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Biological weed control to relieve millions from Ambrosia allergies in Europe
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15586-1 Invasive plants can adversely affect ecosystems and economic costs. Here, the authors quantify the impact of the invasive plant Ambrosia artemisiifolia on seasonal allergies and health costs across Europe, finding that the costs are considerably higher than what previously reported, and estimate also the reduct
47min
Study sheds light on unique culinary traditions of prehistoric hunter-gatherers
Hunter-gatherer groups living in the Baltic between seven and a half and six thousand years ago had culturally distinct cuisines, analysis of ancient pottery fragments has revealed.
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LATEST

Climate change: World mustn't forget 'deeper emergency'
Environmental crises must not be forgotten amid the pandemic, says the UN Secretary General.
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Jane Goodall: We Can Learn From This Pandemic
In a teleconference promoting her participation in Earth Day events on the National Geographic Channel, Jane Goodall talked about what gives her hope during this pandemic, and what she hopes we all learn from it.
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Behavioral intervention, not lovastatin, improves language skills in youth with fragile X
A UC Davis Health study found more evidence for the efficacy of telehealth-delivered behavioral intervention in treating language problems in youth with fragile X syndrome. The authors, however, could not establish efficacy for the drug lovastatin as a treatment for learning or behavior problems in individuals with fragile X.
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Yale-NUS College scientists find bisulphates that curb efficacy of diesel engine catalysts
A team of researchers from Yale-NUS College, in collaboration with scientists in Sweden, has found that bisulphate species in the exhaust stream are strongly connected to decreasing the effectiveness of exhaust remediation catalysts in diesel engines. Their findings pave the way for synthesising more sulphur-tolerant catalysts and developing regeneration strategies for catalyst systems on diesel-p
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Lizards change 'cologne' to communicate in new places
Lizards rapidly and repeatedly developed new chemical signals for communicating with each other after moving in small groups to experimental islands, researchers report. Free from the risk of predators and intent to attract potential mates, male lizards produce a novel chemical calling card, the new research shows. "…there is important variation in chemical signals depending on your context: Who'
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Genome-wide association studies and Mendelian randomization analyses for leisure sedentary behaviours
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15553-w Epidemiological studies have shown an association between sedentary behaviours and cardiovascular disease risk. Here, van de Vegte et al. perform GWAS for self-reported sedentary behaviours (TV watching, computer use, driving) and Mendelian randomization analyses to explore potential causal relationships with c
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Coronavirus live news: UN warns of 'biblical' famine as White House prepares immigration halt
Trump to halt immigration for 60 days initially; 256m people could starve, says UN; cases worldwide pass 2.5 million. Follow the latest updates. Coronavirus latest: at a glance Netherlands and France plan to re-open primary schools Pandemic causing some anti-vaxxers to waver Australia coronavirus updates – live See all our coronavirus coverage 1.41am BST A leading US public health official warned
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You're probably wrong about mom's favorite kid
Adult children are wrong about their parents' favorite kid more often than not, researchers report. "Children are very aware that parents differentiate," says Jill Suitor , a professor of sociology in College of Liberal Arts at Purdue University, "but what we have found is that adult children are wrong the majority of the time." Often unspoken but tacitly understood, perceptions of favoritism are
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Carrot-top pesto, beet ketchup, and other recipes for using up odds and ends in your fridge
Step one: Eat ugly fruits and vegetables you'd normally skip or toss out. (Justin Walker/) This story originally featured on Saveur . We throw away too much food: up to 40 percent of what we produce for human consumption in America. And while the fight against food waste is one we should fight every day, what better day to confront this problem than on Earth Day? According to statistics from the
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India's coronavirus crisis hits country's farmers and food supplies
Lockdown and restrictions on migrant workforce leave crops unpicked as demand collapse
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Scientists find bisulphates that curb efficacy of diesel engine catalysts
A team of researchers from Yale-NUS College, in collaboration with scientists in Sweden, has found that bisulphate species in the exhaust stream are strongly connected to decreasing the effectiveness of exhaust remediation catalysts in diesel engines. Their findings pave the way for synthesising more sulphur-tolerant catalysts and developing regeneration strategies for catalyst systems on diesel-p
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The Atlantic Daily: Four Leaders Who Acted Swiftly
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . SIMON SCHLUTER / FAIRFAX / HEADPRESS / REDUX This outbreak is the ultimate worldwide leadership test. As my colleague Uri Friedman wisely put it: Every leader on the planet is facing the same pot
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Michael Dickinson (CalTech) 3: How Flies Fly: Control
https://www.ibiology.org/biophysics/how-flies-fly Have you ever tried to catch a flying fly only to be frustrated by their ability to evade your efforts? Then you know that many insects are extremely agile fliers. In his three talks, Dr. Michael Dickinson uses aerodynamics, muscle physiology and neuroscience to explain how flies fly. In Part 1, Dickinson focuses on lift. How do insects generate t
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Michael Dickinson (CalTech) 2: How Flies Fly: Power
https://www.ibiology.org/biophysics/how-flies-fly Have you ever tried to catch a flying fly only to be frustrated by their ability to evade your efforts? Then you know that many insects are extremely agile fliers. In his three talks, Dr. Michael Dickinson uses aerodynamics, muscle physiology and neuroscience to explain how flies fly. In Part 1, Dickinson focuses on lift. How do insects generate t
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Michael Dickinson (CalTech) 1: How Flies Fly: Lift
https://www.ibiology.org/biophysics/how-flies-fly Have you ever tried to catch a flying fly only to be frustrated by their ability to evade your efforts? Then you know that many insects are extremely agile fliers. In his three talks, Dr. Michael Dickinson uses aerodynamics, muscle physiology and neuroscience to explain how flies fly. In Part 1, Dickinson focuses on lift. How do insects generate t
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Jane Goodall: We Can Learn From This Pandemic
In a teleconference promoting her participation in Earth Day events on the National Geographic Channel, Jane Goodall talked about what gives her hope during this pandemic, and what she hopes we all… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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UK coronavirus policy places people aged 60-69 at increased risk
The 7.3 million people in the UK aged between 60 and 69 are at increased risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19. Although the government's age threshold for isolation is 70 years and over, data from countries such as China and Italy show that people aged 60-69 years are also at high risk of complications and death from COVID-19.
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Study sheds light on unique culinary traditions of prehistoric hunter-gatherers
A new study suggests the culinary tastes of ancient people were not solely dictated by the foods available in a particular area, but also influenced by the traditions and habits of cultural groups.
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Opposition MPs and peers call for universal basic income after lockdown
Regular payment needed to ward off deeper crisis after virus support ends, warns cross-party group
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The Theorem that Applies to Everything from Search Algorithms to Epidemiology
Extolling the many virtues of the Perron-Frobenius theorem and linear algebra — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Social isolation linked to higher risk of hospital admission for respiratory disease in older adults
Social isolation is linked to a heightened risk of hospital admission for respiratory disease among older adults, suggests research published online in the journal Thorax.
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NHS charging rules for non-residents 'unworkable' and harming wider UK health system
The current NHS regulations for charging those not ordinarily resident in the UK for treatment, such as migrants and short term visitors, are 'unworkable' and harmful to the wider health system, concludes an analysis of survey responses, published in BMJ Paediatrics Open.
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Antibody surveys suggesting vast undercount of coronavirus infections may be unreliable
Critics question accuracy of tests and media promotion before full results are published
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New U.S. Treatment Guidelines for Covid-19 Don't See Much Progress
A panel of experts said there was insufficient evidence about many drugs that have been considered as possible remedies for coronavirus patients, including some President Trump has advocated.
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Author Correction: Thermal equation of state of ruthenium characterized by resistively heated diamond anvil cell
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63865-0
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A Brief History of Chimps in Space
NASA trained dozens of 'astrochimps' as part of Project Mercury, America's mission to put a human in space.
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Will Asia Rewrite Human History?
Politics, geography and tradition have long focused archaeological attention on the evolution of Homo sapiens in Europe and Africa. Now, new research is challenging old ideas by showing that early human migrations unfolded across Asia earlier.
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FirstFT: Today's top stories
Your daily news briefing
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Allergy impact from invasive weed 'underestimated'
The impact on human health of an invasive ragweed plant may be "seriously underestimated".
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Coronavirus Infections May Not Be Uncommon, Tests Suggest
Two preliminary efforts to survey citizens for antibodies to the virus have produced controversial results.
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The researchers taking a gamble with antibody tests for coronavirus
Nature, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01163-5 Despite uncertainties, some scientists are betting that blood tests will help end lockdowns and get people back to work.
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South Africa unveils $26bn pandemic stimulus
Package includes request for IMF loan and aims to fend off looming hunger crisis
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Early marijuana use 'primes' the brain to enjoy cocaine, study suggests
In the study, adolescent and adult rats were first given a synthetic cannabinoid and then cocaine. The results showed that the young rats' brains were more sensitive to the effects of cocaine, but these effects weren't observed in the adult rats. The researchers suggest that research like this can help to develop better treatments for substance abuse disorders. A new study suggests that using mar
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New hybrid material improves the performance of silicon in Li-ion batteries
Researchers have developed a new hybrid material of mesoporous silicon microparticles and carbon nanotubes that can improve the performance of silicon in Li-ion batteries.
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Scientists: the Coronavirus Has Already Mutated Into 30+ Strains
New research suggests that SARS-CoV-2 , the virus that causes COVID-19, could have already mutated into more than 30 separate strains. The study found that different strains can generate vastly different levels of viral load as others, the South China Morning Post reports, making them far more dangerous. One strain, for example, appeared to generate 270 times the viral load — meaning the infected
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Eight science-backed tricks to make you feel less sad
The little things really can help. (Nappy.co/) Happiness can feel hard to find these days, but research shows that there are free and easy ways to help boost your mood—at least a bit. If you're feeling low, consider trying some of these evidence-based tricks to turn your day around. Drinking a cup of tea Scientists are still working on figuring out exactly how tea manages to placate our troubled
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Coronavirus crisis may finally prove that 'Japan Inc' does not exist
Three months on from the country's first officially recorded case, the 'all Japan' corporate instinct has not noticeably kicked in
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How SARS-CoV-2 gets into respiratory tissue — and how it may exploit one of our defenses
What makes SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind COVID-19, such a threat? A new study in the journal Cell, led by Jose Ordovas-Montanes, PhD at Boston Children's Hospital and Alex K. Shalek, PhD at MIT pinpoints the likely cell types the virus infects. Unexpectedly, it also shows that one of the body's main defenses against viral infections may actually help the virus infect those very cells.
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Snap outlines slowdown in ad growth
Revenue deceleration comes despite jump in use of social media platform during lockdowns
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False Negatives in Quick COVID-19 Test Near 15 Percent: Study
Abbott's ID NOW test missed the most positive samples among five products given the green light by the FDA to use during the pandemic.
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From the Editors: We Can Beat Covid-19. Just Trust Science and Hold the Line
The really important thing about science is that it lets people understand the world *together*. And we are all in this together, even if physically apart.
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On Earth Day, Grim Lessons for the COVID-19 Crisis
The administration's preference for economic interests over environmental interests is reflected in its attitude toward both climate change and COVID-19 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Compártenos tus fotos desde la trinchera del coronavirus
Nos gustaría saber de los médicos, enfermeros y trabajadores sanitarios que arriesgan la vida para salvarnos durante la pandemia del coronavirus. ¿Por qué estás haciendo lo que haces?
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Study identifies potential drug treatments for telomere diseases
Capping decades of research, a study in Cell Stem Cell may offer a breakthrough in treating dyskeratosis congenita and other so-called telomere diseases, in which cells age prematurely. Using cells donated by patients, researchers at the Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center identified several small molecules that appear to rebuild telomere and reverse this cellular aging
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Computer scientists create a 'laboratory' to improve streaming video
The quality of internet TV depends on algorithms that minimize glitches and stalls. Scientists recruited volunteer who helped improve them simply by watching.
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Researchers develop new microneedle array combination vaccine delivery system
In parallel to their current work on a potential coronavirus vaccine, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have developed a new vaccine delivery system for vaccines using live or attenuated viral vectors: a finger-tip sized patch that contains 400 tiny needles, each just half of one millimeter. Their progress is reported in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, publis
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FDA Approves First At-Home Coronavirus Test
The dearth of testing put the US at a major disadvantage as the coronavirus pandemic began snowballing earlier this year. Even now, it can be tough to get a test unless you're showing severe symptoms of COVID-19 infection. Testing might be easier to access soon, provided you're willing to drop some cash on an at-home test. LabCorp has announced its new "Pixel" test kit has received the first Emer
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NIH Panel Recommends Against Drug Combination Promoted By Trump For COVID-19
The group of experts, assembled under the agency run by Dr. Anthony Fauci, warns that using a combination of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin could result in potential toxicities. (Image credit: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images)
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Storing up trouble beyond energy
Mike Mackenzie's daily analysis of what's moving global markets
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NASA: Something Is Off About This Interstellar Comet
In 2019, astronomers made an incredible discovery: a comet from a different star system making a close approach to the Sun at an extremely unusual trajectory, which was later named " 2I/Borisov " after the amateur astronomer who discovered it. Observations suggest that its home star system could resemble our own . NASA scientists have even suggested that the object may hold water . Now, a new stu
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These Healthy Habits Can Protect Your Lungs From Coronavirus
For many Americans, the potential for contracting COVID-19 can be high. Here's how to offset your risk.
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Could Curbing Runaway Immune Responses Treat COVID-19?
Drugs targeting patients' immune systems, rather than the virus itself, could be key to recovery from severe cases of the disease, some researchers suggest.
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Coronavirus Updates: The Latest In The U.S. Response
NPR economics, science and politics correspondents relay the latest in the response to the coronavirus epidemic in the United States.
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On Earth Day, Grim Lessons for the COVID-19 Crisis
The administration's preference for economic interests over environmental interests is reflected in its attitude toward both climate change and COVID-19 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Filling Arctic With Giant Animals Could Slow Climate Change
Takes An Army In order to protect the Arctic from the ravages of climate change, a team of scientists has a bizarre plan. The idea, CBS News reports , is to fill the Arctic with hordes of grazing animals like reindeer and bison, which would help keep the permafrost frozen by trampling it — a trick they say could save 80 percent of the Arctic's permafrost until the year 2100. Stomping Ground When
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These Reusable Cotton Kitchen Towels Are The Eco-Friendly Way To Clean Counters
Futurism fans: To create this content, a non-editorial team worked with an affiliate partner. We may collect a small commission on items purchased through this page. This post does not necessarily reflect the views or the endorsement of the Futurism.com editorial staff. Paper towels are a great thing to have around the kitchen for cleaning up messes and spills. But like most other disposable prod
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Is it safe to spin-dry leafy greens in a washing machine?
Some of the nearly 1,000 small farmers in New England who grow leafy greens use a creative, efficient and cost-effective method of drying the fresh veggies after a triple dip in water: a conventional home washing machine.
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SCAI, ACC, and ACEP release consensus on managing AMI patients during COVID-19
The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) have released a consensus statement that provides recommendations for a systematic approach for the care of patients with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) during the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The document is jointly pu
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New algorithm to help process biological images
Skoltech researchers have presented a new biological image processing method that accurately picks out specific biological objects in complex images. Their results will be presented as an oral talk at the high-profile computer vision conference, CVPR 2020.
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Is it safe to spin-dry leafy greens in a washing machine?
Some of the nearly 1,000 small farmers in New England who grow leafy greens use a creative, efficient and cost-effective method of drying the fresh veggies after a triple dip in water: a conventional home washing machine.
5h
Protecting yourself from the latest internet sex crime
Researchers from Michigan State University released a study on "sextortion"—a lesser-known internet crime that poses a threat to adults and minors—that sheds light on the importance of protecting the public from online criminals.
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Weak winds in the Pacific drove record-breaking 2019 summertime marine heat wave
Weakened wind patterns likely spurred the wave of extreme ocean heat that swept the North Pacific last summer, according to new research led by the University of Colorado Boulder and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. The marine heat wave, named the "Blob 2.0" after 2013's "Blob," likely damaged marine ecosystems and hurt coastal fisheries. Waters of
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Study on health workers exposed to COVID-19 needs volunteers
The nation's largest prospective study of health care workers exposed to COVID-19 includes a series of clinical trials that will explore new drug treatments, antibody testing, and long-term health tracking. Close to 550 health care providers and close to 300 non-health care workers from Rutgers University, University Hospital in Newark, and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick
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Antimalarials widely used against COVID-19 heighten risk of cardiac arrest. How can doctors minimize the danger?
Cardiologists urge careful monitoring of patients on chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine
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Coronavirus Live Updates: Senate Passes $484 Billion Aid Package
Oil prices cratered. Mayors in Georgia pushed back on the governor's decision to reopen the state.
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Coronavirus World News: Live Updates
In southern Italy, the pandemic is choking an already fragile economy. Protests erupt in Lebanon.
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Protecting yourself from the latest internet sex crime
Researchers from Michigan State University released a study on 'sextortion' — a lesser-known internet crime that poses a threat to adults and minors — that sheds light on the importance of protecting the public from online criminals.
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New study shows sharp decrease of intimate partner violence in Nicaragua
The percentage of women and girls in Nicaragua's second-largest city who reported experiencing physical violence by their partners during their lifetimes decreased from 55% in 1995 to 28% in 2016, according to a new study published in the journal BMJ Global Health.
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More U.S. Labs Could Be Providing Coronavirus Tests
An online survey reveals bottlenecks, challenges and barriers faced by more than 1,700 biology labs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Air Pollution, COVID-19 and Earth Day
The Trump Administration wants to scale back on Clean Air Act enforcement—even as we learn that places with more pollution have more coronavirus deaths — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Doctors Say COVID "Attacks" Blood Vessels Throughout Body
An international team of researchers say that the coronavirus doesn't just attack lungs — it also assaults blood vessels throughout the body. "This virus does not only attack the lungs, it attacks the vessels everywhere," University Hospital Zurich researcher Frank Ruschitzka, who worked on the research, told the South China Morning Post . "It enters the endothelium, which is the defense line of
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Study: Hydroxychloroquine Doesn't Help COVID, Increases Death Risk
Despite U.S. president Donald Trump singing its praises time and time again, the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine is proving to be a pretty terrible — and potentially dangerous — way to treat COVID-19, as The Daily Beast reports . "It's a very strong, powerful medicine," Trump told reporters earlier this month, hyping the drug. "But it doesn't kill people. We have some very good results and s
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CRISPR helps identify potential Alzheimer's-related protein
Experts have identified a new protein in the pathway that leads to Alzheimer's disease. Researchers used the 'molecular scissors' of CRISPR/Cas9 to search for new genes related to the neurodegenerative disease. Researchers tested a total of 19,150 individual genes for their effect on amyloid beta levels and ruled out all but one: calcium and integrin-binding protein 1 (CIB1).
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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
Preparing for battle: how hospitalists can manage the stress of COVID-19.
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Human pregnancy is weird — new research adds to the mystery
Scientists set out to investigate the evolution of a gene that helps women stay pregnant: the progesterone receptor gene. The results come from an analysis of the DNA of 115 mammalian species.
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Pulse oximetry monitoring overused in infants with bronchiolitis
Monitoring blood oxygen levels with continuous pulse oximetry is being overused in infants with bronchiolitis who do not require supplemental oxygen, according to a new study. The researchers found the use of continuous pulse oximetry occurred frequently and varied widely among hospitals in their sample, despite national recommendations advising against the practice.
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How the brain recognizes change
A research team revealed in an animal study a previously unknown role of a presynaptic adhesion molecule to tell the new change by regulating postsynaptic NMDA-type receptor responses at excitatory synapses.
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Cool down fast to advance quantum nanotechnology
An international team of scientists have found an easy way to trigger an unusual state of matter called a Bose-Einstein condensate. The new method is expected to help advance the research and development of quantum computing at room temperature.
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CRISPR helps identify potential Alzheimer's-related protein
Experts have identified a new protein in the pathway that leads to Alzheimer's disease. Researchers used the 'molecular scissors' of CRISPR/Cas9 to search for new genes related to the neurodegenerative disease. Researchers tested a total of 19,150 individual genes for their effect on amyloid beta levels and ruled out all but one: calcium and integrin-binding protein 1 (CIB1).
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Reporting Your Weather Observations Aids NASA in Climate Science Research
ISeeChange partners with NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory 2 mission to ground-truth data from satellites with earthbound observations.
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Hancock under pressure over testing as blame game begins
Health secretary has committed UK to 100,000 daily tests by end of April
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Anti-Quarantine Protests Are Dangerous and Weird
Please don't make them seem more normal than they are.
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UK ministers struggle for control of coronavirus strategy
Conflicting versions of why government failed to join EU's PPE procurement scheme
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5 Rules for Rooming With Lab Animals During Coronavirus
Coronavirus has prompted many scientists to make space in their homes for their lab animals.
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Air Pollution, COVID-19 and Earth Day
The Trump Administration wants to scale back on Clean Air Act enforcement—even as we learn that places with more pollution have more coronavirus deaths — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Researchers identify link between obesity and sleep loss in worms
Can staying up late make you fat? Researchers found the opposite to be true when they studied sleep in worms: It's not the sleep loss that leads to obesity, but rather that excess weight can cause poor sleep.
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How the blob came back
Weakened wind patterns likely spurred the wave of extreme ocean heat that swept the North Pacific last summer, according to new research led by the University of Colorado Boulder and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego.
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Astrophysicists discover exotic merger of black holes
Gravitational wave researchers at LIGO and Virgo observatories spot black holes of different sizes colliding. The finding is unusual because previous black hole mergers involved partners of similar size. The new information re-confirms Einstein's theory of relativity. Gravitational wave researchers discovered a very unusual merger of black holes 2.4 billion light-years away. They spotted a collis
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How to care for your car if you're not driving it very often
Even sitting in a parking garage for extended periods can be bad for your ride. (Pixabay /) Spending too much time sitting around can be bad for your body—and the same is true for your car. But in reality, that can be difficult during the current pandemic as shelter-in-place orders have drastically reduced traffic by up to 60 percent in some areas. "A car is a machine and it was meant to be opera
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Engineers develop way to improve efficiency and heat tolerance of devices
When it comes to increasing electric storage efficiency and electric breakdown strength — the ability of an electrical system to operate at higher voltage and temperatures with great efficiency — increasing one traditionally has led to a decrease in the other. Researchers recently developed a scalable method that relies on engineered materials to increase both properties.
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An unequal society means covid-19 is hitting ethnic minorities harder
People from an ethnic minority are disproportionately affected by covid-19. Researchers say the reasons are rooted in existing social and healthcare inequalities
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Scientists identify cause of leakiness in eye diseases
Scientists have identified a key step in the process that leads to leaky vessels and harmful swelling in eye diseases.
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Modelling wrinkling and buckling in materials that form the basis of flexible electronics
A new article aims to understand how materials used in flexible electronics behave under stress and strain, particularly, how they wrinkle and buckle.
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Water replaces toxins: Green production of plastics
A new way to synthesize polymers, called hydrothermal synthesis, can be used to produce important high-performance materials in a way which is much better for the environment. Dangerous toxins which usually have to be used to produce theses polymers can be substituted by water.
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Milestone for the early detection of sepsis
Researchers are developing a ground-breaking method that uses biomarkers to detect sepsis 2 to 3 days before the first clinical symptoms appear. This can significantly increase the chances of survival in cases of blood poisoning by bacteria or fungi.
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Heavy cost of excessive drinking on people's decision making
A new study highlights how hangover inhibits individuals' 'core executive functions' with knock-on impacts for those currently working from home.
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Engineers develop way to improve efficiency and heat tolerance of devices
When it comes to increasing electric storage efficiency and electric breakdown strength — the ability of an electrical system to operate at higher voltage and temperatures with great efficiency — increasing one traditionally has led to a decrease in the other. Researchers recently developed a scalable method that relies on engineered materials to increase both properties.
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New model to improve accuracy of storm surge analysis
A new international study applied a novel statistical method that — for the first time — captures the important interactions between tides and storm surges. These natural forces are caused by meteorological effects, such as strong winds and low atmospheric pressure, and their impacts have often been difficult to understand because of the complexity of Mother Nature.
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The Guardian view on tackling the coronavirus: get the basics right | Editorial
Other democracies have kept death tolls low by using a combination of social distancing, tight travel restrictions, mass testing and contact tracing. Why can't the UK? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage In the late 1980s, the biggest medical puzzle of the day was how to design an HIV vaccine. Dozens of well-funded laboratories were on the case and a solution seemed with
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Studying our galaxy's 'water worlds'
In seeking to learn more about Neptune-like exoplanets, an international team of researchers has provided one of the first mineralogy lab studies for water-rich exoplanets.
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Advancing high temperature electrolysis: Splitting water to store energy as hydrogen
Recently, researchers developed a new electrode material for an electrochemical cell that can efficiently convert excess electricity and water into hydrogen. When demand for electricity increases, the electrochemical cell is reversible, converting hydrogen back into electricity for the grid. The hydrogen could also be used as fuel for heat, vehicles or other applications.
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Glaucoma could be successfully treated with gene therapy
A new study has shown a common eye condition, glaucoma, could be successfully treated with a single injection using gene therapy, which would improve treatment options, effectiveness and quality of life for many patients.
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Industry warns over face mask shortage for public
Health chiefs fear change of scientific advice could put further strain on NHS supplies
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Rotating galaxies galore: New results from ALPINE reveal what appear to be spiral galaxies in the infant universe
New results from an ambitious sky survey program, called ALPINE, reveal that rotating disk-shaped galaxies may have existed in large numbers earlier in the universe than previously thought.
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UN says covid-19 pandemic will double number of people facing hunger
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Reply to Serra et al.: Nucleotide substitutions in plant viroid genomes that multiply in phytopathogenic fungi [Letters (Online Only)]
This is our response to the letter by Serra et al. (1), which questioned our recent paper (2) describing plant viroid infections in phytopathogenic fungi. In this study, full-length monomeric cDNA clones of seven plant viroid RNA genomes were produced using oligonucleotide synthesis (2). We opted for the monomeric version…
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Multiple antisocial personalities? [Letters (Online Only)]
Engelmann et al. ask whether "personality traits [can] help us better understand economic behavior across strategic contexts" (ref. 1, p. 12781), and, as an answer to this, identify "an antisocial personality profile" (APP) (ref. 1, p. 12785). There is much to like about this investigation; in particular, it illustrates "that…
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Reply to Schild et al.: Antisocial personality moderates the causal influence of costly punishment on trust and trustworthiness [Letters (Online Only)]
A growing literature at the intersection of personality psychology and behavioral economics investigates the interplay between personality and decision making in social dilemmas (1, 2). Engelmann et al. (3) extend prior research in this area by investigating the role of antisocial personality in the context of a trust game with…
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Mitch Allmond: Shaping a better fundamental understanding of matter
In the Physics Division of the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, James ("Mitch") Allmond conducts experiments and uses theoretical models to advance our understanding of the structure of atomic nuclei, which are made of various combinations of protons and neutrons (nucleons).
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Got seasonal allergies? Beetles could help
Allergies caused by the common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, impact millions, and in Europe alone, around 13.5 million people suffer with symptoms, resulting in 7.4 billion Euros worth of health costs per year, according to the research. The study suggests the leaf beetle, Ophraella communa, could reduce the number of people affected by the pollen and the associated economic impacts, since the
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New scavenger technology allows robots to 'eat' metal for energy
New research is bridging the gap between batteries and energy harvesters like solar panels. Their 'metal-air scavenger' gets the best of both worlds.
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Coronavirus found in Paris sewage points to early warning system
Rising levels of SARS-CoV-2 detected in wastewater before corresponding spike in clinical cases
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This Black-Hole Collision Just Made Gravitational Waves Even More Interesting
An unprecedented signal from unevenly sized objects gives astronomers rare insight into how black holes spin — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New scavenger technology allows robots to 'eat' metal for energy
New research is bridging the gap between batteries and energy harvesters like solar panels. Their 'metal-air scavenger' gets the best of both worlds.
6h
Advancing high temperature electrolysis: Splitting water to store energy as hydrogen
Recently, researchers developed a new electrode material for an electrochemical cell that can efficiently convert excess electricity and water into hydrogen. When demand for electricity increases, the electrochemical cell is reversible, converting hydrogen back into electricity for the grid. The hydrogen could also be used as fuel for heat, vehicles or other applications.
6h
Businesses apply for £1.5bn of state aid for furloughed workers
Accountants raise concerns over issues on the platform as 185,000 companies apply in first 24 hours
6h
The Next Public Health Crisis: Mass Unemployment
Poor access to health insurance will afflict patients, health systems and states — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Christian Health Sharing Group Is Target of Customer Lawsuits
State regulators in New York and elsewhere are also trying to stop the marketing of plans they say look like health insurance but offer no guarantees of coverage.
6h
Listen: Immunity Passports
On this episode of Social Distance , staff writer Sarah Zhang joins Katherine Wells and James Hamblin to talk about the limits of antibody testing, whether we'll be carrying around cards with our immunity status, and the lessons she's learned from reporting on past epidemics. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to rece
6h
Penn Engineers' 'nanocardboard' flyers could serve as martian atmospheric probes
Penn Engineers are suggesting a new way to explore the sky: tiny aircraft that weigh about as much as a fruit fly and have no moving parts.These flyers are plates of 'nanocardboard,' which levitate when bright light is shone on them. As one side heats up, the temperature differential gets air circulating through its hollow structure and shooting out of the corrugated channels that give it its name
6h
The Next Public Health Crisis: Mass Unemployment
Poor access to health insurance will afflict patients, health systems and states — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Astronomers say exoplanet was actually a dust cloud
The exoplanet Fomalhaut b in a nearby star system likely never existed, say astronomers. Their analysis points to a vast, expanding cloud of dust instead—likely from a cosmic collision. "Clearly, Fomalhaut b was doing things a bona fide planet should not be doing." The astronomers conclude that NASA's Hubble Space Telescope was looking at an expanding cloud of very fine dust particles from two ic
7h
UK MPs agree historic 'virtual parliament'
Members of the House of Commons to participate via Zoom to ensure social distancing
7h
As Earth Day turns 50, green movement faces fresh challenges
Gina McCarthy remembers the way things used to be: Tar balls clinging to her legs after swimming in Boston Harbor. The Merrimack River colored bright blue and green by textile mill chemicals. Black smoke everywhere.
7h
Toddlers born with Zika virus seem to be affected in multiple ways
Thousands of babies were born with severe brain damage after the 2015 Zika outbreak. New findings could tell us which therapies could help them most
7h
Poll: Most Americans Think Anti-Quarantine Protesters Are Idiots
You know those protests full of angry people who want the quarantine to end so they can get a haircut or dine out at Applebee's? Well, despite the national attention the protests have garnered, they're actually pretty unpopular across the political spectrum, according to a poll by Yahoo News and YouGov. More than half of the roughly 1,600 Americans who responded oppose the protests — a majority t
7h
Media literacy can improve child nutrition, family relationships
A new study shows that building critical media skills as a family can have a positive impact on kids' nutrition without restricting their access to TV and computers. Researchers found that an education program that had parents and kids learn media literacy skills together not only helped children eat more fruits and vegetables but also improved communication between parents and their kids.
7h
LGBTQ military service members at higher risk of sexual harassment, assault, stalking
A recent study found that LGBTQ service members face an elevated risk of sexual victimization including harassment, assault and stalking while in the military than their non-LGBTQ counterparts.
7h
Human papillomavirus confers radiosensitivity in oropharyngeal cancer cells
The cover for issue 16 of Oncotarget features Figure 6, 'Radiation-induced DNA damage measured by γ-H2AX foci formation at a specified time point after 10 Gy irradiation,' by Zhang, et al.
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The coronavirus pandemic is a dress rehearsal for what awaits us if governments continue to ignore science | John Hewson
Leaders have failed to listen to clear warnings and predictions, but the response to Covid-19 is an inspiring indication of what we're capable of The coronavirus pandemic should be seen as a dress rehearsal for what awaits us if we continue to ignore the laws of science, the physical world and the demands of several catastrophic threats such as climate change. Just as Australia was disturbingly u
7h
CRISPR helps find new class of leukemia genes
Using CRISPR technology, scientists have discovered several new leukemia genes not previously known to have involvement in blood cancers, according to a new study. The researchers then used the powerful new data to paint a clearer map for how aggressive leukemia arises and grows. The paper in Nature Cancer points to several significant discoveries: It unveils a new gene, Staufen 2 (Stau2), that r
7h
Resistance bands that will take your workout to the next level
Stretch it out. (Geert Pieters via Unsplash/) There's only so much that running in the park will do to keep you feeling strong and toned. Luckily, there are lots of ways to make your at-home workouts more effective without having to throw down for a Peloton. Resistance bands are an affordable and effective way to light up your floor routine. Squats with a resistance band will make you feel the bu
7h
Oil price turmoil reveals depths of economic pain
Governments must be mindful to preserve global production capacity
7h
Gene discovery only adds to pregnancy mystery
New results from research on a gene that helps women stay pregnant, the progesterone receptor gene, only add to the mysteries of pregnancy, researchers report. From an evolutionary perspective, human pregnancy is quite strange, says Vincent Lynch, an assistant professor of biological sciences at the University at Buffalo. "For example, we don't know why human women go into labor," Lynch says. "Hu
7h
The Social-Distance Vigilantes in a Massachusetts Senior Home
Lucian Leape was losing patience. Brookhaven, the senior-living facility where he is a resident, had imposed strict social-distancing rules in March to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, but as recently as last week, according to Leape, some residents were still driving off campus and congregating in small groups. One met with family members who had delivered food. Another got in a car accide
7h
The Party of the Aggrieved
T he day after announcing guidelines the nation's governors can use to carry out an orderly reopening of their states, which are in the grip of a pandemic, President Donald Trump—through his weapon of choice , Twitter—openly encouraged protests against the social-distancing restrictions that have saved tens of thousands of American lives. As The New York Times reported , in so doing, the presiden
7h
Photos: Staying Fit Under Lockdown
Professional and amateur athletes, performers, and dancers around the world are learning to improvise to continue their training amid coronavirus lockdowns. Photographers in Australia, Germany, France, and New Zealand captured some of these dancers, weight lifters, rowers, cyclists, and more, all trying to stay fit at home using the spaces and equipment they have on hand.
7h
Establish contingency plans to meet COVID-19 surge in urban areas
In 'Mobilization and Preparation of a Large Urban Academic Center During the COVID-19 Pandemic,'- published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society – experts from Philadelphia's Temple University Hospital share their contingency plans for meeting an increased demand for hospitalization, as well as their protocols and training plans to minimize health care staff exposure to COVID-19 a
7h
Advancing high temperature electrolysis: Splitting water to store energy as hydrogen
While energy sources such as wind and solar are great at producing emissions-free electricity, they depend on the sun and the wind, so supply doesn't always meet the demand. Likewise, nuclear power plants operate more efficiently at maximum capacity so that electricity generation can't be easily ramped up or down to match demand.
7h
Scientists lead study of galaxy's 'water worlds'
Astrophysical observations have shown that Neptune-like water-rich exoplanets are common in our galaxy. These "water worlds" are believed to be covered with a thick layer of water, hundreds to thousands of miles deep, above a rocky mantle.
7h
New Research: There Might Not Be a Planet Nine After All
A new study by astronomers at the University of Pennsylvania brings into question the existence of Planet Nine — a long-suspected ninth planet in our solar system that orbits the Sun beyond Neptune, New Scientist reports . Since 2014, astronomers have proposed a variety of possibilities that could explain strange behavior exhibited by "trans-Neptunian objects" — small celestial bodies that orbit
7h
Rice genetically engineered to resist heat waves can also produce up to 20% more grain
A simple genetic change appears to help plants repair heat-damaged photosynthetic machinery
7h
Star's loops around a giant black hole uphold Einstein's predictions
Nature, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01149-3 The supermassive black hole at the core of the Milky Way adds to support for general relativity.
7h
New macrolactone database could aid drug discovery, research
Researchers from North Carolina State University and Collaborations Pharmaceuticals have created a free-to-use database of 14,000 known macrolactones—large molecules used in drug development—which contains information about the molecular characteristics, chemical diversity and biological activities of this structural class. The database, called MacrolactoneDB, fills a knowledge gap concerning thes
7h
NASA and ESA Lay Groundwork for Mars Sample Return Mission
Scientists have dreamed for decades of getting samples direct from Mars, and this fantasy could become reality in the next decade. NASA's upcoming Perseverance rover will set the stage for a future sample return mission, and NASA has partnered with the European Space Agency (ESA) to get those samples back. In a recent virtual news conference, NASA's Mars exploration team talked about the agency's
7h
International team develops new model to improve accuracy of storm surge analysis
Accurately predicting how many people are at risk due to sea level rise and storm surges has always challenged scientists, but a new method is improving models that account for the impact of these natural occurrences.
7h
N26 battens down the hatches; dv01's loan data; Libra reined in
N26 hunkers down as coronavirus hits spending
7h
This Grad Student Used a Neural Network to Write His Papers
Back when artificial intelligence development company OpenAI created the text-writing algorithm GPT-2, it initially said it was too dangerous to release into the world. Of course, it eventually did did release a full version of the neural network . By and large, it turned out that people were more interested in using GPT-2 as an AI dungeon master than churning out the endless torrent of fake news
7h
As Coronavirus Spreads, Poison Hotlines See Rise in Accidents With Cleaning Products
A new study suggests a link between the increase and recommendations to clean and disinfect.
8h
Lyrid Meteor Shower 2020: Watch It Peak in Night Skies
Meteor showers can light up night skies from dusk to dawn, and if you're lucky you might be able to catch a glimpse.
8h
High-quality boron nitride grown at atmospheric pressure
Graphene Flagship researchers at RWTH Aachen University, Germany and ONERA-CNRS, France, in collaboration with researchers at the Peter Grunberg Institute, Germany, the University of Versailles, France, and Kansas State University, US, have reported a significant step forward in growing monoisotopic hexagonal boron nitride at atmospheric pressure for the production of large and very high-quality c
8h
Advancing high temperature electrolysis: Splitting water to store energy as hydrogen
Recently, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory developed a new electrode material for an electrochemical cell that can efficiently convert excess electricity and water into hydrogen. When demand for electricity increases, the electrochemical cell is reversible, converting hydrogen back into electricity for the grid. The hydrogen could also be used as fuel for heat, vehicles or other applicatio
8h
Coronavirus pushes unemployment in Ireland to 'unprecedented' level
Finance minister warns economy will contract more than 10% this year in 'severe' recession
8h
Mischaracterization of bison migratory patterns in Yellowstone National Park: Consequences for the Green Wave Hypothesis [Letters (Online Only)]
Geremia et al. (1) analyze a range of data on bison movement, remotely sensed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and plant dietary quality at Yellowstone National Park to test tenets of the Green Wave Hypothesis (GWH). The authors conclude that bison migrate in concert with plant phenological development along elevational gradients…
8h
Reply to Craine: Bison redefine what it means to move to find food [Letters (Online Only)]
Ecologists accept the Forage Maturation Hypothesis (FMH) that young plants optimize food quality by balancing nutrient and biomass availability (1). The Green Wave Hypothesis (GWH) applies the FMH to migrating herbivores by linking the timing, pace, and extent of migrations to waves of new plant growth (2, 3). The GWH…
8h
Reconciling global priorities for conserving biodiversity habitat [Ecology]
Degradation and loss of natural habitat is the major driver of the current global biodiversity crisis. Most habitat conservation efforts to date have targeted small areas of highly threatened habitat, but emerging debate suggests that retaining large intact natural systems may be just as important. We reconcile these perspectives by…
8h
Extent of Fermi-surface reconstruction in the high-temperature superconductor HgBa2CuO4+{delta} [Physics]
High magnetic fields have revealed a surprisingly small Fermi surface in underdoped cuprates, possibly resulting from Fermi-surface reconstruction due to an order parameter that breaks translational symmetry of the crystal lattice. A crucial issue concerns the doping extent of such a state and its relationship to the principal pseudogap and…
8h
Optimizing Rhizobium-legume symbioses by simultaneous measurement of rhizobial competitiveness and N2 fixation in nodules [Agricultural Sciences]
Legumes tend to be nodulated by competitive rhizobia that do not maximize nitrogen (N2) fixation, resulting in suboptimal yields. Rhizobial nodulation competitiveness and effectiveness at N2 fixation are independent traits, making their measurement extremely time-consuming with low experimental throughput. To transform the experimental assessment of rhizobial competitiveness and effectiveness, we.
8h
Phosphoinositides regulate chloroplast processes [Commentaries]
Phosphoinositides (PIs), the phosphorylated derivatives of the membrane glycerophospholipid phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), are minor constituents of eukaryotic cell membranes that play an important role as signaling molecules (1). The inositol ring can be phosphorylated at three positions and the seven resulting phosphorylated forms are dynamically interconverted and differentially distributed amo
8h
Metal ions confinement defines the architecture of G-quartet, G-quadruplex fibrils and their assembly into nematic tactoids [Chemistry]
G-quadruplex, assembled from a square array of guanine (G) molecules, is an important structure with crucial biological roles in vivo but also a versatile template for ordered functional materials. Although the understanding of G-quadruplex structures is the focus of numerous studies, little is known regarding the control of G-quartet stacking…
8h
Closing the gap between mind and brain with the dynamic connectome [Commentaries]
At the pinnacle of the 17th century scientific revolution, René Descartes, the father of modern philosophy, published his monumental Meditations on First Philosophy (1), in which he proposed a division between soul and body—mind and brain—with the former in charge of our thoughts and conscious decisions (res cogitans) and the…
8h
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
Carbon content of Earth's core Cutaway of Earth showing the core. Image credit: PublicDomainPictures.net/alex grichenko. The total amount of carbon on Earth—the bulk carbon content—is poorly understood due to uncertainty in the amount of carbon in Earth's core, where most carbon is likely located. To better estimate the carbon content…
8h
The phylogenetic tree of boosting has a bushy carriage but a single trunk [Physical Sciences]
The phylogenetic tree of boosting has a bushy carriage, with early influencers: Ref. 1 was undoubtedly one for the making and use of popular application packages, some used nowadays in almost every Kaggle competition (2), and in that respect it is an understatement to say that the recent work of…
8h
Reply to Nock and Nielsen: On the work of Nock and Nielsen and its relationship to the additive tree [Physical Sciences]
The observation that decision trees are boosting algorithms, as cited in our work (1) and acknowledged by Nock and Nielsen (2), was first established by refs. 3 and 4. This was later used by refs. 5 and 6 to develop, to the best of our knowledge, the first decision tree…
8h
Replications provide mixed evidence that inequality moderates the association between income and generosity [Social Sciences]
Schmukle et al. (1) conducted informative conceptual replications of our finding that economic inequality moderates the relationship between income and generosity (2). Schmukle et al. (1) did not find that inequality moderates associations between income and self-reported charitable donations (study 1), first- and second-mover trust game allocations (study 2), and…
8h
Reply to Cote and Willer: New replication attempts provide no evidence that inequality moderates the effect of income on generosity [Social Sciences]
Côté et al. (1) provided evidence that economic inequality moderates the effect of income on generosity. In their study, individuals with higher household income were less generous in a dictator game than poorer individuals only if they resided in a US state with comparatively large economic inequality. We questioned this…
8h
Identifying the pathways that control resource allocation in higher plants [Plant Biology]
A key feature in the evolution of multicellular organisms was the development of complex vascular systems to transport resources from sites of primary acquisition to sites of usage and storage. In plants, leaves generate the energy required to sustain multicellular growth through the reactions of photosynthesis, and much of that…
8h
From photosynthesis to photocatalysis: Dual catalytic oxidation/reduction in one system [Engineering]
Natural photosynthetic systems and photocatalysis share several fundamental processes in common including light energy conversion and utilization, such as exciton (excited state) generation/splitting and charge migration. The high efficiency of light conversion to chemical redox equivalents in natural photosynthesis is achieved by an electron transfer cascade resulting in a long-distance…
8h
Protein conformations a la carte, a step further in de novo protein design [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Proteins perform a spectrum of functions inside the cell, ranging from energy utilization to enzymatic activity to signaling, as well as structural and mechanical roles, among many others. Substantial research efforts throughout the years have focused on understanding these phenomena at the molecular level as well as the evolutionary processes…
8h
On the enigma of dating the Minoan eruption of Santorini [Anthropology]
The Greek island of Santorini (named Thera in ancient times) is located in the Aegean Sea and experienced a massive volcanic eruption some 3,600 y ago (∼1600 BCE). Recent geological investigations have concluded that the eruption was even more massive than originally thought (1). This eruption is commonly referred to…
8h
The role of the iterative modules in polyketide synthase evolution [Biochemistry]
Polyketide synthases (PKSs) assemble activated carboxylic acids to elaborate chemical compounds (1). The key synthetic step is the C-C bond-forming condensation of an acyl moiety (e.g., acetyl-coenzyme A [CoA]) with an α-carboxyacyl moiety (e.g., malonyl-CoA) on release of CO2. The emerging β-ketoacyl compound can optionally be further modified by three…
8h
Cryo-EM structure of eastern equine encephalitis virus in complex with heparan sulfate analogues [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), a mosquito-borne icosahedral alphavirus found mainly in North America, causes human and equine neurotropic infections. EEEV neurovirulence is influenced by the interaction of the viral envelope protein E2 with heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans from the host's plasma membrane during virus entry. Here, we present a…
8h
Earth 2020: Science, society, and sustainability in the Anthropocene [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
April 22, 2020, marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day and the birth of the modern environmental movement. As we look back over the past half century, we can gain significant insights into the evolving human imprint on Earth's biophysical systems, and the role of science and scientists in driving…
8h
Actuation and locomotion driven by moisture in paper made with natural pollen [Applied Biological Sciences]
Here we describe the development of a humidity-responsive sheet of paper that is derived solely from natural pollen. Adaptive soft material components of the paper exhibit diverse and well-integrated responses to humidity that promote shape reconfiguration, actuation, and locomotion. This mechanically versatile and nonallergenic paper can generate a cyclically high…
8h
Scale-free, programmable design of morphable chain loops of kilobots and colloidal motors [Applied Physical Sciences]
Micron-scale robots require systems that can morph into arbitrary target configurations controlled by external agents such as heat, light, electricity, and chemical environment. Achieving this behavior using conventional approaches is challenging because the available materials at these scales are not programmable like their macroscopic counterparts. To overcome this challenge, we…
8h
Expanding the genetic code of the human hematopoietic system [Biochemistry]
The genetic incorporation of noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins has been realized in bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells, and recently, in multicellular organisms including plants and animals. However, the addition of new building blocks to the genetic code of tissues from human origin has not yet been achieved. To…
8h
Reconstitution of polythioamide antibiotic backbone formation reveals unusual thiotemplated assembly strategy [Biochemistry]
Closthioamide (CTA) is a rare example of a thioamide-containing nonribosomal peptide and is one of only a handful of secondary metabolites described from obligately anaerobic bacteria. Although the biosynthetic gene cluster responsible for CTA production and the thioamide synthetase that catalyzes sulfur incorporation were recently discovered, the logic for peptide…
8h
CtIP promotes the motor activity of DNA2 to accelerate long-range DNA end resection [Biochemistry]
To repair a DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination, 5′-terminated DNA strands must first be resected to reveal 3′-overhangs. This process is initiated by a short-range resection catalyzed by MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) stimulated by CtIP, which is followed by a long-range step involving EXO1 or DNA2 nuclease. DNA2 is a bifunctional…
8h
Computational design of probes to detect bacterial genomes by multivalent binding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Rapid methods for diagnosis of bacterial infections are urgently needed to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics, which contributes to antimicrobial resistance. In many rapid diagnostic methods, DNA oligonucleotide probes, attached to a surface, bind to specific nucleotide sequences in the DNA of a target pathogen. Typically, each probe binds to…
8h
Modular repeat protein sculpting using rigid helical junctions [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The ability to precisely design large proteins with diverse shapes would enable applications ranging from the design of protein binders that wrap around their target to the positioning of multiple functional sites in specified orientations. We describe a protein backbone design method for generating a wide range of rigid fusions…
8h
Tubulin tails and their modifications regulate protein diffusion on microtubules [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Microtubules (MTs) are essential components of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton that serve as "highways" for intracellular trafficking. In addition to the well-known active transport of cargo by motor proteins, many MT-binding proteins seem to adopt diffusional motility as a transportation mechanism. However, because of the limited spatial resolution of current experimental…
8h
Kinetic control of stationary flux ratios for a wide range of biochemical processes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
One of the most intriguing features of biological systems is their ability to regulate the steady-state fluxes of the underlying biochemical reactions; however, the regulatory mechanisms and their physicochemical properties are not fully understood. Fundamentally, flux regulation can be explained with a chemical kinetic formalism describing the transitions between discrete…
8h
A model for the interplay between plastic tradeoffs and evolution in changing environments [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Performance tradeoffs are ubiquitous in both ecological and evolutionary modeling, yet they are usually postulated and built into fitness and ecological landscapes. However, tradeoffs depend on genetic background and evolutionary history and can themselves evolve. We present a simple model capable of capturing the key feedback loop: evolutionary history shapes…
8h
Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase inhibition activates a pathway that branches from the canonical amino acid response in mammalian cells [Cell Biology]
Signaling pathways that sense amino acid abundance are integral to tissue homeostasis and cellular defense. Our laboratory has previously shown that halofuginone (HF) inhibits the prolyl-tRNA synthetase catalytic activity of glutamyl-prolyl-tRNA synthetase (EPRS), thereby activating the amino acid response (AAR). We now show that HF treatment selectively inhibits inflammatory responses…
8h
Primary cilia control glucose homeostasis via islet paracrine interactions [Cell Biology]
Pancreatic islets regulate glucose homeostasis through coordinated actions of hormone-secreting cells. What underlies the function of the islet as a unit is the close approximation and communication among heterogeneous cell populations, but the structural mediators of islet cellular cross talk remain incompletely characterized. We generated mice specifically lacking β-cell primary…
8h
Hog1 activation delays mitotic exit via phosphorylation of Net1 [Cell Biology]
Adaptation to environmental changes is crucial for cell fitness. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, variations in external osmolarity trigger the activation of the stress-activated protein kinase Hog1 (high-osmolarity glycerol 1), which regulates gene expression, metabolism, and cell-cycle progression. The activation of this kinase leads to the regulation of G1, S, and G2…
8h
Ultratough graphene-black phosphorus films [Chemistry]
Graphene-based films with high toughness have many promising applications, especially for flexible energy storage and portable electrical devices. Achieving such high-toughness films, however, remains a challenge. The conventional mechanisms for improving toughness are crack arrest or plastic deformation. Herein we demonstrate black phosphorus (BP) functionalized graphene films with record toughne
8h
Pressure-induced amorphization and existence of molecular and polymeric amorphous forms in dense SO2 [Chemistry]
We report here the pressure-induced amorphization and reversible structural transformation between two amorphous forms of SO2: molecular amorphous and polymeric amorphous, with the transition found at 26 GPa over a broad temperature regime, 77 K to 300 K. The transformation was observed by both Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction in…
8h
The carbon content of Earth and its core [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Earth's core is likely the largest reservoir of carbon (C) in the planet, but its C abundance has been poorly constrained because measurements of carbon's preference for core versus mantle materials at the pressures and temperatures of core formation are lacking. Using metal–silicate partitioning experiments in a laser-heated diamond anvil…
8h
Depth-dependent soil mixing persists across climate zones [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Soil mixing over long (>102 y) timescales enhances nutrient fluxes that support soil ecology, contributes to dispersion of sediment and contaminated material, and modulates fluxes of carbon through Earth's largest terrestrial carbon reservoir. Despite its foundational importance, we lack robust understanding of the rates and patterns of soil mixing, largely…
8h
Dry and moist dynamics shape regional patterns of extreme precipitation sensitivity [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Responses of extreme precipitation to global warming are of great importance to society and ecosystems. Although observations and climate projections indicate a general intensification of extreme precipitation with warming on global scale, there are significant variations on the regional scale, mainly due to changes in the vertical motion associated with…
8h
Opinion: Why carbon pricing is not sufficient to mitigate climate change—and how "sustainability transition policy" can help [Economic Sciences]
Carbon pricing is often presented as the primary policy approach to address climate change. We challenge this position and offer "sustainability transition policy" (STP) as an alternative. Carbon pricing has weaknesses with regard to five central dimensions: 1) problem framing and solution orientation, 2) policy priorities, 3) innovation approach, 4)…
8h
The impact of penalties for wrong answers on the gender gap in test scores [Economic Sciences]
Multiple-choice examinations play a critical role in university admissions across the world. A key question is whether imposing penalties for wrong answers on these examinations deters guessing from women more than men, disadvantaging female test-takers. We consider data from a large-scale, high-stakes policy change that removed penalties for wrong answers…
8h
Multifunctional composites for elastic and electromagnetic wave propagation [Engineering]
Composites are ideally suited to achieve desirable multifunctional effective properties since the best properties of different materials can be judiciously combined with designed microstructures. Here, we establish cross-property relations for two-phase composite media that link effective elastic and electromagnetic wave characteristics to one another, including the respective effective wave speed
8h
The spatiotemporal spread of human migrations during the European Holocene [Environmental Sciences]
The European continent was subject to two major migrations of peoples during the Holocene: the northwestward movement of Anatolian farmer populations during the Neolithic and the westward movement of Yamnaya steppe peoples during the Bronze Age. These movements changed the genetic composition of the continent's inhabitants. The Holocene was also…
8h
The European Union Emissions Trading System reduced CO2 emissions despite low prices [Environmental Sciences]
International carbon markets are an appealing and increasingly popular tool to regulate carbon emissions. By putting a price on carbon, carbon markets reshape incentives faced by firms and reduce the value of emissions. How effective are carbon markets? Observers have tended to infer their effectiveness from market prices. The general…
8h
Human settlement of East Polynesia earlier, incremental, and coincident with prolonged South Pacific drought [Environmental Sciences]
The timing of human colonization of East Polynesia, a vast area lying between Hawai'i, Rapa Nui, and New Zealand, is much debated and the underlying causes of this great migration have been enigmatic. Our study generates evidence for human dispersal into eastern Polynesia from islands to the west from around…
8h
Bacterial flagellar motor PL-ring disassembly subcomplexes are widespread and ancient [Evolution]
The bacterial flagellum is an amazing nanomachine. Understanding how such complex structures arose is crucial to our understanding of cellular evolution. We and others recently reported that in several Gammaproteobacterial species, a relic subcomplex comprising the decorated P and L rings persists in the outer membrane after flagellum disassembly. Imaging…
8h
Exceptional diversity of opsin expression patterns in Neogonodactylus oerstedii (Stomatopoda) retinas [Evolution]
Stomatopod crustaceans possess some of the most complex animal visual systems, including at least 16 spectrally distinct types of photoreceptive units (e.g., assemblages of photoreceptor cells). Here we fully characterize the set of opsin genes expressed in retinal tissues and determine expression patterns of each in the stomatopod Neogonodactylus oerstedii….
8h
Convergent evolution of olfactory and thermoregulatory capacities in small amphibious mammals [Evolution]
Olfaction and thermoregulation are key functions for mammals. The former is critical to feeding, mating, and predator avoidance behaviors, while the latter is essential for homeothermy. Aquatic and amphibious mammals face olfactory and thermoregulatory challenges not generally encountered by terrestrial species. In mammals, the nasal cavity houses a bony system…
8h
Aquatic stem group myriapods close a gap between molecular divergence dates and the terrestrial fossil record [Evolution]
Identifying marine or freshwater fossils that belong to the stem groups of the major terrestrial arthropod radiations is a longstanding challenge. Molecular dating and fossils of their pancrustacean sister group predict that myriapods originated in the Cambrian, much earlier than their oldest known fossils, but uncertainty about stem group Myriapoda…
8h
Trade-off between somatic and germline repair in a vertebrate supports the expensive germ line hypothesis [Evolution]
The disposable soma theory is a central tenet of the biology of aging where germline immortality comes at the cost of an aging soma [T. B. L. Kirkwood, Nature 270, 301–304 (1977); T. B. L. Kirkwood, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci. 205, 531–546 (1979); T. B. L. Kirkwood,…
8h
Derived alleles of two axis proteins affect meiotic traits in autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa [Evolution]
Polyploidy, which results from whole genome duplication (WGD), has shaped the long-term evolution of eukaryotic genomes in all kingdoms. Polyploidy is also implicated in adaptation, domestication, and speciation. Yet when WGD newly occurs, the resulting neopolyploids face numerous challenges. A particularly pernicious problem is the segregation of multiple chromosome copies…
8h
Mapping the cis-regulatory architecture of the human retina reveals noncoding genetic variation in disease [Genetics]
The interplay of transcription factors and cis-regulatory elements (CREs) orchestrates the dynamic and diverse genetic programs that assemble the human central nervous system (CNS) during development and maintain its function throughout life. Genetic variation within CREs plays a central role in phenotypic variation in complex traits including the risk of…
8h
Gene drive and resilience through renewal with next generation Cleave and Rescue selfish genetic elements [Genetics]
Gene drive-based strategies for modifying populations face the problem that genes encoding cargo and the drive mechanism are subject to separation, mutational inactivation, and loss of efficacy. Resilience, an ability to respond to these eventualities in ways that restore population modification with functional genes, is needed for long-term success. Here,…
8h
The T1D-associated lncRNA Lnc13 modulates human pancreatic {beta} cell inflammation by allele-specific stabilization of STAT1 mRNA [Genetics]
The vast majority of type 1 diabetes (T1D) genetic association signals lie in noncoding regions of the human genome. Many have been predicted to affect the expression and secondary structure of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), but the contribution of these lncRNAs to the pathogenesis of T1D remains to be clarified….
8h
Cell-autonomous expression of the acid hydrolase galactocerebrosidase [Genetics]
Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are typically caused by a deficiency in a soluble acid hydrolase and are characterized by the accumulation of undegraded substrates in the lysosome. Determining the role of specific cell types in the pathogenesis of LSDs is a major challenge due to the secretion and subsequent uptake…
8h
Noncoding RNA MaIL1 is an integral component of the TLR4-TRIF pathway [Immunology and Inflammation]
RNA has been proposed as an important scaffolding factor in the nucleus, aiding protein complex assembly in the dense intracellular milieu. Architectural contributions of RNA to cytosolic signaling pathways, however, remain largely unknown. Here, we devised a multidimensional gradient approach, which systematically locates RNA components within cellular protein networks. Among…
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Combined proinflammatory cytokine and cognate activation of invariant natural killer T cells enhances anti-DNA antibody responses [Immunology and Inflammation]
Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells serve as early rapid responders in the innate immune response to self-derived autoantigens and pathogen-derived danger signals and antigens. iNKT cells can serve both as helpers for effector B cells and negatively regulate autoreactive B cells. Specifically, iNKT cells drive B cell proliferation, class…
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PHIP drives glioblastoma motility and invasion by regulating the focal adhesion complex [Medical Sciences]
The invasive behavior of glioblastoma is essential to its aggressive potential. Here, we show that pleckstrin homology domain interacting protein (PHIP), acting through effects on the force transduction layer of the focal adhesion complex, drives glioblastoma motility and invasion. Immunofluorescence analysis localized PHIP to the leading edge of glioblastoma cells,…
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A common polymorphism in the mechanosensitive ion channel PIEZO1 is associated with protection from severe malaria in humans [Microbiology]
Malaria caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum has served as a strong evolutionary force throughout human history, selecting for red blood cell polymorphisms that confer innate protection against severe disease. Recently, gain-of-function mutations in the mechanosensitive ion channel PIEZO1 were shown to ameliorate Plasmodium parasite growth, blood–brain barrier dysfunction,…
8h
A dual effect of ursolic acid to the treatment of multiple sclerosis through both immunomodulation and direct remyelination [Neuroscience]
Current multiple sclerosis (MS) medications are mainly immunomodulatory, having little or no effect on neuroregeneration of damaged central nervous system (CNS) tissue; they are thus primarily effective at the acute stage of disease, but much less so at the chronic stage. An MS therapy that has both immunomodulatory and neuroregenerative…
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Activity in grafted human iPS cell-derived cortical neurons integrated in stroke-inȷured rat brain regulates motor behavior [Neuroscience]
Stem cell transplantation can improve behavioral recovery after stroke in animal models but whether stem cell–derived neurons become functionally integrated into stroke-injured brain circuitry is poorly understood. Here we show that intracortically grafted human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell–derived cortical neurons send widespread axonal projections to both hemispheres of rats…
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Signature of a pair of Majorana zero modes in superconducting gold surface states [Physics]
Under certain conditions, a fermion in a superconductor can separate in space into two parts known as Majorana zero modes, which are immune to decoherence from local noise sources and are attractive building blocks for quantum computers. Promising experimental progress has been made to demonstrate Majorana zero modes in materials…
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Room-temperature skyrmion phase in bulk Cu2OSeO3 under high pressures [Physics]
A skyrmion state in a noncentrosymmetric helimagnet displays topologically protected spin textures with profound technological implications for high-density information storage, ultrafast spintronics, and effective microwave devices. Usually, its equilibrium state in a bulk helimagnet occurs only over a very restricted magnetic field–temperature phase space and often in the low-temperature region.
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Coherent modulation of the electron temperature and electron-phonon couplings in a 2D material [Physics]
Ultrashort light pulses can selectively excite charges, spins, and phonons in materials, providing a powerful approach for manipulating their properties. Here we use femtosecond laser pulses to coherently manipulate the electron and phonon distributions, and their couplings, in the charge-density wave (CDW) material 1T-TaSe2. After exciting the material with a…
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A Sec14 domain protein is required for photoautotrophic growth and chloroplast vesicle formation in Arabidopsis thaliana [Plant Biology]
In eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms, the conversion of solar into chemical energy occurs in thylakoid membranes in the chloroplast. How thylakoid membranes are formed and maintained is poorly understood. However, previous observations of vesicles adjacent to the stromal side of the inner envelope membrane of the chloroplast suggest a possible role…
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Distinct modes of manipulation of rice auxin response factor OsARF17 by different plant RNA viruses for infection [Plant Biology]
Plant auxin response factor (ARF) transcription factors are an important class of key transcriptional modulators in auxin signaling. Despite the well-studied roles of ARF transcription factors in plant growth and development, it is largely unknown whether, and how, ARF transcription factors may be involved in plant resistance to pathogens. We…
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Projecting hospital utilization during the COVID-19 outbreaks in the United States [Population Biology]
In the wake of community coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) transmission in the United States, there is a growing public health concern regarding the adequacy of resources to treat infected cases. Hospital beds, intensive care units (ICUs), and ventilators are vital for the treatment of patients with severe illness. To project…
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Inconsistent allocations of harms versus benefits may exacerbate environmental inequality [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
We report five studies that examine preferences for the allocation of environmental harms and benefits. In all studies, participants were presented with scenarios in which an existing environmental inequality between two otherwise similar communities could either be decreased or increased through various allocation decisions. Our results demonstrate that despite well-established…
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Scaling up psychology via Scientific Regret Minimization [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Do large datasets provide value to psychologists? Without a systematic methodology for working with such datasets, there is a valid concern that analyses will produce noise artifacts rather than true effects. In this paper, we offer a way to enable researchers to systematically build models and identify novel phenomena in…
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Latinos' deportation fears by citizenship and legal status, 2007 to 2018 [Social Sciences]
Deportation has become more commonplace in the United States since the mid-2000s. Latin American noncitizens—encompassing undocumented and documented immigrants—are targeted for deportation. Deportation's threat also reaches naturalized and US-born citizens of Latino descent who are largely immune to deportation but whose loved ones or communities are deportable. Drawing on 6…
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Correction for Johnson et al., Officer characteristics and racial disparities in fatal officer-involved shootings [Corrections]
PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction for "Officer characteristics and racial disparities in fatal officer-involved shootings," by David J. Johnson, Trevor Tress, Nicole Burkel, Carley Taylor, and Joseph Cesario, which was first published July 22, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1903856116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 15877–15882). The authors wish to note the following:…
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What helps couples weather financial storms
Experts have predicted that the COVID-19 pandemic will result in the worst financial crisis in the United States since the Great Depression. While the full scope of the financial fallout remains to be seen, furloughs, job losses and pay cuts resulting from the outbreak have already hit many people hard, and such financial challenges can put a significant strain on romantic relationships.
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Scientists shed new light on viral protein shell assembly
New insight on the conditions that control self-assembly in the protective shell of viruses has been published today in eLife.
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Present-day dogs defy the domestication syndrome
Across a wide range of domesticated animals the same morphological, physiological and behavioural traits appear to change together in a non-random way. For instance, many domesticated animals have white patterns in their coat and floppy ears, and most are more docile and tame than their wild ancestors. This phenomenon where traits change together in domesticated species, compared to their wild anc
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Watch a half-dead sea urchin get menaced by a hungry crab—and live to tell the tale
"Dead urchin walking" survives more than 40 hours after traumatic injury
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Untapped potential: More US labs could be providing tests for coronavirus
Nature, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01154-6 An online survey reveals bottlenecks and challenges and barriers faced by more than 1,700 biology labs.
8h
Scientists shed new light on viral protein shell assembly
New insight on the conditions that control self-assembly in the protective shell of viruses has been published today in eLife.
8h
Present-day dogs defy the domestication syndrome
Across a wide range of domesticated animals the same morphological, physiological and behavioural traits appear to change together in a non-random way. For instance, many domesticated animals have white patterns in their coat and floppy ears, and most are more docile and tame than their wild ancestors. This phenomenon where traits change together in domesticated species, compared to their wild anc
8h
Researchers uncover mechanisms of protective antibody response during Marburg infection
A detailed study of the monoclonal antibodies from a person who survived a Marburg infection led researchers to identify novel mechanisms that contribute protection against the disease, according to the latest findings of a collaborative team led by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The findings are now available in Cell Host & Microbe.
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Tetracycline-family antibiotics may offer early diagnostic for degenerative eye disease
Utilizing human cadaver retinas containing drusen, the researchers used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to measure the light emission from tetracycline staining within those ocular mineral deposits.
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ASU scientists lead study of galaxy's 'water worlds'
In seeking to learn more about Neptune-like exoplanets, an international team of researchers, led by Arizona State University, has provided one of the first mineralogy lab studies for water-rich exoplanets.
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Easing the burden of coronavirus with virtual reality
A new article discusses the psychological stresses imposed by the coronavirus pandemic and suggests that virtual reality can help alleviate the psychological impact of the need for social isolation.
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The positive impact of gratitude on mental and physical health
According to Dr. Robert Emmons, gratitude is an affirmation of goodness and a recognition that these sources of goodness exist outside of ourselves. Various studies have proven there are physical benefits to expressing gratitude on a daily basis, some of which include positive interactions in the brain in the areas that control decision-making, metabolism, and hormone regulating. Other studies ha
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Return of 'the Blob' could intensify climate change impacts on Northeast Pacific fisheries
A large marine heatwave would double the rate of the climate change impacts on fisheries species in the northeast Pacific by 2050, says a recently released study by researchers from the University of British Columbia and University of Bern.
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New POP atomic clock design achieves state-of-the-art frequency stability
Chinese researchers have developed a pulsed optically pumped (POP) atomic clock with a frequency stability of 4.7 x 10-15 at 104 seconds based on a new design.
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Reference genes identified that are useful for genetic improvement in wheat
Wheat feeds the world. According to the FAO, wheat is one of the world's main crops, both in terms of extent and production, as well as being one of the main sources of carbohydrates and vegetable protein in the human diet. The quest for genetic improvement in wheat, leading to varieties that are more resistant to issues brought about by climate change or certain pests, is a response to the need t
8h
Spain's proposed recovery fund has irrefutable merits
If there is going to be a common European fiscal response to the crisis, this is the form it should take
8h
Reference genes identified that are useful for genetic improvement in wheat
Wheat feeds the world. According to the FAO, wheat is one of the world's main crops, both in terms of extent and production, as well as being one of the main sources of carbohydrates and vegetable protein in the human diet. The quest for genetic improvement in wheat, leading to varieties that are more resistant to issues brought about by climate change or certain pests, is a response to the need t
8h
Inland Areas Need to Prepare for Expanding Reach of Hurricanes
Improved emergency planning and stronger building codes could help avoid costly surprises — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Home Office under fire over visa measures for health workers
Immigration lawyers tell MPs that families of medical staff who die during pandemic might be forced out of UK
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AI may help brain cancer patients avoid biopsy
Brain cancer patients in the coming years may not need to go under the knife to help doctors determine the best treatment for their tumors.
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Penn Engineering's new scavenger technology allows robots to 'eat' metal for energy
New research from the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science is bridging the gap between batteries and energy harvesters like solar panels. Their 'metal-air scavenger' gets the best of both worlds.
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Interventions boost sexual health for black teens
Sexual health interventions are effective at increasing both abstinence and condom use in black teens, according to a new study. The new paper in JAMA Pediatrics draws on data from 29 studies that reported 11,918 black teens. Sexual health interventions included, among other things, school-based health classes and community organization programs. "We focused on black adolescents because they face
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Warnings of unrest mount as outbreak hits food availability
G20 agriculture ministers urge governments not to disrupt global supply chains
8h
Machine learning makes building rocket engines easier
Methods from scientific machine learning could address the challenges of testing the stability of rocket engines, researchers report. Time, cost, and safety prohibit testing the stability of a test rocket using a physical build "trial and error" approach. But even computational simulations are extremely time consuming. A single analysis of an entire SpaceX Merlin rocket engine, for example, could
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Offensive linemen should stand up to avoid injury
A simple change to the starting stance of players on the offensive line in American football might reduce the burden of repetitive hits to the head, researchers report. Repetitive hits to the head can cause brain damage without actually leading to a concussion, past studies have suggested. The study shows that offensive linemen experienced at least 40% fewer hits to the head if they started a pla
8h
Oil trader Andurand cleans up in crude's historic crash
Fund manager expected coronavirus-induced slowdown to test logistical constraints
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United States should allow volunteers to be infected with coronavirus to test vaccines, lawmakers argue
Bipartisan letter from 35 members of Congress supports challenge trials
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How Shared Memory Has Shaped the COVID-19 Response
A nation's prior experience with similar disasters can make a big difference — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
To look after these birds is to 'fall in love' with them
Nature, Published online: 21 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01129-7 Andrew Digby works to protect the kakapo, a critically endangered and charismatic New Zealand species of parrot.
8h
Got seasonal allergies? Beetles could help
Allergies caused by the common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, impact millions, and in Europe alone, around 13.5 million people suffer with symptoms, resulting in 7.4 billion Euros worth of health costs per year, according to the research. The study suggests the leaf beetle, Ophraella communa, could reduce the number of people affected by the pollen and the associated economic impacts, since the
9h
How Shared Memory Has Shaped the COVID-19 Response
A nation's prior experience with similar disasters can make a big difference — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
What coronavirus tells us about climate change on Earth Day's 50th anniversary
The Seattle Times headline on Seattle's first Earth Day, on April 22, 1970, was prescient. So much so, it could have been written on this year's 50th anniversary of Earth Day.
9h
WHO: Only a Tiny Fraction of the Population Has Had COVID
During a Monday media briefing, WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said "early data suggests that a relatively small percentage of the populations may have been infected" by the coronavirus, The Guardian reports . "Not more than two to three percent." American infectious diseases expert and the WHO's lead on COVID-19 Maria Van Kerkhove told the media that "initially, we see a lower p
9h
Bread knives for the home baker
For even slices. (Jude Infantini via Unsplash/) Imagine you've put hours of hard work into baking the perfect sourdough bread. You retrieve the loaf from the oven and set it to rest in all its crusty glory. When it's finally ready to be enjoyed, you're going to have to cut into that work of art. So do your dough justice! If you don't use a good bread knife, you'll end up with mangled, uneven slic
9h
Mysterious 'Planet Nine' on the solar system's edge may not be real
Strange orbits of distant space rocks have been used to infer that the solar system has an unseen ninth planet, but those orbits may be less strange than we thought, meaning there is no need for a new planet
9h
Climate change brings summertime heat to Florida's early spring
Florida is caught between a climate change-induced sauna of extreme spring temperatures and a steam bath caused by warming oceans. The result has been record-setting heat that has turned April into summertime across the peninsula, raising the risk that early season Atlantic storms could blossom off the coast.
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Small rises in blood glucose trigger big changes in insulin-producing cells
This study provides a wealth of new data showing how beta cells behave at slightly raised levels of blood glucose — still within the pre-diabetes range. The work provides major additional evidence of a 'glucose toxicity' effect that helps to drive the development of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
9h
High-quality boron nitride grown at atmospheric pressure
Graphene Flagship researchers reported a significant step forward in growing monoisotopic hexagonal boron nitride at atmospheric pressure for the production of large and very high-quality crystals.
9h
Human pregnancy is weird — new research adds to the mystery
University at Buffalo and University of Chicago scientists set out to investigate the evolution of a gene that helps women stay pregnant: the progesterone receptor gene. The results come from an analysis of the DNA of 115 mammalian species.
9h
UK benefits claims surge as disruption hits labour market
More than 1.8m make universal credit applications since start of March as virus impact bites
9h
BHP and Rio see solid rebound in China's steel sector
Country's production this year expected to top 2019 if coronavirus kept at bay
9h
Danmark tager mere præcis antistoftest i brug
PLUS. Danmark begynder snart at bruge ELISA test til at måle antistoffer. Testen er mere omstændig end den nuværende point-of-care test, men også mere præcis.
9h
Children face three times more air pollution during the school run
Children face a worrying threefold increase in air pollution during the daily school runs, causing air quality experts to call for restrictions on the use of cars during those periods.
9h
Expansion of world's cities creating 'new ecological niches' for infectious diseases
New research highlights how urban expansion is creating the conditions for infectious diseases to emerge and spread around the world by blurring the classical boundaries between city, suburb, and countryside.
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Expansion of world's cities creating 'new ecological niches' for infectious diseases
New research highlights how urban expansion is creating the conditions for infectious diseases to emerge and spread around the world by blurring the classical boundaries between city, suburb, and countryside.
9h
Hope for baobab on the brink as thousands of trees are planted in Madagascar
Even giant trees begin their life as humble seeds.
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Hope for baobab on the brink as thousands of trees are planted in Madagascar
Even giant trees begin their life as humble seeds.
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You Will Never Be Forgotten Explores Grief in a Near-Future World
As the coronavirus wreaks havoc across the globe, millions of people have been confined to their homes, reliant on videochats and news alerts to stay connected with friends and family and the happenings of the world outside. Well before the crisis, of course, many of us ordered groceries online, courted partners via apps, and spent hours creating web profiles—all ways of trying to bring order to
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Luftföroreningar kan ligga bakom höga dödstal i covid-19
Personer som länge bott i områden med höga halter av luftföroreningar har 15 procent större risk att dö i covid-19 än personer som bor i områden med lägre halter, visar en studie från Harvards Universitet.
9h
New macrolactone database could aid drug discovery, research
Researchers have created a free-to-use database of 14,000 known macrolactones — large molecules used in drug development — which contains information about the molecular characteristics, chemical diversity and biological activities of this structural class.
9h
How cancer cells don their invisibility cloaks
Immunotherapy drugs that target a protein called programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) on the surface of cancer cells have quickly become a mainstay to treat many forms of cancer, often with dramatic results.
9h
Study finds Tai-Chi-based mindfulness training reduced core ADHD symptoms in children
In a recent study published in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, Stewart H. Mostofsky, M.D., director of the Center for Neurodevelopmental and Imaging Research at Kennedy Krieger Institute, and Karen E. Seymour, Ph.D., assistant professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, found that a mindful movement (Tai-Chi)-based training
9h
International team develops new model to improve accuracy of storm surge analysis
A new international study published this week in the journal Nature Communications, applied a novel statistical method that — for the first time — captures the important interactions between tides and storm surges. These natural forces are caused by meteorological effects, such as strong winds and low atmospheric pressure, and their impacts have often been difficult to understand because of the
9h
North pole will be ice-free in summer
Summer Arctic sea-ice is predicted to disappear before 2050, resulting in devastating consequences for the Arctic ecosystem. The efficacy of climate-protection measures will determine how often and for how long. These are the results of a new study involving 21 research institutes from around the world, including McGill University.
9h
Study: Football offensive linemen should start plays upright to avoid hits to the head
Just a simple change to the starting stance of players on the offensive line in American football could significantly reduce hits to the head, a study conducted by Purdue University and Stanford University researchers now shows.
9h
Comprehensive tumour immunity map opens up immunotherapy to more patients
Scientists have developed a new way to map the molecules on tumour cells that flag their presence to the immune system, according to a study published today in eLife.
9h
HudsonAlpha plant genomics researchers surprised by cotton genome
Plant genomics researchers at HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology announce the surprising results of a cotton sequencing study led by Jane Grimwood, Ph.D., and Jeremy Schmutz, who co-direct the HudsonAlpha Genome Sequencing Center (HGSC). The goal of the project was to identify differences among wild and domesticated cotton that could be used to reintroduce agriculturally beneficial traits lik
9h
NEI researchers link age-related DNA modifications to susceptibility to eye disease
National Eye Institute (NEI) researchers profiling epigenomic changes in light-sensing mouse photoreceptors have a clearer picture of how age-related eye diseases may be linked to age-related changes in the regulation of gene expression. The findings, published online April 21 in Cell Reports, suggest that the epigenome could be targeted as a therapeutic strategy to prevent leading causes of visio
9h
New insight into how a genetic change increases the risk of schizophrenia
A genetic change increases the risk of developing schizophrenia and highlights new opportunities for drug treatment say researchers. In the human genome, small sections of DNA have been found to be duplicated (copied) or deleted in a small number of people. For the first time, research has shown that the 16p11.2 duplication impacts on a number of different inhibitory neuron types, neurons that use
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Ultrasound-assisted molecule delivery looks to preserve blood for years
Blood can typically be stored for only six weeks after donation, but a potential solution attempts to dry blood by using a sugar-based preservative. New work in ultrasound technology looks to provide a path to inserting these sugars into human red blood cells, allowing the molecule trehalose to enter the cells and prevent their degradation when dried for preservation. The researchers discuss their
9h
Organic memory devices show promise for flexible, wearable, personalized computing
The advent of artificial intelligence, machine learning and the internet of things is expected to change modern electronics. The pressing question for many researchers is how to handle this technological revolution. Brain-inspired electronics with organic memristors could offer a functionally promising and cost- effective platform. Since memristors are functionally analogous to the operation of ne
9h
Humble bug holds key to relieving millions of allergy sufferers in Europe
Dr. Urs Schaffner, lead author of study in Nature Communications, says the leaf beetle Ophraella communa can significantly reduce pollen — which causes a range of symptoms from sneezing to itchy eyes and aggravates conditions such as asthma and eczema — from common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia).The interdisciplinary study — the first to quantify the economic benefits of biological control i
9h
Pulse oximetry monitoring overused in infants with bronchiolitis
Monitoring blood oxygen levels with continuous pulse oximetry is being overused in infants with bronchiolitis who do not require supplemental oxygen, according to a study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The researchers found the use of continuous pulse oximetry occurred frequently and varied widely among hospitals in their sample, despite national recommendations advi
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Coronavirus lockdown exits complicated by new infection data
French report concludes not enough people will be infected to prevent possible second wave
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COVID-19 U.S. employment shocks likely larger than Great Depression
The U.S. is likely to see a near-term 24% drop in employment, 17% percent drop in wages, and 22% drop in economic activity as a result of the COVID-19 crisis according to a new study co-authored by SFI External Professor Doyne Farmer at the University of Oxford. The study further shows that these impacts will be very unevenly distributed, with the bottom quarter of earners at risk of a 42% loss in
9h
Warmest oceans on record could set off a year of extreme weather
The world's seas are simmering, with record high temperatures spurring worry among forecasters that the global warming effect may generate a chaotic year of extreme weather ahead.
9h
How do our cells respond to stress?
Cells are often exposed to stressful conditions that can be life threatening, such as high temperatures or toxins. Fortunately, our cells are masters of stress management with a powerful response program: they cease to grow, produce stress-protective factors, and form large structures, which are called stress granules.
9h
Ultrasound-assisted molecule delivery looks to preserve blood for years
Ensuring adequate preservation of the millions of units of blood that are donated every year presents a challenge for blood banks, as blood can typically be stored for only six weeks after donation. A potential solution to the problem attempts to dry blood by using a sugar-based preservative that organisms living in some of Earth's most extreme environments produce to weather long periods of dryne
9h
Organic memory devices show promise for flexible, wearable, personalized computing
The advent of artificial intelligence, machine learning and the internet of things is expected to change modern electronics and bring forth the fourth Industrial Revolution. The pressing question for many researchers is how to handle this technological revolution.
9h
Superbugs could trigger our next global financial crisis
Infectious diseases professor Steven Djordjevic, from the University of Technology Sydney, said the proliferation of drug-resistant bacteria, known as superbugs, was a grave threat to Australia's economy and way of life.
9h
California grants temporary endangered species status to Southern California cougars
The state Fish and Game Commission on Thursday set the stage for a fierce environmental battle by granting temporary endangered species status to the several hundred cougars still roaming Southern California and the Central Coast.
9h
Humble bug holds key to relieving millions of allergy sufferers in Europe
CABI has led a team of scientists on new research which reveals that a bug could relieve more than 2 million sufferers of allergies in Europe while also saving more than €1 billion in health costs.
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Så undviker du "fake news" i coronatider
Ester Pollack, professor i journalistik vid Stockholms universitet, kom förra året ut med boken "Källkritik! Journalistik i lögnens tid". Här tipsar hon om hur du kan navigera i störtfloden av information under coronapandemin. – Kolla först vem som är avsändaren. Lita aldrig på att råd och historier som förmedlats är korrekta utan att du kunnat kontrollera vem som är upphov till dem – och bedöm k
9h
How Closely-Related Are Humans to Apes?
We share a common ancestor, but followed a different evolutionary path.
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What's missing from the American immigrant narrative | Elizabeth Camarillo Gutierrez
Recounting her story of finding opportunity and stability in the US, Elizabeth Camarillo Gutierrez examines the flaws in narratives that simplify and idealize the immigrant experience — and shares hard-earned wisdom on the best way to help those around us. "Our world is one that flourishes when different voices come together," she says.
9h
How do our cells respond to stress?
Cells are often exposed to stressful conditions that can be life threatening, such as high temperatures or toxins. Fortunately, our cells are masters of stress management with a powerful response program: they cease to grow, produce stress-protective factors, and form large structures, which are called stress granules.
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Why Some People Get Sicker Than Others
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . The COVID-19 crash comes suddenly. In early March, the 37-year-old writer F. T. Kola began to feel mildly ill, with a fever and body aches. To be safe, she isolated herself at home in San Francisco. Life continued apace for a week, until one day she tried to load her dishwa
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Tele-diabetes to manage new-onset diabetes during COVID-19 pandemic
Two new case studies highlight the use of tele-diabetes to manage new-onset type 1 diabetes in an adult and an infant during the COVID-19 pandemic.
10h
Scientists shed new light on viral protein shell assembly
New insight on the conditions that control self-assembly in the protective shell of viruses has been published today in eLife.
10h
Present-day dogs defy the domestication syndrome
Does the domestication syndrome exist? New research reveals that this does not seem to be the case in present-day dogs.
10h
New hybrid material improves the performance of silicon in Li-ion batteries
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have developed a new hybrid material of mesoporous silicon microparticles and carbon nanotubes that can improve the performance of silicon in Li-ion batteries.
10h
California grants temporary endangered species status to Southern California cougars
The state Fish and Game Commission on Thursday set the stage for a fierce environmental battle by granting temporary endangered species status to the several hundred cougars still roaming Southern California and the Central Coast.
10h
Humble bug holds key to relieving millions of allergy sufferers in Europe
CABI has led a team of scientists on new research which reveals that a bug could relieve more than 2 million sufferers of allergies in Europe while also saving more than €1 billion in health costs.
10h
The collapse in oil is a wake-up call for stock markets
Any idea that economies are through the worst of coronavirus seems misplaced
10h
Europe's wildlife sanctuaries struggle under virus lockdown
In a bear sanctuary in Romania's Carpathian Mountains, chestnut-gold Lidia and her dark brown companion Jean enjoy a welcome respite from human presence inside the world's largest brown bear sanctuary.
10h
Tuning into dolphin chatter could boost conservation efforts
Tuning in to the signature 'whistles' of dolphins could prove a game-changer in being able to accurately track the movements of this much-loved protected species.
10h
US orders group to stop selling bleach 'miracle cure' for coronavirus
Court injunction aims to stop Florida group, but others are repackaging bleach and advertising 'dangerous' treatments on Facebook and elsewhere Coronavirus – latest US updates C oronavirus – latest global updates See all our coronavirus coverage The US government is attempting to rein in the activities of pseudoscience groups that have begun to peddle bleach solution as a "miracle cure" for coron
10h
Preliminary study links air pollution to coronavirus deaths in England
Experts say a link is plausible as dirty air is known to harm lungs, but more research is needed Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A preliminary study has found the first evidence of a link between higher levels of air pollution and deaths from Covid-19 in England. The analysis showed London, the Midlands and the north-west had the highest levels of nitrogen oxides and
10h
Europe's wildlife sanctuaries struggle under virus lockdown
In a bear sanctuary in Romania's Carpathian Mountains, chestnut-gold Lidia and her dark brown companion Jean enjoy a welcome respite from human presence inside the world's largest brown bear sanctuary.
10h
Tuning into dolphin chatter could boost conservation efforts
Tuning in to the signature 'whistles' of dolphins could prove a game-changer in being able to accurately track the movements of this much-loved protected species.
10h
Veterinarians balance social distance, supply shortages with caring for pets during coronavirus shutdown
Veterinary hospitals and practices are dealing with their own set of issues due to the coronavirus pandemic. Veterinarians have limited all but emergency services and have set up curbside service, so pet owners can just drive up and hand over their pet.
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Veterinarians balance social distance, supply shortages with caring for pets during coronavirus shutdown
Veterinary hospitals and practices are dealing with their own set of issues due to the coronavirus pandemic. Veterinarians have limited all but emergency services and have set up curbside service, so pet owners can just drive up and hand over their pet.
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A giant raft of rock may once have floated across Mars' ancient ocean
Mars could have had an ancient ocean in its northern hemisphere, and a large raft of volcanic rock may have floated across it to settle into mounds we can see today
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High-performance electrolyte solves battery puzzle
Lithium ion batteries have already become an integral part of our everyday life. However, our energy-hungry society demands longer life, faster charging, and lighter batteries for a variety of applications from electric vehicles to portable electronics, including lightening the load a soldier carries as numerous electronics become adopted by the Army.
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How do our cells respond to stress?
Molecular biologists reverse-engineer a complex cellular structure that is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS
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Expansion of world's cities creating 'new ecological niches' for infectious diseases
New research highlights how urban expansion is creating the conditions for infectious diseases to emerge and spread around the world by blurring the classical boundaries between city, suburb, and countryside.
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How Tweets may influence substance abuse in youth
In a new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing), researchers characterized the content of 23 million drug-related tweets by youths to identify their beliefs and behaviors related to drug use and better understand the potential mechanisms driving substance use behavior. They found that youths expressed pride, confidence, or boastfulness online about their drug-re
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Study shows glaucoma could be successfully treated with gene therapy
A new study led by the University of Bristol has shown a common eye condition, glaucoma, could be successfully treated with a single injection using gene therapy, which would improve treatment options, effectiveness and quality of life for many patients.
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Engineers develop way to improve efficiency and heat tolerance of devices
When it comes to increasing electric storage efficiency and electric breakdown strength — the ability of an electrical system to operate at higher voltage and temperatures with great efficiency — increasing one traditionally has led to a decrease in the other. Penn State researchers, led by Qiming Zhang, distinguished professor of electrical engineering, recently developed a scalable method that
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Water replaces toxins: Green production of plastics
A new way to synthesize polymers, called hydrothermal synthesis, can be used to produce important high-performance materials in a way which is much better for the environment. Dangerous toxins which usually have to be used to produce theses polymers can be substituted by water.
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Printed to find a cure
Would you like to be able to find out which antibiotic combination works best for a particular patient? And do it in just 12 or maybe even six hours, in a point-of-care? Or maybe search for antibodies in thousands of samples at a time? It's all possible with a new device invented by scientists from IPC PAS. It is cheap, fast & reliable, it can replace strip tests and give patients a better chance
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Milestone for the early detection of sepsis
Researchers from Graz, Austria, are developing a ground-breaking method that uses biomarkers to detect sepsis 2 to 3 days before the first clinical symptoms appear. This can significantly increase the chances of survival in cases of blood poisoning by bacteria or fungi.
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Coffee changes our sense of taste
Sweet food is even sweeter when you drink coffee. This is shown by the result of research from Aarhus University. The results have just been published in the scientific journal Foods.
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Children face three times more air pollution during the school run
Children face a worrying threefold increase in air pollution during the daily school runs, causing air quality experts to call for restrictions on the use of cars during those periods.
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Half of world's locked-down pupils lack computer: UN
Half of the world's school and university students affected by class closures because of the coronavirus outbreak—from pre-primary to university level—do not have access to a computer for home-schooling, the UN's educational agency said Tuesday.
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Finding better ways to cool down as the climate heats up
We're so used to putting on the AC when it gets hot that we don't even stop to think about what we're doing. But the impact it's having on the globe may surprise you.
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Pandemic cuts both ways for climate change
COVID-19 has overshadowed the climate crisis as governments scramble to protect the health of citizens without cratering their economies, but the pandemic could still open a fast-track pathway -– albeit a narrow one—to a greener, low-carbon future, experts say.
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Let Volunteers Take the COVID Challenge
U ntil scientists discover a treatment or vaccine for COVID-19, the disease will inflict mass suffering. And experts say that safely developing, producing, and delivering a vaccine will likely take at least 18 months. That's in part because, in the final phase of testing, researchers inject thousands or tens of thousands of subjects with the vaccine while others get a placebo, then they wait to s
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The coronavirus pandemic might make buildings sick, too
While millions of people are under orders to stay home amid the coronavirus pandemic, water is sitting in the pipes of empty office buildings and gyms, getting old and potentially dangerous.
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Welcome to the House of Slytherin: Salazar's pit viper, a new green pit viper from India
A new green pit viper species of the genus Trimeresurus was discovered during the herpetological expedition to Arunachal Pradesh in India, part of the Himalayan biodiversity hotspot. The scientists named the newly-discovered snake Trimeresurus salazar after a Parselmouth (able to talk with serpents) wizard, co-founder of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry and the founder of the House of Sl
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Water replaces toxins: Green production of plastics
Many common materials are not sustainable. Some are harmful to plants or animals, others contain rare elements that will not always be as readily available as they are today. A great hope for the future is to achieve different material properties by using novel organic molecules. Organic high-performance materials containing only common elements such as carbon, hydrogen or oxygen could solve our r
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New hybrid material improves the performance of silicon in Li-ion batteries
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have developed a new hybrid material of mesoporous silicon microparticles and carbon nanotubes that can improve the performance of silicon in Li-ion batteries. Advances in battery technology are essential for sustainable development and for achieving climate neutrality.
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New fluorescent biosensor detects glyphosate herbicide in soil, water samples
A researcher at Indiana University South Bend and his undergraduate students have developed a biosensor that could potentially be incorporated into devices that continuously monitor for a popular herbicide during food screening or water and soil treatment.
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Snabbmode har enorm miljöpåverkan
Modeindustrin står för upp emot tio procent av de globala utsläppen av växthusgaser. Närmare 92 miljoner ton avfall skapas årligen vid klädproduktion. En systemomfattande förändring kan minska modeindustrins miljöpåverkan, enligt en ny studie från Chalmers och flera andra internationella universitet. Grundläggande förändringar i modeindustrins affärsmodell – inklusive en snabb övergång bort från
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Working Memory Improved by Magnetic Stimulation
submitted by /u/tahutahut [link] [comments]
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Welcome to the House of Slytherin: Salazar's pit viper, a new green pit viper from India
A new green pit viper species of the genus Trimeresurus was discovered during the herpetological expedition to Arunachal Pradesh in India, part of the Himalayan biodiversity hotspot. The scientists named the newly-discovered snake Trimeresurus salazar after a Parselmouth (able to talk with serpents) wizard, co-founder of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry and the founder of the House of Sl
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Water replaces toxins: Green production of plastics
Many common materials are not sustainable. Some are harmful to plants or animals, others contain rare elements that will not always be as readily available as they are today. A great hope for the future is to achieve different material properties by using novel organic molecules. Organic high-performance materials containing only common elements such as carbon, hydrogen or oxygen could solve our r
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Global tourism industry may shrink by more than 50% due to the pandemic
Due to the coronavirus, people around the world have canceled their travel plans. Governments and health officials have warned the public to avoid boarding cruise ships and long flights. Major events like conferences, trade shows and the Olympics have been canceled or postponed.
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Modelling wrinkling and buckling in materials that form the basis of flexible electronics
Flexible circuits have become a highly desirable commodity in modern technology, with applications in biotechnology, electronics, monitors and screens, being of particular importance. A new paper authored by John F. Niven, Department of Physics & Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, published in EPJ E, aims to understand how materials used in flexible electronics behave under stress
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Economic recovery after shutdown could take up to three years
The coronavirus pandemic poses an enormous challenge for the domestic and global economy. Despite the measures taken by the Austrian government, the consequences of the lockdown and partial suspension of global trade flows will be felt for a long time.
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Washington wolf population increased only 11% after another season of killing
Washington's wolf population increased by just 11% in 2019, according to figures released today by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife—dramatically less than what is needed to sustain the healthy growth of a wolf population into additional good wolf habitat across the state.
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A tale of two telescopes: WFIRST and Hubble
NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), planned for launch in the mid-2020s, will create enormous cosmic panoramas. Using them, astronomers will explore everything from our solar system to the edge of the observable universe, including planets throughout our galaxy and the nature of dark energy.
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When it comes to water, think globally
Earth is a pale, blue dot when seen from space. Its blue color is due to our home planet being 71% covered in water. NASA monitors Earth's water from space, the skies, ground stations on land, ships sailing the seas and even with apps on mobile phones.
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Birds in the wild lower their bill temperature to prevent heat loss
Birds in the wild appear to lower their bill temperature to prevent heat loss in order to preserve energy when food is scarce, according to new research.
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Att hantera sin oro i kristider
Vi är sociala varelser och i kriser har vi en tendens att ty oss till varandra, att vara nära. Men den här krisen tvingar oss att göra precis tvärtom, att hålla fysisk distans. Hur påverkar det vår psykiska hälsa och vad kan vi göra för att må så bra som möjligt, trots allt? Det ligger i vår natur att söka tröst och närhet hos varandra när livet blir jobbigt eller när vi hamnar i någon form av kr
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Holistic way to measure the economic fallout from earthquakes
Officials know how to account for deaths, injuries and property damages after the shaking stops, but a study based on a hypothetical 7.2 magnitude quake near San Francisco, describes the first way to estimate the far greater financial fallout that such a disaster would have, especially on the poor.
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Antibodies could provide new treatment for OCD
Mental health conditions such as obsessive compulsive disorder could be treated in a new way using drugs that target the immune system, research suggests.
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AI to make dentists' work easier
Researchers have developed a new automatized way to localize mandibular canals.
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New discovery helps close the gap towards optically-controlled quantum computation
Scientists have discovered a light-induced switching mechanism in a Dirac semimetal.
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North pole soon to be ice free in summer
The Arctic Ocean in summer will very likely be ice free before 2050, at least temporally, according to new research. The efficacy of climate-protection measures will determine how often and for how long.
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New fluorescent biosensor detects glyphosate herbicide in soil, water samples
A researcher at Indiana University South Bend and his undergraduate students have developed a biosensor that could potentially be incorporated into devices that continuously monitor for a popular herbicide during food screening or water and soil treatment.
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Washington wolf population increased only 11% after another season of killing
Washington's wolf population increased by just 11% in 2019, according to figures released today by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife—dramatically less than what is needed to sustain the healthy growth of a wolf population into additional good wolf habitat across the state.
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Birds in the wild lower their bill temperature to prevent heat loss
Birds in the wild appear to lower their bill temperature to prevent heat loss in order to preserve energy when food is scarce, according to new research.
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Brain 'avalanches' may make memories stick
New research may shed light on how we form and retain memories. Scientists simulated the mechanics of a complex network that helps give neurons their ever-changing structures. They found the complex, Arp2/3, may be largely responsible for the "avalanches" observed in the cells' cytoskeletal networks. The research follows a study last year that detailed the interactions that allow neurons to accep
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Self-reported symptoms pave way for COVID-19 forecasting
Self-reported COVID-19 symptoms might soon help researchers in forecasting COVID-19 activity. Researchers are gathering self-reported descriptions of COVID-19-related symptoms nationwide with the help of Facebook and GoogleSelf. The self-reports correlate well with test-confirmed cases of the disease, the researchers say. Millions of responses to surveys by Facebook and Google users are providing
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North Pole will be ice-free in future summers
Summer Arctic sea ice could disappear before 2050, resulting in devastating consequences for the Arctic ecosystem, researchers report. The efficacy of climate-protection measures will determine how often and for how long, according to their new study. The North Pole is presently covered by sea ice all year. Each summer, the area of sea ice coverage decreases and grows again in winter. However, as
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First COVID-19 At-Home Test Kit Authorized by FDA
The US Food and Drug Administration has authorized the "first test for patient at-home sample collection" for COVID-19. The $119 at-home diagnostic test , called the COVID-19 RT-PCR Test and produced by the Laboratory Corporation of America (LabCorp)'s consumer-facing brand Pixel, is meant to make it easy for people to check if they're positive for the coronavirus from safety of home. At-home tes
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Historian discusses whether COVID-19 will influence city planning
How will COVID-19 impact Toronto in terms of city planning? Will it change how the city grows?
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COVID-19 has laid bare how much we value women's work, and how little we pay for it
The COVID-19 pandemic has turned our lives upside down. Amidst the upheavals, it has laid bare how little we normally pay for "women's work."
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Novel computational methods provide new insight into daytime alertness in people with sleep apnoea
New polysomnography parameters are better than conventional ones at describing how the severity of oxygen desaturation during sleep affects daytime alertness in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea, according to a new study published in European Respiratory Journal.
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New research reveals heavy cost of excessive drinking on people's decision making
A new study highlights how hangover inhibits individuals' 'core executive functions' with knock-on impacts for those currently working from home.
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CRISPR helps identify potential Alzheimer's-related protein
Experts at the University of Tokyo have identified a new protein in the pathway that leads to Alzheimer's disease. Researchers used the 'molecular scissors' of CRISPR/Cas9 to search for new genes related to the neurodegenerative disease. Researchers tested a total of 19,150 individual genes for their effect on amyloid beta levels and ruled out all but one: calcium and integrin-binding protein 1 (C
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UB researchers create a low-cost ventilator for areas with limited means
Researchers from the Biophysics and Bioengineering Unit of the University of Barcelona have created a non-invasive low-cost ventilator, to support patients with respiratory diseases in areas with limited means. Researchers published the results of the study in the European Respiratory Journal together with open source technical features to build it.
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Spanish scientists identify a biomarker that detects atherosclerosis before the appearance of symptoms
Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) and the Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria-Fundación Jiménez Díaz (IIS-FJD) in Madrid have demonstrated that a proteins present in early atheroma plaques — accumulations of cholesterol in the wall of arteries — could be used as a biomarker to detect atherosclerosis in the subclinical phase, before the appearance of sy
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Chiral crystals blowing off polarized spins: Phenomena detected without magnets
Scientists have discovered that a chiral crystal, which exhibits no magnetism, works as a polarizer of electron spins when the charge current is applied at room temperature in the absence of magnetic field. This phenomenon is likely to be originated from the nature that the crystal has a chiral structure. The present work makes a fundamental contribution in revealing universal properties that a wi
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Cool down fast to advance quantum nanotechnology
An international team of scientists have found an easy way to trigger an unusual state of matter called a Bose-Einstein condensate. The new method, recently described in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, is expected to help advance the research and development of quantum computing at room temperature.
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How the brain recognizes change
IBS research team revealed in an animal study a previously unknown role of a presynaptic adhesion molecule to tell the new change by regulating postsynaptic NMDA-type receptor responses at excitatory synapses.
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Charismatic invasive species have an easier time settling into new habitats
An international study, in which the University of Cordoba participated, assessed the influence of charisma in the handling of invasive species and concluded that the perception people have of them can hinder our control over these species and condition their spread
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Lyrids meteor shower reaches its peak
April 21 and 22 is the peak of a shower of meteors—or shooting stars—known as the Lyrids.
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Diamonds shine in energy storage solution
Dr. Haifei Zhan, from the QUT Centre for Materials Science, and his colleagues successfully modelled the mechanical energy storage and release capabilities of a diamond nanothread (DNT) bundle—a collection of ultrathin one-dimensional carbon threads that store energy when twisted or stretched.
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Researchers created a tiny circuit through a single water molecule
Water, the humble combination of hydrogen and oxygen, is essential for life. Despite its central place in nature, relatively little is known about the role that single water molecules play in biology.
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Living in the High Arctic, researcher didn't know COVID's scope
Dr. Vishnu Nandan is a radar remote sensing expert on Arctic and Antarctic sea ice, and a post-doctoral researcher at the UM Centre for Earth Observation Science (CEOS). He has only recently returned from the High Arctic where he was part of a team of researchers on the German research icebreaker R/V Polarstern as part of the Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate (
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U.S. Forbids Uranium Sales to Soviet Union
Originally published in April 1956 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The evolution of the ear canal in an ancient crocodile relative
An international team of researchers has found that an ancient crocodile relative underwent body transitions as it evolved from a land to a sea creature before its ears changed to suit an underwater environment. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their in-depth study of thalattosuchia skulls and what they found.
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Microorganisms work together to survive high temperatures
The conventional view is that high temperatures cause microorganisms to replicate slowly or die. In this current textbook view, microorganisms combat heat-induced damage on their own. Reporting in Nature Microbiology, Delft researchers Diederik Laman Trip and Hyun Youk demonstrate that microorganisms (in this case baker's yeast) can actually work together and help each other and their future gener
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The evolution of the ear canal in an ancient crocodile relative
An international team of researchers has found that an ancient crocodile relative underwent body transitions as it evolved from a land to a sea creature before its ears changed to suit an underwater environment. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their in-depth study of thalattosuchia skulls and what they found.
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Microorganisms work together to survive high temperatures
The conventional view is that high temperatures cause microorganisms to replicate slowly or die. In this current textbook view, microorganisms combat heat-induced damage on their own. Reporting in Nature Microbiology, Delft researchers Diederik Laman Trip and Hyun Youk demonstrate that microorganisms (in this case baker's yeast) can actually work together and help each other and their future gener
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Ny forskning: Områder med luftforurening får flere corona-dødsfald
Luftforurening kan være en betydelig faktor i risikoen for dødsfald af covid-19, viser ny forskning. Indtil videre kan forskere dog kun vise et sammenfald, men ikke bevise en årsagssammenhæng.
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Coronavirus versus BIPOC lives: Surveillance, policing and the absence of health data
The claim that COVID-19 and its associated medical and social responses do not discriminate belies the history of how pandemics work and who is most impacted by them. States of emergency show that citizenship privileges some, is partial for others and disappears others.
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Forholdene er perfekte: I aften kan du se et stjerneskud hvert 3. minut
Skyfri himmel og minimalt månelys giver optimalt udsyn, når meteorsværm topper i aften og nat.
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Ten 'catastrophic' threats to our survival
Australia's Commission for the Human Future calls for sweeping change.
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Planet that never was is still interesting
Astronomers believe it's a dust cloud caused by a cosmic collision.
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When lizards change cologne
Chemical signals shift when they shift.
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Why do more men than women die from coronavirus?
There's a range of factor and they apply to a range of diseases, says a leading geneticist.
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New microscope sets new standards
Researchers detect interactions between molecules.
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ALVIN finds some interesting microbes
They gather at hot vents and eat ethane.
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KPMG UK chairman warns of coronavirus 'economic disaster'
Bill Michael recently returned to work after having been hospitalised with Covid-19
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Contact Tracing Is the Next Step in the Covid-19 Battle—But How Will It Work in Western Countries?
One death in Steven Soderbergh's terrifyingly prescient masterpiece, Contagion , stayed with me: Kate Winslet's Dr. Erin Mears, an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer who chased down peopled with a terrifying viral infection in an effort to warn those who might be at risk and reconstruct the virus's rampage through an unknowing society. For most of us , Mears was probably our first introduction
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Scientists identify cause of leakiness in eye diseases
Scientists have identified a key step in the process that leads to leaky vessels and harmful swelling in eye diseases, according to a new study published today in eLife.
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Modelling wrinkling and buckling in materials that form the basis of flexible electronics
A new paper authored by John F. Niven, Department of Physics & Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, published in EPJ E, aims to understand how materials used in flexible electronics behave under stress and strain, particularly, how they wrinkle and buckle.
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Developing human corneal tissue
Researchers from Osaka University developed a novel method to produce corneal sheets from human induced pluripotent stem cells. By separating corneal epithelial cells from other eye cells using magnetic-activated cell sorting and subsequent culture on specific laminin proteins, the researchers were able to create high-purity corneal cell sheets. These findings could help produce human corneal cell
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A new biosensor for the COVID-19 virus
A team of researchers from Empa, ETH Zurich and Zurich University Hospital has succeeded in developing a novel sensor for detecting the new coronavirus. In future it could be used to measure the concentration of the virus in the environment — for example in places where there are many people or in hospital ventilation systems.
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Scientists explore using 'own' immune cells to target infectious diseases including COVID-19
The engineering of specific virus-targeting receptors onto a patient's own immune cells is now being explored by scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School, as a potential therapy for controlling infectious diseases, including the COVID-19-causing virus, SARS-CoV-2. This therapy that has revolutionised the treatment of patients with cancer has also been used in the treatment of other infectious disea
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Keep children from hospital during crisis
With stressed hospital services, and concerns about the spread of COVID-19, experts are reminding carers of children and young people of the importance of safely adhering to their supported chronic condition self-management plans from the safety of their home. This is particularly vital for chronic conditions of childhood such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, diabetes, mental
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Climate change: Switch road cash to broadband, adviser says
The UK government's climate adviser urges ministers to reconsider plans for road-building.
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Lizards develop new 'love language'
Free from the risk of predators and intent to attract potential mates, male lizards relocated to experimental islets in Greece produce a novel chemical calling card, according to new research.
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Continued CO2 emissions will impair cognition
New research finds that an anticipated rise in carbon dioxide concentrations in our indoor living and working spaces by the year 2100 could lead to impaired human cognition.
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Rooftop Wind Power Might Take Off by Using Key Principle of Flight
A new device could open more areas to wind production by using stationary airfoils instead of twirling turbines — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Boris Johnson speaks to Donald Trump from Chequers
PM will have telephone audience with the Queen while he recovers from coronavirus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson has spoken to Donald Trump and will have a telephone audience with the Queen this week, even though No 10 continues to insist he is not doing any government work while he recovers from coronavirus at Chequers. Epidemics of infectious disease
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New Earthquake Math Predicts How Destructive They'll Be
When a fault slips, it unleashes a torrent of seismic waves, not all of them alike. Long low-frequency waves can travel far from their source and cause tall structures like skyscrapers to sway, while high-frequency waves are excellent at shaking houses and bridges and reducing them to rubble. For much of the past half-century, seismologists have assumed that the frictional slippage of a fault gen
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Nutrient deficiency in tumor cells attracts cells that suppress the immune system
A study led by IDIBELL researchers and published this week in the American journal PNAS shows that, by depriving tumor cells of glucose, they release a large number of signaling molecules. The signaling cascade produced by the lack of nutrients induces tumor inflammation, a determining factor for the evolution of the disease.
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AI to make dentists' work easier
Finnish researchers have developed a new automatized way to localise mandibular canals.
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Diamonds shine in energy storage solution
Researchers have proposed the design of a new carbon nanostructure made from diamond nanothreads that could one day be used for mechanical energy storage, wearable technologies, and biomedical applications.
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The realization of a 1-D magneto-optical trap of polyatomic molecules
Researchers at the Harvard-MIT Center for Ultracold Atoms have recently demonstrated a one-dimensional (1-D) magneto-optical trap (MOT) of polar free radical calcium monohydroxide (CaOH). This technique, outlined in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, was realized by cooling CaOH using radiative laser cooling techniques.
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Nu sendes satellitter på værksted i kredsløb om jorden
Mindre skrot: Så er banen lagt for at yde service i rummer. I første omgang er to kommercielle satellitter forbundet i kredsløb om jorden, hvor den ene kan tilføre brændstof og på sigt udføre service.
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Cool down fast to advance quantum nanotechnology
Rapidly cooling magnon particles proves a surprisingly effective way to create an elusive quantum state of matter, called a Bose-Einstein condensate. The discovery can help advance quantum physics research and is a step towards the long-term goal of quantum computing at room temperature.
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COVID-19 crisis reveals 'digital divide' for L.A. County students
When schools moved from classrooms to home computers at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, a learning gap immediately opened, according to an analysis by Hernan Galperin, associate professor of communication at USC Annenberg.
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Terahertz science discloses the ultrafast photocarrier dynamics in carbon nanotubes
A team of researchers from Osaka University, TU Wien, Nanyang Technological University, Rice University, University of Alberta and Southern Illinois University-Carbondale comes closer to unraveling the physics of quasiparticles in carbon nanotubes.
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Tracing the human genetic history: Every tooth tells a different story
Researchers at the University of Tübingen have shown that the shape of human teeth can be used to reconstruct genetic relationships. Dr. Hannes Rathmann and Dr. Hugo Reyes-Centeno of the University of Tübingen's Humanities Center for Advanced Studies have established which specific dental features are best suited to infer genetic relationships and which dental features might instead reflect other
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How to keep your video calls private
Sometimes you barely want people you know to see you on a video call, much less malevolent strangers. (Nathan Dumlao/Unsplash/) All of a sudden, many of us have been forced to become quite familiar with video calling software—but it's dangerous to assume that your live chats will be secure and private by default. If you want to minimize the risk of unwelcome visitors snooping on your calls (or ev
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Geophysicist remains optimistic for Arctic ozone layer despite huge hole
A University of Huddersfield scientist is scheduled to head back to the Arctic, where he is an experienced researcher of changes in its ice fields and their impact on climate change.
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Plastic pollution: Chemical recycling could provide a solution
The world is drowning in plastic. About 60% of the more than 8,700 million metric tonnes of plastic ever made is no longer in use, instead sat mostly in landfill or released to the environment. That equals over 400kg of plastic waste for every one of the 7.6 billion people on the planet.
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New ethane-munching microbes discovered at hot vents
Researchers have discovered a microbe that feeds on ethane at deep-sea hot vents. They also succeeded in cultivating this microbe in the laboratory. What is particularly remarkable is that the mechanism by which it breaks down ethane is reversible. In the future, this could allow to use these microbes to produce ethane as an energy source.
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Return of 'the Blob' could intensify climate change impacts on Northeast Pacific fisheries
A large marine heatwave would double the rate of the climate change impacts on fisheries species in the northeast Pacific by 2050, says a recently released study.
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Diamonds shine in energy storage solution
Researchers have proposed the design of a new carbon nanostructure made from diamond nanothreads that could one day be used for mechanical energy storage, wearable technologies, and biomedical applications.
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Age matters: Paternal age and the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders in children
It is no secret that genetic factors play a role in determining whether children have neurodevelopmental disorders. Maternal exposure to drugs and viral or bacterial illnesses can be detrimental too.
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Doctors should ask this pain question
Along with the 0-10 rating scale, asking the question "Is your pain tolerable?" could help doctors decide if treatments, including opioid medications, are actually necessary, research shows. "Because of concerns about overtreatment of pain with opioids there has been an enormous effort to rethink how we ask patients about pain," says John D. Markman, director of the Translational Pain Research Pr
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Report: Cruise Line Initially Hid COVID Outbreak From Passengers
Even after it learned of potential coronavirus outbreaks on its cruise ships, Carnival Cruise Line delayed for more than a full day before warning passengers to self-isolate or taking appropriate steps to protect them, according to an explosive Bloomberg investigation . The article describes how the cruise operator slipped letters about the potential outbreaks onboard under passengers' doors whil
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Covid-19 will only increase automation anxiety
Consumers may prefer automated services to face-to-face interactions for some time to come
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What an 1836 Typhus Outbreak Taught the Medical World About Epidemics
An American doctor operating out of Philadelphia made clinical observations that where patients lived, not how they lived, was at the root of the problem
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Why Bats Are One of Evolution's Greatest Puzzles
Paleontologists seek the ancestors that could explain how bats became the only flying mammals.
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Tracing the human genetic history: Every tooth tells a different story
Researchers at the University of Tübingen have shown that the shape of human teeth can be used to reconstruct genetic relationships. Dr. Hannes Rathmann and Dr. Hugo Reyes-Centeno of the University of Tübingen's Humanities Center for Advanced Studies have established which specific dental features are best suited to infer genetic relationships and which dental features might instead reflect other
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Yoga mats for a better at-home workout
These simple pieces of gear can improve all your workouts. (Kike Vega via Unsplash/) You don't have to practice yoga to use a yoga mat. They're also a great surface for push ups, planks, abdominal exercises, and stretching after a run. They also help dampen noise when you do burpees or jumping jacks. To pick the perfect one for your workouts, consider how much cushioning you need, whether you'll
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New POP atomic clock design achieves state-of-the-art frequency stability
Chinese researchers led by DENG Jianliao from the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM) have developed a pulsed optically pumped (POP) atomic clock with a frequency stability of 10 -15 at 10 4 seconds based on a new design.
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Antibodies could provide new treatment for OCD
Mental health conditions such as obsessive compulsive disorder could be treated in a new way using drugs that target the immune system, research suggests.
11h
Reference genes are identified that are useful for genetic improvement in wheat
University of Cordoba Professor Miguel Aguilar participated in a published article on reference genes in the study of wheat meiosis, the process in which reproductive cells are generated
11h
Welcome to the House of Slytherin: Salazar's pit viper, a new green pit viper from India
During an expedition to Arunachal Pradesh in India, part of the Himalayan biodiversity hotspot, a new species of green pit viper Trimeresurus salazar with unique stripes and colouration patterns was discovered near Pakke Tiger Reserve. Scientists named the snake after J.K. Rowling's fictional character, the Parselmouth wizard and the founder of one of the houses in the magical school Hogwarts, Sal
11h
Stanford study reveals a holistic way to measure the economic fallout from earthquakes
Officials know how to account for deaths, injuries and property damages after the shaking stops, but a study in Nature Sustainability, based on a hypothetical 7.2 magnitude quake near San Francisco, describes the first way to estimate the far greater financial fallout that such a disaster would have, especially on the poor.
11h
Coronavirus: WHO developing guidance on wet markets
The World Health Organization calls for stricter safety and hygiene when wet markets reopen.
11h
Hvem kommer først med corona-vaccinen? Her er 12 forsøg, Lægemiddelstyrelsen holder ekstra øje med
Det er dog ikke alle, vi skal have lige store forhåbninger til, siger dansk forsker.
11h
International naturfotograf: 'Jeg er overrasket over, at der findes så fascinerende dyr i Danmark'
Det har taget mere end et år at lave undervandsoptagelserne til 'Vilde vidunderlige Danmark'.
11h
One Woman's Instagram-Fueled Ascent to 'Boss Lady Status'
For New Orleans entrepreneur Jesseca Dupart, social media isn't just a tool for building her business—it's a platform for inspiring other black women to do the same.
11h
This 30-Year-Old Sci-Fi Epic Is a Saga for Our Times
Clocking in at five hours long, the restored director's cut of Until the End of the World arrives as if on cue, with spooky prescience.
11h
The Top 3 Rugged Cameras for Daredevil Shooters
Don't rely on a delicate smartphone for those \#OutdoorAdventure moments. Get a camera that laughs in the face of danger.
11h
Sonos Radio Puts Free, Ad-Supported Music on Your Sonos Speakers
Today's debut marks the speaker-maker's first foray into streaming original content—just as millions of listeners are stuck at home to tune in.
11h
The Essential App Pack for Creating Awesome Social Videos
Shooting an Instagram story from the beach? The latest TikTok dance challenge? Add effects filters and other flair to your clips with these apps.
11h
What Will It Take To Get People to be More Sustainable?
It will take some clever persuasion to rethink consumer consumption.
11h
Astronomers May Have Captured the First Ever Image of Nearby Exoplanet Proxima C
It could be an unprecedented view of a world in the closest planetary system to our own, but uncertainties aplenty remain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Astronomers May Have Captured the First Ever Image of Nearby Exoplanet Proxima C
It could be an unprecedented view of a world in the closest planetary system to our own, but uncertainties aplenty remain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
What helps couples weather financial storms
In financially challenging times, it's especially important to show your partner love and support, says researcher Ashley LeBaron, who studied what contributes to couples' success in financially stressful times.
12h
Terahertz science discloses the ultrafast photocarrier dynamics in carbon nanotubes
A team of researchers at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, in collaboration with TU Wien, Nanyang Technological University, Rice University, University of Alberta and Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, comes closer to unraveling how quasiparticles in carbon nanotubes behave under a strong electric field. Their work provides a significant push towards the realization of ad
12h
Return of 'the Blob' could intensify climate change impacts on Northeast Pacific fisheries
A large marine heatwave would double the rate of the climate change impacts on fisheries species in the northeast Pacific by 2050, says a recently released study by researchers from the University of British Columbia and University of Bern.
12h
Age matters: Paternal age and the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders in children
It is no secret that genetic factors play a role in determining whether children have neurodevelopmental disorders. Maternal exposure to drugs and viral or bacterial illnesses can be detrimental too.
12h
Diamonds shine in energy storage solution
QUT researchers have proposed the design of a new carbon nanostructure made from diamond nanothreads that could one day be used for mechanical energy storage, wearable technologies, and biomedical applications.
12h
Medie: Fup-SMS'er fra norsk smitteapp kan skabes på 10 minutter
Norske sundhedsmyndigheder var bekendt med problemet. Sikkerhedsekspert frygter, at brugere får franarret oplysninger.
12h
How to make emergency childcare safer during COVID-19
New recommendations outline specific measures for safer emergency childcare during the COVID-19 pandemic. Emergency childcare is for the children of parents with essential jobs. The researchers, from Rutgers Pediatric Early Education Working Group, are advising childcare policymakers and administrators to enact system-wide changes to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. While adding specific gu
12h
Nonhuman COVID-19 casualties: Antarctic endeavors, primary healthcare research, dark matter exploration
The year 2020 came with big expectations for researchers, myself included. Last year I was successful in the first round of the National Health and Medical Research Council Investigator Grants scheme. Six years since completing my Ph.D., I managed to launch my Healthy Primary Care research team.
12h
Stabilizing brain-computer interfaces
New research will drastically improve brain-computer interfaces and their ability to remain stabilized during use, greatly reducing or potentially eliminating the need to recalibrate these devices during or between experiments.
12h
Targeting multiple brain cell types through engineered viral capsids
Viruses are nature's Trojan horses: They gain entrance to cells, smuggle in their genetic material, and use the cell's own machinery to replicate. For decades, scientists have studied how to minimize their deleterious effects and even repurpose these invaders to deliver not their own viral genome, but therapeutics for treating disease and tools for studying cells. To be effective in these new role
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