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COVID-19: Exercise may protect against deadly complication
Researcher Zhen Yan, PhD, is urging people to exercise based on his COVID-19 findings, which also suggest a potential treatment approach.
2h
Trump suspends funding to World Health Organization
US president accuses health body of 'covering up' coronavirus outbreak
17h
Kåre Mølbak har ændret mening: Vi kan "danse" os frem til vaccinen uden flokimmunitet
To meters afstand og håndvaskning har vist sig at være så kraftigt et supervåben mod covid-19, at caféer og restauranter muligvis kan åbne, uden at smitten accelererer.
8h

LATEST

Skin that computes
As our body's largest and most prominent organ, the skin also provides one of our most fundamental connections to the world around us. From the moment we're born, it is intimately involved in every physical interaction we have.
4min
The Formation of the Moon May Have Stretched the Earth Into a Potato
The impact of Earth and Theia, as depicted by a NASA artist. (The photo at the top of the story shows the same thing, but visualized by a National Geographic artist instead.) The question of how the Moon formed has fascinated astronomers and geologists for decades. Currently, the prevailing theory is that the Earth was struck by an approximately Mars-sized impactor very early in its life. This im
5min
Nanosensor can alert a smartphone when plants are stressed
Engineers can closely track how plants respond to stresses such as injury, infection, and light damage using sensors made of carbon nanotubes. These sensors can be embedded in plant leaves, where they report on hydrogen peroxide levels.
7min
Crowdsourced Protein Simulation Exceeds Supercomputers' Power
Folding@Home, currently focused on deciphering the workings of SARS-CoV-2, is the first project to have exascale-level computational muscle.
9min
Families of dying in care homes to get right to say goodbye
Government promises procedures to limit infection during coronavirus outbreak but gives no specific measures
10min
Origin of defects that sap potential of next gen solar tech
Scientists have discovered the source of efficiency-limiting defects in perovskites — a class of potential materials for next generation solar cells and flexible LEDs.
17min
Kaffe ændrer din smagssans: Sød mad bliver endnu sødere
Det kan måske også forklare, hvorfor mørk chokolade passer til kaffen, siger forsker.
19min
Coronavirus ventilator wins UK approval in run-up to NHS rollout
Penlon's ESO2 device becomes first model to get green light from UK's healthcare regulator Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A medical ventilator to help Covid-19 patients breathe has been granted regulatory approval, meaning hundreds could be rolled out to hospitals from next week. Penlon's ESO2 device, developed under the codename Project Oyster , will become the fir
22min
Researchers stop COVID-19 drug trial after 11 patients die
Scientists around the world are currently experimenting with chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine as potential treatments for COVID-19. Despite some early reports suggesting that these antimalarial drugs may help prevent and treat the disease, there's still no solid evidence showing that they're a safe and effective treatment. The recent trial in Brazil suggests that high doses of chloroquine are t
29min
Discovered: Metabolic Mechanism of Cytokine Storms
By studying influenza in mice and cells, researchers identify a glucose metabolism pathway critical to the dysregulated immune response that kills many infectious disease patients, including those with COVID-19.
30min
Journey to the center of the Earth
In an effort to investigate conditions found at the Earth's molten outer core, researchers successfully determined the density of liquid iron and sound propagation speed through it at extremely high pressures. They achieved this with use of a highly specialized diamond anvil which compresses samples, and sophisticated X-ray measurements. Their findings confirm the molten outer core is less dense t
31min
Strongest evidence yet that neutrinos explain how the universe exists
New data throws more support behind the theory that neutrinos are the reason the universe is dominated by matter.
31min
When damaged, the adult brain repairs itself by going back to the beginning
When adult brain cells are injured, they revert to an embryonic state, say researchers. In their newly adopted immature state, the cells become capable of re-growing new connections that, under the right conditions, can help to restore lost function.
31min
Human handling stresses young monarch butterflies
People handle monarch butterflies. A lot. Every year thousands of monarch butterflies are caught, tagged and released during their fall migration by citizen scientists helping to track their movements. And thousands of caterpillars are reared by hand or used in classroom demonstrations and outreach events. These activities can provide valuable scientific data and educational benefits for the peopl
31min
COPD as a lung stem cell disease
Two stem cell researchers have found an abundance of abnormal stem cells in the lungs of patients who suffer from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), a leading cause of death worldwide. The team, who used single cell cloning of lung stem cells to make their discovery, is now targeting the cells for new therapeutics.
31min
Nanosensor can alert a smartphone when plants are stressed
Engineers can closely track how plants respond to stresses such as injury, infection, and light damage using sensors made of carbon nanotubes. These sensors can be embedded in plant leaves, where they report on hydrogen peroxide levels.
31min
Vermont's Great Experiment
The call from his commanding officer came on a Sunday at the end of March, when Matthew Tatro was on his couch in front of the television. His life in small-town Vermont was already being reshaped by the coronavirus; for his usual job as a high-school music teacher, he'd been puzzling through how he could teach band remotely if and when the schools closed. But now the governor was activating the
32min
Breastfed babies have fewer viruses in their guts that affect humans
Early in life, babies gain billions of viruses that target gut bacteria – but breastfed babies are less likely to pick up viruses that infect human cells
34min
I was homeschooled for 8 years: Here's what I recommend
I was homeschooled for eight years, from age 11 through to college, before it was a novel way for tiger parents to show off their dynamic commitment to their children's education. Now, if millions of parents and families are suddenly going to be homeschooling their kids for the coming weeks (and, let's be honest, quite likely beyond), it's worth trying to think about how to do this in a manner as
40min
A new tool to predict volcanic eruptions
Earth's atmosphere is made up of 78% nitrogen and 21% oxygen, a mixture that is unique in the solar system. But where did the nitrogen come from? Did it escape from Earth's mantle through volcanic activity? To try to answer these questions, researchers collected samples of gas from several volcanic sites. Their highly precise data could help to predict future volcanic eruptions.
43min
Speeding-up quantum computing using giant atomic ions
Researchers have found a new way to speed up quantum computing that could pave the way for huge leaps forward in computer processing power.
45min
Improving the treatment of periodontitis
For the first time, researchers have shown that a unicellular parasite commonly found in the mouth plays a role in both severe tissue inflammation and tissue destruction.
45min
A new tool to predict volcanic eruptions
Earth's atmosphere is made up of 78% nitrogen and 21% oxygen, a mixture that is unique in the solar system. But where did the nitrogen come from? Did it escape from Earth's mantle through volcanic activity? To try to answer these questions, researchers collected samples of gas from several volcanic sites. Their highly precise data could help to predict future volcanic eruptions.
45min
Soot may only be half the problem when it comes to cookstoves
Researchers spent two weeks in India cooking with local residents. They found that soot wasn't the only worrisome byproduct of traditional cookstoves; organic carbons are causing problems, too.
45min
A more plant-based diet without stomach troubles: Getting rid of FODMAPs with enzymes
A plant-based diet is a good choice for both climate and health. However, many plant-based products, especially legumes, contain FODMAP compounds that are poorly digestible and cause unpleasant intestinal symptoms. A study has succeeded in breaking down FODMAPs with enzymes and producing new, stomach-friendly plant-based food products.
45min
Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way help test dark matter theory
Physicists report tiny satellite galaxies of the Milky Way can be used to test fundamental properties of 'dark matter' — nonluminous material thought to constitute 85% of matter in the universe.
45min
Barrick Gold buys 800,000 antibody test kits
Chief executive Mark Bristow says miner has taken lessons on tackling coronavirus from experience of Ebola outbreak
46min
Ludwig MSK study reveals bile metabolite of gut microbes boosts immune cells
A Ludwig Cancer Research study has discovered a novel means by which bacterial colonies in the small intestine support the generation of regulatory T cells–immune cells that suppress autoimmune reactions and inflammation.
47min
UK lockdown set to be extended until early May
Chief medical officer's view is country probably approaching peak of coronavirus but not safe to say past it
52min
Macron calls for clinical trials of controversial coronavirus 'cure'
Treatment promoted by Didier Raoult is supported by Trump and Bolsonaro but medical experts remain sceptical Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Emmanuel Macron called for clinical trials of a controversial coronavirus "cure" as he hailed the French infection specialist who promoted it as a great scientist. The French president said on Wednesday that he would like the tr
52min
The Guardian view on the WHO and coronavirus: Trump's blame game | Editorial
Cutting off funds to the international body will only punish those most vulnerable to Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The buck, once more, stops somewhere else. Donald Trump has announced he is suspending funding to the World Health Organization. The attempt to shift blame for his disastrous failure to protect his country, despite repeated warnings from the
52min
Live Coronavirus World News Tracker
Germany joined other European nations gingerly plotting a way forward. The head of the W.H.O. expressed dismay at U.S. funding cuts. More than 125,000 people have died worldwide, and confirmed infections are nearing 2 million.
55min
Germany to relax coronavirus lockdown measures
Many shops and schools will reopen as chancellor warns success in slowing spread is 'fragile'
58min
The City We Became review: N. K. Jemisin pits New York against aliens
N. K. Jemisin's latest book sees New York itself come alive to fight off aliens in the first part of a new trilogy with ethnicity at its heart
58min
Don't Miss: absurd animals, the chemical age and DIY dancing
Watch Netflix's Absurd Planet explore weird animals, discover the powerful chemical industry and create dance using a choreographer's motion-capture moves
58min
Altered Carbon 2 review: A great premise that's become too serious
In Altered Carbon's version of the future, our identities are stored in chips and can be switched between bodies. The first series was a hoot. The second, however, is a bit too earnest, says Emily Wilson
58min
Baking without eggs: How to use aquafaba to make meringues
You don't need eggs to make meringues, pancakes and a host of other baked goods. If you know the science behind it, there are ingredients such as aquafaba that can do the same job
58min
New Scientist puzzle #55: Ton up
Try our brain-teaser based on the number 100. Can you divide it into four parts in a way that makes a pattern? Plus, the solution to puzzle #54
58min
The worst April fools' papers of 2020
Feedback is our weekly column of bizarre stories, implausible advertising claims, confusing instructions and more
58min
My patient's marriage was saved by a brain injury
Our brains influence all aspects of our lives, including our sexual desires. This means brain injuries can have some surprising effects, says Amee Baird
58min
Wuhan's covid-19 crisis: Intensive care doctors share their stories
Three doctors reveal what it was like at the heart of Hubei province's coronavirus crisis, as the epidemic peaked in Wuhan and spread elsewhere
58min
The way we think about the brain may be completely wrong
Thinking of the brain as a machine may be hampering our progress in understanding how it works, says The Idea of the Brain: A history by Matthew Cobb
58min
Covid-19 latest: Worldwide coronavirus cases pass 2 million
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
58min
App-based contact tracing may help end coronavirus lockdowns
But only as part of a bigger system
58min
Climate Science Deniers Turn to Attacking Coronavirus Models
Vocal critics have cited perceived flaws in both climate and virus modeling, despite scientific evidence to the contrary — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
All New Yorkers Will be Required to Wear Masks in Public
New York governor Andrew Cuomo said today that he will issue an executive order requiring all New Yorkers to wear a mouth and nose covering in public when they are not able to maintain a social distance of six feet or less, CNN reports . "If you are going to be in a situation, in public, where you come into contact with other people in a situation that is not socially distanced you must have a ma
1h
UCI team develops smartphone application for coronavirus contact tracing
Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a tool that could be instrumental in this effort. TrackCOVID is a free, open-source smartphone application that permits contact tracing for potential coronavirus infections while preserving privacy.
1h
An antibody treatment combats life-threatening sepsis in rodents
Sepsis — the body's extreme and organ-damaging response to severe infections — is a major contributor to death in patients battling infectious disease.
1h
High blood glucose levels may explain why some flu patients experience severe symptoms
Influenza A (a highly contagious virus that causes annual flu epidemics worldwide) may trigger an inflammatory 'cytokine storm' — an excessive immune response that can lead to hospitalization or even death — by increasing glucose metabolism, according to a new study.
1h
Is it bloating or is it a heart attack?
A patient in the hospital for metastatic Hodgkin lymphoma with significant abdominal distention displayed sudden onset of ST-segment elevations — often an indicator of a heart attack — however the heart attack symptoms improved when the cardiovascular care team pressed on the abdomen during a standard exam, according to a case published in JACC: Case Reports.
1h
Economists find carbon footprint grows with parenthood
Two-adult households with children emit over 25% more carbon dioxide than two-adult households without children, according to researchers with the University of Wyoming and Sweden's Lund University School of Economics and Management.
1h
Antiviral drug baloxavir reduces transmission of flu virus among ferrets
Baloxavir treatment reduced transmission of the flu virus from infected ferrets to healthy ferrets, suggesting that the antiviral drug could contribute to the early control of influenza outbreaks by limiting community-based viral spread, according to a study published April 15, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Aeron Hurt of F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd and Wendy Barclay of Imperial Co
1h
Questionnaire survey identifies potential separation-related problems in cats
The first questionnaire survey to identify possible separation-related problems in cats found 13.5 percent of all sampled cats displayed potential issues during their owner's absence, according to a study published April 15, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Daiana de Souza Machado, from the Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brazil, and colleagues.
1h
Software is on cloud Covid-19
Airbnb raises again, newspapers in dire straits, Apple launches cheaper iPhone
1h
Pterosaurs and other fossil flyers to better engineer human-made flight
Pterosaurs were the largest animals ever to fly. They soared the skies for 160 million years — much longer than any species of modern bird. Despite their aeronautic excellence, these ancient flyers have largely been overlooked in the pursuit of bioinspired flight technologies. Researchers outline why and how the physiology of fossil flyers could provide ancient solutions to modern flight problems
1h
Molecular and isotopic evidence of milk, meat and plants in prehistoric food systems
Scientists have provided the first evidence for diet and subsistence practices of ancient East African pastoralists.
1h
Catching COVID-19 from a dead body is possible, but there's no proof it's happened yet
A U.S. Air Force Mortuary funeral specialist demonstrates the proper PPE needed during the embalming process (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Brooke P. Doyle/) Over the weekend, news broke that a forensic medicine professional in Thailand caught COVID-19 from a dead body. But while it's entirely possible to catch an infectious disease from a deceased person, the truth in this case is likely
1h
We Put Science Back into EPA Air Pollution Standards, But…
So far, the agency administrator is ignoring it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Is This Telescope-On-A-Plane Worth Its Pricetag?
NASA's high-flying SOFIA observatory has struggled to prove its scientific worth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Anthropogenic alteration of nutrient supply increases the global freshwater carbon sink
Lakes have a disproportionate effect on the global carbon (C) cycle relative to their area, mediating C transfer from land to atmosphere, and burying organic-C in their sediments. The magnitude and temporal variability of C burial is, however, poorly constrained, and the degree to which humans have influenced lake C cycling through landscape alteration has not been systematically assessed. Here,
1h
Genomic mapping in outbred mice reveals overlap in genetic susceptibility for HZE ion- and {gamma}-ray-induced tumors
Cancer risk from galactic cosmic radiation exposure is considered a potential "showstopper" for a manned mission to Mars. Calculating the actual risks confronted by spaceflight crews is complicated by our limited understanding of the carcinogenic effects of high-charge, high-energy (HZE) ions, a radiation type for which no human exposure data exist. Using a mouse model of genetic diversity, we fi
1h
Population phenomena inflate genetic associations of complex social traits
Heritability, genetic correlation, and genetic associations estimated from samples of unrelated individuals are often perceived as confirmation that genotype causes the phenotype(s). However, these estimates can arise from indirect mechanisms due to population phenomena including population stratification, dynastic effects, and assortative mating. We introduce these, describe how they can bias or
1h
AI Feynman: A physics-inspired method for symbolic regression
A core challenge for both physics and artificial intelligence (AI) is symbolic regression: finding a symbolic expression that matches data from an unknown function. Although this problem is likely to be NP-hard in principle, functions of practical interest often exhibit symmetries, separability, compositionality, and other simplifying properties. In this spirit, we develop a recursive multidimens
1h
Cryo-EM structure of the human heteromeric amino acid transporter b0,+AT-rBAT
Heteromeric amino acid transporters (HATs) catalyze the transmembrane movement of amino acids, comprising two subunits, a heavy chain and a light chain, linked by a disulfide bridge. The b 0,+ AT (SLC7A9) is a representative light chain of HATs, forming heterodimer with rBAT, a heavy chain which mediates the membrane trafficking of b 0,+ AT. The b 0,+ AT-rBAT complex is an obligatory exchanger, w
1h
2.7 A cryo-EM structure of rotavirus core protein VP3, a unique capping machine with a helicase activity
In many viruses, including rotavirus (RV), the major pathogen of infantile gastroenteritis, capping of viral messenger RNAs is a pivotal step for efficient translation of the viral genome. In RV, VP3 caps the nascent transcripts synthesized from the genomic dsRNA segments by the RV polymerase VP1 within the particle core. Here, from cryo–electron microscopy, x-ray crystallography, and biochemical
1h
Nuclear actin regulates inducible transcription by enhancing RNA polymerase II clustering
Gene expression in response to stimuli underlies many fundamental processes. However, how transcription is regulated under these scenarios is largely unknown. Here, we find a previously unknown role of nuclear actin in transcriptional regulation. The RNA-seq data reveal that nuclear actin is required for the serum-induced transcriptional program. Using super-resolution imaging, we found a remarka
1h
Super-resolution imaging reveals the nanoscale organization of metabotropic glutamate receptors at presynaptic active zones
G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a fundamental role in the modulation of synaptic transmission. A pivotal example is provided by the metabotropic glutamate receptor type 4 (mGluR4), which inhibits glutamate release at presynaptic active zones (AZs). However, how GPCRs are organized within AZs to regulate neurotransmission remains largely unknown. Here, we applied two-color super-resolutio
1h
Cryo-EM structure of the Hedgehog release protein Dispatched
The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway controls embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis in multicellular organisms. In Drosophila melanogaster , the pathway is primed by secretion of a dually lipid-modified morphogen, Hh, a process dependent on a membrane-integral protein Dispatched. Although Dispatched is a critical component of the pathway, the structural basis of its activity has, so f
1h
Accretion of a large LL parent planetesimal from a recently formed chondrule population
Chondritic meteorites, derived from asteroidal parent bodies and composed of millimeter-sized chondrules, record the early stages of planetary assembly. Yet, the initial planetesimal size distribution and the duration of delay, if any, between chondrule formation and chondrite parent body accretion remain disputed. We use Pb-phosphate thermochronology with planetesimal-scale thermal models to con
1h
Biomimetic anisotropic polymeric nanoparticles coated with red blood cell membranes for enhanced circulation and toxin removal
The design of next-generation nanobiomaterials requires precise engineering of both physical properties of the core material and chemical properties of the material's surface to meet a biological function. A bio-inspired modular and versatile technology was developed to allow biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles to circulate through the blood for extended periods of time while also acting as a d
1h
PHF20L1 as a H3K27me2 reader coordinates with transcriptional repressors to promote breast tumorigenesis
TUDOR domain–containing proteins (TDRDs) are chiefly responsible for recognizing methyl-lysine/arginine residue. However, how TDRD dysregulation contributes to breast tumorigenesis is poorly understood. Here, we report that TUDOR domain–containing PHF20L1 as a H3K27me2 reader exerts transcriptional repression by recruiting polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and Mi-2/nucleosome remodeling and de
1h
Compression of dynamic tactile information in the human hand
A key problem in the study of the senses is to describe how sense organs extract perceptual information from the physics of the environment. We previously observed that dynamic touch elicits mechanical waves that propagate throughout the hand. Here, we show that these waves produce an efficient encoding of tactile information. The computation of an optimal encoding of thousands of naturally occur
1h
Revealing in real-time a multistep assembly mechanism for SV40 virus-like particles
Many viruses use their genome as template for self-assembly into an infectious particle. However, this reaction remains elusive because of the transient nature of intermediate structures. To elucidate this process, optical tweezers and acoustic force spectroscopy are used to follow viral assembly in real time. Using Simian virus 40 (SV40) virus-like particles as model system, we reveal a multiste
1h
A{beta} deposition is associated with increases in soluble and phosphorylated tau that precede a positive Tau PET in Alzheimers disease
The links between β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau in Alzheimer's disease are unclear. Cognitively unimpaired persons with signs of Aβ pathology had increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) phosphorylated tau (P-tau181 and P-tau217) and total-tau (T-tau), which increased over time, despite no detection of insoluble tau aggregates [normal Tau positron emission tomography (PET)]. CSF P-tau and T-tau started to in
1h
Linking extracellular enzymes to phylogeny indicates a predominantly particle-associated lifestyle of deep-sea prokaryotes
Heterotrophic prokaryotes express extracellular hydrolytic enzymes to cleave large organic molecules before taking up the hydrolyzed products. According to foraging theory, extracellular enzymes should be cell associated in dilute systems such as deep sea habitats, but secreted into the surrounding medium in diffusion-limited systems. However, extracellular enzymes in the deep sea are found mainl
1h
Autonomous synthesis and assembly of a ribosomal subunit on a chip
Ribosome biogenesis is an efficient and complex assembly process that has not been reconstructed outside a living cell so far, yet is the most critical step for establishing a self-replicating artificial cell. We recreated the biogenesis of Escherichia coli's small ribosomal subunit by synthesizing and capturing all its ribosomal proteins and RNA on a chip. Surface confinement provided favorable
1h
Proof of concept for rational design of hepatitis C virus E2 core nanoparticle vaccines
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 are responsible for cell entry, with E2 being the major target of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). Here, we present a comprehensive strategy for B cell–based HCV vaccine development through E2 optimization and nanoparticle display. We redesigned variable region 2 in a truncated form (tVR2) on E2 cores derived from genotypes 1a and 6a, result
1h
O-GlcNAc transferase promotes influenza A virus-induced cytokine storm by targeting interferon regulatory factor-5
In this study, we demonstrated an essential function of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP)–associated O -linked β- N -acetylglucosamine ( O -GlcNAc) signaling in influenza A virus (IAV)–induced cytokine storm. O -GlcNAc transferase (OGT), a key enzyme for protein O -GlcNAcylation, mediated IAV-induced cytokine production. Upon investigating the mechanisms driving this event, we determined
1h
Formation of 2D and 3D multi-tori mesostructures via crystallization-driven self-assembly
The fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) objects by polymer self-assembly in solution is extremely challenging. Here, multi-tori mesostructures were obtained from the crystallization-driven self-assembly of a coil-crystalline block copolymer (BCP) in mixed solvents. The formation of these structures follows a multistep process. First, the BCP self-assembles into amorphous micrometer-large vesicl
1h
Sperm DNA damage causes genomic instability in early embryonic development
Genomic instability is common in human embryos, but the underlying causes are largely unknown. Here, we examined the consequences of sperm DNA damage on the embryonic genome by single-cell whole-genome sequencing of individual blastomeres from bovine embryos produced with sperm damaged by -radiation. Sperm DNA damage primarily leads to fragmentation of the paternal chromosomes followed by random
1h
Bypassing mitochondrial complex III using alternative oxidase inhibits acute pulmonary oxygen sensing
Mitochondria play an important role in sensing both acute and chronic hypoxia in the pulmonary vasculature, but their primary oxygen-sensing mechanism and contribution to stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) remains elusive. Alteration of the mitochondrial electron flux and increased superoxide release from complex III has been proposed as an essential trigger for hypoxic pulmonary
1h
Glutathione dynamics determine the therapeutic efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells for graft-versus-host disease via CREB1-NRF2 pathway
Glutathione (GSH), the most abundant nonprotein thiol functioning as an antioxidant, plays critical roles in maintaining the core functions of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are used as a cellular immunotherapy for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). However, the role of GSH dynamics in MSCs remains elusive. Genome-wide gene expression profiling and high-throughput live-cell imaging assays re
1h
What Does Covid-19 Do to Your Brain?
Scientists are racing to figure out why some patients also develop neurological ailments like confusion, stroke, seizure, or loss of smell.
1h
Inside NEPTUN, a Daring Cold War Disinformation Operation
Rumored Nazi treasure, a dark Bohemian lake, an unsuspecting TV crew—and a brilliant spy to put it all together.
1h
Earth-size, habitable-zone planet found hidden in early NASA Kepler data
A team of transatlantic scientists, using reanalyzed data from NASA's Kepler space telescope, has discovered an Earth-size exoplanet orbiting in its star's habitable zone, the area around a star where a rocky planet could support liquid water.
1h
UK delays banning plastic straws and stirrers because of coronavirus
Campaigners say pandemic should not become a reason to roll back environmental protections
1h
Cash demand surges in Europe despite coronavirus lockdown
Eurozone citizens responded to pandemic by hoarding banknotes, data suggest
1h
UK expected to miss coronavirus testing target
Ambition of reaching 100,000 checks a day within next fortnight seen as 'political' by some experts
1h
The World Health Organization isn't perfect, but it needs more money and power, not less
President Donald Trump has announced that he is halting US payments to the World Health Organization (WHO). It's unclear whether he in fact has legal authority to do so. Leaving that aside, though, as Bill Gates and a variety of world leaders have pointed out, it's a ridiculous decision. The pandemic would have been much worse if not for the actions the WHO has taken in recent months. The WHO sta
1h
The importance of probiotic names — and why some of them have changed
A global group of scientists has published a paper announcing name changes for some of the bacteria that were historically grouped under the category of Lactobacillus. Members of the Lactobacillus genus are among the most popular bacteria found in consumer probiotic products and fermented foods.
1h
WPI researcher's paper on COVID-19 published in Viruses journal
Two months after creating a structural 3D roadmap of the novel coronavirus and sharing it with the scientific community worldwide, Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) bioinformatics researcher Dmitry Korkin has published a paper on the topic in Viruses, a leading academic virology journal.
1h
Trump, Republicans Are 'Exploiting' Coronavirus To Ban Abortion, New Ad Alleges
A six-figure digital ad buy from the abortion rights group NARAL accuses President Trump and his allies of using the pandemic to restrict abortion.
1h
Questionnaire survey identifies potential separation-related problems in cats
The first questionnaire survey to identify possible separation-related problems in cats found 13.5 percent of all sampled cats displayed potential issues during their owner's absence, according to a study published April 15, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Daiana de Souza Machado, from the Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brazil, and colleagues.
1h
Economists find carbon footprint grows with parenthood
Increased time constraints and the need for convenience in raising children appear to offset parents' concerns about the future when it comes to their carbon footprints, according to new research by University of Wyoming economists and a colleague in Sweden.
1h
NASA Employees Are Running the Mars Curiosity Rover From Home
Textbook NASA NASA hasn't abandoned its Curiosity Mars amid the coronavirus pandemic — instead, they've transitioned to controlling Curiosity from their home offices after NASA instructed its employees to work remotely, according to a NASA update . "It's classic, textbook NASA," said science operations team chief Carrie Bridge. "We're presented with a problem and we figure out how to make things
1h
We Put Science Back into EPA Air Pollution Standards, But…
So far, the agency administrator is ignoring it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Questionnaire survey identifies potential separation-related problems in cats
The first questionnaire survey to identify possible separation-related problems in cats found 13.5 percent of all sampled cats displayed potential issues during their owner's absence, according to a study published April 15, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Daiana de Souza Machado, from the Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Brazil, and colleagues.
1h
Farms use charter flights to bring in seasonal workers
Local recruitment is bearing fruit but migrant staff are needed to help training
1h
Researchers use snake venom to solve structure of muscle protein
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have uncovered the detailed shape of a key protein involved in muscle contraction. The report, published today in Neuron, may lead to improved understanding of muscle-weakening genetic conditions called congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS).
1h
Quansys Biosciences Releases Multiplex Human Serological SARS-CoV-2 (4-plex) ELISA
Quansys Biosciences releases the first multiplexed serological assay for SARS-CoV-2 to be used in surveillance studies.
1h
Upgraded LIGO Detector Could See Black Holes Being Thrown Out of Galaxies
Scientists may soon be able to observe a dramatic, long-predicted consequence of Einstein's theory of general relativity. blackhole-merger.jpg An artist's depiction of two black holes in the process of merging with each other. Image credits: NASA Space Wednesday, April 15, 2020 – 13:00 Meredith Fore, Contributor (Inside Science) — When a bullet is fired from a gun, the gun recoils to compensate
1h
Researchers use snake venom to solve structure of muscle protein
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have uncovered the detailed shape of a key protein involved in muscle contraction. The report, published today in Neuron, may lead to improved understanding of muscle-weakening genetic conditions called congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS).
1h
How a team of scientists studying drought helped build the world's leading famine prediction model
Researchers have harnessed climate patterns to forecast famines months in advance
1h
Production cuts fail to dispel oil gloom
IEA says demand will drop even if lockdowns and travel bans are lifted
1h
Human handling stresses young monarch butterflies
People handle monarch butterflies. A lot. Every year thousands of monarch butterflies are caught, tagged and released during their fall migration by citizen scientists helping to track their movements. And thousands of caterpillars are reared by hand or used in classroom demonstrations and outreach events.
1h
Researchers challenge accuracy of methods that analyze trees of life
When species under a taxonomic umbrella have faced forks in the road, leading to extinction or adaptation, the path taken has been difficult to follow. In a newly published paper, two scientists argue that long-used approaches for reconstructing these paths are deeply flawed.
1h
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Human handling stresses young monarch butterflies
People handle monarch butterflies. A lot. Every year thousands of monarch butterflies are caught, tagged and released during their fall migration by citizen scientists helping to track their movements. And thousands of caterpillars are reared by hand or used in classroom demonstrations and outreach events.
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Researchers challenge accuracy of methods that analyze trees of life
When species under a taxonomic umbrella have faced forks in the road, leading to extinction or adaptation, the path taken has been difficult to follow. In a newly published paper, two scientists argue that long-used approaches for reconstructing these paths are deeply flawed.
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Breastfeeding may lead to fewer human viruses in infants
Even small amounts of breastmilk strongly influences the accumulation of viral populations in the infant gut and provides a protective effect against potentially pathogenic viruses, according to researchers who examined hundreds of babies.
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Could a rheumatoid arthritis drug fight coronavirus?
Auranofin, a drug approved by the US Food & Drug Administration to treat rheumatoid arthritis, is effective at inhibiting the novel coronavirus known as SARS-CoV-2, researchers report. The researchers tested the drug as part of a project to screen FDA-approved medications for their potential use against SARS-CoV-2. "…the drug not only could inhibit replication of SARS-CoV-2, mitigating the infect
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US airlines rescue: pivotal moments
Carriers agreed to restrictions, but the terms offered by the Treasury were generous
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Biggest Wall Street banks set aside $25bn for loan losses
Shares in lenders fall as Goldman chief Solomon warns of recession lasting into 2021
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UTSW researchers use snake venom to solve structure of muscle protein
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have uncovered the detailed shape of a key protein involved in muscle contraction.
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COPD as a lung stem cell disease
Two internationally renowned stem cell researchers at the University of Houston have found an abundance of abnormal stem cells in the lungs of patients who suffer from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), a leading cause of death worldwide. The team, who used single cell cloning of lung stem cells to make their discovery, is now targeting the cells for new therapeutics.
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Researchers challenge accuracy of methods that analyze trees of life
When species under a taxonomic umbrella have faced forks in the road, leading to extinction or adaptation, the path taken has been difficult to follow. In a newly published paper, two scientists argue that long-used approaches for reconstructing these paths are deeply flawed. They also offer a a mathematical model as a way forward.
2h
Human handling stresses young monarch butterflies
People handle monarch butterflies. A lot. Every year thousands of monarch butterflies are caught, tagged and released during their fall migration by citizen scientists helping to track their movements. And thousands of caterpillars are reared by hand or used in classroom demonstrations and outreach events. These activities can provide valuable scientific data and educational benefits for the peopl
2h
UK public deserves straight answers from ministers
Government should be more open on its virus mistakes and next steps
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COVID-19 puts new science to the pressure test
By its very nature, science rarely offers a quick fix. New technologies and medicines often take years to prove that they are safe and effective. Yet the surging COVID-19 pandemic is forcing scientists to condense this process to mere months. Researchers are working at breakneck speeds to meet the challenge, according to a series of articles in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsma
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Why didn't the universe annihilate itself? Neutrinos may hold the answer
Alysia Marino and Eric Zimmerman, physicists at CU Boulder, have been on the hunt for neutrinos for the last two decades.
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Logging threatening endangered caribou
Cutting down forests means we're also cutting down woodland caribou, says a pioneering study by University of Guelph ecologists showing that logging in Ontario's extensive boreal stands threatens populations of the elusive but iconic herbivore.
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Logging threatening endangered caribou
Cutting down forests means we're also cutting down woodland caribou, says a pioneering study by University of Guelph ecologists showing that logging in Ontario's extensive boreal stands threatens populations of the elusive but iconic herbivore.
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New COVID-19 test quickly and accurately detects viral DNA
Millions of people have been tested for the novel coronavirus, most using a kit that relies on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This sensitive method amplifies SARS-CoV-2 RNA from patient swabs so that tiny amounts of the virus can be detected. However, as the pandemic surges, this laboratory workhorse is showing signs of strain. Now, researchers reporting a proof-of-concept study in ACS Nano
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Research finds teachers just as likely to have racial bias as non-teachers
Research released today challenges the notion that teachers might be uniquely equipped to instill positive racial attitudes in children or bring about racial justice, without additional support or training from schools. Instead, the results, published in Educational Researcher (ER), find that "teachers are people too," holding almost as much pro-White racial bias as non-teachers of the same race,
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How probiotic Bifidobacteria could help celiac disease patients
Gluten is enemy No. 1 for those with celiac disease, and it's hard to avoid. Episodes of this chronic autoimmune illness can be triggered by ingesting gluten, a key protein in wheat and some other grains. Researchers have been exploring how gut bacteria, especially Bifidobacteria, could be used as a treatment. Now, scientists publishing the results of laboratory experiments in ACS' Journal of Agri
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New data shows vast scale of US economic breakdown
Retail sales and industrial production fall to historic lows as lockdowns bite
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Study unlocks the secret of corals' tolerance to climate change: Their diet
Researchers at the School of Biological Sciences and the Swire Institute of Marine Science, The University of Hong Kong have developed a new method for determining what corals eat, and demonstrated that reliance on certain nutritional sources underpins their bleaching susceptibility in warming oceans.
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Study unlocks the secret of corals' tolerance to climate change: Their diet
Researchers at the School of Biological Sciences and the Swire Institute of Marine Science, The University of Hong Kong have developed a new method for determining what corals eat, and demonstrated that reliance on certain nutritional sources underpins their bleaching susceptibility in warming oceans.
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Bring Home The Tarantulas? As Research Halts, Scientists Face Difficult Decisions
With research projects on hold due to social distancing guidelines, many scientists are being forced to decide what to do with the creatures that they study. (Image credit: Peter Steffen/dpa/AFP via Getty Images)
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Breast milk may shield baby gut from viruses
Even small amounts of breast milk offer protection from potentially pathogenic viruses in an infant's gut, according to a study of hundreds of babies. The study also shows that breast milk strongly influences the accumulation of viral populations, researchers say. The findings expand upon prior research that suggests that breastfeeding plays a key role in the interaction between babies and the mi
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Scientists: US Could've Prevented 90% of Deaths by Shutting Down Two Weeks Earlier
As it currently stands, the U.S. is predicting that COVID-19 will kill about 60,000 Americans over the next four months. But if the government had acted and urged everyone to physically distance themselves just two weeks sooner than it did, that number could have been slashed by 90 percent. That's according to epidemiologists Britta Jewell of Imperial College London and Nicholas Jewell of the Lon
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G20 agrees debt relief for low income nations
Governments suspend bilateral loan repayments and call on investors to follow suit
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Two is better than one
A collaboration of scientists from the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), Yale University, and Arizona State University has designed and tested a new two-dimensional (2-D) catalyst that can be used to improve water purification using hydrogen peroxide.
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Mahogany tree family dates back to last hurrah of the dinosaurs
A new paper by University of Kansas researcher Brian Atkinson in the American Journal of Botany shows the mahogany family goes back to the last hurrah of the dinosaurs, the Cretaceous.
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When damaged, the adult brain repairs itself by going back to the beginning
When adult brain cells are injured, they revert to an embryonic state, say researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine. In their newly adopted immature state, the cells become capable of re-growing new connections that, under the right conditions, can help to restore lost function.
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Study reveals how 'hypermutated' malignant brain tumors escape chemotherapy and immunotherapy
An analysis of more than 10,000 gliomas and clinical outcomes reported in Nature by scientists in Boston and Paris found that glioma patients whose tumors were hypermutated actually had no significant benefit when treated with checkpoint blockers.
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Could the coronavirus trigger post-viral fatigue syndromes?
Conditions like chronic fatigue syndrome have been linked to viral infections, so it's possible that the covid-19 virus may go on to trigger similar conditions
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Strongest evidence yet that neutrinos explain how the universe exists
New data throws more support behind the theory that neutrinos are the reason the universe is dominated by matter.
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Why didn't the universe annihilate itself? Neutrinos may hold the answer
New results from an experiment called T2K suggest that physicists are closer than ever before to answering a major mystery: Why didn't the universe annihilate itself in a humungous burst of energy not long after the Big Bang?
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Improving the treatment of periodontitis
For the first time, researchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin have shown that a unicellular parasite commonly found in the mouth plays a role in both severe tissue inflammation and tissue destruction.
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Drug prevents cognitive impairment in mice after radiation treatment for brain tumors
UCLA researchers identify a new drug that may help prevent cognitive decline in people who undergo radiation therapy for brain tumors.
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New COVID-19 test quickly and accurately detects viral RNA
Millions of people have been tested for the novel coronavirus, most using a kit that relies on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This sensitive method amplifies SARS-CoV-2 RNA from patient swabs so that tiny amounts of the virus can be detected. However, as the pandemic surges, this laboratory workhorse is showing signs of strain. Now, researchers reporting a proof-of-concept study in ACS Nano
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Logging threatening endangered caribou
University of Guelph researchers found habitat and food web changes from forestry are encouraging more wolf packs to prey on caribou. Researchers attached video and GPS-tracking radio collars to caribou and wolves to monitor foraging and movements, including signs wolves had killed a caribou. Overs 6 years they collected and compared data from a site with extensive logging and a site untouched by
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The 'queen of supernovas' is the brightest ever
Astronomers have discovered the "queen of all supernovas," a stellar explosion that glows brighter than any other seen before. A supernova is the term used for a star when it " dies ", i.e., when it can no longer produce sufficient energy. Stars need gas to burn and light up. When they run out of gas, they burn out. Their encounter with gravity catalyses an explosion, which we call a supernova. S
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Matt Hancock's record on NHS coronavirus provision
What has been pledged on testing, PPE and ventilators – and what's been delivered Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Matt Hancock, the health secretary, has been the government's public face for much of the coronavirus crisis, especially since Boris Johnson became ill. As such he has made pledges in a series of key areas – how do they measure up so far? Continue reading
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Facebook is using bots to simulate what its users might do
Facebook has developed a new method to play out the consequences of its code. The context: Like any software company, the tech giant needs to test its product any time it pushes updates. But the sorts of debugging methods that normal-size companies use aren't really enough when you've got 2.5 billion users. Such methods usually focus on checking how a single user might experience the platform and
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Quantum computer chips demonstrated at the highest temperatures ever
Qubits are often stabilised by being supercooled, which makes quantum computer chips hard to scale up. Now they have been operated at above -272°C for the first time
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Neutrinos may explain why we don't live in an antimatter universe
For the universe to exist as it does now, there must have been an imbalance between matter and antimatter early on, which may have been caused by neutrinos
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Breastfed babies have fewer viruses that affect humans in their guts
Early in life, babies gain billions of viruses that target gut bacteria – but breastfed babies are less likely to pick up viruses that infect human cells
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Daily briefing: What we know about COVID-19 immunity
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01110-4 What little we know about COVID-19 immunity, what we can intelligently guess at — and how decision makers can work with it. Plus: the United States halts funding to the World Health Organization, and mathematician and 'Game of Life' designer John Conway has died from COVID-19.
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Venture-Backed Startups Debate the Ethics of Taking US Loans
Some investors are urging their portfolio companies to leave government assistance for restaurants and hairdressers.
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Researchers create tools to help volunteers do the most good after a disaster
In the wake of a disaster, many people want to help. Researchers have now developed tools to help emergency response and relief managers coordinate volunteer efforts in order to do the most good.
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Public health systems hold promise for aging populations, journal finds
In 'Aging and Public Health,' a new special issue of the journal Innovation in Aging from The Gerontological Society of America, researchers look at public health interventions that work to foster healthy aging.
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Journey to the center of the Earth
In an effort to investigate conditions found at the Earth's molten outer core, researchers successfully determined the density of liquid iron and sound propagation speed through it at extremely high pressures. They achieved this with use of a highly specialized diamond anvil which compresses samples, and sophisticated X-ray measurements. Their findings confirm the molten outer core is less dense t
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Why some people were slow to social distance
A new study reveals reasons why people may not have followed early recommendations to limit physical contact with others. Researchers conducted a survey between March 14-23, the period when health officials first introduced shelter-in-place orders in some parts of the United States. Their data, reported in a non-peer reviewed, preprint paper on medRxiv, show that the most common reasons for nonco
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FT and Guardian cut senior staff pay
Telegraph also makes cost savings as news groups are hit by falling advertising and print sales
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Traffic noise reduces bats' ability to feed
Experiment finds species try to avoid audible road sounds The thunder of road traffic is likely to drive away bats, according to a study, which found vehicle noise caused bat activity to decrease by two-thirds. While environmental assessments of new roads focus on the danger of habitat fragmentation, or bats colliding with traffic, the first ever controlled field experiment to investigate the imp
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Color psychology: What does your favorite color say about your personality?
Color psychology has been used in marketing and branding for years, but research in the last decade has taken color psychology and applied it to human personality traits. Colors aren't merely associated with various feelings but can actually shape our perceptions and personalities. Various studies across multiple years have given us insight into what each color represents in regards to our person
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Coronavirus Vaccine Prospects
Time for another look at the coronavirus vaccine front, since we have several recent news items. Word has come from GSK and Sanofi that they are going to collaborate on vaccine development, which brings together two of the more experienced large organizations in the field. It looks like Sanofi is bringing the spike protein and GSK is bringing the adjuvant (more on what that means below). Their pr
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Viltkameror riskerar överskatta populationer av hotade kattdjur
Viltkameror eller åtelkameror är inte så pålitliga som man tidigare trott. I en nyligen genomförd inventering identifierades snöleoparden fel på vart åttonde fotografi, vilket ledde till en betydande överskattning av populationen. Detta innebär också att en del arter kan vara ännu mer hotade än man tidigare har trott. En vanlig metod vid inventering av skygga arter, såsom tiger, snöleopard och ja
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Sanctuary Rents Out Goats, Llamas to Spice Up Zoom Meetings
Llama Party A Silicon Valley-based nonprofit animal sanctuary called Sweet Farm is renting out farm animals, including llamas and goats, to spice up boring Zoom meetings. For less than $100, you can hire a llama to make a cameo appearance during your next session with corporate. The money is meant to help deal with lost revenue the farm is experiencing due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Goa
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US Military: Unlikely COVID-19 Was Created in Lab as Bioweapon
General Mark Milley, a top Pentagon general, said during a Tuesday briefing that the "weight of evidence" points towards the coronavirus having "natural" origins — in other words, it wasn't created in a Chinese laboratory to be used as a bioweapon, as some conspiracy theories suggest. "There's a lot of rumor and speculation in a wide variety of media, blog sites, etc," Milley told reporters on Tu
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Mobile Clinics Can Provide Equity in the Defense against COVID-19
They can reach especially vulnerable groups, including the uninsured, the underinsured and the undocumented — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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UK watchdog orders insurers to pay small business claims quickly
FCA warns failure to act could count against provider's regulatory record
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EU bars bailed-out companies from paying dividends and bonuses
Commission document outlines constraints on businesses receiving state aid
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The best ways to livestream from your phone
Livestreaming that amazing music festival you got tickets for is both the ultimate brag and a full-on public service. (Nicolas LB / Unsplash/) Livestreaming is social media on steroids—sharing a live video feed of what you're doing is well beyond sharing carefully curated photos and videos. It's the difference between live TV news and sitcom reruns. If the idea doesn't instantly make you uncomfor
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Universal credit claims running at up to 3 times normal rate
Civil servant in charge of welfare reform programme says events are 'truly seismic'
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Research finds teachers just as likely to have racial bias as non-teachers
Research released today challenges the notion that teachers might be uniquely equipped to instill positive racial attitudes in children or bring about racial justice, without additional support or training from schools.
3h
How probiotic Bifidobacteria could help celiac disease patients
Gluten is enemy No. 1 for those with celiac disease, and it's hard to avoid. Episodes of this chronic autoimmune illness can be triggered by ingesting gluten, a key protein in wheat and some other grains. Researchers have been exploring how gut bacteria, especially Bifidobacteria, could be used as a treatment. Now, scientists publishing the results of laboratory experiments in ACS' Journal of Agri
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Study: Frequent cannabis users are way too high … in their estimates of cannabinoids
Researchers surveyed nearly 500 Hash Bash attendees, asking them to fill out a 24-item questionnaire. Participants were asked to fill in, in milligrams, the amounts they considered to be effective doses of THC and CBD. They were way off.
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Many women vets report adverse pregnancy outcomes, postpartum mental health problems after leaving military service
Women Veterans with more symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder(PTSD) or moral injury (guilt, shame or demoralization in response to participating in or witnessing events that violate one's sense of right and wrong), are at greater risk for negative pregnancy outcomes and postpartum depression in the three years following discharge from military service.
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Nature: Don't hope mature forests to soak up carbon dioxide emissions
Carbon dioxide (CO2) is sometimes described as "food for plants" as it is the key ingredient in plant photosynthesis. Experiments in which single trees and young, rapidly growing forests have been exposed to elevated CO2 concentrations have shown that plants use the extra carbon acquired through photosynthesis to grow faster.
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First of its kind experiment uses diamond anvils to simulate the Earth's core
In an effort to investigate conditions found at the Earth's molten outer core, researchers successfully determined the density of liquid iron and the speed at which sound propagates through it at extremely high pressures. They achieved this with use of a highly specialized diamond anvil that compresses samples, and sophisticated X-ray measurements. Their findings confirm the molten outer core is l
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Questionable stability of dissipative topological models for classical and quantum systems
Energy conservation lies at the core of every physical theory. Effective mathematical models however can feature energy gain and/or loss and thus break the energy conservation law by only capturing the physics of a subsystem. As a result, the Hamiltonian, the function that describes the system's energy, loses an important mathematical property: it is no longer Hermitian. Such non-Hermitian Hamilto
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Mobile Clinics Can Provide Equity in the Defense against COVID-19
They can reach especially vulnerable groups, including the uninsured, the underinsured and the undocumented — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Coronavirus Live Updates: Trump's Attack on W.H.O. Fueled by Conservative Anger About China
Retail sales see their steepest decline on record. President Trump's decision to halt W.H.O. funding was condemned. Millions of high school students across the country will be able to take at-home, digital versions of the SAT and ACT.
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New textile could keep you cool in the heat, warm in the cold
Imagine a single garment that could adapt to changing weather conditions, keeping its wearer cool in the heat of midday but warm when an evening storm blows in. In addition to wearing it outdoors, such clothing could also be worn indoors, drastically reducing the need for air conditioning or heat. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have made a strong, comfortable fabr
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Bats Are a Key Source of Human Viruses–but They May Not Be Special
Statistical analyses suggest surveillance efforts for the next pandemic should look beyond the flying mammals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Bats Are a Key Source of Human Viruses–but They May Not Be Special
Statistical analyses suggest surveillance efforts for the next pandemic should look beyond the flying mammals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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UK accounting industry faces worst crisis in a decade
London-headquartered 'Big Four' firms cut partners' pay while smaller rivals furlough staff in coronavirus pandemic
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NASA finds Tropical Storm Jeruto develop in Southern Indian Ocean
The latest tropical cyclone to develop in the Southern Indian Ocean is no threat to land areas. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Jeruto on April 15, 2020.
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Speeding-up quantum computing using giant atomic ions
Trapped Rydberg ions may be the next step towards scaling up quantum computers to sizes where they can be practically usable, a new study in Nature shows.
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Economic activity has halved during Spain's coronavirus lockdown, study suggests
Almost one and a half billion spending transactions reveal "real time" reactions of consumers in a major western economy during the nation's peak pandemic period.
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New website will help steer the U.S. away from fossil fuels
A new website, Model Laws for Deep Decarbonization in the United States, was launched on Tuesday to help accelerate a sustainable U.S. transition to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions. It will provide policy makers at the federal, state and local levels with the legal tools needed to transition away from fossil fuels.
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Immigrant Japan: understanding modern Japan through the lives and minds of migrants
Japan has increasingly become a popular travel and migrant destination because of its unique culture and diverse economic opportunities. In the three decades between 1980 and 2019, the population of foreign residents in Japan has nearly quadrupled. "Immigrants are but two percent of Japan's population, yet their presence is transforming Japanese society," says Dr. Gracia Liu-Farrer, Professor at t
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The retention effect of training
Especially in times of shortage of skilled workers, some companies do not offer continuing education that improves the employees' chances on the labour market. Behind this restraint is the employer's fear that employees who have undergone extensive training will use their improved opportunities to switch to other companies.
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Bees point to new evolutionary answers
Evolutionary biology aims to explain how new species arise and evolve to occupy myriad niches—but it is not a singular or simplistic story. Rare bees found in high mountain areas of Fiji provide evidence that they have evolved into many species, despite the fact they can't readily adapt to different habitats.
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States go their own ways on environmental enforcement during crisis
Some state environmental regulators have decided not to follow the Trump administration's lead in easing enforcement of environmental rules for companies adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.
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From deep water to the surface: The nexus between climate, upwelling and marine ecosystems
Upwelling is a process in which deep, cold water rises toward the surface. Typically, water that rises to the surface as a result of upwelling is colder and rich in nutrients. This is the reason why coastal upwelling ecosystems are some of the most productive ecosystems in the world and support many of the world's most important fisheries.
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Konsten att göra en färdtjänstresa bättre
Det går att undvika att utsatta grupper, känner sig ändå mer utsatta när de åker färdtjänst. Forskare vid Karlstads universitet har studerat hur personer med funktionshinder upplever sina färdtjänstresor. Och släpper nu en handbok i hur utsatta grupper kan få en bättre reseupplevelse. Hur upplevs färdtjänstresor? Vilka faktorer har betydande inverkan och vad kan man göra för att skapa en bättre r
3h
Bees point to new evolutionary answers
Evolutionary biology aims to explain how new species arise and evolve to occupy myriad niches—but it is not a singular or simplistic story. Rare bees found in high mountain areas of Fiji provide evidence that they have evolved into many species, despite the fact they can't readily adapt to different habitats.
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Mouse study shows 'chaperone protein' protects against autoimmune diseases
Like a parent of teenagers at a party, Mother Nature depends on chaperones to keep one of her charges, the immune system, in line so that it doesn't mistakenly attack normal cells, tissues and organs in our bodies.
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How expectations influence learning
During learning, the brain is a prediction engine that continually makes theories about our environment and accurately registers whether an assumption is true or not. A team of neuroscientists has shown that expectation during these predictions affects the activity of various brain networks.
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New textile could keep you cool in the heat, warm in the cold
Imagine a single garment that could adapt to changing weather conditions, keeping its wearer cool in the heat of midday but warm when an evening storm blows in. In addition to wearing it outdoors, such clothing could also be worn indoors, drastically reducing the need for air conditioning or heat. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have made a strong, comfortable fabr
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NASA finds Tropical Storm Jeruto develop in Southern Indian Ocean
The latest tropical cyclone to develop in the Southern Indian Ocean is no threat to land areas. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Jeruto on April 15, 2020.
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Crohn's disease: Preserving inflammation-free phases
Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the intestine that, in most cases, relapses episodically. As of now, there is no cure for this disease. A research group led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has discovered a marker at a microscopic level, which can be used to identify patients that show a high probability of suffering from an inflammation recurrence in the immediate
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Alzheimer's patients may need dosing changes in medicines prescribed for other conditions
Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are often prescribed drugs for other conditions — including diabetes or high blood pressure — at the same doses as those without dementia. That practice might need to be reexamined in the wake of new mouse studies reported in ACS' Molecular Pharmaceutics. The findings suggest that AD could alter absorption of medications from the digestive tract, so dosages
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Trump should leave virus response to the experts
Formation of regional coalitions offers a path to a staggered exit
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Coronavirus could be a disaster passed down the generations
With 90 per cent of pupils out of school, most have no access to online learning
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GM Plots an EV Comeback Inside Its Secretive Battery Lab
WARREN, Michigan – If General Motors is to successfully challenge Tesla for supremacy in EVs, the battle starts with better battery technology. Research, prototyping, and testing take place here at the company's Global Battery Systems Lab 20 miles north of Detroit. They'll go into new GM EVs late this year or in 2021, and the batteries will have their own name: Ultium. "We're trying to wear out t
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How Bubonic Plague Has Helped Russia Fight the Coronavirus
A network of health centers formed by the Soviet Union in the 1920s is providing expertise in quarantines and epidemic response for Covid-19.
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Purchasing a New ULT Freezer
Download this article to learn the top five rarely asked—but important—questions for selecting the best ultra-low temperature freezer!
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Veterinär: Hundar ingen stor smittkälla
Många läsare har reagerat på att ny forskning pekar ut gatuhundar i Wuhan som möjliga spridare av viruset sars-cov-2, men det finns ingenting som tyder på att hundar är stora smittspridare.
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How is COVID-19 affecting your county? Check this tracking map
A new data-rich map for tracking COVID-19's spread features US county-level data on testing, population, infection rate, and hospital capacity. Created through a multidisciplinary collaboration by experts from across Johns Hopkins University, the new map features county-level infection and population data, which allow policymakers, the media, and the public to find specific, up-to-date informatio
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Fast Nanoscale 'Movies' Shed Light on a Solar Cell Mystery
Physicists found the locations of major defects in perovskite cells—a critical breakthrough on the path to cheap, flexible solar technology.
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Individuella digitala hjälpmedel ska hålla koll på blodtrycket
Genom motivation och påminnelse, baserat på personliga behov och beteenden, vill forskare vid Högskolan i Halmstad öka sannolikheten för att patienter med högt blodtryck följer ordinerad läkemedelsbehandling. Det finns olika skäl till att patienter inte tar sin medicin, till exempel glömska, rädsla för biverkningar och brist på förståelse för konsekvenserna av utebliven medicinering. Individuella
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Where did the antimatter go? Neutrinos shed promising new light
We live in a world of matter — because matter overtook antimatter, though they were both created in equal amounts when our universe began. Neutrinos and the associated antimatter particles, antineutrinos, are reported by the T2K collaboration to have a high likelihood of differing behaviour that offers a promising path to explaining the mysterious disappearance of antimatter. This work involved F
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Milk pioneers: East African herders consumed milk 5,000 years ago
Animal milk was essential to east African herders at least 5,000 years ago, according to a new study. The research is important for understanding the history of milk drinking worldwide.
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Network pharmacology analysis on Zhichan powder in the treatment of Parkinson's disease
Zhichan is a Chinese herb which has been used for its medicinal properties to treat patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD). Dr Chen's team has recently conducted a systematic analysis of the effects of Zhichan powder for PD treatment. To achieve this, the team used the Traditional Chinese Medicine Systems Pharmacology database to screen for active compounds against PD, and established a
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HKU study unlocks the secret of corals' tolerance to climate change: Their diet
Researchers at School of Biological Sciences and Swire Institute of Marine Science, The University of Hong Kong have developed a new method for determining what corals eat, and demonstrated that reliance on certain nutritional sources underpins their bleaching susceptibility in warming oceans. The research was published in the prestigious journal Science Advances.
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Speeding-up quantum computing using giant atomic ions
An international team of researchers have found a new way to speed up quantum computing that could pave the way for huge leaps forward in computer processing power.
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Childhood exposure to parental smoking linked to poorer cognitive function in midlife
A Finnish study coordinated by the Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Turku, Finland, shows that exposure to parental smoking in childhood and adolescence is associated with poorer learning ability and memory in midlife.
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The retention effect of training
Company training increases the loyalty of its employees. Loyalty also increases if the training improves the employees' chances on the labour market.
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Questionable stability of dissipative topological models for classical and quantum systems
In a new paper in EPJ D, Rebekka Koch from Amsterdam and Jan Carl Budich from Dresden analyse the spectral instability of energy-dissipative systems caused by their boundaries: A situation that is naturally given in experimental setups.
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Impact of donor lymphocyte infusion and intensified conditioning for relapsed/refractory leukemia
Leukemia relapse is still a major problem that impedes the success of hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). Understanding the influence of treatment relevant variables in patients with refractory/relapsed acute leukemia (RRAL) is critical in the therapeutic decision making process. The population-based (the largest for haploidentical group) real-world data suggest that RRAL patients who manage to r
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Mouse study shows 'chaperone protein' protects against autoimmune diseases
Like a parent of teenagers at a party, Mother Nature depends on chaperones to keep one of her charges, the immune system, in line so that it doesn't mistakenly attack normal cells, tissues and organs in our bodies.
4h
Speeding-up quantum computing using giant atomic ions
Trapped Rydberg ions can be the next step towards scaling up quantum computers to sizes where they can be practically usable, a new study in Nature shows.
4h
Nanosensor can alert a smartphone when plants are stressed
MIT engineers can closely track how plants respond to stresses such as injury, infection, and light damage using sensors made of carbon nanotubes. These sensors can be embedded in plant leaves, where they report on hydrogen peroxide levels.
4h
A new tool to predict volcanic eruptions
Earth's atmosphere is made up of 78% nitrogen and 21% oxygen, a mixture that is unique in the solar system. But where did the nitrogen come from? Did it escape from Earth's mantle through volcanic activity? To try to answer these questions, CNRS researcher Jabrane Labidi and his colleagues collected samples of gas from several volcanic sites. Their highly precise data could help to predict future
4h
Shedding light on dark traps
A multi-institutional collaboration, co-led by scientists at the University of Cambridge and Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), has identified the source of efficiency-limiting defects in potential materials for next generation solar cells and LEDs.
4h
Prescribing an overdose: A chapter in the opioid epidemic
Research indicates that widespread opioid overprescribing contributed to the opioid epidemic. New research shows that this dangerous trend has apparently been coupled with another: inappropriate use of high-potency opioids.
4h
How common is racial/ethnic discrimination in US surgical residency programs?
Surveys from nearly 7,000 resident surgeons were used to evaluate how common racial/ethnic discrimination is in US general surgery programs and how it's associated with burnout, thoughts of quitting and suicide.
4h
Examining associations between ages of parents, grandparents and autism risk in children
Older age for parents has been associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in children, however little is known about the association between the age of grandparents at the time of the birth of the parent and the risk of ASD in the grandchildren.
4h
T2K results restrict possible values of neutrino CP phase
The T2K Collaboration has published new results showing the strongest constraint yet on the parameter that governs the breaking of the symmetry between matter and antimatter in neutrino oscillations. Using beams of muon neutrinos and muon antineutrinos, T2K has studied how these particles and antiparticles transition into electron neutrinos and electron antineutrinos, respectively.
4h
Nature publishes review article heralding multispecific drugs as the next wave of drug discovery
In the article 'Multispecific drugs herald a new era of biopharmaceutical innovation' published today in Nature, Raymond Deshaies, Ph.D., senior vice president of Global Research at Amgen, discusses how the advent of multispecific drugs is leading the next revolution of drug discovery and development. In the review, Deshaies describes the major classes of multispecific drugs and how they work, pro
4h
A gut-to-brain circuit drives sugar preference and may explain sugar cravings
The sensation of sweetness starts on the tongue, but sugar molecules also trip sensors in the gut that directly signal the brain. This could explain why artificial sweeteners fail to satisfy the insatiable craving for sugar.
4h
T2K insight into the origin of the universe
Lancaster physicists working on the T2K major international experiment in Japan are closing in on the mystery of why there is so much matter in the universe, and so little antimatter.The Big Bang should have created equal amounts of matter and antimatter in the early universe. One of the greatest challenges in physics is to determine what happened to the antimatter, or why we see an asymmetry betw
4h
Researchers restore sight in mice by turning skin cells into light-sensing eye cells
Researchers have discovered a technique for directly reprogramming skin cells into light-sensing rod photoreceptors used for vision, sidestepping the need for stem cells. The lab-made rods enabled blind mice to detect light after the cells were transplanted into the animals' eyes.
4h
Shedding light on dark traps
A multi-institutional collaboration, co-led by scientists at the University of Cambridge and Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), has discovered the source of efficiency-limiting defects in perovskites — a class of potential materials for next generation solar cells and flexible LEDs.
4h
How does sugar drive consumption? Scientists discover gut-brain sugar sensor in mice
Artificial sweeteners have never fully succeeded in impersonating sugar. Now, a Columbia study in mice has identified a brain mechanism that may explain why.
4h
Hot qubits break one of the biggest constraints to practical quantum computers
A proof-of-concept published today in Nature promises warmer, cheaper and more robust quantum computing. And it can be manufactured using conventional silicon chip foundries.
4h
Studying pterosaurs and other fossil flyers to better engineer manmade flight
Pterosaurs were the largest animals ever to fly. They soared the skies for 160 million years — much longer than any species of modern bird. Despite their aeronautic excellence, these ancient flyers have largely been overlooked in the pursuit of bioinspired flight technologies. In a review published in Trends in Ecology and Evolution researchers outline why and how the physiology of fossil flyers
4h
Smartphone screens are getting an upgrade—here are the specs to know about
The OnePlus 8 Pro boasts some fancy numbers on its display spec sheet. Yesterday, OnePlus announced its first true flagship phone. At $899 retail, the OnePlus 8 Pro packs just about every fancy piece of hardware you could want into a single Android phone. It boasts the most recent Qualcomm Snapdragon 865 processor, wireless charging, and a new four-camera array including an ultra-wide angle lens.
4h
"Indefensible": Trump Pulls World Health Organization Funding
U.S. President Trump has found his latest scapegoat for the coronavirus pandemic: on Wednesday, he announced that he revoking all funding for the World Health Organization (WHO), a prominent agency of the United Nations that promotes global health. Trump first threatened to defund the WHO last week, but backed down after he was publicly challenged. Now he's followed through, according to The Atla
4h
Quarter of Scottish coronavirus deaths are in care homes
Figures suggest there is likely to be a rapid rise in mortality data for England and Wales
4h
Quantum Computers are Hotter Than Ever — Literally
Two independent research groups have created the first superconducting quantum computers that can operate above 1 K, overcoming a major obstacle. quantum computing pic.jpg Researchers on Menno Veldhorst's team at QuTech, a quantum technology research center founded by Delft University of Technology and the Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research. The group is one of the two that
4h
Matter–antimatter symmetry violated
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01000-9 In a mirror world, antiparticles should behave in the same way as particles. But it emerges that leptons — neutrinos, electrons and their more exotic cousins — might not obey this expected pattern.
4h
Tracking inequalities in education around the globe
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00750-w Tools have been developed to project inequalities in education around the world to 2030. They reveal that overall inequality will decline, but that all world regions will fall short of achieving universal secondary education.
4h
Submicrosecond entangling gate between trapped ions via Rydberg interaction
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2152-9 A quantum system combining the accuracy of trapped ions and the speed of Rydberg atoms is reported; the implemented fast gate is a step towards a scalable quantum computer.
4h
Operation of a silicon quantum processor unit cell above one kelvin
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2171-6 A scalable silicon quantum processor unit cell made of two qubits confined to quantum dots operates at about 1.5 K, achieving 98.6% single-qubit gate fidelities and a 2 μs coherence time.
4h
Mechanisms and therapeutic implications of hypermutation in gliomas
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2209-9 Temozolomide therapy seems to lead to mismatch repair deficiency and hypermutation in gliomas, but not to an increase in response to immunotherapy.
4h
Neutrinos could shed light on why the Universe has so much more matter than antimatter
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01022-3 A major finding in particle physics reminds us of the importance of robust preliminary results — and paves the way for more exciting discoveries.
4h
Bacterial metabolism of bile acids promotes generation of peripheral regulatory T cells
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2193-0 The secondary bile acid 3β-hydroxy-deoxycholic (isodeoxycholic) acid, produced by gut bacteria, promotes the generation of colonic extrathymic regulatory T cells, whose immunosuppressive activities are known to be essential for intestinal health.
4h
The gut–brain axis mediates sugar preference
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2199-7 Experiments in mice show that a population of neurons in the vagal ganglia respond to the presence of glucose in the gut and connect to neurons in the brainstem, revealing the circuit that underlies the neural basis for the behavioural preference for sugar.
4h
Pharmacologic fibroblast reprogramming into photoreceptors restores vision
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2201-4 A set of five small molecules can induce the transformation of fibroblasts into rod photoreceptor-like cells, which can partially restore pupil reflex and visual function when transplanted into a rod degeneration mouse model.
4h
Action of a minimal contractile bactericidal nanomachine
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2186-z The authors report near-atomic resolution structures of the R-type bacteriocin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the pre-contraction and post-contraction states, and these structures provide insight into the mechanism of action of molecular syringes.
4h
Constraint on the matter–antimatter symmetry-violating phase in neutrino oscillations
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2177-0 The T2K experiment constrains CP symmetry in neutrino oscillations, excluding 46% of possible values of the CP violating parameter at a significance of three standard deviations; this is an important milestone to test CP symmetry conservation in leptons and whether the Universe's matter–antimatter imbalance originates from lep
4h
Nitrogen variations in the mantle might have survived since Earth's formation
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01020-5 A method for identifying atmospheric contamination of volcanic-gas samples reveals variations in the isotopic composition of nitrogen in the mantle, and provides a clearer view of the origins of this element in Earth's interior.
4h
Performance-limiting nanoscale trap clusters at grain junctions in halide perovskites
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2184-1 Photoemission electron microscopy images of trap states in halide peroskites, spatially correlated with their structural and compositional factors, may help in managing power losses in optoelectronic applications.
4h
Multispecific drugs herald a new era of biopharmaceutical innovation
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2168-1 The development and future prospects of prospectively designed multispecific drugs, which have the potential to transform the biopharmaceutical industry by enabling the targeting of currently inaccessible components of the proteome, are reviewed.
4h
Universal quantum logic in hot silicon qubits
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2170-7 Lithographically defined qubits are shown to support full two-qubit logic at temperatures above one kelvin by using electron spin states in silicon quantum dots.
4h
Evolutionary trees can't reveal speciation and extinction rates
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01021-4 Evolutionary-tree diagrams, which show the branching relationships between species, are widely used to estimate the rates at which new species arise and existing ones become extinct. New work casts doubt on this approach.
4h
Hydrothermal 15N15N abundances constrain the origins of mantle nitrogen
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2173-4 A rare nitrogen isotopologue is used to detect contamination by air in volcanic gas effusions, and thereby derive the isotopic compositions of mantle endmembers.
4h
The stepwise assembly of the neonatal virome is modulated by breastfeeding
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2192-1 The infant gut is colonized first by temperate bacteriophages induced from pioneer bacteria and later by viruses that replicate in human cells, the populations of which are modulated by breastfeeding.
4h
Measuring and forecasting progress towards the education-related SDG targets
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2198-8 Great progress toward the education-related SDG targets has been made; however, global estimates of within-country distributions of education reveal gender disparities and high levels of total inequality in many parts of the world.
4h
Injured adult neurons regress to an embryonic transcriptional growth state
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2200-5 In mouse models of central nervous system injury, Htt is shown to be a key component of the regulatory program associated with reversion of the neuronal transcriptome to a less-mature state.
4h
Extant timetrees are consistent with a myriad of diversification histories
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2176-1 An infinite number of alternative diversification scenarios—which may have markedly different, but equally plausible, dynamics—can underpin a given time-calibrated phylogeny of extant species, suggesting many previous studies have over-interpreted phylogenetic evidence.
4h
Genetic vulnerability linked to childhood problems
Gene combinations could increase lifelong risk of mental illness.
4h
Exploring the potential of 'hot qubits'
Researchers address a practical constraint to quantum computing.
4h
Simulated Mars, real food waste
Researcher learns about lunch and leftovers on the Red Planet.
4h
Thar she blows – up in space
Astronomers detect most energetic outflow from a distant quasar.
4h
The very social lives of flamingos
It's a complex world of groups and besties.
4h
Neutrino Asymmetry Passes Critical Threshold
Physicists have detected the strongest evidence yet of a behavioral difference between elementary particles called neutrinos and their mirror-image twins, antineutrinos. The asymmetry could be the key to why so much more matter than antimatter arose during the Big Bang — further explaining why anything at all exists today, since matter and antimatter in equal portions would have mutually annihila
4h
Apple iPhone SE (2020): Price, Details, Release Date
The $400 fan favorite gets a modern-day revamp (and a larger screen). It goes on sale Friday.
4h
Closing in on matter-antimatter asymmetry: T2K results restrict possible values of neutrino CP phase
The T2K Collaboration has published new results showing the strongest constraint yet on the parameter that governs the breaking of the symmetry between matter and antimatter in neutrino oscillations. Using beams of muon neutrinos and muon antineutrinos, T2K has studied how these particles and antiparticles transition into electron neutrinos and electron antineutrinos, respectively. The parameter g
4h
Hot qubits break one of the biggest constraints to practical quantum computers
Most quantum computers being developed around the world will only work at fractions of a degree above absolute zero. That requires multi-million-dollar refrigeration and as soon as you plug them into conventional electronic circuits they'll instantly overheat.
4h
Studying pterosaurs and other fossil flyers to better engineer manmade flight
Pterosaurs were the largest animals ever to fly. They soared the skies for 160 million years—much longer than any species of modern bird. Despite their aeronautic excellence, these ancient flyers have largely been overlooked in the pursuit of bioinspired flight technologies. In a review published April 15 in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution researchers outline why and how the physiology
4h
Carbon nanotubes embedded in leaves detect chemical signals that are produced when a plant is damaged
MIT engineers have developed a way to closely track how plants respond to stresses such as injury, infection, and light damage, using sensors made of carbon nanotubes. These sensors can be embedded in plant leaves, where they report on hydrogen peroxide signaling waves.
4h
A new tool to predict volcanic eruptions
Earth's atmosphere is made up of 78% nitrogen and 21% oxygen, a mixture that is unique in the solar system. The oxygen was produced by some of the first living organisms. But where did the nitrogen come from? Did it escape from Earth's mantle through volcanic activity?
4h
Trump's decision to freeze WHO funding has been condemned
The news: President Trump's decision to freeze US funding for the World Health Organization has been met with condemnation by political and scientific leaders around the world. Yesterday Trump announced that US funding to the WHO would be suspended for 60 to 90 days pending a review to assess the organization's "role in severely mismanaging and covering up the spread of the coronavirus." The US i
4h
Future dynamics prediction from short-term time series by anticipated learning machine
Predicting short-term time series has significant practical applications over different disciplines. A dynamics-based data-driven method, Anticipated Learning Machine (ALM) is proposed to achieve precise future-state predictions based on short-term but high-dimensional data. From nonlinear-dynamical systems theory, ALM can transform recent spatial information of high-dimensional variables into fut
4h
Additions to resource industry underwater robots can boost ocean discoveries
Underwater robots are regularly used by the oil and gas industry to inspect and maintain offshore structures. The same machines could be adapted to gather extra scientific information, thus boosting environmental and resource management capabilities, an Australian-led study has revealed.
4h
N-doped porous carbon supported Fe single atom catalysts for highly efficient ORR
Researchers report a precursor-dilution strategy to synthesize Fe SACs through the Schiff-based reaction via co-polycondensation of amino-metalloporphyrin, followed by pyrolysis at high temperature. Their catalyst shows superior ORR performances in the alkaline condition and moderate activity under the acidic condition, excellent methanol tolerance and good long-term stability. All the results ind
4h
Bees point to new evolutionary answers
Evolutionary biology aims to explain how new species arise and evolve to occupy myriad niches — but it is not a singular or simplistic story. Rare bees found in high mountain areas of Fiji provide evidence that they have evolved into many species, despite the fact they can't readily adapt to different habitats. These bees — discovered by a team of Australian researchers — serve as a major warni
4h
How expectations influence learning
During learning, the brain is a prediction engine that continually makes theories about our environment and accurately registers whether an assumption is true or not. A team of neuroscientists from Bochum has shown that expectation during these predictions affects the activity of various brain networks. They report on the results in two articles that were published in March and April 2020 in the j
4h
Skewed neutrino behavior could help explain matter's dominion over antimatter
Antineutrinos do not exactly mirror neutrinos, experiment in Japan suggests
4h
U.S. conservatives who detest climate models add a new target: coronavirus models
Lawmakers and pundits cast doubt on numerical forecasting
4h
The claustrophobia of India's coronavirus lockdown
Nerves are fraying in one of the world's biggest and strictest stay-at-home regimes
4h
A New Era for Alzheimer's
Fresh approaches and hopeful clues in the search for novel therapies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Why the Big Bang Produced Something Rather Than Nothing
How did matter gain the edge over antimatter in the early universe? Maybe, just maybe, neutrinos.
4h
New technique turns skin cells into light-sensing eye cells
Study suggests innovative path to modelling eye disease.
4h
Breathing heavy wildfire smoke may increase risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Heavy wildfire smoke may raise the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. To reduce exposure to wildfire smoke, researchers advise people to stay indoors with doors and windows closed, to use high-efficiency air filters in air conditioning systems, avoid exertion, and consider seeking shelter elsewhere if the home does not have an air conditioner and it is too warm to stay inside.
4h
A New Era for Alzheimer's
Fresh approaches and hopeful clues in the search for novel therapies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
From balcony concerts to cyber drinks — the power of ritual in the corona age
Under lockdown, communities are finding new ways to voice their defiance, anger and support
4h
South Africa flattens its coronavirus curve—and considers how to ease restrictions
Sending tens of thousands of health workers to villages, the country looks beyond lockdown to long-term pandemic fight
4h
What policing during the pandemic can tell us about crime rates and arrests
Social distancing orders in place across the U.S. have added to the long list of low-level offenses that police are charged with enforcing as a routine part of their job.
4h
Wildlife Collapse From Climate Change Is Predicted to Hit Suddenly and Sooner
Scientists found a "cliff edge" instead of the slippery slope they expected.
4h
How to spark your curiosity, scientifically | Nadya Mason
Curious how stuff works? Do a hands-on experiment at home, says physicist Nadya Mason. She shows how you can demystify the world around you by tapping into your scientific curiosity — and performs a few onstage experiments of her own using magnets, dollar bills, dry ice and more.
4h
Iran embarks on biggest IPO as economy struggles
Sale of shares in state-run holding company generates income for government
4h
Telefon- og fiberkabler slår igen datarekorder
PLUS. Japanske forskere sender 172 terabit i sekundet over 2.000 kilometer i optiske fibre, mens gammeldags DSL-teknologi bliver boostet til at sende med 10 terabits i sekundet på kort afstand.
4h
China is tightening its grip on coronavirus research
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01108-y Some scientists welcome government vetting because it could stop poor-quality COVID-19 papers being published – others fear it is an attempt to control information.
4h
From deep water to the surface: the nexus between climate, upwelling and marine ecosystems
It is critical for the foundation of the aquatic food web, for the condition of the environment and the biodiversity of the ocean, for fisheries and many activities at sea. A more realistic representation of the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) variability at interannual to decadal scale is provided by a study lead by scientists at the CMCC Foundation and published on Nature Scientific Re
4h
COVID-19 may impact treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes
Individuals with diabetes are at increased risk for bacterial, parasitic and viral infections. New research published in Endocrine Reviews, a journal of the Endocrine Society, illuminates how intersections of the coronavirus infection (COVID-19) and type 2 diabetes may require new approaches in treatment for hospitalized patients.
4h
Coronavirus: lockdown's effect on air pollution provides rare glimpse of low-carbon future
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused industrial activity to shut down and cancelled flights and other journeys, slashing greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution around the world. If there is something positive to take from this terrible crisis, it could be that it's offered a taste of the air we might breathe in a low-carbon future.
4h
Mahogany tree family dates back to last hurrah of the dinosaurs
You might own something made from mahogany like furniture, paneling or a musical instrument.
4h
COVID-19 drives CFO optimism down to Great Recession levels
The new coronavirus drove CFO business optimism to a low point last seen during the Great Recession during the two weeks ending April 3, according to the Duke University/CFO Global Business Outlook.
4h
Weirdly, blockchain can't help combat coronavirus
We really didn't think we'd have to spell this out, but if we must…
4h
Little scientists: Children prefer storybooks that explain why and how things happen
Children have a never-ending curiosity about the world around them and frequently question how and why it works the way it does. Researchers have previously demonstrated that children are interested in causal information, but had not yet linked this to a real-world activity, such as reading. A new study finds that children prefer causally-rich storybooks, suggesting that such content may be more e
4h
Breeding a hardier, more nutritious wheat
High-fructan wheat provides benefits for growers and consumers.
4h
First Gulf of Mexico-wide survey of oil pollution completed 10 years after Deepwater Horizon
Since the 2010 BP oil spill, marine scientists have sampled more than 2,500 individual fish representing 91 species from 359 locations across the Gulf of Mexico and found evidence of oil exposure in all of them, including some of the most popular types of seafood. The highest levels were detected in yellowfin tuna, golden tilefish and red drum.
4h
Fossil record analysis hints at evolutionary origins of insects' structural colors
Researchers have analyzed preserved scales from wing cases of two fossil weevils from the Late Pleistocene era to better understand the origin of light-scattering nanostructures present in present-day insects. The study suggests the weevils' colors evolved initially for camouflage amongst their leafy background before diversifying for other functions such as to signal potential mates or deter pred
4h
Being right-brained or left-brained comes down to molecular switches
Scientists may have solved one of the most puzzling and persistent mysteries in neuroscience: why some people are 'right-brained' while others are 'left-brained.' The answer lies in how certain genes on each side of the brain are switched 'on' and 'off' through a process called epigenetic regulation. The findings may explain why Parkinson's disease and other neurological disorders frequently affec
4h
Transposable elements play an important role in genetic expression and evolution
A new study shows that transposable elements play an important role in regulating genetic expression with implications to advance the understanding of genetic evolution.
4h
Turned-down temperatures boost crops' penchant for production
Drought and heat put stress on plants and reduce grain yield. For some farmers, irrigation is the answer. Many of us assume the practice boosts crop yields by delivering soil water, but it turns out irrigation's cooling effect on crops is important in its own right.
4h
Temporary urban solutions help us deal with crisis—and can lead to radical shifts in city space
The coronavirus pandemic has resulted in new thinking about how cities are best organised to meet our needs. Part of this has involved short-term changes in the use of urban space.
4h
Scientists fit two co-catalysts on one nanosheet for better water purification
A collaboration of scientists from the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science user facility at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory—Yale University, and Arizona State University has designed and tested a new two-dimensional (2-D) catalyst that can be used to improve water purification using hydrogen peroxide. While water treatment with hy
4h
Zoo Says Coronavirus May Force It to Feed Animals to Each Other
Feeding Frenzy Zoos may have to resort to grim measures to keep afloat open during the coronavirus pandemic — including slaughtering and even feeding animals to each other. "We've listed the animals we'll have to slaughter first," Neumünster Zoo's Verena Kaspari toldGerman newspaper Die Welt , as translated by the BBC . "At the worst, we would have to feed some of the animals to others." "If it c
4h
Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way help test dark matter theory
A research team led by physicists at the University of California, Riverside, reports tiny satellite galaxies of the Milky Way can be used to test fundamental properties of "dark matter"—nonluminous material thought to constitute 85% of matter in the universe.
5h
Novel tin 'bubbles' spur advances in the development of integrated chips
The use of extreme ultraviolet light sources in making advanced integrated chips has been considered, but their development has been hindered owing to a paucity of efficient laser targets. Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) recently developed an extremely low-density tin 'bubble,' which makes the generation of extreme ultraviolet reliable and low cost. This novel technology p
5h
Unusually clear skies drove record loss of Greenland ice in 2019
Last year was one of the worst years on record for the Greenland ice sheet, which shrunk by hundreds of billions of tons. According to a study published today in The Cryosphere, that mind-boggling ice loss wasn't caused by warm temperatures alone; the new study identifies exceptional atmospheric circulation patterns that contributed in a major way to the ice sheet's rapid loss of mass.
5h
Computational origami: A universal method to wrap 3-D curved surfaces with nonstretchable materials
The counterintuitive question on how to wrap a curved spherical surface using conventionally stiff and non-stretchable or brittle materials, forms the basis of this study. To answer the question, Yu-Ki Lee and a research team in the departments of materials engineering and computer science in the Republic of Korea and the U.S. extended a geometrical design method of computational origami to wrap s
5h
Why the solar wind is hotter than expected
When the sun expels plasma, the solar wind cools as it expands through space — but not as much as the laws of physics would predict. Physicists now know the reason.
5h
Big variability in blood pressure readings between anatomical sites
Blood pressure readings taken from neuroscience intensive care unit (NSICU) patients had marked differences between opposite sides of the body and different anatomical sites in each individual.
5h
A more plant-based diet without stomach troubles: getting rid of FODMAPs with enzymes
A plant-based diet is a good choice for both climate and health. However, many plant-based products, especially legumes, contain FODMAP compounds that are poorly digestible and cause unpleasant intestinal symptoms. A study by VTT and Finnish companies succeeded in breaking down FODMAPs with enzymes and producing new, stomach-friendly plant-based food products.
5h
Satellite galaxies of the Milky Way help test dark matter theory
A research team led by physicists at the University of California, Riverside, reports tiny satellite galaxies of the Milky Way can be used to test fundamental properties of 'dark matter' — nonluminous material thought to constitute 85% of matter in the universe.
5h
Soot may only be half the problem when it comes to cookstoves
Researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering spent two weeks in India cooking with local residents. They found that soot wasn't the only worrisome byproduct of traditional cookstoves; organic carbons are causing problems, too.
5h
Why the record Opec cut is no match for coronavirus hit to demand
Traders remain unconvinced by assurances that supply curbs will be twice the stated amount
5h
Great chainsaws for every job, from trims to demolitions
Reliable chainsaws for your yard work. (Abby Savage via Unsplash/) Nothing signals that work is about to get done more than the roar of a chainsaw. Its sound has become synonymous with heavy-duty jobs that require a unique blend of precision and power (unless you're talking about horror movies, in which the sound tends to imply something else). If you have need of a non-nonsense power tool, then
5h
Pandemic robs field scientists of 'once-in-a-lifetime' moments
Long-running chimp studies, oceanographic cruises interrupted as researchers avoid travel
5h
Additions to resource industry underwater robots can boost ocean discoveries
Underwater robots are regularly used by the oil and gas industry to inspect and maintain offshore structures. The same machines could be adapted to gather extra scientific information, thus boosting environmental and resource management capabilities, an Australian-led study has revealed.
5h
Additions to resource industry underwater robots can boost ocean discoveries
Underwater robots are regularly used by the oil and gas industry to inspect and maintain offshore structures. The same machines could be adapted to gather extra scientific information, thus boosting environmental and resource management capabilities, an Australian-led study has revealed.
5h
Nyt studie: 'Social distance' kan være nødvendigt i USA indtil 2022
Coronavirus vil sandsynligvis komme igen og igen med mellemrum, der afhænger af varigheden af immuniteten og sæsonbaserede ændringer i smittespredningen.
5h
OsFIT and OsIRO2 interact to regulate iron homeostasis in rice
Iron (Fe) is necessary for plant growth and development because it is involved in many physiological and biochemical reactions. Fe deficiency can cause serious agricultural problems. It is well known that Fer‐like Fe deficiency‐induced transcription factor (FIT) is a key regulator of Fe uptake in Arabidopsis.
5h
Using DNA-like punch cards to store data
A team of researchers at the University of Illinois and the University of Texas has developed a new way to use DNA as a data storage medium—by using them like punch cards. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes their approach and how well it worked when tested.
5h
Is the Reason Coronavirus Seriously Sickens Some and Spares Others in Our Genes?
In the early 1980s, a deadly epidemic was gaining momentum. Caused by a virus dubbed HIV, AIDs has infected and killed millions of people around the world. But not everyone who was exposed to HIV got sick. In the mid-90s, researchers found that a variation of a gene called CCR5 made some people resistant to the virus. When it comes to how viral infections interact with our bodies, genes matter. N
5h
Antibody Detection for Cancer Research
Download this eBook to understand why immune-tumor interactions is key to solving cancer's mysteries!
5h
How Bad is Light Pollution in Your Community? Find Out by Helping the 'Globe at Night' Project
International Dark-Sky Week runs from April 19 to 26, 2020. You can get involved by joining the Globe at Night project, which asks citizen scientists to measure the darkness of the sky near them.
5h
France Bets on Yaks
Originally published in June 1854 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Substances trapped in nanobubbles exhibit unusual properties
Skoltech scientists modeled the behavior of nanobubbles appearing in van der Waals heterostructures and the behavior of substances trapped inside the bubbles. In the future, the new model will help obtain equations of state for substances in nano-volumes, opening up new opportunities for the extraction of hydrocarbons from rock with large amounts of micro- and nanopores.
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Novel tin 'bubbles' spur advances in the development of integrated chips
The use of extreme ultraviolet light sources in making advanced integrated chips has been considered, but their development has been hindered owing to a paucity of efficient laser targets. Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) recently developed an extremely low-density tin 'bubble,' which makes the generation of extreme ultraviolet reliable and low cost. This novel technology p
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The Wolfram Physics Project hopes to find fundamental theory of physics
Physicist and entrepreneur Stephen Wolfram has unveiled "The Wolfram Physics Project," which he subtitles "A Project to Find the Fundamental Theory of Physics." The aim of the project is to enlist the assistance of people around the globe to find the fundamental theory of physics—the theory that ties together all of physics, from the general theory of relativity to quantum mechanics. Wolfram has a
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Untwisting plastics for charging Internet-of-Things devices
Untwisting chains of atoms within a plastic polymer improves its ability to conduct electricity, according to a report by researchers, led by Nagoya University applied physicist Hisaaki Tanaka, in the journal Science Advances. The insight could help accelerate the development of wearable power sources for a vast number of Internet-of-things devices.
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How NASA is helping the world breathe more easily
Look around. Can you see the air? No?
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Prophetic Images of an Empty World From Before the Pandemic
Mat Hennek has been shooting street scenes devoid of people for years. Then reality caught up.
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Active older veterans fall more, but don't get as hurt
Active older veterans fall more often than more sedentary peers who never served in the armed forces, but are less likely to injure themselves when they do, new research shows. The study compared risks of noninjury falls and fall-related injuries in veterans and nonveteran populations, including whether risks differed according to physical activity and age. Historically, veterans are more physica
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France Bets on Yaks
Originally published in June 1854 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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OsFIT and OsIRO2 interact to regulate iron homeostasis in rice
Iron (Fe) is necessary for plant growth and development because it is involved in many physiological and biochemical reactions. Fe deficiency can cause serious agricultural problems. It is well known that Fer‐like Fe deficiency‐induced transcription factor (FIT) is a key regulator of Fe uptake in Arabidopsis.
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Using DNA-like punch cards to store data
A team of researchers at the University of Illinois and the University of Texas has developed a new way to use DNA as a data storage medium—by using them like punch cards. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes their approach and how well it worked when tested.
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To Silence Wind Turbines and Airplanes, Engineers Are Studying Owl Wings
No one knows exactly how the nocturnal hunters manage their whisper-soft flight, yet it's inspiring the design of quieter airplanes, fans and wind turbines
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Light from stretchable sheets of atoms for quantum technologies
A team of Australian scientists from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) and the Australian National University (ANU) believe they have developed a way to address a decades-long challenge in the field of quantum materials—the spectral tuning of proposed quantum light sources.
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Kombucha: What it is, where it came from
As we reach peak kombucha, curious minds are asking exactly what it is, where it came from and is it really a cure for all that ails you?
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Thanks to COVID-19, nothing's moving—and seismologists can tell
As COVID-19 continues to wreak its viral havoc on the human population of Earth, governments around the world have closed their schools, shut down non-essential businesses, and told their citizens to stay at home as much as possible. In other words, there's a lot less human activity on our planet, and it's led to a detectable drop in seismic activity.
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Abuse and abandonment: Why pets are at risk during this pandemic
In a few short months the COVID-19 pandemic has precipitated a series of dramatic social, political and environmental changes. Yet the focus remains resolutely on humans, leaving animals largely out of the picture.
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US food supply: labour lockdown
Workers who keep America fed live and work in close quarters, making them vulnerable to coronavirus
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Kombucha: What it is, where it came from
As we reach peak kombucha, curious minds are asking exactly what it is, where it came from and is it really a cure for all that ails you?
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Abuse and abandonment: Why pets are at risk during this pandemic
In a few short months the COVID-19 pandemic has precipitated a series of dramatic social, political and environmental changes. Yet the focus remains resolutely on humans, leaving animals largely out of the picture.
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Probiotic intervention in ameliorating the altered CNS functions in neurological disorders
The review aims at giving a comprehensive analysis of the studies performed on animals and humans and discusses the findings in different neurological and psychiatric disorders (Anxiety, Major Depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder, cognitive impairments etc).
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High-res imaging with elastography may accurately detect breast cancer in surgical margins
A high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging technique, when combined with quantitative measurement of tissue elasticity, could accurately detect cancer within the resected margins of surgical specimens taken from patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery.
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Face up to eating disorders, and seek help
A new study has found young people are leaving it 'too late' to seek help for eating disorders, citing fear of losing control over their eating or weight, denial, and failure to perceive the severity of the illness as reasons not to get professional advice. The recent online survey of almost 300 Australian young adults aged 18-25 years found even those with anorexia or bulimia had reasons to delay
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Report lifts lid on Australia's international bug superhighway
A new report has identified an international 'bug superhighway' capable of carrying a large variety of environmentally destructive overseas insects into Australia.
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Report lifts lid on Australia's international bug superhighway
A new report has identified an international 'bug superhighway' capable of carrying a large variety of environmentally destructive overseas insects into Australia.
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A quantum metasurface that can simultaneously control multiple properties of light
Metasurfaces are artificial materials designed at the nanoscale, which can control the scattering of light with exceptionally high precision. Over the past decade or so, these materials have been used to create a variety of technological tools ranging from sensors to lenses and imaging techniques.
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Long spaceflights affect astronaut brain volume
Extended periods in space have long been known to cause vision problems in astronauts. Now a new study suggests that the impact of long-duration space travel is more far-reaching, potentially causing brain volume changes and pituitary gland deformation.
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Coronavirus vaccine: when will we have one?
While the official 12- to 18-month timeframe still stands, experimental Covid-19 inoculations for high-risk groups could be rolled out much earlier Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage When will we have a Covid-19 vaccine? Public-facing scientists such as the UK's chief scientific adviser, Sir Patrick Vallance, and his US counterpart, Anthony Fauci, keep repeating that it
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Coronavirus wreaking havoc in UK's Filipino community, say leaders
More than dozen workers from Philippines have died says community that forms backbone of NHS Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage More than a dozen UK-based healthcare workers from the Philippines have died from coronavirus, according to Filipino leaders who said the virus was wreaking havoc on a community that forms a backbone of the NHS and care sector. At least 23 peop
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Macron vows to stick to Notre-Dame reconstruction timetable
French president makes promise despite restoration efforts being put on hold due to coronavirus
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Climate change: Blue skies pushed Greenland 'into the red'
Cloud-free skies played a key role in one of the worst years for Greenland's ice sheet.
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International study sheds new light on the transformation of the Earth's crust
An international study led by Monash University has revealed a new mechanism that may have changed the state of the Earth's crust some 2.5 billion years ago.
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'Frailty' from age 40 — what to look out for
With all eyes on avoiding major illness this year, health researchers are urging people as young as 40 to build physical and mental health to reduce or even avoid 'frailty' and higher mortality risk. A new study published online in BMC Geriatrics found 'pre-frailty occurs in 45% of people aged 40-49 – which is about the same percentage of people aged 70-75.
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Unusually clear skies drove record loss of Greenland ice in 2019
Last year was one of the worst years on record for the Greenland ice sheet, which shrunk by hundreds of billions of tons. According to a study published today in The Cryosphere, that mind-boggling ice loss wasn't caused by warm temperatures alone; the new study identifies exceptional atmospheric circulation patterns that contributed in a major way to the ice sheet's rapid loss of mass.
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Dansk tehus får patent på ny espressomaskine
PLUS. Han har været opfinder, siden han var otte år gammel, og nu har han fået patent på en helt ny opbygning af den traditionelle espressomaskine.
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Simulering visar 80 000 döda i covid-19 i Sverige
Forskare från Uppsala universitet, Karolinska institutet och Kungliga tekniska högskolan i Stockholm har simulerat hur Corona-smittan sprids i det svenska samhället. Resultatet, som publicerats på en server för ej fackgranskade artiklar, visar att smittan kommer att nå en topp i början av maj. Antalet intensivvårdsplatser kommer att vara 40 gånger större än de som fanns tillgängliga vid utbrottets
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Digital picture frames for displaying photos that make you smile
You know that feeling of going years back into your own Instagram account? Recreate that feeling of nostalgia and joy in your home every day. (Pine Watt via Unsplash/) Try telling anyone born after 1995 that you once had to snap a photo with your camera, deliver the film to a pharmacy or photo store, wait several days, and then—and only then—would you know if the subject had blinked or not, and t
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Wondering If You Have COVID-19? Diarrhea May Be a Symptom
Early research suggests that gastrointestinal distress can be an early warning sign of a coronavirus infection.
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Great Science Books to Read During Quarantine
Looking for a quarantine reading list? This roundup of thought-provoking science books has it all: mystery, history, exploration and innovation.
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Scientists confirm dramatic melting of Greenland ice sheet
Study reveals loss largely due to high pressure zone not taken into account by climate models There was a dramatic melting of Greenland's ice sheet in the summer of 2019, researchers have confirmed, in a study that reveals the loss was largely down to a persistent zone of high pressure over the region. The ice sheet melted at a near record rate in 2019 , and much faster than the average of previo
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Microsoft Surface Laptop 3 (15-Inch, Intel, 2020) Review: Now With More Muscle
The addition of an Intel processor gives the updated mobile machine some much-needed muscle.
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Trump Voters Aren't Staying In As Much As Everybody Else
Republicans say they're less afraid of Covid-19 than Democrats, and new research based on cell phone data shows they're acting like it, too.
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Don't Be Weird About Your Calendar Settings
Does everyone really need to know about that medical exam or your midday drinks? Setting work calendars to private is essential to work-life balance and sanity.
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Major outburst and X-ray pulsations detected from RX J0209.6−7427
An international team of astronomers has identified a major outburst and X-ray pulsation from an X-ray binary system known as RX J0209.6−7427. The detection, detailed in a paper published April 6 on the arXiv pre-print server, could shed more light on the nature of this source.
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Coronavirus is also a threat to democratic constitutions
As states morph into the Incredible Hulk, other constitutional actors must assert their rightful role
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Fava beans could be the new soy
Research suggests fava beans could be a source of plant protein—one that's better for the environment than soy. "Many consumers are crying out for alternatives to soy, a crop that places great strain on the environment," says Iben Lykke Petersen, assistant professor in the University of Copenhagen's food science department, and coauthor of the study in the journal Foods . "This prompted us to fin
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Does inflammation cause delirium after surgery?
Inflammation may cause post-surgical delirium, a study in mice suggests. Alzheimer's disease patients who undergo orthopedic or other surgeries frequently develop post-surgical delirium, often leading to a poor recovery and a higher risk of dying. The cause of this acute disruption in the patient's mental status is largely unknown, but previous studies have suggested a link to some intrinsic resp
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Exotic Creature in Antarctica Has Survived More than 30 Ice Ages
Its perseverance is rewriting the history of life, and of ice, across the continent — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Exotic Creature in Antarctica Has Survived More than 30 Ice Ages
Its perseverance is rewriting the history of life, and of ice, across the continent — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Why Science Needs Art
From teaching curious museumgoers to adding creativity to the scientific process, art thrives at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History
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New mask material can remove virus-size nanoparticles
Scientists around the world are scrambling to adapt their research to find solutions to the many problems raised by the COVID-19 pandemic sweeping the world, not the least being a face mask shortage.
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Researchers find organic carbons are also absorbing light—and likely harming people's health
A telltale signature of a cookstove, commonly used to prepare food or provide heat by burning wood, charcoal, animal dung or crop residue, is the thick, sooty smoke that rises from the flames. Its remnants, black stains left on the walls and clothes and in the lungs of the people—usually women—who tend to the stoves, are a striking reminder of the hazards the stoves pose both to human health and t
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Diet diversity: Hawkfish species coexist on coral reefs thanks to differing food preferences
How can many species of hawkfish coexist in proximity on the same coral reef? The answer may lie in their individual diets.
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Diet diversity: Hawkfish species coexist on coral reefs thanks to differing food preferences
How can many species of hawkfish coexist in proximity on the same coral reef? The answer may lie in their individual diets.
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Trump's Backwards Federalism Could Actually Work
Things unraveled the usual way. Earlier this week, President Donald Trump tweeted that whether to "open up the states" and restart the economy "is the decision of the President," not state governors. He doubled down on his position at an afternoon White House news conference, where he added that, as president, he has "total" authority on the subject. Fact-checkers and legal experts rushed to repu
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Governments face 'massive' rise in public debt, IMF warns
Coronavirus response to push budget deficits above financial crisis levels
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System more sustainably models chemical reactions
A lab-based "intelligent microsystem" employs machine learning for modeling chemical reactions, researchers report. The synthesis of plastic precursors, such as polymers, involves specialized catalysts. The traditional batch-based method of finding and screening the right ones for a given result consumes liters of solvent, generates large quantities of chemical waste, and is an expensive, time-co
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How to tame 'wicked problems' like COVID-19
It is easy to buy into the narrative that COVID-19 is one of the five horsemen of the apocalypse, if you read historian Ian Morris and his analysis of the rise and fall of human social development over the past 15,000 years.
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End of one-child policy in China linked to rise in birth anomalies
Following China's switch to a two-child policy, there has been a slight rise in congenital anomalies, perhaps because parents are older on average at conception
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ECMO physicians offer guidance in the context of resource-scarce COVID-19 treatment
Rapidly escalating numbers of COVID-19 patients suffering from respiratory failure threaten to overwhelm hospital capacity and force healthcare providers into making challenging decisions about the care they provide.
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Lack of COVID-19 preparedness in line with previous findings, economists find
The delayed response of U.S. policymakers to the COVID-19 pandemic comes as no surprise to University of Wyoming Professor Jason Shogren and several of his economist colleagues at other institutions.
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An examination of the trash recovered at Armstrong Lunar Park
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00854-3 On a roll.
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Coronavirus symptoms, research chief quits and Nature's plan to join Plan S
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01023-2 The latest science news, in brief.
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UK minister seeks ways to extend bailout to owner-directors
About 2m businesspeople thought to be ineligible for existing coronavirus support schemes
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Image: Deserted Venetian lagoon
Italy's efforts to limit the spread of the coronavirus disease has led to a decrease of boat traffic in Venice's famous waterways—as captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.
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Climate explained: How white roofs help to reflect the sun's heat
Nilesh Bakshi and Maibritt Pedersen Zari talk about whether the "white-roof" concept really works when it comes to sustainable architecture.
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The Pre-pandemic Universe Was the Fiction
Hannah Whitaker Years ago, I started writing a short story, the premise of which was this: All the clocks in the world stop working, at once. Not time itself, just the convention of time. Life freezes in place. The protagonist, who works in a Midtown Manhattan high-rise, takes the elevator down to the lobby and walks out onto the street to find the world on pause, its social rhythms and commercia
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We'll find a treatment for coronavirus – but drug companies will decide who gets it
Pharmaceutical giants will bury treatments in a thicket of patents, making them unaffordable to the world's poorest Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage How will the Covid-19 pandemic end? According to conventional wisdom, the crisis may ease in a few months, when some of the antiviral medicines on trial succeed. In a few years' time, when a vaccine becomes available, we
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COVID-19 Impact Monitor reveals UK population moves drops by 98%
The Oxford COVID-19 Impact Monitor has already revealed how life in the UK has changed since the Coronavirus outbreak:
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Satellites providing clear picture of greenhouse gases
With increasing levels of greenhouse gases causing our climate to change, it is important to understand exactly where these gases come from and how they disperse in the atmosphere. A new dataset, produced by the European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative, provides a detailed view of carbon dioxide and methane—two of the most important human-made gases driving global warming.
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Image of the Day: Olfactory Capacities
Most small amphibious mammals have a diminished sense of smell, a quality that likely arose because of a tradeoff with thermoregulation capacities that allowed them to conserve heat in aquatic environments.
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Top French philosopher warns of virus exploitation
Prominent French intellectual, Bernard-Henri Levy, argues that the coronavirus epidemic is not an unprecedented health threat but that the way societies are responding is both new and dangerous.
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The Psychology of Vaccine Denial
A new study sheds a bit more light on anti-vaccine attitudes.
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DSAM-formand vil afskaffe videokonsultationer efter corona-epidemi
Der er ingen evidens for, at videokonsultationer i almen praksis er en god ide, og derfor bør de afskaffes efter corona-epidemien, mener formanden for DSAM, Anders Beich. Direktør i PLO, Jonatan Schloss, er uenig og peger på, at flere videokonsultationer er en del af overenskomstforhandlingerne.
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State-backed SME lending picks up pace too late for many
Third of UK small businesses reported so low on cash they cannot survive longer than 2 more weeks
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India to relax some lockdown restrictions
Limited manufacturing and agricultural work to resume after April 20
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Italian debt sinks after 'corona bond' plan falters
'It's every man for himself' as countries rack up debt to fight Covid-19 pandemic
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Journals have retracted or flagged more than 40 papers from China that appear to have used organ transplants from executed prisoners
Journals have retracted 30 papers, and added expressions of concern to 13 more, because the research likely involved organs from executed prisoners in China. The issue surfaced as early as 2016, and two of the retractions occurred in 2017, but all of the other retractions, and all of the expressions of concern, happened after a … Continue reading
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Volunteers create world's fastest supercomputer to combat coronavirus
Participants 'folding proteins' on home PCs, a task that could prove instrumental in tackling disease Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The world's fastest supercomputer has been created from volunteers loaning spare time on their home PCs to fold proteins , a scientific task that could prove instrumental in the fight against the coronavirus. According to Folding@Home,
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Model to better predict how climate change will affect Americans' electricity use in summer
During heat waves, people tend to crank up their home's air conditioning not only because it got hotter outside, but also because it feels too humid.
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Earth's atmosphere far dustier than previously believed
Dust is a key component of Earth's climate system. When it interacts with clouds, oceans and the sun's radiation, it has an overall impact on our planet's living systems, affecting everything from weather and rainfall to global warming.
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US allies line up to condemn Trump's WHO funding freeze
EU foreign policy chief captures chorus of concern after US president stops supporting health body
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China airlines/HNA Group: too big to bail out
Beijing should keep its powder dry for businesses of greater systemic importance
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How the coronavirus took advantage of humanity's essential weakness
I am writing this on April 10, 2020. Twenty-five days have passed since San Francisco became the first US city to impose a stay-at-home order on its residents. It feels like six months. As the covid-19 pandemic has advanced across the planet at dizzying speed, economies and health-care systems have toppled like dominos. At this moment, a tracker run by Johns Hopkins University shows 1,617,204 con
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NASA's Curiosity keeps rolling as team operates rover from home
For people who are able to work remotely during this time of social distancing, video conferences and emails have helped bridge the gap. The same holds true for the team behind NASA's Curiosity Mars rover. They're dealing with the same challenges of so many remote workers—quieting the dog, sharing space with partners and family, remembering to step away from the desk from time to time—but with a t
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Researchers use 21st-century genomics to estimate Samoan population over 3,000 years
Reconstructing how many individuals first settled the many small islands in the Pacific and when they arrived remain important scientific questions, as well as an intriguing ones for understanding human history. Human migrations into the islands of Remote Oceania—from circa 3,000 to 1,200 years ago—mark the last major movement into locations previously uninhabited by humans.
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100th lunar asteroid collision confirmed by second telescope
Since March 2017, ESA's NELIOTA project has been regularly looking out for 'lunar flashes' on the moon, to help us better understand the threat posed by small asteroid impacts. The project detects the flash of light produced when an asteroid collides energetically with the lunar surface, and recently recorded its 100th impact. But this time, it was not the only one watching.
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Method to synthesize high-quality copper oxide crystals for quantum photonics
Copper oxidation generally means tarnished surfaces and corroded electronics. But the compound Cu2O, or cuprous oxide, is a promising material for quantum photonics, optoelectronics and renewable energy technologies. Now, a team of researchers has found a way to synthesize high-quality copper oxide microcrystals.
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Researchers develop nanometer-thick electromagnetic shielding film using MXene
A Korean research team has developed a technology to fabricate an ultrathin material for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. The research team, led by Koo Chong-Min, the head of the Materials Architecturing Research Center at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST, Acting President Yoon Seok-jin), announced that it had developed an ultrathin nanometer-thick film using MXene,
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Economic growth is incompatible with biodiversity conservation
The increase in resource consumption and polluting emissions as a result of economic growth is not compatible with biodiversity conservation. However, most international policies on biodiversity and sustainability advocate economic growth. These are the main conclusions of the study "Biodiversity policy beyond economic growth," published this week in the scientific journal Conservation Letters. Th
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Researchers use 21st-century genomics to estimate Samoan population over 3,000 years
Reconstructing how many individuals first settled the many small islands in the Pacific and when they arrived remain important scientific questions, as well as an intriguing ones for understanding human history. Human migrations into the islands of Remote Oceania—from circa 3,000 to 1,200 years ago—mark the last major movement into locations previously uninhabited by humans.
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Economic growth is incompatible with biodiversity conservation
The increase in resource consumption and polluting emissions as a result of economic growth is not compatible with biodiversity conservation. However, most international policies on biodiversity and sustainability advocate economic growth. These are the main conclusions of the study "Biodiversity policy beyond economic growth," published this week in the scientific journal Conservation Letters. Th
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Simo Vanni – Macaque Vision – HBP Partnering Projects Interview
For more information about the HBP Partnering Project Macaque Vision visit: https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/about/project-structure/partnering-projects/macaque-vision/ From: HumanBrainProject
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Petra Ritter – TVB-Cloud – HBP Partnering Projects Interview
For more information about the HBP Partnering Project TVB-Cloud visit: https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/about/project-structure/partnering-projects/tvb-cloud/ From: HumanBrainProject
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Matej Hoffmann – RobotBodySchema – HBP Partnering Projects Interview
For more information about the HBP Partnering Project RobotBodySchema visit: https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/about/project-structure/partnering-projects/robotbodyschema/ From: HumanBrainProject
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Conrado Bosman – CANON and DOMINO – HBP Partnering Projects Interview
For more information about the HBP Partnering Project CANON visit: https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/about/project-structure/partnering-projects/canon1/ For more information about the HBP Partnering Project DOMINO visit: https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/about/project-structure/partnering-projects/domino/ From: HumanBrainProject
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Satoshi Oota – SoRoN – HBP Partnering Projects Interview
For more information about the HBP Partnering Project SoRoN visit: https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/about/project-structure/partnering-projects/soron/ From: HumanBrainProject
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Vibrating clothes could make you feel like you're wearing clouds
Fabric with tiny vibrating motors elicits sensations associated with clouds, water and rocks on the skin and has been made into a dress that could improve emotions
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Researchers solve puzzle of Compton scattering: New approach for testing theories in quantum mechanics
When the American physicist Arthur Compton discovered that light waves behave like particles in 1922, and could knock electrons out of atoms during an impact experiment, it was a milestone for quantum mechanics. Five years later, Compton received the Nobel Prize for this discovery. Compton used very shortwave light with high energy for his experiment, which enabled him to neglect the binding energ
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How the World's Squarest Fish Gets Around
The yellow boxfish is much more agile than it looks.
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The Quiet Revolution of Animal Crossing
Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET on April 15, 2020. M any years ago , when my son was 5, he got upside down on a long-term loan in Animal Crossing, Nintendo's 2002 video game about running away from home to lead a prosaic life in an adorable animal village. The problem was familiar, although perhaps not to a kindergartner: He had spent his income on the trappings of consumer life—furniture, garments, acc
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What's Your Most Important Memory of Touch?
Only about halfway through the 20th century did American scientists understand that touch was important . Before then, distance was the name of the game. The psychologist John Watson proclaimed that authoritarian parenting sparse on touch was the only way to ensure children would grow into strong, well-adjusted adults. The behavioral scientist B. F. Skinner had his daughter sleep and play in a gl
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How the Coronavirus Could Create a New Working Class
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . L ate last month , a photo circulated of delivery drivers crowding around Carbone, a Michelin-starred Greenwich Village restaurant, waiting to pick up $32 rigatoni and bring it to people who were safely ensconced in their apartment. A police officer, attempting to spread ou
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The Carbon We Can't Afford to Lose
We have protected areas for wildlife; we need to protect ecosystems whose death could release massive amounts of CO2 as well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Praktiserende læge død af COVID-19
En 63-årig praktiserende læge døde tirsdag efter fire ugers sygdom og tre ugers intensiv behandling som følge af COVID-19. Vi har ikke viden om andre læger i klinisk arbejde, der er døde af COVID-19, siger lægeformand.
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Chafing Against Regulation, Silicon Valley Pivots to Pandemic
Big data and genetic science are poised to fuel moon shots in biomedicine. Silicon Valley biotech is itching to move fast.
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5 Best Phone Deals This Week: Pixel 4, Galaxy S20, and More
If you're in the market for a new Android smartphone, you can save some cash with these excellent deals.
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What if Covid-19 Returns Every Year, Like the Common Cold?
A new Harvard study models how long we'd have to keep social distancing if the virus turns out to be seasonal, like its coronavirus cousins. It could be years.
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They were waiting for the Big One. Then coronavirus arrived.
Linda Kozlowski's neighbor wanted to know if she needed anything from Walmart. It wasn't a quick trip into town; the drive from the Oregon coast to Portland took two hours. But because of her age, Kozlowski, a 77-year-old retiree, might be at risk from covid-19. Perhaps there would be hard-to-find goods, like hand sanitizer. She thought for a moment and asked for bread, pasta, and toilet paper. H
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What is serological testing?
The US and other countries are scrambling to test hundreds of thousands of people to see if they are infected by the coronavirus. That test, which employs a technique called PCR, looks directly for the genetic material of the virus in a nasal or throat swab. It can tell people with worrisome symptoms what they need to know: Are they infected right now? But a swab cannot tell you if you've had the
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Pandemics through the decades
June 1956 From "The First Great Epidemic of History": Since the beginning of recorded history the people of this world have been molested by a long series of awesome epidemics, several of which have brought mankind dangerously close to extinction. The worst of them all is generally thought to have been the so-called Black Death, which ravaged the known world during most of the second half of the
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What past disasters can teach us about how to deal with covid-19
Mar Hicks teaches a course at the Illinois Institute of Technology on the history of disasters. What has the role of disasters been in shaping society throughout history? Disasters tend to make structural failures and long-running structural inequalities glaringly obvious. They force them to a crisis point. And ideally these terrible events then force people to reckon with ongoing problems that h
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The lessons we didn't learn from Ebola
What steps did the US government take after the 2014 Ebola outbreak? An emergency spending bill that was passed by Congress in December 2014 included $1 billion that the administration used to address some crucial weaknesses. Many nations around the world didn't have testing capabilities to be able to notice when a novel or really lethal pathogen emerges. Using that money, we partnered with more
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Repurposing drugs might help fight this pandemic
In mid-February, a California woman with chronic health problems tested positive for coronavirus. She hadn't traveled overseas, nor had she come into contact with anyone who had it. When Nevan Krogan caught wind of the case, he was immediately concerned. It was the first known case of community spread in the US. "I realized at that point, this is going to be everywhere. This is everywhere," says
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The scientists and technologists who dropped everything to fight covid-19
It began as a project Ben Vigoda developed to convince his parents. Covid-19 was just beginning to hit the US, and they—like so many other Americans—continued going about their daily lives: they took walks, they went to the grocery store, they hung out with friends. Ben Vigoda says the pandemic has taught him the power of collaboration But Vigoda, the CEO and founder of machine-learning startup G
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How does the coronavirus work?
What is it? A SARS-CoV-2 virion (a single virus particle) is about 80 nanometers in diameter. The pathogen is a member of the coronavirus family, which includes the viruses responsible for SARS and MERS infections. Each virion is a sphere of protein protecting a ball of RNA, the virus's genetic code. It's covered by spiky protrusions, which are in turn enveloped in a layer of fat (the reason soap
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World Bank's pandemic bond failure; ESG shakes virtual AGM agendas; BlackRock's green Fed fight
Your guide to the investment and business revolution you can't afford to ignore
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The Carbon We Can't Afford to Lose
We have protected areas for wildlife; we need to protect ecosystems whose death could release massive amounts of CO2 as well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A better society can emerge from the lockdowns
History shows some crises lead to improved equality and access to food and healthcare
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We scientists said lock down. But UK politicians refused to listen | Helen Ward
For 11 fateful days in March, the government ignored the best coronavirus advice. It must learn from that mistake Helen Ward is professor of public health at Imperial College London Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage In mid-February a colleague mentioned that for the first time in his life he was more concerned than his mother, who had been relatively blase about the ri
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Digital bokcirkel ska ge klimatpepp i Corona-tider
Förbered dig på nästa omställning: läs en bok om klimatet och diskutera den digitalt. Det är konceptet bakom nya bokcirkeln Gröna cirklar. – Vår idé är att sprida positiva berättelser – vi drunknar i apokalypser och dystopier, säger Camilla Brudin Borg vid Göteborgs universitet. På Gröna cirklars webbplats presenteras böcker på klimatområdet som passar bra för en bokcirkel. Alla böcker finns som
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Do We Live in a Lopsided Universe?
A new study of galaxy clusters suggests the cosmos may not be the same in all directions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Do We Live in a Lopsided Universe?
A new study of galaxy clusters suggests the cosmos may not be the same in all directions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Nedbrytning i Arktis styrs av mer än temperatur
Frånvaron av daggmaskar kan förklara varför kväve är en bristvara för växter i Arktis. Nya daggmaskarter skulle därför kunna öka den långsamma nedbrytningen i arktiska jordar – och därmed påverka Arktis mer än klimatet gör. Denna förbisedda mekanism har upptäckts av forskare från bland annat Umeå universitet. Näringen i den arktiska marken omsätts mycket långsamt och bristen på kväve styr hur sna
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Mexican workers risk health to prop up US food supply chain
America urgently needs migrant labourers despite hostility in political discourse
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Unlicensed Haircuts Are Only the Beginning
Fourteen years ago this July, I crowded into a gymnasium in Roanoke along with hundreds of other newly minted J.D.s, waiting to take the exam that would determine whether we would be allowed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Virginia. But in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, it looks certain that this year's crop of law-school graduates will be skipping this rite of passage, at least tempo
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Vindkraftsljud påverkar drömsömnen – och känslan av återhämtning
Vindkraftsljud påverkar människors upplevelse av sömnens återhämtande effekt, och har också en liten men signifikant inverkan på drömsömnen, REM-sömnen, visar en studie vid Göteborgs universitet. En natt i vindkraftsljud gav fördröjd och kortare drömsömn. Kunskaperna om hur sömnen påverkas av vindkraftsljud har varit begränsade, och det har saknats forskning där sömnpåverkan studerats fysiologisk
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Landområder halter langt efter med at købe elbiler
PLUS. Fordelingen af elbiler i Danmark er kraftigt skævvredet geografisk, idet langt de fleste ejes af byboer. På Lolland-Falster vil elbil-bestanden skulle 192-dobles for at nå 2030-målet.
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The Supreme Court Should Never Go Back to Its Pre-coronavirus Ways
Like so many parents who have been sheltering in place with their children, I have been conscripted into the role of homeschool teacher—or, more particularly, I am a teacher's aide, charged with shepherding my elementary-school student through remotely assigned tasks. In this role, I have been reminded that simply arriving at an answer—even the right answer—is not enough. To get full credit, the
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The Devastating Decline of a Brilliant Young Coder
Lee Holloway programmed internet security firm Cloudflare into being. But then he became apathetic, distant, and unpredictable—for a long time, no one could make sense of it.
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RNA-läkemedel ett steg närmare användning vid cancer
RNA-molekyler – med med förmåga att påverka eller stänga av sjukdomsframkallande gener – är heta läkemedelskandidater inom flera området. Problemet har varit att få in molekylerna så långt in i cellerna att de har effekt. Nu har forskare vid Lunds universitet utvecklat en teknik som gör det möjligt att studera leveransen in i cellen – och kan visa en möjlig väg att leverera RNA-läkemedel effektiv
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Latin America's left spot comeback opportunity in coronavirus fallout
The region's 'Pink tide' leaders see chance of a revival as inequality and public health concerns take centre stage
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Grønne investeringer i sundhedsvæsenet skal undtages fra anlægsloftet
De fem regioner er på vej med forslag til investeringer, som kan sættes i gang i år, hvor anlægsloftet er midlertidigt suspenderet. Men flere af de grønne investeringer tager længere tid. Derfor bør investeringer, som kan sætte turbo på den grønne omstilling, helt undtages fra anlægsloftet, skriver Heino Knudsen (S).
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First Gulf-wide survey of oil pollution completed 10 years after Deepwater Horizon
Since the 2010 BP oil spill, marine scientists at the University of South Florida (USF) have sampled more than 2,500 individual fish representing 91 species from 359 locations across the Gulf of Mexico and found evidence of oil exposure in all of them, including some of the most popular types of seafood. The highest levels were detected in yellowfin tuna, golden tilefish and red drum.
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Breathing heavy wildfire smoke may increase risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Heavy wildfire smoke may raise the risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.To reduce exposure to wildfire smoke, researchers advise people to stay indoors with doors and windows closed, to use high-efficiency air filters in air conditioning systems, avoid exertion, and consider seeking shelter elsewhere if the home does not have an air conditioner and it is too warm to stay inside.
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A delay in sampling information from temporally autocorrelated visual stimuli
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15675-1 When a cue is provided, people can rapidly attend to a changing scene and remember how it looked right after the cue appeared, but if the scene changes gradually, there is a delay in what we remember. Here the authors model these effects as prolonged attentional engagement.
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Allosteric regulation accompanied by oligomeric state changes of Trypanosoma brucei GMP reductase through cystathionine-β-synthase domain
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15611-3 Trypanosoma brucei guanosine 5′-monophosphate reductase (TbGMPR) catalyses the conversion of GMP to inosine 5′-monophosphate and contains a cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) domain. Here the authors combine X-ray crystallography and kinetic measurements and present the GMP-, GTP-bound and nucleotide-free TbGMPR st
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Atomic imaging of mechanically induced topological transition of ferroelectric vortices
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15616-y Controlling topological polar vortices promises to open up new applications for ferroelectric materials. Here, the authors proposed a method to mechanically manipulate polar vortices and monitored the transition between vortex and ferroelectric phase by in-situ scanning transmission electron microscopy.
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Hydrogen migration at restructuring palladium–silver oxide boundaries dramatically enhances reduction rate of silver oxide
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15536-x Species migration across interfacial boundaries can affect the function of bimetallic catalysts. Here the authors report that palladium oxide drives the reduction of silver oxide by facilitating molecular hydrogen dissociation and migration of hydrogen atoms across the Pd–Ag interface with concurrent surface re
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A rationally enhanced red fluorescent protein expands the utility of FRET biosensors
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15687-x TagRFP is a bright red fluorescent protein, but undergoes photoconversion to a dark state, making it undesirable for conventional fluorescence microscopy. Here, the authors introduce stabilising mutations to create super-TagRFP (stagRFP) and demonstrate its application as both a FRET acceptor and FRET donor.
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The optical conductivity of few-layer black phosphorus by infrared spectroscopy
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15699-7 For many two-dimensional semiconductors, such as MoS2, the exciton absorption increases with thickness. Here, the authors show that, in black phosphorus, less material absorbs more light due to exciton resonances.
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XPO5 promotes primary miRNA processing independently of RanGTP
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15598-x XPO5 mediates nuclear export of miRNA hairpin precursors (pre-miRNAs) through a RanGTP-dependent binding. Here the authors employ HITS-CLIP and biochemical analysis and show that XPO5 binds and promotes nuclear processing of clustered pri-miRNAs, with extensive double-stranded regions, independently of RanGTP.
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Quantitative prediction of grain boundary thermal conductivities from local atomic environments
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15619-9 Connecting grain boundary structures to macroscopic thermal behaviour is an important step in materials analysis and design. Here the authors develop a physical model combined with a machine-learning approach to accurately predict thermal conductivities of various types of MgO grain boundaries.
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HNA bond suspended as coronavirus rattles Chinese conglomerate
Indebted group apologises to investors after delaying payment of separate issuance
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Increased risk of Alzheimer's disease in patients with psoriasis: a nationwide population-based cohort study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63550-2
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Preserving Airway Smooth Muscle Contraction in Precision-Cut Lung Slices
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63225-y
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A First Comprehensive Baseline of Hydrocarbon Pollution in Gulf of Mexico Fishes
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-62944-6
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Gut metagenomic and short chain fatty acids signature in hypertension: a cross-sectional study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63475-w
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Telomere Maintenance Genes are associated with Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility in Northwest Indian Population Group
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63510-w
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Application of Ground-Based LiDAR for Analysing Oil Palm Canopy Properties on the Occurrence of Basal Stem Rot (BSR) Disease
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-62275-6
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Shut down of the South American summer monsoon during the penultimate glacial
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-62888-x
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False Prophet
O n February 28 , Donald Trump stood before a crowd of supporters in South Carolina and told them to pay no attention to the growing warnings of a coronavirus outbreak in America. The press was "in hysteria mode," the president said . The Democrats were playing politics. This new virus was nothing compared with the seasonal flu—and anyone who said otherwise was just trying to hurt him. "This is t
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How does intellectual humility unlock greater knowledge?
Classical liberalist thinking is based on the fundamental notion that we're all equal as citizens within our governmental order. This thought lends itself to the specific principle of intellectual humility. Senior Program Officer at the Institute for Humane Studies, Bradley Jackson provides the definition of intellectual humility as recognition that we have imperfect knowledge of the world. If ea
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A Visual Trek Through the Sweltering Jungle: In Search of Colombia's 'Lost City'
Ciudad Perdida, an ancient city that predates Machu Picchu by several hundred years, has become one of South America's most rewarding adventure destinations.
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Coronavirus Live Updates: Retail Sales Show Steepest Drop on Record
Grocery stores and pharmacies may have seen surging demand, but many businesses closed and consumers cut their spending. President Trump's decision to halt W.H.O. funding was condemned.
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Treating Coronavirus in a Central Park 'Hot Zone'
They've set up field hospitals in wartime, after natural disasters and during disease outbreaks overseas. But this is a first.
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First Gulf-wide survey of oil pollution completed 10 years after Deepwater Horizon
Since the 2010 BP oil spill, marine scientists at the University of South Florida (USF) have sampled more than 2,500 individual fish representing 91 species from 359 locations across the Gulf of Mexico and found evidence of oil exposure in all of them, including some of the most popular types of seafood. The highest levels were detected in yellowfin tuna, golden tilefish and red drum.
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Avloppsvatten avslöjar virusets spridning
Bara fyra dagar efter det första bekräftade coronafallet i Nederländerna hittades viruset i avloppsvatten vid storflygplatsen Schiphol. Resultatet, som publicerats men ännu inte fackgranskats, visar att analyser av avloppsvatten kan användas för smittspårning.
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Antibody Tests For Coronavirus Can Miss The Mark
Antibody tests to detect past exposure to the coronavirus will soon be everywhere. But even the best ones can provide wrong answers surprisingly often — and give false assurance. (Image credit: Ray Chavez/MediaNews Group/The Mercury News via Getty Images)
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Åbne data viser aktivitet under corona: »Vi kan sagtens se, om der er store forsamlinger, som ikke bør være der«
Landets kommuner lægger store mængder data på online-portalen Open Data DK. Og ifølge portalens formand kan de data bruges til at monitorere danskerne i kampen mod corona.
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Når permafrosten mister grebet mærker Arktis konsekvenserne
PLUS. Både mennesker, natur og infrastruktur må holde for, når jord, der har været frosset i årtusinder, nærmer sig 0 °C.
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Australia's Lynas warns on rare earths supply chain
Main non-China producer says it may need public funds to weather coronavirus downturn
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PLO-formand: Almen praksis bliver forandret efter coronaudbruddet
Det skal atter til at være hverdag i almen praksis, og patienterne skal så småt begynde fysisk at kunne møde op igen. Men det bliver ikke det samme som før, siger PLO-formand.
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COVID-19-ramt læge: Det er mit ansvar at sætte et godt eksempel
Praktiserende læge Jens Rosbach er smittet med coronavirus. Han er i isolation, hvor han agter at blive, indtil han er symptomfri. Det er hans lægelige ansvar at sætte et godt eksempel, siger han.
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Social distancing until 2022?! Hopefully not.
A new paper by researchers from Harvard's school of public health modeling the spread of covid-19 in the United States says that "prolonged or intermittent social distancing may be necessary into 2022." The emphasis in many news reports about the paper is on the date, which is startling. Most of us are hoping for some relief far sooner than that. But if modeling results during this pandemic have
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US holds off on IMF plan to boost emerging economies
World leaders call for expansion of liquidity measures for virus-hit nations
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Undersøgelse advarede om smittefarlige motionsløbere: »Ikke brugbart« lyder kritikken
Et studie insinuerede, at man skulle holde ekstra stor afstand til motionerende løbere og cyklister. En forsker delte pointer og illustrationer fra studiet, før det var blevet fagligt godkendt.
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Nyt dansk-islandsk havforskningscenter åbner på KU
Et nyt havforskningscenter åbner på Københavns Universitet i tæt samarbejde med de…
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Staying healthy indoors, the past and future of power, and shoe libraries: Books in brief
Nature, Published online: 15 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01025-0 Andrew Robinson reviews five of the week's best science picks.
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10 pioneer-era apple types thought extinct found in US West
A team of retirees that scours the remote ravines and windswept plains of the Pacific Northwest for long-forgotten pioneer orchards has rediscovered 10 apple varieties that were believed to be extinct—the largest number ever unearthed in a single season by the nonprofit Lost Apple Project.
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10 pioneer-era apple types thought extinct found in US West
A team of retirees that scours the remote ravines and windswept plains of the Pacific Northwest for long-forgotten pioneer orchards has rediscovered 10 apple varieties that were believed to be extinct—the largest number ever unearthed in a single season by the nonprofit Lost Apple Project.
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Manuel Leonetti (CZ Biohub): Functional Genomics: Systematic Approaches for Mapping the Cell
https://www.ibiology.org/techniques/functional-genomics What if we could understand the human cell in such detail that we could paint an accurate representation of a cell's molecular organization? In this lecture, Dr. Manuel Leonetti outlines the different genome-wide approaches that scientists are using to build a complete map of the human cellular architecture. Understanding protein networks an
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Transposable elements play an important role in genetic expression and evolution
Until recently, little was known about how transposable elements contribute to gene regulation. These are little pieces of DNA that can replicate themselves and spread out in the genome. Although they make up nearly half of the human genome, these were often ignored and commonly thought of as "useless junk," with a minimal role, if any at all, in the activity of a cell. A new study by Adam Diehl,
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New research helps explain why the solar wind is hotter than expected
When a fire extinguisher is opened, the compressed carbon dioxide forms ice crystals around the nozzle, providing a visual example of the physics principle that gases and plasmas cool as they expand. When our sun expels plasma in the form of solar wind, the wind also cools as it expands through space—but not nearly as much as the laws of physics would predict.
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Soybean Innovation Lab provides knowledge that assists soybean production in Africa
Soybean production in Africa and other developing regions has the potential to alleviate hunger and boost local economies. But the transition from traditional crops such as cowpea or cassava to a major commercial crop such as soybean is fraught with challenges.
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Public policies that target crime reduction around parks can directly benefit communities
Public parks can be valuable assets for communities, but crime in the area can "lock up" that amenity value. Crime directly affects the use that people get from their local parks. If crime is reduced, the environmental value can be unlocked, a new University of Illinois study shows.
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Transposable elements play an important role in genetic expression and evolution
Until recently, little was known about how transposable elements contribute to gene regulation. These are little pieces of DNA that can replicate themselves and spread out in the genome. Although they make up nearly half of the human genome, these were often ignored and commonly thought of as "useless junk," with a minimal role, if any at all, in the activity of a cell. A new study by Adam Diehl,
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Soybean Innovation Lab provides knowledge that assists soybean production in Africa
Soybean production in Africa and other developing regions has the potential to alleviate hunger and boost local economies. But the transition from traditional crops such as cowpea or cassava to a major commercial crop such as soybean is fraught with challenges.
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Chemist developing 3-D simulations of coronavirus spike proteins
Computational chemist Mahmoud Moradi will develop enhanced, 3-D simulations of the molecular dynamics of coronavirus spike glycoproteins to gain better understanding of how the virus binds to human cells.
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Chemist developing 3-D simulations of coronavirus spike proteins
Computational chemist Mahmoud Moradi will develop enhanced, 3-D simulations of the molecular dynamics of coronavirus spike glycoproteins to gain better understanding of how the virus binds to human cells.
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Beijing seeks to boost financial system as coronavirus pummels growth
Central bank cuts key lending rate days before GDP data is expected to reveal sharp decline
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På jakt efter behandling mot covid-19
Immunologen Anna-Lena Spetz leder projektet "Fight-nCoV" vid Stockholms universitet. Målet är bland annat en nässpray som minskar virusnivåerna i slemhinnan. Anna-Lena Spetz är professor i immunologi vid Institutionen för molekylär biovetenskap, Wenner-Grens institut, vid Stockholms universitet. Hon har lång erfarenhet av att arbeta med virus som HIV, svininfluensa, och RS-virus. – Jag har varit
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Toyota, Renault and VW to reopen plants in Europe
Some car factories to resume production after last month's industry-wide shutdown
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Snabbare och säkrare diagnoser med artificiell intelligens
Bristen på patologer men även osäkerheten kring bedömningen av cancertumörer är utgångspunkten för ett forskningsprojekt där man använder artificiell intelligens i bedömningen av vävnadsprov. Tekniken kan leda till snabbare och säkrare diagnoser så att patologerna kan fokusera på det som faktiskt är cancer.
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Orban's world
Hungarian premier imposes raft of emergency measures despite low rates of Covid-19 infection
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'Crime against humanity': Trump condemned for WHO funding freeze
Timing of move during Covid-19 crisis is deplored by UN chief and experts who say it will cost lives Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Leading health experts have labelled Donald Trump's decision to cut funding to the World Health Organization (WHO) as a "crime against humanity" and a "damnable" act that will cost lives. The move also drew a rebuke from the head of the
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Covid-19: how can social isolation affect us? – podcast
As the lockdown in the UK looks set to continue , Ian Sample speaks to Prof Carmine Pariante about the physiological and psychological effects of social isolation Continue reading…
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Breeding a hardier, more nutritious wheat
High-fructan wheat provides benefits for growers and consumers.
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KIST develops nanometer-thick electromagentic shielding film using MXene
A Korean research team has developed a technology to fabricate an ultrathin material for electromagnetic interference(EMI) shielding. The research team, led by Koo Chong-Min, the head of the Materials Architecturing Research Center at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST), announced that it had developed an ultrathin nanometer-thick film, using MXene, a new two-dimensional nanomateri
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Does primary ovarian insufficiency affect your risks for obesity and diabetes?
Are overweight women less fertile? Does primary ovarian insufficiency increase risks for obesity and diabetes? For years the controversy regarding the connection between reproductive health and body mass index has continued. A new study assessed the effect of ovarian reserve on obesity and glucose metabolism and found no correlation. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journ
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Little scientists: Children prefer storybooks that explain why and how things happen
Children have a never-ending curiosity about the world around them and frequently question how and why it works the way it does. Researchers have previously demonstrated that children are interested in causal information, but had not yet linked this to a real-world activity, such as reading. A new study finds that children prefer causally-rich storybooks, suggesting that such content may be more e
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Fallout From Trump's Decision to Cut W.H.O. Funding Over Coronavirus Response: Live Updates
Voters in South Korea had their temperatures checked and were made to sanitize their hands before entering polling places. More than 125,000 people have died worldwide, and confirmed infections are nearing 2 million.
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Covid-19: how can social isolation affect us?
As the lockdown in the UK looks set to continue, Ian Sample speaks to Prof Carmine Pariante about the physiological and psychological effects of social isolation. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
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On the scene at the creation of the petrochemical industry
The petrochemical industry came of age during World War II, ushering in the era of gasoline, polymers, and plastics. But it truly expanded after the war, helped along by pioneering chemical engineers such as Peter H. Spitz '48, SM '49. Spitz's family emigrated to the US from Austria in 1939, when he was 13, after the Nazis annexed that country. He discovered a passion for chemistry and physics at
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Making ultrasound more accessible with AI guidance
"I would love to see a future where looking inside the body becomes as routine as a blood pressure cuff measurement," says Charles Cadieu '04, MEng '05. As president of the medical technology startup Caption Health, he sees that future in reach—with the help of artificial intelligence. Cadieu still remembers the "lightbulb moment" during his postdoctoral research at MIT when he realized that the
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The passive house that's aggressively green
This May, residents chosen from a lottery of 2,600 applicants are scheduled to begin moving into 98 affordable housing units in the new Finch Cambridge building on Concord Avenue near Fresh Pond in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Designed by Boston's Icon Architecture, the building features playful bay and corner windows to let in sunlight and allow cross-­ventilation, a lobby with a vaulted ceiling an
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After 25 years in finance, a filmmaker returns to the arts
Like many college students, Matthew Kallis '82 took a while to find his focus. He recalls the day it happened: "I sat down in the middle of Killian Court staring out at the pillars of Building 10, and sort of had a cinematic moment. I wandered aimlessly through campus and found this weird lab called the Architecture Machine Group." Fascinated, Kallis went on to study architecture, film, and visua
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Double vision
I still remember the smell of the tobacco smoke. Bans on indoor smoking had recently gone into effect, but there had been no provision to fumigate, and a haze lingered throughout Professor Joseph Harris's office. Still, as a student at Dartmouth College, I found myself racing up three flights of creaking wooden stairs to visit him in the Department of Physics and Astronomy nearly every day. From
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A healthy understanding
Back in 2008, Oregon health officials had enough money to let additional people join their state-run Medicaid system. They figured demand would exceed the number of spaces available, so the state ran a drawing: 90,000 people applied, and 10,000 were accepted. The unusual program seemed almost designed for Amy Finkelstein, PhD '01, to study. Finkelstein, the John and Jennie S. MacDonald Professor
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Rolling up his sleeves
The Institute launched the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing (SCC) with three critical objectives: to support the rapid evolution and growth of computer science and AI, to facilitate collaborations between computing and other disciplines, and to address the social and ethical responsibilities of computing. In August 2019, Daniel Huttenlocher, SM '84, PhD '88, became the inaugural dea
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Weathering the Covid-19 crisis
As this issue of MIT News goes to press, MIT has joined the nation, and the world, in facing an unprecedented public health crisis. Our community has a significant role to play in the response to the Covid-19 pandemic, and this extraordinary challenge has called for dramatic action. The scope of that action may be unparalleled in MIT's history. Following the advice of public health experts, we ha
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Historic commencements
MIT has had more than its share of memorable commencements, from the collapse of founder William Barton Rogers during his 1882 speech, to the arrival of 17 beavers who parachuted into Killian Court when NASA's Daniel Goldin spoke in 2001. But all speakers, from heads of state to the legendarily goofy Car Talk brothers Tom Magliozzi '58 and Ray Magliozzi '72, have been united in their respect for
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How the Institute went coed
When Ellen Swallow Richards became the first woman to graduate from MIT in 1873, she was convinced that her aptitude for science was not unusual–that she was not, as people claimed, an "exception." Richards had graduated from Vassar in 1870 and was admitted to MIT to study chemistry in January 1871, when opportunities for women to gain hands-on laboratory experience were limited. The Institute co
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What is the outlook for the UK housing market?
Share your experiences of trying to buy or sell a house under current market conditions
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Coronavirus, Opec and shale: ask FT energy reporters about the oil industry
Derek Brower and Anjli Raval will be answering questions throughout the day
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Will Covid-19 repatriation leave us with a large tax bill?
We are returning to the UK from the US following the virus outbreak
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HMRC suspends some tax investigations due to pandemic
Tax authority switches focus to supporting businesses and individuals via job retention scheme
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Europe's trade unions wary of fallout from coronavirus
Company restructurings and going back to work before it is safe among list of concerns
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Africa's scientists learn from past epidemics to fight Covid-19
Experience with other outbreaks could compensate for poor healthcare infrastructure
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Coronavirus: property in south-east Asia struggles to recover
Homebuyers in Hong Kong, Singapore and China remain hesitant
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The battle at the heart of British science over coronavirus
The UK government has been accused of paying too much attention to epidemiologists over other experts
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How coronavirus exposed Japan's low-tech blind spot
A country celebrated for innovation has been found wanting by the new reality of remote working
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Companies must prioritise the public good
The aim is to emerge with a sterling reputation, staff trust and solid financial base
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Coronavirus: how a leading tech designer turned to making rag masks
Loren Brichter invented the Twitter app for iOS and pull-to-refresh
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Obama Talks Some Science Policy
As he endorsed Joe Biden today, former president Barack Obama touched on some environmental, economic and science matters.
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Stocks slide on data showing economic damage from coronavirus
US and European shares falter after a strong rally
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Fundamentet vakler under Arktis: Permafrosten er vågnet
PLUS. Infrastruktur og landskaber i Arktis påvirkes, når permafrosten tør. Konsekvensen for klimaet er mere kompliceret, for udviklingen øger både udledning og optag af drivhusgasser.
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Obama Talks Some Science Policy
As he endorsed Joe Biden today, former president Barack Obama touched on some environmental, economic and science matters. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ventilator standards set out for UK makers 'of no use' to Covid patients
Ministers' challenge to manufacturers sets basic specifications that are not suitable to task, say experts
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Coffee climbs as locked-down consumers seek caffeine fix
Industry wrestles with uncertainty over inventories, labour and long-term demand
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Software stocks emerge as downturn winners with online shift
Shares in cloud groups prove more resilient than overall market — and some rise to new records
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New Zealand comedian spends lockdown impersonating Jacinda Ardern
Melanie Bracewell decided to experiment after repeated comments about her likeness to the prime minister Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Jacinda Ardern has expressed her admiration for the skills of a New Zealand comedian who has kept herself busy during the national lockdown by impersonating the prime minister on TikTok. Melanie Bracewell has been in self-isolation
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C.D.C. Says More Than 9,000 Health Care Workers Have Contracted Coronavirus
The agency says the number is likely to grow as more information about patients' occupational status is made available.
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From Liberia to Spain: working in disaster zones
Luis Encinas is a nurse and Médecins Sans Frontières coordinator. He has treated patients in Taliban-ruled Afghanistan, in Sierra Leone as Ebola took hold, and now in Spain, battling Covid-19. He and the Guardian's Madrid correspondent, Sam Jones, describe how the virus has transformed Spain Luis Encinas is a Médecins Sans Frontières coordinator who has seen more than a dozen outbreaks of haemorr
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How did coronavirus start and where did it come from? Was it really Wuhan's animal market?
It's likely Covid-19 originated in bats, scientists say. But did it then spread to pangolins and humans? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage In the public mind, the origin story of coronavirus seems well fixed: in late 2019 someone at the now world-famous Huanan seafood market in Wuhan was infected with a virus from an animal. The rest is part of an awful history still i
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What happens to people's lungs when they get coronavirus?
Respiratory physician John Wilson explains the range of Covid-19 impacts, from no symptoms to severe illness featuring pneumonia Coronavirus – latest global updates See all our coronavirus coverage What became known as Covid-19, or the coronavirus, started in late 2019 as a cluster of pneumonia cases with an unknown cause. The cause of the pneumonia was found to be a new virus – severe acute resp
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Trump Announces a Halt to US Funding For The World Health Organisation
The President is blaming the WHO for failing to contain the pandemic.
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Evolutionary history of modern Samoans [Genetics]
Archaeological studies estimate the initial settlement of Samoa at 2,750 to 2,880 y ago and identify only limited settlement and human modification to the landscape until about 1,000 to 1,500 y ago. At this point, a complex history of migration is thought to have begun with the arrival of people…
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Bats can learn to copy sounds and it may teach us about human speech
Pale spear-nosed bats can learn to alter their calls to mimic different sounds – a rare skill that could help us understand the biology of human speech and language
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The Atlantic Daily: 'The Enemy Isn't Going Anywhere'
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Joan Wong When will things go back to normal? Ed Yong, our science reporter who wrote " How the Pandemic Will End ," is back, taking a closer look at that question. Here are just three takeaways
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Special UV lights could kill coronavirus on surfaces
Researchers are developing ultraviolet LED lights that can decontaminate surfaces—and potentially air and water—that have come in contact with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. As COVID-19 continues to ravage global populations, the world is singularly focused on finding ways to battle the novel coronavirus. "One major application is in medical situations—the disinfection of personal protective equipment, su
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Parts supplier warns of rough road ahead for China's car market
Lack of demand from buyers is a bigger challenge than factory disruptions, says Japan's Yorozu
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Coronavirus live news: Trump suspends WHO funding as global deaths pass 125,000
US to investigate World Health Organization's response to crisis; cases worldwide pass 1.97m; France summons Chinese envoy. Follow the latest updates Trump halts WHO funding over coronavirus 'failure' Australia coronavirus – live Coronavirus latest: at a glance See all our coronavirus coverage 2.00am BST UN Secretary General António Guterres has just released a statement on the World Health Organ
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Minimum epistasis interpolation for sequence-function relationships
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15512-5 High-throughput combinatorial mutagenesis assays are useful to screen the function of many different sequences but they are not exhaustive. Here, Zhou and McCandlish develop a method to impute such missing genotype-phenotype data based on inferring the least epistatic sequence-function relationship.
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Drought alters the biogeochemistry of boreal stream networks
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15496-2 High latitude droughts are increasing, but their effects on freshwater systems are poorly understood. Here the authors investigate Sweden's most severe drought in the last century and show that these dry conditions induce hypoxia and elevated methane production from streams.
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Natural killer cells modulate motor neuron-immune cell cross talk in models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15644-8 Neuroimmune interactions are important in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here the authors characterize the role of NK cells in mouse models of ALS, and in patient tissue.
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A superelastochromic crystal
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15663-5 Color changes by external stimuli, so-called chromism, have been intensively studied to develop smart materials due to the stimulus-responsiveness of chromic materials. Here the authors demonstrate luminescent chromism during a mechanically controllable phase transition in a luminescent organosuperelastic cryst
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S Korea charters flights to factories to reboot supply chains
Operation takes off after attempts to build multilateral support for travel waivers fails
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Anthony Fauci, Lightning Rod
Anthony Fauci considers himself a no-nonsense fact-finder, a servant of science rather than politics or ideology. "No matter what happens to me, I'm going to keep" telling the truth, Fauci told us recently. He's so allergic to telling the president what he wants to hear (as opposed to what he needs to know) that he has cited , as a "dictum to live by," the advice he once received from a Nixon-adm
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Fossil record analysis hints at evolutionary origins of insects' structural colors
Researchers from Yale-NUS College in Singapore and University College Cork have analyzed preserved scales from wing cases of two fossil weevils from the Late Pleistocene era to better understand the origin of light-scattering nanostructures present in present-day insects. The study suggests the weevils' colors evolved initially for camouflage amongst their leafy background before diversifying for
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Care home staff and residents promised coronavirus tests
UK government responds to criticism that sector is struggling to cope with outbreak
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Coronavirus shortages prompt Australia to bring manufacturing home
Critics say the country's economy is vulnerable because of its reliance on China
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Trump halts World Health Organization funding over coronavirus 'failure'
US president accuses group of promoting disinformation and says it 'must be held accountable' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Donald Trump was condemned for putting countless lives at risk on Tuesday when he announced the US is freezing payments to the World Health Organization (WHO) over its handling of the coronavirus pandemic. Related: Trump turns against WHO to m
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Fossil record analysis hints at evolutionary origins of insects' structural colours
Researchers from Yale-NUS College in Singapore and University College Cork (UCC) in Ireland have analysed preserved scales from wing cases of two fossil weevils from the Late Pleistocene era (approx. 13,000 years ago) to better understand the origin of light-scattering nanostructures present in present-day insects.
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The Pentagon Hasn't Fixed Basic Cybersecurity Blind Spots
Five years ago, the Department of Defense set dozens of security hygiene goals. A new report finds that it has abandoned or lost track of most of them.
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Trump Stops U.S. Funding of W.H.O.; U.K. Coronavirus Deaths May Be Higher Than Official Toll
Confirmed infections neared 2 million, with more than 120,000 dead, and the I.M.F. predicted the worst global downturn since the Great Depression. New York City passed 10,000 fatalities.
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Ultraviolet LEDs prove effective in eliminating coronavirus from surfaces and, potentially, air and water
Researchers are developing ultraviolet LEDs that have the ability to decontaminate surfaces — and potentially air and water — that have come in contact with the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
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Discovery offers new avenue for next-generation data storage
The demands for data storage and processing have grown exponentially as the world becomes increasingly connected, emphasizing the need for new materials capable of more efficient data storage and data processing. A new compound is capable of maintaining its skyrmion properties at room temperature, offering promise for commercial applications.
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Keratin scaffolds could advance regenerative medicine and tissue engineering for humans
Researchers have developed a simple method for preparing 3D keratin scaffold models which can be used to study the regeneration of tissue.
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The Atlantic Politics Daily: How Democrats Won an Improbable Victory in Wisconsin
It's Monday, April 14. In today's newsletter: The Democrats' improbable victory in the Wisconsin judicial election. Plus: The pandemic isn't Pearl Harbor or 9/11. It isn't a hurricane or a wildfire. * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (MORRY GASH / AP) In Wisconsin, Democrats somehow score a decisive victory. The conditions for last week's election in Wisconsin were stunning. After weeks of Democratic leader
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The six things California must do before restarting its economy
The question at the top of most Americans' minds right now is: When can we go outdoors again? California took one of the first stabs at answering that question on Tuesday, as Governor Gavin Newsom laid out the key criteria that will guide state and local officials as they determine when, or if, to relax the stay-at-home measures necessitated by the covid-19 pandemic. Much of it involves building
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US Treasury reaches deal to prop up airlines
$25bn in aid to pay staff comes in form of grants, loans and warrants
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Six-junction solar cell sets two world records for efficiency
Scientists have fabricated a solar cell with an efficiency of nearly 50%. The six-junction solar cell now holds the world record for the highest solar conversion efficiency at 47.1%, which was measured under concentrated illumination. A variation of the same cell also set the efficiency record under one-sun illumination at 39.2%.
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Discovery offers new avenue for next-generation data storage
The demands for data storage and processing have grown exponentially as the world becomes increasingly connected, emphasizing the need for new materials capable of more efficient data storage and data processing. A new compound is capable of maintaining its skyrmion properties at room temperature, offering promise for commercial applications.
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