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The CDC just added six official COVID-19 symptoms
A survey shows one in five New Yorkers tested positive for antibodies to SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19. But we will still likely be social distancing in some form well into summer. (Pexels/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . The COVID-19 pandemic is
1h
Coronavirus live news: Trump says China could have stopped virus as global cases pass 3 million
President says US is doing serious investigation into Beijing's actions; New Zealand eases restrictions; pressure grows to ease lockdowns in Europe. Follow the latest updates European leaders face pressure to move faster on easing lockdowns Traffic data that shows the road into – and out of – Covid-19 US – coronavirus updates live Australia – coronavirus updates live See all our coronavirus cover
33min
Trump launches new push to expand coronavirus testing
White House joins forces with retailers but Democrats express scepticism over specifics of plan
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LATEST

15min
Nenana Ice Classic 2020
Readers may recall my interest in phenological indicators of climate change, and ones on which $300K rest are a particular favorite. The Nenana Ice Classic is an annual tradition since 1917, and provides a interesting glimpse into climate change in Alaska. This year's break-up of ice has just happened (unofficially, Apr 27, 12:56pm AKST), and, like in years past , it's time to assess what the tre
16min
Privacy options don't boost trust in voice assistants
Giving users of voice assistants like Alexa the option to adjust settings for privacy or content delivery, or both, doesn't necessarily increase their trust in the platform, according to a new study. In fact, for some users, it could have an unfavorable effect, the new research shows. Trust in Amazon Alexa went up for regular users who had the option to adjust their privacy and content settings,
19min
20min
Could flipping COVID-19 patients over ease breathing?
Flipping over may help patients with COVID-19 breathe more easily. That could keep more patients from needing the ICU's limited space and ventilators. "It's as simple as flipping on your stomach," says Nicholas Bosch, a pulmonary and critical care fellow at Boston Medical Center (BMC) and a graduate researcher in epidemiology at Boston University's School of Public Health. One in four patients wh
26min
US small business rescue fund strained by rush of claims
Computer system processing loans crashes as applicants scramble for fresh $310bn in funding
39min
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Contact tracing and isolation key to controlling SARS-CoV2 in Shenzhen
Extensive contact tracing and isolation key to controlling spread of SARS-CoV-2 in Shenzhen, China
1h
Key PPE items not in pandemic response stockpile as Covid-19 struck
Gowns and visors among items not deemed necessary by expert committee in 2009, BBC finds Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Key items of personal protective equipment (PPE) were not included in the government's pandemic stockpile when coronavirus reached the UK, an investigation has found. BBC Panorama reported that gowns, visors, swabs and body bags were left out of th
1h
'Quarantine Fatigue' Has More People Going Outside
New research shows that people are venturing out more frequently, and traveling farther from home.
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Publisher Correction: Tunable correlated Chern insulator and ferromagnetism in a moiré superlattice
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2237-5
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Lizards develop new chemical language to attract mates in predator-free environments
Scientists discovered that lizards developed novel chemical communication signals when relocated to tiny island groups with no predators. Male lizards began to rapidly produce a new chemical love elixir, not unlike cologne, to call on potential mates. With new technology we're increasingly able to detect and identify the chemicals that make up much of the language of non-human nature. Most of our
1h
China's factories struggle without key import — foreign talent
Travel bans leave tech suppliers unable to bring in production advisers
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CUNY SPH Weekly COVID-19 Survey update week 7
Coronavirus testing geared up in New York over the past week, but only 8% of our 1000 NYC survey respondents reported they had been tested to date. The great majority of these people (74%) said their test took place over the last two weeks and 40% mentioned that it took place just 'within the last few days.'
2h
Fed extends municipal lending to smaller cities and counties
Central bank broadens eligibility for $500bn facility as local governments come under strain
2h
Elon Musk Says SpaceX Could Launch Orbital Observatories
Take Me Higher After ongoing criticism over how bright SpaceX's Starlink satellites appear from the ground , Elon Musk has a new solution for how astronomers can continue their work uninterrupted. Speaking to a committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Musk suggested that research agencies partner up with SpaceX to launch new orbital observatories even higher up
2h
Disruptions in health insurance coverage are common and affect cancer care and survival
A new study finds disruptions in health insurance coverage are common in the United States and are associated with poorer cancer care and survival.
2h
Perception of US democracy tanks after Trump impeachment
While President Donald Trump's impeachment gripped the country, the long-term consequences of his trial and acquittal for American democracy remain yet unclear. What's clear already, however, is that both the public's and political experts' perceptions of the health of US democracy clearly declined during this period. Those are the findings of an academic watchdog group that conducted its latest s
2h
Making sense of the viral multiverse
In a consensus statement, Arvind Varsani, a molecular virologist with ASU's Biodesign Center for Fundamental and Applied Microbiomics and a host of international collaborators propose a new classification system, capable of situating coronaviruses like SARS-CoV-2 within the enormous web of viruses across the planet, known as the virosphere.
2h
Connecting the dots between heart disease, potential for worse COVID-19 outcomes
People with certain heart diseases may be more susceptible to worse outcomes with COVID-19, but the reason why has remained unknown. New research from Mayo Clinic indicates that in patients with one specific type of heart disease ? obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) ? the heart increases production of the ACE2 RNA transcript and the translated ACE2 protein.
2h
Skoltech research shows how a 'Swiss Army knife' protein helps phages disarm their victims
Researchers from the Severinov Laboratory at Skoltech, along with their colleagues from Switzerland and Israel, have investigated a poorly studied bacterial BREX defense mechanism to show that it can be "turned off" by a multipurpose viral protein that successfully impersonates DNA. The paper was published in the journal Nucleic Acids Research.
2h
SpaceX Starship Prototype Finally Aces Pressure Test
SpaceX is gearing up for its first crewed flight for NASA with the Falcon 9 and Dragon spacecraft, but Elon Musk's spaceflight firm is also planning for the future with the Starship. This vessel, previously known as the BFR, is an extremely ambitious project that will eventually give SpaceX enough power to venture to the outer solar system. First, it has to remain intact during pressure testing,
2h
In preparing for COVID-19 cases, plan early, communicate often
Hospitals facing a growing population of COVID-19 cases need a coordinated approach with a multidisciplinary team to increase efficiency, conserve PPE and protect staff. In "Hospital Preparedness for COVID-19: A Practical Guide from a Critical Care Perspective," – published online in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine – experts from Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Pr
2h
A step toward a better way to make gene therapies to attack cancer, genetic disorders
A UCLA-led research team today reports a new method for delivering DNA into stem cells and immune cells safely, rapidly and economically. The method, described in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could give scientists a new tool for manufacturing gene therapies for people with cancer, genetic disorders and blood diseases.
2h
Researchers use machine learning to unearth underground Instagram 'pods'
Not all engagement with posts on social networks is organic, according to a team of researchers at New York University Tandon School of Engineering and Drexel University, who have published the first analysis of a robust underground ecosystem of "pods." These groups of users manipulate curation algorithms and artificially boost content popularity — whether to increase the reach of promoted conten
2h
Strokes Reported Among Some Middle-Aged COVID-19 Patients
Early reports from hospitals document a spike in large vessel blockages, especially among people in their 30s and 40s who tested positive for the coronavirus.
3h
Wuhan Hospital Discharges City's Last Coronavirus Patient
As of Sunday, there are no longer any patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China — the city where the epidemic began . China's National Health Commission announced that the city's last patient has been discharged, according to The Guardian . Meanwhile, China only reported three new cases across the entire country, suggesting it's wrangled the outbreak under control. "Thanks to the joint
3h
What if immunity to covid-19 doesn't last?
Starting in the fall of 2016 and continuing into 2018, researchers at Columbia University in Manhattan began collecting nasal swabs from 191 children, teachers, and emergency workers, asking them to record when they sneezed or had sore throats. The point was to create a map of common respiratory viruses and their symptoms, and how long people who recovered stayed immune to each one. The research
3h
Instagram and the male body image
In a new study among males depicted on Instagram, the majority of posts showed men with low body fat, while only a small fraction depicted men with high body fat. Sixty-two percent of posts showed men with low body fat and 41% showed high muscularity, whereas only 6% showed men with high body fat and 17% showed low muscularity.
3h
Nursing research informs response to COVID-19 pandemic
Nursing research has an important influence on evidence-based health care practice, care delivery, and policy. Two editorials in the journal Research in Nursing & Health, by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing), explore how nursing research has been paramount in dealing with the emerging coronavirus pandemic.
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Tyskland skifter Corona-kurs: Vælger Apple og Googles app-løsning
Tyskland skifter fra centraliseret til decentraliseret datamodel i kampen mod spredning af Covid-19.
3h
Researchers Detect Land Animals Using DNA in Nearby Water Bodies
Monitoring the comings and goings of aquatic life with traces of DNA in water has become an established biomonitoring technique, but scientists are now using environmental DNA to assess terrestrial animals.
3h
Astronaut advice: how to cope with social distancing
Col. Michael E. Fossum has some tips for coping with social distancing that he learned while he was in space as an astronaut. Social distancing because of the COVID-19 pandemic has people around the world struggling to cope with isolation and the related stress. If anyone has expert advice on how to deal with the frustrations of self-isolation, it's Fossum, a former astronaut and CEO of Texas A&M
3h
You Can't Stop Touching Your Face Because You're Subconsciously Sniffing Your Hands
You might not realize it, but you're constantly smelling your own hands to learn about the people and world around you.
3h
Credit risk inside the hall of mirrors
Mike Mackenzie's daily analysis of what's moving global markets
3h
New study suggests ways to alleviate social withdrawal symptoms in mental illnesses
University of California, Davis, researchers studied the role of oxytocin, a neurotransmitter produced in the hypothalamus, which is known to play an important role in social behavior across species.
3h
These Ultra-Durable Steel Toe Boots Are the Future of Footwear
Futurism fans: To create this content, a non-editorial team worked with an affiliate partner. We may collect a small commission on items purchased through this page. This post does not necessarily reflect the views or the endorsement of the Futurism.com editorial staff. Traditional sportswear and shoe companies have made a lot of innovations to sneakers over the last few decades. Thanks to the de
3h
Loss of smell associated with milder clinical course in COVID-19
Researchers at UC San Diego Health report in newly published findings that olfactory impairment suggests the resulting COVID-19 disease is more likely to be mild to moderate, a potential early indicator that could help health care providers determine which patients may require hospitalization.
4h
Rice engineers: Make wastewater drinkable again
Delivering water to city dwellers can become far more efficient, according to Rice University researchers who say it should involve a healthy level of recycled wastewater.
4h
Pentagon Officially Releases Three UFO Videos
Unclassified The Pentagon has finally formally released three unclassified videos of the "unidentified aerial phenomena" first reported in a 2017 investigation by The New York Times . "After a thorough review, the department has determined that the authorized release of these unclassified videos does not reveal any sensitive capabilities or systems, and does not impinge on any subsequent investig
4h
Past measles outbreaks show pandemics spread via small towns
In the most detailed study to date of epidemic spread, an international team of researchers has modeled measles dynamics based on over 40 years of data collected in England and Wales. The models—which span the prevaccination period, introduction of measles vaccination , and local elimination by vaccination in the 1990s—reveal that, before the introduction of a vaccine, measles could persist in bo
4h
Insane Clown Posse Is Modeling Ideal Pandemic Leadership
There aren't many comparisons in American history for Thursday's press conference in which Donald Trump suggested that the coronavirus might be defeated by shining lights inside human beings or injecting people with disinfectant. But there is the song " Miracles, " by Insane Clown Posse. In the much-memed rap-rock track that turned 10 years old this month , the makeup-caked tough guys Violent J a
4h
Syphilis alters just 1 gene to evade immune attack
The bacterium that causes syphilis likely uses a single gene to escape the immune system, according to new research. The finding may explain how syphilis can hide in the body for decades, frustrating the immune system's attempts to eradicate it. It might also account for the bacterium's ability to re-infect previously infected people who should have acquired some immunity to it. Although syphilis
4h
Electrical devices implanted in the brain may help treat anorexia
In a small trial, implanting electrodes into the brain helped women with severe anorexia gain weight and feel less anxious and depresse
4h
This Virus-Proof Suit Lets You Vape, Have Sex
Los Angeles-based design company Production Club has dreamed up a virus-proof half-body suit concept called the " Micrashell " that could allow us to one day safely attend film festivals, concerts and sports events during or after a global pandemic — without having to stand six feet apart. The company calls it a "personal protective equipment design concept that allows for human-to-human interact
4h
Grassland studies, radar-tracked bumblebees offer clues for protecting pollinators
Scientists used a radar to track a bumblebee from its maiden flight until death for the first time as part of wider research racing to understand the impact and needs of declining bee populations, including on Europe's fragmented biodiversity hotspots—grasslands.
4h
Consortium Identifies Risks of Viral Contamination in Biopharma
Nine of the 20 pharma companies that participated in a study had experienced at least one viral contamination event between 1985 and 2018.
4h
Grassland studies, radar-tracked bumblebees offer clues for protecting pollinators
Scientists used a radar to track a bumblebee from its maiden flight until death for the first time as part of wider research racing to understand the impact and needs of declining bee populations, including on Europe's fragmented biodiversity hotspots—grasslands.
4h
Survey: Most Americans want government commitment to reduce inequality
A new poll finds most Americans say the federal government should reduce inequality, amid the COVID-19-produced economic crisis. A national survey conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Lehigh University finds 78% of Americans agree that "considering the spread of coronavirus in the United States and its impact on the economy and the American people," it is 'important' that 'the US government c
4h
A new explanation for the origins of human fatherhood
The origins of paternal care, a key differentiator between humans and other primates, have long been tied to ancestral females trading their own sexual fidelity for food provided by their mates. A new theory developed by economists and anthropologists states that ecological changes, beginning roughly 5-8 million years ago, placed a premium on partnerships – both between and within sexes – and fuel
4h
It takes a neutron beam to find a proton
Researchers from Osaka University have successfully determined the structure of a bacterial copper amine oxidase using neutron crystallography. The high-resolution structure revealed the precise positions of the hydrogen atoms and protons in the enzyme, thereby uncovering an equilibrium state for the cofactor—previously understood to exhibit an exclusive structure—and unusual protonation states at
4h
Potential autism biomarker found in babies, Stanford-led study reports
A biological marker in infants that appears to predict an autism diagnosis has been identified in a small study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
4h
Survey: Most Americans want government commitment to reduce inequality
A new poll finds that a majority of Americans say that the federal government should commit to reducing economic inequality in this country over the next year, considering the spread of coronavirus in the United States and its impact on the economy and the American people.
4h
Lizards Evolve Bigger Toepads to Hang On During Hurricanes
Hurricane survivors pass their grippy toes on to their offspring. grippy-lizard-2_cropped.jpg An Anolis carolinensis lizard using its strong toepads to hang on during simulated hurricane-force winds. Image credits: Colin M. Donihue Creature Monday, April 27, 2020 – 03:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Hurricanes may have triggered evolutionary changes across dozens of species o
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Nanosensor can alert a smartphone when plants are stressed
MIT engineers have developed a way to closely track how plants respond to stresses such as injury, infection, and light damage, using sensors made of carbon nanotubes. These sensors can be embedded in plant leaves, where they report on hydrogen peroxide signaling waves. Plants use hydrogen peroxide to communicate within their leaves, sending out a distress signal that stimulates leaf cells to pro
4h
Why Trump Just Can't Quit His Daily Press Conferences
President Trump's daily coronavirus briefings, the administration's single most consistent and long-running response to the pandemic, have been a failure of moral and public-health leadership from the start. But after a particularly rough series of briefings last week, it seemed that the White House had finally come to understand that the briefings were also failing to help Trump politically. In
4h
Hurricanes Are Reshaping Evolution Across the Caribbean
A new study of lizards in countries struck by hurricanes suggests cataclysmic weather can reshape entire species.
4h
Hurricanes twist evolution in island lizards
Hold that thought: A good grip can mean the difference between life and death for lizards in a hurricane—and as a result, populations hit more frequently by hurricanes have larger toepads.
4h
Virus-infected honey bees more likely to gain entrance to healthy hives
Honey bees that guard hive entrances are twice as likely to allow in trespassers from other hives if the intruders are infected with the Israeli acute paralysis virus, a deadly pathogen of bees, researchers report.
4h
It takes a neutron beam to find a proton
Understanding the behavior of proteins and enzymes is key to unlocking the secrets of biological processes. The atomic structures of proteins are generally investigated using X-ray crystallography; however, the precise information for hydrogen atoms and protons (hydrogen ions) is usually unattainable. Now a team including Osaka University, Osaka Medical College, National Institutes for Quantum and
4h
Work on rare molecule aims to enhance cell therapy and deliver functional cure for HIV
Stanford University chemist Paul Wender and his colleagues are working to improve treatments for cancer, HIV and Alzheimer's—and they are betting that a drab, weedy marine invertebrate is the means to achieving that end. They have focused on this seemingly unremarkable organism, called Bugula neritina, because it cooperates with a bug in its gut to produce bryostatin (specifically, bryostatin-1),
4h
Researchers dig into case of geologic amnesia
A team of geologists led by the University of Colorado Boulder is digging into what may be Earth's most famous case of geologic amnesia.
4h
A new explanation for the origins of human fatherhood
Humans differ from other primates in the types and amounts of care that males provide for their offspring. The precise timing of the emergence of human "fatherhood" is unknown, but a new theory proposes that it emerged from a need for partnership in response to changing ecological conditions, U.S. and French researchers report today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
4h
Microsoft Wants to Mine Cryptocurrency Using Your Brain Waves
Mind Reading Microsoft applied for an unusual new patent that would read users' brainwaves in exchange for cryptocurrency like Bitcoin. The patent application , which has yet to be granted, describes a system that would scan a user's brain activity or other biological signals to make sure they completed a task, such as watching a commercial . The system would then use those signals to mine for cr
4h
Work on rare molecule aims to enhance cell therapy and deliver functional cure for HIV
Stanford University chemist Paul Wender and his colleagues are working to improve treatments for cancer, HIV and Alzheimer's—and they are betting that a drab, weedy marine invertebrate is the means to achieving that end. They have focused on this seemingly unremarkable organism, called Bugula neritina, because it cooperates with a bug in its gut to produce bryostatin (specifically, bryostatin-1),
5h
Hurricanes twist evolution in island lizards
Hold that thought: A good grip can mean the difference between life and death for lizards in a hurricane—and as a result, populations hit more frequently by hurricanes have larger toepads.
5h
Virus-infected honey bees more likely to gain entrance to healthy hives
Honey bees that guard hive entrances are twice as likely to allow in trespassers from other hives if the intruders are infected with the Israeli acute paralysis virus, a deadly pathogen of bees, researchers report.
5h
A new explanation for the origins of human fatherhood
Humans differ from other primates in the types and amounts of care that males provide for their offspring. The precise timing of the emergence of human "fatherhood" is unknown, but a new theory proposes that it emerged from a need for partnership in response to changing ecological conditions, U.S. and French researchers report today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
5h
Sunak plans 'gradual' wind-down of job support scheme
Chancellor looks to wean economy off programme aiding 4m workers under coronavirus while avoiding jobless surge
5h
Coupled magnetic materials show interesting properties for quantum applications
Researchers have uncovered a novel way in which the excitations of magnetic spins in two different thin films can be strongly coupled to each other through their common interface.
5h
No superconductivity in nickelates? It's hydrogen's fault
Last summer, it was discovered that there are promising superconductors in a special class of materials, the so-called nickelates. However, it soon became apparent that these initially spectacular could not be reproduced by other research groups. Scientists have now found the reason for this: In some nickelates additional hydrogen atoms are incorporated into the material structure. This changes th
5h
Eye pupil an indicator of effective decision making
Researchers are investigating how eye-pupil size changes can indicate a person's cognitive state as a means to enable teaming with autonomous agents.
5h
Honey bees could help monitor fertility loss in insects due to climate change
New research could help scientists track how climate change is impacting the birds and the bees… of honey bees.
5h
New understanding of asthma medicines could improve future treatment
New research has revealed new insights into common asthma aerosol treatments to aid the drug's future improvements which could benefit hundreds of millions of global sufferers.
5h
Smallest UK companies given access to 100% state-backed loans
Chancellor bows to pressure with up to £50,000 credit for micro-businesses
5h
Reopening puts Germany's much-praised coronavirus response at risk
Preliminary study plays outsize role in debate about when to ease restrictions
5h
Cold-induced urticarial rash — researchers discover new hereditary disease
Skin rash combined with head and joint pain: these are the symptoms which patients with familial (hereditary) cold urticaria develop when exposed to temperatures below 15 °C. Researchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered a new, previously unknown form of this inflammatory skin disorder. In addition to explaining why conventional treatments are ineffective in some people wi
5h
Urban slums are uniquely vulnerable to COVID-19. Here's how to help.
Government-enforced social isolation can be devastating for the nearly 1 billion people around the globe currently dwelling in urban slums, where physical space is scarce and many rely on daily wage labor for survival. A new report, authored by a team of public health experts and epidemiologists working in collaboration with community leaders and non-governmental organizations, provides eight urge
5h
COVID-19 and pregnancies: What we know
Amid the rapidly evolving global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic that has already had profound effects on public health and medical infrastructure across the globe, many questions remain about its impact on child health. New research published in the Journal of Clinical Virology indicates that the vulnerability of neonates and children and their role in the spread of the virus (severe
5h
Three years of monitoring of Oregon's gray whales shows changes in health
Three years of 'health check-ups' on Oregon's summer resident gray whales shows a compelling relationship between whales' overall body condition and changing ocean conditions that likely limited availability of prey for the mammals.
5h
Getting through the bottleneck — A new class of layered perovskite with high oxygen-ion conductivity
Scientists have discovered a layered perovskite that shows unusually high oxide-ion conductivity, based on a new screening method and a new design concept. Such materials are hard to come by, so the discovery of this material, the new method and design concept will make the realization of many environment-friendly technologies.
5h
Antibiotic exposure can 'prime' single-resistant bacteria to become multidrug-resistant
Researchers report that, for a bacterial pathogen already resistant to an antibiotic, prolonged exposure to that antibiotic not only boosted its ability to retain its resistance gene, but also made the pathogen more readily pick up and maintain resistance to a second antibiotic and become a dangerous, multidrug-resistant strain.
5h
New tool measures quality of life in people with dementia
University of Queensland researchers say a new tool to measure of the quality of life of people with dementia will result in better targeted care for those living with the condition.
5h
Smart interventions reduce malaria transmission by 75%
Mass drug administration and vector control can help eliminate malaria. A vector refers to an organism that transmits infection, as mosquitoes infected with parasites transmit malaria to people.
5h
New findings suggest laws of nature not as constant as previously thought
Not only does a universal constant seem annoyingly inconstant at the outer fringes of the cosmos, it occurs in only one direction, which is downright weird.
5h
Will COVID-19 Make Us Less Democratic and More Like China?
The pandemic has revealed the disadvantages of laissez-faire governance and advantages of centralized control. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Delta taps debt markets for $5bn to replace lost cash flows
Atlanta-based airline raised size of deal in light of investor demand
5h
Balcony Seats: Watching Movies From Apartment Buildings
Measures taken to curb the spread of the coronavirus have closed most movie theaters and restricted people to their homes. While drive-in theaters are enjoying a moment, some groups, companies, and movie fans are also working to present films to their neighbors stuck in apartment buildings, projecting images on the walls of nearby buildings. One group in Berlin, Window Flicks, even coordinated wi
5h
Seeking mental-health help was the best thing I did at grad school
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01271-2 Samir Rachid Zaim faced down an escalating crisis in his home country of Venezuela, as well as his PhD, with the support of mental-health services.
5h
This System Lets You Fly a Drone With Arm Gestures
Researchers at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) have developed a Jedi-like mind control system that allows you to control a drone by just twisting and lifting your forearm . A video uploaded by the CSAIL team shows off the system. The drone pilot is able to maneuver a small drone through a series of rings easily just by twisting, raising, and lowering his forearm tha
5h
Researchers make key advance toward production of important biofuel
An international research collaboration has taken an important step toward the commercially viable manufacture of biobutanol, an alcohol whose strong potential as a fuel for gasoline-powered engines could pave the path away from fossil fuels.
5h
Largest US meat company warns food supply chain is breaking
Tyson chairman flags shortages as slaughterhouses and processing plants are forced to shut
5h
Cook with speed and precision with these induction cooktops
Cooking with magnets makes every meal feel a bit like living in the future. (Amazon/) There's a magic to cooking with gas—the ability to adjust the flame just right to control the heat, the click of starting the burner. But not every home can accommodate a gas stove and, despite that magic, it takes a lot of time to bring water to a boil, or do any other necessary task. Enter the induction cookto
5h
Swift mission tallied water from interstellar comet Borisov
For the first time, NASA's Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory tracked water loss from an interstellar comet as it approached and rounded the Sun. The object, 2I/Borisov, traveled through the solar system in late 2019.
5h
The Guardian view on coronavirus tests: political choices have hurt the UK | Editorial
Damaging ideas within the Conservative party have weakened our ability to defeat the virus The coronavirus pandemic struck the United Kingdom when its National Health Service was on its knees suffering from staff shortages and the longest waiting times ever recorded. A decade of austerity had taken a terrible toll. Yet public satisfaction in the NHS went up . This surprising gap between the NHS f
5h
Doctors alerted to unusual mix of symptoms in some children
Suggestion of link with coronavirus in small number of paediatric cases in England
5h
Supplies for creating your own terrarium
Brighten your day with an indoor garden. (Scott Webb via Unsplash/) Indoor gardening is often focused on growing herbs you can eat, or hanging large plants that gobble up the sun streaming through your window. Terrariums are more like a small-scale greenhouse. They can be enclosed or open to the air, and are essentially a tiny world of your own making. These essential terrarium supplies will get
5h
This timeline shows just how insignificant humans are
A pale blue blip in time. (Set Reset/) Humans have gotten a lot done in 300,000 years: We invented agriculture, developed writing systems, built cities, created the internet, and shrugged off gravity to land on the moon. These innovations make our past seem long—and stuffed with significance. But in the brief history of life, everything we've ever accomplished fits into a tiny sliver of time—just
5h
The Laws of Physics May Break Down at the Edge of the Universe
Bending Rules A controversial new study suggests that it may be possible to bend the laws of the universe — but just a little bit. Scientists at the University of New South Wales found what seem to be discrepancies in what's called the fine structure constant, a number that's thought to remain perfectly unchanging and describes how subatomic particles interact with each other. It's a bold claim,
5h
Researchers make key advance toward production of important biofuel
An international research collaboration has taken an important step toward the commercially viable manufacture of biobutanol, an alcohol whose strong potential as a fuel for gasoline-powered engines could pave the path away from fossil fuels.
5h
In Race for a Coronavirus Vaccine, an Oxford Group Leaps Ahead
As scientists at the Jenner Institute prepare for mass clinical trials, new tests show their vaccine to be effective in monkeys.
6h
EasyJet says Stelios pressure 'highly undesirable'
Airline calls shareholder vote on directors in latest escalation of dispute
6h
Boeing investors could wait 'years' for dividend to return
Aircraft maker's chief executive says focus will be on rebuilding balance sheet post-pandemic
6h
Iran's borders reopen as government seeks to revive regional trade
Islamic republic eases coronavirus restrictions in effort to boost struggling economy
6h
Engineers develop precision injection system for plants
A new method developed by engineers may offer a starting point for delivering life-saving treatments to plants ravaged by diseases.
6h
Research on the International Space Station shows key changes in cultured heart cells
Spaceflight changes much about the human body, including how the heart functions and how cells that create heart tissue behave. Scientists studying these changes on the International Space Station continue to report important discoveries.
6h
What can we learn from 2010's Deepwater Horizon oil spill?
New research details what scientists have learned from studying the Deepwater Horizon oil spill since it happened in 2010. Ten years ago this month, a powerful explosion destroyed an oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico, killing 11 workers and injuring 17 others. Over a span of 87 days, the Deepwater Horizon's Macondo Well released an estimated 168 million gallons of oil and 170,000 tonnes of natural ga
6h
Google's medical AI was super accurate in a lab. Real life was a different story.
The covid-19 pandemic is stretching hospital resources to the breaking point in many countries in the world. It is no surprise that many people hope AI could speed up patient screening and ease the strain on clinical staff . But a study from Google Health—the first to look at the impact of a deep-learning tool in real clinical settings —reveals that even the most accurate AIs can actually make th
6h
Australian hydroxychloroquine trials continue despite studies showing no benefit to coronavirus patients
Clinical findings of the antimalarial drug have been inconsistent, with one study showing a higher mortality rate when it was administered alone Sign up for Guardian Australia's daily coronavirus email Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications The results of early studies from the US and China, which show disappointing results in the use of an antimalarial drug a
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Engineers develop precision injection system for plants
A new method developed by engineers may offer a starting point for delivering life-saving treatments to plants ravaged by diseases.
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Rapid evolution in fish: Genomic changes within a generation
Researchers have identified the genetic basis of rapid adaptation using a native fish species. They compared threespine stickleback fish from different habitats in the Lake Constance region. Their study reveals that changes in the genome can be observed within a single generation.
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Disappearance of animal species takes mental, cultural and material toll on humans
The research reveals that hunter-gatherer societies expressed a deep emotional and psychological connection with the animal species they hunted, especially after their disappearance. The study will help anthropologists and others understand the profound environmental changes taking place in our own lifetimes.
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Deflation is a bigger fear than hyperinflation
A collapse in demand is reducing prices even as central banks print money
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Covid-19 latest: Wuhan discharges outbreak's last coronavirus patient
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Names of UK's coronavirus science advisers to be revealed
The membership of the UK's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies has so far been kept secret, but a list of names will soon be published, the UK's chief scientific adviser has said
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Removing 1 Million Homes from Flood Zones Could Save $1 Trillion
Expanding buyout programs would be more cost-effective than other measures, such as elevating houses or flood-proofing basements — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The balancing act of reopening shuttered economies
Governments weigh up health risks against economic damage
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Whose coronavirus strategy worked best? Scientists hunt most effective policies
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01248-1 Researchers sift through data to compare nations' vastly different containment measures.
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Coronavirus rescue fund not reaching front line, say care homes
English providers warn of funding shortfall as pandemic adds pressure to sector
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Första fossila grodan på Antarktis
Forskare har hittat en fossil groda på Antarktis. Släktingar till grodan lever i dagens Sydamerika och Australien och fyndet bekräftar att dessa groddjur utvecklats gemensamt på superkontinenten Gondwana. Samtidigt visar fyndet att klimatet på Antarktis för 40 miljoner år sedan var regnigt och svalt med plusgrader. På land fanns både tillfälliga ismassor och sötvattensmiljöer för växelvarma ryggr
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Three years of monitoring of Oregon's gray whales shows changes in health
Three years of "health check-ups" on Oregon's summer resident gray whales shows a compelling relationship between whales' overall body condition and changing ocean conditions that likely limited availability of prey for the mammals, a new study from Oregon State University indicates.
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Investigating the causes of the ozone levels in the Valderejo Nature Reserve
Atmospheric contamination is one of society's main concerns, with nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3) being among the contaminants that are giving rise to the most concern. In principle, the measures to reduce NO2 contamination effectively are fairly easy to identify; however, reducing O3 contamination is much more complex because it is a secondary contaminant that is not emitted di
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Three years of monitoring of Oregon's gray whales shows changes in health
Three years of "health check-ups" on Oregon's summer resident gray whales shows a compelling relationship between whales' overall body condition and changing ocean conditions that likely limited availability of prey for the mammals, a new study from Oregon State University indicates.
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Scientists unveil how general anesthesia works
The discovery of general anesthetics — compounds which induce unconsciousness, prevent control of movement and block pain — helped transform dangerous operations into safe surgery. But scientists still don't understand exactly how general anesthetics work. Now, researchers have revealed how a general anesthetic called isoflurane weakens the transmission of electrical signals between neurons, at
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'Elegant' solution reveals how the universe got its structure
The universe is full of billions of galaxies — but their distribution across space is far from uniform. Why do we see so much structure in the universe today and how did it all form and grow? A 10-year survey of tens of thousands of galaxies has provided a new approach to answering this fundamental mystery.
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Kroppseget protein kan läka strålskador i huden
Det är rätt vanligt med akuta hudreaktioner, så kallad dermatit, efter en strålbehandling. En plågsam biverkning som i värsta fall försvårar fortsatt behandling. Nu har forskare vid Umeå universitet upptäckt att ett protein som naturligt finns i kroppen kan påskynda läkningen av dermatit. Det protein som Umeåforskarna intresserar sig för är plasminogen. Det är ett naturligt förekommande protein s
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Live Coronavirus in the US Updates
The C.D.C. added six new Covid-19 symptoms. Oil prices plummeted. Some states gradually allowed some businesses to open, and on Friday, Texas will start reopening businesses in phases.
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Live Updates: Global Coronavirus Pandemic
Even as the global death toll passed 200,000, countries are mapping out a return to public life. Health care workers in Mexico, India and other countries are facing attacks.
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California Antibody Findings Could Be A Game-Changer For COVID-19
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What impact has the global coronavirus lockdown had on pollution?
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Boston Dynamics' Spot robot helping doctors 'remotely' combat COVID-19
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Molecules identified that reverse cellular aging process
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Legislation proposes paying Americans $2,000 a month
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Artificial retina program wins $5M NASA award
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Using Trees To Build A Better World
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Poorer people have a harder time recovering from disasters
The poorer someone or their family is, the harder it is for them to recover and regain their former standard of living after an earthquake or other natural disaster strikes, researchers report. After a disaster, government relief agencies, insurers, and other responders converge to take stock of fatalities and injuries, and to assess the extent and cost of damage to public infrastructure and pers
6h
Women Are Buying 'Essential AF' Shirts, Candles, and Wine Glasses
Spread love, not germs , reads the label on a hand-poured soy candle listed on Etsy for $24.95. Light after a long day of being essential , reads another . A third, recommended as a gift for a health-care worker, uses a curlicue font to declare whoever lights it Essential AF . ("Essential as fuck," but coy!) The coronavirus pandemic has separated American workers into "essential" and "nonessentia
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Names of UK's coronavirus science advisors to be revealed
The membership of the UK's Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies has so far been kept secret, but a list of names will soon be published, the UK's chief scientific advisor has said
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Bacteria that are persistently resistant to one antibiotic are 'primed' to become multidrug-resistant bugs
Antibiotics save lives—but using them also helps antibiotic-resistant strains evolve and spread. Each year, antibiotic-resistant bacteria infect some 2.8 million people in the United States, killing more than 35,000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Infections by multidrug-resistant—or MDR—bacteria, which are resistant to two or more antibiotics, are particularly diffic
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Long-term use of synthetic corticosteroid drugs increases adrenal gland inflammation
New research by academics at the University of Bristol has found evidence that prolonged treatment of synthetic corticosteroid drugs increases adrenal gland inflammation in response to bacterial infection, an effect that in the long-term can damage adrenal function.
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Three years of monitoring of Oregon's gray whales shows changes in health
Three years of 'health check-ups' on Oregon's summer resident gray whales shows a compelling relationship between whales' overall body condition and changing ocean conditions that likely limited availability of prey for the mammals.
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Bacteria that are persistently resistant to one antibiotic are 'primed' to become multidrug-resistant bugs
Antibiotics save lives—but using them also helps antibiotic-resistant strains evolve and spread. Each year, antibiotic-resistant bacteria infect some 2.8 million people in the United States, killing more than 35,000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Infections by multidrug-resistant—or MDR—bacteria, which are resistant to two or more antibiotics, are particularly diffic
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Wales ready to lift coronavirus lockdown
Devolved UK nations may begin to chart different path out of Covid-19 crisis Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The first minister of Wales has said he is ready to move the country out of lockdown earlier than the rest of the UK as he demands more contact from ministers at Westminster. Mark Drakeford said he would rather work with Boris Johnson's government but has the
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Hur nyfödda smittas av hepatit C kan leda till nya behandlingar
Trots att mamman är smittad med hepatit C föds bara cirka fem procent med sjukdomen. Den låga siffran kan förklaras med att barnets immunförsvar redan lyckats slå ut viruset innan födseln. Mekanismen hos de osmittade barnens immunförsvar kan öppna för nya behandlingsmetoder i framtiden, enligt en studie från Karolinska institutet. I motsats till andra sjukdomar som smittas via blodet, som HIV och
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The broken Nobel prize dream that launched a mentoring platform
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01274-z Amal Amin founded Women in Science Without Borders to support researchers in Egypt, her native country, and beyond.
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Disappearance of animal species takes mental, cultural and material toll on humans
For thousands of years, indigenous hunting societies have subsisted on specific animals for their survival. How have these hunter-gatherers been affected when these animals migrate or go extinct?
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Superconductivity: It's hydrogen's fault
Last summer, a new age for high-temperature superconductivity was proclaimed—the nickel age. It was discovered that there are promising superconductors in a special class of materials, the so-called nickelates, which can conduct electric current without any resistance even at high temperatures.
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Coupled magnetic materials show interesting properties for quantum applications
Like fans that blow in sync, certain magnetic materials can exhibit interesting energetic properties. In order to find new ways to transmit and process information, scientists have begun to explore the behavior of electronic and magnetic spins, specifically their resonant excitations, as information carriers. In some cases, researchers have identified new phenomena that could help eventually infor
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'Elegant' solution reveals how the universe got its structure
The universe is full of billions of galaxies—but their distribution across space is far from uniform. Why do we see so much structure in the universe today and how did it all form and grow?
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Proteasome phase separation for destruction
The proteasome is a major proteolytic machine that regulates cellular proteostasis through selective degradation of ubiquitylated proteins. As the maintenance of protein homeostasis is essential to human health, malfunctions of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) causes various diseases such as cancers, inflammation, and neurodegeneration. However, we do not yet know the overall principles behin
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Stay-at-home science project: Whip up a storm in a glass
The storm happens fast, so be ready if you want to take a photo of it. (John Kennedy/) Welcome to PopSci's at-home science projects series. On weekdays at noon, we'll be posting new projects that use ingredients you can buy at the grocery store. Show us how it went by tagging your project on social media using #popsciprojects. The air we breathe every day is full of moisture—even in the desert. U
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Proteasome phase separation for destruction
The proteasome is a major proteolytic machine that regulates cellular proteostasis through selective degradation of ubiquitylated proteins. As the maintenance of protein homeostasis is essential to human health, malfunctions of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) causes various diseases such as cancers, inflammation, and neurodegeneration. However, we do not yet know the overall principles behin
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How Trump's Foes Get Through His Daily Press Briefings
Updated at 1:54 p.m. ET on April 27, 2020. In the Chicago suburbs lives a four-year-old black Labrador retriever named Mabel, whose happiest part of the day is President Donald Trump's daily briefing. In the afternoons, Mabel has been accompanying her owner, former Republican Representative Joe Walsh, as he settles into a living-room chair and flips on the television to watch Trump hold forth. Wh
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Engineers develop precision injection system for plants
A new method developed by engineers at MIT may offer a starting point for delivering life-saving treatments to plants ravaged by such diseases.
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Beta cells from stem cells
The loss of insulin-secreting beta cells by autoimmune destruction leads to type 1 diabetes. Clinical islet cell transplantation has the potential to cure diabetes, but donor pancreases are rare. In a new study, a group of researchers developed an improved pluripotent stem cell differentiation protocol to generate beta cells in vitro with superior glucose response and insulin secretion. This is a
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HudsonAlpha scientists collaborate to uncover a gene that doubles the risk of developing several neurodegenerative diseases
Scientists at the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), and the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), have identified a new risk factor for multiple neurodegenerative diseases.
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Antibiotic exposure can 'prime' single-resistant bacteria to become multidrug-resistant
Researchers at the University of Washington and the University of Idaho report that, for a bacterial pathogen already resistant to an antibiotic, prolonged exposure to that antibiotic not only boosted its ability to retain its resistance gene, but also made the pathogen more readily pick up and maintain resistance to a second antibiotic and become a dangerous, multidrug-resistant strain.
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Investigating the causes of the ozone levels in the Valderejo Nature Reserve
The UPV/EHU's Atmospheric Research Group (GIA) has presented a database comprising over 60 volatile organic compounds (VOC) measured continuously over the last ten years in the Valderejo Nature Reserve (Álava, Basque Country). The aim was to monitor background contamination and characterize the ozone episodes that have been detected at this station in the Basque Country where the legal limits stip
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Open access hardware & 3D printing can help tackle demand for health supplies
Free open source hardware and 3D printing could help to alleviate the burden of Covid-19 on global health systems, according to scientists at the University of Sussex.
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For ME/CFS patients, viral immunities come at a devastating, lifelong cost
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine and three German universities describe an underlying biological basis for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, illustrating how efforts by the body to boost immune system protections can come at physiological cost elsewhere.
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Parkinson's disease may start in the gut
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the University of North Carolina in the USA have mapped out the cell types behind various brain disorders. The findings are published in Nature Genetics and offer a roadmap for the development of new therapies to target neurological and psychiatric disorders. One interesting finding was that cells from the gut's nervous system are involved in Park
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Disappearance of animal species takes mental, cultural and material toll on humans
The research reveals that hunter-gatherer societies expressed a deep emotional and psychological connection with the animal species they hunted, especially after their disappearance. The study will help anthropologists and others understand the profound environmental changes taking place in our own lifetimes.
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The cause of the red coloration in stalagmites
A study by the UPV/EHU confirms the cause of the mysterious red colour of the stalagmites in the Goikoetxe Cave located in the Urdaibai Biosphere Reserve, and its potential use as an indicator of palaeoclimate changes on the Cantabrian seaboard between 7,000 and 5,000 years ago.
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Can exercise during pregnancy reduce obesity in offspring?
Washington State University researchers found that exercising while pregnant might reduce the risk of obesity in children. The study, conducted on mice, also discovered that offspring of fit mothers have better metabolic health. Infant mice whose mothers exercised had higher levels of brown adipose tissue, aka brown fat. There's an ongoing joke among members of Gen X that our mothers smoked cigar
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Analysing the role of therapy during lockdown | Letters
Readers respond to psychotherapist Gary Greenberg's article in which he questions whether there is a place for therapy in a pandemic As a therapist, I was drawn to the Guardian long read ( Therapy Under Lockdown: 'I'm just as terrified as my patients are' , 23 April) but it didn't resonate with me. What's interesting to me is that we are not all necessarily "hapless victims" with "nothing to do b
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New Zealand Claims to Have Eliminated COVID-19
On Monday, the Prime Minister of New Zealand declared that the country had successfully eliminated the coronavirus among its residents. If the claim holds up, that would be a remarkable success story — though, in reality, there are several technicalities about what it means to have "eliminated" the country's outbreak. Chief among them is that there are still new cases of COVID-19 being identified
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Scientists use bacteria to help plants grow in salty soil
A new study has shown that salt-tolerant bacteria can be used to enhance salt tolerance in various types of plants. The new approach could increase crop yield in areas dealing with increasing soil salinity.
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What's the best way to identify male hemp seedlings?
The surge in cannabidiol (CBD) popularity means more farmers are growing non-intoxicating strains of cannabis, or hemp, for CBD production. This new market has led to commercial genetic tests for early determination of hemp plant sex. However, a new study has found that these tests may not all produce accurate results.
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Tube worm slime displays long-lasting, self-powered glow
When threatened, the marine parchment tube worm secretes a sticky slime that emits a unique long-lasting blue light. New research into how the worm creates and sustains this light suggests that the process is self-powered.
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Study recommends new approach to managing risk of earthquakes triggered by fracking
Hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas production can trigger earthquakes, large and small. A new approach to managing the risk of these quakes could help operators and regulators hit the brakes early enough to prevent nuisance and reduce the chance of property damage and injury.
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Scientists use bacteria to help plants grow in salty soil
A new study has shown that salt-tolerant bacteria can be used to enhance salt tolerance in various types of plants. The new approach could increase crop yield in areas dealing with increasing soil salinity.
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What's the best way to identify male hemp seedlings?
The surge in cannabidiol (CBD) popularity means more farmers are growing non-intoxicating strains of cannabis, or hemp, for CBD production. This new market has led to commercial genetic tests for early determination of hemp plant sex. However, a new study has found that these tests may not all produce accurate results.
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Unique digital archive of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution now online
A new digital archive co-created by University of Warwick researcher Dr. Nicola Pratt gathers art, music and film created during the 2011 Egyptian revolution into a unique new multimedia resource for scholars, students and the general public alike.
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Early high school start times adversely affect attendance
A new study finds that earlier high school start times can have significant adverse consequences for students, including increased rates of tardiness and absenteeism.
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Tube worm slime displays long-lasting, self-powered glow
When threatened, the marine parchment tube worm secretes a sticky slime that emits a unique long-lasting blue light. New research into how the worm creates and sustains this light suggests that the process is self-powered.
7h
Agricultural economist evaluates research results on food security
Plant breeding has considerably increased agricultural yields in recent decades and thus made a major contribution to combating global hunger and poverty. At the same time, however, the intensification of farming has had negative environmental effects. Increases in food production will continue to be crucial for the future because the world population and demand continue to grow. A recent study by
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Honey bees could help monitor fertility loss in insects due to climate change
New research from the University of British Columbia and North Carolina State University could help scientists track how climate change is impacting the birds and the bees… of honey bees.
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European countries face a costly 23% increase in fragility fractures by 2030
A new study provides an overview and comparison of the burden and management of fragility fractures due to osteoporosis in the five largest countries in Europe (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom) as well as Sweden. The publication 'Fragility fractures in Europe: burden, management and opportunities' has been authored by an International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) steering co
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Superconductivity: It's hydrogen's fault
Last summer, it was discovered that there are promising superconductors in a special class of materials, the so-called nickelates. However, it soon became apparent that these initially spectacular could not be reproduced by other research groups. TU Wien has now found the reason for this: In some nickelates additional hydrogen atoms are incorporated into the material structure. This changes the el
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Coupled magnetic materials show interesting properties for quantum applications
In a new study led by the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, researchers have uncovered a novel way in which the excitations of magnetic spins in two different thin films can be strongly coupled to each other through their common interface.
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'Elegant' solution reveals how the universe got its structure
The universe is full of billions of galaxies–but their distribution across space is far from uniform. Why do we see so much structure in the universe today and how did it all form and grow? A 10-year survey of tens of thousands of galaxies provided a new approach to answering this fundamental mystery.
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Researchers' method holds promise for brain study, better tests for viruses
University of Texas at Dallas researchers have developed a promising method for remotely stimulating activity in deep brain regions, advancing understanding of how molecules act in the brain and paving the way for better cancer treatments and therapies for other diseases.
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Scientists unveil how general anesthesia works
The discovery of general anesthetics — compounds which induce unconsciousness, prevent control of movement and block pain — helped transform dangerous operations into safe surgery. But scientists still don't understand exactly how general anesthetics work. Now, researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) and Nagoya University have revealed how a ge
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Early high school start times adversely affect attendance
A new study finds that earlier high school start times can have significant adverse consequences for students, including increased rates of tardiness and absenteeism.
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How do epidemics spread and persist before and after introduction of a vaccine?
Modeling of measles epidemics in England and Wales from 1944 to 1994 shows that, before vaccination, measles could persist in both large population centers and by spread among sets of smaller towns.
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Soil in wounds can help stem deadly bleeding
New UBC research shows for the first time that soil silicates–the most abundant material on the Earth's crust–play a key role in blood clotting.
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Fracking and earthquake risk
Earthquakes caused by hydraulic fracturing can damage property and endanger lives. Stanford researchers have developed new guidelines for when to slow or halt fracking operations based on local risks.
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Cutting-Edge Brain Implant Lets Paralyzed Man Move and Feel Again
A cutting-edge implant has allowed a man to feel and move his hand again after a spinal cord injury left him partially paralyzed, Wired reports . According to a press release , it's the first time both motor function and sense of touch have been restored using a brain-computer interface (BCI), as described in a paper published in the journal Cell . After severing his spinal cord a decade ago, Ian
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NASA catches formation and final fate of Eastern Pacific's Tropical Depression 1E
The Eastern Pacific Ocean's hurricane season may not officially start until mid-May, but the first tropical cyclone of the season formed over the weekend of April 25 and 26. NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the small depression when it was at its peak and before it became post-tropical.
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Agricultural economist evaluates research results on food security
Plant breeding has considerably increased agricultural yields in recent decades and thus made a major contribution to combating global hunger and poverty. At the same time, however, the intensification of farming has had negative environmental effects. Increases in food production will continue to be crucial for the future because the world population and demand continue to grow. A recent study by
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Honey bees could help monitor fertility loss in insects due to climate change
New research from the University of British Columbia and North Carolina State University could help scientists track how climate change is impacting the birds and the bees… of honey bees.
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The end of lockdown will risk a new health divide
Those with the fewest rights are least able to demand a safe workplace
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8 lesser-known orientations along the sexuality spectrum
Sexuality is fluid and ever-changing, and our understanding of it has come a long way since the invention of the Kinsey Scale in the 1940's. Defining your own sexuality is important as it is a uniquely personal experience. While creating labels for yourself can help you better understand your orientation and build connections along your sexual journey, it's important not to place labels on others
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New species of moths discovered in the Alps named after three famous alpinists
The discovery of new, still unnamed animal species in a well-researched European region like the Alps is always a small sensation. All the more surprising is the description of a total of three new to science species previously misidentified as long-known alpine moths.
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English councils plead for £10bn to cope with coronavirus
'Cast-iron guarantee' sought that impact of rising costs and falling revenues will be met
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Self-Isolation? I'm an Expert
Here's what I've learned as an oceangoing research scientist — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New metasurface laser produces world's first super-chiral light
Researchers have demonstrated the world's first metasurface laser that produces "super-chiral light": light with ultra-high angular momentum. The light from this laser can be used as a type of "optical spanner" to or for encoding information in optical communications.
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New species of moths discovered in the Alps named after three famous alpinists
The discovery of new, still unnamed animal species in a well-researched European region like the Alps is always a small sensation. All the more surprising is the description of a total of three new to science species previously misidentified as long-known alpine moths.
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Light-based deep brain stimulation relieves symptoms of Parkinson's disease
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have used light-based deep brain stimulation to treat motor dysfunction in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. Succeeding where earlier attempts have failed, the method promises to provide new insights into why deep brain stimulation works and ways in which it can be improved on a patient-by-patient basis.
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A promising new treatment for recurrent pediatric brain cancer
Researchers developed a novel approach that delivers appropriately-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy directly into the cerebrospinal fluid that surrounds recurrent pediatric brain tumors.
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Self-Isolation? I'm an Expert
Here's what I've learned as an oceangoing research scientist — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Researchers develop double-layered paint that reflects heat
A team of researchers from Columbia and Howard Universities in the U.S. and Peking University in China has developed a kind of colored double-layered paint that reflects heat. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describe their paint and possible uses for it.
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Så anpassar sig Nederländerna till högre havsnivåer
Nederländerna är särskilt drabbade av översvämningar. Men istället för att stänga ute vattnet med barriärer, dammar och slussar har holländarna kommit på nya sätt att hantera de stigande havsnivåerna.
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Smart windows can let visible light through while blocking out heat
A 3D printed grate can be used to make a smart window that blocks heat from sunlight out in the summer while letting it through in the winter, conserving energy
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'Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker' Is Coming to Disney+ May 4
Yes, it's arriving just in time for Star Wars Day.
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Sparking a Small-Town Business Ecosystem
The national-level response to the coronavirus pandemic descends from tragedy into catastrophe. The black granite slabs of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington display the names of more than 58,000 Americans who died in that war. Those deaths occurred over more than 15 years of conflict. At current rates, a larger number of Americans will have died from this pandemic within less than two m
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Partial list of Sage members will be published, says Vallance
Move comes amid calls to end secrecy around group advising UK government on coronavirus
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Pseudoscience and COVID-19 — we've had enough already
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01266-z The scientific community must take up cudgels in the battle against bunk.
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NASA catches formation and final fate of Eastern Pacific's Tropical Depression 1E
The Eastern Pacific Ocean's hurricane season may not officially start until mid-May, but the first tropical cyclone of the season formed over the weekend of April 25 and 26. NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the small depression when it was at its peak and before it became post-tropical.
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Erosion process studies in the Volga Region assist in land use planning
Dr. Gusarov (Paleoclimatology, Paleoecology and Paleomagnetism Lab) has been working on erosion processes for two decades as a part of various teams. In this research, he tackled the Middle Volga Region, the one where the city of Kazan – and Kazan Federal University – are situated.
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'We urgently need a renewed public debate about new breeding technologies'
Plant breeding has considerably increased agricultural yields in recent decades and made a major contribution to combating global hunger and poverty. At the same time, however, the intensification of farming has had negative environmental effects. A recent study by the University of Göttingen shows that new plant breeding technologies – such as genetic engineering and gene editing – can help incre
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New metasurface laser produces world's first super-chiral light
Researchers have demonstrated the world's first metasurface laser that produces "super-chiral light": light with ultra-high angular momentum. The light from this laser can be used as a type of "optical spanner" to or for encoding information in optical communications.
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Breastfeeding moms' exposure to nicotine linked to infant skull defect
Lactating mothers who use e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement therapies may be putting their breastfed babies at risk for skull defects, a new study in animals suggests. Cigarette smoking has already been linked to increased risk for these abnormalities in previous research. This study tested the effects of nicotine alone on head and face development.
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University of the Witwatersrand publishes first clinical data on COVID-19 in South Africa
Health professionals will face difficult ethical decisions when it comes to dealing with COVID-19 patients.
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Four griddles that will become your favorite kitchen appliance
An easy-to-clean cooking surface. (Amazon/) Those of you who love a griddle know it's often the secret to a perfectly cooked breakfast. We're talking about the kind of breakfast where everything is served hot and buttery. We want the kind of breakfast where your pancakes are lovely caramel colored disks. If you happen to be a griddle enthusiast, you know that some griddles can be your best friend
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UK to name scientists on coronavirus advisory group Sage
Makeup of group to be made public after political advisers revealed to be in attendance Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The names of scientists advising ministers on the coronavirus epidemic are to be made public this week in an effort to boost transparency around the government's decision-making process. The UK government's chief scientific adviser, Sir Patrick Vall
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Iron-based binary ferromagnets for transverse thermoelectric conversion
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2230-z Aluminium- and gallium-doped iron compounds show a large anomalous Nernst effect owing to a topological electronic structure, and their films are potentially suitable for designing low-cost, flexible microelectronic thermoelectric generators.
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Electronics for high-altitude use can get smaller and sturdier with new nanomaterials
Demand is growing for new materials that can be printed at ever smaller dimensions. But materials that work well on Earth don’t always hold up well at high altitudes and in space. Scientists are now creating metal-based nanomaterials for circuit boards that could be resistant to high-altitude radiation encountered by aerospace equipment and fighter jets. The researchers are presenting their result
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Eye pupil an indicator of effective decision making, study finds
A team of Army and academic researchers are investigating how eye-pupil size changes can indicate a person's cognitive state as a means to enable teaming with autonomous agents.
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COVID-19 could spell the end of an egalitarian National Health Service
A return to the principles of equality and universality of care that informed the NHS 70 years ago could be impossible.
8h
Rapid evolution in fish: genomic changes within a generation
Researchers from Basel have identified the genetic basis of rapid adaptation using a native fish species. They compared threespine stickleback fish from different habitats in the Lake Constance region. Their study reveals that changes in the genome can be observed within a single generation. The results were published in the journal Nature Communications.
8h
Virtual and augmented reality: warnings about the ethical dangers
Research on virtual reality started in the eighties, but it is now that good quality is available to the public and it can become a mass consumer product soon. However, there is almost no scientific knowledge on the effects of virtual reality in the long run, nor any oversight over content.
8h
Honey bees could help monitor fertility loss in insects due to climate change
New research from the University of British Columbia and North Carolina State University could help scientists track how climate change is impacting the birds and the bees… of honey bees.
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Cancer care model could help us cope with COVID-19, says nanomedicine expert
As the UK government looks for an exit strategy to Britain's COVID-19 lockdown a nanomedicine expert from The University of Manchester believes a care model usually applied to cancer patients could provide a constructive way forward. Professor Kostas Kostarelos says we should view the COVID-19 pandemic — or any future virus outbreak — more like a chronic disease, such as cancer, and it should be
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Immune system changes occur early in development of multiple myeloma, study finds
Long before multiple myeloma becomes a malignant disease, the collection of immune system cells and signal carriers amid the tumor cells undergoes dramatic shifts, with alterations in both the number and type of immune cells, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) report in a new study.
8h
Study analyzes contamination in drug manufacturing plants
A study from an MIT-led consortium, which analyzed 18 incidents of viral contamination at biopharmaceutical manufacturing plants, offers insight into the most common sources of viral contamination, and makes recommendations to help companies avoid such incidents.
8h
They remember: Communities of microbes found to have working memory
Biologists studying communities of bacteria have discovered that these so-called simple organisms feature a robust capacity for memory. Using light, researchers were able to encode complex memory patterns and visualize cells with memory. The discovery reveals surprising parallels between low-level single-celled organisms and sophisticated neurons that process memory in the human brain. The finding
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Scientists double understanding of genetic risk of melanoma
A global collaboration of scientists has more than doubled the known number of regions on the human genome that influence the risk of developing melanoma. The joint study leader and QIMR Berghofer statistical geneticist, Associate Professor Matthew Law, said the researchers identified 33 new regions of the genome and confirmed another 21 previously reported regions that are linked to a person's ri
8h
Sustainable light achieved in living plants
This week in Nature Biotechnology, scientists have announced the feasibility of creating plants that produce their own visible luminescence.
8h
New model of the GI tract could speed drug development
MIT engineers have devised a way to speed new drug development by rapidly testing how well they are absorbed in the small intestine. This approach could also help find ways to improve the absorption of existing drugs so they can be taken orally.
8h
Biochemists unveil molecular mechanism for motor protein regulation
Researchers have unveiled the mechanism by which one particular molecule affects dynein function. While it was long known that the lissencephaly-1 gene, or Lis1, affects dynein activity, the details were unclear. Steven Markus and his team have revealed exactly how Lis1 activates dynein by preventing dynein's ability to turn itself off, stabilizing it in an 'open,' uninhibited conformation.
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New type of immune cell discovered in breast ducts
Melbourne breast cancer researchers have discovered a new type of immune cell that helps to keep breast tissue healthy by regulating a vital process within mammary ducts – the sites where milk is produced and transported, but also where most breast cancers arise.
8h
Crabeater seal data used to predict changes in Antarctic krill distribution
The western Antarctic Peninsula is experiencing rapid environmental change, with warming temperatures and decreasing sea ice. How these changes will affect Antarctic krill is a crucial question, because this abundant crustacean is an important food source for a wide range of animals, from penguins to whales. Researchers have now used data from tracking studies of crabeater seals to infer the distr
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Abundant element to power small devices
Researchers have found a way to convert heat energy into electricity with a nontoxic material. The material is mostly iron which is extremely cheap given its relative abundance. A generator based on this material could power small devices such as remote sensors or wearable devices. The material can be thin so it could be shaped into various forms.
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Factors associated with disaster preparedness among US households
Nationally representative survey data from 16,000 US households were used to identify socioeconomic and other factors associated with disaster preparedness among households, such as having food and water stockpiles, an electric generator, communication plans and meeting locations to identify disparities.
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State policies on access to vaccination services for low-income adults
This study evaluated Medicaid benefits coverage and reimbursement amounts for recommended adult vaccines in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.
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Sleep effects of later school start time for teens
This observational study compared how school start times either early or delayed were associated with when, how long and how well high school students slept. Insufficient sleep is a common problem among adolescents.
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Crisis support for the world, one text away | Nancy Lublin
What if we could help people in crisis anytime, anywhere with a simple text message? That's the idea behind Crisis Text Line, a free 24-hour service that connects people in need with trained, volunteer crisis counselors — "strangers helping strangers around the world, like a giant global love machine," as cofounder and CEO Nancy Lublin puts it. Learn more about their big plans to expand to four n
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Early high school start times are bad for students
Earlier high school start times can have significant adverse consequences for students, including increased rates of tardiness and absenteeism, a new study finds. "The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that high schools begin class after 8:30 AM, but we know that most schools start much earlier," says corresponding author Melinda Morrill, an associate professor of economics at North Carol
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Photonic metasurfaces provide a new playground for twistronics
Quantum optics, spintronics and diffraction-free imaging with low loss are among the technologies that may benefit from recently predicted effects in twisted bilayer photonic structures. The work takes inspiration from a burgeoning field of condensed matter research—"twistronics," in which electronic behaviour can be dramatically altered by controlling the twist between layers of 2-D materials.
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The pandemic is a reason to preserve—not pollute—the planet
We've already seen the Trump Administration use COVID-19 as an excuse to stop enforcing environmental laws and there is little question that the pandemic that has all of us under lockdown has driven most other policy issues off of the agenda. In the short run, the sheer desire for normalcy can and should dominate our thoughts and our actions. But we should be very careful about taking actions that
8h
Rapid evolution in fish: Genomic changes within a generation
Researchers from Basel have identified the genetic basis of rapid adaptation using a native fish species. They compared threespine stickleback fish from different habitats in the Lake Constance region. Their study reveals that changes in the genome can be observed within a single generation. The results were published in the journal Nature Communications.
8h
How to include human connection with nature in biodiversity goals
We need new ways of understanding how people depend on nature in our efforts to protect biodiversity. A new thesis from Lund University in Sweden suggests that we rarely take into account people's place-based, varied and often emotional relationships with nature.
8h
World's first 3-D simulations of superluminous supernovae
For most of the 20th century, astronomers have scoured the skies for supernovae—the explosive deaths of massive stars—and their remnants in search of clues about the progenitor, the mechanisms that caused it to explode, and the heavy elements created in the process. In fact, these events create most of the cosmic elements that go on to form new stars, galaxies, and life.
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To tame an electron bunch in an X-ray laser, scientists put a ring on it
A team of scientists has come up with a way to improve electron bunches and produce brighter X-ray beams: Put a ring on them. The team, which includes researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University, published their results in Physical Review Letters earlier this month.
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Coronavirus: Lessons from Italy on the difficulties of exiting lockdown
Italy has been on the front line of the coronavirus pandemic since it exploded there in late February, and it was the first European country to impose lockdown on its citizens.
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Using cloud-precipitation relationship to estimate cloud water path of mature tropical cyclones
The cloud water path of mature tropical cyclones can be estimated by a notable sigmoid function of near-surface rain rate, according to Prof. Yunfei Fu, a professor at the School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, and one of the authors of a recently published study in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences.
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Anti IL-6 For Coronavirus Patients: Does It Work, or Not?
It's been looking for some time as if these coronavirus infections need a biphasic approach to therapy – an antiviral approach earlier on, and for those in serious trouble, perhaps a shift to immune modulation as the body's reaction to the virus starts doing even more harm . That post goes into some detail on possible therapies targeting IL-6 for this purpose, and today we finally have some clini
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Jezero crater on Mars may harbor signs of life
A new analysis of satellite imagery supports the hypothesis that the Jezero crater on Mars could be a good place to look for markers of life. NASA's Perseverance rover, expected to launch in July 2020, will land at the Jezero crater. Undulating streaks of land visible from space reveal rivers once coursed across the Martian surface—but for how long did the water flow? Enough time to record eviden
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Watch how researchers predict droughts months in advance
Early warnings of drought can help prevent catastrophic famines
8h
Scientists create glowing plants using mushroom genes
New technique could help shed light on plants' workings – and lead to unusual home decor Emitting an eerie green glow, they look like foliage from a retro computer game, but in fact they are light-emitting plants produced in a laboratory. Researchers say the glowing greenery could not only add an unusual dimension to home decor but also open up a fresh way for scientists to explore the inner work
8h
Rapid evolution in fish: Genomic changes within a generation
Researchers from Basel have identified the genetic basis of rapid adaptation using a native fish species. They compared threespine stickleback fish from different habitats in the Lake Constance region. Their study reveals that changes in the genome can be observed within a single generation. The results were published in the journal Nature Communications.
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Pest-epidemien førte til livslang strid mellem Newton og Hooke
PLUS. Videnskabshistorie: Under pesten i England i 1665-1666 udførte Isaac Newton optiske eksperimenter, der førte ham på kollisionskurs med Robert Hooke. Det udviklede sig til et regulært fjendskab.
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Open-source hardware, new models and nude selfies
A digest of COVID-19 science, data, reporting and optimism @ 27 April.
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Coupling big data and conservation
Scientists highlight opportunities to generate sustainable solutions.
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Plants grow brightly with mushrooms
Scientists say DNA creates sustainable light.
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Genome regions linked to melanoma risk
Study highlights role of immune system.
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Studying in the UK is a mixed bag for West African students
The number of students traveling abroad for education has increased substantially over the past 20 years. UK Council for International Student Affairs data shows that during the 2015–16 academic year, 19% of students studying in Britain came from outside the European Union. Of these, 8% were from African countries. Most were South African (22%). Just over 20% came from West African countries.
8h
Sustainable light achieved in living plants
The movie Avatar evoked an imaginary world of lush bioluminescent jungles. Now the popular fascination for sustainably glowing foliage is being realized through advances in designer genetics. This week in Nature Biotechnology, scientists have announced the feasibility of creating plants that produce their own visible luminescence.
8h
They remember: Communities of microbes found to have working memory
Biologists studying collectives of bacteria, or "biofilms," have discovered that these so-called simple organisms feature a robust capacity for memory.
8h
Study analyzes contamination in drug manufacturing plants
Over the past few decades, there have been a handful of incidents in which manufacturing processes for making protein drugs became contaminated with viruses at manufacturing plants. These were all discovered before the drugs reached patients, but many of the incidents led to costly cleanups and in one instance a drug shortage.
8h
Biochemists unveil molecular mechanism for motor protein regulation
Movement signals life, and nowhere is this truer than inside a living cell. The millions of proteins and molecules within each of our cells bend, travel and conform in a complex but orchestrated pattern, regulated by the genes that encode what goes where and when. As part of that pattern, an important class of proteins called dynein transport and deliver various cellular cargoes between different
8h
Crabeater seal data used to predict changes in Antarctic krill distribution
The western Antarctic Peninsula is experiencing rapid environmental change, with warming air and ocean temperatures and decreasing sea ice. How these changes will affect Antarctic krill is a crucial question, because this abundant crustacean is an important food source for a wide range of animals, from penguins to whales.
8h
Embrace The Ultimate Unknown
The best way to have a good death is to live a good life. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Sustainable light achieved in living plants
The movie Avatar evoked an imaginary world of lush bioluminescent jungles. Now the popular fascination for sustainably glowing foliage is being realized through advances in designer genetics. This week in Nature Biotechnology, scientists have announced the feasibility of creating plants that produce their own visible luminescence.
8h
They remember: Communities of microbes found to have working memory
Biologists studying collectives of bacteria, or "biofilms," have discovered that these so-called simple organisms feature a robust capacity for memory.
8h
New understanding of asthma medicines could improve future treatment
New research has revealed new insights into common asthma aerosol treatments to aid the drug's future improvements which could benefit hundreds of millions of global sufferers.
9h
The North Atlantic right whale population is in poor condition
New research reveals that endangered North Atlantic right whales are in poorer body condition than individual whales from the three well recovering populations of Southern right whales. This difference is alarming: poor body condition for North Atlantic right whales explains why too many of them are dying, and why they are not giving birth to enough calves to boost the population's recovery. The r
9h
Scientists develop stable luminescent composite material based on perovskite nanocrystals
An international team of scientists that includes researchers from ITMO University has developed a new composite material based on perovskite nanocrystals for the purpose of creating miniature light sources with improved output capacity. The results have been published in ChemNanoMat.
9h
Proteasome phase separation for destruction
Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science (TMiMS) discovered proteasome-containing droplets, which are formed by acute hyperosmotic stress. The proteasome droplets also contain ubiquitin-tagged proteins and multiple interacting proteins, by which induce liquid-liquid phase separation of the proteasome for rapid degradation of unwanted proteins. The ubiquitin-dependent prot
9h
New breakthrough could help us understand how rare childhood brain disorders develop
A new breakthrough in understanding the cause of rare childhood brain disorders has been made by researchers at the University of Sheffield.
9h
New species of moths discovered in the Alps named after three famous alpinists
During a genetic project of the Tyrolean State Museums in Innsbruck, Austrian entomologist and head of the Natural Science Collections Peter Huemer used an integrative research approach to study four long-known, yet controversial European moths. It turned out that he was not dealing with four, but seven species. Those three previously unknown moths were described in the open-access, peer-reviewed
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Researchers identify key mechanisms involved in pulmonary fibrosis development
Working alongside research groups from Heidelberg, researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have elucidated the novel disease processes involved in the development of pulmonary fibrosis. They were able to show that the protein known as NEDD4-2 plays a key role in lung health and that loss of this crucial regulatory molecule has a significant impact on various mechanisms involved in th
9h
Biochemists unveil molecular mechanism for motor protein regulation
Movement signals life, and nowhere is this truer than inside a living cell. The millions of proteins and molecules within each of our cells bend, travel and conform in a complex but orchestrated pattern, regulated by the genes that encode what goes where and when. As part of that pattern, an important class of proteins called dynein transport and deliver various cellular cargoes between different
9h
Bacteria with robust memories
Researchers draw parallels to sophisticated neurons.
9h
Gravitational lensing, by Hubble
We look back on some of the telescope's finest work.
9h
Airbus: braced for impact
The pandemic has made airlines reluctant or unable to accept new jets
9h
Study analyzes contamination in drug manufacturing plants
Over the past few decades, there have been a handful of incidents in which manufacturing processes for making protein drugs became contaminated with viruses at manufacturing plants. These were all discovered before the drugs reached patients, but many of the incidents led to costly cleanups and in one instance a drug shortage.
9h
Crabeater seal data used to predict changes in Antarctic krill distribution
The western Antarctic Peninsula is experiencing rapid environmental change, with warming air and ocean temperatures and decreasing sea ice. How these changes will affect Antarctic krill is a crucial question, because this abundant crustacean is an important food source for a wide range of animals, from penguins to whales.
9h
Nature reveals there's more than one way to build a lung
Our bodies are home to hidden trees—complex, branching structures vital to the functions of organs including the lung, kidney, and pancreas.
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Nature reveals there's more than one way to build a lung
Our bodies are home to hidden trees—complex, branching structures vital to the functions of organs including the lung, kidney, and pancreas.
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Facebook Messenger Rooms wants to be the new Zoom
Rooms will give you the tiled view that helped make Zoom so popular. (Facebook Rooms/) Since Facebook added video chat to Instagram back in 2018, Facebook has offered its users numerous ways to carry out real-time face-to-face interactions. By that point, almost every corner of the Facebook world—including Messenger and WhatsApp—offered some kind of video chat option. When social distancing began
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Video: Using social science to aid in the fight against COVID-19
While medical scientists and clinicians work to combat the coronavirus pandemic and save lives in labs and hospitals around the world, Duke professor Dan Ariely shared an analysis of the pandemic from a social science perspective during a live presentation on YouTube.
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Bronze Age swords bear the marks of skilled fighters
Warriors during the Bronze Age used their weapons in skillful ways that would have required lots of training in specific techniques, researchers say.
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Some industries will thrive during pandemic
Responses to contain the spread of the new coronavirus have brought economic loss and uncertainty, but some businesses and industries can survive and thrive.
9h
Scientists develop stable luminescent composite material based on perovskite nanocrystals
An international team of scientists that includes researchers from ITMO University has developed a new composite material based on perovskite nanocrystals for the purpose of creating miniature light sources with improved output capacity. The introduction of perovskite nanocrystals into porous glass microparticles made it possible to increase their operating time by almost three times, and the subs
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SpaceX Manages to Test Starship Without Failing Catastrophically
Fourth Attempt The SpaceX Starship , the spacecraft that the company designed to carry massive cargo shipments or dozens of crewmembers to the Moon or even Mars, just passed a crucial test. On Sunday, a Starship prototype passed what's called a cryogenic pressure test, Ars Technica reports . That's where its fuel tanks are filled with extremely cold nitrogen and pressurized to several times the p
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IHG/hotels: occupational hazards
Stronger reserves put Holiday Inn owner in a better position than its competitors
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Coronavirus: we're in a real-time laboratory of a more sustainable urban future
A pause has been forced on urban life. Quiet roads, empty skies, deserted high streets and parks, closed cinemas, cafés and museums—a break in the spending and work frenzy so familiar to us all. The reality of lockdown is making ghost towns of the places we once knew. Everything we know about our urban world has come to a shuddering halt. For now.
9h
Salmonid fishes use different mechanism to defend against parasite infections
Collaborate research of the University of Jyvaskyla and the Natural Resources Institute Finland on salmonid fishes, sheds light on animal defence mechanisms and their interactions. The research demonstrates that populations with a strong physiological resistance show little behavioural avoidance and damage repair, and vice versa. The results can have important practical implications for stocking a
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Using cloud-precipitation relationship to estimate cloud water path of mature tropical cyclones
Scientists find the cloud water path of mature tropical cyclones can be estimated by a notable sigmoid function of near-surface rain rate.
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Visible light-photocatalytic water-splitting for hydrogenation of aryl chlorides
A visible light-photocatalytic water-splitting hydrogenation technology (WSHT) is proposed to in-situ generate active H-species for controllable hydrogenation of aryl chlorides instead of using flammable H2.
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The Pessimism of Andrew Yang's Post-pandemic Politics
We're going to get through this, the politicians say. We'll be stronger than ever, better than ever. Except maybe we won't. More than 50,000 Americans are already dead of the coronavirus. That sinking feeling you've probably had at some point during the past few weeks? Andrew Yang's had that feeling for a while. He still sees the world through his cut-the-crap fatalism. (" We have to deal with th
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Drought, fire and flood: How outer urban areas can manage emergencies while reducing future risks
First the drought, then bushfires and then flash floods: a chain of extreme events hit Australia hard in recent months. The coronavirus pandemic has only temporarily shifted our attention towards a new emergency, adding yet another risk.
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Putting the squeeze on liquid iron helps to reveal Earth's make-up
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01260-5 Diamonds help to hold iron at conditions simulating the planet's interior.
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Crafting research labs and concert halls to produce exactly the right acoustics
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01225-8 Jukka Pätynen aims to 'transport' listeners through his room and wall designs.
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Scientists shed light on action of key tuberculosis drug
A new study has shed fresh light on how a key front-line drug kills the tuberculosis bacterium.
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Reducing the carbon footprint of artificial intelligence
A new system cuts the energy required for training and running neural networks.
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CDC Warns About Six New COVID Symptoms to Look Out For
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention just added six new symptoms to its list of known COVID-19 symptoms , including chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headaches, and a sore throat. The original list included known symptoms such as fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Here are the new ones: Chills Repeated shaking with chills Muscle pain Headache Sore throat According t
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Research uncovers the first non-centrosymmetric fluorooxosilicophosphate with Si-F bonds
Deep-ultraviolet (UV) nonlinear optical materials play a vital role in a variety of high-tech scientific instruments. Traditionally, the sources of these materials were usually limited to π-conjugated systems such as borates and carbonates, while the non-π-conjugated system such as phosphates and silicates is relatively unexplored.
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Researchers reconstruct drought variability from teak tree rings in Southern Myanmar
Teak (Tectona grandis) is a tropical, deciduous, broad-leaved tree species indigenous to Southeast Asia. Despite its high dendroclimatological potential, only a few studies have analyzed the relationships between teak ring-width and climate variability in Myanmar.
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Organ size regulator DA1 is involved in the formation of lateral branches
Branches affect plant architecture and plant yield. Although some regulatory factors affecting the formation of lateral branches have been reported, the mechanism of the formation of lateral branches is still largely unknown. The number of branches and the size of organs are always coordinated in plants, and the mechanism of the action remains to be studied.
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Big data says time's running out to save the environment
Big data can help scientists chart not only the degradation of the environment but also help achieve sustainability, according to a new paper. Lead author Rebecca Runting from the University of Melbourne's School of Geography says that while we currently have an unprecedented ability to generate, store, access, and analyze data about the environment, these technological advances will not help the
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Kicking Horses Are More Deadly than Lightning
Originally published in July 1898 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Organ size regulator DA1 is involved in the formation of lateral branches
Branches affect plant architecture and plant yield. Although some regulatory factors affecting the formation of lateral branches have been reported, the mechanism of the formation of lateral branches is still largely unknown. The number of branches and the size of organs are always coordinated in plants, and the mechanism of the action remains to be studied.
9h
Research volunteers won't be told of their coronavirus genetic risk
Half a million people taking part in the UK Biobank, which gathers genetic information for researchers to study, won't be told if they turn out to be genetically vulnerable to the coronavirus
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New findings suggest laws of nature not as constant as previously thought
Not only does a universal constant seem annoyingly inconstant at the outer fringes of the cosmos, it occurs in only one direction, which is downright weird.
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Unique Namibian trial finds smart interventions reduce malaria transmission by 75%
A trial by scientists at the Wits Research Institute for Malaria (WRIM), in collaboration with Namibian, UK, and US researchers demonstrates how mass drug administration and vector control can help eliminate malaria. A vector refers to an organism that transmits infection, as mosquitos infected with parasites transmit malaria to people.
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Travel considerations specified for 177Lu-DOTATATE radiation therapy patients
Researchers and patient advocates have addressed the challenges related to traveling after receiving 177Lu-DOTATATE radiation therapy in a study published in the April issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. Due to the residual radiation activity of 177Lu-DOTATATE, neuroendocrine tumor patients have experienced travel delays at U.S. ports of entry. Researchers recommend that patients carry a tra
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NUS-led team develops artificial intelligence platform to combat infectious diseases
A research team led by Professor Dean Ho from the National University of Singapore has developed a ground-breaking artificial intelligence platform known as 'IDentif.AI' which can identify optimal drug combination therapies at unprecedented speeds.
9h
New tool measures quality of life in people with dementia
University of Queensland researchers say a new tool to measure of the quality of life of people with dementia will result in better targeted care for those living with the condition.
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Spatial variation in carbonate carbon isotopes during Cambrian SPICE event across eastern North China
The Steptoean positive carbon isotope excursion (SPICE) is a large excursion (by ~5‰) in marine carbon isotope (δ13C) records during the middle-late Cambrian transition. The SPICE is hypothesized to be caused by enhanced global carbon burial, a global carbon cycle perturbation accompanied with dramatic marine anoxia and euxinia.
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Remote sensing applied to estimate lake clarity in China
Water quality and trophic state evaluation of inland waters is important, as they are crucial water resources for drinking, industrial and agricultural use. Secchi disk depth (SD) is usually adopted as a reliable proxy for the evaluation. However, traditional approaches are less suitable for monitoring large water bodies or a large number of lakes in extensive areas because of the dynamic nature a
9h
Researchers propose flexible pressure sensor for human-machine interaction
Flexible pressure sensors have attracted considerable attention due to their potential applications in electronic skins. To date, lots of approaches have been reported to achieve effective transformation from mechanical stimuli to electrical signals.
9h
Making terahertz waves: Why liquids prefer long optical pulses
Laser-induced ionization in matter—gas, cluster, liquid, and solid—occurs when a laser pulse with sufficient intensity is focused into a target material, creating electrons and ions through nonlinear processes of laser-matter interaction. Photoionization is an effective way to generate transient currents and electromagnetic radiation covering the spectrum from microwaves to X-rays.
9h
Droplets are key to cells' dynamic activities
A cell is a complex machine whose flexible architecture enables it to take part in life's activities: relaying information, managing waste, responding to stress.
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Harnessing cellular power to meet global challenges
For José Avalos' research team, the intricate, small-scale work of bioengineering could hold the key to solving global challenges in renewable energy and sustainable manufacturing.
9h
How glow-in-the-dark jellyfish inspired a scientific revolution
What makes a jellyfish glow? For scientists, asking that simple question led to a powerful new tool that's completely transformed medicine—and won the Nobel!
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Unraveling the genetic mysteries of infectious disease
As a genomics epidemiologist, Hayley Yaglom is currently studying the transmission patterns of COVID-19 and working to support Arizona communities with testing for the virus. After earning a bachelor's degree in animal science and a master's degree in animal biotechnology, both from the University of Massachusetts, she came to Mizzou in 2011 for her Master of Veterinary Public Health.
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Droplets are key to cells' dynamic activities
A cell is a complex machine whose flexible architecture enables it to take part in life's activities: relaying information, managing waste, responding to stress.
9h
Harnessing cellular power to meet global challenges
For José Avalos' research team, the intricate, small-scale work of bioengineering could hold the key to solving global challenges in renewable energy and sustainable manufacturing.
9h
How glow-in-the-dark jellyfish inspired a scientific revolution
What makes a jellyfish glow? For scientists, asking that simple question led to a powerful new tool that's completely transformed medicine—and won the Nobel!
9h
Unraveling the genetic mysteries of infectious disease
As a genomics epidemiologist, Hayley Yaglom is currently studying the transmission patterns of COVID-19 and working to support Arizona communities with testing for the virus. After earning a bachelor's degree in animal science and a master's degree in animal biotechnology, both from the University of Massachusetts, she came to Mizzou in 2011 for her Master of Veterinary Public Health.
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How do viruses mutate and jump species?
Viruses are little more than parasitic fragments of RNA or DNA. Despite this, they are astonishingly abundant in number and genetic diversity. We don't know how many virus species there are, but there could be trillions.
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How do viruses mutate and jump species?
Viruses are little more than parasitic fragments of RNA or DNA. Despite this, they are astonishingly abundant in number and genetic diversity. We don't know how many virus species there are, but there could be trillions.
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COVID-19 lockdown hits coastal communities the hardest
A new study by the University of Southampton and the Centre for Towns has shown that coastal communities are likely to be most affected economically by the lockdown measures brought in as a result of the COVID19 pandemic, with former industrial towns also at risk from longer-term effects of the crisis.
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Accelerating clinical use of Raman spectroscopy's chemical fingerprints
"The technique of Raman spectroscopy—in combination with emerging machine-learning methods—is making its way into operating rooms at a rapid pace, with the prospect of improving the accuracy of surgical procedures in a wide range of oncology applications, including neurosurgery," says Frédéric Leblond, professor of engineering physics at Polytechnique Montréal. His team's new paper aims to acceler
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Solving the puzzle of life's development
Stanislav Shvartsman dreams of modeling every minuscule interaction in the embryo in all its tortuous detail.
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26 Hours on a Saharan Freight Train
Photographer Adrian Guerin rode Mauritania's Train du Desert, one of the world's longest trains, at the hottest time of the year. It nearly broke him.
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Solving the puzzle of life's development
Stanislav Shvartsman dreams of modeling every minuscule interaction in the embryo in all its tortuous detail.
9h
Support for increased police powers depends on public trust
Public support for increased police powers relies heavily on trust and legitimacy, according to a new study by UCL and the London School of Economics (LSE).
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Thwarting bacteria's defenses as a way to fight infection
To combat the growth of antibiotic resistance, Mark Brynildsen searches for precise treatments that kill pathogens by weakening their defenses against the body's immune system.
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Leg up for podiatry students as 3-D-printed feet put them strides ahead of the rest
It's a massive coup for UniSA's podiatry students who must achieve a minimum of 1000 hours of clinical practice over their degree in order to graduate on time, an issue that's causing much concern for many universities as they grapple to compensate face-to-face clinical practice.
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We need to talk about COVID-19 deaths
The coronavirus pandemic has prompted a national rethink on how society manages death and dying, at the same time as Flinders University has launched research into how people are coping with the trauma of losing loved ones at a time of social distancing.
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Spread of early dairy farming across Western Europe
An international team of scientists analyzed the molecular remains of food left in pottery used by the first farmers who settled along the Atlantic Coast of Europe from 7,000 to 6,000 years ago.
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Stress in parents of children with autism: Pets may help
While current events have increased stress for all families, parents of children with autism report higher levels of stress on average than parents of typically developing kids. Feeling overwhelmed and overburdened by various responsibilities, some parents turn to pets as a source of comfort and support.
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Thwarting bacteria's defenses as a way to fight infection
To combat the growth of antibiotic resistance, Mark Brynildsen searches for precise treatments that kill pathogens by weakening their defenses against the body's immune system.
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Can people give their pets COVID-19?
Millions of people across the country are living under stay-at-home orders, which often means prolonged contact with their pets. With a tiger at the Bronx Zoo recently testing positive for COVID-19, the question of whether people can transmit the disease to their pets is becoming more important.
9h
Police violence makes COVID-19 worse for black Americans
The trauma and stress police violence cause for black people, and the physical toll of that violence, may contribute to the disparity in COVID-19 deaths, a panel of experts argue. There are various reasons COVID-19 is killing black people at six times the rate of white people, including a lack of access to health care, and poor environmental conditions in black communities. "There are levels of c
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This New Smartphone-Based DNA Test Could Help Track Disease in Real Time
On-the-spot DNA tests could prove invaluable to doctors, farmers, and officials responsible for food safety or environmental monitoring. Now Chinese researchers have created an ultra-portable, smartphone-based DNA testing platform that costs less than $10. Whether testing blood for the presence of a particular disease-causing pathogen or monitoring the presence of certain microbes in river water,
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Can people give their pets COVID-19?
Millions of people across the country are living under stay-at-home orders, which often means prolonged contact with their pets. With a tiger at the Bronx Zoo recently testing positive for COVID-19, the question of whether people can transmit the disease to their pets is becoming more important.
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Divorce and parental rejection influence children's educational attainment
The educational attainment of Dutch children depends not only on their parents' socioeconomic position, but also on adverse experiences such as parental divorce or maltreatment. The negative effects of these adverse experiences are the most significant for children of parents with a strong socioeconomic position. This was revealed through research done by Radboud University sociologists that was p
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Salmonid fishes use different mechanism to defend against parasite infections
Research on salmonid fishes by the University of Jyväskylä and the Natural Resources Institute Finland sheds light on animal defence mechanisms and their interactions. The research demonstrates that populations with a strong physiological resistance show little behavioural avoidance and damage repair, and vice versa. The results can have important practical implications for stocking activities of
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A new spin on low-power data storage: Tiny ferromagnets with ultrathin insulating layers
The ability to control the magnetization of electrodes made from ferromagnets could help develop more energy-efficient devices for spintronic applications, including data storage technologies, wearable electronics and implantable medical devices.
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InterContinental reopens nearly all hotels in China
UK-based chain secures £600m government loan as occupancy sits at roughly a fifth of capacity
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Salmonid fishes use different mechanism to defend against parasite infections
Research on salmonid fishes by the University of Jyväskylä and the Natural Resources Institute Finland sheds light on animal defence mechanisms and their interactions. The research demonstrates that populations with a strong physiological resistance show little behavioural avoidance and damage repair, and vice versa. The results can have important practical implications for stocking activities of
10h
Power to the people? Study examines what voters want in a primary election
New research co-authored by a Brandeis politics professor suggests primary voters are more willing to accept influence from party insiders and elites than one might think.
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Study of 17-year cicada choruses reveals dependence on light levels
Think back five years to spring 2015. People in Kansas were enjoying a rare spectacle of nature: the emergence of the Kansan brood (Brood IV) of 17-year cicadas.
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Most firms neglected to include pandemic in annual risk assessments despite warning signs, study shows
Public companies in the United States are required to file annual reports that, among other things, disclose the risk factors that might negatively affect the price of their stock.
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New toolkit offers mobile produce markets a roadmap for success
As mobile produce markets become an increasingly popular strategy around the country for addressing food access and food security, operators now have a new tool they can take advantage of whether they're just getting started or looking to expand.
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Researchers' method holds promise for brain study, better tests for viruses
University of Texas at Dallas researchers have developed a promising method for remotely stimulating activity in deep brain regions, advancing understanding of how molecules act in the brain and paving the way for better cancer treatments and therapies for other diseases.
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Searching the COVID-19 spike protein for a potential vaccine
The virus that causes COVID-19 is studded on its exterior with "spike proteins," a key component in its ability to infect human cells. Two University of Georgia researchers, Rob Woods and Parastoo Azadi, are investigating the proteins and sugars on the surface of the virus with the goal of finding information that could lead to vaccines and therapeutics.
10h
Venice's Black Death and the Dawn of Quarantine
Archaeological research is unearthing Venice's quarantine history to illuminate how the Italian city created a vast public health response 700 years ago and helped lay the modern foundation for coping with pandemics.
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Study spots an autoimmune protein that may cause OCD
A study of mice discovers a protein that can induce anxiety if over-expressed. Anxious mice calmed down when the protein was blocked. Human OCD patients studied have six times more of this protein. There has been a suspicion for some time that the immune system is somehow involved in the development of certain psychological disorders. Now a new study from Queen Mary University in London and led b
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E. Margaret Burbidge (1919–2020)
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01224-9 Astronomer and co-discoverer of evidence that elements are made in stars.
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Study of 17-year cicada choruses reveals dependence on light levels
Think back five years to spring 2015. People in Kansas were enjoying a rare spectacle of nature: the emergence of the Kansan brood (Brood IV) of 17-year cicadas.
10h
Searching the COVID-19 spike protein for a potential vaccine
The virus that causes COVID-19 is studded on its exterior with "spike proteins," a key component in its ability to infect human cells. Two University of Georgia researchers, Rob Woods and Parastoo Azadi, are investigating the proteins and sugars on the surface of the virus with the goal of finding information that could lead to vaccines and therapeutics.
10h
Søren Brostrøms vicedirektør stopper
Den næstkommanderende i Sundhedsstyrelsen Lars Juhl Petersen stopper efter kort tid i stillingen.
10h
Herpes virus decoded
The genome of the herpes simplex virus 1 was decoded using new methods. Hundreds of previously unknown gene products were found. The virus causes lip herpes, but can also be life-threatening.
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Video: How does alcohol kill coronavirus?
How does alcohol kill this virus? With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, alcohol-based hand sanitizer became a much-sought item by hospitals and the general public alike for its ability to inactivate the coronavirus.
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Baby monitors prove useful in COVID-19 hospital rooms
COVID-19 health workers have found a new use for baby monitors: linking ICU staff and offering a connection for patients and their family members. "With HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) filtration in place in COVID ICU rooms to trap and filter air, the noise of the filtration sometimes makes communication difficult between staff working inside the rooms, who are also dressed in full PPE (pe
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Video: How does alcohol kill coronavirus?
How does alcohol kill this virus? With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, alcohol-based hand sanitizer became a much-sought item by hospitals and the general public alike for its ability to inactivate the coronavirus.
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SU2C-funded research to be presented during the AACR Virtual Meeting — April 27-28, 2020
Stand Up To Cancer®-supported research will be presented will be presented during the American Association for Cancer Research Annual (AACR) Virtual Meeting 1. Work presented by SU2C-funded investigators highlights continued support for developing effective immunotherapy approaches to pediatric and young adult ALL and lung cancer and progress in the emerging field of Cancer Interception, seeking a
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New findings suggest laws of nature 'downright weird,' not as constant as previously thought
Not only does a universal constant seem annoyingly inconstant at the outer fringes of the cosmos, it occurs in only one direction, which is downright weird.
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Contagion, xenophobia and leadership can trigger a misguided search for a scapegoat
The ongoing COVID-19 outbreak has been a sort of Rorschach test. In addition to revealing deep strengths and ingenuity in the American community, it also has exposed some of America's deepest fears, xenophobic tendencies, and dysfunctions of leadership.
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What Might Be Speeding Up the Universe's Expansion?
The discrepancy between how fast the universe seems to be expanding and how fast we expect it to expand is one of cosmology's most stubbornly persistent anomalies. Cosmologists base their expectation of the expansion rate — a rate known as the Hubble constant — on measurements of radiation emitted shortly after the Big Bang. This radiation reveals the precise ingredients of the early universe . C
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Nations struggle to measure inflation as virus disrupts shopping
Store closures and frozen spending leave gap in policymakers' economic tracking
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Engineers develop precision injection system for plants
While the human world is reeling from one pandemic, there are several ongoing epidemics that affect crops and put global food production at risk. Oranges, olives, and bananas are already under threat in many areas due to diseases that affect plants' circulatory systems and that cannot be treated by applying pesticides.
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A five-layered approach to safely reopening workplaces
A Harvard healthy-buildings expert has laid out a lower-cost, five-layered approach for employers and building managers as they consider how to safely reopen their establishments and get America back to work.
10h
Engineers develop precision injection system for plants
While the human world is reeling from one pandemic, there are several ongoing epidemics that affect crops and put global food production at risk. Oranges, olives, and bananas are already under threat in many areas due to diseases that affect plants' circulatory systems and that cannot be treated by applying pesticides.
10h
Research revealing huge number of vulnerable children failing at school spurs call to action
One in seven of all children in England have a social worker at some stage during their schooling and are behind educationally by at least 30 percent by the age of 16 compared to their peers, according to new research published today.
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A universe with oligarchs: Era of reionization likely the work of the most massive, luminous galaxies
The sparsely distributed hot gas found today between galaxies, the intergalactic medium (IGM), is ionized. The early universe started off hot, but then it rapidly expanded and cooled allowing its main constituent, hydrogen, to combine to form neutral atoms. When and how did these neutral atoms become reionized to compose the IGM we see today? Astronomers think that ultraviolet radiation emitted by
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Nye materialer skal sikre stilheden i bilen
PLUS. DTU Elektro afprøver forskellige metamaterialers lydisolerende effekt i virkeligheden for at sikre anvendelighed i praksis.
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On its 30th Birthday, the Hubble Telescope has a simple wish for the world
Circling hundreds of miles above the surface of our big blue marble for 30 years, I've had a remarkable view of the universe. I am the Hubble Space Telescope, and I have a birthday wish for… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Those without 'seamless' job histories face hiring bias
People whose employment histories include part-time, temporary help agency or mismatched work can face challenges during the hiring process, according to new research. When hiring managers review job applications, they must make rapid assessments about who they think is a good candidate for a position. But those evaluations are especially critical towards applicants whose employment histories dif
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Experimental Biology press materials available now
Though the Experimental Biology (EB) 2020 meeting was canceled in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, EB research abstracts are being published in the April 2020 issue of The FASEB Journal. Explore the journal for the latest findings in anatomy, biochemistry, molecular biology, investigative pathology, pharmacology and physiology. Discover exciting research highlights below and in our Virtual Newsr
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High-fat diet consequences include mental fatigue, researchers say
Obesity has been shown to place physical stress on the body, but new research suggests that excess weight may also cause mental fatigue.
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Say no to vaping: Blood pressure, heart rate rises in healthy, young nonsmokers
New research finds that nicotine-filled e-cigarettes cause increases in heart rate and blood pressure in young people, health issues that remain even after a vaping session. The research, originally slated for presentation at the APS annual meeting at Experimental Biology (canceled due to the coronavirus), is published in the April issue of The FASEB Journal.
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Scientists uncover how Zika virus can spread through sexual contact
Zika virus is capable of replicating and spreading infectious particles within the outermost cells lining the vaginal tract, according to new research. The findings provide the first molecular-level insights into how the virus can move from person to person through sexual contact.
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Can vaping scar your lungs? New insights and a possible remedy
Researchers report evidence that the compounds in e-cigarette liquid could potentially cause the body's tissue repair process to go haywire and lead to scarring inside the lungs. The new study, conducted in cell cultures, also suggests that inhibiting a certain nicotinic receptor could help promote the death of overactive fibroblast cells and thus slow scar formation, called fibrosis, in affected
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'Dirty' mice could help make a more effective flu vaccine
Studying mice that have been exposed to other illnesses could help make vaccine development processes more reflective of real-world conditions and lead to better vaccines, according to a new study.
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Blood test offers early warning of chemotherapy-related heart problems
Scientists have identified a collection of biomarkers that together signal that a person's cancer treatment may be harming their heart.
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Scientists trace path from PTSD to heart disease
A new study helps explain why people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) face a higher risk of heart disease at an earlier age than people without PTSD.
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Breathing during exercise is harder for women than men
While both sexes have the capacity for phenomenal athletic achievements, women on average must work harder to breathe during strenuous exercise compared to men, according to new research.
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Earbud-like nerve stimulator shows promise for relieving indigestion
People who suffer frequent indigestion may find relief with a small device that hooks onto the ear known as a transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulator, or taVNS. People who used taVNS showed significant improvements in their stomach's ability to accommodate and process a meal, according to a new study.
10h
What's the best way to identify male hemp seedlings?
A new study has found that tests used for early determination of hemp sex may not all produce accurate results.
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Scientists use bacteria to help plants grow in salty soil
A new study has shown that salt-tolerant bacteria can be used to enhance salt tolerance in various types of plants. The new approach could increase crop yield in areas dealing with increasing soil salinity.
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Tube worm slime displays long-lasting, self-powered glow
When threatened, the marine parchment tube worm secretes a sticky slime that emits a unique long-lasting blue light. New research into how the worm creates and sustains this light suggests that the process is self-powered
10h
Insights into why loud noise is bad for your health
Two new mouse studies provide new insight into how noise exposure can lead to high blood pressure and cancer-related DNA damage.
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Less addictive form of buprenorphine may help curb cocaine relapse
New research performed in mice suggests that chemical modifications to buprenorphine can improve its effectiveness to treat cocaine addiction while minimizing abuse potential.
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Researchers identify drugs that could halt preterm labor
Researchers have discovered a common molecular pathway in women who experience preterm labor and are using this insight to develop new treatments for woman who experience early labor.
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CBD shows promise for fighting aggressive brain cancer
Findings from a new study examining human and canine brain cancer cells suggest that cannabidiol, or CBD, could be a useful therapy for a difficult-to-treat brain cancer.
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Light helps arthritis treatments target joints
Results from a new mouse study suggest that a new light-activated drug delivery method helps confine treatments to the joints, which could reduce whole-body side effects.
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Is it safe to vape while breastfeeding?
Findings from a new animal study suggest that maternal nicotine exposure during breastfeeding could be linked to problems with skull and face development.
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Reducing early brain inflammation could slow Alzheimer's progression
In a new animal study examining Alzheimer's disease, researchers found that disease progression could be slowed by decreasing neuroinflammation in the brain before memory problems and cognitive impairment were apparent.
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3D tissue models provide unprecedented insight into human brain function and disease
Researchers have created 3D tissue structures that recapitulate many aspects of specific human brain regions. These tiny, brain-region specific spheroids are allowing scientists to study previously inaccessible aspects of human brain development and function.
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Researchers weave human tissue into new blood vessels
Researchers have used threads made of engineered human tissue to weave blood vessels that could one day help repair diseased or damaged blood vessels.
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'Ethnic spaces' make minority students feel at home on campus
New research by the University of Washington and the University of Exeter examined the value that college students — of many races — place on ethnic cultural centers.
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Singapore struggles to slash coronavirus infections
City-state has third-highest number of cases in Asia
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"Supposing you brought the light inside the body"
Another instalment of grifting quackery in COVID-19 pandemic. Cedars-Sinai scientists and their biotech partners Aytu Biosciences want to light you up from inside, just as President Trump suggested.
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Exercise gear to help you work on your balance
Rock your exercise routine. (Alessio Billeci via Unsplash/) A strong core helps you have good balance , and practicing your balance helps you have a strong core. So where to start? If you're tired of your usual gym routine, try adding in a few of these tools for a fun and beneficial challenge. With these four simple pieces of equipment, it's easy to wobble your way to better health. Hold your pos
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Søren Brostrøms vicedirektør stopper
Den næstkommanderende i Sundhedsstyrelsen Lars Juhl Petersen stopper efter kort tid i stillingen.
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The remote-learning response to COVID-19 is remarkable. It also highlights a problem.
US higher education has a national graduation rate that is well below the performance of other developed countries and behind projected economic need (pre-COVID) for a well-educated workforce. Research shows that students earn higher grades and complete courses in greater numbers when taught by faculty who are trained to implement proven teaching practices. Quality teaching is more important now
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2MASS J050051.85–093054.9 is the closest extremely low-mass white dwarf, study finds
A team of astronomers from Australia and Italy has investigated a nearby white dwarf designated 2MASS J050051.85–093054.9 (J0500−0930 for short). In their new study, they report that the object is the closest extremely low-mass white dwarf. The finding is detailed in a paper published April 16 on arXiv.org.
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'Ethnic spaces' make minority students feel at home on campus
"Ethnic spaces" at U.S. universities make students from underrepresented minority groups feel a greater sense of belonging and engagement with their campus, new research suggests.
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Flying Cars Could Take Off Soon, if We Let the Military Help
A 'New School' approach to military R&D funding doesn't just advance national security. It advances progress.
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The Anti-Quarantine Protests Aren't About Covid-19
If the tone of the demonstrations against stay-at-home orders seems familiar, that's because it is.
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Nya matideal efter decennier av livsstilsätande
Knivhyllan har ersatt bokhyllan som signal för kulturellt kapital. Men efter decennier av livsstilsätande, matlagningsprogram och munhålesensationer håller en ny matgeneration på att etablera sig. Matetnologen Håkan Jönsson ser en comeback för halvfabrikat och avhållsamhet. Mat är mer än näring, vilken roll spelar maten för oss idag? – Mat har blivit ett sätt att visa upp vår förmåga till njutnin
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The Very Real Threat of Trump's Deepfake
When people began talking about the political implications of deepfake technology —manipulating a video to transpose one person's face on another's body—they usually assumed that deepfakery would be deployed by some anonymous, hostile non-state actor, as a no-return-address, high-tech sabotage of democracy. Who imagined that the return address would be 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue? Yet it has happene
11h
An Outgoing Teenager Shuts Down. Something's Out of Whack
In merely weeks, a 15-year-old boy no longer cracks jokes, dances or even utters a word. What's going on?
11h
How Sustainable Development Ravaged the Congo Basin
Pygmies and wildlife coexisted for millennia—until conservation coupled with extractive industries arrived — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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German U-turn over coronavirus tracking app sparks backlash
Move to ditch homegrown technology for Google/Apple-supported app attracts criticism
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After the Dinosaur-Killing Impact, Soot Played a Remarkable Role in Extinction
The famous impact 66 million years ago kicked up soot into the atmosphere that played an even bigger role in blocking sunlight than experts had realized
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Bank of Japan to tighten grip on corporate bond market
Central bank to increase holdings as it scraps ceiling for JGB purchases
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Högre risk för skilsmässa när pappan inte är föräldraledig
En ny studie i demografi visar att bland föräldrapar där pappan inte tar ut någon föräldraledighet alls, det vill säga inte ens sina reserverade dagar som annars brinner inne, är risken för separation eller skilsmässa högre. Men de mest jämställda paren, par där pappan tar ut mer än sin reserverade del, är däremot inte heller de mest stabila paren. I studien har forskarna undersökt om det finns e
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How to Check Sources on Coronavirus Claims
Coronavirus particles (orange) emerging from a cell in culture. Along with the coronavirus pandemic has come an avalanche of data, facts, news, advice, rumors, and just plain falsehoods. With so much information coming from so many directions, it can be difficult to figure out which is worth paying attention to or passing along to others. But there are a few strategies and numerous resources you
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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor er der så få jordskælv i polarområderne?
En læser vil gerne, hvorfor der ikke registreres flere jordskælv i polarområderne. Det svarer forsker i Geus på.
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Psychological Pitfalls and COVID-19
SARS-Cov2 is a challenging little bugger, but in my assessment no match for human science and ingenuity. There are already 1,650 listed scientific articles on COVID-19 and 450 ongoing clinical trials . In short, we are scienceing the shit out of this pandemic and we will get through it. But as I have argued previously , perhaps a bigger threat than the virus itself is human psychology. Crises bri
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Clinicians treating COVID-19 say don't rush to try novel therapies
Intensivists caution against the use of premature novel therapies in lieu of traditional critical care principles in patients with COVID-19 in a recent correspondence letter in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology.
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Immunotherapy before surgery could advance care of an aggressive form of skin cancer
In what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind study to evaluate the safety of a type of immunotherapy before surgery in patients with an aggressive form of skin cancer, researchers report that the treatment eliminated pathologic evidence of cancer in nearly half of the study participants undergoing surgery. In patients whose tumors respond, this treatment approach offers the potential to reduce th
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Insurers are starting to pull trade credit protection
Euler Hermes has written to some brokers, saying it will offer less support in the UK if the government does not agree to backstop trade credit insurers.
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Læge erkender skyld i meningitissag og betaler bøde på 5.000 kr.
En 16-årig dreng døde af meningitis, og sagen ender nu med bøde til den pågældende læge. En dybt ulykkelig sag er afsluttet, siger lægeformand.
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Doctors debate when best to place virus patients on ventilators
Warning of potential harm from tendency to use invasive equipment too quickly
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Brain's 'fear center' skews emotion in anxious kids
Signals from the brain's amygdalae make it more difficult for anxious and stressed children to regulate their emotions, a study shows. The findings, which appear in Biological Psychiatry , come from the first study to use brain scans to examine how anxiety and chronic stress change emotion-regulation circuits in children. The children in the study were 10 or 11 years old, a developmental stage wh
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Poop could be the key to tracking COVID-19 outbreaks
Sampling our stool could offer a faster and cheaper way to pinpoint where outbreaks of COVID-19 are brewing before scores of people become seriously ill. (ASU, Media Relations/) Your poop might soon be pressed into service in the fight against COVID-19. When we flush the toilet, our effluvia are whisked out of sight and mind and in most cases wind up at a wastewater treatment plant. All this wast
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The Only Thing We Have to Fear Is … Fearing Fear Itself
Research into damaged brains provides a vital lesson for our times: Anxiety is not a weakness but a guide.
12h
A Coronavirus Silver Lining: Less Driving, Fewer Crashes
A study finds that California lockdown restrictions reduced crashes that kill or seriously injure people to 200 a day, down from 400 in the same period last year.
12h
A Brain Implant Restored This Man's Motion and Sense of Touch
After his accident, Ian Burkhart didn't think he'd ever be able to move or feel his hand again. A small chip in his brain changed everything.
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Space Telescope Director Says Best Is Yet to Come for Hubble
Three decades into the life of the world's most revered orbital observatory, Ken Sembach, director of the Space Telescope Science Institute, reflects on its future — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Space Telescope Director Says Best Is Yet to Come for Hubble
Three decades into the life of the world's most revered orbital observatory, Ken Sembach, director of the Space Telescope Science Institute, reflects on its future — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A crisis can spur invention, but it rarely works miracles
It would be naive to believe that tech evangelists can ever provide the full answer
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LatAm companies spot opportunity for redemption in pandemic
Pledges to donate Covid-19 test kits pour in from groups including Vale and Petrobras
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The pandemic could bring a global ceasefire
Several long-running conflicts are edging towards a temporary halt to hostilities
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How to manage the COVID-19 pandemic without destroying the economy
In a new study published online on ArXiv, Profs. David Gershon, Alexander Lipton and Hagai Levine show that based on real-life data, Israel and other countries could have controlled COVID-19 without lockdown.
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Applying quantum-impurity theory to quantum fluids of light
A Monash-led study develops a new approach to directly observe correlated, many-body states in an exciton-polariton system that go beyond classical theories.
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Synthesis of pure single layer of blue phosphorus could be useful for semiconduction
NUS chemists have developed a method to synthesize monolayer blue phosphorus for potential semiconductor applications.
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Researchers develop high-performance ceramic fuel cell that operates on butane gas
A Korean research team has developed a high-performance ceramic fuel cell that can operate on butane fuels. Since butane can be liquefied and thus stored and transported easily, the new technology could expand the application range of ceramic fuel cells to portable and mobile applications such as electric cars, robots and drones. Previously, ceramic fuel cells had only been considered for applicat
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Herpes virus decoded: Individual genes now more precisely identified and studied
Until now, scientists had assumed that there are about 80 so-called open reading frames (ORFs) in the genome of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). These are the locations in the genome where the information in the DNA is read and translated into proteins. It is now clear that there are a lot more—namely 284 ORFs. These are translated from hundreds of novel viral transcripts, which have now also been
12h
Herpes virus decoded: Individual genes now more precisely identified and studied
Until now, scientists had assumed that there are about 80 so-called open reading frames (ORFs) in the genome of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). These are the locations in the genome where the information in the DNA is read and translated into proteins. It is now clear that there are a lot more—namely 284 ORFs. These are translated from hundreds of novel viral transcripts, which have now also been
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Highly concentrated aqueous electrolytes could replace solvents used in batteries
Highly concentrated aqueous electrolytes, known as water-in-salt electrolytes, could be an alternative to the organic solvents used in car batteries and other electrochemical devices. They have the advantages of abundance, low cost and nontoxicity, according to the review article "Water-in-salt electrolytes for high voltage aqueous electrochemical energy storage devices," published in the journal
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Quantum electrodynamics experiment 'major step toward' large-scale implementation
The fundamental laws of physics are based on symmetries that determine the interactions between charged particles, among other things. Using ultracold atoms, researchers at Heidelberg University have experimentally constructed the symmetries of quantum electrodynamics. They hope to gain new insights for implementing future quantum technologies that can simulate complex physical phenomena. The resu
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Dramatic loss of food plants for insects
Just a few weeks ago, there were news headlines about plummeting insect numbers. Academic discourse focused on three main causes: the destruction of habitats, pesticides in agriculture and the decline of food plants for insects. A team of researchers from the Universities of Bonn and Zurich and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL have now demonstrated for the fi
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Dramatic loss of food plants for insects
Just a few weeks ago, there were news headlines about plummeting insect numbers. Academic discourse focused on three main causes: the destruction of habitats, pesticides in agriculture and the decline of food plants for insects. A team of researchers from the Universities of Bonn and Zurich and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL have now demonstrated for the fi
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Dear Therapist: My Husband Thinks Social-Distancing Measures Are Too Extreme
Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My husband and I have opposite views on dealing with social distancing. I am trying to follow the advice from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and leave the house only when necessary. I have been
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China construction projects resume in sign of economic reopening
Equipment makers raise prices and break sales record as infrastructure building rebounds
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PPE hoarding and lessons from the 2007 food crisis
We must keep an eye out for governments using the crisis as an excuse for introducing all sorts of distortion
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Coronavirus can only be beaten if groups such as Sage are transparent and accountable | Richard Coker
The reaction to the 1976 swine flu outbreak in the US is a prime example of the dangers of scientific groupthink Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Earlier this month in the Guardian, the Lancet editor, Richard Horton, suggested that "coronavirus is the greatest global science policy failure in a generation". He recalled the many experts who have been predicting such a
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Today's Cartoon: Greeting Rituals
Welcome to Earth.
13h
The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Changing How People Buy Books
Of course, Amazon is still a monster, but some indie booksellers are making it work.
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The Race to Get Convalescent Plasma to Covid-19 Patients
Blood centers across the nation are trying to get antibodies from coronavirus survivors to patients who want this experimental treatment. But it's not easy.
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The Pandemic Will Change American Retail Forever
Last weekend, I walked a mile along M Street in Washington, D.C., where I live, from the edge of Georgetown to Connecticut Avenue. The roads and sidewalks were pin-drop silent. Movie theaters, salons, fitness centers, and restaurants serving Ethiopian, Japanese, and Indian food were rendered, in eerie sameness, as one long line of darkened windows. Because the pandemic pauses the present, it forc
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Rigspolitiet beklager: Vi handlede for sent på ulovlig udlevering af teledata
Rigspolitiet beklager nu, at man handlede for sent på den ulovlige udlevering af teledata fra Telenor. Men ny redegørelse viser, at også andre teleudbydere har udleveret oplysninger uden en retskendelse.
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Glemte data udleder store mængder CO2
Veritas Technologies opfordrer virksomhederne til at få slettet de data, de ikke skal bruge mere. Selskabet har beregnet, at »dark data« i 2020 vil være årsag til en global udledning på cirka 6,4 millioner ton CO2.
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CDC Adds 6 Symptoms To Its COVID-19 List
The Centers for Disease Control now recognizes chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat and new loss of taste or smell as symptoms of the disease. (Image credit: Michael Conroy/AP)
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Bill Gates går igang med vaccinefabrikker
Verdens næstrigeste mand er klar til at producere, så snart kandidaten viser positive resultater.
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New Bandage Repels Blood and Promotes Clotting
Dressing material uses carbon nanofibers to aid healing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Peace at home after Spanish children are allowed out
Total lockdown eased as daily death toll from coronavirus falls
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Study of twins reveals genetic effect on Covid-19 symptoms
Scientists find genetic factors explain 50% of differences between people's symptoms Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Symptoms of Covid-19 appear to be partly down to genetic makeup, researchers at King's College London have discovered. The finding is based on data collected through the Covid-19 Symptom Tracker app, launched by the team last month . Continue reading..
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Träning och kost avgörande för ett hälsosamt åldrande
Styrketräning i kombination med en hälsosam kost som är rik på omega-3-fettsyror hjälper äldre kvinnor att bibehålla sin styrka och rörlighetsförmåga. Den slutsatsen drar forskaren Peter Edholm i sin avhandling, som också visar att träning under medelåldern är särskilt viktigt för ett hälsosamt åldrande. Peter Edholm är medicine doktor i idrottsfysiologi vid Örebro universitet och har i sin avhan
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Techtopia #148: Har Europa en digital fremtid?
Hør medlem af Europa-Parlamentet Christel Schaldemose (S) drøfte EU-Kommissionens nye strategi for europæisk digitalisering, 'Shaping Digitial Europe'.
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The Implications of Trump Derangement Syndrome
Many Donald Trump supporters believe that their political and cultural opponents suffer from a condition called Trump Derangement Syndrome. This supposed psychosis allegedly renders many Trump critics incapable of rational thoughts and prudent judgments. It is ostensibly so distorting that sufferers take downright dangerous positions. "Some people HATE the fact that I got along well with Presiden
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The Mythos of Michael Jordan Continues
Michael Jordan, clad in a draping suit and a fitted beret, is ambling toward a makeshift Chicago Bulls locker room before the 1997 McDonald's Championship, an international summer basketball exhibition tournament, held in Paris. An NBA Entertainment cameraman films the jaunt, then pauses to capture some watercooler talk between Jordan and the NBA commissioner at the time, David Stern. The cameram
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Coronavirus calm reveals flourishing Venice Lagoon ecosystem
"The flora and fauna of the lagoon have not changed during lockdown. What has changed is our chance to see them," says zoologist Andrea Mangoni, plunging his camera into Venice's normally murky waters to observe life.
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Live Coronavirus News and Updates
About three million cases have been detected around the world, and the global death toll passed 200,000. The C.D.C. added six new Covid-19 symptoms. States gradually allowed some business to resume as social distancing remained the norm.
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Coronavirus UK: how many confirmed cases are there in my area?
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported near you Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report symptoms are not being tested, and
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Sällsynta cancerkloner upptäckta i akut myeloisk leukemi, AML
Akut myeloisk leukemi (AML), är en av de vanligaste formerna av leukemi hos vuxna. Nu har en forskargrupp vid Lunds universitet lyckats hitta cancerkloner med mutationer så sällsynta att de inte kan upptäckas vid diagnostillfället. Studien undersöker hur cancerklonerna utvecklas och konkurrerar med varandra.
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Waiting is the hardest part
US students and institutions of higher learning are facing uncertain futures
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Enzymbehandlade bönor ska lugna IBS-magar
Svårsmälta kolhydrater som orsakar gasbildning i tjocktarmen finns i bland annat baljväxter, spannmål, och lök. Dessa skapar smärta och förstoppning för personer med IBS, irritable bowel syndrome, och går under namnet fodmap – fermenterbara, oligo- di- och monosackarider och sockeralkoholer.
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Balloner og soldrevne fly har kurs mod stratosfæren
PLUS. Lufttrafikken i stratosfæren 20 kilometer over jorden vokser jævnt. I Kenya får mobilbrugere i dag 4G fra Google-ejede balloner, og coronakrisen får nye vejrballoner til at stige op i stratosfæren.
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Regulators must now look at commodity trading
Traders sit at the intersection between financial and physical markets
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Halt destruction of nature or suffer even worse pandemics, say world's top scientists
Exclusive: only one species is responsible for coronavirus – humans – say world's leading wildlife experts Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The coronavirus pandemic is likely to be followed by even more deadly and destructive disease outbreaks unless their root cause – the rampant destruction of the natural world – is rapidly halted, the world's leading biodiversity e
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Aerodynamic analysis of SARS-CoV-2 in two Wuhan hospitals
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2271-3
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Another Worrying Side Effect of Covid-19: More Guns
Over the past few years, studies have shown that having a gun in the home increases the risk of accidents, homicides, and suicides, while also making domestic violence more deadly. New gun owners and those buying for self-defense may be at heightened risk during the pandemic, researchers say.
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Boris Johnson warns against lifting coronavirus lockdown too soon
PM says UK is 'turning the tide' but this is 'moment of maximum risk'
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Study traces spread of early dairy farming across Western Europe
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of York, analysed the molecular remains of food left in pottery used by the first farmers who settled along the Atlantic Coast of Europe from 7,000 to 6,000 years ago.
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New staining technique visualizes whole organs and bodies
A RIKEN research team in Japan has established an optimized three-dimensional (3D) tissue-staining and observation technique based on existing tissue clearing technology. The study details how the new technique can be used to stain tissue and label cells in mouse brains, human brains, and whole marmoset bodies. This technique will allow detailed anatomical analysis and whole-organ comparisons betw
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Herpes virus decoded
The genome of the herpes simplex virus 1 was decoded using new methods. Hundreds of previously unknown gene products were found. The virus causes lip herpes, but can also be life-threatening.
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Boris Johnson and the Optimism Delusion
A little over five weeks ago, Boris Johnson bounded toward the central podium in 10 Downing Street for his daily coronavirus press briefing. At the time, 144 people had died in Britain after contracting COVID-19. Johnson opened with a joke about journalists in the room spacing themselves out in compliance with new social-distancing guidelines, then went on to say that he recognized the need to gi
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Ultrafast Photofragmentation of Ln(hfac)3 with a Proposed Mechanism for forming High Mass Fluorinated Products
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64015-2 Ultrafast Photofragmentation of Ln(hfac) 3 with a Proposed Mechanism for forming High Mass Fluorinated Products
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Neonicotinoid insecticides hinder the pupation and metamorphosis into adults in a crabronid wasp
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63958-w
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Mapping of QTL for Grain Yield Components Based on a DH Population in Maize
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63960-2
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Variation of 4 MV X-ray dose rate strongly impacts biological response both in vitro and in vivo
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64067-4
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A digital workflow for design and fabrication of bespoke orthoses using 3D scanning and 3D printing, a patient-based case study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63937-1
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Kairomone-like activity of bile and bile components: A step towards revealing the chemical nature of fish kairomone
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63456-z
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Versatile whole-organ/body staining and imaging based on electrolyte-gel properties of biological tissues
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15906-5 Tissue clearing has revolutionised histology, but limited penetration of antibodies and stains into thick tissue segments is still a bottleneck. Here, the authors characterise optically cleared tissue as an electrolyte gel and apply this knowledge to stain the entirety of thick tissue samples.
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Solar-blind ultraviolet-C persistent luminescence phosphors
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-16015-z Ultraviolet-C radiation sources are important for disinfection and photochemical water purification, but development of persistent phosphors is needed for other applications. Here the authors report praseodymium-doped silicate ultraviolet-C persistent phosphors for self-sustained glowing tags in bright light.
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Endothelial E-selectin inhibition improves acute myeloid leukaemia therapy by disrupting vascular niche-mediated chemoresistance
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15817-5 The cell adhesion molecule E-selectin regulates haematopoietic stem cell self-renewal in the bone marrow vascular niche. Here, the authors show E-selectin adhesion directly induces survival signaling in acute myeloid leukaemia and therapeutic inhibition improves chemotherapy outcomes in mice.
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Universally autonomous self-healing elastomer with high stretchability
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15949-8 Developing autonomous self-healing materials for application under extreme conditions is challenging. Here, the authors design a highly stretchable elastomer by incorporation of H-bonds and disulphide methathesis, which shows efficient self-healing under extreme conditions.
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Latitudinal gradient in dairy production with the introduction of farming in Atlantic Europe
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15907-4 The transition to agriculture brought major changes to human populations in Europe during the Neolithic period. Here, Cubas and colleagues analyse lipid residues from Neolithic pottery from along the Atlantic coast of Europe to trace the spread of dairy production and shifts in diet.
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Autonomous discovery of optically active chiral inorganic perovskite nanocrystals through an intelligent cloud lab
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15728-5 Synthetic platforms coupled with artificial intelligent algorithms are highly desirable for advancing the discovery of new materials with target properties. Here the authors demonstrate the use of an autonomous laboratory for the discovery of optically active CsPbBr3 inorganic perovskite nanocrystals.
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Cytokines regulate the antigen-presenting characteristics of human circulating and tissue-resident intestinal ILCs
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15695-x Murine ILCs can modulate T cell responses in MHCII-dependent manner. Here the authors show that human ILCs process and present antigens and induce T-cell responses upon exposure to IL-1-family cytokines; along with the article by Lehmann et al, this work elucidates how cytokines set context specificity of ILC-T
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The phylogenetic landscape and nosocomial spread of the multidrug-resistant opportunist Stenotrophomonas maltophilia
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15123-0 Multidrug resistance of the opportunistic pathogen Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an increasing problem. Here, analyzing strains from 22 countries, the authors show that the S. maltophilia complex is divided into 23 monophyletic lineages and find evidence for intra-hospital transmission.
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Majority of authors 'hear' their characters speak, finds study
Research on writers appearing at the Edinburgh international book festival reveals 63% listen to their creations, and 61% feel they have their own agency Some writers have always claimed they can hear their characters speaking, with Enid Blyton suggesting she could "watch and hear everything" and Alice Walker describing how her characters would "come for a visit … and talk". But a new study has
14h
Finding your purpose: A less intimidating approach
Do you know your purpose in life? If not, London Business School professor Dan Cable says that's OK. It's normal, even. Many people have trouble finding their purpose because the task itself is too demanding. One way to solve this problem is by connecting with the end user of your work. For example, Microsoft will take its teams on site to interview clients and find solutions. Programmers underst
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Study traces spread of early dairy farming across Western Europe
A study has tracked the shift from hunter-gatherer lifestyles to early farming that occurred in prehistoric Europe over a period of around 1,500 years.
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Americans Are Generally Skeptical Of Government, But Want It To Intervene In A Crisis
The coronavirus pandemic is an example of when Americans want competence from their government at all levels and need to be able to trust their leaders. (Image credit: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images)
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Wall St warns rescue scheme will exclude many companies
Experts say midsized US firms will struggle to qualify for $600bn lending plan
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Russia's economic woes will clip Putin's wings
Pandemic combined with collapsing oil prices spells real hardship
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To Preserve Jobs for Humans, Some Propose a Robot Tax
Slowly but surely, human workers are being pushed into the shallow end of the job pool. In response, some academics, politicians, and business leaders are now beginning to advocate for a robot tax — a sum companies will have to pay whenever they replace workers with robots and computer programs.
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København skal hjælpe med at gøre Beijings floder egnede til badning
PLUS. Danmark hjælper Kina med bl.a. vandkvalitet, klimatilpasning og borgerinddragelse. Kina hjælper Danmark med bl.a. rensning af regnvand og grundvandsmonitorering.
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The tech industry turns to mask diplomacy
As the coronavirus spread from China across the world earlier this year, two friends in Sydney watched in horror. Milton Zhou is a cofounder of a renewable energy company called the Maoneng Group, which developed some of Australia's largest solar farms . Saul Khan is a former partner in an energy efficiency consultancy. They met in a Facebook group for startups, where they bonded over a discussio
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Upptäck naturen runt husknuten: Sju växter att smaka på
I coronatider är det utomhus som gäller när familjemedlemmar ska rastas samtidigt som vi tillämpar social distansering. Passa då på att bota er artblindhet! All forskning visar att ju mer vi vet om naturen, desto mer vill vi värna den. Här kommer tips på tio vanliga – och de flesta även ätbara – växter att leta efter, i staden eller på skogsutflykten. Uteupplevelser har trendat så här i coronatid
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Norwegian says aircraft likely to remain grounded until 2021
Bleak forecast comes as the low-cost carrier pursues a $1.2bn debt-for-equity swap
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Coronatider: Ekspert giver 5 gode råd til online-undervisning
Mange lærere kæmper med at få den digitale fjernundervisning til at fungere optimalt under…
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New findings on hepatitis C in infants can lead to improved treatments
Only about 5% of the babies born to mothers with hepatitis C are themselves infected by the disease. A possible reason for this low figure is that the baby's immune system has already destroyed the virus before birth. A new study from researchers at Karolinska Institutet published in the journal Gut reveals clear adaptations of the uninfected babies' immune system that can lead the way to new trea
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India's central bank offers mutual funds $6.6bn liquidity line
Authorities aiming to head off turmoil after Franklin Templeton fund freeze
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Can Estrogen and Other Sex Hormones Help Men Survive Covid-19?
Men are more likely than women to die of the coronavirus, so scientists are treating them with something women have more of: female sex hormones.
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Hydroxychloroquine and the price of abandoning of science- and evidence-based medicine
Based on anecdotal evidence early in the pandemic and then-unreported clinical trials, followed by hype and bad studies by French "brave maverick doctor" Didier Raoult, antimalarial drugs hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine became the de facto standard of care for COVID-19, despite no rigorous evidence that they worked. A steady drip-drip-drip of negative studies has led doctors and health authorit
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Poor Amazonians go hungry despite living in one of the most biodiverse places on Earth
Poorer rural Amazonians are going hungry despite living in one of the most biodiverse areas on the planet—a new study reveals.
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Poor Amazonians go hungry despite living in one of the most biodiverse places on Earth
Poorer rural Amazonians are going hungry despite living in one of the most biodiverse areas on the planet—a new study reveals.
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Is It Really Better to Run Barefoot? Another Major Study Just Weighed In
Mounting evidence suggests running shoes can weaken your foot bones.
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Bank of Japan steps up stimulus with bond-buying pledge
Central bank to buy unlimited amount of government bonds and keep interest rates low
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Wuhan discharges all coronavirus patients as Beijing takes steps to stop second wave
No new patients in city at centre of pandemic but fears over new infections persist Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Chinese city of Wuhan, where the coronavirus pandemic began, has discharged all of its coronavirus patients, as the nation reported only three new cases and no new deaths. According to the National Health Commission, as of Sunday the number of new c
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Nordmænd skal levere talegenkendelse til Sundhedsplatformen
Region Hovedstaden har været på jagt efter talegenkendelses-it til Sundhedsplatformen. Tidligere i år blev udbuddet annulleret, men efter et genudbud har regionen nu valgt den norske virksomhed Max Manus som leverandør til en fireårig kontrakt på 48 millioner kroner.
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UK doctors finding it harder to get PPE kit to treat Covid-19 patients, research reveals
Royal College of Physicians says NHS staff's lives are still at risk despite ministers' pledges Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Doctors working in the riskiest areas of the UK's hospitals with Covid-19 patients are finding it harder to get protective kit, despite ministerial pledges to solve the problem, research reveals. The Royal College of Physicians has condemned
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Coronavirus latest: at a glance
A summary of the biggest developments in the global coronavirus outbreak Follow our latest coronavirus blog for live news and updates Key developments in the global coronavirus outbreak today include: Continue reading…
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What comes after COVID-19? Special issue in the journal Population and Economics
At this alarming time, when the COVID-19 pandemic is on everyone's mind, a new special issue in the open-access peer-reviewed journal Population and Economics provides a platform for discussion on the impact of the pandemic on the population and economics, both in Russia and worldwide. Economists, demographers and sociologists are invited to submit research on the impact of the pandemic to the spe
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Artificial intelligence could serve as backup to radiologists' eyes
Deploying artificial intelligence could help radiologists to more accurately classify lung diseases.
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KIST develops high-performance ceramic fuel cell that operates on butane gas
A Korean research team has developed a high-performance ceramic fuel cell that can operate on butane fuels. Since butane can be liquified and thus can be stored and carried easily, the new technology is expected to expand the application range of ceramic fuel cells to portable and mobile applications such as electric cars, robots and drones. Previously, ceramic fuel cells had only been considered
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New study reveals life's earliest evolution was more complicated than previously suspected
Biologists have long hoped to understand the nature of the earliest living organisms on Earth. If they could, they might then be able to say something about how, when, and where life arose on Earth, and perhaps by extension, whether life is common in the Universe. Previous studies have suggested this information can be obtained by comparing the genes present in modern organisms. New research indic
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Continuous dosing improves progression-free survival for melanoma patients with common mutations
A first-of-its-kind randomized clinical trial offers strong and perhaps surprising evidence that a combination of two targeted melanoma drugs when given continuously keeps patients' cancer from growing or spreading longer when compared with intermittent treatment, according to study results to be presented at the 2020 virtual annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.
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Scientists identify a potential treatment candidate for early type 2 diabetic retinopathy
Diabetic retinopathy is one of the main vascular complications of type 2 diabetes, and the most common cause of visual deterioration in adults. A new study in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier, reports on the efficacy of a possible treatment candidate that showed anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects on the retina and optic nerve head in early type 2 diabetic retinop
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Study finds no overall survival benefit, but improved quality of life with talazoparib in advanced BRCA-mutated breast cancer
New data from the Phase III EMBRACA trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found the PARP inhibitor talazoparib did not demonstrate a statistically significant overall survival (OS) benefit for patients with metastatic HER2-negative breast cancer and mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes. Most patients included in the study went on to receive subsequent systemic the
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MD Anderson and Ipsen advance new therapy with potential benefit for underserved patients with lung and ovarian cancers
MD Anderson and Ipsen have advanced a new targeted therapy into clinical trials for certain patients with lung and ovarian cancers. Details are being presented at the AACR Annual Meeting.
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Poor Amazonians go hungry despite living in one of the most biodiverse places on Earth
A team of scientists from Brazil and the UK are publishing the results of the first study linking food security for wildlife-dependent people in the Amazon with 'catch rates' — which is the amount of fish caught for each hour spent fishing.
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Covid-19 deaths, markets vs economy, Berlin reopens
An FT analysis finds deaths from Covid-19 may be almost 60 per cent higher than official counts
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Vil du hjælpe Danmarks vilde dyr? Sådan gør du haven eller altanen natur-venlig
Pindsvin, insekter, fugle og padder har brug for din hjælp.
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World Coronavirus News: Live Coverage
Limited testing means the actual toll is higher. In New Zealand, restrictions will begin to loosen on Tuesday. Mosques will reopen in Iran.
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Investigation launched into coronavirus test claims by Australian firm run by convicted rapist
Exclusive: Therapeutic Goods Administration investigates Neran de Silva firm Promedical over claims it has approval for rapid test kit Sign up to get coronavirus updates delivered to your email every weekday evening Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications Coronavirus Australia maps and cases: live numbers and statistics Health authorities have launched an inves
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On-off dosing of cancer drugs does not help melanoma patients
Novel way to counter tumors developing drug resistance, suggested by mouse studies, did not hold up in people
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US, China researchers collaborate despite government battles
Scientists co-operate on hunt for Covid-19 origins despite charges Beijing is withholding data
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Coronavirus puts Swiss political system to the test
Assembly meets to consider its own future after suspension of democratic process
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Further reading
The Respected Comrade; food banks; Cummings; the East Coast response; and more.
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Coronavirus deepens frustrations of young in Middle East
Pandemic stopped protests in Iraq, Algeria and Lebanon, but crisis likely to fuel fresh wave of unrest
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Culture war: How Danone kept making yoghurt in pandemic
From bored employees to train trouble in the French Alps, the manufacturer has faced new challenges
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Poland plans presidential poll in midst of pandemic
Ruling Law and Justice party wants election by postal vote to take place in May
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Coronavirus set to push 29m Latin Americans into poverty
Social damage could take 2 decades to repair, warns top UN official
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Disney and the unequal reality of coronavirus America
The entertainment giant has furloughed more than 100,000 workers while keeping its executive compensation programme
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Lockdown lunches: how to make delicious fresh pasta with a rolling pin
No pasta machine? No problem. Tim Hayward shows Daniel Garrahan how to make it by hand – just like nonna
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Global stocks rise as Japan launches new stimulus round
Stocks rise but crude drops on concern over global oil glut as crisis hits demand
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Dampspærrere smuldrer og har huller: Kan udløse fugtproblemer i nyere byggeri
PLUS. En test af dampspærresystemer fandt huller i membraner og en tape, der decideret ødelagde membranen. Kun seks systemer vurderes at have en levetid på over 45 år
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Australia's NAB slashes dividend as coronavirus hits earnings
Country's second-largest bank to raise $2.3bn as it anticipates further turmoil
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Boris Johnson back to face one of 'biggest calls of his career'
Returning after illness, prime minister must decide how — and when — to ease lockdown without overwhelming NHS
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Age UK warns of 'closures' as charities stand on brink
Treasury's £750m rescue package for sector deemed insufficient to cover fundraising drop
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Post-corona growth should be more robust but less optimal
Psychological biases, largely undetected, have been at work in financial markets
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Local councils criticised for 'concerning' debt collection tactics
Report warns economic impact of coronavirus pandemic could lead to more bankruptcies
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Coronavirus fallout deals small US companies a double blow
Small-cap stocks underperformed large-caps throughout the bear market and rally
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Ardern: New Zealand has 'won battle' against community transmission of Covid-19
Ahead of move to level-3 lockdown, PM says country must remain vigilant Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage New Zealand's prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, has said the country has stopped the "widespread, undetected community transmission" of Covid-19, as tough lockdown restrictions are scheduled to ease on Monday night. Ardern said New Zealand had "avoided the worst" in
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Bring your remodeling visions to life with this easy-to-use software
Building additions to homes can be an expensive and cumbersome undertaking. Remodeling is exciting, but finding the starting point is challenging. The vision for your dream home or new living room can be quickly sketched up on your laptop. There are many reasons for building an addition to your home. Another child is on the way. The light in the back of the house would hit a sunroom perfectly. Af
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No studio? No problem. You can practice yoga anywhere.
The numerous benefits of yoga include a sharper sense of focus, improved bone health, and emotional resilience. Yoga also helps boost your immune system while dropping your blood pressure. Harvard notes that yoga supports better body images and a healthier relationship to food. The physical and emotional benefits of yoga are enormous. Yoga's focus on breathing helps you create focus and calm in y
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Insect Study Reveals Mixed Bag of Population Trends
Terrestrial insect populations decreased while freshwater populations increased, and though the results are more nuanced than those of previous observations of widespread decline, experts say they are cause for concern.
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Need a creative outlet? Try this inventive new way to learn to play piano.
Playing a musical instrument has been shown to benefit your brain more than any other activity. Benefits include increased memory and reading skills, increased blood flow in your brain, and a reduction in stress and depression. Performing music has also been shown to help reduce your risk of dementia. Keeping our brains sharp and healthy is important to all of us. Nothing forces as many parts of
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This electrolyte popcorn is the smart post-workout snack
Electrolytes are necessary for maintaining proper physiological functioning. Athletes need to refuel their electrolytes after sustained periods of exercise. Besides hydration, electrolyte levels are important in the maintenance of blood pH as well as nerve and cell functioning. The supermarket aisles are filled with products that promise health, yet upon closer inspection, they're filled with add
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Learn key lessons from today's best business books in minutes
Over 1,200 business books are published annually. Soundview summarizes top business books, so you can absorb more information faster. 1-year subscriptions are on sale for only $49.99 today. Every year, over 1,200 business books are published, and chances are none of us are going to read three books a day. So how does the modern professional uncover the proverbial diamond in the rough of online sh
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Best test for COVID-19: spit sample or nasal swab?
Saliva samples are a "preferable" indicator for COVID-19 infection than the deep nasal swabs now widely used, according to a new study. The study, conducted with 44 inpatients and 98 health care workers, found that saliva samples taken from just inside the mouth provide greater detection sensitivity and consistency throughout the course of an infection than the broadly recommended nasopharyngeal
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5 tips for feeding picky eaters while staying home
A nutritionist has tips for feeding kids who are picky eaters during the COVID-19 pandemic. Balancing finicky kid appetites with proper nutrition can be a challenge in the best of times. But now, with schools and day cares closed across the country, many parents working from home, and with schedules in disarray, it may seem downright impossible. Kathleen Keller, associate professor of nutritional
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Asia's emerging markets brace for economic fallout of coronavirus
Countries are better insulated than in 1997 financial crisis but uncertainty weighs heavily
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Airbus is 'bleeding cash', says chief executive
Guillaume Faury tells employees in letter that lockdown threatens manufacturer's existence
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Coronavirus live news: Boris Johnson back in Number 10 as Trump denies he plans to fire health secretary
More US states to reopen; Italy to ease lockdown; Egypt asks IMF for bailout loan. Follow the latest updates France, Italy and Spain prepare to ease coronavirus lockdowns Global report: death toll passes 200,000 Coronavirus latest: at a glance Australia coronavirus news – live See all our coronavirus coverage 1.27am BST A look at cases in Panama and Mexico now: Confirmed cases of coronavirus infe
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Hong Kong's hidebound brokers face coronavirus reckoning
Viral outbreak has sped shift to online platforms, squeezing many traditional outfits
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Precarity, not inequality ails the 99 per cent
Our predicament is that wealth has become the only apparent source of safety
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Deutsche eases capital targets in light of coronavirus crisis
German bank makes early announcement of Q1 profits that beat expectations
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Neuroscience and Consciousness
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Neurons
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Touch Restored to Spinal Cord Injury Patient Using Brain-Computer Interface
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Neurons responding to visual stimuli
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'Aha' Moments Trigger Orgasmic Brain Signals
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