flies, scientists reconstructed how the bright orange butterflies came to tolerate to milkweed toxins — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Method to change fundamental architecture of polymers

A research team has developed methods to manipulate polymers in a way that changes their fundamental structure, paving the way for potential applications in cargo delivery and release, recyclable materials, shape-shifting soft robots, antimicrobials and more.

3h

Increasing precipitation extremes driving tree growth reductions across Southwest

As the Earth's temperature warms, its hydrological cycle kicks into overdrive – wet years get wetter, and dry years get drier. According to a new study, these increased rainfall extremes could have dire consequences for the semi-arid forests of the western U.S.

3h

How AIDS pathogens multiply in the body

Scientists have now succeeded in using high-resolution imaging to make visible to the millisecond how the HI virus spreads between living cells and which molecules it requires for this purpose. The researchers provide direct proof for the first time that the AIDS pathogen creates a certain lipid environment for replication.

3h

New imaging platform examines mechanisms behind coral bleaching

A non-invasive approach could help marine biologists monitor coral health in the face of climate change.

3h

Warming impedes a coral defense, but hungry fish enhance it

Corals exude chemical defenses against bacteria, but when heated in the lab, those defenses lost much potency against a pathogen common in coral bleaching. There's hope: A key coral's defense was heartier when that coral was taken from an area where fishing was banned and plenty of fish were left to eat away seaweed that was overgrowing corals elsewhere.

3h

2 Dakota Pipeline Protesters Face Federal Charges Over 2017 Damage

In 2017, Ruby Montoya and Jessica Reznicek said they used torches to pierce steel valves in Iowa and delay the pipeline’s completion. If convicted, they could face decades in prison.

3h

Why Trump Is Firing Off a Barrage of Threats

Though his allies insist that Democrats have been looking for an excuse to impeach Donald Trump since the day he was elected, the president was caught flat-footed two weeks ago when Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi announced an “official impeachment inquiry.” The White House continues to scramble to put together a machine to fight impeachment, but slowly, from a series of enraged tweets and stat

3h

Researchers repurpose failed cancer drug into printable semiconductor

Many potential pharmaceuticals end up failing during clinical trials, but thanks to new research from the University of Illinois, biological molecules once considered for cancer treatment are now being repurposed as organic semiconductors for use in chemical sensors and transistors.

3h

Pioneering red light-activated anti-tumor prodrug reduces side effects

Phorbiplatin is a new anti-cancer prodrug that can be controllably activated by red light. With its unique 'on-site' activation characteristic, this new prodrug can effectively kill cancer cells and minimize damage to normal tissues.

3h

CRISPRed fruit flies mimic monarch butterfly, and could make you vomit

Monarch butterflies and a few other insects evolved essentially the same genetic mutations allowing them to eat toxic milkweed without getting sick. Monarch butterflies and caterpillars store the toxins to deter predators. Scientists have now used CRISPR gene editing to make these same mutations in fruit flies, successfully conferring toxin resistance. This is the first time an animal has been gen

3h

Metals in Baby Teeth Could Help Reveal What Causes Autism, ADHD

Traces of metal in baby teeth point to distinct differences between children with and without neurodevelopmental disorders.

3h

Microsoft thinks a dual-screen Android phone can take on Apple and Samsung – CNET

And it’s turning to a rival to get back in the phone game.

4h

Have microlith, will travel

Early survival toolkit enabled humans to make their home anywhere. Mark Bruer reports.

4h

New Conference Invites “Troublemakers” to Discuss UFOs, Doomsday

Weird Science On Tuesday, the Founders Fund — a Silicon Valley venture capital firm known for being one of Facebook’s earliest investors — announced the creation of a new conference called Hereticon. Another conference. Big deal, right? But what sets Hereticon apart from countless other conferences is the list of topics up for discussion — according to the announcement , the “heretics” and “troub

4h

Seagrass meadows harbor wildlife for centuries, highlighting need for conservation

Seagrass meadows put down deep roots, persisting in the same spot for hundreds and possibly thousands of years, a new study shows. Researchers used modern and fossil shells from seagrass-dwelling animals to estimate the age of these meadows, showing that, far from being transient patches of underwater weeds, they are remarkably stable over time.

4h

Pioneering red light-activated anti-tumor prodrug reduces side effects

Phorbiplatin is a new anti-cancer prodrug that can be controllably activated by red light. With its unique 'on-site' activation characteristic, this new prodrug can effectively kill cancer cells and minimize damage to normal tissues.

4h

Cleaning with bleach could create indoor air pollutants

For generations, people have used chlorine bleach to clean and disinfect their homes. However, researchers have now discovered that bleach fumes, in combination with light and a citrus compound found in many household products, can form airborne particles that might be harmful when inhaled by pets or people.

4h

CRISPRed fruit flies mimic monarch butterfly, and could make you vomit

Monarch butterflies and a few other insects evolved essentially the same genetic mutations allowing them to eat toxic milkweed without getting sick. Monarch butterflies and caterpillars store the toxins to deter predators. Scientists have now used CRISPR gene editing to make these same mutations in fruit flies, successfully conferring toxin resistance. This is the first time an animal has been gen

4h

Microscopic evidence sheds light on the disappearance of the world's largest mammals

Understanding the causes and consequences of Late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions is increasingly important in a world of growing human populations and climate change. A review highlights the role that cutting-edge scientific methods can play in broadening the discussions about megafaunal extinction and enabling insights into ecosystems and species-specific responses to climate change and human

4h

What is the impact of cooked vs. raw food on the gut?

A new study in mice and humans confirms that cooked meals affect the gut microbiome differently from raw foods, which may have health implications.

4h

How does tooth enamel last a lifetime?

Enamel is the strongest tissue in the human body. A recent study finds that an imperfect alignment of crystals helps produce this incredible resilience.

4h

Soaring eagle films crumbling Alpine glaciers as Earth warms

The images will be stunningly beautiful yet also hint of dire future consequences. Filmed with a camera mounted between his majestic wings, they'll show how a white-tailed eagle named Victor sees the world as he flies over the Alps and capture its once-magnificent glaciers now crumbling because of global warming.

4h

Groundwater pumping could 'devastate' river systems

Rampant and unsustainable extraction of groundwater reserves crucial for food production will "critically impact" rivers, lakes and wetlands in half of Earth's drainage basins by mid-century, researchers warned Wednesday.

4h

Soaring eagle films crumbling Alpine glaciers as Earth warms

The images will be stunningly beautiful yet also hint of dire future consequences. Filmed with a camera mounted between his majestic wings, they'll show how a white-tailed eagle named Victor sees the world as he flies over the Alps and capture its once-magnificent glaciers now crumbling because of global warming.

4h

NASA's space geodesy project mapping out a bright future

In April 2019, an international team of more than 300 scientists unveiled the first recorded images of a black hole, its dark shadow and vivid orange disk peering back across 55 million light years of space. Capturing images from so far away required the combined power of eight radio telescopes across four continents, working together to essentially form a massive Earth-sized telescope called the

4h

New imaging platform examines mechanisms behind coral bleaching

As coral reefs deteriorate in the face of climate change, an interdisciplinary Northwestern Engineering research team has developed an innovative method to image coral nanoscale structures and quantify pigment absorption in live corals, an indicator of coral health. The imaging platform could become a valuable tool to help marine biologists better understand coral physiology as well measure and mo

4h

Seagrass meadows harbor wildlife for centuries, highlighting need for conservation

Seagrass meadows put down deep roots, persisting in the same spot for hundreds and possibly thousands of years, a new study shows.

4h

Recommendations to prevent secondary fractures in adults 65+ with osteoporosis

A multistakeholder coalition assembled by the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) has issued clinical recommendations for the optimal prevention of secondary fracture among people aged 65 years and older with a hip or vertebral fracture — the most serious complication associated with osteoporosis.

4h

Finding the 'magic angle' to create a new superconductor

Researchers have made a discovery that could provide new insights into how superconductors might move energy more efficiently to power homes, industries and vehicles. Their work, published last week in the journal Science Advances, showed that graphene — a material composed of a single layer of carbon atoms — is more likely to become a superconductor than originally thought possible.

4h

The propensity to hear 'voices' in Schizophrenia may be established by infancy

Findings reveal how auditory hallucinations may arise in patients with schizophrenia and provide potential new targets for early detection and treatment.

4h

Seagrass meadows harbor wildlife for centuries, highlighting need for conservation

Seagrass meadows put down deep roots, persisting in the same spot for hundreds and possibly thousands of years, a new study shows.

4h

NASA finds Mitag's areas of heavy rainfall over Korean Peninsula

Tropical Storm Mitag was dropping heavy rainfall along coastal areas of South Korea and lighter rainfall over the entire country. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite provided a look at the rainfall occurring from the system.

4h

Metabolic discovery may help in fight against heart disease, diabetes

Researchers at Cornell University have uncovered a key step in how the human body metabolizes sugar, which could lead to better treatment and prevention of heart disease, obesity and Type 2 diabetes.

4h

Researcher develops method to change fundamental architecture of polymers

A Florida State University research team has developed methods to manipulate polymers in a way that changes their fundamental structure, paving the way for potential applications in cargo delivery and release, recyclable materials, shape-shifting soft robots, antimicrobials and more.

4h

Metabolic discovery may help in fight against heart disease, diabetes

Researchers at Cornell University have uncovered a key step in how the human body metabolizes sugar, which could lead to better treatment and prevention of heart disease, obesity and Type 2 diabetes.

4h

Patient cancer cells reliably grow on new 3-D scaffold, showing promise for precision medicine

A new 3-D structure for growing cell cultures could enable doctors to test medications on model tumors grown from a patient's own cells, according to results from a team of engineers and cancer researchers at the University of Michigan.

4h

Hard as ceramic, tough as steel: Newly discovered connection could help design of nextgen alloys

A new way to calculate the interaction between a metal and its alloying material could speed the hunt for a new material that combines the hardness of ceramic with the resilience of metal.

4h

Environmental toxins impair immune system over multiple generations

New research shows that maternal exposure to a common and ubiquitous form of industrial pollution can harm the immune system of offspring and that this injury is passed along to subsequent generations, weakening the body's defenses against infections such as the influenza virus.

4h

Researchers identify molecular process that could accelerate recovery from nerve injuries

Researchers have discovered a molecular process that controls the rate at which nerves grow both during embryonic development and recovery from injury throughout life.

4h

An India-Pakistan nuclear war could kill millions, threaten global starvation

A nuclear war between India and Pakistan could, over the span of less than a week, kill 50-125 million people — more than the death toll during all six years of World War II, according to new research.

4h

Oldest miniaturized stone toolkits in Eurasia

Microliths are often interpreted as being part of composite tools, including projectile weapons, essential to efficient Homo sapiens hunting strategies. In Europe and Africa, these lithic toolkits are linked to hunting medium and large-sized animals in grassland or woodland settings, or as adaptations during periods of climatic change. The presence of microliths in Sri Lanka suggests the existence

4h

Patient cancer cells reliably grow on new 3-D scaffold, showing promise for precision medicine

A new 3-D structure for growing cell cultures could enable doctors to test medications on model tumors grown from a patient's own cells, according to results from a team of engineers and cancer researchers at the University of Michigan.

4h

Scientists Find Building Blocks of Life on Saturn’s Icy Moon

Building Blocks Scientists have been sifting through the mountain of data collected during NASA’s Cassini mission to Saturn and its satellites. And now, a team of researchers from the Free University of Berlin have found something in the data that could point toward the existence of life on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus: traces of organic compounds, in plumes that burst from the moon’s surface, tha

4h

Metabolic discovery may help in fight against heart disease, diabetes

Researchers at Cornell University have uncovered a key step in how the human body metabolizes sugar, which could lead to better treatment and prevention of heart disease, obesity and Type 2 diabetes.

4h

Seagrass meadows harbor wildlife for centuries, highlighting need for conservation

Seagrass meadows put down deep roots, persisting in the same spot for hundreds and possibly thousands of years, a new study shows. University of Florida researchers used modern and fossil shells from seagrass-dwelling animals to estimate the age of these meadows, showing that, far from being transient patches of underwater weeds, they are remarkably stable over time.

4h

NASA finds Mitag's areas of heavy rainfall over Korean Peninsula

Tropical Storm Mitag was dropping heavy rainfall along coastal areas of South Korea and lighter rainfall over the entire country. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite provided a look at the rainfall occurring from the system.

4h

What Your DNA Can't Tell You

Companies are selling reports about a wide range of physical, cognitive, and behavioral traits to consumers based on their genomic data, but such tests have a number of limitations.

4h

Why U.S. Officials Investigating Mysterious Vaping Deaths Are Focusing on Flavorings

As lung injuries among e-cigarette users mount amid a youth vaping epidemic, the impact of new restrictions remains unclear — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Portugal’s Navy Has a Unit That Turns Toys Into Grenade Launchers

Creative Warfare During a recent NATO event, Portugal’s navy demonstrated several of its uncrewed robotics and drone systems. Among the weapons demoed: a pair of remote-controlled toy cars modified to house grenade launchers, according to a story by the military magazine Jane’s Defence Weekly . Hack Attack Portugal calls the unit behind the MacGyvered prototype weapons the Unmanned Vehicle Experi

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‘Helping’ a pregnant coworker can affect her return to work

When coworkers try to lighten a pregnant woman’s load, it can hurt her chances of returning to work after giving birth, according to new research. Researchers wanted to find out how benevolent sexism —the belief, rooted in traditional gender roles, that men and women are better or worse at certain things—affects a woman’s feelings about her career during and following pregnancy. They surveyed 105

4h

Volta Offers Free EV Charging, With Caveats

Tesla set the bar high with free charging for many years. Now comes Volta Charging, a company that aims to build a network of high-speed chargers for all EVs that are free for the first 30 minutes. They’d be in upscale locations that meet Volta’s standards and supported by advertising, including on signage near the DC fast chargers. The typical motorist would pick up 175 miles of driving from the

5h

Researcher develops method to change fundamental architecture of polymers

A Florida State University research team has developed methods to manipulate polymers in a way that changes their fundamental structure, paving the way for potential applications in cargo delivery and release, recyclable materials, shape-shifting soft robots, antimicrobials and more.

5h

Environmental toxins impair immune system over multiple generations

New research shows that maternal exposure to a common and ubiquitous form of industrial pollution can harm the immune system of offspring and that this injury is passed along to subsequent generations, weakening the body's defenses against infections such as the influenza virus.

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Researchers identify molecular process that could accelerate recovery from nerve injuries

Researchers at the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered a molecular process that controls the rate at which nerves grow both during embryonic development and recovery from injury throughout life.

5h

The Last Video Store

Miguel Gomez grew up going to his local video store. He’d spend hours perusing the selections, admiring the VHS cover designs, asking the clerks for recommendations, and whittling down the choices to one rental, which he’d bring home and watch with his family. In the late 1990s, Gomez looked on as Netflix all but killed the video store. By 2014, Blockbuster had shut nearly all of its franchise lo

5h

Extraordinary fossil reveals sharks’ family roots

Nature, Published online: 01 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02955-0 A fish species dated to about 383 million years ago is the earliest known member of the group that includes sharks.

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The Significance of Bernie Sanders’s Heart Disease

Bernie Sanders was hospitalized yesterday after he “experienced some chest discomfort” during a campaign trip to Las Vegas, a senior adviser said in a statement today. The senator was subsequently “found to have a blockage in one artery, and two stents were successfully inserted." This sounds scary, and it’s difficult to know exactly what it means for Sanders’s health. But there is evidence in th

5h

World of WearableArt 2019

The annual World of WearableArt (WOW) international design competition took place in Wellington, New Zealand, last weekend. Designers of diverse backgrounds from around the world came to showcase their creative and inventive garments before as many as 60,000 visitors. Below, a sample of some of the amazing works of wearable art shown this year in Wellington.

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Two ancient migration events in the Andromeda Galaxy: Dynamical footprints uncovered by galactic archaeologists in galaxy next door

Astronomers have uncovered two historic events in which the Andromeda Galaxy underwent major changes to its structure. The findings shed light not only on the evolution and formation of the Andromeda Galaxy, but to our own Milky Way Galaxy as well. Two of the facilities in NSF's National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory, Kitt Peak National Observatory and the International Gemini Obs

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New imaging platform examines mechanisms behind coral bleaching

The non-invasive approach developed by Professors Vadim Backman and Luisa Marcelino could help marine biologists monitor coral health in the face of climate change.

5h

Fungal invasion of pancreas creates cancer risk

Certain fungi move from the gut to the pancreas, expand their population more than a thousand-fold, and encourage pancreatic cancer growth, a new study finds.

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Increasing precipitation extremes driving tree growth reductions across southwest

As the Earth's temperature warms, its hydrological cycle kicks into overdrive – wet years get wetter, and dry years get drier. According to a new University of Arizona-led study, these increased rainfall extremes could have dire consequences for the semi-arid forests of the western U.S.

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Tracking the HI virus

A European research team led by Prof. Christian Eggeling from the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, the Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT), and the University of Oxford has now succeeded in using high-resolution imaging to make visible to the millisecond how the HI virus spreads between living cells and which molecules it requires for this purpose. The researchers provide di

5h

Understanding the genomic signature of coevolution

An international team of researchers including limnologists from the University of Konstanz shows that rapid genomic changes during antagonistic species interactions are shaped by the reciprocal effects of ecology and evolution.

5h

Amputees merge with their bionic leg

In an international collaboration led by scientists in Switzerland, three amputees merge with their bionic prosthetic legs as they climb over various obstacles without having to look. The amputees report using and feeling their bionic leg as part of their own body, thanks to sensory feedback from the prosthetic leg that is delivered to nerves in the leg's stump.

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Nerve-stimulating leg prosthesis improves movement and functionality in amputees

A research team has created a leg prosthesis for lower leg amputees that incorporates advanced neural stimulation, allowing it to recreate sensations of touch in the knee and foot that are missing in conventional prosthetic designs.

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Nuclear war between India and Pakistan would launch a global climate catastrophe

With ongoing tensions between India and Pakistan raising concerns about the possibility of nuclear conflict, even as neither country is likely to initiate without significant provocation, researchers have evaluated both the direct fatalities and global climate anomalies that would result if nuclear war did break out. The researchers evaluated this scenario for the year 2025.

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Warming impedes a coral defense, but hungry fish enhance it

Corals exude chemical defenses against bacteria, but when heated in the lab, those defenses lost much potency against a pathogen common in coral bleaching. There's hope: A key coral's defense was heartier when that coral was taken from an area where fishing was banned and plenty of fish were left to eat away seaweed that was overgrowing corals elsewhere.

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An India-Pakistan nuclear war could kill millions, threaten global starvation

A nuclear war between India and Pakistan could, over the span of less than a week, kill 50-125 million people — more than the death toll during all six years of World War II, according to new research.

5h

New criteria for bank loans and stock exchange listings could protect ocean resources

Review of publicly available information from 2008-2017 found no bank loan to seafood companies that included sustainability criteria. With half of external finance for businesses, on average, coming from bank loans, introducing sustainability criteria into loan agreements is a critical lever to reduce pressures on marine ecosystems. Sustainability criteria in the listing requirements of just four

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Nuclear war between India and Pakistan could kill millions worldwide

More than 100 million people could die immediately if India and Pakistan wage a nuclear war, followed by global mass starvation, according to a Rutgers co-authored study."Such a war would threaten not only the locations where bombs might be targeted but the entire world," said Alan Robock, a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.

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Leg amputees feel and use the prosthesis as a real limb

The bionic prosthesis is perceived, by the brain of three leg amputees, as a real limb, allowing them to avoid falls while walking over obstacles without seeing them, climb stairs much faster and to finely place the feet in the space. Volunteers felt sensations from multiple positions of the foot when touched and knee movements. The prosthetic leg speaks to the brain through a wireless link with t

5h

Oldest miniaturized stone toolkits in Eurasia

Microliths are often interpreted as being part of composite tools, including projectile weapons, essential to efficient Homo sapiens hunting strategies. In Europe and Africa, these lithic toolkits are linked to hunting medium and large-sized animals in grassland or woodland settings, or as adaptations during periods of climatic change. The presence of microliths in Sri Lanka suggests the existence

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45,000 years ago in Sri Lanka: The oldest microlith technology in a rainforest setting

Microliths — small, retouched stone tools — found in a Sri Lankan cave are the earliest evidence of such advanced technology in South Asia, according to a study released October 2, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Oshan Wedage of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Germany and colleagues.

5h

A new route to blocking children's bone cancer

A study in mice showed that reducing a particular hormone signal keeps the cancer from growing and spreading.

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'Personalized DJ' music playlist algorithm matches songs to listeners' changing moods

Imagine having a disc jockey inside your computer who matches the music played to your current frame of mind. According to new research, machine learning can approximate that experience creating ultra-personal music playlists that adapt to each user's changing moods.

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Canadians told to stop taking aspirin to prevent first heart attack, stroke

If you've never had a heart attack or stroke, you likely should not be taking aspirin to prevent them, according to new research. Researchers reviewed three large, randomized, placebo-controlled studies published in 2018 that showed the risk of major internal bleeding associated with taking an aspirin a day is higher than any preventative benefits.

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Hundreds of Rogue Planets Could be Discovered with Upcoming Space Telescopes

Rogue planets, like the one shown in this artist’s concept, drift through interstellar space alone and are thought to be prevalent throughout the Milky Way. Two upcoming space telescopes could help find many more of these faint objects. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech) Our Milky Way galaxy is home to billions of planets orbiting billions of stars in billions of planetary systems. But lurking in the spac

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Water shortages loom for Asia’s new power plants

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02961-2 Climate change could force prospective coal-burning facilities to cut output.

5h

A prosthetic leg that attaches to nerves feels like part of the body

People who have had a leg amputated found that a prosthetic leg with sensors felt like an extension of their own bodies and helped them avoid tripping over

5h

Experimental drug that targets liver fat may help prevent diabetes

The build-up of fat in the liver affects 1 in 3 people and can lead to type 2 diabetes. An experimental drug tested in monkeys appears to reverse it

5h

App can detect signs of eye diseases in kids by scanning your photos

An app uses artificial intelligence to detect "white eye" in photos. This can be just a trick of the light, but is also sometimes a sign of disease

5h

Telomerase promotes formation of a telomere protective complex in cancer cells

Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex that catalyzes addition of telomeric DNA repeats to maintain telomeres in replicating cells. Here, we demonstrate that the telomerase protein hTERT performs an additional role at telomeres that is independent of telomerase catalytic activity yet essential for telomere integrity and cell proliferation. Short-term depletion of endogenous hTERT reduced the l

5h

Reduced tree growth in the semiarid United States due to asymmetric responses to intensifying precipitation extremes

Earth’s hydroclimatic variability is increasing, with changes in the frequency of extreme events that may negatively affect forest ecosystems. We examined possible consequences of changing precipitation variability using tree rings in the conterminous United States. While many growth records showed either little evidence of precipitation limitation or linear relationships to precipitation, growth

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Gold-DNA nanosunflowers for efficient gene silencing with controllable transformation

The development of an efficient delivery system for enhanced and controlled gene interference–based therapeutics is still facing great challenges. Fortunately, the flourishing field of nanotechnology provides more effective strategies for nucleic acid delivery. Here, the triplex-forming oligonucleotide sequence and its complementary strand were used to mediate self-assembly of ultrasmall gold nan

5h

A deep learning virtual instrument for monitoring extreme UV solar spectral irradiance

Measurements of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) solar spectral irradiance (SSI) are essential for understanding drivers of space weather effects, such as radio blackouts, and aerodynamic drag on satellites during periods of enhanced solar activity. In this paper, we show how to learn a mapping from EUV narrowband images to spectral irradiance measurements using data from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Obser

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HIV-1 Gag specifically restricts PI(4,5)P2 and cholesterol mobility in living cells creating a nanodomain platform for virus assembly

HIV-1 Gag protein assembles at the plasma membrane of infected cells for viral particle formation. Gag targets lipids, mainly PI(4,5)P2, at the inner leaflet of this membrane. Here, we address the question whether Gag is able to trap specifically PI(4,5)P2 or other lipids during HIV-1 assembly in the host CD4 + T lymphocytes. Lipid dynamics within and away from HIV-1 assembly sites were determine

5h

Formation of exoplanetary satellites by pull-down capture

The large size and wide orbit of the recently announced exomoon candidate Kepler-1625b-i are hard to explain within traditional theories of satellite formation. We show that these properties can be reproduced if the satellite began as a circumstellar co-orbital body with the original core of the giant planet Kepler-1625b. This body was then drawn down into a circumplanetary orbit during the rapid

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Daily measurement of slow slip from low-frequency earthquakes is consistent with ordinary earthquake scaling

Slow slip transients on faults can last from seconds to months and stitch together the earthquake cycle. However, no single geophysical instrument is able to observe the full range of slow slip because of bandwidth limitations. Here, we connect seismic and geodetic data from the Mexican subduction zone to explore an instrumental blind spot. We establish a calibration of the daily median amplitude

5h

MMOD-induced structural changes of hydroxylase in soluble methane monooxygenase

Soluble methane monooxygenase in methanotrophs converts methane to methanol under ambient conditions. The maximum catalytic activity of hydroxylase (MMOH) is achieved through the interplay of its regulatory protein (MMOB) and reductase. An additional auxiliary protein, MMOD, functions as an inhibitor of MMOH; however, its inhibitory mechanism remains unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure

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The feedback between selection and demography shapes genomic diversity during coevolution

Species interactions and coevolution are integral to ecological communities, but we lack empirical information on when and how these interactions generate and purge genetic diversity. Using genomic time series data from host-virus experiments, we found that coevolution occurs through consecutive selective sweeps in both species, with temporal consistency across replicates. Sweeps were accompanied

5h

Leverage points in the financial sector for seafood sustainability

Can finance contribute to seafood sustainability? This is an increasingly relevant question given the projected growth of seafood markets and the magnitude of social and environmental challenges associated with seafood production. As more capital enters the seafood industry, it becomes crucial that investments steer the sector toward improved sustainability, as opposed to fueling unsustainable wo

5h

RNA binding activates RIG-I by releasing an autorepressed signaling domain

The retinoic acid–inducible gene I (RIG-I) innate immune receptor is an important immunotherapeutic target, but we lack approaches for monitoring the physical basis for its activation in vitro. This gap in our understanding has led to confusion about mechanisms of RIG-I activation and difficulty discovering agonists and antagonists. We therefore created a novel fluorescence resonance energy trans

5h

Unusual kinematics of the Papatea fault (2016 Kaikoura earthquake) suggest anelastic rupture

A key paradigm in seismology is that earthquakes release elastic strain energy accumulated during an interseismic period on approximately planar faults. Earthquake slip models may be further informed by empirical relations such as slip to length. Here, we use differential lidar to demonstrate that the Papatea fault—a key element within the 2016 M w 7.8 Kaikōura earthquake rupture—has a distinctly

5h

Autonomous early detection of eye disease in childhood photographs

The "red reflex test" is used to screen children for leukocoria ("white eye") in a standard pediatric examination, but is ineffective at detecting many eye disorders. Leukocoria also presents in casual photographs. The clinical utility of screening photographs for leukocoria is unreported. Here, a free smartphone application (CRADLE: ComputeR-Assisted Detector of LEukocoria) was engineered to det

5h

Current status of opioid addiction treatment and related preclinical research

Opioid use disorders (OUDs) are diseases of the brain with behavioral, psychological, neurobiological, and medical manifestations. Vulnerability to OUDs can be affected by factors such as genetic background, environment, stress, and prolonged exposure to μ-opioid agonists for analgesia. Two standard-of-care maintenance medications, methadone and buprenorphine-naloxone, have a long-term positive i

5h

Variable effects of local management on coral defenses against a thermally regulated bleaching pathogen

Bleaching and disease are decimating coral reefs especially when warming promotes bleaching pathogens, such as Vibrio coralliilyticus. We demonstrate that sterilized washes from three common corals suppress V. coralliilyticus but that this defense is compromised when assays are run at higher temperatures. For a coral within the ecologically critical genus Acropora , inhibition was 75 to 154% grea

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LEDGF and HDGF2 relieve the nucleosome-induced barrier to transcription in differentiated cells

FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) is a protein complex that allows RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) to overcome the nucleosome-induced barrier to transcription. While abundant in undifferentiated cells and many cancers, FACT is not abundant or is absent in most tissues. Therefore, we screened for additional proteins that might replace FACT upon differentiation. We identified two proteins, lens

5h

Rapidly expanding nuclear arsenals in Pakistan and India portend regional and global catastrophe

Pakistan and India may have 400 to 500 nuclear weapons by 2025 with yields from tested 12- to 45-kt values to a few hundred kilotons. If India uses 100 strategic weapons to attack urban centers and Pakistan uses 150, fatalities could reach 50 to 125 million people, and nuclear-ignited fires could release 16 to 36 Tg of black carbon in smoke, depending on yield. The smoke will rise into the upper

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Trump Administration Drops Advisory Boards on Environment, Health

Three panels devoted to reviewing/recommending policy on marine protected areas, invasive species, and antibiotic resistance were eliminated.

5h

Is YouTube Demonetizing Videos That Mention LGBTQ Words?

Automated Bigotry Evidence is piling up that YouTube’s content moderation algorithms are automatically demonetizing any videos that cover LGBTQ-related topics — even when someone merely utters a related keyword. The new evidence comes courtesy of YouTubers who systematically checked over 15,000 keywords to see which ones YouTube would automatically flag, BoingBoing reports . The list of their res

5h

Understanding the genomic signature of coevolution

An international team of researchers including limnologists from the University of Konstanz shows that rapid genomic changes during antagonistic species interactions are shaped by the reciprocal effects of ecology and evolution.

5h

Increasing precipitation extremes driving tree growth reductions across Southwest

As the Earth's temperature warms, its hydrological cycle kicks into overdrive—wet years get wetter, and dry years get drier. According to a new University of Arizona-led study, these increased rainfall extremes could have dire consequences for the semi-arid forests of the western U.S.

5h

An India-Pakistan nuclear war could kill millions, threaten global starvation

A nuclear war between India and Pakistan could, over the span of less than a week, kill 50-125 million people—more than the death toll during all six years of World War II, according to new research.

5h

Warming impedes a coral defense, but hungry fish enhance it

Corals create potions that fight bacterial attackers, but warming appears to tip the scales against the potions as they battle a bacterium common in coral bleaching, according to a new study. Reef conservation may offer hope: A particular potion, gathered from reefs protected against seaweed overgrowth, proved more robust.

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New criteria for bank loans and stock exchange listings could protect ocean resources

Two reforms in the finance sector have the potential to accelerate action towards a sustainable seafood industry, according to new research published in the journal Science Advances. Compiling data on 160 publicly listed seafood companies and 3000 shareholders, the researchers conclude that introducing sustainability criteria into bank loan agreements and stock exchange listing rules will signific

5h

Oldest miniaturized stone toolkits in Eurasia

Microliths—small stone tools—are often interpreted as being part of composite tools, including projectile weapons, and essential to efficient hunting strategies of Homo sapiens. In Europe and Africa, the earliest appearance of these lithic toolkits are linked to hunting medium and large-sized animals in grassland or woodland settings, or as adaptations to risky environments during periods of clima

5h

Three threats posed by deepfakes that technology won’t solve

As deepfakes get better, companies are rushing to develop technology to detect them. But little of their potential harm will be fixed without social and legal solutions.

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Nuclear war between India and Pakistan would be a planetary catastrophe

Modelling highlights the disastrous threat of nuclear proliferation in unstable countries. Richard A Lovett reports.

5h

A 10-billion-year history of Andromeda’s galactic cannibalism

The findings could shed light on the fate of the Milky Way. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Have microlith, will travel

Early survival toolkit enabled humans to make their home anywhere. Mark Bruer reports.

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Global groundwater extraction a “ticking time bomb”

Current practices are having an escalating impact on aquatic ecosystems. Natalie Parletta reports.

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New solution to weighty issue

Researchers employ drones to learn more about the ecology and health of large cetaceans.

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Understanding the genomic signature of coevolution

An international team of researchers including limnologists from the University of Konstanz shows that rapid genomic changes during antagonistic species interactions are shaped by the reciprocal effects of ecology and evolution.

5h

Sexual minority women more likely to smoke while drinking alcohol than heterosexual women

Sexual minority women are more likely to smoke cigarettes when drinking alcohol than heterosexual women, according to new University at Buffalo research.

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Touting flavor before nutrition encourages healthy eating

Most people want to eat healthier, but efforts to encourage healthy eating by providing nutrition information have not drastically changed habits. A new study suggests that labels emphasizing taste and positive experience could help.

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Extreme wildfires transforming forestlands into shrublands

Wildfire is transforming some forestlands into shrublands, a new study finds. The results suggest these forests, which are used to living with and even benefiting from fire, have not yet adapted to this newer regime of intense, high-severity fires.

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New exhibit plunges people in the world of microbes

Scientists developed an immersive exhibit where visitors can dance with living cells.

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Antidepressant medications appear to be generally safe,study suggests

Antidepressants are generally safe, according to a new study. By assessing evidence from 45 meta-analyses, which combined the results from many studies, the researchers did not find strong evidence of adverse health outcomes associated with antidepressant use.

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Biomarker in urine may offer noninvasive detection of prostate cancer

A research study has identified a novel prostate cancer gene fusion involving the KLK4 protein coding gene and KLKP1 pseudogene. This unique biomarker can be detected in the urine samples of patients with prostate cancer, offering a non-invasive means of detection.

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New mechanism controlling DNA repair identified

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), is the macromolecule that holds all hereditary and genetic information. Continuously under assault, alterations and damage to DNA can lead to many different health issues, including cancer. DNA is highly regulated within cells, where multiple mechanisms are at play to repair and protect its integrity. Scientists are still investigating these mechanisms to fully compreh

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Engineered T cells may be harnessed to kill solid tumor cells

A new study finds that a form of immunotherapy used to treat the blood cancer leukemia may be effective in treating other kinds of cancer as well.

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‘There’s no taboo, no bad ideas’: Anyone can help shape European Union’s new €94 billion research program

European Commission wants the public to “codesign” Horizon Europe and plans to promote it aggressively

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Soaking up Earth views from space

Astronaut Nick Hague enjoys his final moments on a space mission.

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Scare stories of mutant GM mosquitoes aren’t true, but have some truth

Tales of hybrid super-mosquitoes produced by a GM trial in Brazil are way off the mark – but our careless ways do create mutants that harm us, says Michael Le Page

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A Russian Man Is Suing Apple for “Turning Him Gay”

Try Hard In what’s perhaps one of the most frivolous lawsuits in recent memory, a Russian man says his iPhone drove him to homosexuality — and he’s suing Apple, the Moscow Times reports . The plaintiff told a local radio station that he became “mired in same-sex relationships” earlier this year after “receiving 69 GayCoins on a cryptocurrency payment app he downloaded onto his iPhone in 2017,” ac

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The violent history of the big galaxy next door

Astronomers have pieced together the cannibalistic past of our neighboring large galaxy Andromeda, which has now set its sights on the Milky Way as its next main course.

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Species could buffer reproduction against climate change through sperm and egg plasticity

New research shows that beetles have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to reproduce despite warmer temperatures. They have evolved mechanisms that allow their sperm and eggs to quickly cope with increasing environmental temperature variation. And this could help species buffer themselves against climate change.

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Hypoglycaemia prevention could cut hospital stays

New research shows that preventing in-patients with diabetes from developing hypoglycaemia could dramatically reduce the length of time they spend in hospital, and reduce mortality rates.

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4 ways the Surface Duo phone could beat the Galaxy Fold – CNET

Microsoft made a dual-screen Android phone, which means the dual-screen versus foldable battle has begun.

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Helping pregnant women at work can hurt their chances of returning after maternity leave

When colleagues at work try to lighten a pregnant woman's load, it can hurt her chances of returning to work after giving birth, according to new research from Rice University, the University of Memphis, Boston College and the University of Massachusetts Lowell.

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Hard as ceramic, tough as steel: Newly discovered connection could help design of nextgen alloys

A new way to calculate the interaction between a metal and its alloying material could speed the hunt for a new material that combines the hardness of ceramic with the resilience of metal.

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Patient cancer cells reliably grow on new 3D scaffold, showing promise for precision medicine

A new 3D structure for growing cell cultures could enable doctors to test medications on model tumors grown from a patient's own cells, according to results from a team of engineers and cancer researchers at the University of Michigan.

6h

Listen: How does the impeachment process work?

A new podcast episode digs into how impeachment works. The impeachment inquiry launched against President Trump last week marked the fourth time in history such a proceeding has been initiated. It’s been more than 20 years since the last impeachment proceeding began against Bill Clinton, which means the details of how it works might be a little fuzzy. This week’s episode of the Democracy Works po

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No one agrees what it means for a planet to be “habitable”

What makes an extraterrestrial world habitable? New tools and modeling software are providing clues.

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Windborne mosquitoes may carry malaria hundreds of kilometers

Discovery of high-altitude migration has big implications for disease control

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North American seismic networks can contribute to nuclear security

Seismologists explain how the work of regional seismic networks in North America are contributing to nuclear test monitoring, particularly in the case of low-yield explosions.

6h

The violent history of the big galaxy next door

Astronomers have pieced together the cannibalistic past of our neighboring large galaxy Andromeda, which has now set its sights on the Milky Way as its next main course.

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CRISPRed fruit flies mimic monarch butterfly — and could make you puke

Monarch butterflies and a few other insects evolved essentially the same genetic mutations allowing them to eat toxic milkweed without getting sick. Monarch butterflies and caterpillars store the toxins to deter predators. UC Berkeley scientists used CRISPR gene editing to make these same mutations in fruit flies, successfully conferring toxin resistance. This is the first time an animal has been

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Andromeda galaxy ate several dwarf galaxies in two-course lunch

Our nearest major galaxy, Andromeda, has eaten several smaller galaxies over its lifetime. Now we have reconstructed the story of the meal from the leftover debris

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The Andromeda Galaxy Has Been Devouring Other Galaxies Since It Was a Baby (And Earth Is Next)

The Milky Way will collide with the Andromeda galaxy 4.5 billion years from now — and new research shows our neighbor has a violent past of cannibalism.

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North American seismic networks can contribute to nuclear security

Seismologists explain how the work of regional seismic networks in North America are contributing to nuclear test monitoring, particularly in the case of low-yield explosions.

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Female surgeons earned 24% less per hour while operating compared to male surgeons

Female surgeons earned 24 per cent less per hour while operating compared to male surgeons, finds a new study, which also noted that female surgeons performed fewer of the highest-paid primary procedures than male surgeons. The study identified over 1.5 million surgical procedures claimed by 3,275 surgeons in Ontario from the beginning of 2014 until the end of 2016.

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More chronic illness uncovered after Medicaid expansion

Nearly one in three low-income people who enrolled in Michigan’s expanded Medicaid program discovered they had a chronic illness that had never been diagnosed before, according to a new study. And whether it was a newly found condition or one they’d known about before, half of Medicaid expansion enrollees with chronic conditions said their overall health improved after one year of coverage or mor

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Plant diversity a casualty of high-severity wildfires

Sierra Nevada forests are losing plant diversity due to high-severity fires, according to a study from the University of California, Davis. These fires are turning patches of forest into shrub fields—indefinitely, in some cases.

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Pioneering red light-activated anti-tumor prodrug reduces side effects

Most of the current clinical anti-tumor drugs used in chemotherapy move around in the patient's blood after intake and are unable to pinpoint the targeted tumor. As a result, while killing the tumor cells, the healthy cells may also be killed as "collateral damage," leading to undesired side effects. Aiming to overcome this problem, Dr. Zhu Guangyu, Associate Professor of Department of Chemistry,

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New organic compounds found in Enceladus ice grains

New kinds of organic compounds, the ingredients of amino acids, have been detected in the plumes bursting from Saturn's moon Enceladus. The findings are the result of the ongoing deep dive into data from NASA's Cassini mission.

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Kannibal-galakse æder små galakser: En dag bliver det Mælkevejens tur

Andromeda vil en dag støde sammen med Mælkevejen og blive en endnu større galakse.

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Pioneering red light-activated anti-tumor prodrug reduces side effects

Most of the current clinical anti-tumor drugs used in chemotherapy move around in the patient's blood after intake and are unable to pinpoint the targeted tumor. As a result, while killing the tumor cells, the healthy cells may also be killed as "collateral damage," leading to undesired side effects. Aiming to overcome this problem, Dr. Zhu Guangyu, Associate Professor of Department of Chemistry,

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These Butterflies Evolved to Eat Poison. How Could That Have Happened?

Scientists have unraveled the sequence of gene mutations that enabled the monarch butterfly to thrive on toxic milkweed.

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Why are there no animals with three legs?

The answer to why there aren’t any animals with three legs may be at the core of animal evolution, a new essay argues. Tracy Thomson, graduate student in the earth and planetary sciences department at the University of California, Davis, has been pondering the non-existence of tripeds. He recently published an essay on the topic in Bioessays . Thomson got the idea after taking a graduate class on

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Stanford-made exhibit plunges people in the world of microbes

Wandering through the exhibits of the Exploratorium science museum in San Francisco in spring 2018, visitors had the chance to dance with microbes. The boogie appeared to take place on a projection screen where visitors were represented as bright blue silhouettes amidst a crowd of their single-cell dance partners—a light-sensitive organism called Euglena. As the Euglena flipped and shuffled to avo

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Scientists recreate in flies the mutations that let monarch butterfly eat toxic milkweed with impunity

The fruit flies in Noah Whiteman's lab may be hazardous to your health.

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The violent history of the big galaxy next door

Astronomers have pieced together the cannibalistic past of our neighbouring large galaxy Andromeda, which has now set its sights on the Milky Way as its next main course.

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How the monarch butterfly evolved its resistance to toxic milkweed

Scientists engineered fruit flies to have the same resistance—by making just three DNA changes

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The amplitude and origin of sea-level variability during the Pliocene epoch

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1619-z Sea level varied by 13 ± 5 metres on average, but up to 25 metres, over glacial–interglacial cycles during the Pliocene epoch, due to partial collapses of Antarctic Ice Sheets.

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Two major accretion epochs in M31 from two distinct populations of globular clusters

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1597-1 There are two distinct kinematic populations of globular clusters in Messier 31 (M31, the Andromeda galaxy) with rotation axes perpendicular to each other, suggesting that they arose from merger events separated by billions of years.

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Double-click enables synthesis of chemical libraries for drug discovery

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02905-w Operationally simple chemical reactions, termed click reactions, are widely used in many scientific fields. A streamlined synthesis of compounds called azides looks set to expand the role of click chemistry still further.

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The fungal mycobiome promotes pancreatic oncogenesis via activation of MBL

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1608-2 In humans and mouse models, the mycobiome of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumours is markedly enriched in Malassezia species compared to that of normal pancreas, which implicates these pathogenic fungi in oncogenesis.

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The RIPK4–IRF6 signalling axis safeguards epidermal differentiation and barrier function

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1615-3 Signalling between the transcription factor IRF6 and the kinase RIPK4, in particular the phosphorylation of IRF6 by RIPK4, regulates epidermal differentiation and lipid metabolism, thereby maintaining the function of the epidermal barrier.

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Reply to: One neuron versus deep learning in aftershock prediction

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1583-7

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Windborne long-distance migration of malaria mosquitoes in the Sahel

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1622-4 Aerial sampling in the Sahel of Mali reveals large numbers of windborne malaria mosquitoes that had recently fed on blood and could cover hundreds of kilometres in a single night.

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Genome editing retraces the evolution of toxin resistance in the monarch butterfly

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1610-8 CRISPR–Cas9 engineering of the Drosophila Atpα gene (encoding the α-subunit of the sodium pump) is used to study the ability of mutations that evolved independently in several insect orders to confer resistance to keystone plant toxins.

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Coordinated alterations in RNA splicing and epigenetic regulation drive leukaemogenesis

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1618-0 Analyses of transcriptomes from patients with acute myeloid leukaemia identified frequently co-occurring mutations of IDH2 and SRSF2, which functional analyses showed to have distinct and coordinated leukaemogenic effects on the epigenome and RNA splicing.

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Malaria mosquitoes go with the flow

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02880-2 The rapid return of mosquitoes to African semi-desert regions when the dry season ends was an unsolved mystery. A surprising solution to the puzzle is the long-range migration of mosquitoes on high-altitude winds.

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Harnessing innate immunity in cancer therapy

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1593-5 The authors review recent developments in our understanding of the antitumour effects of the innate immune system and how this system could be harnessed in the clinic.

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Two-dimensional semiconductors host high-temperature exotic state

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02906-9 The phenomenon of Bose–Einstein condensation is typically limited to extremely low temperatures. The effect has now been spotted at much higher temperatures for particles called excitons in atomically thin semiconductors.

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Modular click chemistry libraries for functional screens using a diazotizing reagent

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1589-1 A ‘click’ reaction is developed for the simple and rapid formation of azides from primary amines, and is used to prepare a library of over 1,200 azides for subsequent use in the existing triazole annulation click reaction.

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Podcast: Leapfrogging speciation, and migrating mosquitoes

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02977-8 Hear the latest science news, with Shamini Bundell and Nick Howe.

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Fungi accelerate pancreatic cancer

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02892-y The impact of fungi on human health is under-studied and underappreciated. One genus of fungus, Malassezia, has now been linked to the progression of pancreatic cancer.

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Structure of the inner kinetochore CCAN complex assembled onto a centromeric nucleosome

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1609-1 Cryo-electron microscopy structures of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae inner kinetochore complex provide insights into the interdependencies of constituent subcomplexes and the mechanism of centromeric nucleosome recognition.

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Leapfrog to speciation boosted by mother’s influence

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02904-x It has now been found that mothers of a species of frog affect the behaviour of their offspring — influencing female mating preferences and aggression between males. Such behaviours might lead to the formation of new species.

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Evidence of high-temperature exciton condensation in two-dimensional atomic double layers

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1591-7 Condensation of interlayer excitons at temperatures above 100 kelvin is demonstrated in a van der Waals heterostructure consisting of two-dimensional atomic double layers of transition metal chalcogenides.

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Inducing and exploiting vulnerabilities for the treatment of liver cancer

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1607-3 CDC7 inhibition selectively induces senescence in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with TP53 mutations, which enables the selective apoptotic cell death of these senescent cells using inhibitors of mTOR signalling.

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Environmental flow limits to global groundwater pumping

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1594-4 Estimates for when critical environmental streamflow limits will be reached—with potentially devastating economic and environmental effects—are obtained using a global model that links groundwater pumping with the groundwater flow to rivers.

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Imprinting sets the stage for speciation

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1599-z Tadpoles of strawberry poison frogs (Oophaga pumilio) are shown to imprint on adult coloration, affecting both male aggression biases and female preferences and setting the stage for speciation by sexual selection.

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One neuron versus deep learning in aftershock prediction

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1582-8

6h

America’s First Cannabis Cafe Is Open for Business

Munchie Destroyer On Tuesday, the Lowell Cafe opened in West Hollywood, California — and the restaurant is unlike any other in the United States. “For over a century we’ve been forced to hide cannabis consumption out of public view, but that time is now over,” the cafe writes on its website . “We’re proud to announce Lowell Cafe — America’s first cannabis cafe serving farm fresh food, coffee, jui

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Pioneering red light-activated anti-tumor prodrug reduces side effects

Phorbiplatin, a new anti-cancer prodrug that can be controllably activated by red light was developed by a research team from City University of Hong Kong. With its unique 'on-site' activation characteristic, this new prodrug can effectively kill cancer cells and minimize damage to normal tissues.

6h

Stanford-made exhibit plunges people in the world of microbes

Scientists at Stanford and the Exploratorium developed an immersive exhibit where visitors can dance with living cells.

6h

Preaching the benefits of vaccination in an increasingly skeptical world

The jam-packed schedule for IDWeek2019 includes presentations about vaccines and other therapies that are effective against infectious diseases, new research insights about emerging infections and updates about global outbreaks past and present, such as measles and Zika. Children's National faculty is represented all week.

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Plant diversity a casualty of high-severity wildfires

Wildfire is transforming some forestlands into shrublands, a UC Davis study finds. The results suggest these forests, which are used to living with and even benefiting from fire, have not yet adapted to this newer regime of intense, high-severity fires.

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How Art Can Renew a Community

This is No. 2 in a series of three videos from our friends at New America about the realities of community revitalization and economic recovery in the much-discussed Industrial Heartland of America. It’s based on an Indiana tour that Deb Fallows and I made this spring, co-organized by New America Indianapolis and Indiana Humanities . Installment No. 1 was about an innovative, inclusive job-traini

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Fragmented physical activity linked to greater mortality risk

Although reduced physical activity during the day is widely seen as a harbinger of mortality in older people, fragmentation of physical activity — spreading daily activity across more episodes of brief activity — may be an earlier indicator of mortality risk than total amount of daily activity, according to a new study.

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Father's obesity in puberty doubles the risk of asthma in his future offspring

A new study shows that boys who are obese in pre-puberty have an over two times higher risk of having children with asthma than those who are not.

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Safeguarding the world's largest tuna fishery

New research has used a combination of records from captains and scientific observers, FAD tracking data, ocean models and cutting edge simulation methods to reveal for the first time the trajectories and potential impact FADs may have on fisheries around Pacific island nations.

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African evidence support Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis

A team of scientists from South Africa has discovered evidence partially supporting a hypothesis that Earth was struck by a meteorite or asteroid 12,800 years ago, leading to global consequences including climate change, and contributing to the extinction of many species of large animals at the time of an episode called the Younger Dryas.

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Nine Nobel Prize Predictions for 2019

These significant advancements could win the Nobel Prizes in physiology or medicine, physics, and chemistry. nobel2019_listicletop.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics Culture Wednesday, October 2, 2019 – 12:00 Inside Science Staff (Inside Science) — Every year, the Nobel Prizes in physiology or medicine, physics, and c

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Stanford-made exhibit plunges people in the world of microbes

Wandering through the exhibits of the Exploratorium science museum in San Francisco in spring 2018, visitors had the chance to dance with microbes. The boogie appeared to take place on a projection screen where visitors were represented as bright blue silhouettes amidst a crowd of their single-cell dance partners—a light-sensitive organism called Euglena. As the Euglena flipped and shuffled to avo

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Scientists recreate in flies the mutations that let monarch butterfly eat toxic milkweed with impunity

The fruit flies in Noah Whiteman's lab may be hazardous to your health.

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NASA examines extra-tropical large Lorenzo's rainfall

Lorenzo is still at hurricane force in the eastern North Atlantic has now transitioned to an extra-tropical cyclone and has grown in size. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall occurring within this strong system. The Portuguese Institute for the Sea and the Atmosphere has discontinued all warnings for the Azores, and now Ireland and the

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Tunable optical chip paves way for new quantum devices

Researchers have created a silicon carbide (SiC) photonic integrated chip that can be thermally tuned by applying an electric signal. The approach could one day be used to create a large range of reconfigurable devices such as phase-shifters and tunable optical couplers needed for networking applications and quantum information processing.

7h

Carbon emissions soar as tourism reaches new heights

A researcher is examining how the flight routes people take to get to tourist destinations impact the amount of pollution in the air.

7h

Why some greens turn brown in historical paintings

Enticed by the brilliant green hues of copper acetate and copper resinate, some painters in the Renaissance period incorporated these pigments into their masterpieces. However, by the 18th century, most artists had abandoned the colors because of their tendency to darken with time. Now, researchers have uncovered the chemistry behind the copper pigments' color change.

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Teens taking oral contraceptives may be at increased risk for depressive symptoms

Investigators report that there was no association between oral contraceptive use and depressive symptom severity in the entire population they studied (ages 16 through 25). However, they found that 16-year-old girls reported higher depressive symptom severity compared with 16-year-old girls not using oral contraceptives.

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Swimming toward an 'internet of health'?

In recent years, the seemingly inevitable 'internet of things' has attracted considerable attention: the idea that in the future, everything in the physical world — machines, objects, people — will be connected to the internet. Drawing on lessons learned from studies on a variety of marine animals outfitted with sensors, researchers in a new perspective article describe how an 'internet of healt

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Daily briefing: Dolphins frolic again in the Potomac River

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02981-y An iconic river returns to life, why US officials are targeting flavoured vapes and what comes after quantum supremacy.

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'Personalized dj' music playlist algorithm matches songs to listeners' changing moods

Imagine having a disc jockey inside your computer who matches the music played to your current frame of mind. According to new research from The University of Texas at Austin, machine learning can approximate that experience creating ultra-personal music playlists that adapt to each user's changing moods.

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Touting flavor before nutrition encourages healthy eating

Most people want to eat healthier, but efforts to encourage healthy eating by providing nutrition information have not drastically changed habits. A new study suggests that labels emphasizing taste and positive experience could help.

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NASA examines extra-tropical large Lorenzo's rainfall

Lorenzo is still at hurricane force in the eastern North Atlantic has now transitioned to an extra-tropical cyclone and has grown in size. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall occurring within this strong system. The Portuguese Institute for the Sea and the Atmosphere has discontinued all warnings for the Azores, and now Ireland and the

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Inadequate control of thyroid hormones sensitizes to hepatocarcinogenesis and unhealthy aging

For Aging's Volume 11, Issue 18, the Journal devoted the Cover to a research paper by Dr. Alejandro Martin-Montalvo from the Department of Regeneration and Cell Therapy, Andalusian Center for Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine-CABIMER, Junta de Andalucia-University of Pablo de Olavide-University of Seville-CSIC, Sevilla, Spain.

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The Paradox at the Heart of Know My Name

I n June 2016, something remarkable happened: A piece of documentary evidence in a court proceeding went viral. The woman who was then known only as Emily Doe read a victim-impact statement at the sentencing hearing of Brock Turner, the man who had been convicted of sexually assaulting her after a party at Stanford—while she was unconscious, on the ground, next to a dumpster. Her words were seari

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An Astronaut Who Built Paths to Space for Other Women

Janet Kavandi, who recently retired from a senior NASA post, went to space three times and added fairness to the astronaut selection process.

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Yahoo Engineer Admits He Hacked User Accounts to Hunt for Nudes

On The Prowl Former Yahoo software engineer Reyes Daniel Ruiz admitted in court that he used his work privileges to hack some 6,000 Yahoo users’ accounts — all in hopes of uncovering nudes and other sexual content. Ruiz pleaded guilty to computer intrusion, and faces a possible five years in prison and a $250,000 fine, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office . Ruiz reportedly copied videos and pi

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Car Group That ICEd Tesla Superchargers Makes Amends

Block Heads On September 22, members of a car group blocked every Tesla Supercharger in Yorktown Heights, New York, with their gas-powered vehicles — a move known as ICEing — forcing Tesla owners to drive another 14 miles to charge their electric vehicles. The organizers of the group, known as Cars & Coffee Yorktown, NY , have since gone out of their way to make sure members don’t repeat the irri

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Spread of Deadly Mosquito-borne Disease May Be Linked to Climate Change

Populations of the mosquito species thought to transmit Eastern equine encephalitis have persisted later than usual this year — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Heat Changes Insect Call, but It Still Works

Tiny insects called treehoppers produce very different mating songs at higher versus lower temperatures, but the intended recipient still finds the changed songs attractive.

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Study: Biomarker in urine may offer noninvasive detection of prostate cancer

A research study published in the journal Neoplasia and led by principal investigator Nallasivam Palanisamy, Ph.D., associate scientist in the Vattikuti Urology Institute at Henry Ford Health System, has identified a novel prostate cancer gene fusion involving the KLK4 protein coding gene and KLKP1 pseudogene. This unique biomarker can be detected in the urine samples of patients with prostate can

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Using past extinctions to drive future conservation

A growing suite of tools is providing fine-grain detail into the historic ranges and population dynamics of large animals. These new insights may aid in projecting the responses of present-day megafauna to changing climates and habitat.

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Microscopic evidence sheds light on the disappearance of the world's largest mammals

Understanding the causes and consequences of Late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions is increasingly important in a world of growing human populations and climate change. A review, led by scholars at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, highlights the role that cutting-edge scientific methods can play in broadening the discussions about meg

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US sizzles in rare autumn heat wave

A freakish heat wave is making early autumn feel like the dog days of summer in much of the southern and eastern US, with forecasters predicting Wednesday that temperatures could get close to triple digits.

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Five Interventions for Treating Multidrug-Resistant TB

The FDA has approved a drug combination that could be a could be a game changer. We should make sure its use is equitable and sustainable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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DNA Nanomachines Are Opening Medicine to the World of Physics

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NASA is Testing a Drill to Search for Life on Mars – On Its Own

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America's first cannabis cafe opens in California – in pictures

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Toronto's Pearson airport to use AI-powered technology to detect weapons

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The biggest likely source of microplastics in California coastal waters? Our car tires

Driving is not just an air pollution and climate change problem—turns out, it just might be the largest contributor of microplastics in California coastal waters.

7h

Tunable optical chip paves way for new quantum devices

Researchers have created a silicon carbide (SiC) photonic integrated chip that can be thermally tuned by applying an electric signal. The approach could one day be used to create a large range of reconfigurable devices such as phase-shifters and tunable optical couplers needed for networking applications and quantum information processing.

7h

Study: Carbon emissions soar as tourism reaches new heights

A researcher at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) is examining how the flight routes people take to get to tourist destinations impact the amount of pollution in the air in a newly published study he coauthored in the Annals of Tourism Research.

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Virgin Galactic says it'll fly Italian air force researchers

Virgin Galactic says it has been contracted by the Italian air force for a suborbital research flight aboard its winged rocket ship.

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Some Black Holes May Actually Be Blobs of Dark Energy

Well Actually Some of the black holes floating around our universe might actually be something else entirely. It’s possible that some may be blobs of dark energy, the mysterious theoretical force thought to be pushing the universe’s outward expansion, according to Live Science . A pair of University of Hawaii scientists arrived at the unexpected conclusion when they were trying to make sense of t

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Climate change could make borrowing costlier for states and cities

Someday soon, analysts will determine that a city or county, or maybe a school district or utility, is so vulnerable to sea level rise, flooding, drought or wildfire that it is an investment risk.

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Microscopic evidence sheds light on the disappearance of the world's largest mammals

Understanding the causes and consequences of Late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions is increasingly important in a world of growing human populations and climate change. A new review, led by scholars at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, highlights the role that cutting-edge scientific methods can play in broadening the discussions about

7h

Researchers identify mechanism controlling DNA repair

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), is the macromolecule that holds all hereditary and genetic information. Continuously under assault, alterations and damage to DNA can lead to many different health issues, including cancer. DNA is highly regulated within cells, where multiple mechanisms are at play to repair and protect its integrity. Scientists are still investigating these mechanisms to fully compreh

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Novel material with strong action against fungi and tumors developed

A new material with antifungal and antitumor properties has been developed by researchers at the Center for Development of Functional Materials (CDMF), one of the Research, Innovation and Dissemination Centers (RIDCs) supported by São Paulo Research Foundation—FAPESP. CDMF is hosted by the Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar) in São Paulo State, Brazil.

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Fossil fish provides new insights into the evolution

An international research team led by Giuseppe Marramà from the Institute of Paleontology at the University of Vienna discovered a new and well-preserved fossil stingray with an exceptional anatomy, which greatly differs from living species. The find provides new insights into the evolution of these animals and sheds light on the recovery of marine ecosystems after the mass extinction occurred 66

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Microscopic evidence sheds light on the disappearance of the world's largest mammals

Understanding the causes and consequences of Late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions is increasingly important in a world of growing human populations and climate change. A new review, led by scholars at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, highlights the role that cutting-edge scientific methods can play in broadening the discussions about

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Canadians told to stop taking aspirin to prevent first heart attack, stroke

If you've never had a heart attack or stroke, you likely should not be taking aspirin to prevent them, according to new research. Researchers at the University of Alberta Kolber reviewed three large, randomized, placebo-controlled studies published in 2018 that showed the risk of major internal bleeding associated with taking an aspirin a day is higher than any preventative benefits.

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China Reveals Spacecraft Built to Ferry Astronauts to the Moon

To the Moon China just showed off the next-generation spacecraft it plans to use to send astronauts to the Moon and back, according to Space.com . The China Academy of Space Technology released a promo video showing more details about the spacecraft, which is designed to house up to five astronauts. The 30-foot, fully reusable spacecraft has a maximum mass of about 22 tons at liftoff. Beyond Beyo

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Dixie Alley Outbreak | Storm Chasers (Full Episode)

In the worst tornado outbreak in over half a century, Mississippi & Alabama are ravaged by hundreds of twisters. Towns are wiped clean off the map, and hundreds of people lose their lives. Stream More Full Episodes of Storm Chasers: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/storm-chasers Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery Join Us o

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Five Interventions for Treating Multidrug-Resistant TB

The FDA has approved a drug combination that could be a could be a game changer. We should make sure its use is equitable and sustainable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A philosopher is running for president

Jerome Segal is a philosopher and social activist from Maryland who's just joined the 2020 presidential race as a third-party candidate. He doesn't hope to win, necessarily, but instead to ignite a political renaissance in the country. Philosophers have a good idea of what a utopian society should look like, but should we elect one as president? None Jerome Segal, a philosopher and social activis

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Fossil fish gives new insights into evolution after end-Cretaceous mass extinction

An international research team has discovered a new and well-preserved fossil stingray with an exceptional anatomy, which greatly differs from living species. The find provides new insights into the evolution of these animals and sheds light on the recovery of marine ecosystems after the mass extinction occurred 66 million years ago.

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Sex-based differences in the development of brain hubs involved in memory and emotion

Researchers have uncovered sex-based differences in the development of the hippocampus and amygdala. These brain areas have been implicated in the biology of several mental disorders that impact males and females differently. The findings may help researchers better understand sex-based differences in the emergence of mental disorders during adolescence and early adulthood.

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New approach to pain treatment in diseases of the pancreas

One of the worst symptoms associated with inflammation or cancer of the pancreas is severe chronic pain. Pancreatic pain is difficult to treat, because many painkillers prove ineffective in pancreatic patients. In a recent study, medical researchers discovered the cause of this phenomenon for the first time: a particular neuroenzyme in the body is present in the nerves of the organ in high concent

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Object identification and interaction with a smartphone knock

Scientists have developed new technology, dubbed 'Knocker', which identifies objects and executes actions just by knocking on them with the smartphone. Software powered by machine learning of sounds, vibrations, and other reactions will follow the users' directions.

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Inspired by Northern clingfish, researchers make a better suction cup

Scientists, inspired by the clingfish's suction power, set out to develop an artificial suction cup that borrows from nature's design. Their prototype actually performed better than the clingfish.

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Researchers identify mechanism controlling DNA repair

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), is the macromolecule that holds all hereditary and genetic information. Continuously under assault, alterations and damage to DNA can lead to many different health issues, including cancer. DNA is highly regulated within cells, where multiple mechanisms are at play to repair and protect its integrity. Scientists are still investigating these mechanisms to fully compreh

7h

Why some greens turn brown in historical paintings

Enticed by the brilliant green hues of copper acetate and copper resinate, some painters in the Renaissance period incorporated these pigments into their masterpieces. However, by the 18th century, most artists had abandoned the colors because of their tendency to darken with time. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' journal Inorganic Chemistry have uncovered the chemistry behind the copper pigment

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How the U.S. Could Have an All-Renewable Energy Grid

An all-renewable grid will mean more electricity and more transmission lines. (Credit: Russ Allison Loar/flickr, CC BY-NC-ND) The main solution to climate change is well known – stop burning fossil fuels. How to do this is more complicated, but as a scholar who does energy modeling, I and others see the outlines of a post-fossil-fuel future: We make electricity with renewable sources and electrify

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North American seismic networks can contribute to nuclear security

The International Monitoring System is the top global seismic network for monitoring nuclear weapon tests around the world. To expand the system's detection capabilities, however, international monitors should seek out the data, methods and expertise of smaller regional seismic networks.

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Reaffirming the value of international collaborations

Scientific collaborations across the globe are an important part of modern research. However, political and economic strife between governments, such as current tensions between the U.S. and China, can threaten these vital connections, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

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Heat Changes Insect Call, but It Still Works

Tiny insects called treehoppers produce very different mating songs at higher versus lower temperatures, but the intended recipient still finds the changed songs attractive. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Microsoft's Surface Laptop 3 comes with metal finish, Intel and AMD CPUs, 15-inch variant

A "pumped" Panos Panay introduced the third generation Surface Laptop this morning at a Microsoft event, boasting of a number of design changes that people have been asking for since the first …

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Antidepressant medications appear to be generally safe

Antidepressants are generally safe, according to a new study by an international team of researchers. By assessing evidence from 45 meta-analyses, which combined the results from many studies, the researchers did not find strong evidence of adverse health outcomes associated with antidepressant use. The findings have been published in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Study: Carbon emissions soar as tourism reaches new heights

A researcher at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) is examining how the flight routes people take to get to tourist destinations impact the amount of pollution in the air in a newly published study he coauthored in the Annals of Tourism Research.

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Tunable optical chip paves way for new quantum devices

Researchers have created a silicon carbide (SiC) photonic integrated chip that can be thermally tuned by applying an electric signal. The approach could one day be used to create a large range of reconfigurable devices such as phase-shifters and tunable optical couplers needed for networking applications and quantum information processing.

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Let fishers in Africa and Asia keep more of their catches

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02962-1 Fish farms are depriving children of essential micronutrients.

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Ultra-fast optical way to extract critical information from quantum materials

Topological insulators are quantum materials, which, due to their exotic electronic structure, on surfaces and edges conduct electric current like metal, while acting as an insulator in bulk. Scientists have now demonstrated how to tell apart topological materials from their regular — trivial — counterparts within a millionth of a billionth of a second by probing it with ultra-fast laser light.

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Estimating calorie content not clear-cut for all

We make food decisions several times a day – from what time we eat to how much – but a new study has found we are not very good at judging the energy-density of what we consume.

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Inspired by Northern clingfish, researchers make a better suction cup

Scientists, inspired by the clingfish's suction power, set out to develop an artificial suction cup that borrows from nature's design. Their prototype actually performed better than the clingfish.

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Structural color printing of 3D microscale objects by shrinking photonic crystals

Researchers have developed a 'coloring-by-shrinking' method to print arbitrary 3D microscopic objects exhibiting structural colors. The design consisted of woodpile photonic crystals with varying lattice constants as the 3D building blocks. These structures remain colorless until they are heat treated, causing them to shrink and manifest color, a result of their lattice constants shrinking down be

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Technology provides insight into how white sharks hunt

White sharks are top predators in the marine environment, but unlike their terrestrial counterparts, very little is known about their predatory activity underwater, with current knowledge limited to surface predation events. Now, a team of international scientists has used video- and data-logging technology to shed new light on predator-prey interactions of these mighty sea creatures.

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Researchers create new viral vector for improved gene therapy in sickle cell disease

Researchers have developed a new and improved viral vector — a virus-based vehicle that delivers therapeutic genes — for use in gene therapy for sickle cell disease. In advanced lab tests using animal models, the new vector was up to 10 times more efficient at incorporating corrective genes into bone marrow stem cells than the conventional vectors currently used, and it had a carrying capacity o

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Heat Changes Insect Call, but It Still Works

Tiny insects called treehoppers produce very different mating songs at higher versus lower temperatures, but the intended recipient still finds the changed songs attractive. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Microsoft Surface Duo, Surface Neo, Surface Phone: Details, Specs, Release Date

It folds, but the screen isn't foldable. It sort of fits in your pocket. It has a camera. And it makes phone calls—but don't you dare call it a phone.

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Microsoft Surface Pro X, Surface Pro 7, Surface Laptop 3, Surface Earbuds: Price, Specs, Release Date

The company announced a slew of new Surface hardware, including a new model with a custom mobile processor.

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Can we peek at Schrodinger's cat without disturbing it?

Quantum physics is difficult and explaining it even more so. Researchers have now tried to solve one of the biggest puzzles in quantum physics: How to measure the quantum system without changing it?

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Chair yoga more effective than music therapy in older adults with advanced dementia

Researchers assessed the ability of older adults with advanced dementia to participate in non-pharmacological interventions and compared chair yoga with chair-based exercise and music therapy. Results showed that participants with moderate-to-severe dementia could safely adhere to non-pharmacological interventions; more than 97 percent fully engaged in each session. The chair yoga group reported a

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French citizens' panel to advise on climate crisis strategies

Body of 150 non-experts to explore ways of cutting carbon emissions by 40% before 2030 A sample group of 150 French citizens — from unemployed people to pensioners and factory workers — will this week begin advising the French president Emmanuel Macron on how France can cut carbon emissions to tackle the climate emergency. Continue reading…

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How Incognito Google Maps Protects You—and How It Doesn't

Turning on the new Incognito Mode in Google Maps won't make you as invisible as it might sound.

8h

North American seismic networks can contribute to nuclear security

In a paper published as part of an upcoming focus section on regional seismic networks in Seismological Research Letters, University of Utah seismologist Keith Koper explains how the work of regional seismic networks in North America is contributing to nuclear test monitoring, particularly in the case of low-yield explosions.

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Laser therapy gains credibility as effective option for treating vaginal problems

Nearly 50% of menopausal women complain of vaginal dryness, itching, and burning, among other commonly reported menopause symptoms. Laser therapy is one of the newer techniques for addressing these problems. A new study suggests that it is as effective and safe as vaginal estrogen in improving sexual and urinary functionality. Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The Nor

8h

Hypoglycaemia prevention could cut hospital stays

New research shows that preventing in-patients with diabetes from developing hypoglycaemia could dramatically reduce the length of time they spend in hospital, and reduce mortality rates. This research is particularly relevant as it's Hypo Awareness Week this week.

8h

Why some greens turn brown in historical paintings

Enticed by the brilliant green hues of copper acetate and copper resinate, some painters in the Renaissance period incorporated these pigments into their masterpieces. However, by the 18th century, most artists had abandoned the colors because of their tendency to darken with time. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' journal Inorganic Chemistry have uncovered the chemistry behind the copper pigment

8h

Species could buffer reproduction against climate change through sperm and egg plasticity

New research shows that beetles have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to reproduce despite warmer temperatures.They have evolved mechanisms that allow their sperm and eggs to quickly cope with increasing environmental temperature variation. And this could help species buffer themselves against climate change.

8h

Researchers study the mechanisms behind learning and long-term memory in the brain

With this new information, researchers will be able to learn more about long-term memory storage and the implications this may have for understanding Alzheimer's disease and other disorders that result in memory loss.

8h

Lifetime indoor tanning associated with squamous cell carcinoma cancer

This observational study used data from nearly 160,000 women in Norway to examine lifetime indoor tanning and risk of squamous cell carcinoma, one of the most common types of cancer worldwide. The findings suggest the association between cumulative exposure to indoor tanning and risk of squamous cell carcinoma was the same regardless of how many years the women tanned and what age they were when t

8h

ADHD and risk of giving birth as teenagers

Data were used from about 384,000 girls and women in Sweden (including 6,410 with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder) who gave birth for the first time between 2007-2014 to examine whether those with ADHD have an increased likelihood of giving birth as teenagers.

8h

Grading evidence in studies about antidepressant use/exposure and adverse health outcomes

This study graded the evidence of 45 meta-analyses of observational studies on the association between antidepressant use or exposure and adverse health outcomes.

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Maternal lead exposure, intergenerational risk of childhood overweight/obesity and folate

An observational study of 1,442 mother-child pairs examined associations between lead blood levels in mothers and intergenerational risk of their children being overweight or obese and whether adequate folate levels in mothers mitigated that risk.

8h

How were oral contraceptives, concurrent depressive symptoms associated among adolescents, young women?

This observational study examined associations between depressive symptoms and oral contraceptive use in adolescents and young women and how those associations might differ by age. Oral contraceptive use has been associated with increased risk for subsequent depression in adolescents. The study included about 1,000 girls and young women in the Netherlands who completed at least 1 of 4 assessments

8h

Earnings disparities between female, male surgeons in Canada

Female surgeons in Ontario, Canada, earned less per hour than their male counterparts within a fee-for-service system, and women were less likely to perform the most lucrative procedures. Fee-for-services systems of payment are often proposed as being unbiased. This analysis used administrative data from a single-payer health system to compare earnings per hour spent operating for 3,275 surgeons w

8h

Going to sleep on your back in late pregnancy

This study looked at whether going to sleep on your back in the third trimester of pregnancy was associated with average lower birth weights.

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Teens taking oral contraceptives may be at increased risk for depressive symptoms

In a study published in JAMA Psychiatry, investigators report that there was no association between oral contraceptive use and depressive symptom severity in the entire population they studied (ages 16 through 25). However, they found that 16-year-old girls reported higher depressive symptom severity compared with 16-year-old girls not using oral contraceptives.

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Female surgeons earned 24% less per hour while operating compared to male surgeons: study

Female surgeons earned 24 per cent less per hour while operating compared to male surgeons, finds a new study led by St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, which also noted that female surgeons performed fewer of the highest-paid primary procedures than male surgeons. The study identified over 1.5 million surgical procedures claimed by 3,275 surgeons in Ontario from the beginning of 2014 until the end

8h

Fragmented physical activity linked to greater mortality risk

Although reduced physical activity during the day is widely seen as a harbinger of mortality in older people, fragmentation of physical activity–spreading daily activity across more episodes of brief activity–may be an earlier indicator of mortality risk than total amount of daily activity, according to a new study from scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

8h

Scientists improve pancreatic cancer diagnosis with multifunctional platinum nanoreactor

Scientists from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, University of Surrey and the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have developed a multifunctional platinum (Pt) nanoreactor geared towards POC metabolic analysis that performs visual detection and mass spectrometry (MS) fingerprinting simultaneously.

8h

What Will Humans Eat on Mars?

Planetary scientist Kevin Cannon talks about the logistics of feeding a population of one million on the Red Planet

8h

Harvard Won This Round, but Affirmative Action Is Weak

Precedent is powerful; it was always unlikely that District Court Judge Allison Burroughs was going to break it. In a much-anticipated 130-page decision released yesterday , Burroughs ruled that Harvard University’s admissions practices do not discriminate against Asian American applicants. The high-profile lawsuit had been brought by Students for Fair Admissions, whose president, Edward Blum, ha

8h

For older teens, phone dependence can predict depression

Young people hooked on their smartphones may have an increased risk for depression and loneliness, researchers report. A growing body of research has identified a link between smartphone dependency and symptoms of depression and loneliness. However, experts weren’t sure whether reliance on smartphones precedes those symptoms, or whether the reverse is true: that depressed or lonely people are mor

8h

Microsoft previews dual-screen Surface devices out in a year

Microsoft is refreshing its lineup of Surface computers, while previewing dual-screen devices that won't be out for another year.

8h

When Your Math Runs Out of Letters

An airtight proof that there are more than 26 numbers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How bacteria trigger their defenses against invaders

We may finally know how bacterial cells trigger their defense against outside attacks, according to new research. The study also describes how researchers can activate the defense systems on cue. This discovery could be an important cornerstone in fighting diseases in the future. The researchers have shown how a cell under attack from a virus activates a molecule called COA (cyclic oligoadenylate

8h

Diabetes drug offers hope of new treatment for multiple sclerosis

Trial using rats showed the drug metformin repaired nerve damage caused by the disease Scientists have raised hopes of a new treatment for multiple sclerosis after animal studies showed a common diabetes drug can repair nerve damage caused by the disease. The effect of the drug was so striking that doctors in Cambridge are now planning a clinical trial of MS patients next year. Continue reading..

8h

Blog: Piger skal introduceres for teknologi på egne præmisser

Piger kan godt være både computernørder og glitterprinsesser. Men vi er nødt til at droppe forestillingen om, at interessen for teknologi opstår ud af den blå luft, hvis vi vil have pigerne med.

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Swimming toward an 'internet of health'?

In recent years, the seemingly inevitable 'internet of things' has attracted considerable attention: the idea that in the future, everything in the physical world — machines, objects, people — will be connected to the internet. Drawing on lessons learned from studies on a variety of marine animals outfitted with sensors, researchers in a new perspective article in ACS Sensors describe how an 'in

8h

Father's obesity in puberty doubles the risk of asthma in his future offspring

A Norwegian study shows that boys who are obese in pre-puberty have an over two times higher risk of having children with asthma than those who are not.

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Asthma changes obesity rate in black female teens living in disadvantaged neighborhoods

A first-of-its-kind study led by researchers at LSU Health New Orleans Schools of Public Health and Medicine found that asthma may protect against obesity among African American female adolescents living in disadvantaged neighborhoods.

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Sex-based differences in the development of brain hubs involved in memory and emotion

Researchers at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), part of the National Institutes of Health, have uncovered sex-based differences in the development of the hippocampus and amygdala. These brain areas have been implicated in the biology of several mental disorders that impact males and females differently. The findings, which appear in the journal NeuroImage, may help researchers bette

8h

Moffitt researchers identify mechanism controlling DNA repair

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers recently identified a new mechanism that controls DNA repair.

8h

Letters: College Presidents Should Focus on ‘Mission, Purpose, and Student Success’

17 Questions Every College Should Be Asking “Higher education is in the middle of multiple, massive disruptions,” Senator Ben Sasse argued in September, “and it isn’t clear that the leaders of the sector grasp the magnitude of the waves of change breaking on their ivy-covered gates.” Sasse, a former college president himself, presented an (incomplete) list of job-interview questions he hopes sear

8h

Scientists improve pancreatic cancer diagnosis with multifunctional platinum nanoreactor

Metabolic analysis involves ongoing biological pathways and can be more distal than proteomic/genomic approaches to in vitro diagnostics (IVD). However, point-of-care (POC) metabolic analysis needs special designed materials to detect target biomarkers of low concentration in complex biosystems.

8h

Children told lies by parents subsequently lie more as adults, face adjustment difficulty

'If you don't behave, I'll call the police,' is a lie that parents might use to get their young children to behave. Parents' lies elicit compliance in the short term, but a new psychology study suggests that they are associated with detrimental effects when the child becomes an adult.

8h

Decades-long drop in breast cancer death rate continues

A decades-long decline in the breast cancer death rate continues, but has begun to slow in recent years.

8h

Why are there no animal species with three legs?

If 'Why?' is the first question in science, 'Why not?' must be a close second. Sometimes it's worth thinking about why something does not exist. Such as a truly three-legged animal. At least one researcher has been pondering the non-existence of tripeds.

8h

Preventing future forest diebacks

Removing dead trees from the forests and reforesting on a large scale: this is the German Federal Government's strategy against 'Forest Dieback 2.0', researchers say. Ecologists call for other solutions.

8h

Quantum vacuum: Less than zero energy

According to quantum physics, energy can be 'borrowed' — at least for some time. Energies lower than zero are possible, much like a bank account that can be overdrawn. There are, however, certain restrictions to that. Scientists have now shown that these restrictions are very fundamental properties of our universe and must be true for various possible quantum theories.

8h

Sleeping less than 6 hours and heart disease, stroke — deadly combo

Middle-aged adults with high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease or stroke could be at increased risk for cancer and early death when sleeping less than 6 hours per day.

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Ancient genomes provide insight into the genetic history of the second plague pandemic

Researchers have analyzed remains from ten archaeological sites in England, France, Germany, Russia, and Switzerland to gain insight into the different stages of the second plague pandemic and the genetic diversity of Yersinia pestis during and after the Black Death. The researchers reconstructed 34 Y. pestis genomes, tracing the genetic history of the bacterium, which revealed key insights into t

8h

Catch-22: Stricter border enforcement may increase agent corruption

Analysis of corruption cases among customs officers and Border Patrol agents reveals alarming trends depending on their years of service.

8h

Sutherland spaceport plans cover 'extensive' site

Launch towers and "antenna farms" have been proposed for the 815-acre site in the north Highlands.

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Scientists hope to breed sheep that emit less greenhouse gases

Initiative aims to improve the animals’ feeding efficiency and reduce methane emissions Scientists are working to breed sheep that produce less greenhouse gases in order to reduce their impact on the environment. The Grass to Gas initiative will combine international scientific and industry expertise to measure two major factors affecting the environmental consequences of the livestock – feed eff

8h

A solar-powered airship is being built to transport cargo more greenly

Solar-powered airships could be a greener way to transport cargo. One start-up is building one for delivering freight and says it will fly at half the speed of a jumbo jet

8h

Neutrino produced in a cosmic collider far away

The neutrino event IceCube 170922A, detected at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole, appears to originate from the distant active galaxy TXS 0506+056, at a light travel distance of 3.8 billion light years. TXS 0506+056 is one of many active galaxies and it remained a mystery why and how only this particular galaxy generated neutrinos so far.

8h

What the US health care system assumes about you | Mitchell Katz

The US health care system assumes many things about patients: that they can take off from work in the middle of the day, speak English, have a working telephone and a steady supply of food. Because of that, it's failing many of those who are most in need, says Mitchell Katz, CEO of the largest public health care system in the US. In this eye-opening talk, he shares stories of the challenges low-in

8h

Planes and vehicles main culprits masking iconic natural sounds in peaceful national parks

A team of scientists characterized the predominant human noise sources in 66 national parks in the US, in an effort to help parks better manage the noise problem.

8h

TripAdvisor Ends Ticket Sales to Attractions That Breed or Buy Dolphins and Whales

Under the new policy, the company will no longer sell tickets to SeaWorld and other parks that bring in new generations of animals.

9h

Ny minister har sine egne kæpheste: Grøn forskning og de studerendes trivsel

Regeringens grønne forskningsmilliard er dog ikke ekstra penge i forhold til tidligere aftaler, fremgår det af finanslovforslaget fra regeringen

9h

Instagram launches Restrict feature to help stop bullying – CNET

Another way to make looking at cat pictures more peaceful.

9h

Limited seed availability, dry climate hamper post-wildfire forest recovery

A lack of tree seedling establishment following recent wildfires represents a crucial bottleneck limiting coniferous forest recovery in the western US, new research finds.

9h

Planes and vehicles main culprits masking iconic natural sounds in peaceful national parks

A team of scientists characterized the predominant human noise sources in 66 national parks in the US, in an effort to help parks better manage the noise problem.

9h

Managing stormwater and stream restoration projects together

A unified approach may benefit water quality, environment more than piecemeal.

9h

2000 atoms in two places at once

The quantum superposition principle has been tested on a scale as never before in a new study. Hot, complex molecules composed of nearly two thousand atoms were brought into a quantum superposition and made to interfere. By confirming this phenomenon — 'the heart of quantum mechanics', in Richard Feynman's words — on a new mass scale, improved constraints on alternative theories to quantum mecha

9h

Technology provides insight into the hunting behavior of white sharks

White sharks are top predators in the marine environment, but unlike their terrestrial counterparts, very little is known about their predatory activity underwater, with current knowledge limited to surface predation events. Now, a team of international scientists has used video- and data-logging technology to shed new light on predator-prey interactions of these mighty sea creatures.

9h

Technology provides insight into the hunting behavior of white sharks

White sharks are top predators in the marine environment, but unlike their terrestrial counterparts, very little is known about their predatory activity underwater, with current knowledge limited to surface predation events. Now, a team of international scientists has used video- and data-logging technology to shed new light on predator-prey interactions of these mighty sea creatures.

9h

Can we peek at Schrodinger's cat without disturbing it?

Quantum physics is difficult and explaining it even more so. Associate Professor Holger F. Hofmann from Hiroshima University and Kartik Patekar from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay have tried to solve one of the biggest puzzles in quantum physics: how to measure the quantum system without changing it?

9h

Yes, Joker Is a Very Serious Drama. No, That’s Not a Compliment.

“I used to think my life was a tragedy, but now I realize it’s a fucking comedy.” So speaks the Joker (played by Joaquin Phoenix), the face-painted title character in Todd Phillips’s new film. Well, I have news for Mr. Joker. He may think life tragicomic, but the movie he’s in is very much a drama—a pompous, grim, relentlessly one-note adaptation bent on proving just how far removed it is from it

9h

Engineered T cells may be harnessed to kill solid tumor cells

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that a form of immunotherapy used to treat the blood cancer leukemia may be effective in treating other kinds of cancer as well.

9h

Novel material with strong action against fungi and tumors was developed

Researchers have created a composite with antifungal properties that are 32 times greater than those of silver by irradiating a metallic tungstate with electrons and femtosecond laser.

9h

Tyumen historians spoke about the evolution of Russian universities

The 1st Conference of the International Academy of the History of Science took place in Athens, Greece on Sept. 12-15, 2019. Scientists from all over the world gathered in the National Hellenic Research Foundation to discuss different aspects of the history of science and technology.

9h

Fossil fish gives new insights into the evolution

An international research team led by Giuseppe Marramà from the Institute of Paleontology of the University of Vienna discovered a new and well-preserved fossil stingray with an exceptional anatomy, which greatly differs from living species. The find provides new insights into the evolution of these animals and sheds light on the recovery of marine ecosystems after the mass extinction occurred 66

9h

African evidence support Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis

A team of scientists from South Africa has discovered evidence partially supporting a hypothesis that Earth was struck by a meteorite or asteroid 12,800 years ago, leading to global consequences including climate change, and contributing to the extinction of many species of large animals at the time of an episode called the Younger Dryas.

9h

A new route to blocking children's bone cancer

A study in mice showed that reducing a particular hormone signal keeps the cancer from growing and spreading.

9h

Anak Krakatau volcano collapse: 'Warning signs were there'

Taking all the available data, it was clear something was amiss with the tsunami-generating volcano.

9h

New approach to pain treatment in diseases of the pancreas

One of the worst symptoms associated with inflammation or cancer of the pancreas is severe chronic pain. Pancreatic pain is difficult to treat, because many painkillers prove ineffective in pancreatic patients. In a recent study, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) discovered the cause of this phenomenon for the first time: a particular neuroenzyme in the body is present in the nerv

9h

Object identification and interaction with a smartphone knock

A KAIST team has featured a new technology, 'Knocker', which identifies objects and executes actions just by knocking on it with the smartphone. Software powered by machine learning of sounds, vibrations, and other reactions will perform the users' directions.

9h

Spying on topology

Topological insulators are quantum materials, which, due to their exotic electronic structure, on surfaces and edges conduct electric current like metal, while acting as an insulator in bulk. Scientists from the Max-Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) have demonstrated for the first time how to tell apart topological materials from their regular — trivial — cou

9h

Quantum vacuum: Less than zero energy

According to quantum physics, energy can be 'borrowed' — at least for some time. Energies lower than zero are possible, much like a bank account that can be overdrawn. There are, however, certain restrictions to that. Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have now shown that these restrictions are very fundamental properties of our universe and must be true for various possible quantum theories.

9h

Codeine misuse in Australia reduced by prescription-only changes

The move to prescription-only codeine in Australia has seen a 50 percent reduction in the monthly rate of codeine-related poisoning calls and halved codeine sales, finds new research led by the University of Sydney.

9h

FODMAPs diet relieves symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease

New research from King's College London has found that a diet low in fermented carbohydrates has improved certain gut symptoms and improved health-related quality of life for sufferers of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

9h

Decades-long drop in breast cancer death rate continues

A decades-long decline in the breast cancer death rate continues, but has begun to slow in recent years.

9h

Structural color printing of 3-D microscale objects by shrinking photonic crystals

In a report recently published in Nature Communications, a research group led by Associate Professor Joel Yang from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) printed probably the smallest colorful 3-D model of the Eiffel Tower. Impressively, no pigments or inks were used. Instead, the 3-D-printed model of the Eiffel Tower, measuring less than half the width of a human hair at 39 mic

9h

'The Ocean Cleanup' ship sweeps first Pacific plastic

A special ship designed to clean the oceans has harvested its first plastic from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch since setting sail from San Francisco last month, its Dutch inventor said Wednesday.

9h

Doomed Exoplanet Sets Record for Shortest Orbit Around a Star

New Record It takes Mercury just 88 Earth days to orbit the Sun. That’s a minuscule fraction of Earth’s 365-day orbital period — and practically no time at all compared to Neptune’s 164.8-Earth-year-long journey around the Sun. But even Mercury’s orbit seems long compared to that of newly discovered exoplanet NGTS-10b , which has set a new record for shortest orbit, zipping around its star in jus

9h

In Houston, a Rash of Storms Tests the Limits of Coping With Climate Change

A city that did seemed to do everything right after Hurricane Harvey was again inundated last week. Is it a model of adaptation, or a cautionary tale?

9h

Varmare höstar påverkar insektslivet på ekar

– Tidigare forskning har visat att trädets vårfenologi, alltså när knopparna spricker på våren, kan ha stor betydelse för vilka insekter som äter av trädet. Men det är nästan ingen som har undersökt hur tidpunkten för höstlövsfärgning påverkar vilka insekter som äter av trädet. Nu visar vi att den har stor betydelse, säger Adam Ekholm, doktorand vid Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU. För att und

9h

To fix food waste, we have to think bigger

Focus on the big, structural issues that result in food waste, rather than exclusively blaming individual actions, say researchers. No one eats nearly one-third of all the food that is produced. By some estimates, we waste 30 million tons of food in the US and 1.3 billion metric tons worldwide every year. All this waste has huge economic, environmental, and social costs. “When people hear those n

9h

Danske lastbilchaufførers guldalder skildret i ny bog

PLUS. Turen som eksportchauffør mellem Danmark og Syd- og Østeuropa kunne udefra virke spændende. Men det var lange dage og hårdt arbejde. En ny bog fortæller nogle af historierne.

9h

A new act for opera

In November 1953, the Nationaltheater in Mannheim, Germany, staged a new opera, the composer Boris Blacher's "Abstrakte Oper Nr. 1," which had debuted just months previously. As it ran, music fans were treated to both a performance and a raging controversy about the work, which one critic called "a monstrosity of musical progress," and another termed "a stillbirth."

9h

Unshackle schools from test results to give children the chance to form opinions

If political headlines globally are anything to go by, it seems democracy is at risk. Totalitarian views are on the rise. Far-right parties and leaders have gained voters in many countries. And decisions are being made by law courts or by technical experts from international economic organizations. And people, particularly young people, feel they do not have a say. So it's not surprising then that

9h

Did a large meteorite hit the earth 12,800 years ago? Here's new evidence

Just less than 13,000 years ago, the climate cooled for a short while in many parts of the world, especially in the northern hemisphere. We know this because of what has been found in ice cores drilled in Greenland, as well as from oceans around the world.

9h

Why are there no animals with three legs?

If "Why?" is the first question in science, "Why not?" must be a close second. Sometimes it's worth thinking about why something does not exist.

9h

Why are there no animals with three legs?

If "Why?" is the first question in science, "Why not?" must be a close second. Sometimes it's worth thinking about why something does not exist.

9h

Deadly fungus native to Japan and Korea discovered in Australian rainforest

Poison fire coral, the only known fungus whose toxins are absorbed through the skin, found on the outskirts of Cairns One of the world’s deadliest species of fungus, previously thought native to Japan and Korea, has been found by a photographer on the outskirts of Cairns in northern Australia. Scientists say the discovery of poison fire coral in a pocket of rainforest in Redlynch, a Cairns suburb

9h

DNA Nanomachines Are Opening Medicine to the World of Physics

When I imagine the inner workings of a robot, I think hard, cold mechanics running on physics: shafts, wheels, gears. Human bodies, in contrast, are more of a contained molecular soup operating on the principles of biochemistry. Yet similar to robots, our cells are also attuned to mechanical forces—just at a much smaller scale. Tiny pushes and pulls, for example , can urge stem cells to continue

9h

NIH researchers create new viral vector for improved gene therapy in sickle cell disease

Researchers at NIH have developed a new and improved viral vector — a virus-based vehicle that delivers therapeutic genes — for use in gene therapy for sickle cell disease. In advanced lab tests using animal models, the new vector was up to 10 times more efficient at incorporating corrective genes into bone marrow stem cells than the conventional vectors currently used, and it had a carrying cap

9h

Image: Hera logo aboard ISS

The logo for Hera, ESA's proposed asteroid mission for planetary defense, has already reached space, thanks to ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano, who snapped this photo from the cupola of the International Space Station. The Hera mission itself is seeking final approval for development at the Space19+ Ministerial Council this November.

9h

An ultra-fast optical way to extract critical information from quantum materials

Topological insulators are quantum materials, which, due to their exotic electronic structure, on surfaces and edges conduct electric current like metal, while acting as an insulator in bulk. Scientists from the Max-Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) have demonstrated for the first time how to tell apart topological materials from their regular—trivial—counterpa

9h

Quantum vacuum: Less than zero energy

Energy is a quantity that must always be positive—at least that's what our intuition tells us. If every single particle is removed from a certain volume until there is nothing left that could possibly carry energy, then a limit has been reached. Or has it? Is it still possible to extract energy even from empty space?

9h

Elon Musk's Starship may be more moral catastrophe than bold step in space exploration

Elon Musk, founder of private space-faring company SpaceX, recently unveiled his new Starship craft. Amazingly, it is designed to carry up to 100 crew members on interplanetary journeys throughout the solar system, starting with Mars in 2024.

9h

New 3-D printing technique for biomaterials

A new way of 3-D printing soft materials such as gels and collagens offers a major step forward in the manufacture of artificial medical implants.

9h

The Scientific Evidence for the Health Benefits of Cordyceps

The Cordyceps fungus is said to have the power to fix a host of health problems from muscle fatigue to diabetes. But are the claims too good to be true? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Why are so few women inventors named on patents?

Women inventors account for just under 13% of patent applications globally, according to a study.

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Opinion: Can Prizes Help Women Shatter Science's Glass Ceiling?

As we await the announcement of the 2019 Nobel Prize winners, it's time to question why female scientists still lag behind their male colleagues.

9h

A hidden drug overdose crisis has struck Scotland – can we fix it?

Illegal benzodiazepine drugs that cost as little as 15p per tablet are fuelling an overdose crisis in Scotland. How can we prevent hundreds more deaths?

9h

Chimpanzees are being killed by poachers – researchers like us are on the frontline protecting them

On a sunny day in early August 2019, screams broke the calm of a national park in East Africa. Researchers ran to find Kidman – an adult female chimpanzee—and her child being attacked by the dogs of poachers. In their desperate attempt to save them, the researchers fought off the dogs and removed a spear that poachers had lodged in Kidman's back. She died shortly after the researchers had arrived,

9h

Gibbons hold on in last remaining Vietnam stronghold

A crucial population of one of the rarest primates on the planet is holding its own in the face of multiple threats, according to the latest surveys conducted in northern Vietnam.

9h

Chimpanzees are being killed by poachers – researchers like us are on the frontline protecting them

On a sunny day in early August 2019, screams broke the calm of a national park in East Africa. Researchers ran to find Kidman – an adult female chimpanzee—and her child being attacked by the dogs of poachers. In their desperate attempt to save them, the researchers fought off the dogs and removed a spear that poachers had lodged in Kidman's back. She died shortly after the researchers had arrived,

9h

'Environmentally friendly' charcoal is subsidizing destruction of South America's second-largest forest

The fires raging across the Brazilian Amazon have captured the world's attention. Meanwhile, South America's second-largest forest, the Gran Chaco, is disappearing in plain sight.

9h

Gibbons hold on in last remaining Vietnam stronghold

A crucial population of one of the rarest primates on the planet is holding its own in the face of multiple threats, according to the latest surveys conducted in northern Vietnam.

9h

Finding the 'magic angle' to create a new superconductor

Researchers at The Ohio State University, in collaboration with scientists around the world, have made a discovery that could provide new insights into how superconductors might move energy more efficiently to power homes, industries and vehicles.

9h

New research supports hypothesis that asteroid contributed to mass extinction

A team of scientists from South Africa has discovered evidence partially supporting a hypothesis that Earth was struck by a meteorite or asteroid 12 800 years ago, leading to global consequences including climate change, and contributing to the extinction of many species of large animals at the time of an episode called the Younger Dryas.

9h

Why I Called It ‘Quantum Supremacy’

A recent paper from Google’s quantum computing lab announced that the company had achieved quantum supremacy. Everyone has been talking about it, but what does it all mean? In 2012, I proposed the term “quantum supremacy” to describe the point where quantum computers can do things that classical computers can’t, regardless of whether those tasks are useful. With that new term, I wanted to emphasi

9h

Automated Discovery

To what extent can scientific discovery be automated? Where are the areas where automation can make the biggest contribution to human efforts? These questions and a number of others are addressed in a very interesting two-part review article on “ in the Chemical Sciences”. The authors, from MIT, are well-equipped (in all senses of the word) to give their perspectives on this – part I of the revie

10h

Samband mellan assisterad befruktning och risk för prostatacancer

Infertilitet och prostatacancer är tillstånd som drabbar vardera cirka en av tio män. Tidigare forskning har med motsägelsefulla resultat studerat sambandet mellan infertilitet och prostatacancer. I den nya studien har forskarna velat jämföra risken för att utveckla prostatacancer hos tre grupper: de som blir föräldrar genom IVF- respektive ICSI-assisterad befruktning och de som får barn genom na

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Fear of Fatality in Hong Kong

HONG KONG—July 1 feels like a long time ago now. That night, thousands of protesters besieged the offices of this city’s legislature , beating at security glass, trying to break through from the street into the chamber. I had spent the day circling the building, speaking with demonstrators and watching as they hammered away, an effort that at first appeared futile. Hours later, I spotted people w

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Preventing future forest diebacks

Removing dead trees from the forests and reforesting on a large scale: this is the German Federal Government's strategy against 'Forest Dieback 2.0'. Ecologists from the University of Würzburg call for other solutions.

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Physical activity and good fitness improve cardiac regulation in children

A recent Finnish study showed that more physically active and fit children have better cardiac regulation than less active and fit children. The study also showed that cardiac regulation was better especially in boys with better aerobic fitness and in girls with lower levels of sedentary time.

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Can we peek at Schrodinger's cat without disturbing it?

Quantum physics is difficult and explaining it even more so. Associate Professor Holger F. Hofmann from Hiroshima University and Kartik Patekar from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay have tried to solve one of the biggest puzzles in quantum physics: How to measure the quantum system without changing it?

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Estimating calorie content not clear-cut for all — Otago study

We make food decisions several times a day – from what time we eat to how much – but a new University of Otago, New Zealand, study has found we are not very good at judging the energy-density of what we consume.

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What you need to know about the Amazon fires

Thousands of fires continue to burn across the Brazilian Amazon. Since January, a staggering 121,000 fires have broken out across Brazil—and more than half of those fires are taking place in the Amazon, according to the country’s National Institute for Space Research. The fires are destroying the homes of indigenous tribes, threatening millions of animals, and even darkening the skies over major

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NASA Mars Lander Detects Creepy “Dinks and Donks” Sounds

“Dinks and Donks” NASA’s Mars InSight lander has detected some “ peculiar sounds ,” thanks to an onboard seismometer that’s capable of picking up the tiniest of vibrations. The InSight team found that delicate parts inside the seismometer itself were expanding and contracting, causing “dinks and donks” — the team’s nickname for strange mechanical sounds — to show up in the samples received and an

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Researchers: Voting machines can be easily hacked

A group of hackers has demonstrated that many common voting machines are easily compromised. The group presented their findings to Congress, where election security is increasingly a serious concern. The question of how secure voting machines are isn't new, but the current political climate gives it new meaning. Election security is on the minds of millions of Americans. Fears of election tinkeri

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Quantizing single-molecule surface enhanced Raman Scattering with DNA origami metamolecules

Tailored metal nanoclusters can be actively developed in the lab to manipulate light at the subwavelength scale for nanophotonic applications. However, their precise molecular arrangement in a hotspot with fixed numbers and positions remain challenging to investigate. Weina Fang and colleagues at the school of chemistry and chemical engineering, Key Lab of Interfacial Physics and Technology, Organ

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What Is Facebook Dating For?

I used to find it frustrating when people blamed dating apps for how bad dating is. “What’s the alternative?” I would ask when a friend complained about the chore of swiping and starting conversation. “Standing in a bar for six hours a night?” But I said this more often when I was in a relationship that had started on Tinder, and I say it much less often now that I’ve spent eight months back in t

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Children told lies by parents subsequently lie more as adults, face adjustment difficulty

'If you don't behave, I'll call the police,' is a lie that parents might use to get their young children to behave. Parents' lies elicit compliance in the short term, but a new psychology study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) suggests that they are associated with detrimental effects when the child becomes an adult.

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TTUHSC researchers use NHANES to search for hypothyroid-sleep apnea link

To more clearly determine if a link exists between thyroid disorders like hypothyroidism and sleep apnea, a team from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center embarked upon new research using data mined from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a biennial survey conducted by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention to generally evaluate the health of children and

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Chair yoga more effective than music therapy in older adults with advanced dementia

Researchers assessed the ability of older adults with advanced dementia to participate in non-pharmacological interventions and compared chair yoga with chair-based exercise and music therapy. Results showed that participants with moderate-to-severe dementia could safely adhere to non-pharmacological interventions; more than 97 percent fully engaged in each session. The chair yoga group reported a

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The science of mindfulness — What do we really know and where do we go?

The historical practice of mindfulness is a burgeoning integrated medicine field associated with benefits for people with issues ranging from insomnia to chronic pain and fueled by more than $550 million in federal funding over the past 20 years.

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Structural color printing of 3D microscale objects by shrinking photonic crystals

SUTD Researchers have developed a 'coloring-by-shrinking' method to print arbitrary 3D microscopic objects exhibiting structural colors. The design consisted of woodpile photonic crystals with varying lattice constants as the 3D building blocks. These structures remain colorless until they are heat treated, causing them to shrink and manifest color, a result of their lattice constants shrinking do

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Why are there no animals with three legs?

If 'Why?' is the first question in science, 'Why not?' must be a close second. Sometimes it's worth thinking about why something does not exist. Such as a truly three-legged animal. Tracy Thomson, graduate student in the UC Davis Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, has been pondering the non-existence of tripeds.

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S1P molecule regulates dendritic cell localization and vascular integrity in lymph nodes

Researchers found that HEVs, which were deficient for the S1P-transporter Spinster-homologue-2, were unable to attract dendritic cells in order to trigger LTβr-signaling through cell-cell contact with HEVs. They observed a comparable phenotype when HEVs were unable to signal through S1P-receptor-1. Therefore, CCL21 release from HEVs was reduced and DC-HEV interactions abrogated, which led to impai

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Inspired by Northern clingfish, researchers make a better suction cup

A University of Washington team inspired by the clingfish's suction power set out to develop an artificial suction cup that borrows from nature's design. Their prototype, described in a paper published Sept. 9 in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, actually performed better than the clingfish.

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The private lives of sharks

White sharks are top predators in the marine environment, but unlike their terrestrial counterparts, very little is known about their predatory activity underwater, with current knowledge limited to surface predation events. Now, a team of international scientists has used video- and data-logging technology to shed new light on predator-prey interactions of these mighty sea creatures. Their findin

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Safeguarding the world's largest tuna fishery

Understanding the impact of modern fishing techniques is critical to ensure the sustainability of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) tuna fishery—the largest tuna fishery in the world that accounts for 55% of the total tropical tuna catch and provides up to 98% of government revenue for some Pacific Island nations.

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Safeguarding the world's largest tuna fishery

Understanding the impact of modern fishing techniques is critical to ensure the sustainability of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) tuna fishery—the largest tuna fishery in the world that accounts for 55% of the total tropical tuna catch and provides up to 98% of government revenue for some Pacific Island nations.

10h

‘Power poses’ are bunk, but maybe don’t slouch?

Striking power poses won’t boost your confidence or make you feel more powerful, a review of past studies indicates. “There has literally never been a study that compared a power pose to a normal pose and found any positive effect for a power pose.” The concept of power posing—think of a Wonder Woman stance—gained popularity after a 2010 study reported that people who adopted an expansive physica

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Caught in the act: Proteins responsible for metastasis

Research by Assoc. Prof. Nurhan Özlü of Koç University Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and her team, recently published in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, has uncovered the effects of two proteins in the transition from the epithelial to the mesenchymal cell type, the latter of which has mobility. The identification of these two proteins will contribute to the development of new meth

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The impact of communal irrigation systems on earthquake-triggered landslides in Indonesia

New research from Royal Holloway, University of London, has found that changes to the environment caused by human activity can promote earthquake-triggered landslides. The devastation caused by landslides in suburban parts of Palu, Indonesia, after a magnitude 7.5 earthquake last September took the region and the scientific community by surprise and demanded careful study to understand what happen

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Caught in the act: Proteins responsible for metastasis

Research by Assoc. Prof. Nurhan Özlü of Koç University Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics and her team, recently published in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, has uncovered the effects of two proteins in the transition from the epithelial to the mesenchymal cell type, the latter of which has mobility. The identification of these two proteins will contribute to the development of new meth

10h

Forskere: Tandemceller kan revolutionere solenergibranchen

PLUS. Såkaldte tandemceller henter næsten dobbelt så meget effekt fra Solen som almindelige solceller.

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Scientists predict average late winter precipitation in western Europe for the next decade

In a new study, scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) show that the average March precipitation, over the next ten years in western Europe is predictable using a novel method. The research team also issued a forecast for the coming years.

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Fighting for food, penguin sex, and sewers on display: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02941-6 Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

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Podd: Vårt åldrande

Vi kommer inte undan: alla åldras, hela tiden. Men kan vi se fram emot att bli äldre? Hur ska man tänka kring sitt boende? Och finns det fog att säga att 70 är det nya 50? Vetenskap & hälsa träffar Susanne Iwarsson, professor i gerontologi vid Lunds universitet, som forskar om åldrandet.

10h

Researchers find some of the genes responsible for differences in behavior between dog breeds

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. has found some of the genes that are responsible for differences in behavior between dog breeds. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of data from two types of dog-based databases and what they found.

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Researchers find some of the genes responsible for differences in behavior between dog breeds

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. has found some of the genes that are responsible for differences in behavior between dog breeds. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of data from two types of dog-based databases and what they found.

10h

New study provides insights on the mysterious low-mass X-ray binary RX1804

European astronomers have conducted a comprehensive study of a low-mass X-ray binary known as RX1804 (or 1RXS J180408.9–342058). The research allowed the scientists to unveil important insights into the nature of this mysterious object. The findings are detailed in a paper published September 23 on arXiv.org.

10h

States Should Monitor Methane to Meet Climate Goals

Opinion: A new plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in New Mexico using satellites and big data sets a standard that other states should follow.

10h

Safeguarding the world's largest tuna fishery

New research has used a combination of records from captains and scientific observers, FAD tracking data, ocean models and cutting edge simulation methods to reveal for the first time the trajectories and potential impact FADs may have on fisheries around Pacific island nations.

10h

Researchers use drones to weigh whales

Researchers have devised a way to accurately estimate the weight of free-living whales using only aerial images taken by drones.

10h

Smartphone typing speeds catching up with keyboards

The largest experiment to date on mobile typing sheds new light on average performance of touchscreen typing and factors impacting the text input speed. Researchers analyzed the typing speed of tens of thousands of users on both phones and computers. Their main finding is that typing speeds on smartphones are now catching up with physical keyboards.

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Discovery of new source of cancer antigens may expand cancer vaccine capabilities

Scientists have found a common, new source of tumor mutations that could offer three levels of therapy with a cancer vaccine: 1) a broadly protective, or pan-cancer vaccine 2) cancer-type specific vaccines (e.g. breast vs. pancreatic), 3) personalized cancer vaccines based on mutations unique to an individual.

10h

Feeling flight shame? Try quitting air travel and catch a sail boat

If you've caught a long haul flight recently, you generated more carbon emissions than a person living in some developing countries emits in an entire year.

10h

Soil scientists increase phosphorus content in paddy soils

Soil scientists from the RUDN University (Russia) and Huazhong Agricultural University (China) have demonstrated that adding carbon compounds to the soil can increase phosphorus availability in paddy fields. For these purposes, biologists have described the processes of iron (III) compounds reduction and phosphorus release by soil microorganisms in the presence of carbon as an energy source. These

10h

Rewild 25% of the UK for less climate change, more wildlife and a life lived closer to nature

The UK's Labour Party has pledged to offer voters a Green New Deal at the next election. This is a radical program for decarbonizing society and the economy by 2030, through phasing out fossil fuels, investing in renewable energy and creating a public works program to build the zero-carbon infrastructure of the future.

10h

Boris Johnson jokes about UK being ‘on the verge’ of nuclear fusion

In his speech to the Conservative party conference, prime minister Boris Johnson said the UK can become carbon neutral by the middle of this century

10h

La migliore scheda di memoria per il tuo drone DJI – Drone

submitted by /u/Technology2017 [link] [comments]

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New catalyst outshines platinum for producing hydrogen

submitted by /u/bluefirecorp [link] [comments]

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Plant based meat Alternative launched by CSIRO Australia.

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Is It Time to Rethink Parkinson's Pathology?

New evidence points to a waste-clearing problem in patients' cells, rather than the accumulation of protein tangles, as the root cause of the neurodegenerative disease.

11h

Video I made about the neurotransmitter, dopamine

submitted by /u/porterrossi [link] [comments]

11h

Step forward in falling research

New research shows there is more at play than just a sinking feeling when you stumble during movement or trip in a hole in the ground.

11h

Mob mentality rules jackdaw flocks

Jackdaws are more likely to join a mob to drive off predators if lots of their fellow birds are up for the fight, new research shows.

11h

Tenfold increase in number of adolescents on HIV treatment in South Africa since 2010, but many still untreated

A new study of more than 700,000 one to 19-year olds being treated for HIV infection suggests a ten-fold increase in the number of adolescents aged 15 to 19 receiving HIV treatment in South Africa.

11h

Antidepressants linked to heightened pregnancy related diabetes risk

Taking antidepressants while expecting a baby is linked to a heightened risk of developing diabetes that is specifically related to pregnancy, known as gestational diabetes, finds new research.

11h

Acute psychotic illness triggered by Brexit Referendum

Political events can take a serious toll on mental health, a doctor has warned, after treating a man with a brief episode of acute psychosis, triggered by the 2016 Referendum on Brexit — the process of the UK leaving the European Union (EU).

11h

Nordkorea sender missil op i 910 kilometers højde: Kan være affyret fra ubåd

Prøveaffyringen er den 11. i år. Det ballistiske missil endte i Det Japanske Hav omkring 450 kilometer fra affyringsstedet.

11h

Telescope windfall, genius grants and Arctic ice loss

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02952-3 The week in science: 27 September–3 October 2019.

11h

Daylight Saving Time 2019: A Guide to the When, Why, What and How

Here's everything you've ever wanted to know about Daylight Saving Time (often misspelled as "savings"), including times, dates, its history and more.

11h

Why having both male and female teachers is a good idea for schools

In South Africa, one in five teachers in the foundation phase—roughly from ages 6 to 9—are male. This is consistent with a global trend that see men being more likely to teach adolescents than young children.

11h

Dip-coating: How to predict the thickness of thin films?

The immersion method of applying a coating to an object presents a central challenge: predicting the thickness of the layer that will cover the object. This question raises important financial issues for manufacturers. A team from the CBI laboratory at ESPCI Paris and from the College de France has developed an experimentally verified theoretical framework to predict the coating thickness in the c

11h

Turkisk forskare fängslad efter larmrapport om föroreningar

Bülent Şık, före detta biträdande direktör för centrum för livsmedelssäkerhet och jordbruksforskning vid Akdeniz universitet, dömdes för att ha avslöja sekretessbelagd information efter att han publicerade sina forskningsresultat i en turkisk tidning 2018.

11h

You will remember this

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02948-z Can you pass the test?

11h

First skeletal remains of Phoebodus found in Morocco

An international team of researchers has found the first skeletal remains of Phoebodus—an ancient shark—in the Anti-Atlas Mountains in Morocco. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes the fossil and compares it to a modern shark and fish.

11h

Catching up with DIVERSIFY: Fizzing with ideas for aquaculture

DIVERSIFY (Exploring the biological and socio-economic potential of new/emerging candidate fish species for the expansion of the European aquaculture industry) is the largest EU research project focusing on aquaculture to date. With a total budget exceeding EUR 11 million and a total of 40 partners, it comes as no surprise that the project continues to impact the aquaculture sector almost a year a

11h

Preventing future forest diebacks

Bark beetles, heat, drought, storms, and fires have damaged the German forests. Those who go for a walk there often encounter dead spruces and dried beech trees. "The forests are affected in all regions and need quick help," says the website of the German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture.

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A blue pigment found to be a high-performance ammonia adsorbent

Akira Takahashi (Researcher) and institutional collaborators have discovered that the blue pigment Prussian blue has a higher adsorption capacity than common ammonia adsorbents, and controlled the structure of Prussian blue to synthesize Prussian blue analogues with higher ammonia adsorption capacity.

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First skeletal remains of Phoebodus found in Morocco

An international team of researchers has found the first skeletal remains of Phoebodus—an ancient shark—in the Anti-Atlas Mountains in Morocco. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes the fossil and compares it to a modern shark and fish.

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Catching up with DIVERSIFY: Fizzing with ideas for aquaculture

DIVERSIFY (Exploring the biological and socio-economic potential of new/emerging candidate fish species for the expansion of the European aquaculture industry) is the largest EU research project focusing on aquaculture to date. With a total budget exceeding EUR 11 million and a total of 40 partners, it comes as no surprise that the project continues to impact the aquaculture sector almost a year a

11h

Preventing future forest diebacks

Bark beetles, heat, drought, storms, and fires have damaged the German forests. Those who go for a walk there often encounter dead spruces and dried beech trees. "The forests are affected in all regions and need quick help," says the website of the German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture.

11h

Cheap, quick test identifies pneumonia patients at risk of respiratory failure or sepsis

Researchers have now identified specific fragments of genetic material that play a role in the development of respiratory failure and sepsis in pneumonia patients. The findings could enable doctors to test quickly for these biological markers when a patient is admitted to hospital with pneumonia, so that they could anticipate complications and provide more intensive support and monitoring.

11h

One third of patients with severe asthma are taking harmful doses of oral steroids

A third of patients with severe asthma are taking harmful doses of oral steroids, according to a study of several thousand people in The Netherlands.

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Treatment with long term, low dose antibiotic could help people born with chronic lung condition

Taking a low dose of the antibiotic azithromycin for 6 months reduces symptoms for patients with the chronic lung condition primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), according to new research.

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Doctor offers unique perspective as father of a child with rare genetic disease

From a professional standpoint, Nathan Hoot, MD, Ph.D., understands the value of medical research that leads to new, groundbreaking drugs in the treatment of rare diseases. And as an emergency medicine physician, he's familiar with adjusting ventilators and managing patients' airways. But the magnitude of these matters also weigh on Hoot personally — as the father of a child with a rare genetic d

11h

Food insecurity in young adults raises risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma

A paradox of food insecurity in wealthy countries is its association with excess weight. Now, a study finds that young adults in the United States who are food insecure not only are slightly more likely to be obese, they are significantly more likely to suffer from disorders associated with high body mass index, as well as obstructive airway diseases like asthma.

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How folk medicines for blood pressure work

Common herbs, including lavender, fennel, and chamomile, have a long history as folk medicines used to lower blood pressure. New research explains the molecular mechanisms at work. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , the study illustrates how many of the known traditional botanical plants used to lower blood pressure activate a specific potassium channel (KCNQ5) in

11h

Making infant formula more like human breast milk

U.K.-based scientists have engineered plants to produce an oil that mimics the chemical structure of human milk fat, a major component of breast milk. Previous studies suggest the human form of this molecule, triacylglycerol, aids absorption of key nutrients by the infant gut, but few infant formulas contain anything like it.

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Controlling the structure of platinum nanoparticles and tuning their catalytic properties

A new article just published in Nature Catalysis shows the simple ways of controlling the structure of platinum nanoparticles and tuning their catalytic properties.

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Researchers advancing understanding of vital enzyme

Nitrogenases, the enzymes responsible for converting atmospheric nitrogen into the nitrogen-based compounds used by living things, have been a major focus of chemistry research for decades because of the pivotal role that nitrogen fertilizers play in feeding the planet's burgeoning population.

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New process could strengthen 3-D-printed materials by 200 percent

The strength of 3-D-printed products could be improved through a new technique developed by scientists at UT and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

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Cleaning with bleach could create indoor air pollutants

For generations, people have used chlorine bleach to clean and disinfect their homes. However, researchers have now discovered that bleach fumes, in combination with light and a citrus compound found in many household products, can form airborne particles that might be harmful when inhaled by pets or people. They report their results in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology.

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Making infant formula more like human breast milk

U.K.-based scientists have engineered plants to produce an oil that mimics the chemical structure of human milk fat, a major component of breast milk. Previous studies suggest the human form of this molecule, triacylglycerol, aids absorption of key nutrients by the infant gut, but few infant formulas contain anything like it.

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What to Expect When You’re Expecting Gender-Reveal Backlash

The gender reveal that Jonathan Reilly orchestrated for his first baby didn’t go perfectly. In 2016, he had his mother-in-law secretly write down the baby’s sex and order balloons from a party-supply store. The plan was for the balloons, which were all blue, to stay hidden in a bag from Reilly and his wife until the couple hosted a party. The balloons would appear and reveal that the baby was a b

11h

New solution to weighty issue

Researchers employ drones to learn more about the ecology and health of large cetaceans.

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Huawei Mate 30 phones apparently lose backdoor access to Google apps – CNET

A workaround for the Trump ban has seemingly been eliminated.

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How to auto-delete your YouTube history

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Online privacy — or the lack thereof — has become a prominent issue. As a result, more and more services are adding features that speak …

11h

Huge amounts of illegal wild meat from the Amazon are sold in Brazil

The trade in wild meat from the Amazon is on the same scale as the timber trade, but there is still time to control it before it pushes the affected animals to a crisis

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Tesla’s ‘Smart Summon’ Will Fetch Your Car—Sometimes

Tesla introduced a feature that allows drivers to call the car to come to them. What could go wrong?

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Even the AI Behind Deepfakes Can’t Save Us From Being Duped

Google and Facebook are releasing troves of deepfakes to teach algorithms how to detect them. But the human eye will be needed for a long time.

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Image of the Day: Drones Measure Whales

Researchers estimate whale body mass from aerial images.

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The Red Meat Controversy

A new paper flies in the face of current recommendations and concludes we simply don't know the health risks of eating red and processed meat.

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Cleaning with bleach could create indoor air pollutants

For generations, people have used chlorine bleach to clean and disinfect their homes. However, researchers have now discovered that bleach fumes, in combination with light and a citrus compound found in many household products, can form airborne particles that might be harmful when inhaled by pets or people. They report their results in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology.

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T cells are more active at different times of the day

Our biological clock may influence the efficiency of our immune response, according to new research in mice. CD8 T cells, which are essential to fight infections and cancers, function very differently according to the time of day, researchers report. We know that circadian rhythms come from “clock genes”, which influence most organs and cells—including those of the immune system, whose function v

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Utah Runners' 'Freak Accident' with Charging Bison Explained

A runner in Utah was gored by a bison, and then his date suffered the same fate. Why do bison charge people?

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Smartphone typing speeds catching up with keyboards

The largest experiment to date on mobile typing sheds new light on average performance of touchscreen typing and factors impacting the text input speed. Researchers from Aalto University, University …

12h

Geriatrisk team i Holbæk lukker ned

700 af Region Sjællands allersvageste medicinske patienter er siden 2017 blevet tilset af geriatrisk team Holbæk. Nu er satspuljemidlerne imidlertid løbet ud og det udkørende, tværsektorielle team lukket ned. Det ærgrer flere af de involverede parter.

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Ny kommunal hjemmeside har fået praksislægerne til at henvise mere

I januar gik Aalborg Kommune i luften med en ny hjemmeside, hvor kommunens praktiserende læger får en opdateret oversigt over de kommunale henvisningstilbud. Det har givet flere henvisninger – også til tilbud, som tidligere stod tomme.

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Scientists assess storage value in blue carbon ecosystems

When Hurricane Dorian roared up the East Coast during the first week of September, the places where people live and work in several states were under threat. The first line of protection against storm damage was made up of coastal vegetated ecosystems, including nearly 300,000 acres of salt marshes in Georgia.

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More discipline can lead kids to prison, new study finds

Students in stricter middle schools are more likely to end up in jail or prison later in life, according to a new working paper co-authored by Stephen Billings, associate professor at CU Boulder's Leeds School of Business.

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Amazon rainforest fires: Everything you need to know

Since January, a staggering 121,000 fires have broken out across Brazil—and more than half of those fires are taking place in the Amazon, according to the country's National Institute for Space Research.

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Researchers discover process to sustainably produce psilocybin, a drug candidate that could help treat depression

Andrew Jones at Miami University and his team of students may have developed a research first.

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Researchers discover process to sustainably produce psilocybin, a drug candidate that could help treat depression

Andrew Jones at Miami University and his team of students may have developed a research first.

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Ancient genomes provide insight into the genetic history of the second plague pandemic

An international team of researchers has analyzed remains from 10 archaeological sites in England, France, Germany, Russia and Switzerland to gain insight into the stages of the second plague pandemic (14th-18th centuries) and the genetic diversity of Yersinia pestis during and after the Black Death. In a study published in Nature Communications, the researchers reconstructed 34 Y. pestis genomes,

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Ancient genomes provide insight into the genetic history of the second plague pandemic

An international team of researchers has analyzed remains from 10 archaeological sites in England, France, Germany, Russia and Switzerland to gain insight into the stages of the second plague pandemic (14th-18th centuries) and the genetic diversity of Yersinia pestis during and after the Black Death. In a study published in Nature Communications, the researchers reconstructed 34 Y. pestis genomes,

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Why multipartite viruses infect plants rather than animals

Neither living nor non-living, viruses are generally strange. Among viruses, multipartite viruses are among the most peculiar—their genome is not packed into many particles rather than one. Multipartite viruses primarily infect plants rather than animals. A recent paper by researchers from Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) uses mathematical and computational models to explain this observa

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Huge amounts of illegal wild meat from the Amazon is sold in Brazil

The trade in wild meat from the Amazon is on the same scale as the timber trade, but there is still time to control it before it pushes the affected animals to a crisis

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Radikale: Indfør ny skat på streaming

De store streamingtjenester skal støtte den danske public service økonomisk, lyder et nyt forslag fra Radikale Venstre.

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Academic freedom prevents us from getting trapped in circles of delusion

If channels of expression aren't kept open, there runs a risk of pluralistic ignorance. We all have the right to express ideas even if they're incorrect. How would we know whether an idea is right or wrong without expressing and evaluating it? The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpo

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How Dishonesty Drains You

Deceitful behavior diminishes our ability to read emotions, with many consequences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Football's Concussion Crisis Is Awash With Pseudoscience

Products that offer a "seatbelt" or "bubble wrap" for the brain claim to reduce head trauma. If only the laws of physics worked that way.

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Blind Spots in AI Just Might Help Protect Your Privacy

Researchers have found a potential silver lining in so-called adversarial examples, using it to shield sensitive data from snoops.

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Young Black Athletes Are Starting to Understand Their Power

Joshua Christopher, a five-star basketball recruit from California, recently told me that he’s planning to go to Howard University this weekend for an official recruiting visit. This is news. Not just because Howard, a historically black school, hasn’t been to the NCAA tournament since 1992. But also because perhaps it signals a shift in the mentality of young black athletes. “As I grow older, I

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Leopoldina and Tiwari’s scamferences, or what’s the point of Academies

The German Academy of Sciences, Leopoldina, advertises for Ashutosh Tiwari's predatory conferences. Occasion: Academician Herbert Gleiter won an IAAM Award.

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Regeringen vil sløjfe omstridt bredbånds-tilskud

Der er ikke sat en øre af til at udbrede bredbånd i landdistrikterne i regeringens forslag til næste års finanslov. Venstre kalder det løftebrud.

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Black Holes As We Know Them May Not Exist

Black holes may not have singularities at their heart, but instead may be stuffed with dark energy.

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Klimaråd anbefaler klimalov uden dikkedarer

I ny rapport anbefaler Statens Klimaråd, at en fremtidig klimalov skal tage udgangspunkt i reelle indenlandske drivhusgasreduktioner, og at man hvert femte år fastsætter delmål og udarbejder klimaplaner på basis af dem. Monitorering af indsatsen skal ske hvert år.

12h

How Dishonesty Drains You

Deceitful behavior diminishes our ability to read emotions, with many consequences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What Can Carbon Pricing Do?

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

13h

Can a Board Member’s Job Be Automated?

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Google is adding its Password Checkup feature directly into Chrome

The extension, which was released earlier this year, analyzes passwords and usernames to ensure they aren’t part of any major security breaches that result in credentials being leaked online. …

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Nyt honorar: Praksislæger i Region Syddanmark kan nu tilbyde krisesamtaler

Praktiserende læger i Region Syddanmark kan nu få et særskilt honorar for op til tre krisesamtaler med egne patienter. Det er resultatet af en ny lokalaftale med regionen, der skal hjælpe borgeren videre, inden krisen forværres.

13h

Bedre recepter giver mere fair priskonkurrence

Læger har en større tendens til at udskrive medikamenter, som optræder tidligere i alfabetet, og det skævvrider konkurrencen. Men det kan nemt laves om, skriver adjunkt på Københavns Universitet.

13h

Raging robots, hapless humans: the AI dystopia

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02939-0 Stuart Russell’s latest book examines how artificial intelligence could spin out of control. David Leslie critiques it.

13h

The Cult of Rich-Kid Sports

On Tuesday, a federal judge held that Harvard’s admissions policy does not violate the Civil Rights Act. In the ruling, which could be overturned on appeal, the judge rejected claims that the university broke the law by creating a higher standard for Asian American applicants. But a new paper by several economists, including one directly involved in the trial, provides stark evidence that Harvard

13h

Why They Blow the Whistle

For the past three weeks I’ve passed the Watergate complex on my bike ride to the Library of Congress, where I’m working on a book about medical whistle-blowers. To claim a sense of déjà vu would probably be an overstatement. Donald Trump is more Spiro Agnew than Richard Nixon, and the whistle-blower propelling the current scandal hasn’t even been identified yet. But it’s hard to avoid comparison

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‘Miracle’ on ice as chemists pull nanocatalyst paper that fizzled

God giveth miracles … and it seems she taketh them away as well. A group of chemists in China has lost a 2018 paper which described a “miraculous” discovery that wasn’t. The paper was titled “A miraculous chiral Ir–Rh bimetallic nanocatalyst for asymmetric hydrogenation of activated ketones,” and it appeared in Organic Chemistry Frontiers, a … Continue reading

13h

A man's acute psychosis appears to have been triggered by Brexit

A case of a man who appears to have experienced acute psychosis triggered by the UK's 2016 European Union referendum result has been described in a medical journal

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World’s largest untapped coal reserve about to go up in smoke

Botswana has massive coal reserves, but for 50 years they've largely gone untouched. Now that is about to change as large mining operations get under way

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Beyond quantum supremacy: the hunt for useful quantum computers

Nature, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02936-3 Researchers search for ways to put today’s small noisy quantum systems to work.

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The Changing Rhythm of the 40-Year Saudi-Iran Rivalry

When Jamal Khashoggi walked into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul a year ago today, he had been away from his home country of Saudi Arabia for just over a year. And it was a year in which the kingdom had changed enormously—from bright changes such as the introduction of movie theaters and the lifting of a ban on women driving to much darker ones. Though Khashoggi had written about how unbearably o

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Selective bacterial colonization processes on polyethylene waste samples in an abandoned landfill site

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50740-w

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Mice deficient in the lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1 (PPT1) display a complex retinal phenotype

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50726-8

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Substantial Narrowing on the Width of “Concentration Window” of Hydrothermal ZnO Nanowires via Ammonia Addition

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50641-y

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A robust bacterial assay for high-throughput screening of human 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase inhibitors

Scientific Reports, Published online: 02 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50533-1

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