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Foster teens feel unready to manage mental health
As they transition out of foster care, many older teens say they feel unprepared to manage their mental health needs, according to a new study. An estimated 25,000 to 28,000 older teens transition out of foster care each year in the United States. The findings provide an updated look at counseling and medication use among teens in foster care , and reports on how prepared 17-year-olds feel to man
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Targeting multiple brain cell types through engineered viral capsids
Viruses are nature's Trojan horses: They gain entrance to cells, smuggle in their genetic material, and use the cell's own machinery to replicate. For decades, scientists have studied how to minimize their deleterious effects and even repurpose these invaders to deliver not their own viral genome, but therapeutics for treating disease and tools for studying cells. To be effective in these new role
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Think you're mom's favorite? A social scientist says think again
Moms won't admit to it. Families rarely talk about this, but research shows that many parents do, in fact, have a favorite and least favorite child. And more often than not, their kids are wrong about who is who.
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Reef sand dissolving quicker than previously thought, study warns
A new international study led by Monash University climate scientists has found reef sand is dissolving much quicker than previously thought due to the impact of microbes.
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Americans spend more on wasted food than on gasoline
A new study by Zach Conrad, assistant professor in William & Mary's Department of Kinesiology & Health Sciences, finds that the average American consumer spends roughly $1,300 per year on food that ends up being wasted.
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New global economic outlook optimistic, but 'wild cards' could send things spiraling
Compared to what many others are predicting, a new presentation from prominent economist Christopher Thornberg delivers a more optimistic assessment of the long-term economic impacts that could result from the worldwide COVID-19 crisis. In the video presentation, released today by the UCR School of Business Center for Economic Forecasting and Development, Thornberg argues that many of the most dir
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Study points toward a more holistic way to measure the economic fallout from earthquakes
When an earthquake or other natural disaster strikes, government relief agencies, insurers and other responders converge to take stock of fatalities and injuries, and to assess the extent and cost of damage to public infrastructure and personal property.
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Matheminecraft: Where math and Minecraft meet
Mathematician David Strütt, a scientific collaborator at EPFL, worked for four months to develop Matheminecraft, a math video game in Minecraft, where the gamer has to find a Eulerian cycle in a graph. Minecraft is a sandbox video game released in 2011, where the gamer can build almost anything, from simple houses to complex calculators, using only cubes and fluids. These countless possibilities a
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Eran Yashiv: how to reopen society more quickly
Use the coronavirus's latency period against itself
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Investors anticipate European economic rebound as lockdown eases
However assessment of current conditions hits worst level since financial crisis
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Earth Day's Gone Digital. Here's Where to Find It.
New York offers many ways to celebrate online. You can hike, play environmental games, conduct experiments, meet scientists and blast into space — all without leaving home.
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Bioinsecticide-minded researchers prospect for purple-pigmented bacterium
The tidal marshes along the lower Potomac and James rivers in Maryland and Virginia support a rich array of aquatic and terrestrial wildlife—from blue crab and bass, to mud turtles, white-tailed deer and waterfowl among other inhabitants.
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Rising CO2 causes more than a climate crisis—it may directly harm our ability to think
As the 21st century progresses, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations will cause urban and indoor levels of the gas to increase, and that may significantly reduce our basic decision-making ability and complex strategic thinking, according to a new CU Boulder-led study. By the end of the century, people could be exposed to indoor CO2 levels up to 1400 parts per million—more than th
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NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover gets balanced
With 13 weeks to go before the launch period of NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover opens, final preparations of the spacecraft continue at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. On April 8, the assembly, test and launch operations team completed a crucial mass properties test of the rover.
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Continued CO2 emissions will impair cognition
New CU Boulder research finds that an anticipated rise in carbon dioxide concentrations in our indoor living and working spaces by the year 2100 could lead to impaired human cognition.
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Bioinsecticide-minded researchers prospect for purple-pigmented bacterium
The tidal marshes along the lower Potomac and James rivers in Maryland and Virginia support a rich array of aquatic and terrestrial wildlife—from blue crab and bass, to mud turtles, white-tailed deer and waterfowl among other inhabitants.
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Live Global Coronavirus Tracker: Italy, Hong Kong and More
A new report warns that the number of people facing acute hunger could double. In southern Italy, the pandemic is choking an already fragile economy.
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New ethane-munching microbes discovered at hot vents
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have discovered a microbe that feeds on ethane at deep-sea hot vents. With a share of up to 15%, ethane is the second-most common component of natural gas. The researchers also succeeded in cultivating this microbe in the laboratory. Notably, the mechanism by which it breaks down ethane is reversible. In the future, these
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Geolocators give new insights into nesting behavior of godwits
To find out more about birds such as the black-tailed godwit, ecologists have been conducting long-term population studies using standardized information on reproductive behaviour—such as dates of egg-laying or hatching and levels of chick survival. New information gathered using geolocators on godwits in the Netherlands shows that traditional observation methods can lead to inaccurate data. The s
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Admiral to refund £110m of premiums as drivers stay at home
Move by UK group will put pressure on other insurers to follow suit
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Coke sales volumes down 25% as bars and stadiums close
Drinks maker has been hit hard by coronavirus lockdown despite initial stockpiling
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New ethane-munching microbes discovered at hot vents
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have discovered a microbe that feeds on ethane at deep-sea hot vents. With a share of up to 15%, ethane is the second-most common component of natural gas. The researchers also succeeded in cultivating this microbe in the laboratory. Notably, the mechanism by which it breaks down ethane is reversible. In the future, these
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Geolocators give new insights into nesting behavior of godwits
To find out more about birds such as the black-tailed godwit, ecologists have been conducting long-term population studies using standardized information on reproductive behaviour—such as dates of egg-laying or hatching and levels of chick survival. New information gathered using geolocators on godwits in the Netherlands shows that traditional observation methods can lead to inaccurate data. The s
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Facebook has released a map of coronavirus symptoms crowdsourced from its users
What's new: Facebook has released a map showing the proportion of people who say they have experienced coronavirus symptoms in each state in the US. The data was gathered from more than one million Facebook users who filled in a survey created by Carnegie Mellon University about whether they were experiencing symptoms like a cough or a fever. The map, which goes down to county level, will be upda
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PSA warns European car industry faces 25% sales slump this year
Owner of Peugeot, Opel and Vauxhall hit by 16% drop in first-quarter revenues
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MIT Cuts Ties With a Chinese AI Firm Amid Human Rights Concerns
Reports accuse iFlytek of selling technology to the government that's used to oppress ethnic Uighurs in China's northwest.
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The Right Way to Talk across Divides
"Conversational receptiveness" can be learned — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Right Way to Talk across Divides
"Conversational receptiveness" can be learned — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Lægestafetten: Lige nu er det hårdt at være selvstændig
Øjenlæge Maria Salling Eghøj valgte for fem år siden at blive privatpraktiserende læge, og hun har ikke kigget sig tilbage siden, selv om coronakrisen gør ondt. Hvis hun ikke skulle være læge, ville hun være revisor.
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New Covid-19 Antibody Study Results Are In. Are They Right?
Two preprints of California serosurveys offer surprising estimates about the infection rate, and have caused a Twitter "peer review" uproar.
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The Strange Interstellar Comet
Is our solar system similar to other solar systems? That's actually a complex question with many layers. We know that there are different types of stars, varying mainly on their mass and age. We have a yellow sun, but a system around a red, orange, or blue sun is likely to be very different. We also know that at different relative locations in the galaxy the composition of the gas clouds out of w
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Bank of Japan flags coronavirus risks to financial stability
Credit costs, securities investment and foreign currency funding biggest threats to banks
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Chinese iPhone factories cut workers as demand dips
Some of the biggest factories supplying Apple are reducing staff and cutting overtime
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NASA Reveals Composition of Alien Comet
Our solar system has most likely had many interstellar visitors over the eons, but we've only managed to spot a few. The first was 'Oumuamua in 2017, but amateur astronomer Gennady Borisov spotted the object now known as 2I/Borisov late last year. Scientists have been able to take a closer look at this object as it nears the sun, even managing to analyze its composition . And it's pretty, well… a
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Why cows and computer chips signal dependence on China is here to stay
There are some striking parallels between dairy and tech in the age of Covid-19
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What's So Hard to Understand About What Trump Has Said?
At his daily pandemic briefing the other day, President Donald Trump announced, " We are continuing our relentless effort to destroy the [corona]virus ." A lot of people manage not to see much continuity in the president's efforts, and wouldn't use a word like relentless to describe his commitment to the struggle. They haven't been listening to him carefully. We pored over dozens of transcripts o
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Psychiatry under the shadow of white supremacy
Nature, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01126-w From the start, racism has shaped the care of people with mental illness in the United States. By Mical Raz.
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Health Care Workers Are Scared, Sad, Exhausted—and Angry
Leaders from hospital administrators to the president have failed them and betrayed their trust — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Coronavirus causing some anti-vaxxers to waver, experts say
While some are doubling down on their rejection of vaccines, the scale of the Covid-19 crisis is eroding resistance in others Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The coronavirus pandemic may be prompting some anti-vaxxers to question their views, experts say, but others are doubling down – and vaccine hesitancy, amplified by some celebrities, could seriously undermine a
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Data fra mobiler bekræfter: Danskerne holder sig ikke længere hjemme
PLUS. Vi bevæger os mere rundt end vi gjorde for blot få uger siden, viser data fra Apple. Både bilister og fodgængere er kommet i gang.
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The Pandemic Can Taint the Memory of Things We Love
Music, binge-watching, sourdough starters—these things are helping people cope. Will coronavirus also ruin them forever?
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How Is the Coronavirus Pandemic Affecting Climate Change?
Sure, emissions have fallen. But a closer look at how the global crisis is influencing the environment reveals some surprising dynamics.
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Fitbit Charge 4 Review: A Simple and Effective Fitness Tracker
The new fitness tracker offers the most value for your money, like better sleep tracking—but what is sleep even anyway?
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Health Care Workers Are Scared, Sad, Exhausted—and Angry
Leaders from hospital administrators to the president have failed them and betrayed their trust — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ny strategi: 42.000 danskere skal dagligt testes for covid-19
PLUS. Imens syge og sundhedsarbejdere fortsat skal testes på hospitalerne, vil raske skulle en tur i de hvide telte, som både vil teste for aktiv virus og antistoffer.
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Close-Up Views of Tumors Reveal a New Cancer Biology
RNA sequencing has shown a previously unknown dimension to the way malignant cells work—which could lead to novel treatments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ultraljud säkert sätt att upptäcka leversjukdom
Undersökning av leverns stelhet används för att upptäcka leversjukdomar. Så kallad ultraljudsbaserad leverelastografi är en effektivare metod än biopsi. En ny avhandling visar att tillförlitligheten blir bättre ju närmare levern man kommer, något som är extra viktigt hos överviktiga patienter. – På ett enkelt sätt går det att öka tillförlitligheten med ultraljud leverelastografi metoden, speciell
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Navigating lockdown causes stepfamilies further stress
While the coronavirus crisis has been clarifying for some, it also poses problems
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A Different Kind of Civil-Service Organization
The U.S. national government is failing in its response to the pandemic. One recent example: A month ago, on March 20, the United States and South Korea had about the same number of coronavirus deaths: nearly 100 in South Korea, versus somewhere over 200 in the U.S. Since South Korea has a much smaller population—about 50 million, versus more than 300 million for the U.S.—its per capita death rat
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Close-Up Views of Tumors Reveal a New Cancer Biology
RNA sequencing has shown a previously unknown dimension to the way malignant cells work—which could lead to novel treatments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Close-Up Views of Tumors Reveal a New Cancer Biology
RNA sequencing has shown a previously unknown dimension to the way malignant cells work—which could lead to novel treatments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Erik Roj Larsen udnævnt til professor i psykiatri
Behandlingen af mani og depression skal styrkes, mener Erik Roj Larsen, ny professor og forskningsleder ved Psykiatrisk Afdeling Esbjerg.
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Earth Day: How a pillar of the green movement was born 50 years ago
Wednesday marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, often spoken of as the birth of the green movement. Denis Hayes helped coordinate the first event, and speaks to New Scientist about its impact
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New ethane-munching microbes discovered at hot vents
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen have discovered a microbe that feeds on ethane at deep-sea hot vents. They also succeeded in cultivating this microbe in the laboratory. What is particularly remarkable is that the mechanism by which it breaks down ethane is reversible. In the future, this could allow to use these microbes to produce ethane as an energy so
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Deep learning takes on tumours
Nature, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01128-8 Artificial-intelligence methods are moving into cancer research.
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Study Raises Questions About False Negatives From Quick COVID-19 Test
New research suggests the Abbott ID NOW test, which produces results in less than 15 minutes, is the most likely among common tests to reassure people they are not infected when they really are. (Image credit: Seth Wenig/AP)
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Deaths in England and Wales 75% higher than usual in early April
Figures highlight crisis in care homes with weekly numbers in the sector doubling in a month
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Daily briefing: Astrophysicists recoil from hints that the universe is lopsided
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01158-2 A map of 850 distant galaxy clusters suggests "astonishing and depressing" news that the Universe might not be uniform. Plus: what we do and don't know about antibody tests for coronavirus, and a space tow truck has rescued a commercial satellite for the first time.
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The Literature of Plagues Gives Us Words to Live By
In dark times, we turn to stories in which history might be turned back. But it's poetry and farce that will lead us through despair.
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Six-Word Sci-Fi: Formulate a Defense Against Digital-Age Autocrats
Each month we publish a six-word story—and it could be written by you.
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Coders Who Survived Human Trafficking Rewrite Their Identities
At a Bay Area nonprofit, former abuse victims learn to code and level up their futures. A photographer and an artist weave together their stories.
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Film Photography Can Never Be Replaced
Old-school image-making liberates us from algorithms—and helps us pursue an unfiltered connection with our own creativity.
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The Supercilious Side Effects of F/X
Ah, blockbuster season—when the Hollywood hills come alive with the chorus of Criterion collectors huffing out their blanket disdain for CG magic.
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Portable Printers Bring Your Smartphone Photos to Life
These devices connect to your phone over Bluetooth and make wallet-sized prints you can hang on the fridge or sanitize and share.
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When Government Fails, Makers Come to the Rescue
Need masks and face shields? You got it. A network of tinkerers comes in handy when lives are on the line and the authorities are asleep at the wheel.
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Fujifilm's Street-Friendly X100V Checks All the Boxes
The latest model in the series features top-tier image quality, responsive controls, and a portable design that oozes retro charm.
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Fusion Energy Gets Ready to Shine—Finally
Three decades and $23.7 billion later, the 25,000-ton International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor is close to becoming something like the sun.
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These 360-Degree Cameras Have Seen It All
These lookers capture everything around you, then give you tools to serve up shareable edits of your videos.
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Stones, Clocks, and What We Should Actually Leave Behind
Tomorrow has no use for our monuments. It needs our data—and warnings.
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'Lucky' MESSENGER data upends long-held idea about Venus' atmosphere
Philosopher Nicholas Rescher once wrote, "Scientific discoveries are often made not on the basis of some well-contrived plan of investigation, but through some stroke of sheer luck."
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'Fiasco' as publisher misses authors' request to hold off publishing their paper on rubber gloves
The authors of a 2019 paper on rubber gloves have retracted their work after the journal to which they'd submitted their manuscript somehow missed their request to put a hold on the article. The paper, "Are rubber gloves marketed as accelerator-free truly free of accelerators?," was published in Dermatitis, a Lippincott Williams & Wilkins title. … Continue reading
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Soldriven ånggenerator gör havsvatten drickbart
Billiga material som cellulosa och den ledande polymeren PEDOT:PSS blir till en högeffektiv ånggenerator för rening och avsaltning av vatten med hjälp av solens strålar. Det är forskare inom organisk elektronik vid Linköpings universitet som utvecklat en ny typ av ånggenerator. År 2040 beräknas vart fjärde barn i världen att leva i områden där det råder stor brist på rent och drickbart vatten. Av
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Lockdown diary of a London Tube station manager: 'Until I'm told otherwise, I will keep working'
In this FT series people share their stories of this extraordinary time
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Brazil-China ties strained by social media war over coronavirus
Officials' barbs come at a precarious time for Latin American country
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Scores of US public companies take small business funds
More than 80 listed groups tapped bailout money before it ran out, FT analysis finds
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Will social distancing sidetrack the climate movement?
Youth climate activists gathered online on a Saturday night in early April to make posters in preparation for the Earth Day march. (Lili Pike/) Late last month, climate activist Shiv Soin was scheduled to sit down with the New York City Police Department to negotiate permits for a protest that would pack downtown streets on April 22—the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. Now, along with most of the r
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It's time to give the pedometer a break and embrace lifting weights
The incredible benefits of strength training are only just becoming apparent. That's good timing, when working out indoors is beneficial to everyone's health
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ANALYSE: Skyen er lukket land ved IoT
PLUS. Leverandører af IoT-platforme lover åbenhed og gennemsigtighed. Men når data skal fra fabriksgulvet op i skyen, låser leverandøren døren.
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Coronavirus: England and Wales care home deaths quadruple in a week
More than 1,000 die in week before Easter, with private homes deaths more than tripling Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Covid-19 fatalities in care homes in England and Wales have more than quadrupled in a week, rising to 1,043, according to the latest official figures . By 10 April, more than 1,000 people were confirmed to to have died in care homes from the virus,
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Will coronavirus topple the Maduro regime in Venezuela?
Donald Trump ratchets up the pressure on the LatAm country during global pandemic
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Aalborg Portland vil ikke genbruge vinger, selvom Tyskland har løsningen
PLUS. Aalborg Portland afviser at genanvende glasfibervinger. Men i Tyskland tager cementvirksomheden Holcim imod 30.000 tons glasfiber årligt.
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Coronavirus in the US: Live Updates
President Trump announced the plan in a late-night tweet with few details, and it is unclear how many people would be affected. The worldwide death toll from the pandemic is far higher than official counts suggest, according to a Times analysis.
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How The Times Covered the First Earth Day, 50 Years Ago
For the first Earth Day, on April 22, 1970, The New York Times went big.
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Coronavirus Is Forcing Medical Research to Speed Up
What does it mean for science — and public health — that scientific journals are now publishing research at warp speed?
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'Closing borders is ridiculous': the epidemiologist behind Sweden's controversial coronavirus strategy
Nature, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01098-x Anders Tegnell talks to Nature about the nation's 'trust-based' approach to tackling the pandemic.
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Pivotal moment for trust in science – don't waste it
Nature, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01145-7
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Climate: why set emissions timeline for 2100?
Nature, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01148-4
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Better lives: social insight isn't enough
Nature, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01146-6
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Insight on thermal stability of magnetite magnetosomes: implications for the fossil record and biotechnology
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63531-5
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Unravelling the consequences of the bacteriophages in human samples
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63432-7
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Tracking respiratory mechanics around natural breathing rates via variable ventilation
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63663-8
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Single-molecule long-read sequencing of the full-length transcriptome of Rhododendron lapponicum L.
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63814-x
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Mediators of the association between low socioeconomic status and poor glycemic control among type 2 diabetics in Bangladesh
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63253-8
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Collagen-producing lung cell atlas identifies multiple subsets with distinct localization and relevance to fibrosis
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15647-5 Collagen production by lung cells is critical to maintain organ architecture but can also drive pathological scarring. Here the authors perform single cell RNA sequencing of collagen-producing lung cells identifying a subset of pathologic fibroblasts characterized by Cthrc1 expression which are concentrated wit
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A Cdc42-mediated supracellular network drives polarized forces and Drosophila egg chamber extension
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15593-2 During development, organs undergo large scale forces driven by the cytoskeleton but the precise molecular regulation of cytoskeletal networks remains unclear. Here, the authors report a Cdc42-dependent supracellular cytoskeletal network integrates local actomyosin contraction at tissue scale and drives global
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A kinome-wide screen identifies a CDKL5-SOX9 regulatory axis in epithelial cell death and kidney injury
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15638-6 Protein kinases have emerged as critical regulators of disease pathogenesis. Here, the authors have utilized kinome-wide screening approaches to reveal a pathogenic role of CDKL5 kinase in acute kidney injury, which is dependent on suppression of a SOX9-associated transcriptional network.
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Genomic release-recapture experiment in the wild reveals within-generation polygenic selection in stickleback fish
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15657-3 Empirical examples documenting the pace of adaptation across the whole genome in wild populations are scarce. Here the authors study wild stickleback populations from lake and stream habitats and show that there is a genome-wide signature of adaptation to stream habitats within just one generation.
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Circadian regulation of mitochondrial uncoupling and lifespan
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15617-x Disruption of different components of molecular circadian clocks has varying effects on health and lifespan of model organisms. Here the authors show that loss of period extends life in drosophila melanogaster.
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Exploiting evolutionary steering to induce collateral drug sensitivity in cancer
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15596-z Evolutionary steering uses therapies to control tumour evolution by exploiting trade-offs. Here, using a barcoding approach applied to large cell populations, the authors explore evolutionary steering in lung cancer cells treated with EGFR inhibitors.
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Mismatched and wobble base pairs govern primary microRNA processing by human Microprocessor
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15674-2 MicroRNA genes are transcribed to long primary transcripts called primary microRNAs, which are cleaved by Microprocessor. Here the authors employ high-throughput sequencing and Microprocessor assay to show that mismatches and wobble base pairs in primary microRNAs affect the accuracy and efficiency of Microproc
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Solvent tuning of photochemistry upon excited-state symmetry breaking
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15681-3 Symmetric multibranched donor-acceptor molecules are promising photoactive materials for diverse applications. Here the authors show that, in octupolar and quadrupolar dyes, excited-state symmetry breaking occurs efficiently in polar solvents only and results in a concentration of the excitation that may trigge
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Climate change: making decisions in the face of deep uncertainty
Nature, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01147-5
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Gavin Newsom's Nation-State
LOS ANGELES—California is ascendant and its governor, Gavin Newsom, knows it. His state is having dramatic success in containing the coronavirus pandemic, and Newsom is so bullish about its status that he talks about California as if it were one of the world's most powerful nations, not merely the largest state. "I hope we're modeling good behavior," Newsom told me the other day, when I caught up
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Why savvy business people build relationship capital
Relationship capital is one of the most overlooked facets of doing good business, says investor and entrepreneur Daymond John. Savvy entrepreneurs know that digging into the relationships that they've nurtured for 5, 10, or 20 years is what pays the best dividends. That doesn't happen passively. You must build your reputation and take great care to be authentic in your interactions, says John. Re
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Snabbare kvantberäkningar med fluffiga joner
Nyckeln till en typ av kvantdatorer kan vara att utnyttja joner som fått extra energi, och som därför blir större och växelverkar mer. Det menar forskarna bakom ett experiment som visar hur kvantoperationer kan göras på en hundradel av tiden jämfört med andra, liknande system.– Det är ett viktigt genombrott, säger Erik Sjöqvist, professor i kvantinformationsteori vid Uppsala universitet, som har l
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The race to save the first draft of coronavirus history from internet oblivion
Eight years ago, Suleika Jaouad was alone in a hospital room, undergoing aggressive treatment for leukemia and awaiting a bone marrow transplant. Just out of college and harboring dreams of becoming a war correspondent, Jaouad was instead confined to her hospital room and felt desperately, stiflingly alone. In the end, journaling helped Jaouad through her medical isolation. Nearly a decade later,
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Poor countries need latitude from creditors
More needs to be done to help developing world fight virus and avoid economic collapse
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Amid a Pandemic, Landlords Violate Federal Eviction Ban
Landlords in at least four states have violated the eviction ban passed by Congress last month, a review of records shows, moving to throw more than a hundred people out of their homes — with no apparent consequence. National real estate trade groups are also lobbying to limit the scope of the ban.
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Poland urges tax haven crackdown to fund EU virus recovery
Finance Minister Tadeusz Kościński tells FT a digital levy and carbon border tax would also raise money without hurting bloc's economy
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Australia to ease lockdown rules on health and education services
MPs raise privacy concerns over contact tracing app at centre of coronavirus exit strategy
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UK hospital chiefs warn against public mask wearing
NHS Providers says it could jeopardise supply for key health workers
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Coronavirus: five months on, what scientists know about Covid-19
Medical researchers have been studying everything we know about Covid-19. What have they learned – and is it enough to halt the pandemic? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Coronaviruses have been causing problems for humanity for a long time. Several versions are known to trigger common colds and more recently two types have set off outbreaks of deadly illnesses: sever
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'Collapsology': Is this the end of civilisation as we know it?
"The world will never be the same again," has been the oft-repeated refrain since the coronavirus brought the global economy to a juddering halt.
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Huawei revenue rises despite coronavirus challenges
Chinese telecoms group reports 1.4% rise in first-quarter sales to $25.7bn
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At times of suffering, the greatest gift is accompaniment by another
The genetics researchers Anne-Marie Laberge and Wylie Burke in 2009 reported the case of a healthy 31-year-old woman, an administrative assistant with three estranged sisters, and a mother who'd died of breast cancer in her 40s. Concerned about her risk, the woman sought testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 inherited mutations, which increase the risk of female breast and ovarian cancers. When the testing
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Lizards develop new 'love language': Animal chemical signals shift after only four generations
Relocated in small groups to experimental islands, lizards rapidly and repeatedly developed new chemical signals for communicating with each other. Free from the risk of predators and intent to attract potential mates, male lizards produce a novel chemical calling card, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis.
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Lizards develop new 'love language': Animal chemical signals shift after only four generations
Relocated in small groups to experimental islands, lizards rapidly and repeatedly developed new chemical signals for communicating with each other. Free from the risk of predators and intent to attract potential mates, male lizards produce a novel chemical calling card, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis.
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Coronavirus UK: how many confirmed cases are there in my area?
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported near you Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report symptoms are not being tested, and
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A Bridge for Tamarins
One of the world's most spectacular primates has become a symbol of conservation in Brazil, where an overpass is being built over a major highway to keep the species going.
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Australia's Fire Season Ends, and Researchers Look to the Next One
With its otherworldly conditions, Australia has become a testing ground for fire-prediction technology.
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The Sound of One Shrimp Snapping
How climate change is altering nature's sonic landscape.
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RNA-läkemedel ett steg närmare användning vid cancer
De senaste åren har RNA-molekyler, med förmåga att påverka eller stänga av sjukdomsframkallande gener, blivit heta läkemedelskandidater inom flera områden. Men det har varit en utmaning att få in RNA-molekylerna in i cellerna där de har effekt. Forskare vid Lunds universitet har nu utvecklat en teknik som gör det möjligt att studera leveransen in i cellen. Tekniken är intressant för effektiv lever
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Fixed Dose Combination Drugs: Consensi Is a Bad Example
Consensi combines two drugs for high blood pressure and osteoarthritis. That doesn't make sense, and it costs $12,000 a year more than taking the individual components.
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Indians Aren't Buying China's Narrative
For much of the world, the coming weeks and months ( if not years ) will be dedicated to curbing the spread of the coronavirus. In China, where the outbreak has purportedly been contained, another challenge is pressing: damage control. Beijing has been mounting a diplomatic push to help the world contain the pandemic and, in the process, reposition itself not as the authoritarian power that was s
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Håndholdt gadget opdager madforgiftning dobbelt så hurtigt og 200 gange billigere
Det tager typisk flere døgn eller uger at finde smittekilden til et udbrud af madforgiftning. Men…
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Ingeniører: Ingen grund til at corona-overvåge private områder
Ingeniørerne mener også, at en ekstraordinær dataindsamling er fin nok, hvis den er tidsbegrænset.
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Doubt is essential for science – but for politicians, it's a sign of weakness | Jim Al-Khalili
People are searching for certainty about coronavirus, and that's the opposite of what leads to scientific breakthroughs Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As a regular Twitter user, I choose the people and organisations I follow online carefully. And therein lies my problem. On social media, we are more likely to engage with and trust content that aligns with our views,
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Trump says he will impose immigration ban in bid to tackle coronavirus
US president is accused of 'xenophobic scapegoating' with tweet announcing executive order Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Donald Trump has been accused of "xenophobic scapegoating" after announcing he will order a temporary ban on immigration into the US to combat the coronavirus pandemic. There were no other details on the timing, scope or legal basis of the presid
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Coronavirus Global Tracker: Trump Plans Immigration Ban
Hong Kong announced an extension in its restrictions a day after reporting no new cases. And President Trump said he planned to close the United States to people trying to immigrate.
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Country diary: frustrated toads could do with a helping hand
Buxton, Derbyshire : A two-metre wall is the most obvious obstacle to mating. But at least we can do something about that Much as I love toad breeding season for the way it brings thousands to Lightwood's ponds, it's actually a dangerous time for them. For seven evenings a friend's daily exercise involved patrolling a stretch of river with a bucket to retrieve trapped toads. This year we estimate
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Regulate the skies
US airlines deserve a bailout, but we deserve more transparency on pricing.
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Trump suspends immigration to US for 60 days
President says restrictions will apply to green card applicants aiming for permanent residency
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Lizards develop new 'love language'
Free from the risk of predators and intent to attract potential mates, male lizards relocated to experimental islets in Greece produce a novel chemical calling card, according to new research from biologists in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis.
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TGF-β-driven reduction of CYGB is associated with oxidative DNA damage of HSCs in NASH
This study shows that the molecular regulatory mechanism of TGF-β-induced downregulation of CYGB expression in human HSCs, leading to the loss of cellular tolerance to exogenous oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage in activated HSCs in human NASH with advanced fibrosis. Our findings provide new insights into the relationship between CYGB expression and the pathophysiology of NASH fibrosis in
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Nearly half of US breathing unhealthy air; record-breaking air pollution in nine cities
Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the impact of air pollution on lung health is of heightened concern. A new report from the American Lung Association finds nearly half of the nation's population — 150 million people — lived with and breathed polluted air, placing their health and lives at risk. The 21st annual 'State of the Air' report finds that climate change continues to make air pollution worse,
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Covid-19: is seven days in isolation enough? – podcast
How long should you remain in isolation if you have symptoms of Covid-19? It depends on who you ask. The UK government guidelines recommend seven days from the onset of symptoms, whereas the World Health Organization advises 14. To get to the bottom of this apparent disparity, Nicola Davis discusses viral shedding with Dr Charlotte Houldcroft , and asks what the evidence currently tells us about
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Climate Change Undercuts Air Pollution Improvements
More Americans are breathing unhealthy air, even though overall air pollution has decreased in recent decades. In the tug-of-war between air regulations and climate change, global warming is winning. (Image credit: Eric Risberg/AP)
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Covid-19: is seven days in isolation enough?
How long should you remain in isolation if you have symptoms of Covid-19? It depends on who you ask. The UK government guidelines recommend seven days from the onset of symptoms, whereas the World Health Organization advises 14. To get to the bottom of this apparent disparity, Nicola Davis discusses viral shedding with Dr Charlotte Houldcroft, and asks what the evidence currently tells us about ho
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Data gathering can liberate us from a longer lockdown
The return of a virus spells trouble if a high percentage of the population remains susceptible to it
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Coronavirus: universities face a harsh lesson
The pandemic is forcing a rethink of a business model built on overseas students who might now stay at home
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Mutations map holds the key to bringing coronavirus under control
Scientists create vast genealogical tree that will be crucial to halting pandemic and developing medicines
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I've been asked to take a pay cut, should I agree?
My employer has said that if we don't cut salaries redundancies will be on the cards
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Spain calls for €1.5tn EU recovery fund to 'protect internal market'
Economy minister Nadia Calviño tells the FT that richer countries should not be able to support their economies more generously
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Investing in times of uncertainty
Investors must consider the lessons of past downturns as they look to the future
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Conte prepares for toxic choice on eurozone rescue fund
Pressured by the right, Italy's PM has prevaricated over triggering eurozone rescue fund
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What negative US oil prices mean for the industry
Monday's price crash in West Texas Intermediate crude is a nasty sign of a deeply dislocated market
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Coronavirus puts Big Pharma's IP regime to the test
The race is on to find treatments — but who will own the resulting knowhow?
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Big Pharma calls for 'billions' in upfront coronavirus funding
CEOs also urge nations to co-ordinate competing requests and to avoid repeat of Ebola failure
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FT Health: Combating Coronavirus
As the pandemic puts the spotlight on drug companies, we report on CEOs' calls for government support, and ask how Big Pharma can reconcile IP with the need for collaboration. From April 28: manufacturing challenges and the threat from anti-vaxxers
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London restaurant offers 'war bonds' to ease cash flow strains
High-end outlets across the capital launch voucher schemes to raise funds from customers
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IMF's $1tn lending power is not all it is cracked up to be
The organisation's response to the Covid-19 crisis is hamstrung by its conditions
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Dollar's long-term prospects turn gloomy, say analysts
Interest rate cuts and massive fiscal stimulus are expected to weigh on the greenback
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Virus takes toll on Wolverhampton's vulnerable communities
City's focus shifts from driving economic recovery to protecting struggling residents
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Sub-zero oil prices threaten big losses for ETF investors
Those betting on crude recovery using exchange traded funds face 'high risks'
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Companies delay expensive legal battles during coronavirus
New claims in England and Wales fall by 50 per cent as businesses shore up cash
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US Congress nears deal on extra small business funding
Interim stimulus bill extending $350bn US loan programme could be approved by Wednesday
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Oil prices under pressure after sub-zero plunge
Brent crude drops below $20 per barrel for the first time in 18 years after WTI crash
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I probably won't have to die, ever.
I can be anything and everything I want. This idea has been very motivational for me, because for the first time, I have a reason to believe that I really can make a difference. Many differences, in fact. submitted by /u/POPEJOKER [link] [comments]
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Quantum Steampunk: 19th-Century Science Meets Technology of Today
submitted by /u/Apart_Shock [link] [comments]
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Since COVID-19, which companies have seen boosts in employee productivity as a result of their workers working from home?
I'm looking for specific examples of organizations around the globe, with an emphasis on the U.S. Thank you for your insight! – Ashley submitted by /u/untapsocial [link] [comments]
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Scientists uncover principles of universal self-assembly
submitted by /u/jdb3654 [link] [comments]
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Tiny New "Artificial Jellyfish" Taps Wave Ener
submitted by /u/hon_fan [link] [comments]
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Coronavirus pushes Virgin Australia into administration
Country's second-biggest airline becomes its highest-profile casualty of the global crisis
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KKR-backed Envision Healthcare hires restructuring advisers
Medical staffing group hit by drop in elective surgeries since coronavirus arrived in US
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FT High-Growth Companies Asia-Pacific
Businesses shift their focus from scale to survival as a coronavirus-led downturn takes hold — but the region's underlying growth prospects bode well for the recovery
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Lucrative offers for Asian start-ups stutter amid pandemic
Venture capital investors keen to reap cash from paper gains need patience
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Japanese biotech seeks to turn 'brown gem' into gold
Faecal analysis can unveil a wealth of information about the human body and its illnesses
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Asia-Pacific start-ups brace for coronavirus bruising
Some survivors can look forward to greater market share in their sectors
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FT ranking: Asia-Pacific High-Growth Companies
Coronavirus means many businesses face an uncertain future but the region's fundamentals will aid recovery
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The Atlantic Daily: America Was Already Broken
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . OLIVER MUNDAY Argument of the Day The pandemic didn't break America. It was already broken, George Packer argues, and the virus simply exploited its weaknesses. "Every morning in the endless mont
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Infant temperament predicts personality more than 20 years later
Researchers investigating how temperament shapes adult life-course outcomes have found that behavioral inhibition in infancy predicts a reserved, introverted personality at age 26. For those individuals who show sensitivity to making errors in adolescence, the findings indicated a higher risk for internalizing disorders (such as anxiety and depression) in adulthood. The study provides robust evide
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Exoplanet apparently disappears in latest Hubble observations
What scientists thought was a planet beyond our solar system has 'vanished.' Though this happens to sci-fi worlds, scientists seek a more plausible explanation. One interpretation: instead of a planet, it could be a dust cloud produced by two large bodies colliding.
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Origins of human language pathway in the brain at least 25 million years old
The human language pathway in the brain has been identified by scientists as being at least 25 million years old — 20 million years older than previously thought.
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Google's Head of Quantum Computing Hardware Resigns
John Martinis brought a long record of quantum computing breakthroughs when he joined Google in 2014. He quit after being reassigned to an advisory role.
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Coronavirus live news: Trump downplays oil crash as 'short term'
US oil market collapses into negative prices; global cases near 2.5 million; Tokyo Olympics might not happen in 2021. Follow the latest updates US oil prices dip below zero for first time on record US scuppers G20 coronavirus statement on strengthening WHO Australia coronavirus live Coronavirus latest: at a glance See all our coronavirus coverage 2.10am BST US oil prices turned negative for the f
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Rising Stars in Cancer Research
Download this eBook to read about four prominent researchers who rely on novel techniques to overcome barriers in cancer research.
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Plant disease: UK restricts olive tree imports to halt infection
Imports of lavender and rosemary will also be restricted from today to halt a deadly plant infection.
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Voting by mail doesn't help one party more
Voting by mail doesn't benefit one political party over the other, researchers report. The coronavirus has disrupted state primaries and forced the prospect of major reforms for the 2020 election. Election officials across the nation are mulling expansions or transitions to mail-in voting while Congress is fielding calls for a nationwide vote-by-mail program. Democrats and Republicans alike have
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When Americans go back to work, things won't be the same
When the United States returns to work, things won't be the same as they were, Jonathan Caulkins argues. "I think it's unrealistic to think that we will be able to re-open as we were before. In fact, I don't want us to," says Caulkins , professor of operations research and public policy at Carnegie Mellon University. "But society can, and should, make changes now to ease the transition and help t
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Early GP referrals are leading to cancer patients surviving longer
Early GP referrals are likely to lead to cancer patients surviving longer, a study by King's College London has found.
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Low-cost, easy-to-build ventilator performs similarly to high-quality commercial device
A low-cost, easy-to-build non-invasive ventilator aimed at supporting the breathing of patients with respiratory failure performs similarly to conventional commercial devices, according to new research published in the European Respiratory Journal. The researchers say the prototype ventilator could support treatment of coronavirus and other severe respiratory diseases in low income regions or wher
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Cost-effective canopy protects health workers from COVID infection during ventilation
Researchers have designed a cost-effective, plastic canopy system that can help to protect healthcare workers who are at risk of airborne coronavirus infection while delivering noninvasive ventilation or oxygen via high flow nasal canula (HFNC), according to a research letter published in the European Respiratory Journal. Noninvasive ventilation or HFNC is often used to support breathing following
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How Coronavirus Infected Some, but Not All, in a Restaurant
A limited study by Chinese researchers suggests the role played by air currents in spreading the illness in enclosed spaces.
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Taiwan's early success against coronavirus cushions economy
Avoiding lockdown means island likely to escape catastrophic slump looming elsewhere, say analysts
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Rising carbon dioxide levels will make us stupider
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01134-w If allowed to soar unchecked, greenhouse-gas emissions will interfere with people's ability to think.
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Mind over body: Improving brain-computer interfaces
Researchers are working on understanding how the brain works when learning tasks with the help of brain-computer interface technology. The team is moving the needle forward on brain-computer interface technology intended to help improve the lives of amputee patients who use neural prosthetics.
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Author Correction: Development of a novel anti-hepatitis B virus agent via Sp1
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63866-z
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Author Correction: Evidence of trans-generational developmental modifications induced by simulated heat waves in an arthropod
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63871-2
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Author Correction: TmRelish is required for regulating the antimicrobial responses to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in Tenebrio molitor
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63872-1 Author Correction: Tm Relish is required for regulating the antimicrobial responses to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in Tenebrio molitor
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European vaccination survey shows wide variety of parents' opinions across UK, Italy, France, Spain and Germany
A survey of five European countries shows that parents in Spain are the most pro-vaccination (94%) while those in France (73%) are the least in favour of vaccination. One in 30 sets of parents in the UK and Germany are against all vaccinations, no matter which disease they are for. The survey results are part of a study due to be presented at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infe
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Silent, airborne transmission likely to be a key factor in scarlet fever outbreaks
New research due to be presented at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) shows that the airborne transmission, both through symptomatic patients and those who are shedding the virus with no symptoms, may be key factors in the spread of scarlet fever.
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Large population study links blood infection with certain bacteria to increased risk of colorectal cancer
New research due to be presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) shows a link between blood infections with certain anaerobic bacteria and the risk of developing colorectal cancer. The study is by Dr. Ulrik Stenz Justesen, Odense University Hospital, Denmark, and colleagues.
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This photo confirms that your tongue is basically a microbe party
Our tongues are teeming with bacteria. (STEVEN WILBERT AND GARY BORISY, THE FORSYTH INSTITUTE/) The human tongue is an essential component of our daily lives. After all, we wouldn't be able to eat, taste, talk, sip, swallow, or even spit with the same level of precision as we do now without this organ. Despite this, our mouth's main muscle remains somewhat of a mystery to scientists. Only recentl
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Affordable coffee beans to start your day right
For a tasty cup of joe. (Mike Kenneally via Unsplash/) If you're anything like us, the first thing you do in the morning is make a cup of coffee. We're talking before-you're-fully-conscious brewing. Serious coffee drinkers will tell you that having good coffee is a celebration, a ritual, a lifestyle. Any old cup of coffee won't do—there comes a time in a coffee enthusiast's life when she realizes
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Facebook Gaming Is Here—but Who Is It For?
The social giant's latest standalone app doesn't offer enough for either casual gamers or esports steaming fans.
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FirstFT: Today's top news
Your daily news briefing
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Researchers repurpose classic chemotherapy drug to overcome cancer therapy resistance
Drug resistance is a major obstacle in cancer treatment — leading to relapse for many patients. In a new study, researchers report on a promising new strategy to overcome drug resistance in leukemia, using targeted doses of the widely-used chemotherapy drug doxorubicin.
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Arctic research expedition likely faces extreme conditions in fast-changing Arctic
Scientists have simulated conditions along potential routes for the MOSAiC polar expedition, using today's conditions in the 'new Arctic.' The results suggest that thinner sea ice may carry the ship farther than would be expected compared to historical conditions and the sea ice around the ship may melt earlier than the 12-month goal.
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Early exposure to cannabis boosts young brains' sensitivity to cocaine, rodent study finds
Cannabis use makes young brains more sensitive to the first exposure to cocaine, according to a new study on rodents. By monitoring the brains of both adolescent and adult rats after giving them synthetic psychoactive cannabinoids followed by cocaine, the research team identified key molecular and epigenetic changes that occurred in the brains of adolescents — but not adults.
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Mind over body: Improving brain-computer interfaces
Researchers are working on understanding how the brain works when learning tasks with the help of brain-computer interface technology. The team is moving the needle forward on brain-computer interface technology intended to help improve the lives of amputee patients who use neural prosthetics.
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Faster-degrading plastic could promise cleaner seas
To address plastic pollution plaguing the world's seas and waterways, chemists have developed a new polymer that can degrade by ultraviolet radiation.
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Finding leukemia's weakness using genome-wide CRISPR technology
Researchers have used CRISPR technology to identify key regulators of aggressive chronic myeloid leukemia.
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CUNY SPH Weekly COVID-19 Survey Update Week 6
Nearly half (49%) of New York City residents believe we should wait until after June 1st to reopen all non-essential businesses, while 19% said openings should take place between May 16-31. These findings are part of the sixth weekly city and statewide tracking survey from the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health & Health Policy (CUNY SPH), conducted April 17-19, 2020.
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One-third of primary care physicians do not support the use of medications for treating opioid use disorders
A survey of primary care physicians found that one-third did not perceive medications to treat OUD to be more effective than nonmedication treatment or safe for long-term use, despite conclusive evidence to the contrary. Physicians also reported low interest in treating OUD and low support for policy proposals allowing office-based physicians to prescribe buprenorphine and methadone. These finding
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Et 'coronapas' lyder forjættende – men der er ubelyste svagheder ved antistoftest
PLUS. En positiv test for antistoffer lyder attraktiv, hvis den kan give fripas fra restriktionerne. Men pas på hurtige konklusioner, lyder det fra flere forskere.
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Faster-degrading plastic could promise cleaner seas
To address plastic pollution plaguing the world's seas and waterways, chemists have developed a new polymer that can degrade by ultraviolet radiation.
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The secret life of godwits
To find out more about birds such as the black-tailed godwit, ecologists have been conducting long-term population studies using standardized information on reproductive behavior — such as dates of egg-laying or hatching and levels of chick survival. New information gathered using geolocators on godwits in the Netherlands shows that traditional observation methods can lead to inaccurate data.
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Finding leukemia's weakness using genome-wide CRISPR technology
Researchers have used CRISPR technology to identify key regulators of aggressive chronic myeloid leukemia.
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Stabilizing brain-computer interfaces
New research will drastically improve brain-computer interfaces and their ability to remain stabilized during use, greatly reducing or potentially eliminating the need to recalibrate these devices during or between experiments.
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Unprecedented single-cell studies in virtual embryo
Researchers have created the first complete description of early embryo development, accounting for every single cell in the embryo. This 'virtual embryo' will help to answer how the different cell types in an organism can originate from a single egg cell.
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This is What Air Travel Could Look Like After the Pandemic
Peaky Blinders Italian design company Avio Interiors has dreamed up with two airplane seat design concepts that could keep travelers safe — or at least safer — in a post-pandemic world. The concepts, spotted by The Drive , could be one possible solution to the uncomfortable reality of somebody sneezing or coughing next to you on your next flight — that is, if we'll ever experience air travel agai
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First official ATS practice guidelines for Sarcoidosis cover diagnosis and detection
New guidance is available for physicians who must go through a number of steps to provide a probable diagnosis of sarcoidosis — an inflammatory disease that affects the lungs, lymph glands, and other organs.
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What's old is new again
Drug resistance is a major obstacle in cancer treatment–leading to relapse for many patients. In a new study, published online April 20, 2020, in Nature Cell Biology , researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Children's Mercy Hospital Kansas City, and The University of Kansas Cancer Center report on a promising new strategy to overcome drug resistance in leukemia, using target
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Furloughs and Pay Cuts Announced for U of Arizona Employees
The measures are an attempt to mitigate an "extreme financial crisis" during the COVID-19 pandemic, the university says.
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Advanced memory from advanced materials
Researchers successfully demonstrated a method to switch a novel material between two different nonvolatile states at very high speeds and with great accuracy. The physical constituents of the device in question are significantly robust against external influences such as magnetic fields. These facts together mean a high-speed and high-capacity memory device could be created. Such a device would a
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Turning on the 'off switch' in cancer cells
A team of scientists has identified the binding site where drug compounds could activate a key braking mechanism against the runaway growth of many types of cancer. The discovery marks a critical step toward developing a potential new class of anti-cancer drugs that enhance the activity of a prevalent family of tumor suppressor proteins, the authors say.
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Changes in snowmelt threaten farmers in western US
Farmers in parts of the western United States who rely on snowmelt to help irrigate their crops will be among the hardest hit in the world by climate change, a new study reveals.
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Why relying on new technology won't save the planet
Over-reliance on promises of new technology to solve climate change is enabling delay, say researchers. They argue instead for cultural, social and political transformation to enable widespread deployment of both behavioral and technological responses to climate change.
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US southern states move to reopen economies
Move comes as Facebook says will remove pages for some lockdown protests
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Researchers delay onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in laboratory models
Scientists have delayed the onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in laboratory models, leaving them cautiously optimistic that the result, combined with other clinical advances, points to a potential treatment for ALS in humans. The researchers targeted neurons in the brain's motor cortex with an engineered protein that prevented their degeneration and delayed the onset of symptoms such as
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Segregation and local funding gaps drive disparities in drinking water
As droughts become more frequent and intense, the fragmentation of water service in the U.S. among tens of thousands of community systems, most of which are small and rely on local funding, leaves many households vulnerable to water contamination or loss of service, a new Duke University analysis finds.
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Pandemic-Inspired AI Narcs You Out For Standing Too Close
Red Box AI startup Landing AI has developed a video tool that it says can tell if people in public are following social distancing rules. Social distancing has proven to be a promising method to keep the coronavirus from spreading as we wait for scientists to come up with a vaccine. "Landing AI has developed an AI-enabled social distancing detection tool that can detect if people are keeping a sa
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New York State Is Letting You Get Married on Video Chat
Still Counts For any lovebirds who had to put their romantic plans on hold due to the coronavirus pandemic, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has a solution: get married on video chat instead of waiting. As with other celebrations or holidays, using Zoom or Google Hangouts has become an increasingly common way to hold a wedding among those who didn't want to delay their nuptials, The Verge reports .
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One Satellite Has Successfully Serviced Another for the First Time Ever
Space vehicles, once launched, generally don't get brought into the shop for maintenance. The one exception to this rule has been the Hubble Space Telescope, and even then, we were only able to repair and restore that specific piece of equipment because of the types of failures it suffered. Now, a satellite has successfully brought another satellite back online without human intervention. Long-te
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Coronavirus Updates: The Latest In The United States
NPR political and science correspondents break down the latest in the response to the coronavirus pandemic in the United States.
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Study Links Racial Prejudices And Disease Outbreaks
How might a pandemic affect racial prejudice? A new study finds that living in a region with higher infectious disease rates is linked to greater racial prejudice.
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US researchers collaborate with scientist quarantined in China during COVID-19 outbreak
Despite significant obstacles presented by COVID-19, Regenstrief Institute Affiliated Scientist Jie Zhang, PhD, Regenstrief Institute Research Scientist Kun Huang, PhD, both Indiana University School of Medicine faculty members, and Jun Cheng, PhD of Shenzhen University conducted a study applying machine learning and image analysis to distinguish a rare subtype of kidney cancer (tRCC ) while Dr. C
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Segregation and local funding gaps drive disparities in drinking water
The fragmentation of water service in the US among thousands of community systems, most of which are small and rely on local funding, leaves many households vulnerable to water contamination or loss of service as droughts become more frequent, a Duke University analysis finds. Households in low-income or predominantly minority neighborhoods face the highest risks. Making sure their taps don't run
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Hubble observes aftermath of massive collision
What astronomers thought was a planet beyond our solar system, has now seemingly vanished from sight. Astronomers now suggest that a full-grown planet never existed in the first place. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope had instead observed an expanding cloud of very fine dust particles caused by a titanic collision between two icy asteroid-sized bodies orbiting the bright star Fomalhaut, about 2
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With shrinking snowpack, drought predictability melting away
New research suggests that during the 21st century, our ability to predict drought using snow will literally melt away.
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Promiscuity in the Paleozoic: Researchers uncover clues about vertebrate evolution
By looking at the DNA of living animals, researchers have revealed early events in vertebrate evolution, including how jawed vertebrates arose from the mating of two different species of primitive fish half a billion years ago.
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Photonic microwave generation using on-chip optical frequency combs
Using integrated photonic chips, scientists have demonstrated laser-based microwave generators. These microwave signals, as well as their optical carriers, could be used in radars, satellite communications and future 5G wireless networks.
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The smell of fear warns other voles
For a prey animal, the smell of a predator is one of many signals for danger. New research has shown that prey individuals can communicate with each other about the presence of a predator. An individual, who was attacked or chased by a predator, can signal danger with its body odor, i.e. alarm pheromones. The studies showed that alarm pheromone caused different responses in vole behavior and repro
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Catalyst enables reactions with the help of green light
For the first time, chemists have developed a titanium catalyst that makes light usable for selective chemical reactions. It provides a cost-effective and non-toxic alternative to the ruthenium and iridium catalysts used so far, which are based on very expensive and toxic metals. It can be used to produce highly selective chemical products that can provide the basis for antiviral drugs or luminesc
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Exoplanet apparently disappears in latest Hubble observations
What scientists thought was a planet beyond our solar system has 'vanished.' Though this happens to sci-fi worlds (like Superman's home planet Krypton exploding or the Death Star's attack on Alderaan), scientists seek a plausible explanation. One interpretation: instead of a planet, it could be a dust cloud produced by two large bodies colliding.
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PCARE and WASF3 regulate ciliary F-actin assembly that is required for the initiation of photoreceptor outer segment disk formation [Genetics]
The outer segments (OS) of rod and cone photoreceptor cells are specialized sensory cilia that contain hundreds of opsin-loaded stacked membrane disks that enable phototransduction. The biogenesis of these disks is initiated at the OS base, but the driving force has been debated. Here, we studied the function of the…
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Starvation and antimetabolic therapy promote cytokine release and recruitment of immune cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
Cellular starvation is typically a consequence of tissue injury that disrupts the local blood supply but can also occur where cell populations outgrow the local vasculature, as observed in solid tumors. Cells react to nutrient deprivation by adapting their metabolism, or, if starvation is prolonged, it can result in cell…
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Reversal of hyperactive subthalamic circuits differentially mitigates pain hypersensitivity phenotypes in parkinsonian mice [Neuroscience]
Although pain is a prevalent nonmotor symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD), it is undertreated, in part because of our limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Considering that the basal ganglia are implicated in pain sensation, and that their synaptic outputs are controlled by the subthalamic nucleus (STN), we hypothesized that…
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Differential timing of a conserved transcriptional network underlies divergent cortical projection routes across mammalian brain evolution [Neuroscience]
A unique combination of transcription factor expression and projection neuron identity demarcates each layer of the cerebral cortex. During mouse and human cortical development, the transcription factor CTIP2 specifies neurons that project subcerebrally, while SATB2 specifies neuronal projections via the corpus callosum, a large axon tract connecting the two neocortical…
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Loss of the neural-specific BAF subunit ACTL6B relieves repression of early response genes and causes recessive autism [Neuroscience]
Synaptic activity in neurons leads to the rapid activation of genes involved in mammalian behavior. ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers such as the BAF complex contribute to these responses and are generally thought to activate transcription. However, the mechanisms keeping such "early activation" genes silent have been a mystery. In the course…
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Inner ear sensory system changes as extinct crocodylomorphs transitioned from land to water [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Major evolutionary transitions, in which animals develop new body plans and adapt to dramatically new habitats and lifestyles, have punctuated the history of life. The origin of cetaceans from land-living mammals is among the most famous of these events. Much earlier, during the Mesozoic Era, many reptile groups also moved…
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Infant behavioral inhibition predicts personality and social outcomes three decades later [Anthropology]
Does infant temperament predict adult personality and life-course patterns? To date, there is scant evidence examining relations between child temperament and adult outcomes, and extant research has relied on limited methods for measuring temperament such as maternal report. This prospective longitudinal study followed a cohort of infants (n = 165)…
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Transposable elements teach T cells new tricks [Commentaries]
Mammalian genomes are replete with transposable elements (TEs): parasitic genetic sequences that can replicate to high copy numbers within host genomes (1). TEs are widely recognized as a potent source of cell type- and context-specific regulatory elements (2, 3). In PNAS, Ye et al. (4) analyze chromatin profiling data from…
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A scientific theory of gist communication and misinformation resistance, with implications for health, education, and policy [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
A framework is presented for understanding how misinformation shapes decision-making, which has cognitive representations of gist at its core. I discuss how the framework goes beyond prior work, and how it can be implemented so that valid scientific messages are more likely to be effective, remembered, and shared through social…
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Improved surrogates in inertial confinement fusion with manifold and cycle consistencies [Computer Sciences]
Neural networks have become the method of choice in surrogate modeling because of their ability to characterize arbitrary, high-dimensional functions in a data-driven fashion. This paper advocates for the training of surrogates that are 1) consistent with the physical manifold, resulting in physically meaningful predictions, and 2) cyclically consistent with…
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Triptolide suppresses IDH1-mutated malignancy via Nrf2-driven glutathione metabolism [Medical Sciences]
Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation is a common genetic abnormality in human malignancies characterized by remarkable metabolic reprogramming. Our present study demonstrated that IDH1-mutated cells showed elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and higher demands on Nrf2-guided glutathione de novo synthesis. Our findings showed that triptolide, a diterpenoid epoxide from Tripterygium…
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Correction for AbuHammad et al., Regulation of PRMT5-MDM4 axis is critical in the response to CDK4/6 inhibitors in melanoma [Corrections]
MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Regulation of PRMT5–MDM4 axis is critical in the response to CDK4/6 inhibitors in melanoma," by Shatha AbuHammad, Carleen Cullinane, Claire Martin, Zoe Bacolas, Teresa Ward, Huiqin Chen, Alison Slater, Kerry Ardley, Laura Kirby, Keefe T. Chan, Natalie Brajanovski, Lorey K. Smith, Aparna D. Rao, Emily J….
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Ammonia emission abatement does not fully control reduced forms of nitrogen deposition [Environmental Sciences]
Human activities and population growth have increased the natural burden of reactive nitrogen (N) in the environment. Excessive N deposition on Earth's surface leads to adverse feedbacks on ecosystems and humans. Similar to that of air pollution, emission control is recognized as an efficient means to control acid deposition. Control…
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Loss of nucleus accumbens low-frequency fluctuations is a signature of chronic pain [Neuroscience]
Chronic pain is a highly prevalent disease with poorly understood pathophysiology. In particular, the brain mechanisms mediating the transition from acute to chronic pain remain largely unknown. Here, we identify a subcortical signature of back pain. Specifically, subacute back pain patients who are at risk for developing chronic pain exhibit…
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New HST data and modeling reveal a massive planetesimal collision around Fomalhaut [Astronomy]
The apparent detection of an exoplanet orbiting Fomalhaut was announced in 2008. However, subsequent observations of Fomalhaut b raised questions about its status: Unlike other exoplanets, it is bright in the optical and nondetected in the infrared, and its orbit appears to cross the debris ring around the star without…
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Large H2O solubility in dense silica and its implications for the interiors of water-rich planets [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Sub-Neptunes are common among the discovered exoplanets. However, lack of knowledge on the state of matter in H2O-rich setting at high pressures and temperatures (P−T) places important limitations on our understanding of this planet type. We have conducted experiments for reactions between SiO2 and H2O as archetypal materials for rock…
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Correction for Uyhazi et al., Pumilio proteins utilize distinct regulatory mechanisms to achieve complementary functions required for pluripotency and embryogenesis [Corrections]
DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Correction for "Pumilio proteins utilize distinct regulatory mechanisms to achieve complementary functions required for pluripotency and embryogenesis," by Katherine E. Uyhazi, Yiying Yang, Na Liu, Hongying Qi, Xiao A. Huang, Winifred Mak, Scott D. Weatherbee, Nicola de Prisco, Vincenzo A. Gennarino, Xiaoling Song, and Haifan Lin, which was…
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Correction for Xu et al., Structure of the cell-binding component of the Clostridium difficile binary toxin reveals a di-heptamer macromolecular assembly [Corrections]
BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for "Structure of the cell-binding component of the Clostridium difficile binary toxin reveals a di-heptamer macromolecular assembly," by Xingjian Xu, Raquel Godoy-Ruiz, Kaylin A. Adipietro, Christopher Peralta, Danya Ben-Hail, Kristen M. Varney, Mary E. Cook, Braden M. Roth, Paul T. Wilder, Thomas Cleveland, Alexander Grishaev,…
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Earth 2020: Science, society, and sustainability in the Anthropocene [Perspectives]
April 22, 2020, marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day and the birth of the modern environmental movement. As we look back over the past half century, we can gain significant insights into the evolving human imprint on Earth's biophysical systems, and the role of science and scientists in driving…
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Procedural justice training reduces police use of force and complaints against officers [Social Sciences]
Existing research shows that distrust of the police is widespread and consequential for public safety. However, there is a shortage of interventions that demonstrably reduce negative police interactions with the communities they serve. A training program in Chicago attempted to encourage 8,480 officers to adopt procedural justice policing strategies. These…
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In utero MRI identifies consequences of early-gestation alcohol drinking on fetal brain development in rhesus macaques [Neuroscience]
One factor that contributes to the high prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is binge-like consumption of alcohol before pregnancy awareness. It is known that treatments are more effective with early recognition of FASD. Recent advances in retrospective motion correction for the reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) fetal brain MRI…
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Cannabinoid exposure in rat adolescence reprograms the initial behavioral, molecular, and epigenetic response to cocaine [Neuroscience]
The initial response to an addictive substance can facilitate repeated use: That is, individuals experiencing more positive effects are more likely to use that drug again. Increasing evidence suggests that psychoactive cannabinoid use in adolescence enhances the behavioral effects of cocaine. However, despite the behavioral data, there is no neurobiological…
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Profile of Paul L. McEuen [Profiles]
In 1965, engineer Gordon Moore predicted that the number of transistors in an integrated circuit would double every two years. This prediction, known as Moore's Law, has been proven accurate and spurred semiconductor research toward miniaturization. Moore's Law, however, is starting to plateau. According to Cornell University physicist and National…
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What did scientists learn from Deepwater Horizon?
Scientists review what they — and their science colleagues from around the world — have learned from studying the spill over the past decade.
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Aquaculture at the crossroads of global warming and antimicrobial resistance
Antimicrobial resistance is responsible for some 700,000 deaths each year worldwide. In relation to this phenomenon, researchers have raised the alarm regarding the development of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in aquaculture, which is affecting fish production and human health worldwide. Their study established for the first time a link between global warming and an increased risk of antimicrob
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Chemists create faster-degrading plastic for marine uses
To address the plastic environmental crisis, Cornell chemists have developed a new polymer with ample strength in a marine setting that is poised to degrade by ultraviolet radiation, according to research published March 30 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.
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Arctic research expedition likely faces extreme conditions in fast-changing Arctic
In October 2019, scientists trapped a ship filled with equipment in Arctic sea ice with the intention of drifting around the Arctic Ocean for a full year, gathering data on the polar regions and sea ice floes. However, a new study indicates there is a chance the expedition may melt out months before the year-end goal.
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A method for predicting antiviral drug or vaccine targets
A novel method to predict the most promising targets for antiviral drugs or vaccines is based on the conformational changes viral glycoproteins go through during the process of recognition and binding to the host cell. This prediction method, which targets backbone hydrogen bonds for motifs with the highest free energy, is published in Journal of Computational Biology.
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'My Boyfriend Died of COVID-19'
As 2019 drew to a close, a young woman, Niuniu, and her fiancé, Tongsheng, looked forward to a bright future. In the spring, as the cherry blossoms fell in Wuhan, the couple would get married. They had started saving up to buy a house. Just a month later, however, their dreams came to a grinding halt. An animated short documentary from Olmo Parenti, based on a series of Niuniu's WeChats, tells th
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Mind over body: The search for stronger brain-computer interfaces
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University are working on understanding how the brain works when learning tasks with the help of brain-computer interface technology. In a set of papers, the second of which was published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, the team is moving the needle forward on brain-computer interface technology intended to help improve the lives of
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A method for predicting antiviral drug or vaccine targets
A novel method to predict the most promising targets for antiviral drugs or vaccines is based on the conformational changes viral glycoproteins go through during the process of recognition and binding to the host cell. This prediction method, which targets backbone hydrogen bonds for motifs with the highest free energy, is published in Journal of Computational Biology.
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Bailout interest rate for US airlines is as low as 1%
United reveals more details of taxpayer funding it will use to cover payrolls during pandemic
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How dystopian narratives can incite real-world radicalism
Humans are storytelling creatures: the stories we tell have profound implications for how we see our role in the world, and dystopian fiction keeps growing in popularity. According to Goodreads.com, an online community that has grown to 90 million readers, the share of books categorised as 'dystopian' in 2012 was the highest for more than 50 years. The boom appears to have begun after the terrori
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Different minerals cause heart disease in men, women
Different minerals cause aortic heart valve blockage in men and women, according to a new study. The findings could change how doctors diagnose and treat heart disease. Researchers used the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan to analyze damaged heart valves from patients who had undergone transplants. The findings in Acta Biomaterialia show considerable differences in th
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COVID-19 and Climate Change Threats Compound in Minority Communities
Port Arthur, Tex., is a case in point: disproportionately hit by hurricanes, fossil-fuel pollution and now the coronavirus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Starlink space display 'set to continue all week'
The 60 Starlink satellites launched by Elon Musk's SpaceX firm appear in a line crossing the night sky.
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Air pollution linked to raised Covid-19 death risk
The World Health Organization warns high air pollution could be a risk factor for severe Covid-19 cases.
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Study describes cocktail of pharmaceuticals in waters in Bangladesh
An analysis revealed that water samples held a cocktail of pharmaceuticals and other compounds, including antibiotics, antifungals, anticonvulsants, anesthetics, antihypertensive drugs, pesticides, flame retardants and more. Not all of these chemicals were found at every location, and sometimes amounts detected were low. But the ubiquity of contamination is concerning, scientists say.
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ALMA reveals unusual composition of interstellar comet 2I/Borisov
A galactic visitor entered our solar system last year — interstellar comet 2I/Borisov. When astronomers pointed the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) toward the comet on Dec. 15-16, 2019, for the first time they directly observed the chemicals stored inside an object from a planetary system other than our own.
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Cable bacteria can drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions from rice cultivation
The rice fields account for five percent of global emissions of the greenhouse gas methane, which is 25 times stronger than CO2. Researchers have found that cable bacteria could be an important part of the solution. In the laboratory, they have grown rice in soil with and without cable bacteria, and the pots with cable bacteria emitted 93% less methane than the pots without cable bacteria.
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Gypsy moth larvae love poplar leaves infected by fungi
Black poplar leaves infected by fungi are especially susceptible to attack by gypsy moth caterpillars. A research team found that young larvae that fed on leaves covered with fungal spores grew faster and pupated earlier than those feeding only on leaf tissue. The results shed new light on the co-evolution of plants and insects, in which microorganisms play a much greater role than previously assu
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Facebook Is Taking Down Pages Organizing Anti-Quarantine Protests
Small clusters of anti-quarantine protests are breaking out across the country, with participants defying state-imposed shelter-at-home policies implemented to safeguard public health during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. The decision to gather in large numbers while the country is approaching peak numbers of cases and deaths isn't just a direct threat to their own health and the communities t
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Cochrane Review confirms effectiveness of MMR vaccines
New evidence published in the Cochrane Library today finds MMR, MMRV and MMR+V vaccines are effective and that they are not associated with increased risk of autism.
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Infant temperament predicts personality more than 20 years later
Researchers investigating how temperament shapes adult life-course outcomes have found that behavioral inhibition in infancy predicts a reserved, introverted personality at age 26. For those individuals who show sensitivity to making errors in adolescence, the findings indicated a higher risk for internalizing disorders (such as anxiety and depression) in adulthood. The study provides robust evide
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Actin 'avalanches' may make memories stick
Avalanches in branched actomyosin networks are one possible mechanism by which the brain's neurons preserve memories. A new study models these seismic events.
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Early exposure to cannabis boosts young brains' sensitivity to cocaine, rodent study finds
Cannabis use makes young brains more sensitive to the first exposure to cocaine, according to a new study on rodents led by scientists at Columbia University and the University of Cagliari in Italy. By monitoring the brains of both adolescent and adult rats after giving them synthetic psychoactive cannabinoids followed by cocaine, the research team identified key molecular and epigenetic changes t
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Police training reduced complaints and use of force against civilians
A Northwestern University evaluation of a procedural justice training program involving more than 8,000 Chicago Police Department (CPD) officers shows it reduced complaints filed against police by approximately 10%. It also reduced use of force by 6% in the two years following officers' training.
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Cholera studies reveal mechanisms of biofilm formation and hyperinfectivity
Free-swimming cholera bacteria are much less infectious than bacteria in biofilms, aggregates of bacterial cells that form on surfaces. This accounts for the surprising effectiveness of filtering water through cloth, such as a folded sari, which can reduce infections dramatically in places where the disease is endemic, despite the fact that individual cholera bacteria easily pass through such a fi
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Astronomers discover planet that never was
What was thought to be an exoplanet in a nearby star system likely never existed in the first place, according to University of Arizona astronomers. Instead, they concluded that the Hubble Space Telescope was looking at an expanding cloud of very fine dust particles from two icy bodies that smashed into each other.
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WHO warns that few have developed antibodies to Covid-19
Herd immunity hopes hit by report suggesting only 2%-3% of people have been infected without realising it Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Only a tiny proportion of the global population – maybe as few as 2% or 3% – appear to have antibodies in the blood showing they have been infected with Covid-19, according to the World Health Organization, a finding that bodes ill
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Male-female cardiac repair differences in heart failure survival after heart attack
A new study investigated the molecular and cellular processes underlying cardiac repair in male and female mice after a severe heart attack. The researchers discovered that heart repair happened faster in the female mice than the males after heart attack, and that improved survival and delayed cardiac failure.
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Milky Way could be catapulting stars into its outer halo
Astronomers have shown that clusters of supernovas can cause the birth of scattered, eccentrically orbiting suns in outer stellar halos, upending commonly held notions of how star systems have formed and evolved over billions of years.
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Solar panels with more natural designs could cut stress
A new design of eye-pleasing, fractal-patterned rooftop solar panels could reduce stress and improve solar electricity, researchers report. In their new study, physicist Richard Taylor and psychologist Margaret Sereno, both of the University of Oregon, combined the psychology of aesthetics—in this case, the appreciation of beauty seen in nature—and the electrical engineering of solar panel design
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When Crocodiles Once Dived Like Dolphins and Whales
They didn't have blowholes, but an ancient lineage of crocodilians returned to the oceans in a manner similar to some marine mammals.
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The Case of the Disappearing Exoplanet
Fomalhaut b was one of the first planets around another star to be directly imaged by telescopes. Some astronomers now say it was a cloud of asteroid debris.
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Fast peer reviews, demographics and Captain Tom
A digest of COVID-19 science, data, reporting and optimism @ 20 April.
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Confirmed: 2I/Borisov is not your average comet
Two new views on our interstellar visitor.
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Oil goes sub-zero
The front month of the WTI contract is now trading at a negative rate. Yes. You read that right.
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Antibody Tests for the Coronavirus May Not Change Everything
Touted as society's way out of widespread lockdowns, scientists say the true potential of these rapidly developed tests is still unknown — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Police training reduced complaints and use of force against civilians
A Northwestern University evaluation of a procedural justice training program involving more than 8,000 Chicago Police Department (CPD) officers shows it reduced complaints filed against police by approximately 10%. It also reduced use of force by 6% in the two years following officers' training.
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Actin 'avalanches' may make memories stick
If you're on skis, you want to avoid avalanches. But when the right kind happen in your brain, you shouldn't worry. You won't feel them. They're probably to your benefit.
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Astronomers discover planet that never was
What astronomers thought was a planet beyond our solar system has now seemingly vanished from sight, suggesting that what was heralded as one of the first exoplanets to ever be discovered with direct imaging likely never existed.
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Cholera studies reveal mechanisms of biofilm formation and hyperinfectivity
Free-swimming cholera bacteria are much less infectious than bacteria in biofilms, aggregates of bacterial cells embedded in a sticky matrix that form on surfaces. This accounts for the surprising effectiveness of filtering water through cloth, such as a folded sari, which can reduce infections dramatically in places where the disease is endemic, despite the fact that individual cholera bacteria e
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Seeing the adult in the child
Toddler temperament can predict personality, study finds.
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Biologists test the waters off Japan
New study looks at impact of carbon dioxide on marine habitats.
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The ultimate in power windows
Incorporating solar cells adds a whole new dimension.
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A bit of disruption, simulated
Milky Way could be catapulting stars into its outer halo, astronomers say.
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Arctic research expedition likely faces extreme conditions in fast-changing Arctic
Scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have simulated conditions along potential routes for the MOSAiC polar expedition, using today's conditions in the 'new Arctic.' The results suggest that thinner sea ice may carry the ship farther than would be expected compared to historical conditions and the sea ice around the ship may melt earlier than the 12-month goal.
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Mental health preparedness among older youth in foster care
Researchers interviewed 17-year-olds in California foster care. The adolescents' use of mental health services is elevated, but not necessarily their confidence level.
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RAF dispatched to Turkey to bring back NHS safety kit
Chancellor Rishi Sunak says UK government pursuing 'every possible option' to secure PPE
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More than 1m salaries covered as UK steps up business rescue
HMRC computer system withstands more than 140,000 companies applying to scheme
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Actin 'avalanches' may make memories stick
If you're on skis, you want to avoid avalanches. But when the right kind happen in your brain, you shouldn't worry. You won't feel them. They're probably to your benefit.
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Cholera studies reveal mechanisms of biofilm formation and hyperinfectivity
Free-swimming cholera bacteria are much less infectious than bacteria in biofilms, aggregates of bacterial cells embedded in a sticky matrix that form on surfaces. This accounts for the surprising effectiveness of filtering water through cloth, such as a folded sari, which can reduce infections dramatically in places where the disease is endemic, despite the fact that individual cholera bacteria e
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For the First Time Ever, the Price of Oil is Now Negative
Type Oil Negative For the first time in history, the price of crude oil has gone negative — as a result of plummeting demand amid the coronavirus outbreak, Bloomberg reports . Oil traders are literally running out of space to store excess oil. In a single day, the price of oil dropped far below the previous record, set in 1946, when the world was still recovering from World War 2. A Storage Probl
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Our 3,000th Episode
Here are some "highlights" from the past 13.5 years of this podcast.
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UK braced for long recession due to virus fear factor
Officials worried about public caution over spending and return to work after lockdown
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Astronomers: Our Galaxy Is Belligerently Flinging Stars Into Space
Yeet! New research suggests that the supernovae in the center of our galaxy could be constantly launching stars out toward its outermost reaches. New simulations by University of California, Irvine researchers show how clusters of exploding stars could be powerful enough to blast their unfortunate brethren all the way out to the boondocks of the Milky Way, CNET reports . The simulations suggest t
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If You're Working From Home, Choosing the Right VPN Is More Important Than Ever
Futurism fans: To create this content, a non-editorial team worked with an affiliate partner. We may collect a small commission on items purchased through this page. This post does not necessarily reflect the views or the endorsement of the Futurism.com editorial staff. Even with millions of people now working from home, many Internet users are resigned to the fact that our online activity is up
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Faster-degrading plastic could promise cleaner seas
To address plastic pollution plaguing the world's seas and waterways, Cornell University chemists have developed a new polymer that can degrade by ultraviolet radiation, according to research published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.
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Lockdown measures infringe human rights, says UK justice secretary
Buckland insists measures are needed, but plans for a contact-tracing app increase concerns over civil liberties
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Live Coronavirus News and Updates
As the virus overwhelms the health care system, people with other illnesses are struggling to find treatment. A $450 billion deal to aid taxpayers and businesses stalls in Congress amid a dispute over testing.
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World News Updates: Coronavirus Death Toll Soars in Turkey, Amid Signs Reality Is Even Worse
A W.H.O. official warns of roadblocks in the way of a vaccine. Singapore, an early success story, is having a surge in cases, while European countries start to ease restrictions.
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Tomatoes, tempura, and other foods whose origins will surprise you
Can you guess the origins of these popular foods? (Oscar Bolten Green/) Peach cobbler and ballpark peanuts have something in common: They're classic American dishes built on decidedly un-American crops. The state fruit of Georgia originated in China, while peanuts (just like "Irish" potatoes) hail from South America. These aren't gastronomical exceptions either. From the heyday of the Silk Road t
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The Utter Futility of Biden's China Rhetoric
If he wants to attack Donald Trump's response to COVID-19, Joe Biden has an embarrassment of options. The presumptive Democratic nominee could slam Trump for ignoring his own advisers' warnings about the potential severity of the virus. Biden could skewer the president for his administration's inability to develop a coronavirus test. He could blast the Trump administration for failing to adequate
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European citizens in UK at risk of losing out on jobless benefit, warn campaigners
Fears that 1.3m holders of 'pre-settled status' could be refused universal credit amid virus lay-offs
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China has a chance to show global leadership
Action to stimulate domestic demand would help other economies
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Covid-19 latest: Pro-gun groups push US social distancing protests
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Lung injury in COVID-19 is not high altitude pulmonary edema
A group of researchers with experience in treating high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) have written to correct the misconception in medical social media forums and elsewhere that the lung injury seen in COVID-19 is not like typical acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is instead like HAPE.
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Revealed: the secret life of godwits
To find out more about birds such as the black-tailed godwit, ecologists have been conducting long-term population studies using standardized information on reproductive behaviour–such as dates of egg-laying or hatching and levels of chick survival. New information gathered using geolocators on godwits in the Netherlands shows that traditional observation methods can lead to inaccurate data. The
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Social grooming factors influencing social media civility on COVID-19
A new study analyzing tweets about COVID-19 found that users with larger social networks tend to use fewer uncivil remarks when they have more positive responses from others.
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Material grabs minerals for stiffness under pressure
A self-adapting material can change its stiffness in response to applied force, researchers report. Inspired by how human bone and colorful coral reefs adjust mineral deposits in response to their surrounding environments, this advancement could someday open the doors for materials that can self-reinforce to prepare for increased force or stop further damage. "Imagine a bone implant or a bridge t
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Contact-tracing apps raise surveillance fears
Mobile phone data could be vital tool for reopening economies
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Social distancing measures recommended until 2022
Harvard researchers have recommended that intermittent social distancing measures should be in place until 2022. An observational study in Hong Kong found that social distancing measures have helped the nation avoid stricter lockdowns. America has a severe testing shortage that is delaying our ability to effectively measure the impact of COVID-19. While the media spotlight over the last week has
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The story behind Trump's 'miracle' drug hydroxychloroquine – Full Story podcast
For 65 years the drug hydroxychloroquine has been used to treat a number of diseases, including malaria. But after a French study claimed it was effective against coronavirus it has been hailed by the US president and other people around the world as a cure. But there is scant evidence it is effective – and it could actually be harmful when taken This episode first aired on Today in Focus , the G
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Lopinavir/ritonavir and Arbidol not effective for mild-to-moderate COVID-19 in adults
An exploratory randomized, controlled study on the safety and efficacy of either lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) or Arbidol as treatments for COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, suggests that neither drug improves the clinical outcome of patients hospitalized with mild-to-moderate cases of the disease over supportive care. The findings appeared April 17 in Med, a new medi
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A method for predicting antiviral drug or vaccine targets
A novel method to predict the most promising targets for antiviral drugs or vaccines is based on the conformational changes viral glycoproteins go through during the process of recognition and binding to the host cell.
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Extra money helps folks with opioid addiction stay sober longer
Adding $8 an hour to the paychecks of people with opioid addiction may help those in recovery stay drug free longer, a new study shows. That extra money may also encourage them to get and hold regular jobs. Poverty is an independent risk factor for drug abuse that treatment plans largely ignore, the researchers say. As reported in in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health , the researcher
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Chocolate 'fingerprints' could confirm label claims
The flavor and aroma of a fine chocolate emerge from its ecology, in addition to its processing. But can you be certain that the bar you bought is really from the exotic locale stated on the wrapper? Now, researchers are presenting a method for determining where a particular chocolate was produced—and someday, which farm its beans came from—by looking at its chemical "fingerprint."
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Elon Musk: The Cybertruck Will "Float For a While"
We All Float Down Here According to a new tweet by Tesla CEO Elon Musk, the electric automaker's upcoming Cybertruck will be able to float — at least for short periods of time. "Yes. It will even float for a while," Musk responded on Twitter about the vehicle's wading depth. As Electrek reports , Musk bragged back in 2016 that Tesla's smaller Model S sedan also could float for a little while. "We
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This Heatmap Shows Severity of COVID Outbreak in Every US County
Facebook just launched a heatmap of the entire United States that illustrates the severity of the coronavirus outbreak within each individual county. The map doesn't necessarily reflect the actual number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in each area — that number that would be inaccurate anyway given how hard it still is to get tested in many places. Rather, it shows how the proportion of people who s
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Covid-19 relief at last for UK start-ups
Contact-tracing apps could exclude 2bn, tech earnings ahead, Facebook Gaming
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Can breathing exercises really help protect you from covid-19?
Taking deep breaths and forcing a cough can help clear mucus, but these techniques are unlikely to prevent or treat coronavirus infections – here's why
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This black-hole collision just made gravitational waves even more interesting
Nature, Published online: 20 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01153-7 An unprecedented signal from unevenly sized objects gives astronomers rare insight into how black holes spin.
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CDC Lab Contamination Delayed Coronavirus Testing
Assembling the first COVID-19 test kits in the same room as coronavirus material, along with other practices that didn't follow protocol, made the tests unusable, officials say.
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Chocolate 'fingerprints' could confirm label claims
The flavor and aroma of a fine chocolate emerge from its ecology, in addition to its processing. But can you be certain that the bar you bought is really from the exotic locale stated on the wrapper? Now, researchers are presenting a method for determining where a particular chocolate was produced by looking at its chemical 'fingerprint.' The researchers are presenting their results through the Am
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Gender-based violence in the COVID-19 pandemic
Gender-based violence has been shown to increase during global emergencies. In a paper just published by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, researchers report that according to early evidence it is the same for the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Virtual reality makes empathy easier
Virtual reality activates brain networks that increase your ability to identify with other people, according to new research published in eNeuro. The technology could become a tool in the treatment of violent offenders to empathize more with others.
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Our 3,000th Episode
Here are some "highlights" from the past 13.5 years of this podcast. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Quantum entanglement could take GPS to the next level
Quantum entanglement can help detect radio frequencies with more sensitivity and accuracy than ever, researchers report. Your phone's GPS, the WiFi in your house, and communications on aircraft are all powered by radio-frequency waves, or RF waves, which carry information from a transmitter at one point to a sensor at another. The sensors interpret this information in different ways. For example,
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Denmark to test everyone with coronavirus symptoms
Country is being scrutinised as it begins reopening economy after lockdown
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Shake Shack: bailing out of a bail out
The sight of big companies taking money from mom-and-pop operations inspires justifiable outrage
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Senegal bans most single-use plastics
A ban on single-use plastics came into effect in Senegal on Monday, although the government has said it will allow the sale of plastic water sachets until the coronavirus pandemic ends.
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Diagnostic biosensor quickly detects SARS-CoV-2 from nasopharyngeal swabs
According to many experts, early diagnosis and management are critical for slowing the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the new coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Therefore, the race is on to develop diagnostic tests for the virus that are faster, easier and more accurate than existing ones. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a field-effect transistor-based biosensor that detects SARS-CoV-2
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Optimizing a new spraying method for ceramic coatings
For a long time, the production of ceramic coatings has only been possible by means of sintering techniques conducted at more than 1,000 degrees Celsius. However, a novel spraying method, Powder Aerosol Deposition (PAD), enables their production at normal room temperatures. It is therefore highly attractive for industrial applications. Engineering scientists from the University of Bayreuth under t
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New discovery helps close the gap towards optically-controlled quantum computation
Scientists at Ames Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and the University of Alabama Birmingham have discovered a light-induced switching mechanism in a Dirac semimetal. The mechanism establishes a new way to control the topological material, driven by back-and-forth motion of atoms and electrons, which will enable topological transistor and quantum computation using light waves.
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Oak genomics proves its worth
A year and a half following the publication of the pedunculate oak genome by France's National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and the Environment (INRAE) and The Commission for Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies (CEA), initial results based on this genomic resource were published in the April 16, 2020, issue of New Phytologist.
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Four dishwashers to save you time in the kitchen
Let the machine do the dishes. (Sidekix Media via Unsplash/) As a kid, it was always hard to understand why game show contestants got so excited about free dishwashers. Choose the jet ski! But after cleaning the umpteenth plate by hand, most homeowners learn that nothing beats the kitchen appliance for convenience. Today's washers are designed to save water, take up less space, use less energy, a
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Quantum entanglement offers unprecedented precision for GPS, imaging and beyond
Engineers have demonstrated for the first time that it's possible to connect a network of sensors through quantum entanglement. The experiment opens a door to unprecedented levels of sensitivity in GPS navigation, medical imaging and astronomy.
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Oak genomics proves its worth
A year and a half following the publication of the pedunculate oak genome by France's National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and the Environment (INRAE) and The Commission for Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies (CEA), initial results based on this genomic resource were published in the April 16, 2020, issue of New Phytologist.
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After Years on the Decline, Hepatitis C Is Returning — Primarily Among Millennials
Much to the surprise of public health officials, a once-declining disease is surging again and heavily impacting people who are under age 40.
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Unprecedented single-cell studies in virtual embryo
"How are the many different cell types in the body generated during embryonic development from an egg, which is only a single cell? This is one of the most fundamental questions in biology," explains Dr. Pierre Neveu, group leader at EMBL Heidelberg, setting out the rationale behind the research he and his group have performed in collaboration with the group of Dr. Lars Hufnagel.
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Study: Visitor's garden is improving prison visitation experience for all
New research shows that a visitor's garden designed and built by Iowa State University students and incarcerated individuals at the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women is helping to strengthen connections between the women and their children.
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New discovery helps close the gap towards optically controlled quantum computation
Scientists have discovered a light-induced switching mechanism in a Dirac semimetal.
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Optimizing a new spraying method for ceramic coatings
For a long time, the production of ceramic coatings has only been possible by means of sintering techniques conducted at more than 1,000 degrees Celsius. However, Powder Aerosol Deposition (PAD) enables their production at normal room temperatures. Engineering scientists from the University of Bayreuth show in the journal of 'Advanced Materials' how the functional properties of ceramic films can b
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Diagnostic biosensor quickly detects SARS-CoV-2 from nasopharyngeal swabs
According to many experts, early diagnosis and management are critical for slowing the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the new coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Therefore, the race is on to develop diagnostic tests for the virus that are faster, easier and more accurate than existing ones. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a field-effect transistor-based biosensor that detects SARS-CoV-2
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Survey: Food insecurity in Vermont rose 33% during pandemic
Food insecurity in Vermont has increased by one-third during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a statewide survey conducted by the University of Vermont at the end of March. The increase in food insecurity was strongly correlated with employment status. Among food insecure Vermonters, two-thirds (66%) had experienced job losses or work disruptions since the outbreak of the pandemic.
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Oak genomics proves its worth
A landmark 10 article collection published in the April 16 issue of New Phytologist helps clarify the evolution of oaks and identify key genes involved in oak adaptation to environmental transitions and resistance to pathogens. It also addresses the implications and history of oak hybridization, and traces genomic evidence for an estimated 56 million years of oak evolution.
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Milky Way may fling stars from its center
The Milky Way may catapult stars into its outer halo, astronomers report. In new research, astronomers have shown that clusters of supernovas can cause the birth of scattered, eccentrically orbiting suns in outer stellar halos. The findings upend commonly held notions of how star systems have formed and evolved over billions of years. "…it's likely the Milky Way has been launching stars in circum
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Unprecedented single-cell studies in virtual embryo
"How are the many different cell types in the body generated during embryonic development from an egg, which is only a single cell? This is one of the most fundamental questions in biology," explains Dr. Pierre Neveu, group leader at EMBL Heidelberg, setting out the rationale behind the research he and his group have performed in collaboration with the group of Dr. Lars Hufnagel.
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Ants restore Mediterranean dry grasslands
In nature, certain species are able to regulate the cycling of soil nutrients and vegetation diversity and dynamics.
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The Pandemic's Hidden Victims: Sick or Dying, but Not From the Coronavirus
As the coronavirus overwhelms the health care system, people with other illnesses struggle to find treatment.
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"Mediebilden av romer legitimerar rasism"
Rasism och främlingsfientlighet mot romer uttrycks subtilt i traditionella rumänska medier. Men på sociala medier tar sig rasismen mer extrema former. Det visar forskning från Örebro universitet Petre Breazu, doktor i medie- och kommunikationsvetenskap vid Örebro universitet, har i sin avhandling undersökt hur romer skildras i rumänska tidningar, tv-nyheter och sociala medier sedan landets EU-int
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Unprecedented 3D images of live cells plus details of molecules inside
The insides of living cells can be seen in their natural state in greater detail than ever before using a new technique. This advance should help reveal the complex and fragile biological interactions of medical mysteries, like how stem cells develop or how to deliver drugs more effectively.
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Self-aligning microscope smashes limits of super-resolution microscopy
An ultra-precise microscope that surpasses the limitations of Nobel Prize-winning super-resolution microscopy will let scientists directly measure distances between individual molecules.
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A cheap organic steam generator to purify water
A high-efficiency steam generator for the purification and desalination of water can be built using cheap and natural materials such as cellulose.
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New decision model shapes strategies for dealing with public health emergencies
The efficient allocation of medical resources can be modelled mathematically. The study, which started a few years before coronavirus appeared, offers timely insights for governments and organizations who are faced with an unprecedented healthcare crisis. Specifically, it presents a comprehensive decision model for optimizing the use of alternative tests and treatments on specific population group
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Ants restore Mediterranean dry grasslands
In nature, certain species are able to regulate the cycling of soil nutrients and vegetation diversity and dynamics.
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Eurasian ice sheet collapse raised seas eight metres: study
The melting of the Eurasian ice sheet around 14,000 years ago lifted global sea levels by about eight metres, according to new research published Monday that highlights the risks of today's rapid ice cap melt.
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Scientists solve air quality puzzle: Why does ozone linger long after its ban?
When high in the atmosphere, ozone protects Earth from harmful solar radiation—but ozone at ground level is a significant pollutant. Exposure to high concentrations of ground-level ozone aggravates respiratory illnesses, thus exacerbating the negative health effects of heat and contributing to the catastrophic impacts of recent heatwaves and drought in Europe.
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LIGO and Virgo detectors catch first gravitational wave from binary black hole merger with unequal masses
The expectations of the gravitational-wave research community have been fulfilled: gravitational-wave discoveries are now part of their daily work as they have identified in the past observing run, O3, new gravitational-wave candidates about once a week. But now, the researchers have published a remarkable signal unlike any of those seen before: GW190412 is the first observation of a binary black
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Ants restore Mediterranean dry grasslands
A team of ecologists and agronomists led by Thierry Dutoit, a CNRS researcher, studied the impact of the Messor barbarus harvester ant on Mediterranean dry grasslands. Their study shows that these invertebrates accelerated the resilience of plant communities in these degraded grasslands by facilitating their recovery.
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Supercomputers and Archimedes' law enable calculating nanobubble diffusion in nuclear fuel
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have proposed a method that speeds up the calculation of nanobubble diffusion in solid materials. This method makes it possible to create significantly more accurate fuel models for nuclear power plants.
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Finding leukemia's weakness using genome-wide CRISPR technology
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center used CRISPR technology to identify key regulators of aggressive chronic myeloid leukemia.
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Study: Visitor's garden is improving prison visitation experience for all
New research shows that a visitor's garden designed and built by Iowa State University students and incarcerated individuals at the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women is helping to strengthen connections between the women and their children.
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Unprecedented single-cell studies in virtual embryo
Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg and from the University of Padua School of Medicine have created the first complete description of early embryo development, accounting for every single cell in the embryo. This 'virtual embryo' will help to answer how the different cell types in an organism can originate from a single egg cell. The results are publish
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Princeton scientist solves air quality puzzle: Why does ozone linger long after its ban?
As global climate change leads to more hot and dry weather, the resulting droughts are stressing plants, making them less able to remove ozone from the air — despite laws successfully limiting pollution. With hot and dry summers expected to become more frequent over the coming decades, this has significant implications for European policymakers, report an international team of scientists led by M
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Photonic microwave generation using on-chip optical frequency combs
In our information society, the synthesis, distribution, and processing of radio and microwave signals are ubiquitous in wireless networks, telecommunications, and radars. The current tendency is to use carriers in higher frequency bands, especially with looming bandwidth bottlenecks due to demands for, for example, 5G and the "Internet of Things." 'Microwave photonics,' a combination of microwave
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Interstellar comet 2I/Borisov: Carbon monoxide abundance points to birth around cooler star
Interstellar comet 2I/Borisov is providing a glimpse of another star system's planetary building blocks, using new observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.
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