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Medical experts denounce Trump's latest 'dangerous' suggestion to treat Covid-19
Doctors warn president's musings on disinfectant as a cure for coronavirus could lead to death Coronavirus – latest US updates Coronavirus – latest global updates See all our coronavirus coverage Donald Trump has stunned viewers by suggesting that people could receive injections of disinfectant to cure the coronavirus, a notion one medical expert described as "jaw-dropping". At Thursday's White
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Spread and dynamics of the COVID-19 epidemic in Italy: Effects of emergency containment measures [Medical Sciences]
The spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Italy prompted drastic measures for transmission containment. We examine the effects of these interventions, based on modeling of the unfolding epidemic. We test modeling options of the spatially explicit type, suggested by the wave of infections spreading from the initial foci to…
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New targeted agent produces considerable responses in patients with uterine cancer
The DNA repair-blocking drug adavosertib shrinks tumors in nearly one-third of patients in clinical trial data to be shared at the Society for Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer.
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LATEST

Stocks fall as coronavirus drug flops in first trial
Investors had pinned hopes on treatment providing relief in fight against Covid-19
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Coronavirus sell-off puts faith in CLOs to the test
Loan instruments have always held up well in a crisis, but 'hope is not a strategy'
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How will the UK's new contact tracing programme work?
Former health minister warns on the logistical challenge of launching large-scale operation
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Nightingales largely empty as NHS weathers the storm
Facilities were launched with a fanfare but medics complain they lack equipment for complex Covid cases
19min
Silicon Valley sets up volunteer army to help vulnerable
Entrepreneurs to recruit workers at low-risk from virus to carry out essential tasks
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Eksperter frygter hamstring af corona-vacciner
PLUS. Mens udviklingen stadig foregår, frygter flere eksperter, at de rige lande vil hamstre vacciner mod covid-19, så ikke alle får adgang til beskyttelse, når en sådan eksisterer. Ny FN-resolution skal få medlemslandene til at samarbejde.
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'Distancing is impossible': refugee camps race to avert coronavirus catastrophe
Nature, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01219-6 From Bangladesh to Somalia, researchers and aid workers are taking different steps to protect people among the most vulnerable to the pandemic.
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Vintergatan mycket större än vi trott
Galaxen vi lever i, Vintergatan, är mycket större än vi trott. Det visar en ny brittisk forskningsstudie, som dessutom säger att Vintergatan faktiskt har en rätt tydligt definierad ytterkant. Något vi inte riktigt trott tidigare.
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We All Live in Bubbles Now. How Safe Is Yours?
Isolating with others requires rules and trust. What happens if your roommate keeps seeing other people?
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Australian rugby faces financial maul from coronavirus
Game suffers on and off pitch in country where sport is part of national identity
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Social tipping intervention strategies for rapid decarbonization need to consider how change happens [Letters (Online Only)]
Otto et al.'s (1) evaluation of "social tipping interventions" (STIs) for accelerating a global transformation to carbon neutrality by 2050 is an important sociopolitical contribution to a debate that is all-too-often technocentric in focus. Otto et al.'s (1) expert panel identified six social tipping elements—within energy production/storage, human settlement, financial…
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Reply to Smith et al.: Social tipping dynamics in a world constrained by conflicting interests [Letters (Online Only)]
We fully agree that, in analyzing social tipping interventions (STIs) for accelerating a global transformation to carbon neutrality by 2050 (1), there is a need to analyze social change processes and social movements in greater depth (2). We hope that more research will follow and each of the identified STIs…
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Epileptic brain fluorescent imaging reveals apigenin can relieve the myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidative stress and inhibit ferroptosis [Chemistry]
Myeloperoxidase (MPO)-mediated oxidative stress has been suggested to play an important role in the pathological dysfunction of epileptic brains. However, there is currently no robust brain-imaging tool to detect real-time endogenous hypochlorite (HClO) generation by MPO or a fluorescent probe for rapid high-throughput screening of antiepileptic agents that control the…
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High-throughput antibody screening from complex matrices using intact protein electrospray mass spectrometry [Biochemistry]
Toward the goal of increasing the throughput of high-resolution mass characterization of intact antibodies, we developed a RapidFire–mass spectrometry (MS) assay using electrospray ionization. We achieved unprecedented screening throughput as fast as 15 s/sample, which is an order of magnitude improvement over conventional liquid chromatography (LC)-MS approaches. The screening enabled…
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Quasi-Fermi level splitting in nanoscale junctions from ab initio [Applied Physical Sciences]
The splitting of quasi-Fermi levels (QFLs) represents a key concept utilized to describe finite-bias operations of semiconductor devices, but its atomic-scale characterization remains a significant challenge. Herein, the nonequilibrium QFL or electrochemical potential profiles within single-molecule junctions obtained from the first-principles multispace constrained-search density-functional forma
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Intertwined signatures of desiccation and drought tolerance in grasses [Plant Biology]
Grasses are among the most resilient plants, and some can survive prolonged desiccation in semiarid regions with seasonal rainfall. However, the genetic elements that distinguish grasses that are sensitive versus tolerant to extreme drying are largely unknown. Here, we leveraged comparative genomic approaches with the desiccation-tolerant grass Eragrostis nindensis and…
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MAPK-directed activation of the whitefly transcription factor CREB leads to P450-mediated imidacloprid resistance [Agricultural Sciences]
The evolution of insect resistance to pesticides poses a continuing threat to agriculture and human health. While much is known about the proximate molecular and biochemical mechanisms that confer resistance, far less is known about the regulation of the specific genes/gene families involved, particularly by trans-acting factors such as signal-regulated…
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'Hydrologists should be happy.' Big Supreme Court ruling bolsters groundwater science
Underground flows protected by Clean Water Act in many instances
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COVID-19: What the Autopsies Reveal
Pathologists are starting to get a closer look at the damage that COVID-19 does to the body by carefully examining the internal organs of people who have died from the novel coronavirus. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Georgia businesses resist governor's call to reopen
Republican wants to allow customers at spas and tattoo parlours despite criticism by Trump
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India's biggest slum tests Modi's coronavirus response
Outbreak in Mumbai's cramped and unsanitary Dharavi highlights magnitude of challenge
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The Atlantic Daily: How to Stay Calm During a Pandemic
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Life is scary and weird. First, our columnist offers a three-step remedy for negative thoughts. Then, we'll zoom in on, er, Zoom, and why our new digital social lives can feel unsatisfying. (JAN
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Fysioterapeuter hjælper coronapatienter med at trække vejret
Som led i coronabekæmpelsen har fysioterapeuterne en central rolle i både at lindre patienternes vejtrrækningsbesvær, forhindre forværring, og forberede dem på tiden efter hospitalsopholdet. Fysioterapeuterne gør en kæmpe forskel, siger overlæge.
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#81 Sygeplejerskernes år
WHO har udråbt 2020 til at være sygeplejerskernes år, og lyt bl.a. til historien om en sygeplejerske i Aarhus, der fortæller om lysten til at gøre en forskel for patienterne, men også et stigende arbejdspres.
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Volcanic time-bomb threatens nearby trees
Surviving trees growing near to an active volcano face an uncertain future for several years after an eruption, a study suggests.
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House approves $484bn in new Covid-19 relief funds
Donald Trump to sign bill that adds another $320bn to small business loan programme
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John Houghton, Who Sounded Alarm on Climate Change, Dies at 88
He led the United Nations panel on global warming that won a Nobel Peace Prize; he died from complications of the coronavirus
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Iris Love, Stylish Archaeologist and Dog Breeder, Dies at 86
She was once known as the archaeologist in a miniskirt, a scion of old New York whose second career was raising Westminster Kennel Club champions.
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Hubble telescope celebrates 30 years of stunning science
Three decades on from its launch, the orbiting observatory is still producing cutting-edge research.
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No time to waste to avoid future food shortages
Plant scientists are working on improving photosynthesis on different fronts, from finding crop varieties that need less water, to tweaking parts of the process in order to capture more carbon dioxide and sunlight to ensure future global food security. These solutions have been highlighted in a recent Food Security Special issue of the Journal of Experimental Botany.
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Biodiversity in Britain at risk from standstill due to coronavirus
Wildlife Trusts warn of effects from neglected reserves and species loss, to fly-tipping and illegal shooting Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage While lockdown has allowed some a greater appreciation of spring and the fun of seeing goats , sheep and deer foraying into urban landscapes, Covid-19 is wreaking havoc with UK biodiversity as vital conservation projects are pu
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Maker of drug touted as coronavirus cure accuses China of gouging
Hydroxychloroquine controversially pushed by Trump as Covid-19 remedy
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These words and views suggest who dehumanizes immigrants
A study finds links the dehumanization of immigrants to other views, such as support for the death penalty. Dehumanization refers to depriving a person or group of fundamental human qualities. It is complex process but identifiable by taking a holistic view of individuals, says David Markowitz, an assistant professor in the School of Journalism and Communication at the University of Oregon, who l
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We Clap For Our Heroes. Thank You!
The Discovery Family says thank you to the heroes on the frontlines who are still working, protecting, and responding in this time of need. 👏 From: Discovery
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Simple 'do it yourself' circuit to ventilate two patients at once is technically feasible
A simple 'do it yourself' breathing circuit, using accessories that are readily available in intensive care, can be used to ventilate two critically ill patients at once, should clinicians be faced with equipment shortages, suggests research published online in the journal Thorax.
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To combat COVID-19, behavioral pitfalls must be addressed
In a commentary piece for The Lancet, researchers from Princeton University and the Sunnybrook Research Institute review eight behavioral pitfalls that challenge judgments made during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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New clues suggest how autoimmune diseases begin
New research in mice may upend current ideas about how autoimmune diseases get started. After cancer and heart disease, the most common group of diseases in the US are autoimmune diseases, which occur when the immune system mistakenly attacks the body's own organs, tissues, and cells. Autoimmune diseases can affect just about any part of the body, and more than 100 types have been identified so f
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Daily briefing: Five science classics you might finally have time to read
Nature, Published online: 23 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01243-6 From Galileo to Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, catch up on some of the science classics you've always intended to read (or pretended to have read). Plus, the first COVID-19 death in the US might have occurred 3 weeks earlier than thought and why one climate scientist says there is no silver lining to coronavirus.
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Adult astrocytes are key to learning and memory
Researchers have discovered that astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the brain, play a direct role in the regulation of adult neuronal circuits involved in learning and memory.
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Hummingbirds show up when tropical trees fall down
When the tree fell that October in 2015, the tropical giant didn't go down alone. Hundreds of neighboring trees went with it, opening a massive 2.5-acre gap in the Panamanian rainforest. Treefalls happen all the time, but this one just happened to occur in the exact spot where a decades-long ecological study was in progress, giving researchers a rare look into tropical forest dynamics.
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How much does it cost California cannabis growers to safety test?
The high cost of testing cannabis in California leads to higher prices for the consumer, which could drive consumers to unlicensed markets. A new study finds the safety tests cost growers about 10 percent of the average wholesale price of legal cannabis. The biggest share of this expense comes from failing the test.
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C.D.C. Stresses Need for Coronavirus Testing at Homeless Shelters
A study of four cities suggested that those living in close quarters in shelters can spread the virus at high rates even when asymptomatic.
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Dissolved oxygen and pH policy leave fisheries at risk
Scientists have considered accumulating scientific evidence on the harmful effects of coastal hypoxia and acidification in coastal ecosystems and suggest approaches that would address current policy shortfalls and facilitate improved protection of aquatic life.
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'Jurassic Park' in Eastern Morocco: Paleontology of the Kem Kem Group
The Kem Kem beds in Morocco are famous for the spectacular fossils found there, including at least four large-bodied non-avian theropods, several large-bodied pterosaurs and crocodilians.
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Icelandic DNA jigsaw-puzzle brings new knowledge about Neanderthals
An international team of researchers has put together a new image of Neanderthals based on the genes Neanderthals left in the DNA of modern humans when they had children with them about 50,000 years ago. The researchers found the new information by trawling the genomes of more than 27,000 Icelanders. Among other things, they discovered that Neanderthal children had older mothers and younger father
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In glowing colors: Seeing the spread of drug particles in a forensic lab
Scientists used UV light and glow powder to study the way small amounts of drug residue get spread around a forensic chemistry lab when analysts test seized drugs. Their study addresses safety concerns in an age of super-potent synthetic drugs like fentanyl, which can potentially be hazardous to chemists who handle them frequently.
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More protections needed to safeguard biodiversity in the Southern Ocean
Current marine protected areas in the Southern Ocean need to be at least doubled to adequately safeguard the biodiversity of the Antarctic, according to a new study.
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Social marketing is shown to help small fishing communities adopt sustainable fishing practices
If you live in a small community where fishing is your primary source of income and nutrition, it's tough to hear you might have to slow, stop or change your activities to more sustainably manage your fish stocks.
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New design could make fiber communications more energy efficient
Researchers say a new discovery for optoelectronic devices could help make optical fiber communications more energy efficient.
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Natural mood regulation low or even absent in people with depression
Mood varies from hour-to-hour, day-to-day and healthy mood regulation involves choosing activities that help settle one's mood. However, in situations where personal choices of activities are constrained, such as during periods of social isolation and lockdown, this natural mood regulation is impaired which might result in depression. New research suggests a new target for treating and reducing de
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Miss Out on Earth Day? Don't Worry — Here Are Ways to Help the Environment All Year
Earth Day is all about lasting environmental change, after all.
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FirstFT: Today's top news
Your daily news briefing
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Inexpensive, portable detector identifies pathogens in minutes
Researchers have demonstrated an inexpensive yet sensitive smartphone-based testing device for viral and bacterial pathogens that takes about 30 minutes to complete. The roughly $50 smartphone accessory could reduce the pressure on testing laboratories during a pandemic such as COVID-19.
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How much does it cost california cannabis growers to safety test?
The high cost of testing cannabis in California leads to higher prices for the consumer, which could drive consumers to unlicensed markets. A new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis, finds the safety tests cost growers about 10 percent of the average wholesale price of legal cannabis. The biggest share of this expense comes from failing the test.
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Ruth's Chris Steak House repays $20m government aid loan
Group's decision comes after US Treasury guidelines suggest public companies are ineligible
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Ramaphosa prepares to reopen South African economy gradually
Five-week shutdown to be eased stage by stage according to a series of rolling levels
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These Billionaires Are Making a Killing Off the Pandemic
Ass-Backwards A number of American billionaires have used the coronavirus pandemic to grow even wealthier than they were before. In fact, billionaires in the U.S. have increased their wealth by a combined $282 billion, Fast Company reports . That's a ten percent increase over where the billionaire class stood at the beginning of March — illustrating how the global crisis has furthered global ineq
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Inexpensive, portable detector identifies pathogens in minutes
Researchers have demonstrated an inexpensive yet sensitive smartphone-based testing device for viral and bacterial pathogens that takes about 30 minutes to complete. The roughly $50 smartphone accessory could reduce the pressure on testing laboratories during a pandemic such as COVID-19.
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Experts issue guide on lung cancer screening, management during COVID-19
A new expert panel consensus statement provides guidance to clinicians managing lung cancer screening programs and patients with lung nodules during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Hummingbirds show up when tropical trees fall down
When the tree fell that October in 2015, the tropical giant didn't go down alone. Hundreds of neighboring trees went with it, opening a massive 2.5-acre gap in the Panamanian rainforest. Treefalls happen all the time, but this one just happened to occur in the exact spot where a decades-long ecological study was in progress, giving University of Illinois researchers a rare look into tropical fores
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Boosting the immune system's appetite for cancer
A combination of immunotherapy agents that encourages some immune cells to eat cancer cells and alert others to attack tumors put mice with a deadly type of brain cancer called glioblastoma into long-term remission.
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UTEP researchers develop nanohybrid vehicle to optimally deliver drugs into the human body
The researchers discovered that encapsulating ellagic acid in chitosan, a sugar, reduces its inherent cytotoxicity while enhancing its antioxidant properties. The chitosan shell, which makes up the hard outer skeleton of shellfish, also permits EA delivery via a rapid burst phase and a relatively slow phase. This further enhances the drug delivery because the nanohybrid vehicle is uniquely suited
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SMU professors detail how homeless students are doing educationally in Houston ISD
A new report by SMU professors Alexandra Pavlakis and Meredith Richards details how homeless students in Houston ISD are faring educationally.
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TGen adds to international studies identifying cells susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection
Two studies involving hundreds of scientists, including a human geneticist at TGen, suggest that cells in the nasal passage shaped like champagne glasses — goblet cells — may play a significant role in the spread of COVID-19. One published April 23 in Nature Medicine and another published April 22 in Cell, indicate goblet cells highly express a receptor enzyme called ACE2 that binds to the spike
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COVID-19 could cost the United States billions in medical expenses
A new study shows that hospitalizations, ventilators, and other health resources that patients would require could cost the United States $654 billion if a majority of the population gets infected with the COVID-19 coronavirus.
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Would you volunteer for a COVID-19 vaccine trial? 1,500 people just did.
1Day Sooner recruited nearly 1,500 volunteers for a potential human-challenge trial to test for COVID-19 vaccines. Human-challenge trials could help expedite the process that clinical trials must endure. At least six COVID-19 vaccination trials are currently underway, with over 70 planned around the world. Americans are being asked to sacrifice a lot right now. Shelter at home orders are in place
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19 Objects Near Jupiter May Be From Outside the Solar System
Tour Group A team of astronomers thinks it's found a whole slew of interstellar visitors — asteroids that came from elsewhere but got trapped in the Sun's gravitational pull — orbiting out near Jupiter. The 19 asteroids, known as the Centaurs, were first spotted as early as 2015, Gizmodo reports . But scientists are still making sense of their unusual behavior. Putting Down Roots Typically, inter
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COVID Patients Are Getting Mysterious and Deadly Blood Clots
Scientists and healthcare workers are still trying to make sense of the many symptoms of COVID-19. From extensive lung and blood vessel damage to the loss of smell and taste and even strange discoloration of toes , questions linger about the deadly virus currently sweeping the globe. Now, doctors are noticing mysterious blood clots in COVID-19 patients that may be causing extremely low oxygen lev
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Sunak bends to pressure for 100% guarantees on small business loans
As many as 1m 'micro-SMEs' could benefit after pleas by Tory MPs and Bank of England
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How to grieve in the midst of social distancing
People weren't made to grieve alone, but with social isolation in place, it's something many of us must confront. (Photo by Dazzle Jam from Pexels/) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including the most recent numbers , tips on how to make your own masks , and advice on what to donate for health care workers . For as long as humans have been alive, we've been memorializing, praying,
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The Last True Hermit Was Alone for 27 Years
For decades, the residents of Maine's Kennebec Valley believed that the North Pond hermit was a myth. According to local lore, a hermit had been living undetected in the woods since the 1980s; every so often, he would break into seasonal cabins to steal food and other resources. But no one could prove the hermit's existence—if he was out there, he had taken great pains to guarantee his isolation.
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In a World Facing Grim Challenges, Hope Still Reigns Supreme
Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie G. Bunch III says: 'It's time to put our heads down, and work'
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19th-century atlas offers glimpse of North Sea's fish-rich past
In little more than a century, fish stocks in the North Sea declined by 99%. For people living today, a grey and exhausted sea is all they know. O.T. Olsen's Atlas of the North Sea's fish species is a reminder of the richness that once was. "Specialist and magnificent" Ole T. Olsen's 'Piscatorial Atlas' is a masterclass in data presentation, and it doesn't half look bad either. As map guru Tim Br
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How couples survive financial stress
Some couples may be better equipped to manage financial stress than others, research suggests. Financial challenges such as furloughs, job losses, and pay cuts due to the COVID-19 pandemic can put a significant strain on romantic relationships, one expert says. While the full scope of the COVID-19 financial fallout remains unknown, some predict that the pandemic will result in the worst financial
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Dissolved oxygen and pH policy leave fisheries at risk
In a Policy Forum, "Dissolved oxygen and pH criteria leave fisheries at risk" published in the April 24 issue of the journal Science, Stony Brook University's Dr. Christopher J. Gobler and Stephen J. Tomasetti, Science Teaching and Research to Inform Decisions fellow, consider accumulating scientific evidence on the harmful effects of coastal hypoxia and acidification in coastal ecosystems and sug
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Adult astrocytes are key to learning and memory
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine discovered that astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the brain, play a direct role in the regulation of adult neuronal circuits involved in learning and memory.
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Researchers are making recombinant-protein drugs cheaper
The mammalian cell lines that are engineered to produce high-value recombinant-protein drugs also produce unwanted proteins that push up the overall cost to manufacture these drugs. These same proteins can also lower drug quality. Researchers have now shown that their genome-editing techniques could eliminate up to 70 percent of the contaminating protein by mass in recombinant-protein drugs produc
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Grodfossil ger inblick i Antarktis varma urtid
För 40 miljoner år sedan var Antarktis ännu inte fruset. Klimatet var tempererat, med varma somrar och svala vintrar. Genom kontinentaldriften hade ett smalt havssund nyligen öppnats mellan Sydamerika och den halvö som Antarktis sträcker ut mot grannkontinenten. – Det här är en spännande tid, just innan Antarktis frös ned, säger paleontologen Thomas Mörs från Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
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Everything is not fine: Kids can tell when parents suppress their stress
New research finds that parents suppressing feelings of stress around their kids can actually transmit those feelings to the children. The study found that children had a physical response when parents tried to hide their emotions.
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Researchers are making recombinant-protein drugs cheaper
The mammalian cell lines that are engineered to produce high-value recombinant-protein drugs also produce unwanted proteins that push up the overall cost to manufacture these drugs. These same proteins can also lower drug quality. Researchers have now shown that their genome-editing techniques could eliminate up to 70 percent of the contaminating protein by mass in recombinant-protein drugs produc
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An obesity protein discovery may lead to better treatments
By determining the structure of a key receptor in obesity, scientists have unlocked an opportunity for the development of new drugs.
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Archaeologists verify Florida's Mound Key as location of elusive Spanish fort
Florida and Georgia archaeologists have discovered the location of Fort San Antón de Carlos, home of one of the first Jesuit missions in North America. The Spanish fort was built in 1566 in the capital of the Calusa, the most powerful Native American tribe in the region, on present-day Mound Key in the center of Estero Bay on Florida's Gulf Coast.
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Promising signs for Perseverance rover in its quest for past Martian life
New research indicates river delta deposits within Mars' Jezero crater — the destination of NASA' Perseverance rover on the Red Planet — formed over time scales that promoted habitability and enhanced preservation of evidence.
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SpaceX Launches More Internet Satellites, Musk Teases Beta Program This Year
SpaceX launched yet another batch of Starlink internet satellites atop a Falcon 9 this week, moving the company tantalizingly close to firing up the network for a limited beta test. CEO Elon Musk has provided a few details about what such a test would look like, but SpaceX still only has a fraction of its planned Starlink constellation in orbit. The early tests will be limited, but it's only a ma
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Researchers Want to Explore Mars Using "Nanocardboard" Aircraft
Tiny Flyers Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania say we could one day explore the surface of Mars using a fleet of "nanocardboard" aircraft that each weigh as much as a fruit fly and feature no moving parts. The tiny flyers, as outlined in the study first published in the journal Advanced Materials in February, work by harnessing the power of temperature differentials between the upper a
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RIT scientists develop first 3D mass estimate of microplastic pollution in Lake Erie
Rochester Institute of Technology scientists have developed the first three-dimensional mass estimate to show where microplastic pollution is collecting in Lake Erie. The study examines nine different types of polymers that are believed to account for 75 percent of the world's plastic waste.
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COVID-19 coronavirus could cost the US billions in medical expenses
One of the major concerns about the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic has been the burden that cases will place on the health care system. A new study published April 23, 2020 in the journal Health Affairs found that the spread of the virus could cost hundreds of billions of dollars in direct medical expenses alone and require resources such as hospital beds and ventilators that may exceed what is cur
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Biologists investigate why the sweet taste of sugary foods diminishes when they're cool
Have you ever noticed how a bite of warm cherry pie fills your mouth with sweetness, but that same slice right out of the refrigerator isn't nearly as tempting? Scientists know this phenomenon to be true, but the mechanism behind it has been poorly understood.
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Researchers use 'hot Jupiter' data to mine exoplanet chemistry
After spotting a curious pattern in scientific papers — they described exoplanets as being cooler than expected — astronomers have improved a mathematical model to accurately gauge the temperatures of planets from solar systems hundreds of light-years away.
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Game theory suggests more efficient cancer therapy
Mathematicians are using game theory to model how this competition could be leveraged, so cancer treatment — which also takes a toll on the patient's body — might be administered more sparingly, with maximized effect.
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Iron deficiency in corals?
When iron is limited, the microalgae that live within coral cells change how they take in other trace metals, which could have cascading effects on vital biological functions and perhaps exacerbate the effects of climate change on corals.
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Scientists fashion new class of X-ray detector
Scientists have identified a new class of X-ray detectors based on layered perovskites, a semiconducting material.
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TED group backs pandemic response effort
The big-ideas TED Conference said Thursday it was allocating prize funding this year to a project aimed at tackling pandemics like the COVID-19 outbreak and related health initiatives.
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Germany throws weight behind EU recovery fund
Commission to prepare detailed plans but differences remain across bloc on size and form of aid
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Coronavirus Updates: The Latest Unemployment Data In The U.S.
In the last month, the coronavirus pandemic has claimed the jobs of one in six workers in the United States. NPR economic, science and congressional correspondents discuss the latest coronavirus news.
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Supreme Court rejects EPA's narrow view of Clean Water Act
The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that sewage plants and other industries cannot avoid environmental requirements under landmark clean-water protections when they send dirty water on an indirect route to rivers, oceans and other navigable waterways.
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New research finds cost transparency can increase sales 20%
Businesses don't typically disclose information to consumers on how much it costs to produce a product. However, new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science provides evidence that doing so can increase consumers' purchase interest by more than 20%.
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Common soil fungus could be ally in organic corn growers' fight against pests
A common soil fungus might be enlisted as a powerful partner by corn producers to suppress pests and promote plant growth, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest promoting the fungus could be an especially valuable strategy for organic growers who struggle with insect control.
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Common soil fungus could be ally in organic corn growers' fight against pests
A common soil fungus might be enlisted as a powerful partner by corn producers to suppress pests and promote plant growth, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest promoting the fungus could be an especially valuable strategy for organic growers who struggle with insect control.
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Dietary supplements an important weapon for fighting off COVID-19
Supplements containing vitamins C and D and other micronutrients, sometimes in amounts exceeding the federally recommended levels, are a safe, effective and low-cost means of helping your immune system fight off COVID-19 and other acute respiratory tract diseases.
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New research finds cost transparency can increase sales 20%
Businesses don't typically disclose information to consumers on how much it costs to produce a product. However, new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science provides evidence that doing so can increase consumers' purchase interest by more than 20%.
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Making recombinant-protein drugs cheaper
The mammalian cell lines that are engineered to produce high-value recombinant-protein drugs also produce unwanted proteins that push up the overall cost to manufacture these drugs. These same proteins can also lower drug quality. In a new paper in Nature Communications, researchers from the University of California San Diego and the Technical University of Denmark showed that their genome-editing
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Inexpensive, portable detector identifies pathogens in minutes
Most viral test kits rely on labor- and time-intensive laboratory preparation and analysis techniques; for example, tests for the novel coronavirus can take days to detect the virus from nasal swabs. Now, researchers have demonstrated an inexpensive yet sensitive smartphone-based testing device for viral and bacterial pathogens that takes about 30 minutes to complete. The roughly $50 smartphone ac
7h
Researchers use 'hot Jupiter' data to mine exoplanet chemistry
After spotting a curious pattern in scientific papers—they described exoplanets as being cooler than expected—Cornell University astronomers have improved a mathematical model to accurately gauge the temperatures of planets from solar systems hundreds of light-years away.
7h
Making recombinant-protein drugs cheaper
The mammalian cell lines that are engineered to produce high-value recombinant-protein drugs also produce unwanted proteins that push up the overall cost to manufacture these drugs. These same proteins can also lower drug quality. In a new paper in Nature Communications, researchers from the University of California San Diego and the Technical University of Denmark showed that their genome-editing
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Pocket-sized device tests DNA in blood samples for genetic conditions
A cheap, lightweight smartphone-heated device can test for DNA in blood, urine and other samples in a fraction of the time it takes to test in a lab
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New findings on procedures and meanings of human heart sacrifices in Mesoamerica
Sacrificial rituals featuring human heart extraction were a prevalent religious practice throughout ancient Mesoamerican societies. Intended as a means of appeasing and honoring certain deities, sacrifices served as acts of power and intimidation as well as demonstrations of devotion and gratitude. Human sacrifices were highly structured, complex rituals performed by elite members of society, and
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US governors rebuff McConnell state bankruptcies proposal
Republican Senate majority leader faces blowback from both parties after floating idea
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88.1% of NYC coronavirus patients put on ventilators died
This is the first large-case study of COVID-19 outcomes in New York hospitals. The ventilator mortality rate in the study is shocking: 88.1%. The study's data is preliminary, ending April 4, and doesn't include patients still hospitalized at that time or since. The scarcity of ventilators for COVID-19 patients has been one of the frightening problems facing medical professionals during the pandem
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Biologists investigate why the sweet taste of sugary foods diminishes when they're cool
Have you ever noticed how a bite of warm cherry pie fills your mouth with sweetness, but that same slice right out of the refrigerator isn't nearly as tempting? Scientists know this phenomenon to be true, but the mechanism behind it has been poorly understood.
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Game theory suggests more efficient cancer therapy
Cornell mathematicians are using game theory to model how this competition could be leveraged, so cancer treatment — which also takes a toll on the patient's body — might be administered more sparingly, with maximized effect.
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Inexpensive, portable detector identifies pathogens in minutes
Most viral test kits rely on labor- and time-intensive laboratory preparation and analysis techniques; for example, tests for the novel coronavirus can take days to detect the virus from nasal swabs. Now, researchers have demonstrated an inexpensive yet sensitive smartphone-based testing device for viral and bacterial pathogens that takes about 30 minutes to complete. The roughly $50 smartphone ac
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Examining heart extractions in ancient Mesoamerica
A recent study confirms that Mesoamerican priests ripped the hearts out of their still-living victims in three different ways. New forensic evidence, historic witness accounts and native representations now show that the most common form of native heart extraction was from beneath the rib cage, second was forceful chest penetration between two ribs and at mid-chest level between the nipples, and t
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Export bans blocked signed contracts to buy PPE, MPs told
Deals with international suppliers for coronavirus safety equipment 'not worth the paper they were written on'
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First trial for potential Covid-19 drug shows it has no effect
WHO draft put online states remdesivir does not benefit severe coronavirus patients Coronavirus latest: at a glance Remdesivir, a drug thought to be one of the best prospects for treating Covid-19, failed to have any effect in the first full trial, it has been revealed. The drug is in short supply globally because of the excitement it has generated. It is one of the drugs Donald Trump claimed was
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Reports of an insect apocalypse are overblown but still concerning
While an alarming 9 per cent of insects on land are being lost each decade, the state of the world's insects is much more nuanced than warnings of an insect apocalypse
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Novel coronavirus detected, monitored in wastewater
A new approach to monitoring the novel coronavirus (as well as other dangerous pathogens and chemical agents) is being developed and refined. Known as wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE), the method mines sewage samples for vital clues about human health. It can potentially identify levels of coronavirus infection at both a local and global scale.
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Researchers use 'hot Jupiter' data to mine exoplanet chemistry
After spotting a curious pattern in scientific papers — they described exoplanets as being cooler than expected — Cornell University astronomers have improved a mathematical model to accurately gauge the temperatures of planets from solar systems hundreds of light-years away.
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Researchers are making recombinant-protein drugs cheaper
The mammalian cell lines that are engineered to produce high-value recombinant-protein drugs also produce unwanted proteins that push up the overall cost to manufacture these drugs. These same proteins can also lower drug quality. In a new paper in Nature Communications, researchers have shown that their genome-editing techniques could eliminate up to 70 percent of the contaminating protein by mas
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Everything is not fine: Kids can tell when parents suppress their stress
New research finds that parents suppressing feelings of stress around their kids can actually transmit those feelings to the children. The study found that children had a physical response when parents tried to hide their emotions.
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Scientists May Be Close to Understanding Why the Universe Exists
Universal Imbalance Scientists think that they've taken a step toward finally understanding one of the greatest mysteries of the universe: why it exists in the first place. When the universe formed, it created both antimatter and matter , which destroy each other when they meet. So why there's enough matter left to form all the galaxies, stars, and worlds out there is a key question. Now, Scienti
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20 Undersung Crime Shows to Binge-Watch
Maybe it begins with a body in the woods, half-buried under bracken. Or with a glimmering shot of the London skyline. Or with a furtive deal, carried out at dusk, before an unknown character heads toward an untimely end. The clichés and conventions of crime dramas are their own strange reprieve because of what they tend to guarantee: After a trip into the murkiest corners of the human psyche, an
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Children who hold 'benevolent' sexist views are also likely to possess 'hostile' ones
Children who hold seemingly positive, 'benevolent' views about women are also likely to hold negative ones, a team of psychology researchers has found. Their results also show differences between boys and girls in how these views change over time.
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Excessive rainfall may have triggered 2018 Kilauea eruption
In May 2018 Kilauea volcano on the island of Hawaii erupted, touching off months of intense activity. Through August, incandescent lava from fissures spewed hundreds of feet in the air, and billowing ash clouds reached as high as six million.
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Promising MERS coronavirus vaccine trial in humans
Scientists have now conducted a first-in-human trial with a vaccine against MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome). The MVA-MERS-S vaccine was tolerated well and triggered the development of antibodies and T cell immunity.
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Climate change's toll on freshwater fish: A new database for science
The Fish and Climate Change Database — or FiCli (pronounced "fick-lee") — is a searchable directory of peer-reviewed journal publications that describe projected or documented effects of climate change on inland fishes. Researchers, fisheries managers, conservationists, journalists and others can use FiCli to find scientific articles.
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Hungry galaxies grow fat on the flesh of their neighbors
Galaxies grow large by eating their smaller neighbors, new research reveals. Exactly how massive galaxies attain their size is poorly understood, not least because they swell over billions of years. But now a combination of observation and modelling has provided a vital clue.
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DNA may not be life's instruction book — just a jumbled list of ingredients
The common view of heredity is that all information passed down from one generation to the next is stored in an organism's DNA. But one research suggests this might not be so. In two new papers, he argues DNA is just the ingredient list, not the set of instructions used to build and maintain a living organism. The instructions, he says, are stored in the molecules that regulate a cell's DNA and ot
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Researchers restore injured man's sense of touch using brain-computer interface technology
Researchers have been able to restore sensation to the hand of a research participant with a severe spinal cord injury using a brain-computer interface (BCI) system. The technology harnesses neural signals that are so minuscule they can't be perceived and enhances them via artificial sensory feedback sent back to the participant, resulting in greatly enriched motor function.
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Domino's sees more pizza sales at dinner than late at night
US eating habits under lockdown laid bare by one of the pandemic's few business winners
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Vital kit across NHS 'running out', say medics and care staff
Supply chains at breaking point as surge of coronavirus patients with kidney side effects hits supplies
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Nature crisis: 'Insect apocalypse' more complicated than thought
The health of insect populations globally is far more varied than previous research suggested.
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Your personality shapes how music affects your focus
If you're working from home during the coronavirus pandemic, you might think twice before turning on the tunes, a psychologist says. The answer to whether listening to music while trying to work will affect your performance isn't the same for everyone, says Jack Aiello , a professor of psychology at Rutgers University. Aiello, who has researched how music affects the performance of cognitive work
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Too hot to handle: Authors retract Science paper on electromagnetics
Sometimes scientific findings can be too hot to handle. Literally. A team of researchers in India and Japan who reported breakthrough results in two papers about electromagnetics, including an article in Science, are retracting the articles because the exciting data resulted from experimental error. To be precise: unbeknownst to them, inadvertent heating of their samples … Continue reading
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Bill Gates: COVID Is Like a World War, Except for One Thing
In a blog post , billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates likened the ongoing coronavirus pandemic to a world war — with a striking difference. "This is like a world war, except in this case, we're all on the same side," he wrote. He also urged readers to look on the bright side. "During World War II, an amazing amount of innovation, including radar, reliable torpedoes, and code-breaking, helped end
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An obesity protein discovery may lead to better treatments
By determining the structure of a key receptor in obesity, scientists have unlocked an opportunity for the development of new drugs.
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Geology of the Pacific Northwest: A Great Introduction for Kids
Help kids learn about the geology of the Pacific Northwest in a fun, informative geology book with easy projects. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Interpreting the Covid-19 Death Rate: You Asked, We Answered
Antibody testing seems to suggest that Covid-19 isn't as deadly as previously thought. Isn't that good news? I feel like I probably have Covid-19, but it's only a mild case. Should I get tested anyway, and is my blood useful to science? Undark's publisher, Deborah Blum, answers these questions and more.
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We may have found 19 more interstellar asteroids in our solar system
A bunch of asteroids near Jupiter and Neptune with orbits perpendicular to the plane of the solar system may have come here from a different star system
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India Under Coronavirus Lockdown
Responding to the coronavirus outbreak, the government of India ordered a nationwide lockdown on March 24, closing down businesses and limiting the movements of more than 1.3 billion people. Originally planned to last 21 days, Prime Minister Narendra Modi recently announced that the lockdown would be extended until May 3, with a few exceptions. Since the outbreak began, India has reported 21,700
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UK to extend testing to millions of workers in key industries
Hancock unveils new contact tracing strategy as UK races to meet target of 100,000 tests a day
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Novel coronavirus detected, monitored in wastewater
A new approach to monitoring the novel coronavirus, (as well as other dangerous pathogens and chemical agents), is being developed and refined. Known as wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE), the method mines sewage samples for vital clues about human health. It can potentially identify levels of coronavirus infection at both a local and global scale.
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Common soil fungus could be ally in organic corn growers' fight against pests
A common soil fungus might be enlisted as a powerful partner by corn producers to suppress pests and promote plant growth, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest promoting the fungus could be an especially valuable strategy for organic growers who struggle with insect control.
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Key nose cells identified as likely COVID-19 virus entry points
Two specific nose cell types have been identified as likely initial infection points for COVID-19 coronavirus. Scientists discovered that goblet and ciliated cells in the nose have high levels of the entry proteins that the COVID-19 virus uses to get into our cells, which could help explain the high rate of transmission. The study with Human Cell Atlas Lung Biological Network found cells in the ey
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How to make the healthiest coffee
What's the healthiest way to make a fresh cup of coffee? A new study examining links between coffee brewing methods and risks of heart attacks and death has concluded that filtered brew is safest.
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Robert Carroll, Who Studied Amphibian Evolution, Dies
The McGill University paleontologist, who died from COVID-19, was known for using multidisciplinary methods to explore the origins of amphibians, birds, and mammals.
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'Designer virus' is first new oral polio vaccine in 50 years
Virologists report promising Phase 1 clinical results for the first new oral polio vaccine in 50 years, which they have designed to be incapable of evolving the ability to cause disease in humans.
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Retail landlords banned from aggressive rent collection
Winding-up orders and statutory demands halted as UK high street struggles
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Home secretary faces calls to relax palliative drug rules
GPs and charities warn patients dying from coronavirus are suffering unnecessarily
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Scientists criticise UK government's 'following the science' claim
Ministers accused of abdicating political duty to narrow field of opaque expertise on Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Experts have voiced growing frustration over the UK government's claim that it is "following the science", saying the refrain is being used to abdicate responsibility for political decisions. They also raised concerns that the views of public
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The Guardian view on following viral science: why did we go it alone? | Editorial
People are dying. It is time to give up on the fantasies of British exceptionalism If there is a simple way of showing how out of step this government is with the rest of the world on coronavirus, it can be found in the gap last week between the five criteria that Dominic Raab said the country must fulfil before the lockdown was lifted and the six tests the World Health Organization set. Missing
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Study shows fewer kids enrolling in cancer clinical trials
Colorado study shows pediatric oncology clinical trial enrollment may be down, from 40-70 percent seen in studies completed in the 1990s, to 20-25 percent in the early 2000s, to 19.9 percent in the current study.
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Atmospheric tidal waves maintain Venus' super-rotation
An international research team led by Takeshi Horinouchi of Hokkaido University has revealed that the 'super-rotation' on Venus is maintained near the equator by atmospheric tidal waves formed from solar heating on the planet's dayside and cooling on its nightside. The study was published online in Science on April 23.
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Fishers livelihood measured by more than catch
Scientists throwing shade on the idea that a fisher's life is Zen, showing the arrangements before and after the fish takes the bait the must be considered to make effective and equitable policy about global fishing.
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Scientists shed light on action of key tuberculosis drug
A new study led by scientists at the University of Birmingham has shed fresh light on how a key front-line drug kills the tuberculosis bacterium.
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Discovery of protein's configuration could lead to more effective anti-obesity treatments
Researchers have unveiled the precise shape of a key player in human metabolism, which could open the door to better treatments for obesity and other metabolic disorders.
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Breakthrough discovery in HIV research opens path to new, better therapies
Cells infected with HIV make two forms of the virus's RNA. A new Science paper finds a single nucleotide controls which version of viral RNA an infected cell makes; both forms are necessary for HIV to replicate. The critical nucleotide happens to be in a region of the HIV genome with low mutation rates. That placement makes it a promising target for new therapies, because the virus is less likely
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Ocean biodiversity has not increased substantially for hundreds of millions of years — new study
A new way of looking at marine evolution over the past 540 million years has shown that levels of biodiversity in our oceans have remained fairly constant, rather than increasing continuously over the last 200 million years, as scientists previously thought.
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Poor coastal hypoxia and acidification policy leaves marine fisheries at risk
Current regulatory standards regarding the dissolved oxygen and pH levels of coastal waters have not kept pace with the scientific understanding of hypoxia and acidification, nor with the mounting evidence of their negative impact on coastal marine life.
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Thermal tides cause Venus' atmosphere to rotate far faster than its surface
By tracking the thick clouds of Venus' rapidly rotating atmosphere, researchers have gained new insight into the dynamic forces that drive atmospheric super-rotation – a little-understood phenomenon in which an atmosphere rotates much faster than the solid planetary body below.
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Avoid making exceptions for research quality during COVID-19 pandemic
Global crises are no excuse for lowering scientific standards, argue Alex London and Jonathan Kimmelman in a Policy Forum.
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Global changes in insect populations reflect both decline and growth
The widely reported 'insect apocalypse' is far more nuanced than previous studies have suggested, according to a new study, which reports the findings of a meta-analysis featuring data from 166 long-term surveys across 1,676 sites worldwide.
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Insects: Largest study to date finds declines on land, but recoveries in freshwater
A worldwide compilation of insect abundance studies shows the number of land-dwelling insects is in decline. On average, there is a global decrease of 0.92% per year, which translates to approximately 24% over 30 years. At the same time, the number of insects living in freshwater has increased on average by 1.08% each year. Local trends are highly variable. These are results from the largest study
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Crises are no excuse for lowering scientific standards, say ethicists
Ethicists from Carnegie Mellon and McGill universities are calling on the global research community to resist treating the urgency of the current COVID-19 outbreak as grounds for making exceptions to rigorous research standards in pursuit of treatments and vaccines.
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Sturgeon outlines plan for phased lifting of Scottish lockdown
First minister provides insight into likely UK strategy for easing restrictions
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Outbreak to pandemic
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Caught in the act
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Fungal diseases
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Proteostasis dISRupted
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A public health catch-22
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cDC1 and cancer
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Rubbery alloys
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Separation climatology
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Selective targeting of BD1 and BD2 of the BET proteins in cancer and immunoinflammation
The two tandem bromodomains of the BET (bromodomain and extraterminal domain) proteins enable chromatin binding to facilitate transcription. Drugs that inhibit both bromodomains equally have shown efficacy in certain malignant and inflammatory conditions. To explore the individual functional contributions of the first (BD1) and second (BD2) bromodomains in biology and therapy, we developed select
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The effect of travel restrictions on the spread of the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak
Motivated by the rapid spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in mainland China, we use a global metapopulation disease transmission model to project the impact of travel limitations on the national and international spread of the epidemic. The model is calibrated on the basis of internationally reported cases and shows that, at the start of the travel ban from Wuhan on 23 January 2020, mo
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Evolving epidemiology of poliovirus serotype 2 following withdrawal of the serotype 2 oral poliovirus vaccine
Although there have been no cases of serotype 2 wild poliovirus for more than 20 years, transmission of serotype 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV2) and associated paralytic cases in several continents represent a threat to eradication. The withdrawal of the serotype 2 component of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV2) was implemented in April 2016 to stop VDPV2 emergence and secure eradication of all
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How waves and turbulence maintain the super-rotation of Venus atmosphere
Venus has a thick atmosphere that rotates 60 times as fast as the surface, a phenomenon known as super-rotation. We use data obtained from the orbiting Akatsuki spacecraft to investigate how the super-rotation is maintained in the cloud layer, where the rotation speed is highest. A thermally induced latitudinal-vertical circulation acts to homogenize the distribution of the angular momentum aroun
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Crystal structure of SARS-CoV-2 main protease provides a basis for design of improved {alpha}-ketoamide inhibitors
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome–coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a global health emergency. An attractive drug target among coronaviruses is the main protease (M pro , also called 3CL pro ) because of its essential role in processing the polyproteins that are translated from the viral RNA. We report the x-ray structures of the unliganded S
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Structural basis for transcriptional start site control of HIV-1 RNA fate
Heterogeneous transcriptional start site usage by HIV-1 produces 5'-capped RNAs beginning with one, two, or three 5'-guanosines ( Cap 1G, Cap 2G, or Cap 3G, respectively) that are either selected for packaging as genomes ( Cap 1G) or retained in cells as translatable messenger RNAs (mRNAs) ( Cap 2G and Cap 3G). To understand how 5'-guanosine number influences fate, we probed the structures of cap
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Meta-analysis reveals declines in terrestrial but increases in freshwater insect abundances
Recent case studies showing substantial declines of insect abundances have raised alarm, but how widespread such patterns are remains unclear. We compiled data from 166 long-term surveys of insect assemblages across 1676 sites to investigate trends in insect abundances over time. Overall, we found considerable variation in trends even among adjacent sites but an average decline of terrestrial ins
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The spatial structure of Phanerozoic marine animal diversity
The global fossil record of marine animals has fueled long-standing debates about diversity change through time and the drivers of this change. However, the fossil record is not truly global. It varies considerably in geographic scope and in the sampling of environments among intervals of geological time. We account for this variability using a spatially explicit approach to quantify regional-sca
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Structure of a trapped radical transfer pathway within a ribonucleotide reductase holocomplex
Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are a diverse family of enzymes that are alone capable of generating 2'-deoxynucleotides de novo and are thus critical in DNA biosynthesis and repair. The nucleotide reduction reaction in all RNRs requires the generation of a transient active site thiyl radical, and in class I RNRs, this process involves a long-range radical transfer between two subunits, α and β.
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Determination of the melanocortin-4 receptor structure identifies Ca2+ as a cofactor for ligand binding
The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is involved in energy homeostasis and is an important drug target for syndromic obesity. We report the structure of the antagonist SHU9119-bound human MC4R at 2.8-angstrom resolution. Ca 2+ is identified as a cofactor that is complexed with residues from both the receptor and peptide ligand. Extracellular Ca 2+ increases the affinity and potency of the endogenou
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Advice for the worried
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Structural basis of ER-associated protein degradation mediated by the Hrd1 ubiquitin ligase complex
Misfolded luminal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins undergo ER-associated degradation (ERAD-L): They are retrotranslocated into the cytosol, polyubiquitinated, and degraded by the proteasome. ERAD-L is mediated by the Hrd1 complex (composed of Hrd1, Hrd3, Der1, Usa1, and Yos9), but the mechanism of retrotranslocation remains mysterious. Here, we report a structure of the active Hrd1 complex, as
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The integrated stress response: From mechanism to disease
Protein quality control is essential for the proper function of cells and the organisms that they make up. The resulting loss of proteostasis, the processes by which the health of the cell's proteins is monitored and maintained at homeostasis, is associated with a wide range of age-related human diseases. Here, we highlight how the integrated stress response (ISR), a central signaling network tha
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Ultrafast vector imaging of plasmonic skyrmion dynamics with deep subwavelength resolution
Plasmonic skyrmions are an optical manifestation of topological defects in a continuous vector field. Identifying them requires characterization of the vector structure of the electromagnetic near field on thin metal films. Here we introduce time-resolved vector microscopy that creates movies of the electric field vectors of surface plasmons with subfemtosecond time steps and a 10-nanometer spati
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Why WHO?
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Lost in transition
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News at a glance
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Survivors' burden
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Retraction
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Researchers restore injured man's sense of touch using brain-computer interface technology
Researchers have been able to restore sensation to the hand of a research participant with a severe spinal cord injury using a brain-computer interface (BCI) system. The technology harnesses neural signals that are so minuscule they can't be perceived and enhances them via artificial sensory feedback sent back to the participant, resulting in greatly enriched motor function.
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How birds evolved big brains
Evolutionary biologists and paleontologists have reconstructed the evolution of the avian brain using a massive dataset of brain volumes from dinosaurs, extinct birds like Archaeopteryx and the great auk, and modern birds.
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Very low-dose Avastin effective for preventing blindness in preterm infants
Babies born prematurely who require treatment to prevent blindness from retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) could be treated with a dose of Avastin (bevacizumab) that is a fraction of the dose commonly used for ROP currently.
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Giant teenage shark from the dinosaur era
Scientists examined parts of a vertebral column, which was found in northern Spain in 1996, and assigned it to the extinct shark group Ptychodontidae. In contrast to teeth, shark vertebrae bear biological information, like body size, growth, and age and allowed the team surrounding Patrick L. Jambura to gain new insights into the biology of this mysterious shark group.
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New test for COVID-19 may deliver faster results to more people
Scientists have developed a novel assay capable of detecting the causative viral pathogen of COVID-19 that can be run in decentralized test facilities, according to a new report.
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Coronaviruses and bats have been evolving together for millions of years
Scientists compared the different kinds of coronaviruses living in 36 bat species from the western Indian Ocean and nearby areas of Africa. They found that different groups of bats have their own unique strains of coronavirus, revealing that bats and coronaviruses have been evolving together for millions of years. Developing a better understanding of how coronaviruses evolved can help us create be
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Caught in the act
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Fungal diseases
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Proteostasis dISRupted
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A public health catch-22
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cDC1 and cancer
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Archaeologists verify Florida's Mound Key as location of elusive Spanish fort
Florida and Georgia archaeologists have discovered the location of Fort San Antón de Carlos, home of one of the first Jesuit missions in North America. The Spanish fort was built in 1566 in the capital of the Calusa, the most powerful Native American tribe in the region, on present-day Mound Key in the center of Estero Bay on Florida's Gulf Coast.
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Biologists investigate why the sweet taste of sugary foods diminishes when they're cool
Have you ever noticed how a bite of warm cherry pie fills your mouth with sweetness, but that same slice right out of the refrigerator isn't nearly as tempting? Scientists know this phenomenon to be true, but the mechanism behind it has been poorly understood.
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'Bursty' email communication helps groups convert resources into results
Many organizations arrange employees into groups, and research has recognized the importance of groups having access to resources (e.g., labor, knowledge, raw materials, technology, financial capital), as well as how they use those resources to ensure optimal performance. These studies have shown that groups with the same resources vary in how they use what is available, suggesting that the same r
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When iron is limited, microalgae that live in coral cells may compensate with other metals
When iron is limited, the tiny algae that live within coral cells—which can provide the majority of a coral's nutritional needs—change how they take in other trace metals, which could have cascading effects on vital biological functions. A new study in the journal Coral Reefs explores how different species of these microalgae rely on iron, whose already limited supply in oceans could decline with
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Listen: Why Do Some People Get Sicker?
As we understand more about the role that the immune system plays in COVID-19, we may learn why some patients have much worse outcomes. James Hamblin discusses his recent story with Katherine Wells on the podcast Social Distance . Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.
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Biologists investigate why the sweet taste of sugary foods diminishes when they're cool
Have you ever noticed how a bite of warm cherry pie fills your mouth with sweetness, but that same slice right out of the refrigerator isn't nearly as tempting? Scientists know this phenomenon to be true, but the mechanism behind it has been poorly understood.
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When iron is limited, microalgae that live in coral cells may compensate with other metals
When iron is limited, the tiny algae that live within coral cells—which can provide the majority of a coral's nutritional needs—change how they take in other trace metals, which could have cascading effects on vital biological functions. A new study in the journal Coral Reefs explores how different species of these microalgae rely on iron, whose already limited supply in oceans could decline with
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Insect numbers down 25% since 1990, global study finds
Scientists say insects are vital and the losses worrying, with accelerating declines in Europe called 'shocking' The biggest assessment of global insect abundances to date shows a worrying drop of almost 25% in the last 30 years, with accelerating declines in Europe that shocked scientists. The analysis combined 166 long-term surveys from almost 1,700 sites and found that some species were buckin
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Agnelli heir perseveres with contrarian bet on print media
John Elkann confident in journalism as Exor takes control of Italy's biggest newspaper group
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Fishers livelihood measured by more than catch
Fishing for a living can seem so Zen—a time to be in the moment, just the fisher, the boat, the water.
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Lifting the UK's lockdown or saving lives are not mutually exclusive
It is not a matter of protecting people 'or' the economy but of protecting people 'and' the economy
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Fishers livelihood measured by more than catch
Fishing for a living can seem so Zen—a time to be in the moment, just the fisher, the boat, the water.
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Insects: Largest study to date finds declines on land, but recoveries in freshwater
A worldwide compilation of long-term insect abundance studies shows that the number of land-dwelling insects is in decline. On average, there is a global decrease of 0.92% per year, which translates to approximately 24% over 30 years. At the same time, the number of insects living in freshwater, such as midges and mayflies, has increased on average by 1.08% each year. This is possibly due to effec
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Ethical encouragement, a molecule hunt and curatorial curiosities
A digest of COVID-19 science, data, reporting and optimism @ 23 April.
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Without food, there can be no exit from the pandemic
Nature, Published online: 23 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01181-3 Countries must join forces to avert a global food crisis from COVID-19.
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Study suggests 3D face photos could be a sleep apnea screening tool
Facial features analyzed from 3D photographs could predict the likelihood of having obstructive sleep apnea, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.
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Survey shows regions of elevated food insecurity due to COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to elevated levels of food insecurity in the southern US compared to other areas, according to new research from University of Arkansas sociologists.
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Archaeologists verify Florida's Mound Key as location of elusive Spanish fort
Florida and Georgia archaeologists have discovered the location of Fort San Antón de Carlos, home of one of the first Jesuit missions in North America. The Spanish fort was built in 1566 in the capital of the Calusa, the most powerful Native American tribe in the region, on present-day Mound Key in the center of Estero Bay on Florida's Gulf Coast.
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Reducing the carbon footprint of artificial intelligence
MIT system cuts the energy required for training and running neural networks.
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Insects: Largest study to date finds declines on land, but recoveries in freshwater
A worldwide compilation of long-term insect abundance studies shows that the number of land-dwelling insects is in decline. On average, there is a global decrease of 0.92% per year, which translates to approximately 24% over 30 years. At the same time, the number of insects living in freshwater, such as midges and mayflies, has increased on average by 1.08% each year. This is possibly due to effec
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Atmospheric tidal waves maintain Venus' super-rotation
Images from the Akatsuki spacecraft unveil what keeps Venus's atmosphere rotating much faster than the planet itself.
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Ocean biodiversity has not increased substantially for hundreds of millions of years: study
A new way of looking at marine evolution over the past 540 million years has shown that levels of biodiversity in our oceans have remained fairly constant, rather than increasing continuously over the last 200 million years, as scientists previously thought.
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Discovery of protein's configuration could lead to more effective anti-obesity treatments
Researchers have unveiled the precise shape of a key player in human metabolism, which could open the door to better treatments for obesity and other metabolic disorders.
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Covid-19 latest: Up to half of deaths in Europe were in care homes
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Ocean biodiversity has not increased substantially for hundreds of millions of years: study
A new way of looking at marine evolution over the past 540 million years has shown that levels of biodiversity in our oceans have remained fairly constant, rather than increasing continuously over the last 200 million years, as scientists previously thought.
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Discovery of protein's configuration could lead to more effective anti-obesity treatments
Researchers have unveiled the precise shape of a key player in human metabolism, which could open the door to better treatments for obesity and other metabolic disorders.
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Pandemic Advertising Got Weird Fast
A few weeks ago, as millions of Americans settled into home confinement in a desperate effort to stymie an era-defining pandemic, Little Caesars invited them to step up to its Pizza Portal, a virus-hostile pie locker that circumvents the need for human interaction. Little Caesars was not the only brand—or, for that matter, the only pizza company—that wanted people to know their lockdown options.
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Preventing metastasis — An antibody with therapeutic potential
A receptor in the cell layer that lines the blood vessels from the inside stimulates both the formation of new blood vessels in tumors and metastasis. Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center in Heidelberg (DKFZ) and the Mannheim Medical Faculty of the University of Heidelberg have succeeded in blocking this receptor with an antibody to thus prevent the growth of metastases in mice with bre
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'Bursty' email communication helps groups convert resources into results
A new study looked at more than 1,300 retail banking sales teams in a large regional bank to explore whether groups vary in how they convert resources into performance. The study found that resources are generally helpful, but groups differ in the results they achieve. The variation is also largely associated with the group's coordinated attention – specifically, their patterns of email communicat
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Not so sweet
Have you ever noticed how a bite of warm cherry pie fills your mouth with sweetness, but that same slice right out of the refrigerator isn't nearly as tempting? Scientists know this phenomenon to be true, but the mechanism behind it has been poorly understood.
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Iron deficiency in corals?
When iron is limited, the microalgae that live within coral cells change how they take in other trace metals, which could have cascading effects on vital biological functions and perhaps exacerbate the effects of climate change on corals.
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Lufthansa warns it will run out of cash in weeks
German flag carrier has applied for state aid in number of European countries and decommissioned more than 40 jets
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Forhistorisk krokodille droppede landjorden: Udviklede hale og finner som en delfin
En masseuddøen kan have lokket krokodillerne til at indtage havet.
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The case for a global probe of Covid-19's origins
China could rebuild trust by allowing a multilateral expert mission to Wuhan
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France rules out coronavirus aid for tax-haven businesses
Finance minister also says companies cannot pay dividends while receiving government money
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VIDEO: 6 Tips For Staying Safe While Grocery Shopping
Coronavirus got you nervous about grocery shopping? We talked to scientists for their advice about how to stay safe at the store — and when handling food back home. (Image credit: Clare Schneider / NPR)
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"Ghost Flights" Haunt the Skies, Enlarging Carbon Footprints
Though air travel demand has plummeted, federal regulations have required airlines to maintain flights — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Elon Musk Says the Starlink Network Will Go Live in Six Months
Test Run SpaceX CEO Elon Musk tweeted Wednesday that the company's Starlink satellite network will come online for a public beta in about six months. The network will still be incomplete — Business Insider reports that SpaceX hopes to launch thousands more satellites in the coming years. But the beta will be the first attempt to test out whether Starlink can reliably beam internet service down fr
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New research highlights blood clot dangers of COVID-19
A special report published today in the journal Radiology outlines prevention, diagnosis and treatment of complications stemming from blood clots in patients with COVID-19. The journal also published two research letters and a case study on this topic.
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Argonne scientists fashion new class of X-ray detector
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Argonne and Los Alamos National Laboratories have identified a new class of X-ray detectors based on layered perovskites, a semiconducting material.
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Helping a helper: Uncovering how different proteins cooperate in DNA repair
DNA is critical for life as we know it. Ensuring that DNA is kept in a stable state is therefore important in all organisms. Although DNA faces a plethora of assaults on a daily basis, most of this damage is inconsequential due to the actions of proteins that efficiently repair broken DNA. Researchers at Tokyo Tech and Yokohama City University (YCU) collaborated to understand the interplay between
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Here's How Local Communities Can Help Save Mangroves
The Global Mangrove Alliance has a goal of increasing the world's mangrove cover by 20 percent over the next decade
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COVID-19 vaccine protects monkeys from new coronavirus, Chinese biotech reports
China's Sinovac makes headway with old-fashioned technology that "kills" whole virus
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Business and Science Are Pointing in the Same Direction
The question on everyone's mind now is when it will be safe to come back out. Business interests argue that the economy should be reopened; public-health scientists argue that it is still too early; and politicians are struggling to find a path forward. What they need, though, is not a path, but a process. And when it comes to designing a process for making crucial decisions, business leaders and
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Why sweet foods aren't as tasty when they're cool
Cool temperatures suppress the appeal of sweet foods for fruit flies, researchers report. Have you ever noticed how a bite of warm cherry pie fills your mouth with sweetness, but that same slice right out of the refrigerator isn't nearly as tempting? Scientists know this phenomenon to be true, but the mechanism behind it has been poorly understood, until now. While cooler temperatures cut flies i
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De Beers to cut diamond production by 20 per cent this year
World's second-largest diamond miner cites disruption along the supply chain
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Forskning kan også være for bemærkelsesværdig
PLUS. Banebrydende forskning giver uventede resultater, men der er grund til at være ekstra på vagt over for totalt uventede resultater – både helt generelt og i coronatider.
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The basis of glyphosate resistance in amaranth
William T. Molin (U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS) teamed up with Allison Yaguchi, Mark Blenner, and Christopher A. Saski (Clemson University, SC) to sequence and dissect the structure of the extrachromosomal DNA replicon that underlies the molecular and biochemical basis of resistance to the herbicide glyphosate in Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri).
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A cellular mechanism protecting against cancer
Susanne Hellmuth and Olaf Stemmann from the University of Bayreuth have discovered a natural protective mechanism that leads to the programmed death of potentially diseased cells. It protects from cancer that can develop as a result of irregular distribution of genetic information to daughter cells. The enzyme separase plays a central role in these processes. The findings published in "Nature" off
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Sensor detects biomarker of early-stage multiple sclerosis
Diagnostic strategy developed by Brazilian researchers can also be used to distinguish MS from neuromyelitis optica, another demyelinating disorder. The two diseases have similar symptoms but must be treated differently.
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Experts issue guide on lung cancer screening, management during COVID-19
A new expert panel consensus statement published simultaneously today in the journals Radiology: Imaging Cancer, Chest and the Journal of the American College of Radiology provides guidance to clinicians managing lung cancer screening programs and patients with lung nodules during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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The basis of glyphosate resistance in amaranth
William T. Molin (U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS) teamed up with Allison Yaguchi, Mark Blenner, and Christopher A. Saski (Clemson University, SC) to sequence and dissect the structure of the extrachromosomal DNA replicon that underlies the molecular and biochemical basis of resistance to the herbicide glyphosate in Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri).
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New research explores the impact of cover crop residues on weed control
Cover crops have a well-documented role to play in suppressing troublesome weeds. But what happens as those cover crops degrade?
10h
North Atlantic right whales are in much poorer condition than Southern right whales
New research by an international team of scientists reveals that endangered North Atlantic right whales are in much poorer body condition than their counterparts in the southern hemisphere.
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New study takes the pulse of a sleeping supervolcano
Under the volcanoes in the Andes where Chile, Argentina and Bolivia meet, there is a gigantic reservoir of molten magma. For several million years, it has been there without fully solidifying or causing a supervolcanic eruption. Geologists have long wondered how this is possible. Researchers from Uppsala University, among others, have now discovered that the secret may be hidden tributaries of hot
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Promising signs for Perseverance rover in its quest for past Martian life
Undulating streaks of land visible from space reveal rivers once coursed across the Martian surface—but for how long did the water flow? Enough time to record evidence of ancient life, according to a new Stanford study.
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Gene-editing protocol for whitefly pest opens door to control
Whiteflies are among the most important agricultural pests in the world, yet they have been difficult to genetically manipulate and control, in part, because of their small size. An international team of researchers has overcome this roadblock by developing a CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing protocol that could lead to novel control methods for this devastating pest.
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Zero-emissions Boston could save 288 lives and $2.4 billion annually
Air pollution from just the City of Boston contributes to nearly as many deaths across the wider region as car crashes do, as well as non-fatal cardiovascular and respiratory disease and days of missed work.
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Mathematical curves predict evolution in COVID-19 spread
Efforts to contain the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic are now the top priority of governments across the globe. As they make these life-saving decisions, it is particularly crucial for policymakers to accurately predict how the spread of the virus will change over time. Through research published in EPJ Plus, Ignazio Ciufolini at the University of Salento, and Antonio Paolozzi at Sapienza Univers
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New research explores the impact of cover crop residues on weed control
Cover crops have a well-documented role to play in suppressing troublesome weeds. But what happens as those cover crops degrade?
10h
North Atlantic right whales are in much poorer condition than Southern right whales
New research by an international team of scientists reveals that endangered North Atlantic right whales are in much poorer body condition than their counterparts in the southern hemisphere.
10h
Gene-editing protocol for whitefly pest opens door to control
Whiteflies are among the most important agricultural pests in the world, yet they have been difficult to genetically manipulate and control, in part, because of their small size. An international team of researchers has overcome this roadblock by developing a CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing protocol that could lead to novel control methods for this devastating pest.
10h
Following the insect meltdown, numbers of orb web spiders have drastically declined
The abundance of large orb web spiders in the Swiss midland has declined drastically over the last 40 years. The main reason for this is the shrinking food supply available to these insectivorous animals. This is demonstrated in a study conducted by researchers from the University of Basel and Ghent University (Belgium), as reported in the scientific journal Insects.
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A Europe covered in grasslands or forests: Innovation and research on climate models
Forestation is one of the main strategies recommended by the scientific community for climate change mitigation. But, would a European continent completely covered in forests be any cooler than one without forests?
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Asteroid visiting Earth's neighborhood brings its own face mask
The Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico is following an asteroid approaching Earth this week and while it poses no threat, it appears to know our planet is facing a pandemic.
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Falling visibility shows African cities suffering major air pollution increases
Falling visibility in three major African cities reveals that air pollution has increased significantly over the last 45 years—leaving citizens facing further short-term increases in man-made pollution due to increasing urbanization and economic development, a new study reveals.
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Multi-functionalization of graphene for molecular targeted cancer therapy
Three functional molecules (near-infrared fluorescent probe, tumor targeting molecule, and an anticancer drug) are successfully decollated onto the surface of a graphene molecule. This multi-functional graphene allows effective cancer cell elimination. For fighting off cancerous diseases, this "triple" chemical modified nanomaterial might save the patient.
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Tiny sensors fit 30,000 to a penny, transmit data from living tissue
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Will COVID-19 Spark a Moral Revolution? Eight Possibilities
submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]
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Open Discussion- How important do you feel Environment Education is in School?
So I am doing a online CPD course in Environmental Management and would like to invite people to discuss their thoughts and opinions on how important do you feel Environment Education is in School? submitted by /u/DracoZoso [link] [comments]
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How important may a World Government be to the future of Humanity?
Would you say that a World Government would be crucial for the future of our species? If we were to leave our planet or even our solar system, would our current system of nationstates governing our planet still be feasible? Realistically, how and when could we achieve a World Government? Personally, I don't see us still being divided into nationstates in the future. It would be too much of a hind
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Daimler ends hydrogen car development because it's too costly
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UK solar peak generation record broken
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Glaucoma could be successfully treated with gene therapy
submitted by /u/Fascinax [link] [comments]
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U.S. Space Force's First Offensive Weapon Is a Satellite Jammer
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Sweden Exits Coal 2 years Early Reducing Subsidy Costs
submitted by /u/SoUnProfessional [link] [comments]
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Nuclear power's ray of hope: hydrogen-boron fusion
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How much space does nature need? 30 percent of the planet may not be enough
submitted by /u/storunner13 [link] [comments]
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Following the insect meltdown, numbers of orb web spiders have drastically declined
The abundance of large orb web spiders in the Swiss midland has declined drastically over the last 40 years. The main reason for this is the shrinking food supply available to these insectivorous animals. This is demonstrated in a study conducted by researchers from the University of Basel and Ghent University (Belgium), as reported in the scientific journal Insects.
10h
Huge fire ravages Poland's largest nature reserve
Massive wildfires have ravaged Poland's largest nature reserve, the Biebrza National Park, as the country faces its worst drought in years.
10h
Conservative MPs voice disquiet over lockdown exit strategy
Government pressed to outline intentions as concerns grow over impact on UK economy
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Surveys of infectious disease experts aim to predict COVID-19's toll
Consensus judgments could provide an alternative to statistical models
10h
Dramatic decrease in cold-water plankton during industrial era
There has been a dramatic decrease in cold-water plankton during the 20th century, in contrast to thousands of years of stability, according to a new UCL-led study.
10h
Views on guns and death penalty are linked to harsh treatment of immigrants
An online study that pulled equally from people who identify as Democrats or Republicans has found subtle new clues that underlie views about immigrants.
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Women's faces in Time Magazine throughout history
In a paper published in Journal of Cultural Analytics, an interdisciplinary group of researchers used machine learning to extract 327,322 faces from an archive of Time Magazine containing 3,389 issues dating from 1923 to 2014. The gender of each extracted face was computationally classified. Additionally, researchers chose a sample of articles for close reading in order examine the socio-political
10h
New research explores the impact of cover crop residues on weed control
Cover crops have a well-documented role to play in suppressing troublesome weeds. But what happens as those cover crops degrade?
10h
North Atlantic right whales are in much poorer condition than Southern right whales
New research by an international team of scientists reveals that endangered North Atlantic right whales are in much poorer body condition than their counterparts in the southern hemisphere.
10h
New study takes the pulse of a sleeping supervolcano
Under the volcanoes in the Andes where Chile, Argentina and Bolivia meet, there is a gigantic reservoir of molten magma. For several million years, it has been there without fully solidifying or causing a supervolcanic eruption. Geologists have long wondered how this is possible. Researchers from Uppsala University, among others, have now discovered that the secret may be hidden tributaries of hot
10h
Sensors woven into a shirt can monitor vital signs
MIT researchers developed a way to incorporate electronic sensors into stretchy fabrics, allowing them to create shirts or other garments that could monitor vital signs such as temperature, respiration, and heart rate.
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Gilead antiviral drug remdesivir flops in first trial
Exclusive: Disappointing results revealed in draft documents published accidentally by WHO
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Cancelled Oktoberfest removes Bavaria's froth
Germany's international calling card joins mass events falling victim to Covid-19
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New book charts the evolution of fatherhood
A new book offers an anthropological perspective of the evolution of fatherhood and how it continues to change. As an academic, Frank L'Engle Williams likes to do his research. So, when his wife was pregnant with their first child in 2005, he devoured books on parenting and fatherhood. But there was one book no one seemed to have written. "I couldn't find the book I was looking for, so I had to w
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Jurassic Park in eastern Morocco: Paleontology of the Kem Kem Group
The Kem Kem beds in Morocco are famous for the spectacular fossils found there, including at least four large-bodied non-avian theropods, and several large-bodied pterosaurs and crocodilians.
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Biosero Collaborates with Scripps Research Institute to Automate Lab Screening for COVID-19 Drug Therapy Candidates
Biosero has designed and implemented an automated lab workflow for Scripps Research Institute so researchers can accelerate the screening of COVID-19 drug therapy candidates.
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Gap stops paying landlords as retailers reel from virus lockdown
Clothing chain details deteriorating cash position while Target warns on profit margins
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Art supplies to keep you creative and happy
Sketch, sculpt, and fold your way to contentment. (Carolina Garcia Tavizon via Unsplash/) It's scientifically proven that doing something creative makes people less sad . But there are so many ways to be artistic it can be a little overwhelming figuring out where to start. Crafting kits—like crocheting amigurumi animals or painting a model train set—give you something to work toward, but don't gi
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Gene-editing protocol for whitefly pest opens door to control
Whiteflies are among the most important agricultural pests in the world, yet they have been difficult to genetically manipulate and control, in part, because of their small size. An international team of researchers has overcome this roadblock by developing a CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing protocol that could lead to novel control methods for this devastating pest.
10h
Your football team loses a match. You may suffer a heart attack.
Lost football games may trigger heart attacks in male fans, according to research presented today on EAPC Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). 'Our study shows that poor results from the local professional football team coincided with more heart attacks in male residents,' said study author Dr. Lukasz Kuzma of the Medical University of Bialystok, Pol
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Icelandic DNA jigsaw-puzzle brings new knowledge about Neanderthals
An international team of researchers has put together a new image of Neanderthals based on the genes Neanderthals left in the DNA of modern humans when they had children with them about 50,000 years ago. The researchers found the new information by trawling the genomes of more than 27,000 Icelanders. Among other things, they discovered that Neanderthal children had older mothers and younger father
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The basis of glyphosate resistance in amaranth
This work reveals the unique genomic content and structural organization of an extrachromosomal circular DNA replicon in Amaranth plants, with implications for the advancement of crop breeding and our understanding of the evolution of herbicide resistance.
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High-altitude adaptations connected with lower risk for chronic diseases
High-altitude adaptations in the Himalayas may lower risk for some chronic diseases, according to a research team including faculty from Binghamton University, State University of New York, the University of New Mexico, and the Fudan University School of Life Sciences.
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Horizon Discovery CHOSOURCE™ platform supports development of immunotherapy for autoimmune diseases
Batavia Biosciences and Immutep utilize Horizon's GS knockout CHO K1 cell line expression system to generate high yielding cell line for LAG-3 immunotherapy
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The Baker Company has partnered with Lucid Scientific, a manufacturer of the most sensitive and accurate optical oxygen sensors available, to distribute its novel product line in North America.
The Baker Company, global leader in containment technology, owner of Baker Ruskinn, itself a global leader in anaerobic and precision low-oxygen culture solutions for microbiology and cell culture applications, has partnered with Lucid Scientific, to distribute their unique RESIPHER solution that turns a multi-well plate into a dynamic oxygen consumption reader.
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How COVID-19 has disrupted the food supply chain
COVID-19 has disrupted the way Americans get their food in all kinds of ways, such as shortages on store shelves, shuttered sit-down restaurants, and farmers left with surplus products they can't sell. Here, two experts from the agricultural and resource economics department at North Carolina State University explain how our food supply chain works, how the pandemic affects it, and how it may cha
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I Can See it in Your Face: Facial Expressions in Mice
How do you know what an animal is feeling? Unfortunately, you can't ask a dog, mouse, or fly how they are feeling or what they are thinking. This is one of the chief problems in animal research – we just don't have ready access to their internal thoughts and feelings. This inability to access the […]
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Hospitals Are Using iPads to Turn Robot Dogs Into Doctors
Robot manufacturer Boston Dynamics has found a new job for its robot dog Spot Mini amidst the coronavirus outbreak: Modified Spot robots, oufitted with iPads, are now letting doctors walk into the rooms of coronavirus patients without risking infection. Hospitals have been asking the company for help with remote health. "Based on these conversations, as well as the global shortage of critical per
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AI can search satellite data to find plastic floating in the sea
AI can check satellite images of the ocean and distinguish between floating materials such as seaweed or plastics, which could help clean-up efforts
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Brain implant lets man with paralysis move and feel with his hand
A brain-computer interface has helped a man with a severe spinal cord injury move and feel using a hand again, letting him carefully lift light objects such as a paper cup
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Loop Genomics Launches Most Accurate SARS-CoV-2 Long-read Sequencing for Research Use
Loop Genomics' sequencing technology generates viral amplicon long-reads with only 1/25,000 errors per bp
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What's next in the fight against COVID-19?
Before Americans started taking the threat of coronavirus seriously, Gerardo Chowell was watching the developing COVID-19 pandemic closely. Back in January, Chowell, professor of mathematical epidemiology in the School of Public Health at Georgia State University, traveled to New York. For weeks, he had tracked the coronavirus outbreaks in China and Europe, and he understood some of the unique da
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Doctors Want to Use Lethal Injection Drugs on COVID-19 Patients
Doctors treating severe cases of COVID-19 have started making an unusual plea: they're asking states with the death penalty for access to their stores of lethal injection medications. Specifically, according to The Associated Press , the doctors are asking for the sedative midazolam, the paralytic vecuronium bromide, and the opioid fentanyl — which states stockpile for executions, but which they
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Speedy drones are helping Ghana test for the novel coronavirus
The testing samples float down to the ground below. (Zipline/) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here . When one of these 6-foot-long drones takes off from a facility in Ghana, a rope catapults the little airplane off a ramp and into the sky. With that dynamic launch and its two 14-inch propellers spinning, it very quickly hits a speed of nearly 70 miles per hour. It whirs along during cr
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Workplace reopenings: watch your speed
Any return to work should be gradual and responsive to the evolving threat
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The Pandemic Could Lead to More Discrimination against Black Americans
African-Americans are already afflicted disproportionately by COVID-19, but economic collapse could make things even worse for them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Zero-emissions Boston could save 288 lives and $2.4 billion annually: BU study
With much of the City of Boston shut down by COVID-19, the region is enjoying better air quality than it has seen in decades, a preview of the reduced emissions that will come as part of the city's ambitious 'Carbon Free Boston' goals.
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New test for COVID-19 may deliver faster results to more people
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in over 2.5 million confirmed cases worldwide and nearly over 170,000 deaths as of April 21 according to the World Health Organization1. Early identification of potential patients and diagnosis followed by isolation are critical for controlling the current pandemic and flattening the curve. This study describes a novel method that may enable decentralized facilit
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'Designer virus' is first new polio vaccine in 50 years
UC San Francisco virologist Raul Andino, PhD and Andrew Macadam, PhD, of the UK's National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC) report promising Phase 1 clinical results for the first new oral polio vaccine in 50 years, which they have designed to be incapable of evolving the ability to cause disease in humans.
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The Pandemic Could Lead to More Discrimination against Black Americans
African-Americans are already afflicted disproportionately by COVID-19, but economic collapse could make things even worse for them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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One Thing Space Agencies Must Watch Out for Now: Cats
Daniel Lakey was in the middle of an important meeting when an unauthorized participant decided to chime in. "He appeared at the door, jumped on the table, meowed in my face, walked across the keyboard, put his furry ass in my face, and eventually curled up sweetly on the desk next to the laptop," Lakey recounted to me recently. It was Sparkle, Lakey's fluffy brown-and-white cat. Sparkle stuck ar
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Could mass screening benefit kids at high risk of diabetes?
Studies are screening thousands of children for antibodies in the blood that precede symptoms
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Switzerland's central bank suffers record loss in market rout
First-quarter volatility deals $39bn blow to SNB as it steps up fight for Swiss franc
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Multi-functionalization of graphene for molecular targeted cancer therapy
Three functional molecules (near-infrared fluorescent probe, tumor targeting molecule, and anticancer drug) are successfully decollated onto the surface of graphene molecule. The multi-functional graphene allows effective cancer cell elimination.
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Discovered the physiological mechanisms underlying the most common pediatric leukemia
Researchers from the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute unveil the mechanisms that lead to hyperdiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia, hyper D-ALL, the most common pediatric B-cell leukemia.
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Giant teenage shark from the Dinosaur-era
Scientists of the University of Vienna examined parts of a vertebral column, which was found in northern Spain in 1996, and assigned it to the extinct shark group Ptychodontidae. In contrast to teeth, shark vertebrae bear biological information, like body size, growth, and age and allowed the team surrounding Patrick L. Jambura to gain new insights into the biology of this mysterious shark group.
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Dietary counselling introduced in infancy leads to better cardiovascular health in adults
The Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project investigated the long-term effects of dietary counselling on cardiovascular health. The individuals, who had participated in the trial between ages 7 months and 20 years, were invited to a follow-up study at the age of 26. The results show that the intervention group who received dietary counselling had lower serum cholesterol level and b
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Mathematical curves predict evolution in COVID-19 spread
Through research published in EPJ Plus, researchers identify a clear mathematical trend in the evolution of daily new COVID-19 cases and death numbers in China, and use the same curve to predict how a similar slowdown will unfold in Italy.
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Key nose cells identified as likely COVID-19 virus entry points
Two specific nose cell types have been identified as likely initial infection points for COVID-19 coronavirus. Scientists discovered that goblet and ciliated cells in the nose have high levels of the entry proteins that the COVID-19 virus uses to get into our cells, which could help explain the high rate of transmission. The study with Human Cell Atlas Lung Biological Network found cells in the ey
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Following the insect meltdown, numbers of orb web spiders have drastically declined
The abundance of large orb web spiders in the Swiss midland has declined drastically over the last 40 years. The main reason for this is the shrinking food supply available to these insectivorous animals. This is demonstrated in a study conducted by researchers from the University of Basel and Ghent University (Belgium), as reported in the scientific journal Insects.
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Straight Talk About a COVID-19 Vaccine – Facts So Romantic
There are many challenges to developing a vaccine that will be successful against COVID-19. eamesBot / Shutterstock Wayne Koff is one of the world's experts on vaccine development, the president and CEO of the Human Vaccines Project. He possesses a deep understanding of the opportunities and challenges along the road to a safe and effective vaccine against COVID-19. He has won prestigious awards,
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Space Force Unveils Its First Weapon, a Satellite Jammer
Playing Offense The U.S. Space Force recently acquired its first offensive weaponry: a device capable of blocking satellite communications, temporarily rendering orbiting satellites useless. The technology behind these Counter Communications Systems, as they're called, has already existed for years, Interesting Engineering reports , but the devices were only delivered to the military last month .
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Take Your Brick-And-Mortar Business Online With This All-In-One Ecommerce Solution
Futurism fans: To create this content, a non-editorial team worked with an affiliate partner. We may collect a small commission on items purchased through this page. This post does not necessarily reflect the views or the endorsement of the Futurism.com editorial staff. Having a brick and mortar store is great. Small boutique businesses are essential for building strong communities. However, as t
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A Close Look at the Frontrunning Coronavirus Vaccines As of April 23
There's plenty of news on the coronavirus vaccine front, so let's have a look. If you need some details on the different sorts of vaccines in general, here's the background post , which should help this one make sense. This is a rapidly advancing field, with a huge number of programs. Some of the players are doing a lot more than they're talking about, while others (as is always the case) are tal
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Top-tier drawing tablets for every budget
Upgrade your sketching. (Norbert Levajsics via Unsplash/) If you've ever tried drawing on a great digital tablet before, you know how satisfying it is. There's something really great about drawing by hand and watching it appear on the computer screen. Whether you're a professional animator or an enthusiastic doodler, a drawing tablet is a great purchase. You can use it in place of a whiteboard if
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Donald Kennedy, who led Science through turbulent times, dies at 88
A lifetime of public service included heading Stanford University and the Food and Drug Administration
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LIVE NOW: Watch the Smithsonian's Earth Optimism Digital Summit
The two-day virtual event will bring scientists and many other experts to highlight success stories in conservation
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IKBFU and University of Oviedo Physicists tested new research model on magnetic materials
Laboratory of Novice Magnet Materials working in collaboration with Spanish scientists (the University of Oviedo, Spain) tested the Preisach model using interfacing Fe-based microwires. This research was made to check whether it is applicable for FORC-analysis and how real-life conditions affect it.
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Amperometric sensors assist in analyzing food safety
Antioxidants are one of the most interesting and widely investigated compounds in life sciences due to their key role in the protection of living systems from the negative effects of free radicals. A great variety of antioxidants and discoveries of new ones give opportunities to better understand their pathways and mechanisms of action.
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Scientists from IKBFU, Moscow and Kiev conducted research on treating obesity
In the 21st century, the search for methods of treating noncommunicable diseases, such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes are among the top priorities. Prevention and treatment of these diseases include changing and controlling lifestyle, diet, and the use of pharmaceuticals.
12h
A Europe covered in grasslands or forests: innovation and research on climate models
An experiment to better understand how atmospheric variables respond to land use changes. For the first time, research in this field integrates nine different models: giving birth to a study that, with the CMCC Foundation's contribution within an international team, looks at increasingly advanced climate models to identify concrete and effective strategies to tackle climate change.
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Falling visibility shows African cities suffering major air pollution increases — study
Falling visibility in three major African cities reveals that air pollution has increased significantly over the last 45 years – leaving citizens facing further short-term increases in man-made pollution due to increasing urbanization and economic development, a new study reveals.
12h
A new therapeutic target turns the immune system against lymphoma
EPFL scientists have identified a key mechanism that tumor cells use to take advantage of and avoid detection from the immune system. Targeting this mechanism offers a new therapeutic strategy for cancers like Non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
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Examining associations between hearing loss, balance
About 3,800 adults 40 and older in South Korea participating in a national health survey were included in this analysis that examined associations between hearing loss and a test of their ability to retain balance. Age-related hearing loss affects the inner ear, which may increase the risk of dizziness.
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How common for cancer survivors to stay at jobs for health insurance?
This survey study looked at how often cancer survivors in the United States and their spouses or partners stay in their jobs because of concerns about losing their health insurance.
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Epidemiological assessment of imported COVID-19 cases in Wenzhou, China
This decision analytical model describes several key epidemiological features of imported coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases in Wenzhou, China.
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Association of renin-angiotensin system inhibitors with severity or risk of death in patients with hypertension hospitalized for COVID-19
The association between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and the severity of illness and death in patients with hypertension hospitalized for COVID-19 is examined in this study.
12h
New AI model accurately classifies colorectal polyps using slides from 24 institutions
Researchers at Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center have trained a deep neural network to distinguish the four major types of colorectal polyps excised during screening colonoscopy. The model not only produced results that demonstrated accuracy and sensitivity at the level of practicing pathologists, but withstood evaluation using broad datasets spanning multiple insti
12h
Very low-dose Avastin effective for preventing blindness in preterm infants
Babies born prematurely who require treatment to prevent blindness from retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) could be treated with a dose of Avastin (bevacizumab) that is a fraction of the dose commonly used for ROP currently. Results from the dose-finding study were published April 23 in JAMA Ophthalmology. The study was conducted by the Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group (PEDIG) and supported
12h
How birds evolved big brains
An international team of evolutionary biologists and paleontologists have reconstructed the evolution of the avian brain using a massive dataset of brain volumes from dinosaurs, extinct birds like Archaeopteryx and the great auk, and modern birds.
12h
Environment: Satellite data used to detect marine plastic
A new method of detecting patches of floating macroplastics — larger than 5 millimeters — in marine environments is presented in Scientific Reports this week. The approach, which uses data from the European Space Agency Sentinel-2 satellites, is able to distinguish plastics from other materials with 86% accuracy.
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Palaeontology: Fossil frogs offer insights into ancient Antarctica
The discovery of the earliest known modern amphibians in Antarctica provides further evidence of a warm and temperate climate in the Antarctic Peninsula before its separation from the southern supercontinent, Gondwana. The fossils, which belong to the family of helmeted frogs, are described in Scientific Reports this week.
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Researchers restore injured man's sense of touch using brain-computer interface technology
On April 23 in the journal Cell, a team of researchers report that they have been able to restore sensation to the hand of a research participant with a severe spinal cord injury using a brain-computer interface (BCI) system. The technology harnesses neural signals that are so minuscule they can't be perceived and enhances them via artificial sensory feedback sent back to the participant, resultin
12h
New blood test for Alzheimer's developed
A new blood test for Alzheimer's disease has been developed under the leadership of researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. The method is based on measuring a specific variant of tau protein in ordinary blood samples, which makes the test relatively simple and cheap to perform.
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Astronomical time can help us put lockdown into perspective
The coronavirus pandemic is making life feel slower than ever, but observing timescales across the universe can bring us some comfort, writes Chanda Prescod-Weinstein
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Forskere: Heftig regn aktiverede vulkan på Hawaii
PLUS. Nedbør i massive mængder kan være årsagen til et voldsomt vulkanudbrud på Haiwaii i 2018. Den viden kan bruges til at forbedre de advarselssystemer der forudsiger udbrud.
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Here's How Coronavirus Could Raise Cities' Risk for Climate Disasters
Faced with falling revenue and virus-related burdens, local officials are delaying sea walls and other projects to protect cities from climate change.
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First Frog Fossil Found on Antarctica
The specimen is some 40 million years old, and is probably related to species currently living in South America.
12h
Why does coronavirus kill more men than women? Researchers may have found an important clue.
A new study found that women clear coronavirus from their systems much faster than men. The researchers hypothesize that high concentrations of ACE2-expressing cells in the testes may store more coronavirus. There are many confounding factors to this mystery—some genetic, others social and behavioral. There's much we don't know about novel coronavirus. We don't know how the virus leaped from bats
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The Coronavirus May Be Doing Something Strange to Your Toes
Health practitioners are noticing a strange new sign that patients could be carrying the coronavirus without symptoms such as a dry cough or fever. The media and even some health experts are now referring to the condition as "COVID toes" — mysterious blue or red discoloration in toes and sometimes fingers. It seems to only affect young people. "We don't know for sure if it's related to COVID-19,
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US lawyers and insurers must face Covid-19 liability
Private lawsuits are a vital tool for upholding standards in the free market system
12h
Singapore oil traders rush to reassure clients
Tightening of credit lines after Hin Leong scandal raises prospect of liquidity crunch
12h
How Argentina's Strict Covid-19 Lockdown Saved Lives
Being there in mid-March gave me a window into what it would have looked like had the US taken serious action from the start. It also nearly stranded me 5,000 miles from home.
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'Expert Twitter' Only Goes So Far. Bring Back Blogs
To ensure readers get the latest, best information on Covid-19, pandemic experts need to go back to the early days of Web 2.0.
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Satellite data used to detect marine plastic
A new method of detecting patches of floating macroplastics—larger than 5 millimetres—in marine environments is presented in Scientific Reports this week. The approach, which uses data from the European Space Agency Sentinel-2 satellites, is able to distinguish plastics from other materials with 86% accuracy.
12h
How birds evolved big brains
They once compared well with dinosaurs.
12h
Punishing selfishness starts young
It's influenced by social norms, study suggests.
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We just keep finding marine plastic
Researchers detect it from the air and in the ice.
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Fossil frogs offer insights into early Antarctica
Researchers find first traces of amphibians.
12h
Eye contact activates the autonomic nervous system even during video calls
A new study from Tampere University in Finland found that eye contact during video calls can elicit similar psychophysiological responses than those in genuine, in-person eye contact.
12h
Wiring the quantum computer of the future: A novel simple build with existing technology
Efficient quantum computing is expected to enable advancements that are impossible with classical computers. Scientists from Japan and Sydney have collaborated and proposed a novel two-dimensional design that can be constructed using existing integrated circuit technology. This design solves typical problems facing the current three-dimensional packaging for scaled-up quantum computers, bringing t
12h
Breakthrough in genome visualization
Kadir Dede and Dr. Enno Ohlebusch at Ulm University in Germany have devised a method for constructing pan-genome subgraphs at different granularities without having to wait hours and days on end for the software to process the entire genome. Scientists will now be able to create visualizations of pan-genomes on different scales much more rapidly.
12h
Conservation research on lynx
Scientists at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and the Leibniz Institute for Molecular Pharmacology (Leibniz-FMP) discovered that selected anti-oxidative enzymes, especially the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD2), may play an important role to maintain the unusual longevity of the corpus luteum in lynxes. It is highly likely that SOD2 not only detoxifies the reacti
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Dramatic decrease in cold-water plankton during industrial era
There has been a dramatic decrease in cold-water plankton during the 20th century, in contrast to thousands of years of stability, according to a new UCL-led study.
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Pancreatic cancer cells hijack basic cell mechanism to evade immunotherapy
Pancreatic cancer cells use a normal waste removal process to hide tags on their surfaces that would otherwise let the immune system destroy them, a new study finds. Published online April 22 in Nature, the study results help to answer a longstanding question: why are pancreatic cancers so resistant to immunotherapies, which use the body's own immune defenses to fight cancer?
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Researchers traces the history of brain evolution from tyrannosaurs to modern crows
An international team of evolutionary biologists and paleontologists have reconstructed the evolution of the avian brain using a massive dataset of brain volumes from dinosaurs, extinct birds like Archaeopteryx and the Great Auk, and modern birds.
12h
Fossil frogs offer insights into ancient Antarctica
The discovery of the earliest known modern amphibians in Antarctica provides further evidence of a warm and temperate climate in the Antarctic Peninsula before its separation from the southern supercontinent, Gondwana. The fossils, which belong to the family of helmeted frogs, are described in Scientific Reports this week.
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Why Sex? Biologists Find New Explanations
Sex might be biology's most difficult enigma. The downsides of relying on sex to reproduce are undeniable: It takes two individuals, each of whom gets to pass on only part of their genome. Because these individuals generally have to get fairly intimate, they make themselves vulnerable to physical harm or infections from their partner. Asexual reproduction, or self-cloning, has none of these disad
12h
Report: Racial gap in state prisons has shrunk
The longstanding racial divide in state prisons—while still significant—has shrunk, research finds. Since the era of Reconstruction, ethnic and racial minorities have made up a disproportionate share of the United States prison population. The report , which the nonpartisan think tank Council on Criminal Justice published, examines how disparities in state imprisonment rates changed between 2000
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Seismic stress in America
New map shows all the faults and pressure points.
12h
A peculiarity of Spanish flu may shed light on covid-19
Age-related mortality is not always what might be expected
12h
Researchers traces the history of brain evolution from tyrannosaurs to modern crows
An international team of evolutionary biologists and paleontologists have reconstructed the evolution of the avian brain using a massive dataset of brain volumes from dinosaurs, extinct birds like Archaeopteryx and the Great Auk, and modern birds.
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Politics this week
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Business this week
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KAL's cartoon
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Specialized nerve cells increase the appetite for high-fat foods
Fat activates nociceptin neurons in the hypothalamus of mice.
12h
Humans Are Too Optimistic to Comprehend the Coronavirus
If America had taken the threat of coronavirus more seriously, countless deaths could have been prevented. The federal government could have stocked up on masks and testing reagents . The United States could have built field hospitals sooner, as China did , in dense places that were likely to be hardest hit. Officials could have advised people to avoid travel and mass gatherings earlier. Instead,
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Astronomers find formula for subsurface oceans in exomoons
So far, the search for extraterrestrial life has focused on planets at a distance from their star where liquid water is possible on the surface. But within our Solar System, most of the liquid water seems to be outside this zone. Moons around cold gas giants are heated beyond the melting point by tidal forces. The search area in other planetary systems therefore increases if we also consider moons
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Eurozone bank stress starts to show in funding markets
Lenders' borrowing costs stretch away from the European Central Bank benchmark
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Helt flippade klassrum
Omställningen till distansundervisning på gymnasierna har blivit en snabbkurs i digital undervisning för skolorna. Betygssättning och stöd de till de svagaste eleverna pekas ut som de svåraste utmaningarna. Men trots allt har anpassningen gått över förväntan. Även om det ännu inte finns en samlad bild av hur skolorna har hanterat den påtvingade omställningen till distansundervisningen under coron
12h
Dramatic double discovery of a fish on the brink of extinction
Within the space of less than a month, two specimens of a vanishingly rare fish have been plucked from the waters of the Rioni River in Georgia.
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A study finds neuropeptide somatostatin enhances visual processing?
Researchers have confirmed that neuropeptide somatostatin can improve cognitive function in the brain. A research group of Professor Seung-Hee Lee from the Department of Biological Sciences at KAIST found that the application of neuropeptide somatostatin improves visual processing and cognitive behaviors by reducing excitatory inputs to parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the cortex.
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Promising signs for Perseverance rover in its quest for past Martian life
New research indicates river delta deposits within Mars' Jezero crater — the destination of NASA' Perseverance rover on the Red Planet — formed over time scales that promoted habitability and enhanced preservation of evidence.
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PTSD partners feel invisible, study finds
Recognition of the needs of wives and intimate partners in supporting the recovery of veterans and front-line emergency workers affected by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been highlighted in a new study led by Flinders University.Their contribution to trauma recovery, and their own need for support, are not well understood by military and emergency service organisations, healthcare prov
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Digital solutions for dementia care
Telehealth delivery of dementia care in the home can be as effective as face-to-face home visit services if carers and recipients take advantage of the technologies available, Australian researchers say. The study of 63 people living with mild to moderate dementia, and their care partners, found that telehealth services using videoconferences can save travel time – particularly in rural and remote
12h
Health impacts of pollution upon indigenous peoples
A new study from the University of Helsinki presents the current state of knowledge on the exposure and vulnerability of Indigenous Peoples to environmental pollution, reviewing the innumerable impacts that pollution poses on Indigenous communities from all over the world.
12h
Jurassic Park in Eastern Morocco: Paleontology of the Kem Kem Group
The Kem Kem beds in Morocco are famous for the spectacular fossils found there, including at least four large-bodied non-avian theropods, several large-bodied pterosaurs and crocodilians. In their study, published in the open-access journal Zookeys, an international group of scientists, led by Dr. Nizar Ibrahim and Prof. Paul Sereno, evaluate the geological and paleontological significance of the
12h
Dramatic double discovery of a fish on the brink of extinction
Within the space of less than a month, two specimens of a vanishingly rare fish have been plucked from the waters of the Rioni River in Georgia.
12h
Coronavirus Live Updates: Staggering Unemployment Hits States as House Convenes Before Aid Vote
The Trump administration is moving migrant teenagers to ICE detention centers as they turn 18. The discovery of an early death rewrote the timeline of the U.S. outbreak. The House is set to vote on $484 billion in additional aid.
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Almost All COVID Patients on Ventilators Are Dying, Study Suggests
As the number of cases and deaths resulting from COVID-19 continues to rise in the US, hospitals are quickly running out of ventilators, which are machines that take care of breathing for patients who are experiencing severe pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome . But the prognosis for a COVID-19 patient hooked up to a ventilator appears grim: about 88 percent of those placed on ventil
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As humanity hides from coronavirus, wildlife reclaims lost territory
Naturalist Gerry Hans stood in the middle of a lonely road in Griffith Park on Saturday, inhaled deeply though his face mask and admired the natural sights and sounds of an oddly serene landscape that typically draws thousands of visitors each weekend.
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As humanity hides from coronavirus, wildlife reclaims lost territory
Naturalist Gerry Hans stood in the middle of a lonely road in Griffith Park on Saturday, inhaled deeply though his face mask and admired the natural sights and sounds of an oddly serene landscape that typically draws thousands of visitors each weekend.
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The Voters Trump Needs Most Right Now
As the two parties offer dueling interpretations of Donald Trump's response to the coronavirus outbreak, new polling suggests that the pandemic's ultimate political consequences may be determined by the substantial group of voters who accept the central premise of each side's case. The principal line of attack from Democrats, amplified in super-PAC ads already running across the battleground stat
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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan kan tsunamier bevæge sig så langt uden at miste energi?
En række læsere spørger ind til tsunamiers hastighed og konsekvenser for lande langt fra epicentret. Hvilke forhold gør sig gældende for, hvor og hvor hurtigt en tsunami rammer? Det svarer oceanograf fra DMI på.
13h
Good news for the wheat-sensitive among us
A joint project between Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Australia and CSIRO has revealed key insights about the proteins causing two of the most common types of wheat sensitivity – non-coeliac wheat sensitivity and occupational asthma (baker's asthma).
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How hearing loss in old age affects the brain
If your hearing deteriorates in old age, the risk of dementia and cognitive decline increases. So far, it hasn't been clear why. A team of neuroscientists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) in Germany examined what happens in the brain when hearing gradually deteriorates: key areas of the brain are reorganized, and this affects memory. The results are published online in the journal "Cerebral Cortex
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Asteroid visiting Earth's neighborhood brings its own face mask
The Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico is following an asteroid approaching Earth this week and while it poses no threat, it appears to know our planet is facing a pandemic.
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Views on guns and death penalty are linked to harsh treatment of immigrants
An online study that pulled equally from people who identify as Democrats or Republicans has found subtle new clues that underlie the dehumanization of immigrants. The findings by two University of Oregon researchers were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
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Women's faces in Time Magazine throughout history
In a paper published in Journal of Cultural Analytics, an interdisciplinary group of researchers used machine learning to extract 327,322 faces from an archive of Time magazine issues dating from 1923 to 2014. Titled the Faces of Time project, findings reveal that more images of female faces were presented during eras where women took on an increased participation in public life, and less images w
13h
Professor collaborates with international colleagues on shell evolution of exotic nuclei research
In an atomic nucleus, protons and neutrons, collectively called nucleons, are bound together by nuclear forces. These forces describe the interactions between nucleons, which cause them to occupy states grouped in shells, where each shell has a different energy and can host a certain number of nucleons. A nucleus is said to be magic when the neutron or protons happen to exactly fill up their respe
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Drought, bushfire, flood, hail, and dust: Local action the way forward for Australia's sustainability
Australia recently experienced unprecedented bushfires, affecting people's health in many of its major cities and destroying homes and lives.
13h
In Rwanda, 'Human Bait' Volunteers Help Battle Malaria
Rwanda has managed to reduce malaria deaths by 80 percent over the last 15 years, in large part due to entomological "sentinel sites" that, among other things, monitor mosquitoes and evaluate insecticides, enabling researchers to monitor the spread of disease in real time and inform government policies.
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Coronavirus has created conditions for unique environmental science 'global experiment'
Stay-at-home orders enacted to slow human movement, and consequently the spread of COVID-19, have had obvious benefits for the environment, but they are also impacting environmental science. Researchers are racing to collect atmospheric and other data, which they can use to assess their climate models and determine the extent of the impact of the coronavirus on the environment and human health as
13h
Materials for medical gowns undergo rigorous testing
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to fill hospitals around the state, several Colorado manufacturers are hoping to shift gears and start making medical gowns for health-care professionals in need of personal protective equipment. They have turned to a high-tech textile laboratory at Colorado State University for its expertise in testing materials that could be used for the gowns.
13h
Spinal cord injury increases risk for mental health disorders
A new study finds adults with traumatic spinal cord injury are at an increased risk of developing mental health disorders and secondary chronic diseases compared to adults without the condition.
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Ef­fects of rapid-act­ing an­ti­de­press­ants con­sol­id­ated in sleep?
Ketamine alleviates depressive symptoms within hours, with the most significant change typically seen a day after its administration. However, the symptoms often reappear within a week. According to researchers, neural connections strengthened by the quick treatment of depression are consolidated in the brain during the deep sleep periods of the following night. To prevent the circle of negative t
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At least four new species of African leaf-nosed bats discovered
Researchers just discovered at least four new species of African leaf-nosed bats — cousins of the horseshoe bats that served as hosts of the virus behind COVID-19. Bats play a big role in our lives — they pollinate crops, eat disease-carrying bugs, and carry diseases themselves — but we know very little about them. The more we know about bats, the better able we're to protect them and defend ou
13h
A new way to cool down electronic devices, recover waste heat
Using electronic devices for too long can cause them to overheat, which might slow them down, damage their components or even make them explode or catch fire. Now, researchers have developed a hydrogel that can both cool down electronics, such as cell phone batteries, and convert their waste heat into electricity.
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A new way to cool down electronic devices, recover waste heat
Using electronic devices for too long can cause them to overheat, which might slow them down, damage their components or even make them explode or catch fire. Now, researchers have developed a hydrogel that can both cool down electronics, such as cell phone batteries, and convert their waste heat into electricity.
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The cabinet blame game has begun – but Matt Hancock may yet escape unscathed | Katy Balls
Unmet coronavirus test promises have put the health secretary in the firing line. But scientists may be made the real scapegoats Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage When Boris Johnson was recovering in hospital after his admission to intensive care, he was advised not to work. There was no suggestion this time from No 10 that he would even be supplied with a red box. The
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Doctors are using AI to triage covid-19 patients. The tools may be here to stay
Rizwan Malik had always had an interest in AI. As the lead radiologist at the Royal Bolton Hospital, run by the UK's National Health Service (NHS), he saw its potential to make his job easier. In his hospital, patients often had to wait six hours or more for a specialist to look at their x-rays. If an emergency room doctor could get an initial reading from an AI-based tool, it could dramatically
13h
Protecting Australia's reptiles and amphibians with global impact
Ecosystems around the world rely on reptiles and amphibians. They play a crucial role as part of the food web—as predator and prey—and, sometimes, a role in pollination and dispensing seeds. Frogs provide a good sign of ecosystem health due to their sensitivity to environmental change. As the environment around the world changes, frog populations are in rapid decline, and reptile and amphibian spe
13h
POCKET DNA-testing kit uses smartphone to detect mutations
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and one in the U.S. has developed the POCKET DNA-testing kit—a small, inexpensive system that uses a 3-D-printed integrated chip and a smartphone to perform DNA tests on small samples of various materials. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes the system and its possible uses.
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Warm Clothes Could Be Made of Chicken Feathers
Originally published in March 1951 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Linking Self-Driving Cars to Traffic Signals Might Help Pedestrians Give Them the Green Light
Automated vehicles don't have human operators to communicate their driving intentions to pedestrians at intersections. My team's research on pedestrians' perceptions of safety shows their trust of traffic lights tends to override their fear of self-driving cars. This suggests one way to help pedestrians trust and safely interact with autonomous vehicles may be to link the cars' driving behavior t
13h
Antimatter Discovery Reveals Clues about the Universe's Beginning
New evidence from neutrinos points to one of several theories about why the cosmos is made of matter and not antimatter — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Older adults prefer videos to learn driver assistance tech
Older adults are more likely to use driver-assistance technology if they learn how to use these technologies through interactive videos rather than through manuals or live demonstrations, according to a new study. Most vehicles today come with their fair share of bells and whistles, ranging from adaptive cruise-control features to back-up cameras. These advanced driver-assistance systems, or ADAS
13h
Wiring the quantum computer of the future: A novel simple build with existing technology
Efficient quantum computing is expected to enable advancements that are impossible with classical computers. Scientists from Japan and Sydney have collaborated and proposed a novel two-dimensional design that can be constructed using existing integrated circuit technology. This design solves typical problems facing the current three-dimensional packaging for scaled-up quantum computers, bringing t
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Supernova remnant N132D investigated in detail
Researchers from Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) have conducted detailed spectroscopy of N132D—an X-ray bright supernova remnant (SNR) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Results of the study, presented in a paper published April 15 on the arXiv pre-print server, provide important information about the chemical composition of this SNR and shed more light on its origin.
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Anti-oxidative enzymes are important for the longevity of the corpus luteum in lynx
Another piece of the puzzle about the longevity of the corpus luteum in lynxes has been uncovered. Scientists at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and the Leibniz Institute for Molecular Pharmacology (Leibniz-FMP) discovered that selected anti-oxidative enzymes, especially the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD2), may play an important role to maintain the unusual lon
13h
Breakthrough in genome visualization: Faster, less memory-intensive method
Kadir Dede and Dr. Enno Ohlebusch at Ulm University in Germany have devised a method for constructing pan-genome subgraphs at different granularities without having to wait hours and days on end for the software to process the entire genome. Scientists will now be able to create visualizations of pan-genomes on different scales much more rapidly.
13h
MSU professor collaborates with international colleagues in Reviews of Modern Physics journal article
MSU Professor Alexandra Gade collaborated with international colleagues for a Reviews of Modern Physics article about shell evolution of exotic nuclei. The graphic displays the chart of nuclei, or proton vs. neutron number, and indicates the magic numbers that were shown to change for short-lived nuclei at the fringes of the chart. To understand the production of the elements in the Universe, the
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Antimatter Discovery Reveals Clues about the Universe's Beginning
New evidence from neutrinos points to one of several theories about why the cosmos is made of matter and not antimatter — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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South Africa discusses lifting lockdown sector by sector
Ramaphosa administration wants phased reopening to limit damage to struggling economy
13h
Protecting Australia's reptiles and amphibians with global impact
Ecosystems around the world rely on reptiles and amphibians. They play a crucial role as part of the food web—as predator and prey—and, sometimes, a role in pollination and dispensing seeds. Frogs provide a good sign of ecosystem health due to their sensitivity to environmental change. As the environment around the world changes, frog populations are in rapid decline, and reptile and amphibian spe
13h
POCKET DNA-testing kit uses smartphone to detect mutations
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and one in the U.S. has developed the POCKET DNA-testing kit—a small, inexpensive system that uses a 3-D-printed integrated chip and a smartphone to perform DNA tests on small samples of various materials. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes the system and its possible uses.
13h
Anti-oxidative enzymes are important for the longevity of the corpus luteum in lynx
Another piece of the puzzle about the longevity of the corpus luteum in lynxes has been uncovered. Scientists at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and the Leibniz Institute for Molecular Pharmacology (Leibniz-FMP) discovered that selected anti-oxidative enzymes, especially the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD2), may play an important role to maintain the unusual lon
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From Military Service to Civilian Leadership
Here's another installment in the chronicle of people who are trying to take up the slack, while the national government flails rather than coping with a pandemic. Previously in this series: innovations from libraries ; changes in a statewide program in California; and responses from a nationwide nonprofit network . (To update the California report: This week the state launched an expanded "Calif
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Engineered microbes can produce biodegradable plastics at lower cost and environmental impact than plant-based plastics
If you look up from your screen and glance around you, it's nearly certain that there will be something made of synthetic plastic within arm's reach (maybe even the clothing you're wearing). Humans have only been manufacturing plastics for about 100 years, but we have already produced about 8,300 million metric tons of it since the 1950s—that's roughly the weight of 25,000 Empire State Buildings.
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Cooler catalytic converters: Cleaner air for all
As the lives of millions of people worldwide were disrupted by social distancing measures to combat the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020, an unexpected piece of good news surfaced: levels of air pollution in major cities had dropped by up to 50% due to the global reduction in traveling, manufacturing, and construction. The most dramatic effects were seen in India, home to 14 of the 20 most polluted
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Engineered microbes can produce biodegradable plastics at lower cost and environmental impact than plant-based plastics
If you look up from your screen and glance around you, it's nearly certain that there will be something made of synthetic plastic within arm's reach (maybe even the clothing you're wearing). Humans have only been manufacturing plastics for about 100 years, but we have already produced about 8,300 million metric tons of it since the 1950s—that's roughly the weight of 25,000 Empire State Buildings.
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The International Space Station: Keeping an eye on earth
Earth's climate is the product of many rich and complex systems. It's affected by water in its many forms; on land, in the air, in the oceans, and as ice. It feels influences from vegetation, from soil conditions, from the carbon cycle, from human impacts. We study and observe our planet's ever-changing conditions in many ways, from many locations. One location in particular provides a unique and
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Coronavirus contact-tracing apps: Most of us won't cooperate unless everyone does
As governments look to ease general social-distancing measures and instead use more targeted strategies to stop coronavirus transmission, we face a social dilemma about the limits of cooperative behaviour.
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Neurobiologist and Former Stanford President Donald Kennedy Dies
Kennedy, who succumbed to COVID-19, served as commissioner of the FDA and editor-in-chief of Science, and is credited with helping to transform Stanford into a top research university.
13h
Breakthrough in genome visualization: Faster, less memory-intensive method
Kadir Dede and Dr. Enno Ohlebusch at Ulm University in Germany have devised a method for constructing pan-genome subgraphs at different granularities without having to wait hours and days on end for the software to process the entire genome. Scientists will now be able to create visualizations of pan-genomes on different scales much more rapidly.
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BCG vaccine being trialled as potential protection against covid-19
A long-standing hypothesis suggests the BCG vaccine also serves to generally enhance the immune system, meaning it could protect against covid-19, and trials are underway to find out
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Being fun is no laughing matter
A longitudinal study examined whether children who are well-liked and children who are popular got that way by being fun to hang around with. Results clearly underscore the importance of being fun. Across a two-month period, primary school children perceived by classmates as someone who is fun to be around experienced an increase in the number of classmates who liked them and the number who rated
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Sparkling dolphins swim off our coast, but humans threaten these natural light shows
It was 2 am on a humid summer's night on Sydney's coast. Something in the distance caught my eye—a pod of glowing dolphins darted towards the bow of the boat. I had never seen anything like it before. They were electric blue, trailing swaths of light as they rode the bow wave.
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Animal Grief Shows We Aren't Meant to Die Alone
The coronavirus pandemic is robbing some people of a chance to come together to mourn: a practice deeply embedded in many animal species.
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Kids with 'nice' sexist views hold hostile ones, too
Children who hold seemingly positive but problematic views about women are also likely to hold negative ones, psychology research on benevolent sexism finds. The results also show differences between boys and girls in how these views change over time: "hostile" sexist perceptions decline for both boys and girls as they get older, but "benevolent" sexist ones diminish only for girls. "It might see
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COVID-19: Is 6 feet apart far enough?
As people stay six feet apart during social distancing to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, you might wonder where we got that number. And if it's enough distance. Here, Rob Dunn , a professor of applied ecology at North Carolina State University, asks professors Linsey Marr , Matt Koci , Benjamin Chapman , and Jack Gilbert to chat—virtually—about how viruses spread in general and the origins of the s
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Sparkling dolphins swim off our coast, but humans threaten these natural light shows
It was 2 am on a humid summer's night on Sydney's coast. Something in the distance caught my eye—a pod of glowing dolphins darted towards the bow of the boat. I had never seen anything like it before. They were electric blue, trailing swaths of light as they rode the bow wave.
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COVID-19 skader også hjertet
Ikke kun lungerne tager skade af COVID-19-virus. Det går også ud over hjertet. Det er essensen af nye studier, som for nylig er publiceret i bl.a. Jama Cardiology.
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Tropiska cykloner ökar i framtiden
Tropiska cykloner är en av de naturkatastrofer som orsakar störst skada. Antalet cykloner kommer att öka i området kring Mekongfloden i Sydostasien, förutspår en forskargrupp vid Göteborgs universitet, tillsammans med forskare från USA. Runt 70 miljoner människor lever i flodområdet längs Mekong och invånarna där drabbas ofta av tropiska cykloner, som främst drar in via Vietnam. – Cyklonerna orsa
13h
Education in the Age of Finance, redux
Universities want a bailout. Guess who saw it coming?
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Mapping key areas for conservation could help plants and animals survive climate change
People have spent most of the past month indoors as communities attempt to flatten the curve to limit the spread of COVID-19. For many of us, small doses of nature have helped provide solace in stressful times. In my Edmonton neighborhood, we are keeping company with large flocks of Bohemian waxwings, urban jackrabbits and sometimes their coyote predators.
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The Lost Worlds of Soviet Space Graphics [Slideshow]
A new book captures the pioneering, propaganda-infused visions of mid-20th-century Soviet space exploration — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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China to give WHO an extra $30m to fight coronavirus
Move comes a week after Donald Trump suspended US funding
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Mapping key areas for conservation could help plants and animals survive climate change
People have spent most of the past month indoors as communities attempt to flatten the curve to limit the spread of COVID-19. For many of us, small doses of nature have helped provide solace in stressful times. In my Edmonton neighborhood, we are keeping company with large flocks of Bohemian waxwings, urban jackrabbits and sometimes their coyote predators.
13h
The Lost Worlds of Soviet Space Graphics [Slideshow]
A new book captures the pioneering, propaganda-infused visions of mid-20th-century Soviet space exploration — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Controlling ion transport for energy, environment
Understanding and controlling ion transport in porous materials and at hydrophobic interfaces is critical to a wide variety of energy and environmental technologies, ranging from ion selective membranes, drug delivery and biosensing to ion batteries and supercapacitors.
14h
6 steps toward addressing homelessness to improve assistance for young people
What would happen if we were able to redesign the homelessness services system so homelessness could be decreased and ultimately ended? Our newly released research report sets out an agenda of practical innovations. If implemented systemically, these changes could radically transform Australia's response to youth homelessness within a decade.
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How coronavirus could make a bad wildfire season even worse
In the summer of 2003, I had a first-hand look at a fire season that was unlike any that had occurred before.
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In defense of viruses: Most are harmless, and many can be beneficial to us
Every day, in countries all over the world, people are dying because of a new virus. This time they are dying from a new strain of coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2 that causes the acute respiratory disease known as COVID-19. And this is just the latest. Viruses are responsible for the deaths of millions of people throughout history, from smallpox to flu.
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Protein produced in sepsis lowers blood pressure, treatment identified to reverse effects
Temple scientists show that when a molecule known as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) becomes active in sepsis, it increases the production of a protein called B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) — the more BNP that is produced in sepsis, the greater the deterioration of cardiovascular function. But perhaps more significantly, in mice, the researchers show that JNK and BNP activity can be halted, rever
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Seismic map of North America reveals geologic clues, earthquake hazards
A new stress map that reveals the forces acting on the planet's crust will contribute to safer energy exploration, updated seismic hazard maps and improved knowledge about the Earth.
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New heart attack testing protocol expedites treatment in ER
A new protocol using highly sensitive blood tests to determine whether someone is having a heart attack.
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Which foods do you eat together? How you combine them may raise dementia risk
It's no secret that a healthy diet may benefit the brain. However, it may not only be what foods you eat, but what foods you eat together that may be associated with your risk of dementia, according to a new study.
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From Voldemort to Vader, fictional villains may draw us to darker versions of ourselves
People may find fictional villains surprisingly likeable when they share similarities with the viewer or reader.
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In defense of viruses: Most are harmless, and many can be beneficial to us
Every day, in countries all over the world, people are dying because of a new virus. This time they are dying from a new strain of coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2 that causes the acute respiratory disease known as COVID-19. And this is just the latest. Viruses are responsible for the deaths of millions of people throughout history, from smallpox to flu.
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How kudzu became the 'bad seed' of the plant world
Under different circumstances, kudzu might be heralded for its utility—its leaves ideal for grazing cattle, its root a treatment for stomach upset. Instead, the climbing and coiling perennial vine is almost universally reviled as a noxious weed, a scourge – "the vine that ate the South."
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Pollution impacts food and water consumption for Indigenous peoples worldwide
A new study from the University of Helsinki presents the current state of knowledge on the exposure and vulnerability of indigenous peoples to environmental pollution, reviewing the innumerable impacts that pollution poses on Indigenous communities from all over the world.
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The Pandemic Has Made a Mockery of Minimalism
No comparison for the coronavirus pandemic is quite apt, in part because no world-stopping catastrophe in recent memory has been so quiet. Terrorism, war, hurricanes, and earthquakes create excessive, ultra-visual chaos: fireballs, rubble, water, wounds. The virus, meanwhile, cannot be seen, and the crisis it's created has, in a horrifying way, tidied the world. Just as each added tally in the de
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Sygehus Lillebælt henter ny lægefaglig direktør fra Nordjylland
Mads Koch Hansens afløser er fundet, og 1. juli begynder Thomas Larsen som ny lægefaglig direktør på Sygehus Lillebælt.
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How kudzu became the 'bad seed' of the plant world
Under different circumstances, kudzu might be heralded for its utility—its leaves ideal for grazing cattle, its root a treatment for stomach upset. Instead, the climbing and coiling perennial vine is almost universally reviled as a noxious weed, a scourge – "the vine that ate the South."
14h
Ocean microbes' role in climate effects
A new study shows that 'hotspots' of nutrients surrounding phytoplankton — which are tiny marine algae producing approximately half of the oxygen we breathe every day — play an outsized role in the release of a gas involved in cloud formation and climate regulation.
14h
You can actually get a refund on that app you didn't like
Don't even try requesting a refund after you finished your game, though. ( William Hook / Unsplash/) Software like apps and games are in a weird place—the old model it's on its way out, but consumers are still not sold on subscribing to every app they own . Developers aren't sure what people want—and people aren't quite sure either. But more and more platforms are building their business models o
14h
Giant 'teenager' shark from the dinosaur era identified from vertebrae remains
Scientists of the University of Vienna have examined parts of a vertebral column found in northern Spain in 1996, and assigned it to the extinct shark group Ptychodontidae. In contrast to teeth, shark vertebrae bear biological information like body size, growth and age, which allowed the team of Patrick L. Jambura to gain new insights into the biology of this mysterious shark group.
14h
Learning from fish and flags to inform new propulsion strategies
Recent research by Andres J. Goza at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign found relationships between frequencies and the passive dynamics at play when vehicles move in air or water toward a better understanding of how to use these forces to enhance performance. Understanding this fluid-structure interaction at a very basic level, could help inform new aircraft and submarine designs with
14h
Why the coronavirus pandemic is especially dangerous for immigrants
The immigrant population is likely to be among the hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic, as many struggle to access information, medical care and relief services. Clinical Profs. Nicole Hallett and Claudia Flores of the University of Chicago Law School recently discussed several key issues—including President Donald Trump's announcement late Monday that he would temporarily halt immigration in
14h
All the Ways to Kill a Coronavirus (So Far)
Even a bug this ruthless has a few fatal weaknesses of its own.
14h
JLab Go Air Review: The Cheap Wireless Earbuds to Beat
With 5-hour battery life, sweat resistance, and a sleek design, these buds beat Apple's $159 AirPods on everything but sound.
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Will politicization of COVID-19 erode national consensus on response?
Earlier this month, the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication (YPCCC)—which studies public climate change beliefs, risk perceptions, policy preferences, and behavior—retooled its efforts to investigate how Americans are responding to the COVID-19 crisis.
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Social distancing in Antarctica: You're never really alone
As a glaciologist for over 30 years, Sridhar Anandakrishnan is well-used to social distancing. Professor of geosciences and a core member of Penn State's Ice and Climate Exploration group, his field work in Antarctica and Greenland typically takes place in a small camp in the middle of a glacier, 1,000 miles from the closest neighbor. "For the most part," he says, "it's two to four people living o
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On the Heels of a Light Beam
— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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CRISPR Gene Editing May Help Scale Up Coronavirus Testing
An inexpensive assay based on the technique can provide yes or no answers in under an hour—perhaps even in the home soon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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CRISPR Gene Editing May Help Scale Up Coronavirus Testing
An inexpensive assay based on the technique can provide yes or no answers in under an hour—perhaps even in the home soon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Nytt blodtest för alzheimer utvecklat
Ett nytt blodtest för alzheimer har utvecklats under ledning av forskare vid Göteborgs universitet. Metoden bygger på att mäta en specifik variant av proteinet tau i ett vanligt blodprov, vilket gör testet enklare och billigare att utföra. Alzheimers sjukdom karakteriseras av två sjukliga förändringar i nervsystemets vävnad. Dels plack, bildat av proteinet beta-amyloid, och dels neurofibriller so
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Trods blæst om ACE-hæmmere i coronakrisen: Læger skal behandle patienter med forhøjet blodtryk som hidtil
Der er hverken nok evidens for, at ACE-hæmmere skulle øge risikoen for at dø af COVID-19 som for at beskytte lungerne. Derfor skal patienterne behandles som de plejer, lyder det fra dansk professor i et e-learningskursus for det europæiske diabetesselskab EASD.
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US jobless claims of 4.4m take pandemic toll to a record 26m
Historic levels of benefit applications more than wipe out past decade of employment gains
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Kluddetæppe af IoT-platforme forvirrer
PLUS. Teleselskaber, industri­koncerner, startups og software-giganter står klar med IoT-platforme til industrien. Men det er svært at skelne dem fra hinanden lyder det fra IoT-analytiker.
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Stress has more adults drinking and getting high
During the coronavirus stay-at-home orders, more adults report using alcohol and drugs to cope with stress, researchers report. More than one in four adults (28%) report using alcohol or drugs to feel better, according to a new study that tracked behaviors a week after the World Health Organization announced the pandemic in mid-March. Adults report using a variety of coping strategies to deal wit
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Deep Space Nine Upscale Project Update: Variable Frame Rate DVDs Can Burn in Hell
The following unhinged rant article is the sole opinion of its author. ExtremeTech does not discriminate against variable frame rate media. In my previous two Star Trek: Deep Space Nine articles , I've discussed my efforts to upscale the content, provided some video and image samples, and discussed the process of slowly attempting to remaster the show using commercially available software. I have
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Hydroxychloroquine Not Looking Good for Covid-19
We have been tracking the story of the hype surrounding hydroxychloroquine over at Science-Based Medicine, but there is a brief follow up I wanted to comment on. The short version of the story so far is that one very bad French study claimed to show dramatic reduction in detected virus in those treated. This study, however, was not only preliminary, it was a horrible study , so much so that the r
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Dubai prepares to relax coronavirus lockdown to support economy
Shopping malls and offices could reopen at 30 per cent capacity, document shows
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How our economy can survive the pandemic
With the COVID-19 pandemic wreaking havoc on the economy, we're all hoping for a quick recovery.
15h
Newly Unemployed, and Labeling Photos for Pennies
People who've lost jobs and are stuck indoors are turning to crowd work—filling out online surveys and transcribing audio for less than the minimum wage.
15h
A 'Russian Doll' Cocreator Is Working on a Star Wars Series for Disney+
Also, *Westworld* is getting a fourth season.
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This Hungry Little Beetle Could Help Ease Seasonal Allergies
Where the leaf beetle lives with the common ragweed, pollen counts crash 80 percent. Maybe the enemy of our enemy is our allergy-fighting friend.
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Finding joy in Earth's biodiversity while sheltering in place
NatCap's Gretchen Daily and Jeffrey Smith contributed to a new book, "Earth 2020: An Insider's Guide to a Rapidly Changing Planet," a collection of interdisciplinary essays to celebrate 50 years of Earth Day. Their chapter, "Everyday Biodiversity," describes the small ways that biodiversity supports the fabric of our daily lives, from our first sip of coffee in the morning to an evening beer as th
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Finding joy in Earth's biodiversity while sheltering in place
NatCap's Gretchen Daily and Jeffrey Smith contributed to a new book, "Earth 2020: An Insider's Guide to a Rapidly Changing Planet," a collection of interdisciplinary essays to celebrate 50 years of Earth Day. Their chapter, "Everyday Biodiversity," describes the small ways that biodiversity supports the fabric of our daily lives, from our first sip of coffee in the morning to an evening beer as th
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How habitat destruction enables the spread of diseases like COVID-19
Wildlife habitats are vital to human survival and agricultural production. But these natural places—and the plants and animals that inhabit them—face increasing pressure from human activity, leading to the emergence of new animal-to-human transmitted diseases like COVID-19.
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Researchers to study impact of COVID-19 and social distancing on families
Since social distancing has been implemented to slow the spread of COVID-19, many families are experiencing high levels of stress and conflict—arguments and conflict between parents, between parents and children, and between siblings.
15h
What's driving governors' lockdown decisions?
As debate and protests about lockdowns and opening up flare up across the nation, experts are considering why governors decided to lockdown states in the first place.
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Credit Suisse boosts loan provisions sevenfold as coronavirus hits clients
Swiss bank's CFO warns it is entering 'worst economic crisis the world has seen since 1920s'
15h
Coronavirus: Mexico and Brazil leaders challenge lockdowns in Latin America
How presidents Andres López Obrador and Jair Bolsonaro have come under fire for their laid-back response compared to neigbours like El Salvador and Argentina
15h
How habitat destruction enables the spread of diseases like COVID-19
Wildlife habitats are vital to human survival and agricultural production. But these natural places—and the plants and animals that inhabit them—face increasing pressure from human activity, leading to the emergence of new animal-to-human transmitted diseases like COVID-19.
15h
Survey shows regions of elevated food insecurity due to COVID-19 pandemic
Nearly half of all respondents in some states report food insecurity in the wake of the COVID-19 Pandemic, according to new research from University of Arkansas sociologists.
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Short-term environment gains likely impermanent
In the weeks leading up to Earth Day 2020, clear blue skies broke out over famously smog-ridden cities like Beijing, Los Angeles, and Delhi. Harvard Law School Professor Jody Freeman LL.M. '91 S.J.D. '95 believes these short-term gains in air quality, likely driven in part by economic slowdowns necessitated by the global pandemic, are no panacea for the environment. Instead, says the Archibald Cox
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Neandertals had older mothers and younger fathers
When the ancestors of modern humans left Africa 50,000 years ago they met the Neandertals. In this encounter, the Neandertal population contributed around two percent of the genome to present day non-African populations. A collaboration of scientists from Aarhus University in Denmark, deCODE Genetics in Iceland, and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, have c
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Waste water tests could monitor 2 billion people for the coronavirus
We need to scale up testing efforts to tackle the coronavirus pandemic, and looking for signs of virus RNA in our sewage could provide a shortcut
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Coronaen har sat turbo på digitale konsultationer for diabetespatienter
For ganske kort tid siden var lægerne på Endokrinologisk Afdeling på Aalborg Universitetshospital så småt og en kende modstræbende gået i gang med at bruge en ny app-baseret konsultation. Nu er den en nødvendighed.
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High-end computer monitors for a greater display
Add a screen and watch your productivity (or ability to watch Netflix while you work) increase. (Josh Sorenson via Unsplash/) Laptops are great for getting things done on the go, but sometimes you need to stretch out and settle into your work at home or in the office. Computer monitors offer the luxury and display size of a desktop computer without limiting you to a stationary workspace. Designer
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Lockdowns lower personal grooming standards, says Unilever
Homeworking prompts decline in demand for consumer group's skin and haircare products
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Diseases Can Jump to Humans from Plants, Not Just from Animals
The deadly fungal pathogen Candida auris may have developed drug resistance on farms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
16h
Researchers discover ferroelectricity at the atomic scale
As electronic devices become progressively smaller, the technology that powers them needs to get smaller and thinner.
16h
New discovery: First asteroid population from outside our solar system
Ka'epaoka'awela asteroid surprised the world in 2018: It was the first object in the solar system that was demonstrated to be of extrasolar origin. But now, the researchers who discovered it have announced that it is not alone. Published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Societyon 23 April 2020, work by Fathi Namouni, a CNRS researcher in the Laboratoire Lagrange (CNRS/Observatoire de l
16h
Renault close to sealing state-backed loan as it burns through cash
French carmaker on verge of securing multibillion-euro credit line from government
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Virus Researchers Cast Doubt On Theory Of Coronavirus Lab Accident
The Trump administration is investigating the theory that the virus leaked from a lab. Scientists who work with viruses say that's virtually impossible and point to transmission from an animal. (Image credit: Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images)
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Arizona meteorite fall points researchers to source of LL chondrites
The Dishchii'bikoh meteorite fall in the White Mountain Apache reservation in central Arizona has given scientists a big clue to finding out where so-called LL chondrites call home. They report their results in the April 14 issue of Meteoritics and Planetary Science.
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EXPRES looks to the skies of a scorching, distant planet
Yale technology is giving astronomers a closer look at the atmosphere of a distant planet where it's so hot the air contains vaporized metals.
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The birth of a 'snowman' at the edge of the solar system
A model developed at the Faculty of Physics at the Technion, in collaboration with German scientists at Tübingen, explains the unique properties of Arrokoth, the most distant object ever imaged in the solar system. The research team's results shed new light on the formation of Kuiper Belt objects, asteroid-like objects at the edge of the solar system, and for understanding the early stages of the
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A rare snail living on driftwood is discovered in the Arctic ocean
The mollusk Leptogyra bujnitzkii first appeared in a biological collection in Russia thanks to the legendary Arctic drift that began on 23 October 1937. Three icebreaking steamers—Georgiy Sedov, Malygin and Sadko—were beset and drifting in the ice following the sea current in the area of the New Siberian Islands. The same current transports driftwood from the Siberian rivers toward Greenland. In A
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A rare snail living on driftwood is discovered in the Arctic ocean
The mollusk Leptogyra bujnitzkii first appeared in a biological collection in Russia thanks to the legendary Arctic drift that began on 23 October 1937. Three icebreaking steamers—Georgiy Sedov, Malygin and Sadko—were beset and drifting in the ice following the sea current in the area of the New Siberian Islands. The same current transports driftwood from the Siberian rivers toward Greenland. In A
16h
The Stockbrokers Of Magic: The Gathering Play for Keeps
The market for the popular strategy game's cards has started to resemble Wall Street, complete with speculation, arbitrage, and yes, insider trading.
16h
Covid-19 May Worsen the Antibiotic Resistance Crisis
The disease can't be treated with these drugs, but antibiotic use is rising anyway, in ICUs and among the worried well.
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How to Grieve and Support Others During a Pandemic
What can you do for a friend when you can't give them a hug? We talked to some experts to find out.
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Farmers Are Dumping Milk, Even as People Go Hungry. Here's Why
About half of the nation's food is typically consumed in group settings like restaurants and schools. Quickly rerouting the supply chain isn't easy.
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