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Revealed: Dominic Cummings on secret scientific advisory group for Covid-19
Exclusive: Leaked list reveals presence of Johnson adviser and Vote Leave ally on supposedly independent body Who's who on Sage? Case for transparency never clearer See all our coronavirus coverage The prime minister's chief political adviser, Dominic Cummings, and a data scientist he worked with on the Vote Leave campaign for Brexit are on the secret scientific group advising the government on t
4h
Trump claims disinfectant 'injection' idea was sarcasm
Medical community warns of dangers from use of cleaning agent as internal treatment
14h
Ny forskning: Aircondition kan sprede smitte
Uanset om coronavirus er luftbåren eller ej, viser en undersøgelse, at luftstrømmen fra ventilationssystemer sandsynligvis påvirker smittespredningen.
7h

LATEST

High density EEG produces dynamic image of brain signal source
Marking a major milestone on the path to meeting the objectives of the NIH BRAIN initiative, researchers advance high-density electroencephalography (EEG) as the future paradigm for dynamic functional neuroimaging.
7min
F.D.A. Warns of Heart Problems From Malaria Drugs Used for Coronavirus
The drugs, hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, have been repeatedly promoted by President Trump. But they should be used only in clinical trials or hospitals, the agency said.
15min
The Hubble Space Telescope just turned 30, and it's working better than ever
Hubble zooms in for an up-close look at star assembly in one of the galaxies orbiting the Milky Way. (NASA, ESA and STScI/) On April 24, 1990, the Space Shuttle Discovery blasted off from Florida with an instrument that would forever divide astronomy into two eras: the time before space telescopes, and the time after. From its perch above Earth's fuzzy atmosphere, the Hubble Space Telescope has s
23min
High density EEG produces dynamic image of brain signal source
Marking a major milestone on the path to meeting the objectives of the NIH BRAIN initiative, researchers advance high-density electroencephalography (EEG) as the future paradigm for dynamic functional neuroimaging.
25min
Digital agriculture paves the road to agricultural sustainability
Researchers outline how to develop a more sustainable land management system through data collection and stakeholder buy-in.
25min
New dual-action coating keeps bacteria from cross-contaminating fresh produce
Over the course of their journey from the open fields to the produce displays at grocery stores, fresh vegetables and fruits can sometimes become contaminated by microorganisms. These items can then spoil other produce, spreading the contamination further and increasing the number of food items that can cause illnesses.
25min
Diabetes reversed in mice with genetically edited stem cells derived from patients
Researchers have used induced pluripotent stem cells produced from the skin of a patient with a rare, genetic form of insulin-dependent diabetes, transformed the stem cells into insulin-producing cells, used the CRISPR gene-editing tool to correct a defect that caused the diabetes, and implanted the cells into mice to reverse diabetes in the animals.
25min
Apple, Google Announce Privacy Changes to Coronavirus Tracing
Credit: NIH Google and Apple announced a rare cooperative project recently with the aim of developing a mobile coronavirus contact tracing platform. The companies were slow to release details, but observers still pointed out some potential privacy and security concerns. Today, Apple and Google have released an overview of changes they will make to the upcoming program to assuage those concerns. T
30min
The Government Is Offering Me $4 Million. I'm Turning It Down.
My favorite small business in Chicago is a Middle Eastern restaurant called Old Jerusalem. It has maybe 15 tables, and some of the best falafel and garlic sauce you can find in the city. It's still run by the same family that started it 40 years ago. On a street increasingly studded with the storefronts of chain restaurants and exercise studios, Old Jerusalem has remained a neighborhood instituti
33min
Millennials Just 'Get' Keanu Reeves
For our first #AtlanticMovieClub , I decided to revisit the career of one '90s-era actor, through five films, to help make sense of their place in American pop culture. Our first subject was picked by the voting public , and among Jennifer Lopez, Keanu Reeves, Winona Ryder, and Will Smith, the voters picked Reeves by a wide margin. It's not hard to understand why. For 35 years, Reeves has worked
33min
Insects: Largest study to date finds declines on land, but recoveries in freshwater
A worldwide compilation of insect abundance studies shows the number of land-dwelling insects is in decline. On average, there is a global decrease of 0.92 percent per year, which translates to approximately 24 percent over 30 years. At the same time, the number of insects living in freshwater has increased on average by 1.08 percent each year. Local trends are highly variable.
39min
A cellular mechanism protecting against cancer
Researchers have discovered a natural protective mechanism that leads to the programmed death of potentially diseased cells. It protects from cancer that can develop as a result of irregular distribution of genetic information to daughter cells. The enzyme separase plays a central role in these processes.
53min
New research highlights blood clot dangers of COVID-19
A special report published today in the journal Radiology outlines prevention, diagnosis and treatment of complications stemming from blood clots in patients with COVID-19. The journal also published two research letters and a case study on this topic.
53min
Save the Postal Service
W hen I carried the mail in Durham, North Carolina—back in the 1990s, before I became a historian—an older man used to greet me joyfully, "Here comes Uncle Sam!" To him, and to others on my route, I represented not just the chance of a letter, but also a connection to the federal government—and to an institution that had probably provided a relative with a steady job, and a path into the middle c
55min
What If Colleges Don't Reopen Until 2021?
E very two years, New Jersey's higher-education secretary expects the state's school administrators to present contingency plans for disaster scenarios. Dorm fires, mass shootings, extreme weather events—all types of threats are considered by these college representatives. University presidents, deans, and others in essential management roles have color-coordinated charts and go bags stashed in t
1h
No time to waste to avoid future food shortages
Plant scientists are working on improving photosynthesis on different fronts, from finding crop varieties that need less water, to tweaking parts of the process in order to capture more carbon dioxide and sunlight to ensure future global food security. These solutions have been highlighted in a recent Food Security Special issue of the Journal of Experimental Botany.
1h
New targeted agent produces considerable responses in patients with uterine cancer
The DNA repair-blocking drug adavosertib shrinks tumors in nearly one-third of patients in clinical trial data to be shared at the Society for Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer.
1h
Corona Tools 7
"I was asking a question sarcastically to reporters like you just to see what would happen."
1h
COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
Ventilator Triage Policies During the COVID-19 Pandemic at U.S. Hospitals Associated With Members of the Association of Bioethics Program Directors
1h
The best material for homemade face masks may be a combination of two fabrics
Researchers report that a combination of cotton with natural silk or chiffon can effectively filter out aerosol particles — if the fit is good.
1h
Each map is worth a thousand pictures
Few simple things are as expressive as a well-crafted cartogram. The Data Atlas of the World provides a simple overview of complex data. Based on neutral datasets, this growing collection offers context without bias. A picture is worth a thousand words, they say. And a map? If it's a good one: at least a thousand pictures. Few simple things are as immediately expressive as a well-crafted cartogra
1h
The most promising strategies for defeating coronavirus: A review study
Experts from UNC Chapel Hill review possible clinical approaches from antivirals to gene therapy against the virus responsible for COVID-19 and related diseases.
1h
The best material for homemade face masks may be a combination of two fabrics
Researchers report that a combination of cotton with natural silk or chiffon can effectively filter out aerosol particles — if the fit is good.
1h
Simple 'do it yourself' circuit to ventilate two patients at once is technically feasible
A simple 'do it yourself' breathing circuit, using accessories that are readily available in intensive care, can be used to ventilate two critically ill patients at once, should clinicians be faced with equipment shortages, new research suggests.
1h
Sneaky Zero-Click Attacks Are a Hidden Menace
Hacks that can play out without any user interaction may be more common than we realize, in part because they're so difficult to detect.
1h
How COVID-19 Will Pass from Pandemic to Prosaic – Facts So Romantic
The final outcome of COVID-19 is still unclear. It will ultimately be decided by our patience and the financial bottom line. Castleski / Shutterstock On January 5, six days after China officially announced a spate of unusual pneumonia cases, a team of researchers at Shanghai's Fudan University deposited the full genome sequence of the causal virus, SARS-CoV-2, into Genbank. A little more than thr
1h
Skynd dig før de lyse nætter stopper festen: Satellit-toget er stadig tydeligt på himlen
Om kort tid er det for sent – ellers må du vente til efteråret med at se Starlink-satellitterne.
1h
Coronavirus FAQs: Does A Bigger Dose Make You Sicker? Can You Go To The Dentist?
We also discuss the phenomenon of symptom-free cases — how many are there, do we know how much of a role they play in spreading the virus? (Image credit: Cristina Spano for NPR)
1h
China Will Launch Mars Mission "In Coming Months"
Forging Ahead China says that it's still on schedule for the mission to Mars it plans to launch later this year. The mission, originally slated for a July launch date , is set to happen "in the coming months," according to the China National Space Administration (CNSA), CNN reports . On top of that, the mission finally has a name: "Tianwen 1," which translates roughly to "heavenly questions." Whe
1h
New study finds connection between fault roughness and the magnitude of earthquakes
A new study led by McGill University has found that tectonic plates beneath the Earth's surface can show varying degrees of roughness and could help explain why certain earthquakes are stronger than others.
2h
On Covid-19, a Respected Science Watchdog Raises Eyebrows
The Stanford professor of medicine has gained a reputation for consistently highlighting flaws in research methods, pushing scientists and physicians to be more rigorous in evaluating and applying evidence. But his own Covid-19 research and comments, critics now say, seem to be flouting his own rules.
2h
Closing the spread is the task of central banks
Mike Mackenzie's daily analysis of what's moving global markets
2h
Two steps closer to flexible, powerful, fast bioelectronic devices
Researchers have designed biocompatible ion-driven soft transistors that can perform real-time neurologically relevant computation and a mixed-conducting particulate composite that allows creation of electronic components out of a single material. These have promise for bioelectronic devices that are fast, sensitive, biocompatible, soft, and flexible, with long-term stability in physiological envi
2h
Researchers discover new structure for promising class of materials
Florida State University researchers have discovered a novel structure for organic-inorganic hybrid materials that shows potential for more efficient technologies.
2h
More mangrove trees could prevent hurricane damage
Mangrove trees may be one way to protect against hurricane damage, researchers report. Climate change is making the impact of hurricanes and other storms more dangerous—and more expensive. As the costs loom over coastlines across the globe, vulnerable communities are looking for new ways to mitigate the economic impact. The researchers found that mangrove trees, which grow in coastal waters and h
2h
Life Inside the Extinction
These are startling times, but there's a way out — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Stacey Abrams's Remarkable Campaign for Vice President
Peyton Fulford / Guardian / eyevine / Redux Stacey Abrams has a theory about how Joe Biden can beat Donald Trump: Pick her as his running mate. "We have to win the election. And I would point out that I ran the most successful campaign to engage the communities we need to build the broadest coalition necessary in 2020, because what we are going to see on the ground is that this is going to be a c
2h
Climate change may push some species to higher elevations—and out of harm's way
A new WCS-led study reveals that mountain-dwelling species fleeing warming temperatures by retreating to higher elevations may find refuge from reduced human pressure.
2h
Climate change may push some species to higher elevations—and out of harm's way
A new WCS-led study reveals that mountain-dwelling species fleeing warming temperatures by retreating to higher elevations may find refuge from reduced human pressure.
2h
Mr Kipling, Marvel and . . . bread: unfashionable foods make a comeback in lockdown
Consumers seeking comfort abandon premium products and return to decades-old brands
2h
The challenge of keeping science alive during the COVID-19 shutdowns
Campus shutdowns mean researchers must be classified as essential personnel to tend collections, like these fungus-colonized plants. (Cameron Stauder/) Matt Kasson is an assistant Professor of Plant Pathology and Mycology, West Virginia University. Brian Lovett is a Postdoctoral Researcher in Mycology, West Virginia University. Rita Rio is a Professor of Biology, West Virginia University. This st
2h
Two steps closer to flexible, powerful, fast bioelectronic devices
Researchers have designed biocompatible ion-driven soft transistors that can perform real-time neurologically relevant computation and a mixed-conducting particulate composite that allows creation of electronic components out of a single material. These have promise for bioelectronic devices that are fast, sensitive, biocompatible, soft, and flexible, with long-term stability in physiological envi
2h
Nursing homes prepared for pandemics, but COVID-19 reveals gaps
New data suggests that Michigan nursing homes that responded to a survey were far better prepared for the COVID-19 pandemic than they were for the last one. The study includes responses from 130 nursing homes to a survey during the week that the state announced its first documented case of COVID-19.
2h
COVID-19: The downside of social distancing
When faced with danger, humans draw closer together. Social distancing thwarts this impulse. Researchers argue that this dilemma poses a greater threat to society than overtly antisocial behavior.
2h
'Bursty' email communication helps groups convert resources into results
A new study looked at more than 1,300 retail banking sales teams in a large regional bank to explore whether groups vary in how they convert resources into performance. The study found that resources are generally helpful, but groups differ in the results they achieve. The variation is also largely associated with the group's coordinated attention – specifically, their patterns of email communicat
2h
Database tracks climate change's toll on fish
A new database will help track the impacts of climate change on fish living in rivers, lakes, and other inland waters throughout the world. The Fish and Climate Change Database —or FiCli (pronounced "fick-lee")—is a searchable directory of peer-reviewed journal publications that describe projected or documented effects of climate change on inland fishes. These wild animals are a vital source of f
2h
Coronavirus Updates: President Signs Bill, Clarifies Disinfectant Suggestion
Thursday night's coronavirus task force briefing included preliminary research on how the virus responds to sunlight and heat. NPR's science and White House correspondents contextualize those claims.
2h
Nearly All NYC-Area COVID-19 Hospitalizations Had Comorbidities
The most common pre-existing conditions among the patients were diabetes, obesity, and hypertension.
2h
Artificial intelligence takes on song-composing duties in Eurovision-inspired contest
The public will help judge the resulting lyrics and melodies
2h
Groundbreaking development in rapid large-scale testing of COVID-19
OU Medicine, the OU Health Sciences Center and the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation collaborated to create a new test for COVID-19 using technology and reagents from Fluidigm Corporation, an innovative biotechnology tools provider. The test is intended for large-scale testing of patients across the OU Medicine healthcare system, with the capacity to test 180,000 samples over the next 90 days.
2h
Higher levels of NETs in blood associated with more severe COVID-19
New study explores the connection between levels of a type of destructive white blood cell, known as a neutrophil, with the severity of COVID-19.
2h
Pressure over testing mounts as UK website overwhelmed
Booking system closed after taking 16,000 requests for virus checks on first day and government warns peak not yet past
2h
Infrared-reflecting paint can cool buildings even when it is black
Black paint usually absorbs heat, but a new two-layer polymer paint reflects infrared light and keeps objects 16°C cooler, which could help make buildings more energy efficient
2h
Hubble Space Telescope Celebrates 30 Years
It's one of NASA's longest-living and most valuable telescopes, sending back amazing space images to Earth for decades. Hubble Space Telescope Celebrates 30 Years Video of Hubble Space Telescope Celebrates 30 Years Space Friday, April 24, 2020 – 15:30 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) — This month, the Hubble Space Telescope hits its 30th year in orbit. Some of its biggest discoveri
2h
Brazilian chloroquine study halted after high dose proved lethal for some patients
Termination comes as the journal Nature raises alarm on serious heart risks associated with Covid-19 patients taking the drugs Coronavirus – live US updates Live global updates See all our coronavirus coverage A Brazilian study investigating whether the anti-malaria drug chloroquine was effective in treating patients with Covid-19 has been halted on safety concerns, after a high dose of the drug
2h
The Order of Battle
Among the many drug-discovery lessons that this pandemic is highlighting is the difficulty of meeting the challenges of a new target, a new pathogen, a new disease, or a new mechanism of action. When you look at the history of the drug industry, the typical time for an effective therapy to be developed from a standing start is somewhere around ten years. Once in a while it's shorter, and it can b
3h
Hubble celebrates its 30th anniversary with a tapestry of blazing starbirth
Hubble Space Telescope's iconic images and scientific breakthroughs have redefined our view of the universe. To commemorate three decades of scientific discoveries, this image is one of the most photogenic examples of the many turbulent stellar nurseries the telescope has observed during its 30-year lifetime.
3h
Cookstoves may be more dangerous than believed
Despite the whitish appearance 0f the smoke that carries them, organic carbon particles absorb as much—if not more—sunlight in the atmosphere as black carbon, according to a new study. And their health effects may be worse for the nearly 2.7 billion households worldwide that use cookstoves. A telltale signature of a cookstove, commonly used to prepare food or provide heat by burning wood, charcoa
3h
FDA flags risks for virus drug promoted by Trump
US regulator cautions against using chloroquine outside of hospitals or clinical trials
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Coronavirus Interrupts, but Doesn't End, an Arctic Research Expedition
The Polarstern, a science ship, will have to temporarily break out of polar ice because supply flights are no longer possible.
3h
Hubble Space Telescope Releases New 30th Birthday Image
A new image reminds us of what the orbiting observatory has let us see.
3h
How Should You Stock Your Medicine Cabinet?
We asked pharmacists and doctors what they would want in the house for their own families. Here's what they suggested.
3h
Coronavirus Roundup for April 18-24
Here are pandemic news highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
US Ditches Global Team Helping Develop COVID Vaccine
The United States has ditched a global initiative led by the World Health Organization to accelerate cooperation on a coronavirus vaccine and to openly share information on possible treatments and technologies, as The Guardian reports . "There will be no U.S. official participation," a spokesman for the US mission in Geneva told Reuters . WHO director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus noted the
3h
France limits nicotine sales after coronavirus study
Stimulant given as 'likely' reason for lower infections but authorities stress health risks
3h
Plan to move beluga whales from Canada to U.S. aquarium sparks controversy
Mystic aquarium in Connecticut says whales would be used for research
3h
FSU researchers discover new structure for promising class of materials
Florida State researchers have published a new study in the journal Science Advances that explains how they created a hollow nanostructure for metal halide perovskites that would allow the material to emit a highly efficient blue light.
3h
Water may look like a simple liquid; however, it is anything but simple to analyze
Scientists have been able to shed new light on the properties of water at the molecular level. In particular, they were able to describe accurately the interactions between three water molecules, which contribute significantly to the energy landscape of water. The research could pave the way to better understand and predict water behavior at different conditions, even under extreme ones.
3h
Palaeontologists reveal 'the most dangerous place in the history of planet Earth'
100 million years ago, ferocious predators, including flying reptiles and crocodile-like hunters, made the Sahara the most dangerous place on Earth.
3h
Dyson says its ventilator not needed in UK
Appliance maker had responded to UK government appeal to help equip health service
4h
Georgia's Governor Lets Businesses Reopen. Some Say No Thanks
Concerned about the health of employees and customers, owners of businesses permitted to reopen Friday are staying closed.
4h
NASA JPL Engineers Design COVID-19 Ventilator in 37 Days
The unprecedented coronavirus pandemic has left many hospitals without enough ventilators, but companies like Tesla are trying to design new, easily built machines. Now, scientists from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) have created their own ventilator design in just 37 days . Patients suffering from COVID-19 can sometimes experience respiratory distress as the virus attacks the lungs. A sm
4h
New study finds connection between fault roughness and the magnitude of earthquakes
A new study led by McGill University has found that tectonic plates beneath the Earth's surface can show varying degrees of roughness and could help explain why certain earthquakes are stronger than others.
4h
Maryland engineers open door to big new library of tiny nanoparticles
A research team has developed a new method for mixing metals generally known to be immiscible, or unmixable, at the nanoscale to create a new range of bimetallic materials. Such a library will be useful for studying the role of these bimetallic particles in various reaction scenarios such as the transformation of carbon dioxide to fuel and chemicals.
4h
Two steps closer to flexible, powerful, fast bioelectronic devices
Led by Biomedical Engineering Professor Dion Khodagholy, researchers have designed biocompatible ion-driven soft transistors that can perform real-time neurologically relevant computation and a mixed-conducting particulate composite that allows creation of electronic components out of a single material. These have promise for bioelectronic devices that are fast, sensitive, biocompatible, soft, and
4h
Scientists discover just how runny a liquid can be
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London and the Russian Academy of Sciences have found a limit to how runny a liquid can be.
4h
Catalyst opens door to more efficient, environmentally friendly ethylene production
Researchers have engineered a new catalyst that can more efficiently convert ethane into ethylene, which is used in a variety of manufacturing processes. The discovery could be used in a conversion process to drastically reduce ethylene production costs and cut related carbon dioxide emissions by up to 87%.
4h
Water may look like a simple liquid; however, it is anything but simple to analyze
Scientists have been able to shed new light on the properties of water at the molecular level. In particular, they were able to describe accurately the interactions between three water molecules, which contribute significantly to the energy landscape of water. The research could pave the way to better understand and predict water behavior at different conditions, even under extreme ones.
4h
Delivery Companies Hand Out Safety Gear—With Mixed Results
Some gig workers say their supplies were low-quality or arrived damaged, as shortages continue for items like masks and sanitizer.
4h
Moiré Patterns Reveal Materials' Hidden Properties
By overlapping materials with periodic properties, scientists can detect features otherwise too small to be seen directly. Moire.gif An animated gif showing a Moiré pattern generated by two overlapping sets of concentric circles. Image credits: Jacopo Bertolotti, Wikimedia Commons Rights information: Public domain Physics Friday, April 24, 2020 – 14:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) —
4h
Facebook takes aim at Zoom with new video chat features
Zoom shares fall 10% as tech giant launches rival to apps made popular during lockdowns
4h
Dramatic loss of food plants for insects
Plummeting insect numbers are becoming a concern. A team of researchers have now demonstrated for the first time that the diversity of food plants for insects in the canton of Zurich has dramatically decreased over the past 100 years or so.
4h
Listen: Are the Celebrities Okay?
On the latest episode of the Social Distance podcast, staff writers Hannah Giorgis and Spencer Kornhaber update James Hamblin and Katherine Wells on where all the celebrities went, and whether our fascination with them will survive this moment. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they
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The Scariest Pandemic Timeline
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . If you held out a glimmer of hope about life returning to normal this year, that hope may have been thoroughly extinguished this week by the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Robert Redfield. "There's a possibility that the assault of the virus on
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Why CO2 Isn't Falling More During a Global Lockdown
The answer lies in what sectors of the economy have shut down and expectations of recovery later in the year — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Shuttered: How Covid-19 Changed Sunday Service for Kennedi Carter
In the Bible Belt where parishioners are under stay-at-home orders, even celebrations like Easter have become more muted affairs.
4h
Will American shale oil rise again?
Donald Trump's efforts to end a price war backfired leaving the industry on its knees
4h
Vitrification decoupling from {alpha}-relaxation in a metallic glass
Understanding how glasses form, the so-called vitrification, remains a major challenge in materials science. Here, we study vitrification kinetics, in terms of the limiting fictive temperature, and atomic mobility related to the α-relaxation of an Au-based bulk metallic glass former by fast scanning calorimetry. We show that the time scale of the α-relaxation exhibits super-Arrhenius temperature
4h
Energy transfer within the hydrogen bonding network of water following resonant terahertz excitation
Energy dissipation in water is very fast and more efficient than in many other liquids. This behavior is commonly attributed to the intermolecular interactions associated with hydrogen bonding. Here, we investigate the dynamic energy flow in the hydrogen bond network of liquid water by a pump-probe experiment. We resonantly excite intermolecular degrees of freedom with ultrashort single-cycle ter
4h
Deciphering atomistic mechanisms of the gas-solid interfacial reaction during alloy oxidation
Gas-solid interfacial reaction is critical to many technological applications from heterogeneous catalysis to stress corrosion cracking. A prominent question that remains unclear is how gas and solid interact beyond chemisorption to form a stable interphase for bridging subsequent gas-solid reactions. Here, we report real-time atomic-scale observations of Ni-Al alloy oxidation reaction from initi
4h
Four direct measurements of the fine-structure constant 13 billion years ago
Observations of the redshift z = 7.085 quasar J1120+0641 are used to search for variations of the fine structure constant, a, over the redshift range 5:5 to 7:1. Observations at z = 7:1 probe the physics of the universe at only 0.8 billion years old. These are the most distant direct measurements of a to date and the first measurements using a near-IR spectrograph. A new AI analysis method is emp
4h
Kimberlite genesis from a common carbonate-rich primary melt modified by lithospheric mantle assimilation
Quantifying the compositional evolution of mantle-derived melts from source to surface is fundamental for constraining the nature of primary melts and deep Earth composition. Despite abundant evidence for interaction between carbonate-rich melts, including diamondiferous kimberlites, and mantle wall rocks en route to surface, the effects of this interaction on melt compositions are poorly constra
4h
Predictive relation for the {alpha}-relaxation time of a coarse-grained polymer melt under steady shear
We examine the influence of steady shear on structural relaxation in a simulated coarse-grained unentangled polymer melt over a wide range of temperature and shear rates. Shear is found to progressively suppress the α-relaxation process observed in the intermediate scattering function, leading ultimately to a purely inertially dominated β-relaxation at high shear rates, a trend similar to increas
4h
The NALCN channel complex is voltage sensitive and directly modulated by extracellular calcium
The sodium leak channel (NALCN) is essential for survival in mammals: NALCN mutations are life-threatening in humans and knockout is lethal in mice. However, the basic functional and pharmacological properties of NALCN have remained elusive. Here, we found that robust function of NALCN in heterologous systems requires co-expression of UNC79, UNC80, and FAM155A. The resulting NALCN channel complex
4h
Finite-temperature violation of the anomalous transverse Wiedemann-Franz law
The Wiedemann-Franz (WF) law has been tested in numerous solids, but the extent of its relevance to the anomalous transverse transport and the topological nature of the wave function, remains an open question. Here, we present a study of anomalous transverse response in the noncollinear antiferromagnet Mn 3 Ge extended from room temperature down to sub-kelvin temperature and find that the anomalo
4h
Designing complex architectured materials with generative adversarial networks
Architectured materials on length scales from nanometers to meters are desirable for diverse applications. Recent advances in additive manufacturing have made mass production of complex architectured materials technologically and economically feasible. Existing architecture design approaches such as bioinspiration, Edisonian, and optimization, however, generally rely on experienced designers' pri
4h
Graphene reinforced carbon fibers
The superlative strength-to-weight ratio of carbon fibers (CFs) can substantially reduce vehicle weight and improve energy efficiency. However, most CFs are derived from costly polyacrylonitrile (PAN), which limits their widespread adoption in the automotive industry. Extensive efforts to produce CFs from low cost, alternative precursor materials have failed to yield a commercially viable product
4h
Delocalized electron effect on single metal sites in ultrathin conjugated microporous polymer nanosheets for boosting CO2 cycloaddition
CO 2 cycloaddition with epoxides at low temperature and pressure has been broadly recognized as an ambitious but challenging goal, which requires the catalysts to have precisely controlled Lewis acid sites. Here, we demonstrate that both stereochemical environment and oxidation state of single cobalt active sites in cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine [CoPc(NH 2 ) 4 ] are finely tuned via molecular e
4h
Laser-engineered heavy hydrocarbons: Old materials with new opportunities
Polycyclic heavy hydrocarbons (HHs) such as coal, tar, and pitch are a family of materials with extremely rich and complex chemistry, representing a massive opportunity for their use in a range of potential applications. The present work shows that optimal selection of initial HHs based on molecular constituents is essential in tuning the material for a particular and targeted electronic applicat
4h
Colored and paintable bilayer coatings with high solar-infrared reflectance for efficient cooling
Solar reflective and thermally emissive surfaces offer a sustainable way to cool objects under sunlight. However, white or silvery reflectance of these surfaces does not satisfy the need for color. Here, we present a paintable bilayer coating that simultaneously achieves color and radiative cooling. The bilayer comprises a thin, visible-absorptive layer atop a nonabsorptive, solar-scattering unde
4h
Hollow metal halide perovskite nanocrystals with efficient blue emissions
Metal halide perovskite nanocrystals (NCs) have emerged as new-generation light-emitting materials with narrow emissions and high photoluminescence quantum efficiencies (PLQEs). Various types of perovskite NCs, e.g., platelets, wires, and cubes, have been discovered to exhibit tunable emissions across the whole visible spectrum. Despite remarkable advances in the field of perovskite NCs, many nan
4h
Mixed-conducting particulate composites for soft electronics
Bioelectronic devices should optimally merge a soft, biocompatible tissue interface with capacity for local, advanced signal processing. Here, we introduce an organic mixed-conducting particulate composite material (MCP) that can form functional electronic components by varying particle size and density. We created MCP-based high-performance anisotropic films, independently addressable transistor
4h
Overcoming immiscibility toward bimetallic catalyst library
Bimetallics are emerging as important materials that often exhibit distinct chemical properties from monometallics. However, there is limited access to homogeneously alloyed bimetallics because of the thermodynamic immiscibility of the constituent elements. Overcoming the inherent immiscibility in bimetallic systems would create a bimetallic library with unique properties. Here, we present a none
4h
Switchable giant nonreciprocal frequency shift of propagating spin waves in synthetic antiferromagnets
The nonreciprocity of propagating spin waves, i.e., the difference in amplitude and/or frequency depending on the propagation direction, is essential for the realization of spin wave–based logic circuits. However, the nonreciprocal frequency shifts demonstrated so far are not large enough for applications because they originate from interfacial effects. In addition, switching of the spin wave non
4h
A new solvent system: Hydrothermal molten salt
This work proposes a new solvent system composed of a molten salt in pressurized water, so-called hydrothermal molten salt (HyMoS). This system changes the paradigm of the solubility of inorganics in supercritical water. Using as an example NaOH, a low melting temperature salt, we show the possibility to precipitate it at a temperature above its melting one, leading to the instantaneous formation
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Rapid heating induced ultrahigh stability of nanograined copper
Inherent thermal and mechanical instability of nanograined materials bottlenecks their processing and technological applications. In addition to the traditional stabilization strategy, which is based on alloying, grain boundary relaxation was recently found to be effective in stabilizing nanograined pure metals. Grain boundary relaxation can be induced by deforming very fine nanograins below a cr
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Realizing small-flake graphene oxide membranes for ultrafast size-dependent organic solvent nanofiltration
Membranes for organic solvent nanofiltration (OSN) or solvent-resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) offer unprecedented opportunities for highly efficient and cost-competitive solvent recovery in the pharmaceutical industry. Here, we describe small-flake graphene oxide (SFGO) membranes for high-performance OSN applications. Our strategy exploits lateral dimension control to engineer shorter and less to
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A molten carbonate shell modified perovskite redox catalyst for anaerobic oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane
Acceptor-doped, redox-active perovskite oxides such as La 0.8 Sr 0.2 FeO 3 (LSF) are active for ethane oxidation to CO x but show poor selectivity to ethylene. This article reports molten Li 2 CO 3 as an effective "promoter" to modify LSF for chemical looping–oxidative dehydrogenation (CL-ODH) of ethane. Under the working state, the redox catalyst is composed of a molten Li 2 CO 3 layer covering
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Wireless smart contact lens for diabetic diagnosis and therapy
A smart contact lens can be used as an excellent interface between the human body and an electronic device for wearable healthcare applications. Despite wide investigations of smart contact lenses for diagnostic applications, there has been no report on electrically controlled drug delivery in combination with real-time biometric analysis. Here, we developed smart contact lenses for both continuo
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Minimal quantum viscosity from fundamental physical constants
Viscosity of fluids is strongly system dependent, varies across many orders of magnitude, and depends on molecular interactions and structure in a complex way not amenable to first-principles theories. Despite the variations and theoretical difficulties, we find a new quantity setting the minimal kinematic viscosity of fluids: , where m e and m are electron and molecule masses. We subsequently in
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Live Q&A: How are you managing your business in the crisis?
Tell us about how you are navigating hard decisions about staff and finances — Andrew Hill will be answering your questions on Monday
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Covid-19 news: US not involved in global WHO plan to tackle pandemic
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Researchers develop breakthrough antibody test for COVID-19 virus
A recent article published in Current Protocols in Microbiology details a breakthrough antibody test for COVID-19.
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Traffic officer protein governs speed of sugar/fat conversion pathway
Scientists in Texas and Pennsylvania have identified a protein sensor that restricts how much sugar and fat our cells convert into energy during periods of starvation. It is possible, the scientists say, that the sensor could be fine-tuned to prompt more sugar and fat conversion in people with metabolic conditions.
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Engineers open door to big new library of tiny nanoparticles
The development of bimetallic nanoparticles (i.e., tiny particles composed of two different metals that exhibit several new and improved properties) represents a novel area of research with a wide range of potential applications. Now, a research team in the University of Maryland (UMD)'s A. James Clark School of Engineering has developed a new method for mixing metals generally known to be immisci
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Catalyst opens door to more efficient, environmentally friendly ethylene production
A research team led by North Carolina State University has engineered a new catalyst that can more efficiently convert ethane into ethylene, which is used in a variety of manufacturing processes. The discovery could be used in a conversion process to drastically reduce ethylene production costs and cut related carbon dioxide emissions by up to 87%.
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Scientists discover just how runny a liquid can be
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London and the Russian Academy of Sciences have found a limit to how runny a liquid can be.
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Two steps closer to flexible, powerful, fast bioelectronic devices
Dion Khodagholy, assistant professor of electrical engineering, is focused on developing bioelectronic devices that are not only fast, sensitive, biocompatible, soft, and flexible, but also have long-term stability in physiological environments such as the human body. Such devices would greatly improve human health, from monitoring in-home wellness to diagnosing and treating neuropsychiatric disea
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Chemists develop fast-degrading plastic for cleaner oceans
Cornell University chemists have developed a polymer with the strength of industrial-grade plastics but degrades quickly in sunlight. They hope the plastic will one day be used to make fishing nets that leave no environmental trace. Their research joins other programs and initiatives aimed at restoring our oceans. In popular imagination, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a concentration of trash
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Turkish supplier blames delays to gown order from UK on late go-ahead
Selegna says it sent 300,000 units after Ankara stepped in to co-ordinate first shipment
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Lufthansa warns of 10,000 excess jobs
German carrier tells staff company is unlikely to experience pre-crisis levels of demand until 2023
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New Theory of Everything Unites Quantum Mechanics with Relativity … and Much More
Stephen Wolfram, a controversial physicist and computer scientist, has united relativity, quantum mechanics and computational complexity in a single theory of everything. But will other physicists be convinced?
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Slime Molds Show Us the Perks of Being a Loner
It isn't easy being a loner — but in the slime mold world, natural selection favors it. Populations wouldn't survive without those who depart from the herd.
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With a heavy heart: How men and women develop heart disease differently
A new study by researchers from McGill University has uncovered that minerals causing aortic heart valve blockage in men and women are different, a discovery that could change how heart disease is diagnosed and treated.
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Could suicide risk be predicted from a patient's records?
A study led by Boston Children's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital demonstrates that a predictive computer model can identify patients at risk for attempting suicide from patterns in their electronic health records — an average of two years ahead of time.
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Who's who on secret scientific group advising UK government?
Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) is advising cabinet on coronavirus response Revealed: Cummings on secret scientific advisory group Case for transparency never clearer See all our coronavirus coverage On Friday the Guardian revealed the 23 attendees of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage). They comprise 21 scientists and two Downing Street political advisers. Sir P
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The Guardian view on the EU and Covid-19: better late than never | Editorial
Europe is in the pandemic frontline but unity among the nations has been rare. That may be changing – not before time Almost seven weeks after the World Health Organization confirmed the pandemic, Europe remains in the frontline of the battle to contain the Covid-19 virus. Five of the six countries reporting most cases are in Europe. Seven of the 10 countries reporting most deaths are in our cont
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Trump Is Building a Dystopia in Real Time
Y esterday, as part of the White House briefing on the coronavirus pandemic, William Bryan, the undersecretary for science and technology at the Department of Homeland Security, shared preliminary government research suggesting that "heat and humidity suppress COVID-19" and that "commonly available disinfectants work to kill the virus." Then Donald Trump took to the briefing room's lectern. Seizi
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Pet food can contain drug-resistant bacteria that may pass to humans
Some dogs and cats may be passing gut microbes to their owners that withstand last-resort antibiotics, which can be needed to fight off pneumonia from a coronavirus infection
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Amazon loses French court appeal over virus protection for staff
Company faces €100,000 fine for every non-essential delivery until it completes safety assessment
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New study takes the pulse of a sleeping supervolcano
Under the volcanoes in the Andes where Chile, Argentina and Bolivia meet, there is a gigantic reservoir of molten magma. For several million years, it has been there without fully solidifying or causing a supervolcanic eruption. Geologists have long wondered how this is possible. Researchers have now discovered that the secret may be hidden tributaries of hot magma from inside the Earth.
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The PC viruses carried by Covid-19
Silicon Valley's ImmuneCorps, AT&T chief to exit, avoiding Hairmageddon
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Daily briefing: What happens after you survive coronavirus
Nature, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01258-z The long road to full recovery after being hit hard with COVID-19. Plus: why physicians are becoming more hesitant to use ventilators to treat the illness.
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Climate change may push some species to higher elevations — and out of harm's way
A new WCS-led study reveals that mountain-dwelling species fleeing warming temperatures by retreating to higher elevations may find refuge from reduced human pressure.
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Highly concentrated aqueous electrolytes could replace solvents used in batteries
The review article by researchers at the University of São Paulo shows the advantages of this technological alternative, which is nontoxic and much cheaper than other methods.
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Substituting the next-best protein
Children born with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have a mutation in the X-chromosome gene that would normally code for dystrophin, a protein that provides structural integrity to skeletal muscles. The loss of this protein causes severe symptoms, including deteriorating muscle strength beginning around the age of four. While there is no cure, a promising area of research has developed around the prot
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Is the FaceTime Haircut Here to Stay?
One Saturday earlier this month, my mom grabbed a pair of dull shears, a comb, and a spray bottle; sat my brother in a wicker chair on our back porch; and FaceTimed her stylist, Isabelle Goetz. My brother's hair was pure entropy. The only part that all pointed in one direction was the front, which crashed down his forehead like a tidal wave. At some point the determination had been made—by whom,
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US stays away as world leaders agree action on Covid-19 vaccine
Video meeting seen as global endorsement of WHO and sign of Trump's isolation on world stage Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Global leaders have pledged to accelerate cooperation on a coronavirus vaccine and to share research, treatment and medicines across the globe. But the United States did not take part in the World Health Organization initiative, in a sign of Do
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NASA: Don't Break Quarantine to Watch SpaceX Launch Astronauts
Stay Home If there wasn't a global pandemic going on, NASA's upcoming SpaceX launch — the first to send astronauts into space from U.S. soil since 2011 — would be a huge spectacle. But this time around, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine urged would-be spectators to stay home and stay safe, Space.com reports . Bridenstine still hopes the public will tune in online, but said on a Thursday conferen
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Dramatic loss of food plants for insects
Just a few weeks ago, everyone was talking about plummeting insect numbers. A team of researchers from the Universities of Bonn and Zurich and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL have now demonstrated for the first time that the diversity of food plants for insects in the canton of Zurich has dramatically decreased over the past 100 years or so. The study has no
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Quantum electrodynamics experiment
The fundamental laws of physics are based on symmetries that, among other things, determine the interactions between charged particles. Using ultracold atoms, researchers at Heidelberg University have experimentally constructed the symmetries of quantum electrodynamics. They hope to gain new insights for implementing future quantum technologies that can simulate complex physical phenomena.
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Holistic approach best for tackling nonmedical drug use, study finds
Health practitioners are constantly developing new ways to help those with drug and alcohol addictions wean themselves from their substance of choice. Most such programs have limited success, however. A new study finds that interventions that take a multidimensional approach — tackling the biological, social, environmental and mental health obstacles to overcome while also addressing a person's s
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At-Home Coronavirus-Sample-Collection Kits Aren't Perfect but Could Help Fill Testing Gap
LabCorp's Pixel kits rely on self-swabbing and mailing samples, and they have yet to be scaled up for widespread use — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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At-Home Coronavirus-Sample-Collection Kits Aren't Perfect but Could Help Fill Testing Gap
LabCorp's Pixel kits rely on self-swabbing and mailing samples, and they have yet to be scaled up for widespread use — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Microwaved bamboo could be used to build super-strong skyscrapers
Bamboo is a renewable material that when microwaved becomes stronger by weight than steel or concrete – which could make it ideal for constructing buildings, cars and planes
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Targeting euphoria may curb cocaine addiction
A new study explains how cocaine modifies functions in the brain. The work reveals a potential target for therapies aimed at treating cocaine addiction. Researchers have demonstrated that a key receptor for dopamine, called D2 (D2R), intervenes in the mechanism through which cocaine modifies functions in the striatum. The striatum is a region of the brain responsible for the psychomotor and rewar
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Was the First Beer Brewed for the Dead?
Archaeologists disagree on whether they've found the world's oldest beer, or just bread.
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Use of conservative and social media linked with COVID-19 misinformation
People who relied on conservative media or social media in the early days of the COVID-19 outbreak were more likely to be misinformed about how to prevent the virus and believe conspiracy theories about it, a study of media use and public knowledge has found.
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Bose-Einstein condensate: Magnetic particles behave repulsively
Data transmission that works by means of magnetic waves instead of electric currents: For many scientists, this is the basis of future technologies that will make transmission faster and individual components smaller and more energy-efficient. Magnons, the particles of magnetism, serve as moving information carriers. Almost 15 years ago, researchers at the University of Münster (Germany) succeeded
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Fueling the world sustainably: Synthesizing ammonia using less energy
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have developed an improved catalyst by taking the common dehydrating agent calcium hydride and adding fluoride to it. The catalyst facilitates the synthesis of ammonia at merely 50 °C, by using only half the energy that existing techniques require. This opens doors to ammonia production with low energy consumption and reduced greenhouse gas
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Diverse livelihoods helped resilient Levänluhta people survive a climate disaster
A multidisciplinary research group coordinated by the University of Helsinki dated the bones of dozens of Iron Age residents of the Levänluhta site in Finland, and studied the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios. The results provide an overview of the dietary habits based on terrestrial, marine and freshwater ecosystems, as well as of sources of livelihoods throughout the Levänluhta era.
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An eclipsing binary millisecond pulsar discovered by FAST
Using the data obtained by the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST), a research team led by Prof. Pan Zhichen and Prof. Li Di from the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) discovered an eclipsing binary millisecond pulsar in Globular Cluster (GC) Messier 92 (M92).
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Assessing El Niño's impact on fisheries and aquaculture around the world
While considerable resources are invested in seasonal forecasts and early-warning systems for food security, not enough is known about El Niño's impact on the fisheries and aquaculture sectors, even though its name was given in the 1600s by fishers off the coast of Peru.
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Europe urged to raise its game on vaccines
Sanofi chief calls for US-style body to support development
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Apple and Google boost privacy and accuracy of contact tracing system
Response from tech companies on security as they prepare to release first version of coronavirus tracking tool
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Global trade contracts as coronavirus hits world economy
Figures show early slowdown in China and suggest further decline
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COVID-19 is a 'global experiment' for the environment
Researchers are racing to collect data to assess climate models and determine the impact of the coronavirus on the environment and human health. Stay-at-home orders enacted to slow human movement, and consequently the spread of COVID-19, have had obvious benefits for the environment, but they are also affecting environmental science. "There's a global experiment going on in our atmosphere," says
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Rare 'killer' mutations present at birth could be taking years off your life
Exceedingly uncommon variants present at birth that can destroy gene function
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Conservative and social media usage associated with misinformation about COVID-19
A study based on a survey of more than 1,000 US adults examines the association between media consumption and misinformation about COVID-19. Conservative and social media use correlated with belief in conspiracy theories, including believing that some in the CDC were exaggerating the threat to damage Donald Trump's presidency.
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COVID-19: The downside of social distancing
When faced with danger, humans draw closer together. Social distancing thwarts this impulse. Professor Ophelia Deroy from Ludwigs-Maximilians Universitaet in Munich (LMU) and colleagues argue that this dilemma poses a greater threat to society than overtly antisocial behavior.
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Starmer selects Doreen Lawrence to review virus impact on minorities
Labour leader appoints prominent activist as disproportionate toll emerges on black, Asian and ethnic communities
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Covid-19 has revolutionised the NHS
The crisis exposed the system was on a knife edge, but the emergency changes are for the better
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Primary voters disagree about who should pick nominees
Primary voters are more willing to accept influence from party insiders and elites than one might think, according to new research. In a paper in Party Politics , coauthor Zachary Albert, an assistant professor of politics at Brandeis University, and colleagues analyzed survey responses from 2,000 citizens in late 2018. Respondents rated how much influence they thought certain actors should have
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Drinking, bathing in, or injecting yourself with bleach can be deadly—and it won't cure COVID-19
For cleaning purposes only. (Unsplash/) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . The idea of using bleach to "detox" the body or prevent certain diseases is nothing new, but global panic over the novel-coronavirus pandemic means this dangerous DIY treatment is
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Lots of carbon and metal flow under Arctic sea ice
Significant quantities of carbon and trace elements are flowing across the central Arctic Ocean under the sea ice via freshwater runoff from rivers and continental shelf sediments, according to a new study. "This research is critical to understanding the current and future health of the Arctic Ocean, which is warming faster than much of the rest of the planet," says Jessica Fitzsimmons, assistant
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Amazon Sick-Out Unites Tech and Warehouse Workers in Protest
A coalition of groups is organizing employees to call in sick on Friday, weeks after Amazon fired two prominent activists.
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Coronavirus shutdown forces research ship to break out of Arctic ice
Nature, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01253-4 MOSAiC mission will return to its frozen platform but the disruption, to exchange teams, will create a gap in its unique climate data set.
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Coronapod: The race to expand antibody testing
Nature, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01252-5 The role of antibody tests in controlling the pandemic, how public-health spending could curtail an economic crisis, and the efforts of the open hardware community.
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Black Hole Devours Outside of Star, Leaves Core Behind
Two-Course Meal In a gruesome bit of cosmic drama, a distant star was partially devoured by a black hole but managed to escape, at least for the time being. Looking at x-ray data from NASA and European Space Agency (ESA) observatories, astronomers found what appear to be the remnants of a red giant star that veered too close to a black hole. As a result, the star's outer layers were stripped away
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Ten great science projects you can do with your kids
This is an ongoing project, so you can use the weekend to grab your supplies as part of your bi-weekly grocery shopping trip. Then, check back Monday for the first project! It's time to do some science. (Gustavo Fring/Pexels/) Throughout elementary, middle, and high school, science class was always the place we could count on having a little fun. Where else would we get the chance to build a volc
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Why Is an Empty Shampoo Bottle So Easy to Knock Over?
Two physics experts answer a bewildering shower thought. shampoobottle_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Physics Friday, April 24, 2020 – 12:15 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) — Knocking over a shampoo bottle is an annoyance most of us have experienced, especially when the bottle is almost empty and seems to fall at the slightest nudge. In a rece
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Dyson will not supply ventilators to NHS to treat Covid-19
Engineering firm has been told by the government that their services are no longer required Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Dyson will not supply medical ventilators to help the NHS treat Covid-19 patients after the government told the engineering firm that its services were no longer required. Sir James Dyson, the company's billionaire founder, said the company had
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Inside UK care homes: why the system is failing its coronavirus test
Frail residents in the underfunded and overwhelmed sector emerge as the hidden victims of the Covid-19 crisis
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Local authorities say multimillion-pound light rail deal not enough
Support for five networks around England follows coronavirus rescue packages for bus and train sectors
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Israel is using AI to flag high-risk covid-19 patients
One of Israel's largest health maintenance organizations is using artificial intelligence to help identify which of the 2.4 million people it covers are most at risk of severe covid-19 complications. Maccabi Healthcare Services says the system—which it developed with AI company Medial EarlySign—has already flagged 2% of its members, amounting to around 40,000 people. Once identified, individuals
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What the first coronavirus antibody testing surveys can tell us
We need to be very cautious about preliminary studies estimating how many people have already been infected by the coronavirus
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What is it like to be a covid-19 contact tracer and what do they do?
Covid-19 contact tracers are part healthcare worker, part detective and part call centre operative. But what is the job really like? New Scientist spoke to one in Ireland to find out
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DraftKings surges up to 16% in public market debut
Sports betting site's listing comes at a time when most events have been cancelled
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Bose-Einstein condensate: Magnetic particles behave repulsively
Data transmission that works with magnetic waves instead of electric currents can be the basis for future information technologies. Some years ago, researchers at Münster University (Germany) reached a new quantum state of magnetic particles at room temperature — a Bose-Einstein condensate. In a new study they show that the particles in the condensate behave repulsively, which leads to its stabil
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A 'corset' for the enzyme structure
The structure of enzymes determines how they control vital processes such as digestion or immune response. This is because the protein compounds are not rigid, but can change their shape through movable 'hinges.' The shape of enzymes can depend on whether their structure is measured in the test tube or in the living cell. This is what physicochemists at the University of Bonn discovered about YopO
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An eclipsing binary millisecond pulsar discovered by FAST
Using the data obtained by the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST), a research team led by Professor PAN Zhichen and Prof. LI Di from the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) discovered an eclipsing binary millisecond pulsar in Globular Cluster (GC) Messier 92 (M92).
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COVID-19 Will Hit the Elderly Even Harder in Developing Countries
The suffering will be unimaginable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Initial antibody test results suggest 2.7 million New York infections
It may be that many more unsymptomatic New Yorkers have encountered COVID-19 and fought it off. If this is true, the death rate may be lower than currently believed. Andrew Cuomo presented these early findings with the caveat that the study hasn't been completed or published yet. We don't really know how many people have or have not been infected by coronavirus. Insufficient testing has left us l
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COVID-19 Will Hit the Elderly Even Harder in Developing Countries
The suffering will be unimaginable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Best of this week's opinion
Our columnists' thoughts on saving the eurozone, M&A risks, and strongman leaders
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If you're buying a beard trimmer, make it one of these
Keep it tight with a trim. (Amazon/) Those of you who keep your facial hair from getting too scruffy know that it takes some effort—and a good trimmer makes all the difference. No one wants irritated skin or uneven edges. Surprisingly, there are a lot of beard trimmers that will make you feel like it's not worth the upkeep. We've rounded up three of our favorites that will make your life easy. Ta
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Fueling the world sustainably: Synthesizing ammonia using less energy
Scientists at Tokyo Tech have developed an improved catalyst by taking the common dehydrating agent calcium hydride and adding fluoride to it. The catalyst facilitates the synthesis of ammonia at merely 50 °C, by using only half the energy that existing techniques require. This opens doors to ammonia production with low energy consumption and reduced greenhouse gas emission.
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Environment-friendly compound shows promise for solar cell use
In research published today in Advanced Functional Materials, a team of engineers, material scientists, and physicists demonstrated how a new material — a lead-free chalcogenide perovskite — that hadn't previously been considered for use in solar cells could provide a safer and more effective option than others that are commonly considered.
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Diverse livelihoods helped resilient Levänluhta people survive a climate disaster
A multidisciplinary research group coordinated by the University of Helsinki dated the bones of dozens of Iron Age residents of the Levänluhta site in Finland, and studied the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios. The results provide an overview of the dietary habits based on terrestrial, marine and freshwater ecosystems, as well as of sources of livelihoods throughout the Levänluhta era.
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Summary of preliminary data about obesity and severity of COVID-19
In a Nature Reviews Endocrinology 'Comment' authors from the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), the Boston Children's Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health call for more research about the relationships of obesity, disproportionate fat distribution and impaired metabolic health with the severity of COVID-19.
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Adjust your clocks: lockdown is bending time completely out of shape | Jonathan Freedland
Coronavirus has robbed us of life's markers and left us like prisoners crossing off the days until we can live freely again It was a long March, perhaps the longest any of us can remember. And yet April is on course to be if not the cruellest month, then unexpectedly the shortest. Strictly speaking, none of that makes sense. There were 31 days in March, as always, and there will be 30 in April, a
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Under Coronavirus Lockdowns, an Unfamiliar Ramadan Begins: Live Global Coverage
Pakistani doctors warn that the country is loosening its lockdown too soon. Japan is recalling masks it sent to every home.
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China hits back at EU disinformation claims
Internal European report highlights growing concerns about pandemic propaganda
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Coronavirus Live Updates: F.D.A. Issues Warning on Anti-Malaria Drugs; Businesses in Georgia Start to Reopen
The F.D.A. warned the drugs can cause dangerous abnormalities in heart rhythm. The maker of Lysol and other disinfectants issued a warning against improper use of its products after President Trump touted their power to kill the virus.
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NASA Develops Ventilator to Treat Coronavirus Patients
NASA Ventilator A team of NASA researchers have developed a ventilator for treating COVID-19 patients in just 37 days. The space agency is now asking the US Food and Drug Administration for a fast-tracked approval. According to a statement , the machine was "tailored to treat coronavirus patients" — and "passed a critical test" earlier this week. VITAL The device, dubbed VITAL (Ventilator Interve
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Lysol Begs Customers Not to Drink Its Cleaning Products
Reckitt Benckiser, the British company behind the cleaning product brands Lysol and Dettol, is urging customers not to consume its cleaning supplies after U.S. President Donald Trump suggested scientists should try to inject COVID patients with disinfectants. No, we're not making this up. In a statement , the company was forced to reiterate that Lysol wipes should not be on the menu. "As a global
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Effect of high vs. low dosage of chloroquine diphosphate on SARS-CoV-2 infection
This randomized clinical trial evaluates the safety and efficacy of two chloroquine diphosphate dosages in patients with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
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Facing a pandemic while pregnant
The author describes her experience being pregnant during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic.
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Child abuse awareness month during COVID-19 pandemic
This Patient Page calls attention to risk factors for child abuse during the COVID-19 pandemic and discusses ways to reduce stress and risk of child abuse during social isolation.
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Mental health in children on home confinement in COVID-19 outbreak in China
This study investigates the depression and anxiety of children in China's Hubei province during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown.
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COVID-19 crisis as catalyst for telemedicine for chronic neurological disorders
The reasons for and reality of a rapid advance toward telemedicine in neurology during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic is described in this Viewpoint article.
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Did 'Joker' movie perpetuate prejudices against those with mental illness?
Researchers in this survey study examined whether watching the 2019 movie 'Joker,' in which the namesake character is violent and has mental illness, was associated with a change in the level of prejudice toward people with mental illness compared with others who watched another movie.
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Underprotected marine protected areas in a global biodiversity hotspot
Through the assessment of the 1,062 MPAs in the Mediterranean Sea, covering 6% of the Mediterranean Basin, a research team has shown that 95% of the total area protected lacks regulations to reduce human impacts on biodiversity. Unevenly distributed across political boundaries and eco-regions, effective levels of protection for biodiversity conservation represent only 0.23% of the Mediterranean Ba
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A global pandemic calls for global solutions | Larry Brilliant
Examining the facts and figures of the coronavirus outbreak, epidemiologist Larry Brilliant evaluates the global response in a candid interview with head of TED Chris Anderson. Brilliant lays out a clear plan to end the pandemic — and shows why, to achieve it, we'll have to work together across political and geographical divides. "This is not the zombie apocalypse; this is not a mass extinction e
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Electronic skin fully powered by sweat can monitor health
Electronic skin monitors body's vitals signs while being powered by sweat.
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Can the West Actually Ditch China?
"Hold China accountable," urges a fundraising appeal from U.S. President Donald Trump. U.K. Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab vowed to ask " hard questions " and threatened the end of "business as usual" with Beijing. German Chancellor Angela Merkel urged China to be more transparent about how it tackled the outbreak. French President Emmanuel Macron said that it would be "naive" to compare China's
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What to Ask Instead of 'How Are You?' During a Pandemic
Every conversation I have these days with someone who doesn't live in my home—every FaceTime with a friend or family member, every reporting phone call—kicks off with a brief, awkward, accidental meditation on mortality. "Hi!" I say. "Hi!" the other person says back. "How are you?" I ask next, out of habit. And then we both spend a long moment gazing directly into the abyss. How are we? People ar
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The Problem With Celebrities Urging Fans to Donate During a Pandemic
In a recent video on Instagram, Ashton Kutcher and his wife, Mila Kunis, made an appeal to Kutcher's 4 million followers. Before Kutcher could finish declaring that these "unprecedented times" call for "unprecedented measures," Kunis weighed in with her own solution: "More drinking!" Then the couple introduced a new product called "Quarantine Wine," a pinot noir they're selling to benefit coronav
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Electronic skin fully powered by sweat can monitor health
Electronic skin monitors body's vitals signs while being powered by sweat.
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Why Are Venus' Clouds So Weird?
Our sister world's rapidly moving clouds have long fascinated astronomers. And in the last few decades, we've learned quite a bit about them.
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CNN's Bill Weir Offers Solutions for How to Talk Climate Change in a Contentious World
Smithsonian's Earth Optimism Summit features CNN's Chief Climate Correspondent Bill Weir
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Clashes break out in locked-down Paris suburbs as tensions rise
Strict measures enforced during virus pandemic exacerbate entrenched inequalities, say experts
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Coronavirus treatments: fighting chance
Pandemic offers a once-in-a-generation opportunity to reset the reputation of the pharmaceuticals industry
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Kids locked at home all day are a recipe for accidental injuries and visits to the ER | Sadiqa AI Kendi
Unintentional injuries are the top cause of death for kids in the US and today's forced confinement raises the risk As an emergency department doctor in a busy children's hospital, I am relieved not many children are becoming seriously ill or dying from the coronavirus. However, as an injury prevention expert, I am worried about a hidden danger for America's children. I am worried about this hidd
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Organic heterostructures composed of one- and two-dimensional polymorph
A recent study facilely synthesized the OHSs composed of these two polymorph phases, whose growth mechanism is attributed to the low lattice mismatch rate of 5.8% between (001) plane of α phase (trunk) and (010) crystal plane of β phase (branch), Significantly, the multiport in/output channels can be achieved in the OHSs, which demonstrates the structure-dependent optical signals with the differen
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Brain insulin sensitivity determines body weight and fat distribution
Just where fat is deposited in the body and to what degree a person may benefit from a lifestyle intervention depends on how sensitive the brain is to insulin. If the person's brain responds sensitively to the hormone, a significant amount of weight can be lost and unhealthy visceral fat. People with brain insulin resistance only showed a slight weight loss. These are the results of a long-term st
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Assessing El Niño's impact on fisheries and aquaculture around the world
New report presents the main regional consequences caused by the five types of the climate pattern.
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Paleontologists reveal 'the most dangerous place in the history of planet Earth'
100 million years ago, ferocious predators, including flying reptiles and crocodile-like hunters, made the Sahara the most dangerous place on Earth.
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Shortcuts in COVID-19 Drug Research Could Do Long-Term Harm, Bioethicists Worry
Compassionate use of experimental medicine needs to coexist with scientific rigor to help patients, researchers write in the journal Science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Training instance segmentation neural network with synthetic datasets for seed phenotyping
In the midst of unprecedented climate change and population growth, the establishment of a method to rapidly create elite crop varieties via selective breeding is a matter of urgency to maintain the food supply. In order to select such cultivars, it is necessary to define and evaluate a metric for what is a 'superior variety' in an efficient manner. For example, the shape of seeds is understood to
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Trump Suggests Injecting COVID Patients With Disinfectant, UV Light
On Thursday, U.S. President Donald Trump suggested a number of bizarre and untested treatments for COVID-19 patients. Chief among them, NBC News reports , was injecting some sort of disinfectant — Trump never specified which — into patient's lungs to kill any viruses lingering there. He also suggested somehow putting high levels of ultraviolet radiation "inside the body, which you can do either t
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Consumer spending is down. Will we continue to buy less stuff?
Despite toilet paper hoarding and panic buying, overall consumer spending has sharply declined since the COVID-19 pandemic started, with retail sales dropping an unprecedented 8.7% in March. Stay-at-home orders also have caused many people to change the way they shop for the things they need. Sabrina Helm , associate professor in the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences in the College of
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Drop in calls to child abuse hotlines raises red flags
Child abuse and neglect hotlines report a decline in calls in recent weeks. While normally good news, it doesn't bode well during COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, an expert says. "Normally, a decrease in calls about alleged child abuse and neglect or maltreatment would be a welcome start to child abuse prevention month, but the context of current declines is worrisome," says Melissa Jonson-Reid, pro
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Training instance segmentation neural network with synthetic datasets for seed phenotyping
In the midst of unprecedented climate change and population growth, the establishment of a method to rapidly create elite crop varieties via selective breeding is a matter of urgency to maintain the food supply. In order to select such cultivars, it is necessary to define and evaluate a metric for what is a 'superior variety' in an efficient manner. For example, the shape of seeds is understood to
7h
Shortcuts in COVID-19 Drug Research Could Do Long-Term Harm, Bioethicists Worry
Compassionate use of experimental medicine needs to coexist with scientific rigor to help patients, researchers write in the journal Science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Travis Scott launched his world tour in Fortnite, and 12 million people showed up
Brazil has hosted some of the largest concert events in history. Back on December 31, 1994, Rod Stewart played to an estimated crowd of more than 3.5 million people to ring in the new year. Last night, however, more than 12 million people attended a performance by rapper Travis Scott. It wasn't in a park or on a beach, however—it all happened inside the video game world of Fortnite. Typically, Fo
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Training instance segmentation neural network with synthetic datasets for seed phenotyping
A team of scientists led by Yosuke Toda, Designated Assistant Professor at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM), Nagoya University, and Fumio Okura, Assistant Professor at the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, have developed a system which utilizes image analysis and artificial intelligence (AI) to analyze the shape of large numbers of seeds fro
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New active ingredient against allergic asthma
Our immune system protects us against pathogens. However, an excessive immune reaction can trigger allergies or chronic asthma. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München have discovered an active ingredient taken from the larvae of a worm parasite that could help diminish immune reactions.
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Nursing homes prepared for pandemics, but COVID-19 reveals gaps
New data suggests that Michigan nursing homes that responded to a survey were far better prepared for the COVID-19 pandemic than they were for the last one. The study includes responses from 130 nursing homes to a survey during the week that the state announced its first documented case of COVID-19.
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Sanfilippo C syndrome: New brain cell models to evaluate therapies
The Sanfilippo syndrome type C is a severe neurodegenerative disease which appears during the first years of life and for which there is no treatment yet. A recent study, published in Journal of Clinical Medicine, has created brain cell models of neurons and astrocytes that allow researchers to better know the mechanisms of this syndrome and assess potential therapies.
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Tectonic plates started shifting earlier than previously thought
Scientists examining rocks older than 3 billion years discovered that the Earth's tectonic plates move around today much as they did between 2 and 4 billion years ago. The findings suggest that the continents settled into place and sustained life much earlier than previously thought, and give insights into plate tectonics on other planets.
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Sweet potato microbiome research important first step towards improving yield
Despite the importance of sweet potato, little is known about the sweet potato microbiome.
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New species of turtle discovered
Together with an international team, Senckenberg scientist Uwe Fritz described a new species of mata mata turtle based on genetic analyses. Until now, it had been assumed that the genus Chelus only contained a single species. The new description also necessitates a reassessment of the conservation status of these species, which are frequently sold in the illegal animal trade. The study was recentl
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Are bats to blame for the coronavirus crisis?
Horseshoe bats in China are a natural wildlife reservoir of SARS-like coronaviruses. Some health experts think wildlife markets—specifically in Wuhan, China—led to the spillover of the new coronavirus into human populations. Though not confirmed, the hypothesis has given bats around the world a bad rap, and public fears of exposure to bats are on the rise. Illinois Natural History Survey wildlife
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Towards a nanomechanical quantum switchboard
Physicists at Universität Regensburg have coupled the vibrations of a macromolecule—a carbon nanotube—to a microwave cavity, creating a novel and highly miniaturized optomechanical system. The team of Dr. Andreas K. Hüttel achieved this by using the quantization of the electrical charge, i.e., that it is carried by single electrons, as a strong amplifier mechanism. Their findings were published on
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New species of turtle discovered
Together with an international team, Senckenberg scientist Uwe Fritz described a new species of mata mata turtle based on genetic analyses. Until now, it had been assumed that the genus Chelus only contained a single species. The new description also necessitates a reassessment of the conservation status of these species, which are frequently sold in the illegal animal trade. The study was recentl
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Are bats to blame for the coronavirus crisis?
Horseshoe bats in China are a natural wildlife reservoir of SARS-like coronaviruses. Some health experts think wildlife markets—specifically in Wuhan, China—led to the spillover of the new coronavirus into human populations. Though not confirmed, the hypothesis has given bats around the world a bad rap, and public fears of exposure to bats are on the rise. Illinois Natural History Survey wildlife
7h
Hubble celebrates its 30th anniversary with a tapestry of blazing starbirth
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's iconic images and scientific breakthroughs have redefined our view of the Universe. To commemorate three decades of scientific discoveries, this image is one of the most photogenic examples of the many turbulent stellar nurseries the telescope has observed during its 30-year lifetime.
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As Covid-19 'Treatment' Loses Its Luster, Trump Floats Nonsense
Despite waves of hype and hope surrounding hydroxychloroquine as a Covid-19 treatment, additional study is casting doubt. Meanwhile, U.S. President Donald Trump stunned public health officials this week by appearing to suggest that ingesting or injecting disinfectant might also be helpful. (It's not.)
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Leaving no one behind during the coronavirus pandemic
How has COVID-19 affected rural communities in Ireland?
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Tomanowos: The meteorite that survived mega-floods and human folly
The rock with arguably the most fascinating story on Earth has an ancient name: Tomanowos. It means "the visitor from heaven" in the extinct language of Oregon's Clackamas Indian tribe.
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Study: Structure of biocatalysts depends on whether they are in cells or in the test tube
The structure of enzymes determines how they control vital processes such as digestion or immune response. This is because the protein compounds are not rigid, but can change their shape through movable "hinges." The shape of enzymes can depend on whether their structure is measured in the test tube or in the living cell. This is what physicochemists at the University of Bonn discovered about YopO
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Video: The muddle in the middle-Pleistocene
During the late middle Pleistocene—between 400 000 and 150 0000 years ago—the populations occupying Earth, and Africa specifically, looked very differently from what they do now. There is evidence for at least three forms of human relatives inhabiting Africa, including Homo heidelbergensis, Homo naledi and Homo sapiens (modern humans).
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Boosting polaritonic nonlinearity with a mechanism to create polaron-polaritons
A team of researchers from the Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zürich, the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics and the Munich Center for Quantum Science and Technology has found a way to boost polaritonic nonlinearity. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review X, the group describes building a mechanism to create polaron-polaritons, which led to a boost in polaritonic nonli
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New high-energy-density physics research provides insights about the universe
Atoms and molecules behave very differently at extreme temperatures and pressures. Although such extreme matter doesn't exist naturally on the earth, it exists in abundance in the universe, especially in the deep interiors of planets and stars. Understanding how atoms react under high-pressure conditions—a field known as high-energy-density physics (HEDP)—gives scientists valuable insights into th
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Water molecules dance in three
An international team of scientists lead by Professor Martina Havenith from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) has been able to shed new light on the properties of water at the molecular level. In particular, they were able to describe accurately the interactions between three water molecules, which contribute significantly to the energy landscape of water. The research could pave the way to better und
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The best office chairs for all office cultures
All the free seltzer and coffee in the world won't make up for a bad office chair. (Raj Rana via Unsplash/) With all the time we spend on our computers, it's easy to subject your back and neck to rigid, uncompromising office chairs. If you're doing to buckle down and get to work, you can at least have all the support and comfort that you need. We've planted down in a wide variety of office chairs
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Reporter Describes Horror of San Francisco Quake
Originally published in April 1906 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New systematic review captures what makes a positive post-birth experience for new mothers
A new qualitative systematic review conducted to inform the scope of a new World Health Organization (WHO) post-birth (postnatal) guideline identifies four clear themes for a positive experience in mothers across 15 different countries and cultures.
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Pearson maintains £100m final dividend payout for 2019
Education publisher yet to reap benefits of boom in online learning during pandemic
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Why COVID-19 Is a Special Danger to Otolaryngologists
Anosmia, or loss of smell, can be an early symptom—and that puts these ear, nose and throat physicians at risk — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Study: Structure of biocatalysts depends on whether they are in cells or in the test tube
The structure of enzymes determines how they control vital processes such as digestion or immune response. This is because the protein compounds are not rigid, but can change their shape through movable "hinges." The shape of enzymes can depend on whether their structure is measured in the test tube or in the living cell. This is what physicochemists at the University of Bonn discovered about YopO
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Highly sensitive nanosensor detects subtle potassium changes in the brain
Researchers have developed a number of potassium ion (K+) probes to detect fluctuating K+ concentrations during a variety of biological processes. However, such probes are not sensitive enough to detect physiological fluctuations in living animals and it is not easy to monitor deep tissues with short-wavelength excitations that are in use so far. In a new report, Jianan Liu and a team of researche
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Big data reveals we're running out of time to save environment and ourselves
The use of big data can help scientists chart not only the degradation of the environment but can be part of the solution to achieve sustainability, according to a new commentary paper.
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The Books Briefing: A Guide to Transcending Your Daily Anxieties
Just as reading a riveting book can transport you out of your daily life, dedicating yourself to a particular challenge can help you find a sense of freedom even within hardship. In her memoir, The Living Mountain (the author Robert Macfarlane's chosen text for an online pandemic book club ), Nan Shepherd describes how a mountaineer finds an escape in the effort of climbing, which "absorbs and so
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Chloroquine hype is derailing the search for coronavirus treatments
Nature, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01165-3 With politicians touting the potential benefits of malaria drugs to fight COVID-19, some people are turning away from clinical trials of other therapies.
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Hubble celebrates its 30th anniversary with a tapestry of blazing starbirth
Hubble Space Telescope's iconic images and scientific breakthroughs have redefined our view of the universe. To commemorate three decades of scientific discoveries, this image is one of the most photogenic examples of the many turbulent stellar nurseries the telescope has observed during its 30-year lifetime.
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Hubble marks 30 years in space with tapestry of blazing starbirth
NASA is celebrating the Hubble Space Telescope's 30 years of unlocking the beauty and mystery of space by unveiling a stunning new portrait of a firestorm of starbirth in a neighboring galaxy. The image is nicknamed the ;Cosmic Reef,' because it resembles an undersea world.
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Achievement requires passion and grit
Boys need to burn for something to succeed. Maybe that's why they often do less well at school than girls.
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Human uterus colonized by clones with cancer-driving mutations that arise early in life
Many cells in the inner lining of the uterus carry 'cancer-driving' mutations that frequently arise early in life, report scientists. The research team conducted whole-genome sequencing of healthy human endometrium, providing a comprehensive overview of the rates and patterns of DNA changes in this tissue.
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Turning low-cost printers into high-tech producers
The Army has a new type of multi-polymer filament for commonly-used desktop 3-D printers. This advance may save money and facilitate fast printing of critical parts at the point of need.
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Spotting air pollution with satellites, better than ever before
Researchers have devised a method for estimating the air quality over a small patch of land using nothing but satellite imagery and weather conditions. Such information could help researchers identify hidden hotspots of dangerous pollution, greatly improve studies of pollution on human health, or potentially tease out the effects of unpredictable events on air quality, such as the breakout of a gl
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IG Group staff set for big bonuses as online platform rides trading boom
Market volatility stemming from coronavirus pandemic entices thousands of new customers
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How to benefit from food waste in the age of climate change
Humanity bounces from one crisis to another as history shows us. Food waste and climate change are perhaps part of the same crisis. Now, research published in the International Journal of Global Warming suggests that finding secondary uses for food waste might reduce the overall impact of this problem.
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The Big Covid-19 Blind Spot: Lack of Risk Management Is Leaving Us Wanting
In many organizations, risk managers have long been essentially back-office roles, with limited or no access to boards, executives, and key decision-makers. They oversee a varied and ad hoc set of risks like workplace health and safety, business continuity, cybersecurity, compliance, and fraud. But their jobs tend to lack sufficient authority and funding, and those in leadership positions often d
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How the immune system reacts to hepatitis C viruses
The interferon-stimulated gene C19orf66 plays an important role in the defence against hepatitis C viruses. A research team at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) headed by Professor Eike Steinmann from the Department for Molecular and Medical Virology has now studied how C19orf66 works. The results show that C19orf66 disrupts the formation of the viral replication machinery.
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Why COVID-19 Is a Special Danger to Otolaryngologists
Anosmia, or loss of smell, can be an early symptom—and that puts these ear, nose and throat physicians at risk — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Chinese COVID-19 Vaccine Effective in Monkeys
Researchers at Beijing pharmaceutical company Sinovac Biotech have developed an experimental COVID-19 vaccine that it says protected macaques from infection, Science Magazine reports . The vaccine was based on a tried-and-true formulation that included an inactivated version of the virus SARS-CoV-2, as detailed in a preprint uploaded to the server bioRxiv on April 19. "These data support the rapi
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What the EPA's mercury decision means for public health
On April 16th, the Trump administration gutted a key component of the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS), a set of regulations designed to compel the country's oil-and-coal-fired power plants to cut emissions of mercury and other hazardous air pollutants. The administration determined that it is not "appropriate and necessary" to regulate mercury under the Clean Air Act and that the costs of
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Microplastics found in Antarctic ice cores
A team of researchers from the University of Tasmania has found evidence of microplastics in ice cores collected off the coast of Antarctica. In their paper published in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin, the group describes their study of the cores and the plastics they found.
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Phenotyping the Tumor Microenvironment with Multiplex Immunohistochemistry
Visualize biomarkers in morphological context
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RNA degradation contributes to gene silencing in higher eukaryotes
The Gasser group discovered that silencing of heterochromatic regions—and more specifically of hundreds of Polycomb-target genes enriched for H3K27me3—can occur through selective RNA degradation, and not only through transcriptional repression. The study links the epigenetics state of a gene with the fate of its RNA transcript. It is the first time that this is shown in higher eukaryotes.
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RNA degradation contributes to gene silencing in higher eukaryotes
The Gasser group discovered that silencing of heterochromatic regions—and more specifically of hundreds of Polycomb-target genes enriched for H3K27me3—can occur through selective RNA degradation, and not only through transcriptional repression. The study links the epigenetics state of a gene with the fate of its RNA transcript. It is the first time that this is shown in higher eukaryotes.
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Researchers develop fused-ring electron acceptor with 3-D exciton and charge transport
Recently, Professor Zhan Xiaowei's group from the College of Engineering at Peking University made progress in non-fullerene acceptors for organic solar cells (OSCs). They developed a new fluorinated fused-ring electron acceptor (FREA) with 3-D stacking and exciton and charge transport (Adv. Mater., DOI: 10.1002/adma.202000645).
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New tsunami risk identified in Indonesia
A team of scientists led by Heriot-Watt University has identified a potential new tsunami risk in Indonesia by mapping below the seabed of the Makassar Strait.
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COVID-19 has changed consumer behavior. What does it mean for the future?
Despite toilet paper hoarding and panic buying, overall consumer spending has sharply declined since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, with retail sales dropping an unprecedented 8.7% in March. Stay-at-home orders also have caused many people to change the way they shop for the things they do need.
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'Food stamps' for kids increase earnings and lifespan
Children whose families have access to food assistance get more education, live longer, and are less likely to rely on public assistance or be incarcerated as they grow up, research finds. Researchers examined the effect of the federal Food Stamp program, now called the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, on children between conception and age five over the course of their lives. The study
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Coronavirus detected on particles of air pollution
Exclusive: Scientists examine whether this route enables infections at longer distances Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Coronavirus has been detected on particles of air pollution by scientists investigating whether this could enable it to be carried over longer distances and increase the number of people infected. The work is preliminary and it is not yet known if t
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Scientists are working to protect invaluable living collections during coronavirus lockdowns
During World War II, a devoted group of botanists guarded the world's oldest collection of plants over the 28-month-long siege of Leningrad. Nearly a dozen of them starved to death, valuing the survival of the collection over their temptation to eat seeds.
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Atmospheric tidal waves maintain Venus' super-rotation
An international research team has revealed that the 'super-rotation' on Venus is maintained near the equator by atmospheric tidal waves formed from solar heating on the planet's dayside and cooling on its nightside.
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Water molecules dance in three
An international team of scientists has been able to shed new light on the properties of water at the molecular level. In particular, they were able to describe accurately the interactions between three water molecules, which contribute significantly to the energy landscape of water. The research could pave the way to better understand and predict water behavior at different conditions, even under
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Colliding solitons in optical microresonators
Solitons in optical microresonators are frequently used to generate frequency combs, which have found applications in sensing, telecommunication, and metrology. Now, scientists at EPFL have discovered a novel state of colliding solitons, which reveals interesting properties that can be used in both fundamental studies and practical applications.
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After a heart attack, physical activity makes you feel better
Heart attack patients who take part in a lifestyle improvement program feel better — especially when they do additional physical activity. That's the finding of a large study presented today on ACVC Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
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Syphilis eludes immune attack by altering a single gene
Shuffling of DNA in a single gene might be why the syphilis bacteria can evade the immune system. The change alters a protein on its cell surface to create a distraction. People can become re-infected several times with syphilis because they can't develop immunity, Untreated syphilis can hide in the body for decades. Genomic findings on these evasive strategies may point to designs for vaccines to
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Big data reveals we're running out of time to save environment and ourselves
The paper, 'Opportunities for big data in conservation and sustainability', published today in Nature Communications, said increased computing speeds and data storage had grown the volume of big data in the last 40 years, but the planet was still facing serious decline.
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Scientists are working to protect invaluable living collections during coronavirus lockdowns
During World War II, a devoted group of botanists guarded the world's oldest collection of plants over the 28-month-long siege of Leningrad. Nearly a dozen of them starved to death, valuing the survival of the collection over their temptation to eat seeds.
8h
Can we 'trap and zap' the coronavirus?
Researchers plan to reconfigure "trap and zap" wastewater-treatment technology to capture and deactivate the virus that causes COVID-19. Their chemical-free nanotechnology, introduced earlier this year as a way to kill bacterial "superbugs" and degrade their antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater, would employ graphitic carbon nitride customized at the molecular level to selectively absorb vir
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Can virtual therapy help us cope with the coronavirus lockdown?
Many people are turning to virtual therapy and mental health apps to cope with the stress of the coronavirus pandemic, but they may not be as helpful as talking face to face
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Coronavirus: religion and politics in Indonesia
The FT's Stefania Palma looks at the problems facing the world's largest Muslim majority nation
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Caring for community to beat coronavirus echoes Indigenous ideas of a good life
The COVID-19 pandemic has reminded us our own well-being is intimately connected to other people and our natural environment.
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How destroying wildlife habitats boosts COVID-19
Human activity can disrupt wildlife habitats in such a way that it leads to the emergence of new animal-to-human transmitted diseases like COVID-19, in a process known as zoonosis, researchers say. Zoonosis occurs when an infection carried by an animal, like a bat in the case of COVID-19, is transmissible to a human. Six out of every 10 infectious diseases in people are zoonotic, says Roland Kays
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At some point, you will probably have to take a COVID-19 test. Here's how that test actually works.
Technologies such as PCR, serologic assays and rapid diagnostics help us understand the spread of COVID-19. But how do they do that? Please visit our website to discover the latest advances in science and technology: http://bit.ly/30Z4ZpZ Discover world-changing science with a subscription to Scientific American. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2RtR1cs From: Scientific American
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It-kriminelle udnytter corona-hjælpepakker
Virksomheder, der søger økonomisk hjælp fra staten, risikerer at blive franarret deres personlige oplysninger eller udsat for betalingstyveri.
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If we can put a man on the moon, we can save the Great Barrier Reef
Scientists recently confirmed the Great Barrier Reef suffered another serious bleaching event last summer—the third in five years. Dramatic intervention to save the natural wonder is clearly needed.
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Feeling the pressure: How blood vessels sense their environment
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba discovered that Thbs1 is a key extracellular mediator of mechanotransduction upon mechanical stress. Using a mice model of pressure overload, they showed that mice lacking Thbs1 are less likely to withstand high mechanical stress. These findings help understand the biomechanical impact of cardiovascular diseases.
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New high-energy-density physics research provides insights about the universe
Researchers at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics have applied physics theory and calculations to predict the presence of two new phenomena — interspecies radiative transition (IRT) and the breakdown of the dipole selection rule–in the transport of radiation in atoms and molecules under high-energy-density (HED) conditions. The research enhances an understanding of HED
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UVC and Covid-19
On this week's SGU (which will go online tomorrow) I talked about the use of ultraviolet light as an anti-viral strategy. I wasn't planning on also writing about it, but then the president decided to make some incredibly dubious comments about is, so I thought I would address it here. Here's what he said: "So, supposing we hit the body with a tremendous – whether it's ultraviolet or just very pow
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Do You Want to Die in an I.C.U.? Pandemic Makes Question All Too Real
Sobering statistics for older patients sharpen the need to draw up advanced directives for treatment and share them with their families.
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Susan Pinker: What Makes Social Connection So Vital To Our Well-Being?
Psychologist Susan Pinker explains why face-to-face connection is a human necessity. But during this period of isolation, she says some ways of connecting online are better substitutes than others. (Image credit: Bret Hartman/TED)
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Buried under colonial concrete, Botany Bay has even been robbed of its botany
The HMS Endeavour's week-long stay on the shores of Kamay in 1770 yielded so many botanical specimens unknown to western science, Captain James Cook called the area Botany Bay.
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Warming climate undoes decades of knowledge of marine protected areas
A new study highlights that tropical coral reef marine reserves can offer little defence in the face of climate change impacts. And the changes that are being observed will force scientists, conservationists and reserve managers to rethink the role these protected areas can bring.
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How to target a microbial needle within a community haystack
A team led by researchers at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Marine Microbiology has developed, tested and deployed a pipeline to first target cells from communities of uncultivated microbes, and then efficiently retrieve and characterize their genomes.
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Did Humans and Dinosaurs Ever Live Together?
Dinosaurs and humans have only coexisted in our imaginations.
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Bedre luft og lys styrker elevers indlæring
PLUS. Forskere fra DTU Byg har undersøgt de effekter, som bedre belysning og ventilation har på elevers præstationer i skolen. Eleverne leverede op til 12 procent bedre, når luft- og lystiltag blev kombineret.
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Lockdown Has Taken Us From Internet Time to Groundhog Time
Plus: Bezos' 10,000-year clock, life in XR, and tornado warnings at the eye of the storm.
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'Receiver 2' Makes Players Understand What Guns Do IRL
The videogame instills some much needed realism into the first-person shooter genre.
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Dell XPS 13 (2020) Review: Close to Perfect, Yet Again
A bigger screen, long battery life, and an ultra-portable design make this a winning computer.
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Pandemic forces Arctic expedition to take 3-week break
Organizers of a year-long international Arctic science expedition say they have found a way to keep going despite difficulties caused by the pandemic lockdown, but it will require a three-week break in the mission.
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Non-invasive imaging technique could reduce need for repeat cancer surgeries
A team of University of Alberta engineers is refining a new imaging technique that could reduce the number of repeat surgeries patients undergo to remove cancerous tumors.
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What COVID-19 can teach us about sustainability
The coronavirus strain that causes COVID-19 has infected over two million people in more than 160 countries. The rising death counts are heartbreaking, and the fact that we can't even go through the customary funeral rituals to help us heal emotionally has made the crisis that much harder for many of us. We're also feeling the economic impacts of the pandemic, with unemployment rates climbing, the
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How to target a microbial needle within a community haystack
A team led by researchers at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Marine Microbiology has developed, tested and deployed a pipeline to first target cells from communities of uncultivated microbes, and then efficiently retrieve and characterize their genomes.
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Long-term efficacy of managed wildfires in restoration efforts
Land managers are increasingly interested in using lightning-ignited wildfires as a tool to restore forests and reduce fuel loads. But little is known about the effectiveness of managing wildfires to meet restoration goals.
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Delivering animal vaccines and antibodies to protect humans from diseases like COVID-19
Zoonoses—diseases that can spread between animals and humans, like avian influenza, rabies and severe acute respiratory syndrome—comprise a large percentage of all newly identified infectious diseases. As they represent a persistent global threat to public health, scientists are striving to develop strategies that effectively tackle widespread outbreaks, such as the novel coronavirus disease (COVI
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Team gains insights on the oxide layer of stainless steel
In March, a team of Alfa Laval researchers and scientists from Lund University led by Axel Knutsson, Material Specialist at Alfa Laval, came to the MAXPEEM beamline for four-days beamtime. MAXPEEM, one of the soft X-ray beamlines in the 1.5 GeV storage ring, is specialized in surface imaging techniques with structural, chemical, electronic, and magnetic contrasts at spatial resolutions in the nano
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COVID-19: the rise of a global collective intelligence?
All around the world, scientists and practitioners are relentlessly harnessing data on the pandemic to model its progression, predict the impact of possible interventions and develop solutions to medical equipment shortages, generating open-source data and codes to be reused by others.
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Delivering animal vaccines and antibodies to protect humans from diseases like COVID-19
Zoonoses—diseases that can spread between animals and humans, like avian influenza, rabies and severe acute respiratory syndrome—comprise a large percentage of all newly identified infectious diseases. As they represent a persistent global threat to public health, scientists are striving to develop strategies that effectively tackle widespread outbreaks, such as the novel coronavirus disease (COVI
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To Protect Black Americans from the Worst Impacts of COVID-19, Release Comprehensive Racial Data
Properly reported information is crucial for black communities to recover from this crisis and transcend a history of exclusion — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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To Protect Black Americans from the Worst Impacts of COVID-19, Release Comprehensive Racial Data
Properly reported information is crucial for Black communities to recover from this crisis and transcend a history of exclusion — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Electric shavers for a smooth head and an easy haircut
You choose how short you want to go. (Jonathan Weiss via Unsplash/) Spring cleaning can take many forms. One classic way to wash away the woes of winter is to buzz your head. There are few things more satisfying than taking a shaver to the cranium and giving your hair the old heave-ho. You'll feel brand new—lighter, cooler, and smoother to the touch. You won't have to check your hair in the mirro
9h
Colliding solitons in optical microresonators to reveal important fundamental physics
Solitons are self-reinforcing particle-like wave packets enabled by the balance between dispersion and nonlinearity. Occurring in hydrodynamics, lasers, cold atoms, and plasmas, solitons are generated when a laser field is confined in a circular resonator with ultra-low loss, which produces multiple solitons travelling around the resonator.
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Richard Horton: 'It's the biggest science policy failure in a generation'
The Lancet editor on Britain's response to coronavirus — and being labelled a pariah
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Pet stress has increased during COVID-19, bringing behavior problems
As the COVID-19 pandemic closes many schools for the rest of the year and confines nonessential workers and the unemployed to staying at home, many of us are going a little stir crazy, not to mention experiencing feelings of anxiety about what the future holds.
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Pet stress has increased during COVID-19, bringing behavior problems
As the COVID-19 pandemic closes many schools for the rest of the year and confines nonessential workers and the unemployed to staying at home, many of us are going a little stir crazy, not to mention experiencing feelings of anxiety about what the future holds.
9h
Pandemics and pollution: A conversation with an atmospheric scientist
You may have seen the striking before-and-after photos: cities previously blanketed by a dense fog of air pollution now sporting clear skies, as COVID-19 stay-at-home orders bring auto traffic and industry to a halt.
9h
A cellular mechanism protecting against cancer
Susanne Hellmuth and Olaf Stemmann from the Chair of Genetics at the University of Bayreuth have discovered a natural protective mechanism that leads to the programmed death of potentially diseased cells. It protects from cancer that can develop as a result of irregular distribution of genetic information to daughter cells. The enzyme separase plays a central role in these processes. The findings
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A cellular mechanism protecting against cancer
Susanne Hellmuth and Olaf Stemmann from the Chair of Genetics at the University of Bayreuth have discovered a natural protective mechanism that leads to the programmed death of potentially diseased cells. It protects from cancer that can develop as a result of irregular distribution of genetic information to daughter cells. The enzyme separase plays a central role in these processes. The findings
9h
FirstGroup taps UK for £300m as buses and trains are left empty
Transport group also expects its Greyhound bus service to receive US financial support
9h
Oil is not the only negative price coming to you
Minus prices are not uncommon, even if they suggest infinite losses and generate horror
9h
Investors baffled by soaring stocks in 'monster' depression
Gap between financial markets and global economy yawns wider
9h
Children with access to SNAP fare better as adults
Children whose families have access to food assistance get more education, live longer and are less likely to rely on public assistance or be incarcerated as they grow up, according to a University of Michigan-led study.
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Coronavirus global slowdown is cleaning the skies. How long will it last?
The coronavirus pandemic has produced startling images, not just of besieged emergency rooms, but of deserted highways, beaches, and other public places—of life interrupted everywhere.
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The Science behind How Coronavirus Tests Work
Technologies such as PCR, serological assays and rapid diagnostics help us understand the spread of COVID-19. But how do they do so? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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US equity valuations reach near two-decade high after rally
Forward price-to-earnings ratio for S&P 500 hits highest level since December 2001
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'Smart containment' can save lives, shorten the recession—but requires better testing
Selective quarantine can reduce the number of COVID-19 deaths while lessening negative economic impacts, say researchers in a working paper published recently by the National Bureau of Economic Research.
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Homelessness will worsen due to COVID-19 outbreak—but there are solutions
Eradicating homelessness in America is possible, but it will take "political will," according Vanderbilt University research professor and author Marybeth Shinn.
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'Decoy' nanoparticles can block HIV and prevent infection
Flipping the standard viral drug targeting approach on its head, engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a promising new "nanosponge" method for preventing HIV from proliferating in the body: coating polymer nanoparticles with the membranes of T helper cells and turning them into decoys to intercept viral particles and block them from binding and infiltrating the body's
10h
Researchers offer glimpse into dinosaur ecosystems
By casting an eye into the daily lives of dinosaurs millions of years in the past, Western researchers may be helping humanity get a glimpse of its future.
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'Dino Cave' reveals dinosaur crouch walkers
Old photos from Mount Morgan's sealed off "Dino Cave' have shed light onto new and unusual Aussie dinosaur behaviours, thanks to University of Queensland research.
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Sunny outlook for domestic tourism in Australia post COVID–19 restrictions
Australians are keen to travel close to home when COVID-19 restrictions are lifted, with new national data revealing positive signs for the domestic tourism industry.
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The best material for homemade face masks may be a combination of two fabrics
In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that people wear masks in public. Because N95 and surgical masks are scarce and should be reserved for health care workers, many people are making their own coverings. Now, researchers report in ACS Nano that a combination of cotton with natural silk or chiffon can effectively filter out aerosol part
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The hunt for a coronavirus vaccine – a perilous and uncertain path
The pressing need to find a solution to the pandemic means risks and shortcuts may have to be taken Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The stakes could hardly be higher; the prize still tantalisingly out of reach. It is no exaggeration to say that the fate of many millions of people rests on the discovery of a vaccine for Covid-19 – the only sure escape route from the p
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Why COVID-19 is tough for undocumented immigrants
During the COVID-19 pandemic, undocumented immigrants face challenges obtaining resources and health care services needed to stay safe. Karen D'Alonzo, an associate professor at Rutgers School of Nursing and director of the Center for Community Health Partnerships, which works to bridge health disparities in Mexican American neighborhoods in New Brunswick, NJ, says working in unprotected environm
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"Vi har bara börjat nosa på virus"
Varför har du skrivit den här essän?– Det här är ett utdrag ur min tidigare bok Den svåra konsten att leva (utgiven på Fri tanke förlag 2015) där jag klippt ut det jag skrivit om virus och lagt till prolog och epilog om det nya coronaviruset sars-cov-2. Jag tror att allmänheten vill veta mer om virus och eftersom jag sitter på materialet vill jag bjuda på det.
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Trump Asks if Sunlight Can Kill Viruses. 'Not as a Treatment,' Birx Says.
At a briefing, the president promoted unproven treatments and asked Dr. Deborah Birx if she had heard of the success of sunlight as a tool against viruses.
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How Do We (Safely) Go Back to Normal?
This week, senior correspondent Adam Rogers talks about how we could go about reopening the country.
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Want a New Covid-19 Drug Fast? Bring on the Battle Royale
Scientists have no shortage of contenders to fight the new coronavirus. But to find the winners, they're trying new approaches to testing.
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Across the world, face masks are becoming mandatory. Why not in the UK? | Babak Javid
The government's objections to this seemingly effective measure appear more political and economic than scientific Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Passing through the new Beijing Daxing airport on my way to an international scientific meeting on 25 January, two days after Wuhan had been put under lockdown, one sight in particular was unsettling. Close to 100% of peop
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The best material for homemade face masks may be a combination of two fabrics
In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that people wear masks in public. Because N95 and surgical masks are scarce and should be reserved for health care workers, many people are making their own coverings. Now, researchers report in ACS Nano that a combination of cotton with natural silk or chiffon can effectively filter out aerosol pa
10h
Tiny, Shapeshifting Robots Could Aid Nanoscale Manufacturing
Centimeter-scale foldable buildings blocks may lead to industrial applications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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'Loving the minimal FOMO': First major physics conference to go virtual sees record attendance
Nature, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01239-2 The American Physical Society held its massive April Meeting online because of coronavirus — and registrations soared.
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Bypass retail investors at your peril
Technology means small shareholders need not — and should not — be excluded from emergency equity fundraisings
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Leading in a crisis
As the coronavirus pandemic presents the ultimate leadership test for chief executives, the FT provides insights into their successes and setbacks
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Chefens stöd avgörande vid distansarbete
Chefens stöd, med regelbunden återkoppling och engagemang i var och en, blir extra viktigt nu då många som jobbar på distans inte är vana att göra det, menar forskare vid Högskolan i Gävle. Sverige ligger på andra plats i Europa vad gäller andelen personer som arbetar på distans. Men då nya grupper påtvingats distansarbete under coronakrisen krävs chefer som kan hjälpa dem att organisera sitt arb
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Gammeldags vaccine-teknik viser tegn på at beskytte aber mod Covid-19
Et kinesisk biotekselskab har øjensynligt haft succes med at beskytte seks aber. Fire aber i kontrolgruppe fik lungebetændelse.
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The Wisdom of Third Molar Removal
In the Olden Times (ten or so years ago), the indication for third molar (aka "wisdom teeth") removal was the presence of wisdom teeth. Now, oral surgeons are rethinking things.
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Saakashvili calls on IMF to double aid to Ukraine
Incoming deputy PM says fund's offer of assistance is inadequate
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How Blood Sugar Can Trigger a Deadly Immune Response in the Flu and Possibly COVID-19
Glucose metabolism plays a key role in the cytokine storm seen in influenza, and the link could have potential implications for novel coronavirus infections — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Why there isn't a one-size-fits-all plan for states to reopen their economies
How and when states reopen their economies will look different from one state to the next state depending, in part, on where that state is in the trajectory of its coronavirus illnesses. In this Q&A, Hilary Godwin, dean of the University of Washington School of Public Health, explains why, and why it makes sense for groups of states, such as Washington, Oregon and California, to coordinate their p
10h
How Blood Sugar Can Trigger a Deadly Immune Response in the Flu and Possibly COVID-19
Glucose metabolism plays a key role in the cytokine storm seen in influenza, and the link could have potential implications for novel coronavirus infections — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How Blood Sugar Can Trigger a Deadly Immune Response in the Flu and Possibly COVID-19
Glucose metabolism plays a key role in the cytokine storm seen in influenza, and the link could have potential implications for novel coronavirus infections — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Pandemic spurs return of frozen food, says Nestlé
Looming recession means 'value and budget-conscious eating will be important'
11h
Russia cuts lending rates in effort to stem economic hit from coronavirus
Belated move comes despite pressure it will put on inflation and rouble
11h
Hubble telescope's Universe revealed in 3D
New techniques are being used to transform images from Hubble into spectacular 3D visualisations.
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What will it take to close the gender gap in physics?
When Patricia Rankin was a young scientist in the 1980s, colleagues and acquaintances often told her that she didn't look like a physicist.
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Video: Why are we acting like wolves at night?
Around the world, people are collectively making noise while social distancing. In Colorado, we're howling like wolves. Joanna Lambert, a professor in the Program of Environmental Studies, studies wolf communication.
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Synthesizing new superheavy elements to open up the eighth period of the periodic table
Measurements of collisions between small and large atomic nuclei by RIKEN physicists will inform the quest to produce new elements and could lead to new chemistry involving superheavy elements.
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Among the reasons COVID-19 is worse for black communities: Police violence
There are various reasons COVID-19 is killing black people at six times the rate of white people, including a lack of access to health care, and poor environmental conditions in black communities.
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Air pollution drops in India following lockdown
Lockdowns imposed to halt the spread of the coronavirus have been recently linked with cleaner air quality over Europe and China. New images, from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite, from the European Union Copernicus programme, now show some cities across India seeing levels drop by around 40–50% owing to its nationwide quarantine.
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Video: Mars confinement tips
In these times of confinement, ESA astronaut support engineer Romain Charles shares nine tips on how to live in isolation—he spent 520 days locked in a mockup spacecraft and is a true expert on the subject.
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UK government apologises after closing virus testing booking site
New scheme flooded with 20,000 applications in first few hours after launch
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New solution to capture microplastics before they enter waterways
A thousand liters of seawater can contain up to 8.3 million particles of microplastics. Until now, identifying these very small particles has been difficult—usually they are only detected once they have accumulated in the bodies of fish. A method developed at VTT utilizes nanocellulose structures for early particle identification. Nanocellulose would allow particles to be captured even before they
11h
Star survives close call with a black hole
Astronomers may have discovered a new kind of survival story: a star that had a brush with a giant black hole and lived to tell the tale through exclamations of X-rays.
11h
Researchers watch the dynamics of plasmonic skyrmions made from light on ultra-smooth gold platelets for the first time
The destructive force of a tornado occurs due to the extremely high rotational speeds in its center, which is called a vortex. Surprisingly, similar effects are predicted for light that travels along an atomically smooth gold surface, which can exhibit angular momentum and vortices. Researchers at the Universities of Stuttgart and Duisburg-Essen and the University of Melbourne (Australia) have now
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Adsorbent material developed from PET bottles for the removal of antibiotics from water
South Korea, with its high antibiotic use, is categorized as a country at high risk of the emergence of multi-drug-resistant bacteria, or so-called "super bacteria." According to the Ministry of Environment, antibiotic substances have been detected at livestock wastewater treatment facilities, sewage treatment plants and in rivers.
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Some of the Most Visible Christians in America Are Failing the Coronavirus Test
If the coronavirus is a test of our collective character, some American Christians are flat-out flunking. Consider the popular pastor John Piper, who was asked what he would say to pastors who claim that the pandemic is God's judgment on sinful cities and arrogant nations. "God sometimes uses disease to bring particular judgments upon those who reject him and give themselves over to sin," Piper r
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Coronavirus Roundup for April 18-24
Here are pandemic news highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A Birthday Message from the Hubble Telescope
I'm turning 30, and it's been an amazing journey so far — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Oil prices on a slippery slope
Energy funds and ETFs have suffered as crude prices plunge
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The Psychology Behind That Tempting Quarantine Makeover
Thinking of bleaching your hair or growing a beard? It's not boredom—it's a coping mechanism.
11h
The Boston Dynamics Coronavirus Doctor Robot Dog Will See You Now
Spot, the famously deft robot, gets a job screening patients at a hospital. But there's still much that it and other medical robots can't do.
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Facebook and Google Survey Data May Help Map Covid-19's Spread
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon hope to use the data to observe and predict surges in the spread of the virus.
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Stop Getting So Excited About 'Preliminary' Findings
No, seriously, when it comes to Covid-19—or any disease—bad data is worse than no data at all.
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A Birthday Message from the Hubble Telescope
I'm turning 30, and it's been an amazing journey so far — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Sanofi warns Europe on Covid-19 vaccine
French pharma group has two candidates in pipeline
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Coronavirus: what have scientists learned about Covid-19 so far?
Medical researchers have been studying everything we know about Covid-19. What have they learned – and is it enough to halt the pandemic? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Coronaviruses have been causing problems for humanity for a long time. Several versions are known to trigger common colds and more recently two types have set off outbreaks of deadly illnesses: sever
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How to Protect Civil Liberties in a Pandemic
L ast month, tens of millions of Americans suddenly accepted previously unthinkable restrictions on freedoms as basic as leaving home, gathering for worship, assembling in public, running businesses, and having elective surgery. They did so understanding the sacrifice to be urgent and temporary. The coronavirus was spreading. Dramatic action was required to avert countless deaths. Then life would
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Heathrow chief calls for health checks at UK airports
Downing Street rejects plea and insists country's stance on controls is based on scientific advice
12h
Captain Tom and why we need heroes
What does it take to be a hero? Henry Mance speaks to the 99-year-old war veteran who has captivated the nation
12h
The Oil Industry Doesn't Need Government Protection
I n 2008, a record-breaking spike in oil prices sent gasoline above $4 a gallon for months. Since then, world crude-oil production has increased by an astonishing 15 percent. Even more astonishing, nearly 90 percent of that increase has come from just one small region mostly in West Texas—the Permian Basin—which extends hardly a few hundred miles from the old oil towns of Odessa and Midland. West
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The Pandemic Shows What Cars Have Done to Cities
The New York City streetscape has become a strange, inverted mirror image of the normal world. Suddenly, if you have a car, and actually have someplace to go, driving seems weirdly pleasant, almost rational: Congestion is rare, gas is even cheaper than usual, and parking is abundant. This is the Hollywood version of getting around Brooklyn: No matter your destination, you can find a spot right ou
12h
US banks pull back from lending to European companies
JPMorgan, Goldman and BofA have become more cautious over loans, say executives and bankers
12h
Politiet har ret: Google-overvågning bekræfter, at danskerne farer ud i solen
PLUS. Det solrige forårsvejr sætter danskernes evne til at holde afstand på prøve, advarer politiet, der varsler bøder til solslikkende danskere, der ignorerer forsamlingsforbuddet.
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Franklin Templeton winds up $3bn of India funds after market turmoil
US investment group halts withdrawals in move that could rock asset management industry
12h
Methylglyoxal couples metabolic and translational control of Notch signalling in mammalian neural stem cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15941-2 Gene regulation and metabolism co-ordinate self-renewal and differentiation of neural precursors (NPCs) in the developing brain. Here the authors show that methylglyoxal, a glycolytic intermediate metabolite, promotes GADPH-dependent translational repression of Notch1, thereby promoting NPC differentiation.
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Conditional deletion of Nedd4-2 in lung epithelial cells causes progressive pulmonary fibrosis in adult mice
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15743-6 Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating disease with poor prognosis. Here, the authors show that deficiency of the E3 ubiqutin-protein ligase Nedd4-2 in airway epithelial cells causes IPF-like disease in adult mice. This model may aid studies of the pathogenesis and therapy of IPF.
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Neutralization of SARS-CoV-2 spike pseudotyped virus by recombinant ACE2-Ig
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16048-4 SARS-CoV-2 uses ACE2 as the entry receptor. Here, the authors show that an ACE2-Ig fusion protein inhibits entry of virus pseudotyped with the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, show differential binding kinetics of SARS-CoV and SARSCoV-2 spike proteins to ACE2, and determine pharmakocinetic parameters of ACE2-Ig in mic
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Confining H3PO4 network in covalent organic frameworks enables proton super flow
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15918-1 Development of porous proton-transporting materials combining stability and high performance has remained a challenge. Here, the authors report a stable covalent organic framework with excellent proton conductivity in which nitrogen sites on pore walls confine and stabilize a H3PO4 network in the channels via h
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Power laws in pressure-induced structural change of glasses
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15583-4 A puzzle in metallic glass research is the existence of the fractional power law in reciprocal space, whilst its origin remains controversial. Zhang et al. show that nonuniform local deformations under compression induce this phenomenon and quantify the power law exponent at both two and three dimensions.
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A masked initiation region in retinoblastoma protein regulates its proteasomal degradation
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16003-3 Human papilloma virus (HPV) E7 protein destabilizes the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) by inducing its ubiquitination in cervical cancer cells, however proteasomal degradation requires cleavage of Rb after Lys 810 and so far it has been unclear how Rb cleavage contributes to its degradation. Here, the authors comb
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Using proteolysis-targeting chimera technology to reduce navitoclax platelet toxicity and improve its senolytic activity
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15838-0 Senolytics have the potential to extend healthspan by selectively killing senescent cells (SCs), but senolytics that target Bcl-xl may cause platelet toxicity. Here, the authors generated a Bcl-xl proteolysis-targeting chimera (PROTAC) senolytic, which effectively clears SCs and rejuvenates tissue stem and prog
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Oceanic crust recycling controlled by weakening at slab edges
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15750-7 Retreating subduction zones are enabled by the development of faults at the edges of the slab, but the physical mechanisms controlling fault propagation remain debated. Here, the authors find that oceanic crust recycling is controlled by weakening of fractures forming at the edges of slabs.
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Open science takes on the coronavirus pandemic
Nature, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01246-3 Data sharing, open-source designs for medical equipment, and hobbyists are all being harnessed to combat COVID-19.
12h
An Oral History of the Day Everything Changed
On March 11, 2020, the coronavirus pandemic seemed to crystalize in the national consciousness. Americans look back on the turning point.
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Kartläggning av vilka celler coronaviruset kan infektera
Forskare har identifierat vilka celler i kroppen som det nya coronaviruset (SARS-CoV-2) kan infektera. Kartläggningen kan ge ledtrådar till möjliga smittvägar och typer av läkemedel som kan vara effektivt mot infektionen. För att kunna infektera celler använder virus spikproteiner, som på samma sätt som en nyckel i ett nyckelhål bara kan binda till vissa celler hos värden. Tidigare studier har vi
12h
How a deadly pandemic cured my apocalyptic pessimism
Society's ability to join together in the face of coronavirus has proven a reassuring surprise for writer Mark O'Connell
12h
Collective action trumps privacy rights in a pandemic
We already use data mining to prevent terrorism and money laundering, why not to stop infection?
12h
Fed's bailout role could put it in political crosshairs
US central bank will disburse potentially trillions of dollars to companies and municipalities
12h
Interleukin-1α associates with the tumor suppressor p53 following DNA damage
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63779-x
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Decline of the boreal willow grouse (Lagopus lagopus) has been accelerated by more frequent snow-free springs
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63993-7 Decline of the boreal willow grouse ( Lagopus lagopus ) has been accelerated by more frequent snow-free springs
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Liposomal drug delivery of Aphanamixis polystachya leaf extracts and its neurobehavioral activity in mice model
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63894-9
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Kv1 potassium channels control action potential firing of putative GABAergic deep cerebellar nuclear neurons
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63583-7
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Elevated O-GlcNAcylation induces an antidepressant-like phenotype and decreased inhibitory transmission in medial prefrontal cortex
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63819-6
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Study on the relationship between hyperthyroidism and vascular endothelial cell damage
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-62796-0
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My new government-inspired 'non-information strategy' '
Whether on pocket money or holidays, I see the wisdom in refusing to discuss important decisions
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PODCAST: Hvor fører den danske corona-strategi os hen?
Hvad er egentlig den danske strategi over for corona-epidemien. Skal vi teste, inddæmme og holde os isolerede – samtidig med at Tivoli, zoologiske haver og mange andre erhverv tripper for at åbne. Vi sammenligner den danske afbødningsstrategi med de øvrige skandinaviske lande, som er gået hver si…
12h
Researchers solve 'link discovery' problem for terahertz data networks
When someone opens a laptop, a router can quickly locate it and connect it to the local Wi-Fi network. That ability is a basic element of any wireless network known as link discovery, and now a team of researchers has developed a means of doing it with terahertz radiation, the high-frequency waves that could one day make for ultra-fast wireless data transmission.
12h
Warming climate undoes decades of knowledge of marine protected areas
Climate change and warming seas are transforming tropical coral reefs and undoing decades of knowledge about how to protect these delicate and vital ecosystems.
12h
Biotech stock soars on debut as coronavirus fuels investor boom
Akeso's shares surge in Hong Kong as buyers brush off city's economic downturn
12h
Covid-19 news: Up to half of deaths in Europe have been in care homes
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Coronavirus Live Updates: Georgia Businesses Begin to Reopen; F.D.A. Issues Warning on Anti-Malaria Drugs
The F.D.A. warned the drugs can cause dangerous abnormalities in heart rhythm. The maker of Lysol and other disinfectants issued a warning against improper use of its products after President Trump touted their power to kill the virus.
12h
Do You Want to Die in an I.C.U.? Pandemic Makes Question All Too Real
Sobering statistics for older patients sharpen the need to draw up advanced directives for treatment and share them with their families.
12h
Trods tidligere benægtelser: Amazon udnytter data fra deres sælgere
Selvom Amazon tidligere har benægtet det, så bekræfter en række tidligere ansatte, at firmaet udnytter data fra deres sælgere, når de skal udvikle konkurrerende produkter.
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Politisk flertal vil sætte Femern-tunnelarbejde i gang fra nytår
Arbejdet starter med tunnelelementfabrik og tunnelportal på Lolland og rykker til tysk side midt i 2022. De første tunnelelementer ventes nedsænket i starten af 2024.
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UK retail sales suffer historic fall as lockdown triggers shopping freeze
Volume drops 5% in March despite record increase in grocery purchases
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Kinesisk studie sår tvivl om effekten af Covid-19-håbet Remdesivir
Lækket studie fra Kina viser ingen fordele ved brug af ebolapræparatet Remdesivir, som der ellers er store forhåbninger til som covid-19-behandling. Studiet er for lille, lyder det fra producenten.
13h
Researchers solve 'link discovery' problem for terahertz data networks
A team of researchers from Brown and Rice universities has demonstrated a way to help devices to find each other in the ultra-fast terahertz data networks of the future.
13h
Warming climate undoes decades of knowledge of marine protected areas
A new study highlights that tropical coral reef marine reserves can offer little defence in the face of climate change impacts. And the changes that are being observed will force scientists, conservationists and reserve managers to rethink the role these protected areas can bring.
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Rädsla för hat leder till självcensur hos journalister
Ökad risk för hatstormar mot journalister kan påverka yttrandefrihet och demokrati. I ett nytt projekt ska forskarna bland annat analysera vad som skrivs om 2 000 journalister på Twitter. Att självcensur förekommer visar den inledande kunskapssammanställning som forskarna gjort. Digitaliseringen och sociala medier har banat väg för att många fler människor och experter än tidigare kan komma till
13h
Trump's Plan to Save His Presidency
Two key forces that drove Donald Trump's election victory in 2016 were the cult of personality he attracted and a hard-edged nationalist message. There is no sign that his core followers will ever abandon him. But the Ever Trumpers won't be enough to win him reelection amid a historic crisis that a majority of the country feels he's bungled . Trump needs to reach some band of the electorate still
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How the last two centuries led to today's economy
Adam Davidson, co-founder of NPR's Planet Money, can trace a line through time from homemade clothing and baked goods to today's passion economy. Davidson argues that a combination of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries are how we got to where we are. We shifted from an intimate and localized economy of goods and services, to an economy of scale, and finally to what Davidson refers to as "inti
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The Undark Interview: A Conversation With Alan M. Kraut
The author of "Silent Travelers: Germs, Genes, and the Immigrant Menace" discusses the complex interplay between immigration and issues of health and medicine and the persistence of xenophobia in the United States, from the earliest days of American nationhood to the current Covid-19 pandemic.
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Antigen testing could be a faster, cheaper way to diagnose covid-19
Coronavirus testing in the US is nowhere near where it should be. A recent road map suggested we need to test upwards of 20 million people every day in order to safely reopen the economy (we're currently running around 150,000 a day ). To scale up, we need to move beyond conventional methods—and that might require an entirely different type of test. The gold standard for covid-19 testing is the p
13h
Why The Warning That Coronavirus Was On The Move In U.S. Cities Came So Late
U.S. health officials said equipping six cities with extra testing would pick up under-the-radar viral spread. But an NPR investigation finds conflicts and shortages caused painful delays. (Image credit: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
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Glimpses of a silver lining in the Great Lockdown
Crash course in communications technology will have lasting benefits
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KU-forskere indgår aftale om fremtidig produktion af vaccine mod covid-19
Forskere fra Københavns Universitet arbejder på højtryk på at udvikle en vaccine…
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Free FT webinar: Pensions funding storm
The Pensions Regulator and former minister Sir Steve Webb take part in online debate
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Fins from endangered hammerhead sharks in Hong Kong market traced mainly to Eastern Pacific
For the first time, researchers have traced the origins of shark fins from the retail market in Hong Kong back to the location where the sharks were first caught. This will allow them to identify "high-risk" supply chains for illegal trade and better enforce international trade regulations.
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Fins from endangered hammerhead sharks in Hong Kong market traced mainly to Eastern Pacific
For the first time, researchers have traced the origins of shark fins from the retail market in Hong Kong back to the location where the sharks were first caught. This will allow them to identify "high-risk" supply chains for illegal trade and better enforce international trade regulations.
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Kunstgræsbaners skadelige udledning til vandmiljø skal tackles
PLUS. Flere nordeuropæiske lande er på vej med lovstramninger, men Miljøstyrelsen afventer EU-udmelding.
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UK prime minister Boris Johnson set to return to work
Rapid recovery from coronavirus means he could be back in charge by Monday, say officials
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Corona-udfordringen bliver at komme i gang med ny forskning
UGENTLIG CORONA-UPDATE: Der er nedgang i antallet af corona-patienter på Hvidovre Hospital. Først til efteråret vil presset igen vokse, forventer overlæge og professor Thomas Benfield. Den største udfordring bliver at få sat gang i en række nye forskningsforsøg om COVID-19 på rekordtid.
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We spoke to hundreds of prison gang members – here's what they said about life behind bars
The United States incarcerates a larger proportion of its citizens than any other developed country in the world, with around 1.5 million people serving time in prison. But to anyone who doesn't work or live in a facility, life behind bars largely remains a mystery . The public gets a glimpse of life on the inside only when there are riots , executions or scandals . As criminologists , we spent n
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COVID-19 har givet stort fokus på hygiejne
Hygiejnesygeplejerske Marie Stangerup bruger en stor del af sin tid på at hjælpe personalet på de afdelinger, som tager sig af hospitalets COVID-19 patienter.
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Varför är inte experterna överens?
Varje dag kommer nya rapporter om coronaviruset men många blir förvirrade och undrar varför slutsatserna skiljer sig åt. Varför kommer man fram till så olika svar? Varför är inte forskarna överens? Och finns det några handfasta tips för hur man kan lära sig att se vilka rapporter och studier som kanske är mer trovärdiga än andra?
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Insurers face biggest-ever losses, warns Lloyd's chief
Pandemic could dwarf other disasters such as Hurricane Katrina, John Neal says
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Should we blame bats for the terrible coronavirus? We should not. Bats are our friends | First Dog on the Moon
Some people are angry at bats which is ridiculous. There are a lot more things to be angry at Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are published Get all your needs met at the First Dog shop if what you need is First Dog merchandise and prints Continue reading…
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No time to waste to avoid future food shortages
During the past few weeks, empty supermarket shelves, without pasta, rice and flour due to panic buying, has caused public concerns about the possibility of running out of food. Australian farmers have reassured consumers saying that the country produces enough food to feed three times its population. However, will this statement remain true in ten to twenty years in a country severely affected by
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No time to waste to avoid future food shortages
During the past few weeks, empty supermarket shelves, without pasta, rice and flour due to panic buying, has caused public concerns about the possibility of running out of food. Australian farmers have reassured consumers saying that the country produces enough food to feed three times its population. However, will this statement remain true in ten to twenty years in a country severely affected by
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Dissolved oxygen and pH policy leave fisheries at risk
In a Policy Forum, "Dissolved oxygen and pH criteria leave fisheries at risk" published in the April 24 issue of the journal Science, Stony Brook University's Dr. Christopher J. Gobler, Endowed Chair of Coastal Ecology and Conservation, and Stephen J. Tomasetti, Science Teaching and Research to Inform Decisions (STRIDE) fellow, consider accumulating scientific evidence on the harmful effects of co
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SMU professors detail how homeless students are doing educationally in Houston ISD
A new report by SMU professors Alexandra Pavlakis and Meredith Richards details how homeless students in Houston ISD are faring educationally.
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Hummingbirds show up when tropical trees fall down
When the tree fell that October in 2015, the tropical giant didn't go down alone. Hundreds of neighboring trees went with it, opening a massive 2.5-acre gap in the Panamanian rainforest.
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Hummingbirds show up when tropical trees fall down
When the tree fell that October in 2015, the tropical giant didn't go down alone. Hundreds of neighboring trees went with it, opening a massive 2.5-acre gap in the Panamanian rainforest.
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Learn from past to protect oceans
History holds valuable lessons—and stark warnings—about how to manage fisheries and other ocean resources, a new study says.
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Researchers develop nanohybrid vehicle to optimally deliver drugs into the human body
Researchers in The University of Texas at El Paso's Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have developed a nanohybrid vehicle that can be used to optimally deliver drugs into the human body.
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Scientists develop first 3-D mass estimate of microplastic pollution in Lake Erie
Rochester Institute of Technology scientists have developed the first three-dimensional mass estimate to show where microplastic pollution is collecting in Lake Erie. The study examines nine different types of polymers that are believed to account for 75 percent of the world's plastic waste.
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Learn from past to protect oceans
History holds valuable lessons—and stark warnings—about how to manage fisheries and other ocean resources, a new study says.
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Drugmakers urged to collaborate on coronavirus vaccine
Investors say competition needs to be put aside for the greater good
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EU's virtual summit reveals rift over real money
Europe's leaders split over grants vs loans to finance the EU's post-pandemic recovery
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How to Cultivate Wisdom
submitted by /u/svnzrs [link] [comments]
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The mind as…
submitted by /u/svnzrs [link] [comments]
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Trump Asks if Sunlight Can Kill Viruses. 'Not as a Treatment,' Birx Says.
At a briefing, the president promoted unproven treatments and asked Dr. Deborah Birx if she had heard of the success of sunlight as a tool against viruses.
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World Coronavirus News: Live Coverage
China reported no new coronavirus deaths for at least the seventh straight day. Pakistani doctors warn that the country is loosening its lockdown too soon. And thousands of Muslims in Indonesia defied religious edicts urging them to stay home.
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Probable cause of Aids found – archive, 24 April 1984
24 April 1984 : Researchers could be within two years of developing a cure for the ailment Washington : The US Government announced yesterday that state-sponsored researchers have discovered the probable cause of the disease, Aids, which has caused panic among homosexuals in recent years. The researchers could be within two years of developing a cure for the ailment, the Health and Human Services
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Forskningsprojekter sat i gang på rekordtid
Forskningssygeplejerskerne Mette Boye (tv) og Charlotte Bernhoff på lunge­medicinsk afdeling er inden for få uger blevet kastet ud i arbejdet med tre forskningsprojekter, hvis hovedfokus er at finde nye behandlinger til COVID-19 patienter.
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Photos of the Week: Tiny Pony, Quiet Wedding, Bosporus Strait
Orthodox Easter in Ukraine, health-care workers on the job, a fundraiser in New Jersey, empty streets in Moscow, the U.S. Air Force Academy commencement in Colorado, surfers in Australia, idle aircraft in Denver, preparations to reopen Austria, and much more
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Learn from past to protect oceans
History holds valuable lessons — and stark warnings — about how to manage fisheries and other ocean resources, a new study says.
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Adsorbent material developed with PET bottles for the removal of antibiotics from water
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team has developed a high-efficiency, adsorbent material using PET waste bottles. The new material is expected to help solve the problem of environmental toxins and antibiotic-resistant bacteria which are caused by leaks of antibiotics into water.
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Artificial intelligence can categorize cancer risk of lung nodules
Computed tomography scans for people at risk for lung cancer lead to earlier diagnoses and improve survival rates, but they can also lead to overtreatment when suspicious nodules turn out to be benign.
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The most promising strategies for defeating coronavirus: A review study
Experts from UNC Chapel Hill review possible clinical approaches from antivirals to gene therapy against the virus responsible for COVID-19 and related diseases.
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88.1% of NYC coronavirus patients put on ventilators died
This is the first large-case study of COVID-19 outcomes in New York hospitals. The ventilator mortality rate in the study is shocking: 88.1%. The study's data is preliminary, ending April 4, and doesn't include patients still hospitalized at that time or since. The scarcity of ventilators for COVID-19 patients has been one of the frightening problems facing medical professionals during the pandem
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Ny kategorisering af brystkræftpatienter viser vej til bedste behandling
Nye metoder til at inddele brystkræftpatienter i undergrupper viser, at nogle patienter har rigtig god gavn af epirubicin, mens andre slet ikke har det.
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Kunstig intelligens opsporer CLL-patienter i høj risiko for infektion
På Rigshospitalets hæmatologiske klinik har man fundet en måde at pinpointe præcis de patienter, der har størst risiko for en livstruende infektion og derfor prompte har brug for behandling ved hjælp af en intelligent computeralgoritme.
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Knap to års øget overlevelse for patienter med levermetastaser
Ny teknik giver patienter med tarmkræft, der har spredt sig til leveren, langt bedre overlevelsesmuligheder end den traditionelle metode. Det dokumenterer et skandinavisk forskningsprojekt.
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Nyt håb for patienter med kræft i bugspytkirtlen
Et nyt kirurgisk indgreb gør det muligt at tilbyde flere patienter, der har kræft i bugspytkirtlen, en operation. Indgrebet forbedrer overlevelsen væsentligt.
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Forskere laver enormt ­katalog over kræftgener
Katalog over kræftrelaterede mutationer i arvemassen kan styrke både forskningen i kræft og den kliniske tilgang til diagnose og behandling af patienter, siger forskere.
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Stjerner og vandbærere
Den omstilling, som det danske sygehusvæsen har klaret på 42 dage, er historisk. Både for stjernerne og vandbærerne, skriver Rikke Esbjerg, chefredaktør på Dagens Medicin.
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Coronakrisen peger på, at ­mange psykiatribrugere ikke hører til i psykiatrien
Samfundsmæssige problematikker kan manifestere sig som psykiske problemer hos den enkelte borger, men disse skal løses på politisk og samfundsmæssigt niveau. De skal ikke løses af psykiatrien med flere sengepladser, flere diagnoser og mere medicin.
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På jagt efter coronarisikoen for mennesker med diabetes
Forskere fra Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen vil ved hjælp af registerforskning finde svar på mange af de spørgsmål, der hober sig op for diabetespatienter i coronaens tid.
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Disruption for åben skærm
Valget står ikke mellem økonomi og liv, men at balancere mellem mulighederne i et samfund, der er COVID-19-lukket, skriver Torben Mogensen.
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Hospitalernes store ­omstilling til COVID-19
Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg ­Hospital er et af mange akut­hospitaler, som med kort frist måtte omstille fra normal drift til en hverdag domineret af et COVID-19 beredskab. En omstilling som har haft vidtgående ­konsekvenser for de fleste af ­hospitalets ansatte. Læs her ­interview med 10 af dem.
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Siri Hustvedt: 'I think of the sirens as New York's heartbreaking music'
The writer on coronavirus, death tolls and the dangerous rhetoric of Donald Trump
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The Godzilla effect: how coronavirus is shaking up Japanese society
Under lockdown-lite, Tokyo's citizens are rethinking how they live, work and love
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Pinn's illustration of the week: Going digital
Earth day struggles for global attention
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How to stop economies falling like Humpty Dumpty
Economic distress is contagious too and we need a plan to stop its uncontrolled spread
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Virus deals body blow to Spain's tourism sector
Industry risks losing more than €120bn as foreign visitors are shut out
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Domino's Pizza: boxing clever
Chain's shares hit a record high this week as pandemic fuels sales
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How Richard Branson changed his mind over government aid
Tycoon steps up battle to save Virgin empire as group's Australian carrier collapses
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Coronavirus: private equity's bailout moment
Governments' dilemma as buyout firms tap state funding for portfolio companies
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I'm buying a property — can I get a discount?
Homebuyers trying to chip the price of property deals could be disappointed
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Private equity wants a hand from taxpayers
Governments are facing calls for help from companies backed by cash-rich buyout shops
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Trump golf course seeks a lifeline from Ireland
President's family businesses cannot seek virus aid in the US but are applying for funds overseas
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Tilbage til gateke­­­eper-rollen
Cecilie Bryld, socialmediciner og speciallæge i almen medicin, har taget springet fra skrivebordsarbejde til en post i frontlinjen på hospitalets Corona Checkpoint.
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En psykisk hård periode
Portør Emil Dinesen har sin gang overalt på ­Bispebjerg Hospital, og er bekymret for at bringe smitte med sig rundt på afdelingerne.
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Vi kender rutinerne med ­isolationspatienter
Rengøringsassistent Didar Rakipovska (th) er meget bevidst om, hvordan hun bedst beskytter sig mod smitte, når hun gør rent på ­hospitalets COVID-19 afsnit.
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Jeg er vant til at håndtere ­patienter i ­isolation
Bioanalytiker Dorte Larsen sørger for værnemidler og kortvarig kontakt til ­patienterne, når hun tager blodprøver.
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Hverdagen er blevet mere uforudsigelig
Portør Brian Palm Posts arbejdstider er præget af, at afdelingernes behov for værnemidler og andet udstyr er større end tidligere.
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Ensom opgave med stort ansvar
Intensivsygeplejerske Jan Kristensen ser god ledelse og en klart defineret arbejds­struktur som afgørende for sikkerhed og kontrol i en periode præget af ­usikkerhed.
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Africa needs malaria action tailored to its reality
Local drug research and joined-up thinking will deliver results on the ground
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Coronavirus lockdown raises India malaria fears
Demand for the anti-malarial President Trump touted as Covid-19 treatment adds to strains
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Covid-19 focus threatens precarious malaria progress
Pandemic could set back the fight against malaria by 20 years, with Africa hit worst
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