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Phylogenetic network analysis of SARS-CoV-2 genomes [Anthropology]
In a phylogenetic network analysis of 160 complete human severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2) genomes, we find three central variants distinguished by amino acid changes, which we have named A, B, and C, with A being the ancestral type according to the bat outgroup coronavirus. The A and…
6h
Experts at UTHealth successfully treat severe case of COVID-19 in 3-week-old infant
In one of the first reported cases of its kind, a 3-week-old infant in critical condition recovered from COVID-19 due to rapid recognition and treatment by physicians from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The case was published April 22, 2020 in the New England Journal of Medicine.
3h
Genåbningen kan true kapaciteten af særlig intensiv­behandling
Behandlingskapaciteten til COVID-19 patienter med svær lungesvigt er allerede under stort pres, og kan blive presset af genåbningen af sundhedsvæsenet, vurderer den ansvarlige overlæge på Rigshospitalets intensivafdeling. Se masser af billeder fra afdelingen.
10h

LATEST

Virologists show that sample pooling can massively increase coronavirus testing capacity
To contain the coronavirus pandemic, global testing capacity for the SARS-CoV-2 virus needs to be ramped up significantly. Scientists at the Institute of Virology at Saarland University Medical Centre have developed a pool testing procedure now published in the high-ranking, international scientific journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases.
9min
Airborne Coronavirus Detected in Wuhan Hospitals
While the RNA of the virus was found in tiny droplets in China, scientists don't know if it was capable of transmitting the virus.
12min
Fitch cuts Italy's credit rating to one notch above junk
Downgrade reflects economic impact of coronavirus and extra debt Rome taking on
15min
36min
Best Google Smart Speaker Deals (April 2020): Nest Mini, Hub Max, and More
From the Nest Mini to the Hub Max, you can save money if you're looking to build a smarter home.
36min
Author Correction: Probabilistic Assessment of Nerve Regeneration with Diffusion MRI in Rat Models of Peripheral Nerve Trauma
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64339-z
37min
Author Correction: Dual-energy CT perfusion imaging for differentiating WHO subtypes of thymic epithelial tumors
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64341-5
37min
Voyager: What's Next for NASA's interstellar probes?
Thousands of years from now, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 will leave our solar system. But their instruments will stop working long before that happens.
49min
Listen: Will the Restaurants Come Back?
On the latest episode of the Social Distance podcast, staff writer Derek Thompson joins James Hamblin and Katherine Wells to discuss what the future of your neighborhood storefront tells us about how the pandemic could change American cities. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they'r
1h
The Coronavirus Genome is Like a Shipping Label That Lets Epidemiologists Track Where it's Been
Tracking the coronavirus genome around the world is important to decide its future.
1h
Coursera offers 3,800 free online classes for unemployed workers
Coursera is allowing federal, state, and local agencies that serve the unemployed to enroll in the free program until September 30. Typically costing $399 per year, workers will be able to access free online classes by going through unemployment agencies that have enrolled. Subjects range from cloud computing and computer science, to business and art. As workers begin retraining and school distri
1h
Foot feathering in domesticated breeds of pigeons and chickens use same gene regulatory networks
Lead researcher Leif Andersson has investigated the genetic basis of foot feathering. The trait, known scientifically as ptilopody, can be observed in domesticated and wild avian species and is characterized by the partial or complete development of feathers on the skin of the ankles and feet. Andersson and his colleagues have shown that genes and specific mutations corresponding to the previously
1h
Foot feathering birds flock genetically together
Lead researcher Chiara Bortoluzzi and colleagues at Wageningen University in the Netherlands, investigated the genetic basis of foot feathering, a phenotype that is observed in certain breeds of chicken. Her new study provides strong evidences that foot feathering has evolved by parallel evolution in chickens and pigeons.
1h
Study reveals rich genetic diversity of Vietnam
In a new paper, Dang Liu, Mark Stoneking and colleagues have analyzed newly generated genome-wide SNP data for the Kinh and 21 additional ethnic groups in Vietnam, encompassing all five major language families in MSEA, along with previously published data from nearby populations and ancient samples.
1h
Major trial shows breast cancer drug can hit prostate cancer Achilles heel
A drug already licensed for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers is more effective than targeted hormone therapy at keeping cancer in check in some men with advanced prostate cancer, a major clinical trial reports.Olaparib, a pill lacking the side effects of chemotherapy, can target an Achilles heel in prostate cancers with a weakness in their ability to repair damaged DNA.
1h
Next-generation batteries take major step toward commercial viability
A group of researchers has found a way to stabilize one of the most challenging parts of lithium-sulfur batteries, bringing the technology closer to becoming commercially viable.
1h
New opportunity to develop high-energy batteries
In recent years, lithium-ion batteries have become better at supplying energy to soldiers in the field, but the current generation of batteries never reaches its highest energy potential. Researchers are extremely focused on solving this challenge and providing the power soldiers demand.
1h
Heart disease more likely for adults with dysfunctional childhoods
Children who experience trauma, abuse, neglect and family dysfunction are at increased risk of having heart disease in their 50s and 60s. People exposed to the highest levels of childhood family environment adversity were more than 50% more likely to have a cardiovascular disease event such as a heart attack or stroke over a 30-year follow-up.
1h
New insights into how genes control courtship and aggression
Fruit flies, like many animals, engage in a variety of courtship and fighting behaviors. Now, scientists have uncovered the molecular mechanisms by which two sex-determining genes affect fruit fly behavior. The male flies' courtship and aggression behaviors, they showed, are mediated by two distinct genetic programs. The findings demonstrate the complexity of the link between sex and behavior.
1h
New opportunity to develop high-energy batteries
In recent years, lithium-ion batteries have become better at supplying energy to soldiers in the field, but the current generation of batteries never reaches its highest energy potential. Researchers are extremely focused on solving this challenge and providing the power soldiers demand.
1h
New staining technique visualizes whole organs and bodies
A research team has established an optimized three-dimensional (3D) tissue-staining and observation technique based on existing tissue clearing technology. The study details how the new technique can be used to stain tissue and label cells in mouse brains, human brains, and whole marmoset bodies. This technique will allow detailed anatomical analysis and whole-organ comparisons between species at
1h
Five ways that Trump is undermining environmental protections under the cover of coronavirus
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01261-4 While the world focuses on the pandemic, the United States is adopting controversial policies at the Environmental Protection Agency.
1h
COVID-19 is causing strokes in young people and doctors don't know why
Researchers think that the new coronavirus may bind to receptors on endothelial cells, which are found on the inside of blood vessels, like veins and arteries. (Pixabay/) COVID-19 may be causing strokes and heart attacks, even in patients who don't seem to be at risk for those conditions. This alarming news has made headlines in recent days , but researchers say the link between infection with th
1h
Surgeons help create new process for disinfecting and reusing N95 masks
Amid shortages of personal protective equipment due to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, a St. Louis health care system has implemented a process to disinfect disposable N95 respirator masks that allows health care workers to reuse their own mask for up to 20 cycles.
1h
Childhood obesity and high blood pressure warn of future heart disease
A large study in adolescents and children, some as young as 3 years of age, shows a link between obesity, high blood pressure, and later damage to blood vessels.
1h
Genomic secrets of scaly-foot snail from hydrothermal vents
Researchers have decoded for the first time the genome of Scaly-foot Snail, a rare snail inhabited in what scientists called 'the origin of life'- deep-sea hydrothermal vents characterized with near-impossible living conditions. Unraveling the genome of this unique creature will not only shed light on how life evolved billions of years ago, but will also lay the foundation for the discovery of pot
1h
Antibiotics may increase risk for opioid abuse
Taking antibiotics alongside opioids may increase the risk of opioid abuse, according to research in rats.
1h
Soil component in wounds can help stem deadly bleeding
New research shows for the first time that soil silicates — the most abundant material on the Earth's crust — play a key role in blood clotting. While the researchers caution that there is a high risk of infection from unsterilized dirt, they say their findings may have implications for the future development of novel strategies using sterilized dirt to help manage bleeding and potentially under
1h
New species of moths discovered in the Alps named after three famous alpinists
An entomologist used an integrative research approach to study four long-known, yet controversial European moths. It turned out that he was not dealing with four, but seven species.
1h
Parkinson's disease may start in the gut
Researchers have mapped out the cell types behind various brain disorders. The findings offer a roadmap for the development of new therapies to target neurological and psychiatric disorders. One interesting finding was that cells from the gut's nervous system are involved in Parkinson's disease, indicating that the disease may start there.
1h
New metasurface laser produces world's first super-chiral light
Researchers have demonstrated the world's first metasurface laser that produces 'super-chiral light': light with ultra-high angular momentum. The light from this laser can be used as a type of 'optical spanner' to or for encoding information in optical communications.
1h
Fracking and earthquake risk
Earthquakes caused by hydraulic fracturing can damage property and endanger lives. Researchers have developed new guidelines for when to slow or halt fracking operations based on local risks.
1h
New insights into how genes control courtship and aggression
Fruit flies, like many animals, engage in a variety of courtship and fighting behaviors. Now, Salk scientists have uncovered the molecular mechanisms by which two sex-determining genes affect fruit fly behavior. The male flies' courtship and aggression behaviors, they showed, are mediated by two distinct genetic programs. The findings demonstrate the complexity of the link between sex and behavior
1h
The most dangerous place on Earth 100 million years ago
A new study compiles a comprehensive record of a fossil-rich area of southeastern Morocco. Giant swimmers in a long-gone river system fed huge terrestrial and flying predators. The area was home to a diverse population best studied from afar. Set the Wayback Machine to 100 million years ago. Where do you want to go? Well, where you really don't want to go is the Sahara. According to the lead auth
1h
5 Big Mistakes We Can Make Fighting the Covid-19 Pandemic
Staying at home is a big sacrifice. But lifting shelter-in-place orders too soon is one of the many mistakes that will make the crisis even more brutal.
2h
Agricultural pickers in US to see unsafely hot workdays double by 2050
Temperature increases by 2050 and 2100 in U.S. counties where crops are grown will double, then triple the number of unsafe workdays. The study also looks at strategies the industry could adopt to protect workers' health.
2h
Surveying the lipid landscape
Software LipidCreator enables researchers to characterize 60 lipid classes in cells with mass spectrometry.
2h
Understanding how fluids heat or cool surfaces
Textbook formulas for describing heat flow characteristics, crucial in many industries, are oversimplified, study shows.
2h
Crops sown in a uniform spatial pattern produce higher yields and reduce environmental impact
Higher yields and fewer weeds are possible if farmers sow wheat, maize, soy and other crops in more uniform spatial patterns, according to researchers. More precise sowing can also help reduce herbicide use and fertiliser runoff.
2h
Contact tracing and isolation key to controlling SARS-CoV2 in Shenzhen, report finds
Contact tracing to rapidly isolate people who could be infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) reduced the length of time people were infectious in the community over 4 weeks (from 14 January to 12 February 2020) in Shenzhen, China, according to newly published results from 391 cases and 1,286 of their close contacts.
2h
Heart disease more likely for adults with dysfunctional childhoods
Children who experience trauma, abuse, neglect and family dysfunction are at increased risk of having heart disease in their 50s and 60s. People exposed to the highest levels of childhood family environment adversity were more than 50% more likely to have a cardiovascular disease event such as a heart attack or stroke over a 30-year follow-up.
2h
Researchers tackle a new opportunity to develop high-energy batteries
In recent years, lithium-ion batteries have become better at supplying energy to Soldiers in the field, but the current generation of batteries never reaches its highest energy potential. Army researchers are extremely focused on solving this challenge and providing the power Soldiers demand.
2h
Next-generation batteries take major step toward commercial viability
A group of researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin has found a way to stabilize one of the most challenging parts of lithium-sulfur batteries, bringing the technology closer to becoming commercially viable.
2h
COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
Health insurance status and risk factors for poor outcomes with COVID-19 among US health care workers: A cross-sectional study.
2h
As COVID-19 forces conferences online, scientists discover upsides of virtual format
The scientific community is "making lemonade out of lemons," one researcher says
2h
Surveying the lipid landscape
Software LipidCreator enables researchers to characterize 60 lipid classes in cells with mass spectrometry.
2h
Trump Reportedly Ignored Numerous Intel Warnings About COVID
According to a new report by The Washington Post , president Donald Trump ignored more than a dozen classified briefings dating back to January and February that were prepared for him by US intelligence agencies. These briefings, in the form of the "President's Daily Brief" or PDB, mentioned the imminent threat of a global virus outbreak, and its dire political and economic consequences, more tha
2h
Quality and growth ride the waves
Mike Mackenzie's daily analysis of what's moving global markets
2h
Drug prevents severe cardiac events in children undergoing chemotherapy for AML
The cardioprotective drug dexrazoxane preserved cardiac function in pediatric patients undergoing chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) without compromising overall patient survival and potentially improving it, according to a new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). The results suggest dexrazoxane should be considered for cardioprotection in all pediatric pa
2h
The hunger-boredom paradigm explained by scientists
True hunger builds gradually and can be satisfied by any source of food, while emotional eating (which includes eating out of boredom) is insatiable and generally leads to feelings of guilt or shame. One 2015 study suggests we eat to escape the self-awareness that comes in moments of boredom or inactivity, while Johns Hopkins University professor Susan Carnell explains there may be a neuroscienti
2h
Study reveals important flowering plants for city-dwelling honey bees
Trees, shrubs and woody vines are among the top food sources for honey bees in urban environments, according to an international team of researchers. By using honey bees housed in rooftop apiaries in Philadelphia, the researchers identified the plant species from which the honey bees collected most of their food, and tracked how these food resources changed from spring to fall. The findings may be
2h
Variation in how side effects are reported clouds drug safety
A new study finds significant variation in how drug side effects are reported, potentially making some drugs seem safer or less safe than they really are.
2h
Scientists explore the power of radio waves to help control fusion reactions
New research points to improved control of troublesome magnetic islands in future fusion facilities.
2h
Virus genomes help to explain why a major livestock disease has re-emerged in Europe
Livestock diseases like bluetongue virus (BTV) can have devastating economic and health consequences, but their origins can be difficult to establish. New research shows that the recent re-emergence of BTV in France could have been caused by human activities, based on the virus' unusual genetic makeup.
2h
Understanding deer damage is crucial when planting new forests
Scientists say understanding the risk of damage by deer to new and existing forests in Britain is crucial when considering their expansion.
2h
Correlations in COVID-19 growth point to universal strategies for slowing spread
Models drawing on chaos theory find growth in nine countries conforms to a power law curve and highlight the value of strict social distancing and testing policies.
2h
Two-person-together MRI scans on couples investigates how touching is perceived in the brain
Researchers can now scan two people together, showing that touching synchronizes couple's brains, making them mirror each other's movements.
2h
Urban slums are uniquely vulnerable to COVID-19: Here's how to help
Government-enforced social isolation can be devastating for the nearly 1 billion people around the globe currently dwelling in urban slums, where physical space is scarce and many rely on daily wage labor for survival. A new report, authored by a team of public health experts and epidemiologists working in collaboration with community leaders and non-governmental organizations, provides eight urge
2h
Making sense of the viral multiverse
Researchers propose a new classification system, capable of situating coronaviruses like SARS-CoV-2 within the enormous web of viruses across the planet, known as the virosphere.
2h
Hubble captures breakup of comet ATLAS
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has provided astronomers with the sharpest view yet of the breakup of Comet C/2019 Y4 (ATLAS). The telescope resolved roughly 30 fragments of the fragile comet on 20 April and 25 pieces on 23 April.
2h
Study reveals important flowering plants for city-dwelling honey bees
Trees, shrubs and woody vines are among the top food sources for honey bees in urban environments, according to an international team of researchers. By using honey bees housed in rooftop apiaries in Philadelphia, the researchers identified the plant species from which the honey bees collected most of their food, and tracked how these food resources changed from spring to fall. The findings may be
2h
Polymer membranes could benefit from taking a dip
Many industrial processes rely on thin membranes that can clean water, for example, by filtering out impurities. In recent years, a technique called atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been used to tune these membranes for better performance, but there's a hitch: Many of them are made from materials that aren't compatible with ALD, a process using alternating chemical vapors to create very thin laye
2h
Polymer membranes could benefit from taking a dip
A new technique developed by a team including researchers from the US Department of Energy (DOE)'s Argonne National Laboratory makes atomic layer deposition possible on nearly any membrane.
2h
AGS COVID-19 brief offers roadmap to government action for assisted living facilities
In a policy brief published today in its namesake journal (DOI: 10.1111/jgs.16510), the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) offered a roadmap to guide federal, state, and local governments addressing COVID-19 concerns in an important but oft-overlooked arena: Assisted living facilities (ALFs).
2h
Widely Used Surgical Masks Are Putting Health Care Workers at Serious Risk
Because high-end N95 masks are scarce, hospitals and other medical centers are using less protective surgical masks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Work-related stress linked to increased risk for peripheral artery disease
People who reported work-related stress were more likely to be hospitalized for treatment of peripheral artery disease compared to those who did not report work-related stress. Work-related stress, or job strain, refers to psychological and social stress at work, often from high expectations combined with lower levels of personal control.
2h
New type of immune cell discovered in breast ducts
Breast cancer researchers have discovered a new type of immune cell that helps to keep breast tissue healthy by regulating a vital process within mammary ducts – the sites where milk is produced and transported, but also where most breast cancers arise.
2h
Trump to order meat processing plants to stay open
Fears of food shortages have risen as coronavirus outbreaks force facilities to shut
2h
Why don't some coronavirus patients sense their alarmingly low oxygen levels?
Doctors try to find the best way to treat "happy hypoxics"
3h
A child's home environment can impact the risk of developing depression
New research finds that children's rearing environment has a meaningful impact on their risk for major depression later in life, and notes the importance supporting of nurturing environments when children are at risk.
3h
Invasive lionfish likely to become permanent residents in the Mediterranean
A team of international scientists has shown the species, first seen off the coast of Cyprus in 2012, is now thriving and well-established right across southern Europe.
3h
Researchers dig into case of geologic amnesia
A team of geologists is digging into what may be Earth's most famous case of geologic amnesia — the Great Unconformity.
3h
Make wastewater drinkable again
Delivering water to city dwellers can become far more efficient, according to researchers who say it should involve a healthy level of recycled wastewater.
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Make wastewater drinkable again
Delivering water to city dwellers can become far more efficient, according to researchers who say it should involve a healthy level of recycled wastewater.
3h
San Francisco Enlists A Key Latino Neighborhood In Coronavirus Testing
To get better data this week on a hard-hit community, the public health department and researchers are offering free testing for everyone over age 4 in a broad swath of the Mission District. (Image credit: Eric Westervelt/NPR)
3h
These Are the Decade's Biggest Discoveries in Human Evolution
Celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Smithsonian's "David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins" with some of the biggest discoveries in human evolution
3h
MILLIPLEX® Assays Powered by xMAP® Technology
Look closer, with the largest portfolio of verified assays for Luminex® instruments. Entirely configurable to run the analytes of your choice.
3h
UK sets new target to recruit 18,000 contact tracers by mid-May
The UK government has set a new target of recruiting an army of 18,000 coronavirus contact tracers by the middle of May, to be in place for the launch of the NHS contact tracing app
3h
Frozen bull semen may have unleashed bluetongue virus on farm animals
The ongoing spread of bluetongue virus among European farm animals may have started when a cow was inseminated with infected bull semen stored from an earlier outbreak
3h
Variation in how side effects are reported clouds drug safety
University of Colorado Cancer Center study finds significant variation in how drug side effects are reported, potentially making some drugs seem safer or less safe than they really are.
3h
Superhard candy — scientists cracked the complex crystal structure of molybdenum borides
In their search for new superhard compounds, researchers carried out a prediction of stable molybdenum borides and their crystal structures. They revealed that the highest borides contain four to five boron atoms per each molybdenum atom. The estimated Vickers hardness of MoB5 is 37-39 GPa, which makes it a potential superhard material.
3h
This Disinfectant Can Keep Surfaces Coronavirus-Free for Months
Protective Coating Scientists in Hong Kong developed a protective anti-viral coating that they say can kill viruses like the coronaviruses for up to three months straight. The disinfectant, dubbed MAP-1, wasn't a response to the coronavirus. Rather, Reuters reports that Hong Kong University of Science and Technology researchers have been working on it for the last ten years. But all the same, the
3h
Experts successfully treat severe case of COVID-19 in 3-week-old infant
In one of the first reported cases of its kind, a 3-week-old infant in critical condition recovered from COVID-19 due to rapid recognition and treatment by physicians from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
3h
Hubble captures breakup of comet ATLAS
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has provided astronomers with the sharpest view yet of the breakup of Comet C/2019 Y4 (ATLAS). The telescope resolved roughly 30 fragments of the fragile comet on April 20 and 25 pieces on April 23.
3h
Gut microbes influence how rat brains react to opioids
Antibiotic treatment — which depletes gut microbes — drastically changes the parts of a rat's brain that are activated during opioid addiction and withdrawal.
3h
Researchers make key advance toward production of important biofuel
An international research collaboration has taken an important step toward the commercially viable manufacture of biobutanol, an alcohol whose strong potential as a fuel for gasoline-powered engines could pave the path away from fossil fuels.
3h
Researchers' method holds promise for brain study, better tests for viruses
Researchers have developed a promising method for remotely stimulating activity in deep brain regions, advancing understanding of how molecules act in the brain and paving the way for better cancer treatments and therapies for other diseases.
3h
Light-based deep brain stimulation relieves symptoms of Parkinson's disease
Biomedical engineers have used light-based deep brain stimulation to treat motor dysfunction in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. Succeeding where earlier attempts have failed, the method promises to provide new insights into why deep brain stimulation works and ways in which it can be improved on a patient-by-patient basis.
3h
Summer Presents Dangerous Choice: Swelter in Quarantine or Risk Contagion
Extreme heat is deadly to many of the same populations that are most vulnerable to COVID-19 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Spinal cord gives bio-bots walking rhythm
Miniature biological robots are making greater strides than ever, thanks to the spinal cord directing their steps. Researchers developed the tiny walking 'spinobots,' powered by rat muscle and spinal cord tissue on a soft, 3D-printed hydrogel skeleton. While previous generations of biological robots, or bio-bots, could move forward by simple muscle contraction, the integration of the spinal cord g
3h
Coronavirus diaries: school's out forever
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01293-w John Tregoning deals with work responsibilities alongside homeschooling and childcare.
3h
DJI's newest drone can dodge other flying objects
Sensors on the back, front, and bottom help the DJI Mavic Air 2 navigate. (DJI /) The Mavic Air is the middle child. At $799, it fits nicely between the pint-sized Mavic Mini and the more advanced Mavic Pro models. That can be an awkward position, but in DJI's case, the Mavic Air 2 —just announced today—looks more like it's in the sweet spot. The Mavic Air 2 replaces the original , which debuted
3h
Deadly virus turns honey bees into Trojan horses
Sick bees better at passing muster with other colonies' guards
3h
Spinal cord gives bio-bots walking rhythm
Miniature biological robots are making greater strides than ever, thanks to the spinal cord directing their steps. Researchers developed the tiny walking 'spinobots,' powered by rat muscle and spinal cord tissue on a soft, 3D-printed hydrogel skeleton. While previous generations of biological robots, or bio-bots, could move forward by simple muscle contraction, the integration of the spinal cord g
3h
How the heart affects our perception
When we encounter a dangerous situation, signals from the brain make sure that the heart beats faster. When we relax the heart slows down. But the heartbeat also affects the brain but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Researchers have now identified two mechanisms underpinning how the heart influences our perception, the brain, and how these mechanisms differ between individuals.
3h
Early high school start times adversely affect attendance
A new study finds that earlier high school start times can have significant adverse consequences for students, including increased rates of tardiness and absenteeism.
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How mistakes help us recognize things
When we look at the same object in quick succession, our second glance always reflects a slightly falsified image of the object. Guided by various object characteristics such as motion direction, color and spatial position, our short-term memory makes systematic mistakes. Apparently, these mistakes help us to stabilize the continually changing impressions of our environment.
4h
Glacier detachments: A new hazard in a warming world?
On the evening of 5 August 2013, a startling event occurred deep in the remote interior of the United States' largest national park. A half-kilometer-long tongue of Alaska's Flat Creek glacier suddenly broke off, unleashing a torrent of ice and rock that rushed 11 kilometers down a rugged mountain valley into the wilderness encompassed by Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve.
4h
Immune-regulating drug improves gum disease in mice
A drug that has life-extending effects on mice also reverses age-related dental problems in the animals, according to a new study.
4h
Over-65s and workers with symptoms to be offered test
Matt Hancock says expansion of access to tests will help state hit 100,000 daily target
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Pence Says His Earlier Comments About Testing Were Misunderstood
At issue: test distribution versus test completion. The vice president said his statement in March about 4 million tests referred to test distribution. (Image credit: Alex Brandon/AP)
4h
How Spies Snuck Malware Into the Google Play Store—Again and Again
Malicious Android apps from the so-called PhantomLance campaign targeted hundreds of users, and at least two slipped past Google's defenses.
4h
Hubble watches comet ATLAS disintegrate into more than 2 dozen pieces
These two Hubble Space Telescope images of comet C/2019 Y4 (ATLAS), taken on April 20 and 23, 2020, provide the sharpest views yet of the breakup of the fragile comet.
4h
How animals 'dial up' the pain they experience from certain stimuli
Scientists have — for the first time — shown how chemical triggers in the nervous system can amplify the pain experienced by mammals in response to certain stimuli.
4h
How animals 'dial up' the pain they experience from certain stimuli
Scientists have — for the first time — shown how chemical triggers in the nervous system can amplify the pain experienced by mammals in response to certain stimuli.
4h
Virus genomes help to explain why a major livestock disease has re-emerged in Europe
Livestock diseases like bluetongue virus (BTV) can have devastating economic and health consequences, but their origins can be difficult to establish. New research published in the open access journal PLOS Biology this week shows that the recent re-emergence of BTV in France could have been caused by human activities, based on the virus' unusual genetic makeup.
4h
What did Ancient Romans do without toilet paper?
We've all been caught unawares by our digestive tract at one time or another. It happened to the Nash family several months ago. We were nearing the end of an extended road trip, driving down a secondary highway through a sparsely populated area of Colorado at night, when one of my 9-year-old twin sons had to use the bathroom. Despite my pleading, he said he couldn't make it to the next town. (He
4h
As lockdowns lift, new hazards lurk in the water
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01286-9 Stagnant water in unused buildings can harbour infectious bacteria and heavy metals. Scientists point out that guidance on reopening is limited.
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Finding motivation while working from home as a PhD student during the coronavirus pandemic
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01292-x Stay productive by setting a routine, identifying a workspace and getting dressed, says Melina Papalampropoulou-Tsiridou.
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How (Not) to Do an Antibody Survey for SARS-CoV-2
Preprints from the first round of seroprevalence studies indicate that many more people have been infected with the virus than previously reported. Some of these studies also have serious design flaws.
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Beware of Antibody-based COVID-19 "Immunity Passports"
Dozens of tests with unknown accuracy have flooded the U.S. thanks to a move by the FDA that loosened restrictions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Synthetic antibodies built with bacterial superglue could help fight emerging viruses
Synthetic antibodies constructed using bacterial superglue can neutralize potentially lethal viruses, according to a new study.
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Smart contact lenses that diagnose and treat diabetes
Medical researchers have develops wireless smart contact lenses for diagnosis and treatment of diabetes.
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Hugs and kisses: Research connects affection, attachment style and marriage satisfaction
Go ahead: Give your partner a hug or cuddle while you catch some Netflix. According to recently published research, it just might build a stronger relationship.
4h
New device simulates feel of walls, solid objects in virtual reality
Today's virtual reality systems can create immersive visual experiences, but seldom do they enable users to feel anything — particularly walls, appliances and furniture. A new device, however, uses multiple strings attached to the hand and fingers to simulate the feel of obstacles and heavy objects.
4h
A great new way to paint 3D-printed objects
Engineers have created a highly effective way to paint complex 3D-printed objects, such as lightweight frames for aircraft and biomedical stents, that could save manufacturers time and money and provide new opportunities to create 'smart skins' for printed parts.
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Virus-infected honey bees more likely to gain entrance to healthy hives
Honey bees that guard hive entrances are twice as likely to allow in trespassers from other hives if the intruders are infected with the Israeli acute paralysis virus, a deadly pathogen of bees, researchers report.
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Daily briefing: The death toll from coronavirus might be almost 60% higher than reported in official counts
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01288-7 The Financial Times compared all known deaths during the outbreak in 14 countries with the average deaths in those places over the past four years. Plus: how scientists are discovering which COVID-fighting strategies work best and we celebrate 30 years of the Hubble telescope (and look at why it's still going strong).
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Report: COVID May Have Killed Way More Americans Than We Think
A new analysis found that during the early weeks of the coronavirus outbreak, the number of excess deaths in the US far exceeded the number of deaths attributed to COVID-19, according to The Washington Post . In other words, the numbers suggest that the pandemic's death toll could be vastly higher than what the government has been reporting so far. Official records collected from the beginning of
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Virus genomes help to explain why a major livestock disease has re-emerged in Europe
Livestock diseases like bluetongue virus (BTV) can have devastating economic and health consequences, but their origins can be difficult to establish. New research published in the open access journal PLOS Biology this week shows that the recent re-emergence of BTV in France could have been caused by human activities, based on the virus' unusual genetic makeup.
4h
Keir Starmer to urge government to outline lockdown exit plan
Labour leader says England being far too slow to set out its strategy
4h
Corporate bailouts should come with strings
Business cannot expect emergency cash without sensible conditions
4h
Study reveals important flowering plants for city-dwelling honey bees
Trees, shrubs and woody vines are among the top food sources for honey bees in urban environments, according to an international team of researchers. By using honey bees housed in rooftop apiaries in Philadelphia, the researchers identified the plant species from which the honey bees collected most of their food, and tracked how these food resources changed from spring to fall. The findings may be
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New study finds biases against physically dirty people take root as early as age 5
People develop biases against individuals who are physically dirty as early as the age of 5 and carry these perceptions into adulthood, according to researchers from Boston College and Franklin & Marshall College. In the time of the COVID-19 crisis, the findings recognize similar biases against the sick may contribute to social marginalization of people who contract the coronavirus.
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Hubble captures breakup of comet ATLAS
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has provided astronomers with the sharpest view yet of the breakup of Comet C/2019 Y4 (ATLAS). The telescope resolved roughly 30 fragments of the fragile comet on April 20 and 25 pieces on April 23.
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Thrive announces clinical data from study of blood test to detect multiple cancers
Thrive Earlier Detection published data from DETECT-A, the first ever prospective, interventional study to use a blood test to screen for multiple types of cancers in a real-world population, in the journal Science. Thrive's blood test more than doubled the number of cancers first detected by standard-of-care screening, approximately two-thirds that were earlier stage. DETECT-A is the first study
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Gold standard force fields help identify promising peptides to disrupt COVID-19
Drug discovery is arduous, expensive, and often prone to failure, but computer-aided drug design and simulation can speed up and improve the development of treatments.
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People with brown fat may burn 15% more calories
Short-term cold exposure may help people with brown fat burn 15% more calories than those without, according to a small study.
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TAMA300 blazes trail for improved gravitational wave astronomy
Researchers have used the infrastructure of the former TAMA300 gravitational wave detector in Mitaka, Tokyo to demonstrate a new technique to reduce quantum noise in detectors. This new technique will help increase the sensitivity of the detectors comprising a collaborative worldwide gravitational wave network, allowing them to observe fainter waves.
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Beware of Antibody-based COVID-19 "Immunity Passports"
Dozens of tests with unknown accuracy have flooded the U.S. thanks to a move by the FDA that loosened restrictions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Virus genomes help to explain why a major livestock disease has re-emerged in Europe
Livestock diseases like bluetongue virus (BTV) can have devastating economic and health consequences, but their origins can be difficult to establish. New research published in the open access journal PLOS Biology this week shows that the recent re-emergence of BTV in France could have been caused by human activities, based on the virus' unusual genetic makeup.
4h
Gold standard force fields help identify promising peptides to disrupt COVID-19
Drug discovery is arduous, expensive, and often prone to failure, but computer-aided drug design and simulation can speed up and improve the development of treatments.
4h
Outdoor grills for cooking everything under the sun
You're suddenly everybody's best friend. (Jo Jo via Unsplash/) Picture this: it's perfect outside on the longest day of the year. You're surrounded by loved ones, and they're all getting hungry after hours in the sun. Twilight is just starting to make its approach as you fire up the grill, an assortment of meats and veggies at the ready. Beer, margarita, or lemonade in hand, you preside over the
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Bankers were left in dark on size of Sunak loan plan
Executives in the lenders who will administer scheme were surprised by chancellor's £50,000 borrowing limit
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New Disinfectant Can Kill Coronavirus on Surfaces for 90 Days
Credit: NIH Hong Kong was one of the early epicenters of the coronavirus pandemic, and public health officials are only beginning to get a handle on the situation. A new type of disinfectant could help bring down COVID-19 infections, and combat future diseases. Researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have developed a disinfectant that can protect surfaces for u
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Scientists explore the power of radio waves to help control fusion reactions
A key challenge to capturing and controlling fusion energy on Earth is maintaining the stability of plasma—the electrically charged gas that fuels fusion reactions—and keeping it millions of degrees hot to launch and maintain fusion reactions. This challenge requires controlling magnetic islands, bubble-like structures that form in the plasma in doughnut-shaped tokamak fusion facilities. These isl
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Harnessing psyllid peptides to fight citrus greening disease
Citrus greening disease, also called huanglongbing (HLB), is a bacterial infection of citrus trees that results in small, misshapen and sour fruits that are unsuitable for consumption, ultimately killing the tree. Because there is no cure, HLB is a major threat to the $10 billion citrus industry in Florida, where it was first detected in 2005, and to the $7 billion industry in California, where it
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Psychological Trauma Is the Next Crisis for Coronavirus Health Workers
Hero worship alone doesn't protect frontline clinicians from distress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3M promises monthly updates in lieu of earnings forecasts
Industrial bellwethers wrestle with how to keep investors informed during virus uncertainty
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Harnessing psyllid peptides to fight citrus greening disease
Citrus greening disease, also called huanglongbing (HLB), is a bacterial infection of citrus trees that results in small, misshapen and sour fruits that are unsuitable for consumption, ultimately killing the tree. Because there is no cure, HLB is a major threat to the $10 billion citrus industry in Florida, where it was first detected in 2005, and to the $7 billion industry in California, where it
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Psychological Trauma Is the Next Crisis for Coronavirus Health Workers
Hero worship alone doesn't protect frontline clinicians from distress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Arctic wildlife uses extreme method to save energy
The extreme cold, harsh environment and constant hunt for food means that Arctic animals have become specialists in saving energy. Now, researchers have discovered a previously unknown energy-saving method used by birds during the polar night.
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Visual-spatial learning disorder is more common than thought, finds study
Researchers estimate non-verbal learning disorder may affect up to 3 million children in the United States.
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They remember: Communities of microbes found to have working memory
Biologists studying communities of bacteria have discovered that these so-called simple organisms feature a robust capacity for memory. Using light, researchers were able to encode complex memory patterns and visualize cells with memory. The discovery reveals surprising parallels between low-level single-celled organisms and sophisticated neurons that process memory in the human brain. The finding
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Harnessing psyllid peptides to fight citrus greening disease
BTI, USDA and UW scientists have identified peptides in the Asian citrus psyllid, an insect that spreads the bacterium that causes citrus greening disease (huanglongbing, HLB). The researchers are using the peptides as starting points for developing an insecticide to halt damage to the U.S.'s multi-billion dollar citrus industry.
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Spinal cord gives bio-bots walking rhythm
Miniature biological robots are making greater strides than ever, thanks to the spinal cord directing their steps. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers developed the tiny walking 'spinobots,' powered by rat muscle and spinal cord tissue on a soft, 3D-printed hydrogel skeleton. While previous generations of biological robots, or bio-bots, could move forward by simple muscle contra
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Scientists explore the power of radio waves to help control fusion reactions
New research points to improved control of troublesome magnetic islands in future fusion facilities.
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Ayurveda and yoga for COVID-19 prevention
Experts in Indian traditional medicine, including the chair of the Government of India's committee charged to lead that nation's efforts on the potential uses of traditional medicine relative to COVID-19, describe how the approach of Ayurveda and yoga may help strengthen host immunity and provide an effective, accessible, and affordable means of prophylaxis of COVID-19 infection.
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Quarantine Could Change How Americans Think of Incarceration
E arlier this month , Ellen DeGeneres attracted public ire for something she said during the first "at home" edition of her show. Sitting in one of her palatial houses , the 62-year-old comedian joked that self-isolation is "like being in jail … mostly because I've been wearing the same clothes for 10 days and everyone in here is gay." The video was removed from her YouTube channel following swif
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The False Hope of Antibody Tests
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . For months, the lack of testing for the novel coronavirus in the United States has allowed, ironically, a small glimmer of hope: The official number of COVID-19 cases, currently 957,875 , is almost certainly too low. If people who want to get tested can't get tested, and if
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DNA blood test spots cancers in seemingly cancer-free women, but also produces false alarms
Early detection test finds "hidden" cancers in 26 women, but more than 100 had had false positives
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What's your emotional style? How your responses can help children navigate this crisis | Lea Waters
Helping children express, understand and grow from their emotions during Covid-19 is a skill that will last into their adult lives See all our coronavirus coverage Read more in the Good Place series Sign up for Coronavirus: Australia at a glance , our daily email newsletter Most families are going through the full gamut of emotions right now. Gratitude, worry, fear, love, compassion, frustration,
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UN chief: don't use taxpayer cash to rescue carbon-intensive industries
António Guterres calls for coronavirus aid to be directed at firms with green credentials Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Governments should not use taxpayer cash to rescue fossil fuel companies and carbon-intensive industries, but devote economic rescue packages for the coronavirus crisis to businesses that cut greenhouse gas emissions and create green jobs, the UN
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Antibody test makes picking COVID-19 plasma donors easier
A new microchip technology could optimize convalescent plasma therapy for COVID-19 patients, according to a new study. Researchers report using a new and more accurate way of testing for antibodies against SARS CoV-2 in recovered patients as a means to characterize the potential effectiveness of their convalescent plasma for donation to sick patients. The project used microchip technology origina
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Covid-19 latest: Worldwide confirmed coronavirus cases pass 3 million
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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BU researchers: Race and income shape COVID-19 risk
The new coronavirus does not discriminate, but discrimination and inequality have shaped the risk of severe illness and death, according to a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study
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Making transitions from nursing home to hospital safer during COVID-19 outbreak
Based on their research and clinical experiences, Kathleen Unroe, M.D., and colleagues have developed the top 10 points for safe care transitions between nursing home and emergency departments during the pandemic. Their paper, which also emphasizes important of advance care planning, is published in the Journal of Geriatric Emergency Medicine.
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Battered by floods, U.S. river communities try new remedies
Hollywood Beach Road was once such prime real estate that the neighborhood had its own airstrip, enabling well-heeled residents to zip back and forth between homes in nearby St. Louis and weekend cottages on the Meramec River in suburban Arnold, Missouri.
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Glacier detachments: A new hazard in a warming world?
On the evening of 5 August 2013, a startling event occurred deep in the remote interior of the United States' largest national park. A half-kilometer-long tongue of Alaska's Flat Creek glacier suddenly broke off, unleashing a torrent of ice and rock that rushed 11 kilometers down a rugged mountain valley into the wilderness encompassed by Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve.
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Textbook formulas for describing heat flow characteristics, crucial in many industries, are oversimplified, study shows
Whether it's water flowing across a condenser plate in an industrial plant, or air whooshing through heating and cooling ducts, the flow of fluid across flat surfaces is a phenomenon at the heart of many of the processes of modern life. Yet, aspects of this process have been poorly understood, and some have been taught incorrectly to generations of engineering students, a new analysis shows.
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Crisis lays bare risks of financial leverage, again
This time it is capital markets, rather than banks, that have to reform
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NIH Cancels Funding for Bat Coronavirus Research Project
The abrupt termination comes after the research drew President Trump's attention for its ties to the Wuhan Institute of Virology.
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To boost crop yield, plant in a pattern
Higher yields and fewer weeds are possible if farmers sow wheat, maize, soy, and other crops in more uniform spatial patterns, according to a new study. Further, precise sowing can also help reduce herbicide use and fertilizer runoff, say the researchers. One of the greatest challenges facing humanity is how to grow more food while reducing the negative impacts of agriculture on the environment.
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Study reveals pharmacy-level barriers to treatment for opioid use disorder in Appalachian Kentucky
A new study led by University of Kentucky researcher April Young and Emory University researcher Hannah Cooper shows that a number of pharmacies in the Appalachian region of Kentucky are limiting the dispensing of buprenorphine, a medication used to treat opioid use disorder (OUD).
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How the heart affects our perception
When we encounter a dangerous situation, signals from the brain make sure that the heart beats faster. When we relax the heart slows down. But the heartbeat also affects the brain but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences have now identified two mechanisms underpinning how the heart influences our perception, the brain
5h
Glacier detachments: A new hazard in a warming world?
On the evening of 5 August 2013, a startling event occurred deep in the remote interior of the United States' largest national park. A half-kilometer-long tongue of Alaska's Flat Creek glacier suddenly broke off, unleashing a torrent of ice and rock that rushed 11 kilometers down a rugged mountain valley into the wilderness encompassed by Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve.
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Understanding how fluids heat or cool surfaces
Textbook formulas for describing heat flow characteristics, crucial in many industries, are oversimplified, study shows.
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Forskaren: "Landhöjningen har skyddat oss men den håller på att avta"
Landhöjningen har skyddat Sverige från stigande havsnivåer – men det kommer inte vara för alltid. Spela videon för att se hela Victoria Dyrings intervju med Anna Wåhlin, professor i oceanografi vid Göteborgs Universitet.
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Medical waste piles up in Italy's virus epicentre
Contaminated hospital waste is piling up in the Italian epicentre of the coronavirus crisis.
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Agricultural pickers in US to see unsafely hot workdays double by 2050
The global pandemic has put a focus on essential workers, those we rely on for basic services. Workers who pick crops, from strawberries to apples to nuts, already face harsh conditions harvesting in fields during summer harvest months. Those conditions will worsen significantly over the coming decades.
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Enter Our Annual Top 10 Innovations Contest
Submit your new product now to have a chance at being selected for a coveted spot in The Scientist's 2020 competition.
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Biden Should Release His Papers
Tara Reade's allegation against Joe Biden is not going away. Reade, who worked on his Senate staff in the 1990s, accuses Biden of sexually assaulting her in a hallway. Last week, The Intercept discovered a 1993 call to the talk-show host Larry King from a woman who Reade says was her now-deceased mother. The call, which refers to "problems" that the woman's daughter had while "working for a promi
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Study shows immunotherapy prior to surgery may help destroy high-risk breast cancer
A new study led by Yale Cancer Center (YCC) researchers shows women with high-risk HER2-negative breast cancer treated before surgery with immunotherapy, plus a PARP inhibitor with chemotherapy, have a higher rate of complete eradication of cancer from the breast and lymph nodes compared to chemotherapy alone.
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Agricultural pickers in US to see unsafely hot workdays double by 2050
Temperature increases by 2050 and 2100 in U.S. counties where crops are grown will double, then triple the number of unsafe workdays. The study also looks at strategies the industry could adopt to protect workers' health.
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Scientists recreate DNA damage caused by toxins from smoking
Researchers from the University of York have recreated how toxins from smoking cause unique patterns of DNA damage. The discovery could help scientists better understand the cause of bladder cancer and the link to smoking.The causes of bladder cancer remain largely unknown, however smoking is seen as the main risk factor for the disease.
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China Is Installing Surveillance Cameras Inside People's Homes
Personalized Surveillance In order to make sure people exposed to the coronavirus are obeying lockdown orders, Chinese authorities have been installing security cameras aimed directly at residents' doors — and, sometimes, inside their homes. Various Chinese provinces have been installing the cameras over the past two months, CNN reports . By doing so, they're effectively expanding the country's a
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A Nest of Alien Asteroids Orbits Our Sun
Astronomers say they have found orphan rocks from another star, or stars, stashed in the outer solar system.
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Vip1 is a kinase and pyrophosphatase switch that regulates inositol diphosphate signaling [Biochemistry]
Inositol diphosphates (PP-IPs), also known as inositol pyrophosphates, are high-energy cellular signaling codes involved in nutrient and regulatory responses. We report that the evolutionarily conserved gene product, Vip1, possesses autonomous kinase and pyrophosphatase domains capable of synthesis and destruction of D-1 PP-IPs. Our studies provide atomic-resolution structures of the PP-IP…
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Chitin perception in plasmodesmata characterizes submembrane immune-signaling specificity in plants [Plant Biology]
The plasma membrane (PM) is composed of heterogeneous subdomains, characterized by differences in protein and lipid composition. PM receptors can be dynamically sorted into membrane domains to underpin signaling in response to extracellular stimuli. In plants, the plasmodesmal PM is a discrete microdomain that hosts specific receptors and responses. We…
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Impact of Xylella fastidiosa subspecies pauca in European olives [Agricultural Sciences]
Xylella fastidiosa is the causal agent of plant diseases that cause massive economic damage. In 2013, a strain of the bacterium was, for the first time, detected in the European territory (Italy), causing the Olive Quick Decline Syndrome. We simulate future spread of the disease based on climatic-suitability modeling and…
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The AMPK-PP2A axis in insect fat body is activated by 20-hydroxyecdysone to antagonize insulin/IGF signaling and restrict growth rate [Agricultural Sciences]
In insects, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) limits the growth period by triggering developmental transitions; 20E also modulates the growth rate by antagonizing insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS). Previous work has shown that 20E cross-talks with IIS, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we found that, in both the…
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Outer membrane vesicles catabolize lignin-derived aromatic compounds in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 [Applied Biological Sciences]
Lignin is an abundant and recalcitrant component of plant cell walls. While lignin degradation in nature is typically attributed to fungi, growing evidence suggests that bacteria also catabolize this complex biopolymer. However, the spatiotemporal mechanisms for lignin catabolism remain unclear. Improved understanding of this biological process would aid in our…
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ZNF263 is a transcriptional regulator of heparin and heparan sulfate biosynthesis [Biochemistry]
Heparin is the most widely prescribed biopharmaceutical in production globally. Its potent anticoagulant activity and safety makes it the drug of choice for preventing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. In 2008, adulterated material was introduced into the heparin supply chain, resulting in several hundred deaths and demonstrating the need…
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Alkyltransferase-like protein clusters scan DNA rapidly over long distances and recruit NER to alkyl-DNA lesions [Biochemistry]
Alkylation of guanine bases in DNA is detrimental to cells due to its high mutagenic and cytotoxic potential and is repaired by the alkyltransferase AGT. Additionally, alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs), which are structurally similar to AGTs, have been identified in many organisms. While ATLs are per se catalytically inactive, strong evidence…
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Rcf2 revealed in cryo-EM structures of hypoxic isoforms of mature mitochondrial III-IV supercomplexes [Biochemistry]
The organization of the mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins into supercomplexes (SCs) is now undisputed; however, their assembly process, or the role of differential expression isoforms, remain to be determined. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cytochrome c oxidase (CIV) forms SCs of varying stoichiometry with cytochrome bc1 (CIII). Recent studies have revealed,…
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RNA polymerase II stalls on oxidative DNA damage via a torsion-latch mechanism involving lone pair-{pi} and CH-{pi} interactions [Biochemistry]
Oxidation of guanine generates several types of DNA lesions, such as 8-oxoguanine (8OG), 5-guanidinohydantoin (Gh), and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp). These guanine-derived oxidative DNA lesions interfere with both replication and transcription. However, the molecular mechanism of transcription processing of Gh and Sp remains unknown. In this study, by combining biochemical and structural…
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A common coupling mechanism for A-type heme-copper oxidases from bacteria to mitochondria [Biochemistry]
Mitochondria metabolize almost all the oxygen that we consume, reducing it to water by cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). CcO maximizes energy capture into the protonmotive force by pumping protons across the mitochondrial inner membrane. Forty years after the H+/e− stoichiometry was established, a consensus has yet to be reached on…
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Determining the correct stoichiometry of Kv2.1/Kv6.4 heterotetramers, functional in multiple stoichiometrical configurations [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The electrically silent (KvS) members of the voltage-gated potassium (Kv) subfamilies Kv5, Kv6, Kv8, and Kv9 selectively modulate Kv2 subunits by forming heterotetrameric Kv2/KvS channels. Based on the reported 3:1 stoichiometry of Kv2.1/Kv9.3 channels, we tested the hypothesis that Kv2.1/Kv6.4 channels express, in contrast to the assumed 3:1, in a…
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Curling of epithelial monolayers reveals coupling between active bending and tissue tension [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Epithelial monolayers are two-dimensional cell sheets which compartmentalize the body and organs of multicellular organisms. Their morphogenesis during development or pathology results from patterned endogenous and exogenous forces and their interplay with tissue mechanical properties. In particular, bending of epithelia is thought to result from active torques generated by the…
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Structural and kinetic basis for the regulation and potentiation of Hsp104 function [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Hsp104 provides a valuable model for the many essential proteostatic functions performed by the AAA+ superfamily of protein molecular machines. We developed and used a powerful hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX MS) analysis that can provide positionally resolved information on structure, dynamics, and energetics of the Hsp104 molecular machinery, even…
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Redefining the heterogeneity of peripheral nerve cells in health and autoimmunity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Peripheral nerves contain axons and their enwrapping glia cells named Schwann cells (SCs) that are either myelinating (mySCs) or nonmyelinating (nmSCs). Our understanding of other cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) remains limited. Here, we provide an unbiased single cell transcriptomic characterization of the nondiseased rodent PNS. We identified…
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The microcircuits of striatum in silico [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The basal ganglia play an important role in decision making and selection of action primarily based on input from cortex, thalamus, and the dopamine system. Their main input structure, striatum, is central to this process. It consists of two types of projection neurons, together representing 95% of the neurons, and…
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Electrochemically scrambled nanocrystals are catalytically active for CO2-to-multicarbons [Chemistry]
Promotion of C–C bonds is one of the key fundamental questions in the field of CO2 electroreduction. Much progress has occurred in developing bulk-derived Cu-based electrodes for CO2-to-multicarbons (CO2-to-C2+), especially in the widely studied class of high-surface-area "oxide-derived" copper. However, fundamental understanding into the structural characteristics responsible for efficient C–C…
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Reactivity oscillation in the heavy-light-heavy Cl + CH4 reaction [Chemistry]
It has long been predicted that oscillatory behavior exists in reactivity as a function of collision energy for heavy–light–heavy (HLH) chemical reactions in which a light atom is transferred between two heavy atoms or groups of atoms, but direct observation of such a behavior in bimolecular reactions remains a challenge….
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A multiproducer microbiome generates chemical diversity in the marine sponge Mycale hentscheli [Chemistry]
Bacterial specialized metabolites are increasingly recognized as important factors in animal–microbiome interactions: for example, by providing the host with chemical defenses. Even in chemically rich animals, such compounds have been found to originate from individual members of more diverse microbiomes. Here, we identified a remarkable case of a moderately complex…
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The complexity of human computation via a concrete model with an application to passwords [Computer Sciences]
What can humans compute in their heads? We are thinking of a variety of cryptographic protocols, games like sudoku, crossword puzzles, speed chess, and so on. For example, can a person compute a function in his or her head so that an eavesdropper with a powerful computer—who sees the responses…
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Spermatozoa lacking Fertilization Influencing Membrane Protein (FIMP) fail to fuse with oocytes in mice [Developmental Biology]
Sperm–oocyte fusion is a critical event in mammalian fertilization, categorized by three indispensable proteins. Sperm membrane protein IZUMO1 and its counterpart oocyte membrane protein JUNO make a protein complex allowing sperm to interact with the oocyte, and subsequent sperm–oocyte fusion. Oocyte tetraspanin protein CD9 also contributes to sperm–oocyte fusion. However,…
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JNK-dependent intestinal barrier failure disrupts host-microbe homeostasis during tumorigenesis [Developmental Biology]
In all animals, the intestinal epithelium forms a tight barrier to the environment. The epithelium regulates the absorption of nutrients, mounts immune responses, and prevents systemic infections. Here, we investigate the consequences of tumorigenesis on the microbiome using a Drosophila intestinal tumor model. We show that upon loss of BMP…
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CD93 negatively regulates astrogenesis in response to MMRN2 through the transcriptional repressor ZFP503 in the developing brain [Developmental Biology]
Astrogenesis is repressed in the early embryonic period and occurs in the late embryonic period. A variety of external and internal signals contribute to the sequential differentiation of neural stem cells. Here, we discovered that immune-related CD93 plays a critical negative role in the regulation of astrogenesis in the mouse…
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Large and projected strengthening moisture limitation on end-of-season photosynthesis [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Terrestrial photosynthesis is regulated by plant phenology and environmental conditions, both of which experienced substantial changes in recent decades. Unlike early-season photosynthesis, which is mostly driven by temperature or wet-season onset, late-season photosynthesis can be limited by several factors and the underlying mechanisms are less understood. Here, we analyze the…
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Viral zoonotic risk is homogenous among taxonomic orders of mammalian and avian reservoir hosts [Ecology]
The notion that certain animal groups disproportionately maintain and transmit viruses to humans due to broad-scale differences in ecology, life history, and physiology currently influences global health surveillance and research in disease ecology, virology, and immunology. To directly test whether such "special reservoirs" of zoonoses exist, we used literature searches…
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Holographic virtual staining of individual biological cells [Engineering]
Many medical and biological protocols for analyzing individual biological cells involve morphological evaluation based on cell staining, designed to enhance imaging contrast and enable clinicians and biologists to differentiate between various cell organelles. However, cell staining is not always allowed in certain medical procedures. In other cases, staining may be…
6h
Evolution of male pregnancy associated with remodeling of canonical vertebrate immunity in seahorses and pipefishes [Evolution]
A fundamental problem for the evolution of pregnancy, the most specialized form of parental investment among vertebrates, is the rejection of the nonself-embryo. Mammals achieve immunological tolerance by down-regulating both major histocompatibility complex pathways (MHC I and II). Although pregnancy has evolved multiple times independently among vertebrates, knowledge of associated…
6h
Analysis of APOBEC-induced mutations in yeast strains with low levels of replicative DNA polymerases [Genetics]
Yeast strains with low levels of the replicative DNA polymerases (alpha, delta, and epsilon) have high levels of chromosome deletions, duplications, and translocations. By examining the patterns of mutations induced in strains with low levels of DNA polymerase by the human protein APOBEC3B (a protein that deaminates cytosine in single-stranded…
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RepeatModeler2 for automated genomic discovery of transposable element families [Genetics]
The accelerating pace of genome sequencing throughout the tree of life is driving the need for improved unsupervised annotation of genome components such as transposable elements (TEs). Because the types and sequences of TEs are highly variable across species, automated TE discovery and annotation are challenging and time-consuming tasks. A…
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Evolutionary history of modern Samoans [Genetics]
Archaeological studies estimate the initial settlement of Samoa at 2,750 to 2,880 y ago and identify only limited settlement and human modification to the landscape until about 1,000 to 1,500 y ago. At this point, a complex history of migration is thought to have begun with the arrival of people…
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Resolvin E1 is a pro-repair molecule that promotes intestinal epithelial wound healing [Immunology and Inflammation]
Resolution of intestinal inflammation and wound repair are active processes that mediate epithelial healing at mucosal surfaces. Lipid molecules referred to as specialized proresolving mediators (SPMs) play an important role in the restorative response. Resolvin E1 (RvE1), a SPM derived from omega-3 fatty acids, has been reported to dampen intestinal…
6h
Frailty markers comprise blood metabolites involved in antioxidation, cognition, and mobility [Medical Sciences]
As human society ages globally, age-related disorders are becoming increasingly common. Due to decreasing physiological reserves and increasing organ system dysfunction associated with age, frailty affects many elderly people, compromising their ability to cope with acute stressors. Frail elderly people commonly manifest complex clinical symptoms, including cognitive dysfunction, hypomobility, and
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Effectiveness of convalescent plasma therapy in severe COVID-19 patients [Medical Sciences]
Currently, there are no approved specific antiviral agents for novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In this study, 10 severe patients confirmed by real-time viral RNA test were enrolled prospectively. One dose of 200 mL of convalescent plasma (CP) derived from recently recovered donors with the neutralizing antibody titers above 1:640…
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Unbiased proteomics identifies plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 as a negative regulator of endothelial nitric oxide synthase [Medical Sciences]
Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is a critical mediator of vascular function. eNOS is tightly regulated at various levels, including transcription, co- and posttranslational modifications, and by various protein–protein interactions. Using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) and mass spectrometry (MS),…
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The E. coli transcription factor GrlA is regulated by subcellular compartmentalization and activated in response to mechanical stimuli [Microbiology]
Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a foodborne pathogen that colonizes the gastrointestinal tract and has evolved intricate mechanisms to sense and respond to the host environment. Upon the sensation of chemical and physical cues specific to the host's intestinal environment, locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE)-encoded virulence genes are activated and…
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Infectious KoRV-related retroviruses circulating in Australian bats [Microbiology]
Bats are reservoirs of emerging viruses that are highly pathogenic to other mammals, including humans. Despite the diversity and abundance of bat viruses, to date they have not been shown to harbor exogenous retroviruses. Here we report the discovery and characterization of a group of koala retrovirus-related (KoRV-related) gammaretroviruses in…
6h
PSGL-1 restricts HIV-1 infectivity by blocking virus particle attachment to target cells [Microbiology]
P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) is a dimeric, mucin-like, 120-kDa glycoprotein that binds to P-, E-, and L-selectins. PSGL-1 is expressed primarily on the surface of lymphoid and myeloid cells and is up-regulated during inflammation to mediate leukocyte tethering and rolling on the surface of endothelium for migration into inflamed tissues….
6h
The type IV pilin PilA couples surface attachment and cell-cycle initiation in Caulobacter crescentus [Microbiology]
Understanding how bacteria colonize surfaces and regulate cell-cycle progression in response to cellular adhesion is of fundamental importance. Here, we use transposon sequencing in conjunction with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy to uncover the molecular mechanism for how surface sensing drives cell-cycle initiation in Caulobacter crescentus. We identify the…
6h
Dynamic coupling of whole-brain neuronal and neurotransmitter systems [Neuroscience]
Remarkable progress has come from whole-brain models linking anatomy and function. Paradoxically, it is not clear how a neuronal dynamical system running in the fixed human anatomical connectome can give rise to the rich changes in the functional repertoire associated with human brain function, which is impossible to explain through…
6h
A retinal circuit for the suppressed-by-contrast receptive field of a polyaxonal amacrine cell [Neuroscience]
Amacrine cells are a diverse population of interneurons in the retina that play a critical role in extracting complex features of the visual world and shaping the receptive fields of retinal output neurons (ganglion cells). While much of the computational power of amacrine cells is believed to arise from the…
6h
Cytokinesis and postabscission midbody remnants are regulated during mammalian brain development [Neuroscience]
Building a brain of the proper size and structure requires neural stem cells (NSCs) to divide with tight temporal and spatial control to produce different daughter cell types in proper numbers and sequence. Mammalian NSCs in the embryonic cortex must maintain their polarized epithelial structure as they undergo both early…
6h
Seasonal changes in NRF2 antioxidant pathway regulates winter depression-like behavior [Neuroscience]
Seasonal changes in the environment lead to depression-like behaviors in humans and animals. The underlying mechanisms, however, are unknown. We observed decreased sociability and increased anxiety-like behavior in medaka fish exposed to winter-like conditions. Whole brain metabolomic analysis revealed seasonal changes in 68 metabolites, including neurotransmitters and antioxidants associated with
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Distinct locomotor precursors in newborn babies [Neuroscience]
Mature locomotion involves modular spinal drives generating a set of fundamental patterns of motoneuron activation, each timed at a specific phase of locomotor cycles and associated with a stable muscle synergy. How locomotor modules develop and to what extent they depend on prior experience or intrinsic programs remains unclear. To…
6h
Electron temperature of the solar wind [Physics]
Solar wind provides an example of a weakly collisional plasma expanding from a thermal source in the presence of spatially diverging magnetic-field lines. Observations show that in the inner heliosphere, the electron temperature declines with the distance approximately as Te(r)∼r−0.3…r−0.7, which is significantly slower than the adiabatic expansion law ∼r−4/3….
6h
Confidence collapse in a multihousehold, self-reflexive DSGE model [Physics]
We investigate a multihousehold dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) model in which past aggregate consumption impacts the confidence, and therefore consumption propensity, of individual households. We find that such a minimal setup is extremely rich and leads to a variety of realistic output dynamics: high output with no crises; high…
6h
Pathogen manipulation of chloroplast function triggers a light-dependent immune recognition [Plant Biology]
In plants and animals, nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins are intracellular immune sensors that recognize and eliminate a wide range of invading pathogens. NLR-mediated immunity is known to be modulated by environmental factors. However, how pathogen recognition by NLRs is influenced by environmental factors such as light remains unclear. Here,…
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Social, psychological, and demographic characteristics of dehumanization toward immigrants [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
This study extends the current body of work on dehumanization by evaluating the social, psychological, and demographic correlates of blatant disregard for immigrants. Participants (n = 468) were randomly assigned to read a scenario where 1) an immigrant or 2) an immigrant and their child were caught illegally crossing the…
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Neuroticism may not reflect emotional variability [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Neuroticism is one of the major traits describing human personality, and a predictor of mental and physical disorders with profound public health significance. Individual differences in emotional variability are thought to reflect the core of neuroticism. However, the empirical relation between emotional variability and neuroticism may be partially the result…
6h
Rising between-workplace inequalities in high-income countries [Social Sciences]
It is well documented that earnings inequalities have risen in many high-income countries. Less clear are the linkages between rising income inequality and workplace dynamics, how within- and between-workplace inequality varies across countries, and to what extent these inequalities are moderated by national labor market institutions. In order to describe…
6h
The Diversity-Innovation Paradox in Science [Social Sciences]
Prior work finds a diversity paradox: Diversity breeds innovation, yet underrepresented groups that diversify organizations have less successful careers within them. Does the diversity paradox hold for scientists as well? We study this by utilizing a near-complete population of ∼1.2 million US doctoral recipients from 1977 to 2015 and following…
6h
Robust landscapes of ribosome dwell times and aminoacyl-tRNAs in response to nutrient stress in liver [Systems Biology]
Translation depends on messenger RNA (mRNA)-specific initiation, elongation, and termination rates. While translation elongation is well studied in bacteria and yeast, less is known in higher eukaryotes. Here we combined ribosome and transfer RNA (tRNA) profiling to investigate the relations between translation elongation rates, (aminoacyl-) tRNA levels, and codon usage…
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Correction for Xu et al., Structure of the cell-binding component of the Clostridium difficile binary toxin reveals a di-heptamer macromolecular assembly [Correction]
BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for "Structure of the cell-binding component of the Clostridium difficile binary toxin reveals a di-heptamer macromolecular assembly," by Xingjian Xu, Raquel Godoy-Ruiz, Kaylin A. Adipietro, Christopher Peralta, Danya Ben-Hail, Kristen M. Varney, Mary E. Cook, Braden M. Roth, Paul T. Wilder, Thomas Cleveland, Alexander Grishaev,…
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Correction for Uyhazi et al., Pumilio proteins utilize distinct regulatory mechanisms to achieve complementary functions required for pluripotency and embryogenesis [Correction]
DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Correction for "Pumilio proteins utilize distinct regulatory mechanisms to achieve complementary functions required for pluripotency and embryogenesis," by Katherine E. Uyhazi, Yiying Yang, Na Liu, Hongying Qi, Xiao A. Huang, Winifred Mak, Scott D. Weatherbee, Nicola de Prisco, Vincenzo A. Gennarino, Xiaoling Song, and Haifan Lin, which was…
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Correction for AbuHammad et al., Regulation of PRMT5-MDM4 axis is critical in the response to CDK4/6 inhibitors in melanoma [Correction]
MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Regulation of PRMT5–MDM4 axis is critical in the response to CDK4/6 inhibitors in melanoma," by Shatha AbuHammad, Carleen Cullinane, Claire Martin, Zoe Bacolas, Teresa Ward, Huiqin Chen, Alison Slater, Kerry Ardley, Laura Kirby, Keefe T. Chan, Natalie Brajanovski, Lorey K. Smith, Aparna D. Rao, Emily J….
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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
Evolution of male pregnancy and immune remodeling Seahorses (Hippocampus abdominalis) swimming in an aquarium. Image credit: Sarah Kaehlert (GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany). In vertebrates, a developing embryo must avoid being recognized as foreign tissue by an immune system attuned to attack foreign antigens. Olivia Roth…
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On Mr. Hyslop's prediction, content archives, and preprint servers [Editorials]
The alfalfa looper moth, Autographa californica, is a nondescript grayish brown moth first described by German lepidopterist Adolph Speyer in 1875 (1) and then reclassified by American entomologist Rodrigues Ottolengui (2). Neither the moth's scientific name nor its common name is particularly descriptive; its range includes not just California but…
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Simulation model for kinship structures is ethnographically invalid [Biological Sciences]
The simulation model presented in ref. 1 requires correct usage of kinship concepts. However, the two kinship concepts central to the model, the incest taboo and the clan form of social organization, are incorrectly presented. The authors incorrectly consider the incest taboo to express preference for marriages between different social…
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Reply to Read and Parkin: Our model correctly expresses the ethnographic nature of the cultural incest taboo and kinship structures [Biological Sciences]
We are aware of several definitions of kinship terminology. We follow the meaning used by Levi-Strauss (1). In our paper (2), we state explicitly what each term means. The incest taboo has both cultural (symbolic) and biological implications. As stated (2), we are interested in the former—"a cultural marriage rule…
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Mischaracterization of bison migratory patterns in Yellowstone National Park: Consequences for the Green Wave Hypothesis [Biological Sciences]
Geremia et al. (1) analyze a range of data on bison movement, remotely sensed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and plant dietary quality at Yellowstone National Park to test tenets of the Green Wave Hypothesis (GWH). The authors conclude that bison migrate in concert with plant phenological development along elevational gradients…
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Reply to Craine: Bison redefine what it means to move to find food [Biological Sciences]
Ecologists accept the Forage Maturation Hypothesis (FMH) that young plants optimize food quality by balancing nutrient and biomass availability (1). The Green Wave Hypothesis (GWH) applies the FMH to migrating herbivores by linking the timing, pace, and extent of migrations to waves of new plant growth (2, 3). The GWH…
6h
Frank Press, A life of magnitude [Retrospectives]
Frank Press, 19th president of the National Academy of Sciences, died on Wednesday, January 29, 2020, at his home in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, at the age of 95. His career spanned the golden age of postwar science, and its arc took him to the highest levels of leadership in…
6h
Profile of Paul L. McEuen [Profiles]
In 1965, engineer Gordon Moore predicted that the number of transistors in an integrated circuit would double every two years. This prediction, known as Moore's Law, has been proven accurate and spurred semiconductor research toward miniaturization. Moore's Law, however, is starting to plateau. According to Cornell University physicist and National…
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Transposable elements teach T cells new tricks [Genetics]
Mammalian genomes are replete with transposable elements (TEs): parasitic genetic sequences that can replicate to high copy numbers within host genomes (1). TEs are widely recognized as a potent source of cell type- and context-specific regulatory elements (2, 3). In PNAS, Ye et al. (4) analyze chromatin profiling data from…
6h
Proresolving lipid mediators enhance PMN-mediated bacterial clearance [Immunology and Inflammation]
Host responses to bacterial infection are protective, yet without timely resolution they can lead to uncontrolled infection, with systemic engagement and multiple organ failure. In PNAS, Sekheri et al. (1) report the property of specific lipid mediators to counteract the delay tactics of bacterial DNA released from proliferating or dying…
6h
Ancient aquaculture and the rise of social complexity [Anthropology]
The abilities of humans to produce and store food have been key components in theories that explain how and why societies flourished and developed complex socioeconomic systems over time. Archaeological evidence shows that the transition from hunting/gathering/foraging to the purposeful cultivation of plants and domestication of animals was an important…
6h
Phosphoinositides regulate chloroplast processes [Plant Biology]
Phosphoinositides (PIs), the phosphorylated derivatives of the membrane glycerophospholipid phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), are minor constituents of eukaryotic cell membranes that play an important role as signaling molecules (1). The inositol ring can be phosphorylated at three positions and the seven resulting phosphorylated forms are dynamically interconverted and differentially distributed amo
6h
Cavitation in soft matter [Engineering]
Cavitation is the sudden, unstable expansion of a void or bubble within a liquid or solid subjected to a negative hydrostatic stress. While predominantly studied in fluids, cavitation is also an origin of damage in soft materials, including biological tissues. Examples of cavitation in fluids and soft solids are shown…
6h
A machine learning framework for solving high-dimensional mean field game and mean field control problems [Applied Mathematics]
Mean field games (MFG) and mean field control (MFC) are critical classes of multiagent models for the efficient analysis of massive populations of interacting agents. Their areas of application span topics in economics, finance, game theory, industrial engineering, crowd motion, and more. In this paper, we provide a flexible machine…
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Microscopic sensors using optical wireless integrated circuits [Applied Physical Sciences]
We present a platform for parallel production of standalone, untethered electronic sensors that are truly microscopic, i.e., smaller than the resolution of the naked eye. This platform heterogeneously integrates silicon electronics and inorganic microlight emitting diodes (LEDs) into a 100-μm-scale package that is powered by and communicates with light. The…
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Inner Workings: Microbiota munch on medications, causing big effects on drug activity [Microbiology]
Millions of patients with Parkinson's disease rely on the drug Levodopa for relief from tremors, slowed movement, and other motor symptoms. But many patients experience side effects such as cardiac arrhythmias, nausea, and gastrointestinal problems. Levodopa's side effects and benefits vary widely among patients. Those puzzling disparities, it turns out,…
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Noninvasive hippocampal blood-brain barrier opening in Alzheimer's disease with focused ultrasound [Neuroscience]
The blood–brain barrier (BBB) presents a significant challenge for treating brain disorders. The hippocampus is a key target for novel therapeutics, playing an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD), epilepsy, and depression. Preclinical studies have shown that magnetic resonance (MR)-guided low-intensity focused ultrasound (FUS) can reversibly open the BBB and…
6h
How the pandemic made this virologist an unlikely cult figure
Christian Drosten, who has become Germany's most popular podcaster, warns against reopening the country too soon
6h
Putin extends Russia's lockdown and warns worst to come
'Hard and difficult path lies ahead', says president in sombre TV speech to nation
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Red-flagging misinformation could slow the spread of fake news on social media
A new study on the spread of disinformation reveals that pairing headlines with credibility alerts from fact checkers, the public, news media and even AI, can reduce peoples' intention to share. However, the effectiveness of these alerts varies with political orientation and gender.
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What Was Lost When SXSW Was Canceled
Last year, Rebecca Stern got her big break. Her feature debut, Well Groomed , was selected to premiere at the South by Southwest Film Festival in Austin, Texas. It was the moment that Stern, a documentary filmmaker, had been building up to for five years—and it paid off big time. At the festival, Stern's film, about an eccentric cohort of dog groomers, garnered attention from press and buyers, in
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Are these the fracture lines that will break the EU?
Most EU members have shut their borders to limit coronavirus infection. While understandable, it also goes against one of Europe's most fundamental freedoms. In the longer run, these border closures could threaten the very existence of the EU itself. To blunt the rise of COVID-19, EU member states have instinctively reverted to the age-old remedy against 'foreign' dangers: shutting their national
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Study indicates artificial intelligence could help stem tide of school violence
By leveraging the basics of artificial intelligence technology now used to predict risk for suicide or other mental health issues, researchers developed an AI system that analyzes linguistic patterns to predict a youth's risk for committing acts of school violence. Study data published in the International Journal of Medical Informatics by physicians and clinical informaticians show the system can
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New VR tech simulates touching walls and other stuff
A new device uses multiple strings attached to the hand and fingers to simulate the feel of obstacles and heavy objects in virtual reality, researchers report. Today's virtual reality systems can create immersive visual experiences, but seldom allow users to feel anything—particularly walls, appliances, and furniture. In comparison, the new device locks the strings when the user's hand is near a
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Robots with 3D-printed muscles are powered by the spines of rats
Robots made of 3D-printed muscle and rat spines could help us understand conditions like motor neurone disease and the technique may eventually be used to build prosthetic devices
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France and Spain to ease coronavirus lockdowns
Partial relaxation of restrictions in both countries will begin on May 11
6h
Understanding deer damage is crucial when planting new forests
Scientists at the University of Southampton and Forest Research say understanding the risk of damage by deer to new and existing forests in Britain is crucial when considering their expansion.
6h
Understanding deer damage is crucial when planting new forests
Scientists at the University of Southampton and Forest Research say understanding the risk of damage by deer to new and existing forests in Britain is crucial when considering their expansion.
6h
The Covid-19 Pandemic Reveals Ransomware's Long Game
Hackers laid the groundwork months ago for attacks. Now they're flipping the switch.
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Stay-at-home science project: Leave secret messages with invisible ink
Invisible messages only require a tiny bit of lemon juice. You can use the rest to make a nice dressing. You're welcome. (Sandra Gutierrez /) Welcome to PopSci's at-home science projects series. On weekdays at noon, we'll be posting new projects that use ingredients you can buy at the grocery store. Show us how it went by tagging your project on social media using #popsciprojects. Movie spies are
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Birds That Eat Fire, Pet Food and Sugar Packets to Live Another Day
A willingness to experiment with new foods and ways of foraging may make some birds less vulnerable to extinction.
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Will Americans Be Willing to Install COVID-19 Tracking Apps?
Many would, but it depends on what organizations are distributing them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Red-flagging misinformation could slow the spread of fake news on social media
The dissemination of fake news on social media is a pernicious trend with dire implications for the 2020 presidential election. Indeed, research shows that public engagement with spurious news is greater than with legitimate news from mainstream sources, making social media a powerful channel for propaganda.
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Private sector rationing of open spaces may be on the cards
As the coronavirus lockdown continues, one golf course is allowing families to book walking time slots
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Pandemic is turbocharging tech's appeal for investors
Businesses faring best have flexible staffing and easy-to-use digital offerings
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Surgeons help create new process for disinfecting and reusing N95 masks
Amid shortages of personal protective equipment due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a St. Louis health care system has implemented a process to disinfect disposable N95 respirator masks that allows health care workers to reuse their own mask for up to 20 cycles.
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New drug formulation could treat Candida infections
With antimicrobial resistance (AMR) increasing around the world, new research led by the University of Bristol has shown a new drug formulation could possibly be used in antifungal treatments against Candida infections.
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Yoga blocks that prop up your confidence
Give yourself some extra support. (Carl Barcelo via Unsplash/) Even when we're in great shape, our bodies aren't the same day-to-day. Some days, we feel limber and can stretch easily. Other days, our muscles are tight and sore. Fortunately for most people, yoga is not a competition. The most important goal is to bring yourself to the mat to practice regularly. With these supportive yoga blocks, s
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Midtjylland vil af med Ulrich Fredberg
Hospitalsledelsen ved Hospitalsenhed Midt vil fyre ledende overlæge Ulrich Fredberg for bl.a samarbejdsproblemer, og for at have modarbejdet en genoprettelse af patientsikkerheden. Beslutningen kan gøre »betydelig skade« for lungekræftdiagnostik i Danmark, frygter professor Frede Olesen.
6h
Will Americans Be Willing to Install COVID-19 Tracking Apps?
Many would, but it depends on what organizations are distributing them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Plastic pollution reaching the Antarctic
Food wrapping, fishing gear and plastic waste continue to reach the Antarctic. Two new studies detail how plastic debris is reaching sub-Antarctic islands.
6h
Synthetic antibodies built with bacterial superglue could help fight emerging viruses
Synthetic antibodies constructed using bacterial superglue can neutralise potentially lethal viruses, according to a study published on April 21 in eLife.
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Oops: Organizer of Anti-Quarantine Protests Catches Coronavirus
An administrator for an anti-quarantine Facebook group in North Carolina, a local woman named Audrey Whitlock, confirmed that she tested positive for COVID-19, local news station ABC11 reports . Whitlock, fortunately, says that she self-quarantined for the recommended 14 days after the positive test results. The news comes after North Carolina governor Roy Cooper extended stay-at-home orders in t
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Stick vacuums that make cleaning your floors quick and easy
Trade your bulky machine for a light and maneuverable stick vacuum. (Amazon/) Whether we like it or not, spring cleaning is upon us. And while sponges, mops, and feather dusters are all fine and dandy, there is one cleaning tool that tops them all: the stick vacuum. This handy tool allows you to reach even the trickiest of corners in the house, to extend far beneath couches, and suck up even the
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Synthetic antibodies built with bacterial superglue could help fight emerging viruses
Synthetic antibodies constructed using bacterial superglue can neutralise potentially lethal viruses, according to a study published on April 21 in eLife.
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Is it Hemp or Marijuana?
New scanner developed at Texas A&M knows the answer.
7h
How mistakes help us recognize things
When we look at the same object in quick succession, our second glance always reflects a slightly falsified image of the object. Guided by various object characteristics such as motion direction, colour and spatial position, our short-term memory makes systematic mistakes. Apparently, these mistakes help us to stabilise the continually changing impressions of our environment. This has been discove
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Surveying the lipid landscape
Software LipidCreator enables researchers to characterize 60 lipid classes in cells with mass spectrometry.
7h
Understanding deer damage is crucial when planting new forests
Scientists at the University of Southampton and Forest Research say understanding the risk of damage by deer to new and existing forests in Britain is crucial when considering their expansion.
7h
Scientists studied the growth rate effect of gut bacteria on degradation of dietary fibers
It is known that approximately 80% of human immune system functions in the gastrointestinal tract. Gut bacteria and their metabolites play a fundamental role in the interaction between gut and other organs. Since the organic acids produced by colon bacteria (acetate, lactate, propionate, succinate and butyrate) activate a number of immune and hormonal processes, the microbiota composed of hundreds
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Drinking coffee appears to cause epigenetic changes to your DNA
Coffee has been linked to changes on our DNA that affect how active certain genes are. The finding may help explain some of coffee's touted health benefits
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Warren, Ocasio-Cortez propose M&A ban during crisis
Progressive Democrats say large companies should not exploit pandemic to snap up smaller ones
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Too many children miss out on education — but better data can help
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01263-2 A massive assessment of education shows that only 61% of children worldwide will complete secondary education.
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State support will offset just quarter of UK economic hit, says think-tank
Niesr forecasts biggest challenges will come after easing of lockdown measures
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Rate cut wrong response to Covid-19, says Sweden's central bank chief
Stefan Ingves focuses on insulating financial sector from problems in real economy as Riksbank holds rate
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Study from Chinese city of Shenzhen, outside Hong Kong in southern China, provides key insights on how coronavirus spreads
The extensive use of epidemiological surveillance, isolation of infected patients, and quarantines of exposed individuals in the Chinese city of Shenzhen in the early months of the COVID-19 outbreak allowed scientists to estimate important characteristics of this now-pandemic infectious disease, according to a study co-led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
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Synthetic antibodies built with bacterial superglue could help fight emerging viruses
Synthetic antibodies constructed using bacterial superglue can neutralise potentially lethal viruses, according to a study published on April 21 in eLife.
7h
Plastic pollution reaching the Antarctic
Food wrapping, fishing gear and plastic waste continue to reach the Antarctic. Two new studies into how plastic debris is reaching sub-Antarctic islands are published this month (April 2020) in the journal Environment International.
7h
Red-flagging misinformation could slow the spread of fake news on social media
A new study led by Nasir Memon and Sameer Patil on the spread of disinformation reveals that pairing headlines with credibility alerts from fact checkers, the public, news media and even AI, can reduce peoples' intention to share. However, the effectiveness of these alerts varies with political orientation and gender.
7h
Immune-regulating drug improves gum disease in mice
A drug that has life-extending effects on mice also reverses age-related dental problems in the animals, according to a new study published today in eLife.
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Correlations in COVID-19 growth point to universal strategies for slowing spread
Many months since the first COVID-19 outbreak, countries continue to explore solutions to manage the spread of the virus. Chaos theory researchers analyzed the growth of confirmed cases across four continents to better characterize the spread and examine which strategies are effective in reducing it, and their results, published in Chaos, found the virus commonly grows along a power law curve.
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Offspring may inherit legacy of their father's Toxoplasma infection
Australian researchers have revealed for the first time that males infected with the Toxoplasma parasite can impact their offspring's brain health and behaviour. Studying mice infected with the common parasite Toxoplasma, the team discovered that sperm of infected fathers carried an altered 'epigenetic' signature which impacted the brains of resulting offspring. Molecules in the sperm called 'smal
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To face coronavirus disease 2019, surgeons must embrace palliative care
This Viewpoint describes the relevance of a palliative care approach to surgery during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic.
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Rat spinal cords control neural function in biobots
Biological robots draw inspiration from natural systems to mimic the motions of organisms, such as swimming or jumping. Improvements to biobots to better replicate complex motor behaviors can lead to exciting biorobotic engineering applications to help solve real world challenges. However, this requires the creation of biohybrid, which is a challenge. Researchers combined an intact rat spinal cord
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COVID-19 in US prisons, jails
The importance of minimizing COVID-19 transmission in prisons and jails is described and policies and programs for doing so are detailed.
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Simulating borehole ballooning helps ensure safe drilling of deep-water oil, gas
A device which simulates borehole ballooning, a detrimental side effect of deep-water drilling operations, is expected to ensure safe and efficient operations. If not prevented, borehole ballooning can lead to irreversible damage and serious drilling accidents, which can result in reservoir pollution and huge economic loss. In Review of Scientific Instruments, researchers present a device that can
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How blood cells deform, recover when traveling through tiny channels
In this week's Biomicrofluidics, a method to characterize the shape recovery of healthy human RBCs flowing through a microfluidic constricted channel is reported. This investigation revealed a coupling between the cell's mechanical properties and the hydrodynamic properties of the flow. In addition, the method could distinguish between healthy red blood cells and those infected by the malaria para
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Wide bandgap semiconductor devices based on silicon carbide may revolutionize electronics
Silicon plays a central role within the semiconductor industry for microelectronic and nanoelectronic devices, and silicon wafers of high purity single-crystalline material can be obtained via a combination of liquid growth methods. In Applied Physics Reviews, researchers describe the atomic mechanisms governing extended defect kinetics in cubic silicon carbide, which has a diamondlike zincblende
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Experts Fear COVID-19 Will "Wreak Havoc" on Indigenous Tribes
In Brazil, indigenous populations living in and around the Amazon are struggling under the coronavirus pandemic. Earlier this month, the indigenous Yanomami people suffered their first coronavirus-linked death. The community already suffers from institutionalized racism, bringing with it poor access to healthcare and economic support, Coventry University agroecologists Nina Moeller and JD Pederse
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What To Do When People Don't Practice Social Distancing
Some people stand too close, or jog without masks, or go so far in their defiance as to throw "coronavirus parties." What should you do if you see people who are not maintaining social distance? (Image credit: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images)
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17 tech innovations that could help ease coronavirus lockdown restrictions
We're eager to return to "normal," but authorities are understandably wary about lifting lockdown restrictions while a vaccine and effective treatment for COVID-19 continue to elude us. Innovators and tech companies are stepping up with new solutions as well as repurposing existing tech to help ease lockdown restrictions. Technologies already in use include those for protecting and empowering hea
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How "policing for profit" undermines your rights | Dick M. Carpenter II
Many countries have an active, centuries-old law that allows government agencies to take your things — your house, your car, your business — without ever convicting you of a crime. Law researcher Dick M. Carpenter II exposes how this practice of civil forfeiture threatens your rights and creates a huge monetary incentive for law enforcement to pocket your possessions — and he lays out a path to
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Forskare vill veta hur personer 70+ upplever coronakrisen
Den pågående coronapandemin utgör en förändring för alla i samhället med mycket stor påfrestning på både global nivå och för enskilda individer. Hur klarar de gamla i vårt samhälle att hantera och förhålla sig till krisen? Det håller forskare vid Karlstads universitet på att undersöka. När vi blir äldre ökar sårbarheten och förmågan att hantera ansträngda situationer kan vara nedsatt, samtidigt s
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Shoddy statistics and false claims: Dr. Erickson dangerously misled the public on coronavirus
By now, you have likely seen the viral video of two doctors in Bakersfield, California (Dan Erickson and Artin Massihi) holding their own press briefing in which they argued that COVID19 is no deadlier than the flu, shelter in place … Continue reading →
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Featured Session: Restarting the Global Economy
Economies are in turmoil. Get the answers to the questions on everyone's mind: What will it take to stabilize and boost regional, national, and global economies? What can business leaders do to prepare for growth? In this nearly worldwide pause, how can organizations reset, rethink, and innovate the way their business is done in order to become more resilient in the face of future threats? In thi
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Hear from the CEOs of Slack and Zoom
Technology is changing the nature of work on every level of business, from workforce talent to digital implementation and automation. What technologies are having the most significant impact? How do we make smart, practical decisions that enhance and embrace the technologies redefining the way we work today? EmTech Next concludes with Eric Yuan, founder and CEO of Zoom, and Stewart Butterfield, c
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The business of emerging technologies
A continuous stream of emerging technologies is radically transforming business, disrupting the technological status quo, and reinventing the way people work. On day two of EmTech Next , we'll delve into the state of technology today and what leaders need to know now in order to prosper and thrive. Transforming 5G Communications. 5G is unlocking the potential of advanced communications, enabling
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Math After COVID-19
On February 22 — a lifetime ago now — the mathematician Priyam Patel was at Charles de Gaulle airport, waiting to catch a connecting flight home to Salt Lake City. She noticed a sign urging travelers to wash their hands to protect against COVID-19 transmission. "I remember thinking, 'I wonder if that's going to be a big deal?'" she said. Patel, a professor at the University of Utah, was returning
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Dansk IoT-platform skal opspore smitte hos sundhedspersonale
PLUS. Et danskudviklet Internet of Things-platform, der bruges til at forbedre håndhygiejnen på hospitaler, skal nu testes som smitteopsporingsystem ved at følge sundhedspersonalets bevægelser.
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How blood cells deform, recover when traveling through tiny channels
Laboratory blood tests are often done by forcing samples through small channels. When the channels are very small, as in microfluidic devices, red blood cells (RBCs) are deformed and then relax back to their original shape after exiting the channel. The way the deformation and relaxation occur depends on both the flow characteristics and mechanical properties of the cell's outer membrane.
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Wide bandgap semiconductor devices based on silicon carbide may revolutionize electronics
Growth of high-quality substrates for microelectronic applications is one of the key elements helping drive society toward a more sustainable green economy. Today, silicon plays a central role within the semiconductor industry for microelectronic and nanoelectronic devices.
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Simulating borehole ballooning helps ensure safe drilling of deep-water oil, gas
A device which simulates borehole ballooning, a detrimental side effect of deep-water drilling operations, is expected to ensure safe and efficient operations. If not prevented, borehole ballooning can lead to irreversible damage and serious drilling accidents, which can result in reservoir pollution and huge economic loss.
7h
Offspring may inherit legacy of their father's Toxoplasma infection
Australian researchers have revealed for the first time that males infected with the Toxoplasma parasite can impact their offspring's brain health and behaviour.
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Rat spinal cords control neural function in biobots
Biological robots, or biobots, draw inspiration from natural systems to mimic the motions of organisms, such as swimming or jumping. Improvements to biobots to better replicate complex motor behaviors can lead to exciting biorobotic engineering applications to help solve real world challenges. However, this requires the creation of biohybrid robots—biobots made up of both organic and artificial ma
7h
Correlations in COVID-19 growth point to universal strategies for slowing spread
Many months since the first COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan, China, countries continue to explore solutions that are effective at managing the spread of the virus and culturally feasible to implement. Chaos theory analysis has provided insight on how well infection prevention strategies can be adopted by multiple countries.
7h
When Will Homo Sapiens Go Extinct?
Other species of human used to walk the Earth. Homo sapiens are the last to survive.
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After trending on GitHub, time to be a manager?
When crowdsourcing goes especially well, team leaders often need to rely on traditional organizational management structure to get the work done, research on GitHub finds. When a collaborative crowdsourced project enters the limelight, the impact—or shock—of so much attention forces the original creators to carefully manage community engagement or risk stalling progress. The research from the Uni
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Hierarchically porous TiO2/rGO with exposed (001) facets for lithium storage capacity
In this work, the (001) faceted nanosheet-constructed hierarchically porous TiO2/rGO hybrid architecture shows unprecedented and highly stable lithium storage performance. The DFT calculations evidence that the (001) faceted TiO2 nanosheets enable enhanced reaction kinetics and the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) largely improves the charge transport. Moreover, the formed Li2Ti2O4 nanodots facilitate
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HKUST researchers unlock genomic secrets of scaly-foot snail
Researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have decoded for the first time the genome of Scaly-foot Snail, a rare snail inhabited in what scientists called 'the origin of life'- deep-sea hydrothermal vents characterized with impossible living condition. Unraveling the genome of this unique creature will not only shed light on how life evolved billions of years ago,
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Arctic wildlife uses extreme method to save energy
The extreme cold, harsh environment and constant hunt for food means that Arctic animals have become specialists in saving energy. Now, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered a previously unknown energy-saving method used by birds during the polar night.
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How blood cells deform, recover when traveling through tiny channels
Laboratory blood tests are often done by forcing samples through small channels. When the channels are very small, as in microfluidic devices, red blood cells (RBCs) are deformed and then relax back to their original shape after exiting the channel. The way the deformation and relaxation occur depends on both the flow characteristics and mechanical properties of the cell's outer membrane.
7h
Offspring may inherit legacy of their father's Toxoplasma infection
Australian researchers have revealed for the first time that males infected with the Toxoplasma parasite can impact their offspring's brain health and behaviour.
7h
Rat spinal cords control neural function in biobots
Biological robots, or biobots, draw inspiration from natural systems to mimic the motions of organisms, such as swimming or jumping. Improvements to biobots to better replicate complex motor behaviors can lead to exciting biorobotic engineering applications to help solve real world challenges. However, this requires the creation of biohybrid robots—biobots made up of both organic and artificial ma
7h
These Gene-Hacked Glowing Plants Look Incredible
A team of Russian scientists have gene-hacked two species of the tobacco plant to emit a visible glow — around the clock, for the entire duration of their life cycle. A stunning video shows off the science fiction-like effect. Scientists have coaxed other plants to glow by injecting them with chemicals — but these new plants exhibit bioluminescence without such intervention, as ScienceAlert point
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Play fighting helps equip animals for later life – new research
As we endure the current COVID-19 crisis with its important measures of social isolation and distancing, those of us in the northern hemisphere can perhaps take some solace in seeing the arrival of spring.
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'Teaching Machines' Needed to Educate Growing Population
Originally published in December 1958 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Play fighting helps equip animals for later life – new research
As we endure the current COVID-19 crisis with its important measures of social isolation and distancing, those of us in the northern hemisphere can perhaps take some solace in seeing the arrival of spring.
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5G möjliggör kommunicerande prylar och hållbarhet
​Femte generationens mobilnät, 5G, är snart här med alla de möjligheter som den nya tekniken erbjuder när även våra prylar kan utbyta information med varandra. 5G beskrivs ofta i termer av snabbhet och ökad kapacitet. Men tekniken kommer också att möjliggöra mindre resursslöseri och en utveckling mot ett hållbarare samhälle. ​​Det som skiljer 5G från tidigare generationers mobilstandarder är att
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The race for coronavirus vaccines: a graphical guide
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01221-y Eight ways in which scientists hope to provide immunity to SARS-CoV-2 .
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Cells edited with CRISPR prove safe in humans
Nature, Published online: 27 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01262-3 People with cancer show no serious side effects after treatment with gene-edited immune cells.
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Lebanese riots over economy and soaring poverty leave one dead and dozens hurt
Demonstrators defy coronavirus lockdown and set fire to banks amid mounting currency crisis and joblessness
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Want to help rare birds? Dig a pond
The first swallows have made landfall in the UK, fanning out over the greening landscape. The early arrivals, generally males, are a streak of electric blue in the spring sunshine.
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Fused-ring electron acceptor with 3D exciton and charge transport
Professor Zhan Xiaowei's group from the College of Engineering at Peking University made new progress in non-fullerene acceptors for organic solar cells (OSCs). They developed a new fluorinated fused-ring electron acceptor (FREA) with 3D stacking and exciton and charge transport.
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Key progress on the MRI compatible DBS electrodes and simultaneous DBS-fMRI
Recently, collaboration between Dr. Duan Xiaojie's group (Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University) and Dr. Liang Zhifeng's group (Institute of Neuroscience, Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology, CAS) has led to a novel MRI compatible, graphene fiber DBS electrode.
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Shrinking instead of growing: how shrews survive the winter
Even at sub-zero temperatures, common shrews do not need to increase their metabolism.
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Navigating change as a leader
Times of crisis require leadership and strategy to navigate the path forward. Day one of EmTech Next digs into topics including: Innovation and Leadership in a Time of Crisis . If innovation is the fuel that drives business, then what is the formula for innovation? In this segment, we will explore how smart leaders develop, adopt, and fund the efforts to foster disruptive technologies. Creating a
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Technology changes everything
We are living in a changed world. Technology and what it means to be digitally resilient are driving the nature of work on every level of the organization as never before. Your key to success as a leader will be making smart, practical decisions about enhancing the technology you use today and embracing the technology poised to restart business. Join us June 8-10 for EmTech Next , MIT Technology
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Want to help rare birds? Dig a pond
The first swallows have made landfall in the UK, fanning out over the greening landscape. The early arrivals, generally males, are a streak of electric blue in the spring sunshine.
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How digital tools can keep democracy thriving during lockdown
This is not business as usual for democracy. As the COVID-19 pandemic rages, governments at all levels are having to work remotely, and postpone elections and parliamentary sessions. To further complicate things, they are having to do this while delivering fast-paced and effective decision-making.
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Chloroquine Hype Is Derailing the Search for Coronavirus Treatments
With politicians touting the potential benefits of malaria drugs to fight COVID-19, some people are turning away from clinical trials of other therapies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Finding the genes to build a better cancer treatment
Scientists are one step closer to understanding how the cancer-fighting drug Taxol is produced by trees.
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Plastic pollution reaching Antarctica
Food wrapping, fishing gear and plastic waste continue to reach the Antarctic. Two new studies into how plastic debris is reaching sub-Antarctic islands are published in the journal Environment International.
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'Spider-Man' Immune Response May Promote Severe COVID-19
Clinical trials have begun to test drugs that counter toxic molecular webs linked to lung distress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Finding the genes to build a better cancer treatment
Scientists are one step closer to understanding how the cancer-fighting drug Taxol is produced by trees.
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A molecular pressure cooker tenderizes tough pieces of protein and helps to bite off
Proteins are composed of amino acids connected by amide bonds. The amide bond exhibits high chemical stability and has a planar structure around the bond. Although the high stability of the amide bond is indispensable for maintaining protein functions, it is problematic to convert the building block into some other molecular species by selective dissociation of a relevant amide bond.
8h
TAMA300 blazes trail for improved gravitational wave astronomy
Researchers at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) have used the infrastructure of the former TAMA300 gravitational wave detector in Mitaka, Tokyo, to demonstrate a new technique to reduce quantum noise in detectors. This new technique will increase the sensitivity of the detectors comprising a collaborative worldwide gravitational wave network, allowing them to observe fainter w
8h
3 volunteering guidelines to heed during the coronavirus pandemic
Lending a hand is a big U.S. tradition. More than 77.4 million Americans volunteered in 2019, completing 6.9 billion hours of service worth an estimated US$167 billion.
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'Spider-Man' Immune Response May Promote Severe COVID-19
Clinical trials have begun to test drugs that counter toxic molecular webs linked to lung distress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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'Spider-Man' Immune Response May Promote Severe COVID-19
Clinical trials have begun to test drugs that counter toxic molecular webs linked to lung distress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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MA3Bi2I9 single-crystal enables X-ray detection down to nanograys per second
A zero-dimensional (0D) MA3Bi2I9 (MA=CH3NH3) single crystals with inch-sized were fabricated by solution methods. The 0D crystal structure leads to a high energy barrier for ion migration (0.46 eV) and a low dark carrier concentration (~ 10 6 cm-3). As a result, stable devices with a very limit of detection (LoD) of 0.62 nGyair s-1 were achieved, which approaches the background radiation on Earth
8h
Initial motivation, a key factor for learning in massive open online courses
The research was carried out by means of a survey of 1768 participants from 6 different MOOCs. The students were classified in function of their motivational profile and learning intentions at the start of the course. The results show that initial motivation is clearly associated with the satisfaction and the quality perceived on the quality of the learning experience.
8h
Finding the genes to build a better cancer treatment
A group of researchers led by Washington State University's Mark Lange, has found candidate genes that could eventually be used to manufacture Taxol more quickly and efficiently.
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X-ray analysis sheds light on construction and conservation of artefacts from Henry VIII's warship
21st century X-ray technology has allowed University of Warwick scientists to peer back through time at the production of the armour worn by the crew of Henry VIII's favoured warship, the Mary Rose.
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New HKBU-led study unveils COVID-19 transmission patterns and reopening plans
New research led by Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) computer scientists has used a data-driven modelling approach to answer the time-critical question of when the stringent social distancing and quarantine measures against COVID-19 can be loosened so that normal life and economic activities can be restored in a safe manner.
8h
The truth lies in the soil: How human activity leaves a chemical footprint in soils
After analyzing the composition of soil samples across a large mountainous region in Southwest China, a team of scientists from the Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences and China Geological Survey explains how natural processes determine the distribution of chemical elements on Earth's surface. This study, published in Earth Science Frontiers, demonstrates that human activity, such as mining, di
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Barn och rädslor i coronatider
Många barn upplever just nu framtiden som väldigt oviss och skrämmande. Helena Hörnfeldt, docent i etnologi, har nyligen avslutat ett forskningsprojekt om barns rädslor nu och historiskt. – Både coronapandemin och klimatkrisen visar, på ett dramatiskt sätt, både på planetens skörhet och vår egen utsatthet som art, säger hon. Hur påverkar coronapandemin barns rädslor? – Det är tydligt att det inte
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COVID-19 is a dress rehearsal for entrepreneurial approaches to climate change
As the U.S. struggles to control the COVID-19 pandemic, some experts have suggested that we can learn something about how to address climate change from this crisis.
8h
Don't handcuff private capital in this crisis
Blackstone and other PE firms can give companies a fighting chance of survival
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Tree rings tell a story of water and climate change
Scientists compile a global water-use efficiency database.
8h
Hurricane coming? Get bigger toepads
Study suggests lizards evolve to hang on.
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Learning from the spread of measles
Models reveal complex dynamics.
8h
A leap in using silicon for battery anodes
The same material you'll find at the tip of a pencil—graphite—has long been a key component in today's lithium-ion batteries. As our reliance on these batteries increases, however, graphite-based electrodes are due for an upgrade. For that, scientists are looking to the element at the heart of the digital revolution: silicon.
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Economist: 'We're not all experiencing the same pandemic'
Labor economist Christopher King is a senior research scientist at the Ray Marshall Center for the Study of Human Resources at The University of Texas at Austin's LBJ School of Public Affairs. He directed the center until 2014 and has won the Texas Exes Teaching Award. We spoke to him on April 21, 2020.
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The weight of the universe
Bochum cosmologists headed by Professor Hendrik Hildebrandt have gained new insights into the density and structure of matter in the universe. Several years ago, Hildebrandt had already been involved in a research consortium that had pointed out discrepancies in the data between different groups. The values determined for matter density and structure differed depending on the measurement method. A
8h
Recycled wastewater could make city water better
Recycling wastewater to make it drinkable could make delivering water to people who live in cities far more efficient, according to a new study. Using Houston as a model, researchers developed a plan that could reduce the need for surface water (from rivers, reservoirs, or wells) by 28% by recycling wastewater to make it drinkable once again. While the energy cost needed for future advanced purif
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Belief in democracy dropped after Trump impeachment
Both the public's and political experts' perceptions of the health of US democracy declined during the period of President Donald Trump's impeachment, a new survey finds. Bright Line Watch , an academic watchdog group, conducted its latest survey between March 12 and April 15. Since February 2017, Bright Line Watch, a nonpartisan group of political scientists, has surveyed the American public as
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Lionfish quite at home in the Mediterranean
Invasive species has spread quickly.
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Immune cells found in breast ducts
Imaging shows they keep tissue healthy.
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Colliding galaxies, by Hubble
We look back on some of the telescope's finest work.
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Crops sown in a uniform spatial pattern produce higher yields and reduce environmental impact
Higher yields and fewer weeds are possible if farmers sow wheat, maize, soy and other crops in more uniform spatial patterns, according to University of Copenhagen researchers. More precise sowing can also help reduce herbicide use and fertiliser runoff.
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Childhood obesity and high blood pressure warn of future heart disease
A large study in adolescents and children, some as young as 3 years of age, shows a link between obesity, high blood pressure, and later damage to blood vessels. The research is presented today on EAPC Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
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Success in specific detection of molecules using deformation of a single atomic sheet
Toyohashi University of Technology developed a test chip using graphene, a sheet material with a thickness of one carbon atom. The chip has a trampoline structure with a narrow gap of 1 micrometer or less formed under a monoatomic graphene film, and can specifically trap a biomarker, a protein included in bodily fluids, on graphene. It's expected that viruses and diseases will be able to be simply
8h
Ribosome biogenesis gene DEF/UTP25 is essential for liver homeostasis and regeneration
Digestive-organ-expansion-factor (Def) is a nucleolar factor. Depletion of Def causes hypoplastic digestive organs in zebrafish. Mechanistically, Def recruits cysteine proteinase Calpain3 (Capn3) to the nucleolus to cleave target proteins including p53 and Mpp10 during organogenesis. Here researchers demonstrate that Def is also essential for liver homeostasis and regeneration in mouse, a mammalia
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How Will Coronavirus End? It Depends on Our Immunity. Three Possible Outcomes
We're all so ready for this to be over. With the curve finally flattening in the US, the ramping up of anti-viral and vaccine trials against SARS-CoV-2—the virus that causes Covid-19—and the launch of antibody tests to screen for previous infection, it seems like science is rapidly moving towards the end game. How exactly the Covid-19 pandemic will finally bugger off into history is still anyone'
8h
Arctic wildlife uses extreme method to save energy
Researchers from Lund University and the University of Tromsø have examined the immune system strength of the Svalbard rock ptarmigan in the Arctic. This bird lives the farthest up in the Arctic of any land bird, and the researchers have investigated how the immune response varies between winter and late spring.
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Forskare lyckades reparera strokeskadad råtthjärna
Nu har forskare vid Lunds universitet i en studie lyckats återställa rörlighet och känsel hos råttor med stroke genom att transplantera in nervceller som utvecklats från omprogrammerade hudceller från människa i djurens hjärnor.
8h
Arctic wildlife uses extreme method to save energy
Researchers from Lund University and the University of Tromsø have examined the immune system strength of the Svalbard rock ptarmigan in the Arctic. This bird lives the farthest up in the Arctic of any land bird, and the researchers have investigated how the immune response varies between winter and late spring.
8h
Scientists at work: Uncovering the mystery of when and where sharks give birth
If you have a toddler, or if you encountered one in the last year, you've almost certainly experienced the "Baby Shark" song. Somehow, every kid seems to know this song, but scientists actually know very little about where and when sharks give birth. The origins of these famous baby sharks are still largely a mystery.
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AT&T, Comcast, Verizon Extend Data Cap Suspension
AT&T, Comcast, and Verizon all announced extensions of some of the coronavirus policies they've enacted to-date, extending those guarantees out to June 30. The responses from each company are somewhat unique, so we'll cover each below: Comcast Comcast will waive late fees if you contact them and tell them you cannot pay. It has pledged not to disconnect any Xfinity internet, mobile, or voice user
9h
New Mexico badlands help researchers understand past Martian lava flows
Planetary scientists are using a volcanic flow field in New Mexico to puzzle out how long past volcanic eruptions on Mars might have lasted, a finding that could help researchers determine if Mars was ever hospitable to life.
9h
Scientists at work: Uncovering the mystery of when and where sharks give birth
If you have a toddler, or if you encountered one in the last year, you've almost certainly experienced the "Baby Shark" song. Somehow, every kid seems to know this song, but scientists actually know very little about where and when sharks give birth. The origins of these famous baby sharks are still largely a mystery.
9h
Toilet paper, hand sanitizer, and now elastic? Mask makers cope with unexpected COVID-19-related shortages
As shoppers scavenge to find toilet paper and other quarantine essentials, some crafters who are making protective masks said they struggle to find another necessary item: elastic.
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FCA warns banks against pressuring companies for extra fees
UK regulator's move follows complaints and comes as businesses rush to raise funding over virus disruption
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Can deep brain stimulation treat Parkinson's disease?
Biomedical engineers have used deep brain stimulation based on light to treat motor dysfunction in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. Succeeding where earlier attempts have failed, the method promises to provide new insights into why deep brain stimulation works and ways in which it can be improved on a patient-by-patient basis. "If you think of the area of the brain being treated in deep br
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Gene defects linked to eczema, wheeze and nasal disease among babies
A link has been discovered between a common gene defect and eczema, nasal blockage and wheeze among babies as young as six months, according to a new study at Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS). The research raises new questions about how soon in life these defects could start affecting babies, resulting in serious health problems, and suggests treatment targeted towards children carrying t
9h
Mobile telehealth system in China facilitates clinical communication during COVID-19
A mobile telehealth system (MTS) has been used in a hospital in China where COVID-19 patients were treated in isolation wards set off from other healthcare providers.
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Here are 5 ways to flatten the climate change curve while stuck at home
After the horrors of the last bushfire season, climate action in Australia seemed to have new momentum. But then coronavirus struck. All of a sudden, the public was preoccupied by a different catastrophe.
9h
Porous carbon nanofibers demonstrate exceptional capacitive deionization
Capacitive deionization (CDI) is energetically favorable to deionize water, but existing methods are limited by their desalination capacities and time-consuming cycles due to insufficient ion-accessible surfaces and slow electron/ion transport. In a new report on Science Advances, Tianyu Liu and a research team in the departments of chemistry, civil and environmental engineering, and nanoscience a
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Coronavirus pandemic puts the spotlight on poor housing quality in England
The current COVID-19 pandemic has brought the relationship between health and housing quality into sharp focus. Contagious disease spreads more rapidly in overcrowded housing. The link between overcrowding and coronavirus has been made both in relation to England and elsewhere.
9h
X-rays offer clues to armor on Henry VIII's warship
X-ray technology offers new information about the armor worn by the crew on Henry VIII's warship the Mary Rose . The Tudor warship the Mary Rose was one of the first warships that Henry VIII ordered not long after he ascended to the throne in 1509 and possibly his favorite. On July 19, 1545, it sank in the Solent (the strait between mainland England and the Isle of Wight) during a battle with a F
9h
"Patienten først" – tak for kaffe!
Begrebet "patienten først" er uden mening og uden retning. Det er faktisk ren nonsens, skriver afdelingslæge.
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Why we aren't running out of food during the coronavirus pandemic
We are living through a period in which many jurisdictions have shut down virtually all non-essential commerce. People are working from home or have been temporarily laid off.
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Sturgeon says Scots should wear face masks for shopping and travel
First minister issues new virus guidance but insists there is no 'divide or split' with UK advice Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Nicola Sturgeon has announced new guidance recommending that the Scottish public should wear face masks in enclosed spaces where social distancing is difficult to achieve, for example while shopping or using public transport. She announced
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What Rome Learned From the Deadly Antonine Plague of 165 A.D.
The outbreak was far deadlier than COVID-19, but the empire survived
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If more of us work from home after coronavirus we'll need to rethink city planning
,We have seen an unprecedented rise in the number of people working from home as directed by governments and employers around the world to help stop the spread of COVID-19.
9h
X-ray analysis of artifacts from Henry VIII's warship the Mary Rose
21st century X-ray technology has allowed University of Warwick scientists to peer back through time at the production of the armor worn by the crew of Henry VIII's favored warship, the Mary Rose.
9h
Scientists design an experimental mouse model for investigating the mechanical function of proteins
The Molecular Mechanics of the Cardiovascular System group at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC), led by Jorge Alegre Cebollada, in partnership with an international scientific team, has generated the first experimental mouse model that allows direct analysis of the mechanical function of proteins in living organisms.
9h
Backyard sheds for every budget and storage need
A place for everything that doesn't fit in the garage. (Zoltan Tasi i/) If your spare room and garage are already short on space, a storage shed is just the place to stash your lawn mower, wheelbarrow, and other bulky home improvement gear that's essential but not used regularly. Installing a dedicated shed for your equipment keeps it from getting rusty in the weather while safely in a space of i
9h
Video cameras for indie film directors, home video creators, and Youtubers
Have you always wanted to make a short film? (Sam McGhee via Unsplash/) Your phone delivers 4K footage and it's always in your pocket, so why on earth would you buy a dedicated video camera? Because image resolution isn't everything and you'll eventually run up against the phone's inherent limitations, like tiny sensors, static lenses, and limited controls. Among other features, video cameras oft
9h
Visual-spatial learning disorder is more common than thought, finds study
Columbia University researchers estimate non-verbal learning disorder may affect up to 3 million children in the United States.
9h
A leap in using silicon for battery anodes
Scientists have come up with a novel way to use silicon as an energy storage ingredient. They've developed a nanostructure incorporating carbon nanotubes to strengthen the material and modify the way silicon interacts with lithium, a key component in batteries used in electric cars and other devices.
9h
TAMA300 blazes trail for improved gravitational wave astronomy
Researchers at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) have used the infrastructure of the former TAMA300 gravitational wave detector in Mitaka, Tokyo to demonstrate a new technique to reduce quantum noise in detectors. This new technique will help increase the sensitivity of the detectors comprising a collaborative worldwide gravitational wave network, allowing them to observe faint
9h
A molecular pressure cooker tenderizes tough pieces of protein and helps to bite off
Researchers have succeeded in promoting the amide bond cleavage by twisting the amide bond with enclosing and pressurizing amide molecules, analogs of small pieces of proteins, inside a hollow, self-assembled molecular cage, which has been developed by the researchers for many years. The rate of bond cleavage can be accelerated without chemical modifications. This result will lead to developing no
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People with brown fat may burn 15% more calories
Short-term cold exposure may help people with brown fat burn 15% more calories than those without, according to a small study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
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Smart contact lenses that diagnose and treat diabetes
Professor Sei Kwang Hahn's team at POSTECH develops wireless smart contact lenses for diagnosis and treatment of diabetes
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Scientists design an experimental mouse model for investigating the mechanical function of proteins
The Molecular Mechanics of the Cardiovascular System group at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC), led by Jorge Alegre Cebollada, in partnership with an international scientific team, has generated the first experimental mouse model that allows direct analysis of the mechanical function of proteins in living organisms.
9h
Minor evolutionary changes helped transform the salamander tongue into a fast elastic recoil mechanism
A team of researchers from the University of South Florida and California State University Stanislaus has found that just a few minor evolutionary changes led to the development of the superfast salamander tongue. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of a variety of salamander species and what they learned about their strong e
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Lokal opvarmning fjerner stor trussel mod hovedstadens drikkevand
PLUS. Grundvandet i Region Hovedstaden er særligt truet af klorerede opløsningsmidler. Regionen prioriterer først oprensning af de grunde, hvor man får mest drikkevand for pengene, bl.a. ved et tidligere militærområde, hvor man sikrer drikkevand til cirka 170.000 indbyggere – til blot 15-20 øre pr. m3.
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Minor evolutionary changes helped transform the salamander tongue into a fast elastic recoil mechanism
A team of researchers from the University of South Florida and California State University Stanislaus has found that just a few minor evolutionary changes led to the development of the superfast salamander tongue. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of a variety of salamander species and what they learned about their strong e
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Konsten att stoppa läckande blodkärl vid ögonsjukdomar
Ögonsjukdomar med tillväxt av läckande blodkärl kan leda till förlorad syn. Problemet är att en och samma molekyl orsakar både läckage och viktig tillväxt. Forskare vid Uppsala universitet har nu upptäckt att de båda effekterna kan skiljas åt, något som skulle kunna leda till säkrare behandlingsstrategier mot kärlläckage. Åldersförändringar i gula fläcken och diabetesretinopati gör att läckande b
9h
How Indigenous people in the Amazon are coping with the coronavirus pandemic
A 15-year-old boy from a remote region of the Brazilian Amazon, near the border with Venezuela, died of COVID-19 on April 9. A member of the 35,000-strong Yanomami people, the boy was the first known death among Brazil's Indigenous communities in the current pandemic. There are now growing fears that COVID-19 will wreak havoc across the Amazon.
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Governments knew a pandemic was a threat: Here's why they weren't better prepared
Most people think or at least hope their government is doing a good job in the face of COVID-19, according to the polls. But there can be no doubt that governments around the world were ill-prepared for this pandemic.
9h
Southwest Airlines makes $94m loss in first quarter
Company estimates operating revenue will fall as much as 95% in April and May
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How AI is changing the customer experience
AI is rapidly transforming the way that companies interact with their customers. MIT Technology Review Insights' survey of 1,004 business leaders, "The global AI agenda," found that customer service is the most active department for AI deployment today. By 2022, it will remain the leading area of AI use in companies (say 73% of respondents), followed by sales and marketing (59%), a part of the bu
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Could Staring Into a Stranger's Eyes Cure Zoom Fatigue?
Human Online still requires a screen, but in place of the agony of work meetings or happy hours, you spend 60 seconds with a single person—no speaking.
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During the Pandemic, the FCC Must Provide Internet for All
Broadband access is more crucial than ever, particularly for low-income Americans. The Trump administration must stop withholding it.
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Now Is the Time for Main Street Shops to Go Digital
WIRED editor in chief Nicholas Thompson talks to branding expert Amanda Brinkman about how America's small businesses are coping with coronavirus
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Covid-19 Was Here Earlier Than Most Americans Thought. Now What?
Epidemiologists aren't surprised that virus was spreading in the US in early February. But those early days offer lessons for how to catch the next wave.
9h
Why fighter jets are flying over New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania today
Thunderbirds F-16s earlier this month in Colorado. (Airman 1st Class Nilsa E. Garcia / US Air Force/) If you live in the New York City or Philadelphia area, you might see—or hear—fighter jets tearing through the sky today. The aircraft are F-16s and F/A-18s, flown by the Thunderbirds and Blue Angels, the Air Force and Navy aerial demonstrations teams. The purpose of the flights is a chance "to sa
9h
Study identifies the most metal-poor stars in the Omega Centauri cluster
By analyzing spectroscopic data, astronomers have investigated the globular cluster Omega Centauri, aiming to find a population of stars with very low metallicity. The study resulted in the detection of the 11 most metal-poor stars in this cluster. The finding is reported in a paper published April 20 on arXiv.
9h
Doubts hang over Boris Johnson's virus transparency pledge
UK prime minister's promise welcome in principle, but it is ambiguous all the same
9h
UK cyber-security chief advises NHS on tracing app
NCSC technical director Ian Levy was instrumental in Britain's decision to allow Huawei access to Britain's 5G networks
9h
Quantum gases won't take the heat
The quantum world blatantly defies intuitions that we've developed while living among relatively large things, like cars, pennies and dust motes. In the quantum world, tiny particles can maintain a special connection over any distance, pass through barriers and simultaneously travel down multiple paths.
10h
Build diverse food systems for post-COVID-19 world
The world's 7.6 billion residents are facing an unmitigated and unprecedented fight against a global public health emergency.
10h
Lakes triple amount of carbon they bury in response to human disruption of global nutrient cycles
A new study led by Loughborough University has revealed that lake burial of organic carbon has increased three-fold over the last 100 years in response to human disruption of global nutrient cycles.
10h
Pradigms of mobility and immobility are being upended by the pandemic
For many of us, the COVID-19 pandemic has led to drastic changes in how we move about in our daily lives. Adhering to social distancing rules, millions of people are now working and socializing from home—only venturing out for essential trips. This shift marks a stark contrast to a mere few months ago when many were able to freely move about, not only of necessity but for desire and fun.
10h
Will coronavirus help or hinder women's candidacies?
Women's leadership has drawn a lot of praise during the COVID-19 crisis, including for politicians like New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and chief medical officers Theresa Tam and Bonnie Henry.
10h
1 in 7 Americans would avoid care for suspected COVID-19 fearing cost of treatment
About 1 in 7 Americans say they would avoid seeking medical care if they experienced key symptoms associated with COVID-19 out of fear of the potential cost. Another six percent – representing about 15 million people – report that they or a family member have been denied medical care for some other health issue due to heavy volume brought on by the coronavirus outbreak.
10h
How COVID-19 affects farmers and the food supply chain
Empty shelves lining supermarkets, farmers dumping milk and abandoning fields of crops, restaurants laying off staff—the American food landscape has changed dramatically in just a month, thanks to stay-at-home advisories and social distancing in the age of COVID-19.
10h
Germany hopes for rain to avoid 3rd straight summer drought
Germany's farmers, foresters, and firefighters are eagerly awaiting widespread rain forecast for later this week, as a warm, dry spring has raised fears of a third summer drought in as many years.
10h
How the Stunning Scarlet Macaw Came Back From the Brink
The bird, decimated by poachers and smugglers, is making a big comeback in the Central American rainforest
10h
Rural areas near big cities less vulnerable to disasters
Rural populations living around large cities have better access to resources and are therefore less vulnerable to disasters than rural communities located near small cities, a new study conducted in Pakistan's Punjab province suggests.
10h
A global agreement to end disruption of coronavirus medical supplies
An international agreement on vital medical goods that keeps import restrictions low and constrains the use of export bans could help ensure all countries have sufficient supplies for the fight against Coronavirus, a new policy paper proposes.
10h
Ethicists: COVID-19 shows inequities in structure of society
Beneath many of the coronavirus ethical dilemmas facing Americans lie longstanding inequities in our social structure and failures of social justice, say three ethicists. They call the current crisis a "wake-up call" for the future. Taking part in this roundtable discussion of ethics and COVID-19 are Randall Curren, William FitzPatrick, and Rosa Terlazzo. "The most vulnerable are going to suffer
10h
Three ways to turn the page after your first paper rejection
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01166-2 You can bounce back by counting your blessings, listing your strengths and celebrating your achievements, says Lucy Taylor.
10h
AGA and joint task force on allergy-immunology practice parameters release EoE guidelines
Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus triggered by allergens that causes difficulty with swallowing in adults, which grows more frequent and intense over time, affecting patients' quality of life. Children experience varied symptoms that include feeding difficulty, pain, vomiting, as well as dysphagia. EoE affects an estimated one in 2,000 people.
10h
Leading through COVID: Helping the hardest hit
Even when the economy was roaring along, far too many Americans lacked the savings and support to respond to an unexpected loss of income. The COVID-19 crisis has thrown that fragility into stark relief. We talked with Andrea Levere '83, president emerita of Prosperity Now, about how we got to this point and how we can create more resilient and equitable structures for the future.
10h
The Coronavirus Pandemic Puts Children at Risk of Online Sexual Exploitation
One conversation could keep your kids safe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Should you be checking your own oxygen levels if you have coronavirus symptoms? | Ann Robinson
Oximeters measure the oxygen in blood. As a GP I think they are useful, but there's more to assessing how sick you are Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Covid-19 is proving to be a many-headed monster. And though most people will steadily improve and recover, a small percentage (up 4%) suffer a precipitous, unpredicted and sometimes delayed decline. Experts are warning
10h
Global database for water-use efficiency
By examining the carbon isotope composition of tree-rings, researchers from Swinburne and the University of California, Davis have compiled the first comprehensive global database for water-use efficiency.
10h
COVID-19: The impact on supply chains
As the fight against the coronavirus continues and the country wrestles with when to reopen the economy, Zach G. Zacharia, associate professor of supply chain management and director of the Center for Supply Chain Research at the College of Business, addressed the potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on global supply chains.
10h
First things first: To meet climate goals, we can't skip lower steps of mitigation hierarchy
Reflected in the number of companies setting science-based targets (SBTs) in line with climate science within the SBTI (Science-Based Targets Initiative), corporate climate progress has been striking, and we are seeing encouraging signs in the nature space as well (e.g., Fashion pact, Act4Nature, and OP2B, etc.). Key questions in corporate climate and nature actions are the necessity to reduce imp
10h
Researchers crack COVID-19 genome signature
Using machine learning, a team of Western computer scientists and biologists have identified an underlying genomic signature for 29 different COVID-19 DNA sequences.
10h
Veterinary ophthalmologist researches treatment for golden retriever pigmentary uveitis
At least 2 billion people around the world have vision problems—but how do you know if and when your pet is struggling with its own eyesight?
10h
Rethinking the traditional vaccine delivery in response to coronaviruses
Researchers are proposing a possible COVID-19 vaccine that could be good news for resisting current and future pandemics, as well as for the needle-phobic: inhalable vaccines.
10h
Teams from Wisconsin, New York search for molecular clues to defeat COVID-19
In the center of the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals are racing to maintain quality care for patients with severe disease while facing a shortage of resources and limited understanding of the novel coronavirus.
10h
Klimapartnerskab: Fugt og støj skal være en del af energimærket
PLUS. Indeklimaproblemer får i højere grad mennesker til at foretage klimavenlige renoveringer end en lavere varmeregning, lyder begrundelsen. En model til at klassificere indeklima er snart klar.
10h
Researchers crack COVID-19 genome signature
Using machine learning, a team of Western computer scientists and biologists have identified an underlying genomic signature for 29 different COVID-19 DNA sequences.
10h
Veterinary ophthalmologist researches treatment for golden retriever pigmentary uveitis
At least 2 billion people around the world have vision problems—but how do you know if and when your pet is struggling with its own eyesight?
10h
Teams from Wisconsin, New York search for molecular clues to defeat COVID-19
In the center of the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals are racing to maintain quality care for patients with severe disease while facing a shortage of resources and limited understanding of the novel coronavirus.
10h
Social media can provide insight into the well-being of a community, scholar finds
Social media can reveal more than just a single person's mood or frame of mind. It can capture the psychological states of an entire population, according to new research by Stanford scholar Johannes Eichstaedt.
10h
Some Asteroids May Be Fragments of a Long-Lost Alien Solar System
Credit: NASA A new paper suggests that there may be 19 asteroids — all part of the Centaur family — that didn't come from our own solar system at all. If this were proven true, it would mean we have ancient material formed around an alien star in orbit in our own solar system. Centaurs are some of the most interesting space rocks in our solar system. A Centaur is formally defined as a small body
10h
Coal reveals a sophisticated side: Dirty carbon could be used to make a variety of useful devices
Tar, the everyday material that seals seams in our roofs and driveways, has an unexpected and unappreciated complexity, according to an MIT research team: It might someday be useful as a raw material for a variety of high-tech devices including energy storage systems, thermally active coatings, and electronic sensors.
10h
Shrinking instead of growing: How shrews survive the winter
Common shrews have one of the highest metabolic rates among mammals. They must therefore consume a considerable amount of energy for their relatively low body weight. Because their fat reserves are quickly used up, they often starve to death after only a few hours without food. Nevertheless, forest shrews and their close relatives are highly evolutionarily successful and quite widespread, especial
10h
How the coronavirus multiplies its genetic material
When someone becomes infected with the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the pathogen proliferates rapidly in the cells of the infected person. To do so, the virus has to multiply its genetic material, which consists of a single long RNA strand. This task is performed by the viral "copy machine," the so-called polymerase. Researchers led by Patrick Cramer at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Ch
10h
Tech Is a Double-Edged Lifeline for Domestic Violence Victims
As Covid-19 forces some to shelter place with their abusers, dedicated hotlines, apps, and text messages can provide support. But using them is also risk.
10h
Delivery Robots Aren't Ready—When They Could Be Needed Most
Sheltering in place has driven up demand for deliveries, but machines still have trouble confronting the unpredictability of the real world.
10h
The Coronavirus Pandemic Puts Children at Risk of Online Sexual Exploitation
One conversation could keep your kids safe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Shrinking instead of growing: How shrews survive the winter
Common shrews have one of the highest metabolic rates among mammals. They must therefore consume a considerable amount of energy for their relatively low body weight. Because their fat reserves are quickly used up, they often starve to death after only a few hours without food. Nevertheless, forest shrews and their close relatives are highly evolutionarily successful and quite widespread, especial
10h
How the coronavirus multiplies its genetic material
When someone becomes infected with the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the pathogen proliferates rapidly in the cells of the infected person. To do so, the virus has to multiply its genetic material, which consists of a single long RNA strand. This task is performed by the viral "copy machine," the so-called polymerase. Researchers led by Patrick Cramer at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Ch
10h
Pentagon UFO Videos
Several alleged UFO videos have been circulating for the last few years, and now the Pentagon has officially released them , in order to dampen public speculation about their authenticity. There is now no question that the videos are genuine Navy videos of unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP). But of course, the core questions remains – what are they? The temptation, of course, is to leap from "un
10h
Trump's Response to Virus Reflects a Long Disregard for Science
The president's Covid-19 response has extended the administration's longstanding practice of undermining scientific expertise for political purposes.
10h
Research shows how a 'Swiss Army knife' protein helps phages disarm their victims
Researchers from the Severinov Laboratory at Skoltech, along with their colleagues from Switzerland and Israel, have investigated a poorly studied bacterial BREX defense mechanism to show that it can be turned off by a multipurpose viral protein that successfully impersonates DNA. The paper was published in the journal Nucleic Acids Research.
10h
Beta cells from stem cells: Potential for cell replacement therapy
The loss of insulin-secreting beta cells by autoimmune destruction leads to type 1 diabetes. Clinical islet cell transplantation has the potential to cure diabetes, but donor pancreases are rare. In a new study, a group of researchers developed an improved pluripotent stem cell differentiation protocol to generate beta cells in vitro with superior glucose response and insulin secretion. This is a
10h
Research shows how a 'Swiss Army knife' protein helps phages disarm their victims
Researchers from the Severinov Laboratory at Skoltech, along with their colleagues from Switzerland and Israel, have investigated a poorly studied bacterial BREX defense mechanism to show that it can be turned off by a multipurpose viral protein that successfully impersonates DNA. The paper was published in the journal Nucleic Acids Research.
11h
Building block for quantum computers more common than previously believed
Advanced, fault-tolerant quantum computers may be closer to reach than scientists have projected, according to recent advances reported by Johns Hopkins researchers in a new study recently published in Physical Review Letters.
11h
Beta cells from stem cells: Potential for cell replacement therapy
The loss of insulin-secreting beta cells by autoimmune destruction leads to type 1 diabetes. Clinical islet cell transplantation has the potential to cure diabetes, but donor pancreases are rare. In a new study, a group of researchers developed an improved pluripotent stem cell differentiation protocol to generate beta cells in vitro with superior glucose response and insulin secretion. This is a
11h
Coronavirus deaths more than twice hospital toll, data indicate
Official death statistics for England and Wales suggest the crisis is more severe than previously thought
11h
Santander profit plunges on loan loss provisions
Lender puts aside €1.6bn and prepares for 'strong global recession'
11h
Nyupptäckt mekanism kan leda till nya metoder mot Alzheimers
Oligomerer är giftiga proteinklumpar som bryter ner nervcellerna i hjärnan vid Alzheimers sjukdom. Nu har ett internationellt forskarteam lyckats mäta hur snabbt giftiga oligomererna skapas och bryts ner. Upptäckten kan bli avgörande i jakten på nya metoder att begränsa demenssjukdomen. Vid Alzheimers sjukdom förtvinar nervcellerna i ett eller flera av hjärnans områden, vilket leder till minnespr
11h
It's impossible to predict if crucial Antarctic glacier will collapse
The Pine Island glacier has three tipping points that could lead to the collapse of the entire West Antarctic ice sheet, potentially raising sea levels by 3 metres over centuries
11h
Americans' Faith in Law Is at Stake in the DACA Case
I have been studying and working in law for 70 years, and based on those decades of experience, I fear that the Supreme Court's decision in the DACA cases, expected later this week, will test the public's belief that law and justice intersect in America. Legal scholars might well scoff at such a dramatic prediction, considering that the cases involve the interpretation of the esoteric Administrat
11h
Svenskarna stödjer ytterligare åtgärder mot covid-19
Tre av fyra svenskar vill se fler åtgärder för att minska spridningen av covid-19. Två av fem är positiva till ett tillfälligt utegångsförbud i städer. Det visar en ny undersökning vid Handelshögskolan i Stockholm. I början av april skickade forskare vid Handelshögskolan i Stockholm ut en enkät för att ta reda på hur svenskarna ser på eventuella ytterligare åtgärder för att motverka coronaviruset
11h
There's no such thing as just 'following the science' – advice is political | Jana Bacevic
As we're seeing in this pandemic, politicians tend to favour the evidence that supports their argument Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage At this stage in the coronavirus crisis, the government seems to have made error after error. The UK was slow to enforce a lockdown that seemed inevitable, shortages of personal protective equipment contributed to unnecessary deaths a
11h
China has valuable lessons for the world in how to fight Covid-19
Stigmatising the country only distracts from the global effort needed to beat the pandemic
11h
Let Africa into the market for COVID-19 diagnostics
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01265-0 Africa is boosting its capacity to respond to COVID-19, but lack of solidarity will cost lives, warns Africa CDC head John Nkengasong.
11h
The Democrats Have No Good Options
President Donald Trump signed the latest coronavirus-relief legislation as he was managing the fallout of Bleachgate. The president insisted at the signing of the $484 billion package that his comments the previous day—he had mused at an April 23 press conference, "I see the disinfectant that knocks [the virus] out in a minute, one minute," and asked, "Is there a way we can do something like that
11h
Medication Shortages Are the Next Crisis
Widespread critical-medication shortages are the next big crisis of the coronavirus pandemic. Some hospitals, including in New York, are running low on paralytic agents that are needed to safely intubate patients. Steve Corwin, the president and CEO of New York–Presbyterian, recently noted on MSNBC that his hospital is even running short on solutions needed for dialysis. I am fortunate to work in
11h
'Valorant' Is Cutthroat, Punishing, and Addictive as Hell
The Riot Games follow-up to *League of Legends* is worth the wait.
11h
Here's What Disinfectants and UV Light *Really* Do to Your Body
There's a reason why cleaners for external surfaces are not meant for your innards. They're indiscriminate killers, not medicine.
11h
The Pandemic Creates New Challenges for Crisis Counselors
Therapists and hotline workers who work with abuse victims now must take calls from home, increasing their risk for isolation and emotional burnout.
11h
Comparing COVID-19 Deaths to Flu Deaths Is like Comparing Apples to Oranges
The former are actual numbers; the latter are inflated statistical estimates — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Eksperter på jagt efter mystisk fejl: Skagerrak-kabel lukkes i ti uger
PLUS. Mindre end fem år efter at Skagerrak 4 blev sat i drift, må hele den kraftige kabelforbindelse til Norge lukkes ned henover sommeren for at finde årsagen til nogle fejl, som har ramt det danske landkabel.
11h
Comparing COVID-19 Deaths to Flu Deaths Is like Comparing Apples to Oranges
The former are actual numbers; the latter are inflated statistical estimates — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Telia blokerer for stjålne smartphones
»Med det nye sikkerhedssystem kan vi enkelt og effektivt gøre stjålne telefoner værdiløse og dermed fjerne de kriminelles gevinst ved at stjæle telefoner hos os,« lyder det fra teknologidirektør i Telia, Henrik Kofod.
11h
Miljøministeren: Forbud mod sprøjtning, gødning og pløjning kan få naturen tilbage på beskyttede enge
PLUS. Kritikerne hævder at det ikke gavner biodiversiteten at begrænse landbruget på de §3 beskyttede enge, men miljøminister Lea Wermelin holder fast i at lovforslaget vil gavne naturen.
12h
How the COVID-19 Pandemic Could End
Recent epidemics provide clues to ways the current crisis could stop — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
A great new way to paint 3-D-printed objects
Rutgers engineers have created a highly effective way to paint complex 3-D-printed objects, such as lightweight frames for aircraft and biomedical stents, that could save manufacturers time and money and provide new opportunities to create "smart skins" for printed parts.
12h
A great new way to paint 3D-printed objects
Rutgers engineers have created a highly effective way to paint complex 3D-printed objects, such as lightweight frames for aircraft and biomedical stents, that could save manufacturers time and money and provide new opportunities to create "smart skins" for printed parts. The findings are published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
12h
Marks and Spencer warns dividend is at risk for coming year
UK retailer seeks to preserve cash because of 'highly uncertain' conditions after lockdown
12h
Don't dismiss philanthropy: it's crucial during the coronavirus crisis | Beth Breeze and Paul Ramsbottom
Whether it's helping research a vaccine or supporting those worst hit by the pandemic, private giving is needed as never before In Bill Gates' eerily prescient 2015 Ted Talk he states that "the greatest risk of global catastrophe … is not missiles but microbes", which, he predicted, could claim over 10 million lives and wipe $3tn (£2.4tn) off the global economy. Related: Twitter chief to donate q
12h
Coronavirus: sampling now for future analysis
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01267-y
12h
Post-pandemic economic overhaul will take more than tweaks
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01222-x As COVID-19 exacerbates inequalities, Thomas Piketty's analysis reads as timely, but inadequate. By Ingrid Harvold Kvangraven.
12h
Shiftworking keeps locked-down lab on track
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01268-x
12h
Scientists whose ideas came on the move
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01270-3
12h
Five things we need to do to make contact tracing really work
The ongoing pandemic is fertile ground for opportunistic hucksters , loud frauds, and coronavirus deniers who attack or blame everyone and everything from Chinese-Americans to Bill Gates to 5G networks. The latest front in this bizarre war: contact tracing. Tracing is the technique public health workers use to identify carriers of an infectious disease and then uncover who else they may have expo
12h
FCA tells banks advising on debt not to muscle into equity raising
UK regulator says it has seen 'credible reports' some lenders have pressured clients
12h
Publisher slaps expressions of concern on 20 papers by nutrition supplement-selling doctor
More than two years after being made aware of undisclosed conflicts of interest by a Minnesota physician who ran afoul of the U.S. FDA for health claims about supplements sold by his company, a publisher has added expressions of concern on 20 of the doctor's papers. As we reported in August 2019, on Feb. 23, … Continue reading
12h
Horny lemurs use body odor as a pick-up line
Snuggly, stinky, lemurs. (Daniel C. Devor/) For ring-tailed lemurs, love stinks. They practically use body odor as a pick-up line, with ring-tails rubbing their fluffy tails into scent glands on their wrists so that they might wave the aroma around enticingly. Lemur researchers have witnessed this behavior in the wild for years, and knew the stinky courtship ritual was uniquely important to the a
12h
My lockdown life: a CEO and a supermarket assistant on working through the crisis
In this FT series people share their stories of this extraordinary time
12h
I'm a GP who got coronavirus because I had no PPE. I feel guilty but also angry
We were left unprotected and felt like we were going into a battlefield. I don't think our profession will ever be the same Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage I have been off work for five weeks with coronavirus, which I contracted during consultations with patients at the GP practice where I work. I still gasp when I try to talk, each day hoping for a miraculous improv
12h
Airbus og Rolls Royce stopper udviklingen af elektrisk test-fly
To teknologigiganter i luftfarten har besluttet at stoppe deres fælles udviklingsplatform for fremtidens bæredygtige fly. Hver for sig vil de fortsætte med at udvikle teknologi der kan reducerer CO2-belastningen fra fly.
13h
France announces 'progressive and controlled' lockdown exit plan
Spain also plans 'transition to normality' despite rise in German Covid-19 infection rate after relaxation of restrictions Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage France and Spain have announced detailed roadmaps for gradual, phased exits from their strict coronavirus lockdowns, with restrictions to be loosened progressively and varying from region to region. The French prim
13h
Live Coronavirus News and Updates
At least a dozen U.S. states forged ahead with of strategies to ease restrictions. Rhode Island's testing strategy helps discover infections that might have gone overlooked elsewhere. The Treasury secretary warned companies not to apply for small business aid if they aren't eligible.
13h
Tiden er ikke til corona-konklusioner – hverken for somatiske eller psykiatriske afdelinger
Coronakrisen sætter sundhedsvæsnet i en undtagelsestilstand, der hverken kan bruges som grundlag for at bedømme behovet for somatiske eller psykiatriske sengepladser.
13h
The past can help us deal with the pandemic's mental health fallout
Lessons learned from natural disasters and the military can help guide our responses to help people's mental health during the covid-19 pandemic
13h
Prefrontal reinstatement of contextual task demand is predicted by separable hippocampal patterns
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15928-z Spatial contexts are often predictive of the tasks to be performed in them (e.g., a kitchen predicts cooking). Here the authors show that the retrieval of task demand when encountering a spatial context depends on hippocampal-prefrontal interactions.
13h
Emergent tetratic order in crowded systems of rotationally asymmetric hard kite particles
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15723-w For colloidal particles, it remains challenging to predict the forms of order that can emerge in their dense assembled structures. Here, the authors show, by Monte Carlo simulations, that tetratic-ordered phases emerge in a dense two-dimensional system of hard kites that are rotationally asymmetric.
13h
The BRCA2-MEILB2-BRME1 complex governs meiotic recombination and impairs the mitotic BRCA2-RAD51 function in cancer cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15954-x In meiosis, BRCA2 associates to MEILB2 localising at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, the authors identify BRCA2 and MEILB2- associating protein 1 termed BRME1 to work together in regulating meiotic recombination.
13h
AI-værktøj skal snart forudsige corona-forløb på danske hospitaler
Et nyt værktøj til at forudsige corona-patienters behov for intensiv behandling forventes at gå i luften i juni.
13h
America's Elections Won't Be the Same After 2020
T his year's Democratic presidential primary was tumultuous from beginning to end—starting with a record field of two dozen major candidates and ending in the middle of a pandemic. But its lasting legacy could be far more fundamental: The chaos of the 2020 election season could radically, even permanently, change how Americans vote. By November, a majority of the country—and possibly the overwhel
13h
Cytosine base editors with minimized unguided DNA and RNA off-target events and high on-target activity
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15887-5 Cytosine base editors have been reported to induce off-target mutations in DNA and RNA. Here the authors identify next-generation CBEs with reduced guide-independent off-target editing profiles and retain high on-target editing activity.
13h
A HaloTag-TEV genetic cassette for mechanical phenotyping of proteins from tissues
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15465-9 Testing mechanical forces on native molecules in natural environments remains a challenge. Here the authors engineer titin to carry a HaloTag-TEV insertion to allow analysis of dynamics under force in muscle fibers.
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13h
LipidCreator workbench to probe the lipidomic landscape
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15960-z Targeted mass spectrometry enables reproducible and accurate lipid quantification but dedicated software tools to develop targeted lipidomics assays are lacking. Here, the authors develop a targeted lipidomics workbench and lipid knowledgebase for the streamlined generation of targeted assays.
13h
Engineered niches support the development of human dendritic cells in humanized mice
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15937-y Classical human dendritic cells (cDCs) are rare sentinel cells specialized in regulating adaptive immunity. Here, the authors show that expression of membrane bound FLT3L, along with stem cell factor (SCF) and CXCL12 in stromal cells induces specification of pre/AS-DCs, type 1 and type2 cDC from haematopoietic
13h
Spectro-temporal encoded multiphoton microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging at kilohertz frame-rates
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15618-w Two-photon microscopy has been limited by low acquisition rates due to mechanical scanners. Here, the authors employ pulse-modulated, rapidly wavelength-swept lasers and inertia-free beam steering through angular dispersion in order to achieve non-linear microscopy with kilohertz frame rates.
13h
Artifact-free and high-temporal-resolution in vivo opto-electrophysiology with microLED optoelectrodes
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15769-w Artifact-free opto-electrophysiology is key for precise modulation and monitoring of individual neurons at high spatio-temporal resolution. The authors present a method for eliminating stimulation artifacts in high-density micro-LED optoelectrodes for accurate functional mapping of local circuits.
13h
Proteogenomics analysis unveils a TFG-RET gene fusion and druggable targets in papillary thyroid carcinomas
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15955-w Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is one of the most common type of endocrine malignancy. Here, the authors use proteogenomic approaches to analyse the primary tumour and lymph node metastases from a PTC patient and report an oncogenic RET fusion, and potential druggable targets from the ubiquitin signaling machin
13h
New study links severe sleep apnea to higher blood glucose levels in African-Americans
African-Americans with severe sleep apnea and other adverse sleep patterns are much more likely to have high blood glucose levels — a risk factor for diabetes — than those without these patterns, according to a new study funded in part by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health.
13h
CNIC scientists design an experimental mouse model for investigating the mechanical function of proteins
CNIC scientists, working with international partners, have developed a new experimental mouse model that allows them to study how cells sense, interpret, and generate mechanical forces.
13h
Work-related stress linked to increased risk for peripheral artery disease
People who reported work-related stress were more likely to be hospitalized for treatment of peripheral artery disease compared to those who did not report work-related stress. Work-related stress, or job strain, refers to psychological and social stress at work, often from high expectations combined with lower levels of personal control.
13h
Higher economic status does not always translate to better heart health
Upward income mobility is associated with a trade-off between well-being and cardiometabolic health.Reaching a higher income status is not always beneficial for cardiometabolic health, even if it improves economic standing and mental health.
13h
Broaden economics theory for global fixes
Nature, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01269-w
13h
Pressure-Assisted Fabrication of Perovskite Solar Cells
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64090-5
13h
Materials and Device Considerations in Electrophoretic Drug Delivery Devices
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64114-0
13h
Revealing the air pollution burden associated with internal Migration in Peru
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64043-y
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Evaluation of the Relationship Between Age and Trabecular Meshwork Height to Predict the Risk of Glaucoma
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64048-7
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Pore structure and its impact on susceptibility to coal spontaneous combustion based on multiscale and multifractal analysis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63715-z
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Global trends in mangrove forest fragmentation
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63880-1
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The US already has the technology to test millions of people a day
There is widespread agreement that the only way to safely reopen the economy is through a massive increase in testing. The US needs to test millions of people per day to effectively track and then contain the covid-19 pandemic. This is a tall order. The country tested only around 210,000 people per day last week , and the pace is not increasing fast enough to get to millions quickly. The urgency
13h
Unified in Coronavirus Lockdown, India Splinters Over Reopening
As India starts loosening restrictions, a once-broad consensus among leaders on how to proceed has weakened — and many people are staying home anyway.
13h
Pence Trips Show Challenges Of Returning To Political Normal
Vice President Pence is road-testing the political and logistical hurdles the White House faces as it looks to try to return to some kind of new political normal. (Image credit: Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty Images)
13h
Maslow's hierarchy of needs: Updated for the 21st century
When we imagine Maslow's famous hierarchy of needs, we visualize a pyramid. This is all wrong, says humanistic psychologist Scott Barry Kaufman. This is because life isn't a video game, where you unlock new levels until you reach the final prize of self-actualization. In fact, Maslow viewed human development as a two steps forward, one step back dynamic. Kaufman rebuilt Maslow's hierarchy of need
13h
Tunnel Vision: Lessons in the Impermanence of Permafrost
Scientists worry that the thaw of global permafrost could liberate microbes wholly foreign to the modern world, and release as much as 300 to 600 million metric tons of planet-warming carbon annually. In a tunnel beneath Fox, Alaska, they are now racing to understand permafrost before it's gone.
13h
HSBC quarterly profit halves as pandemic hits loans
Lender warns loan loss provisions could reach $11bn this year, surging to highest levels since financial crisis
13h
Son of doctor who died from Covid-19 confronts Matt Hancock over PPE
Intisar Chowdhury, 18, asks health secretary why his father's letter warning of shortages was ignored Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The son of a doctor who died of coronavirus after warning Boris Johnson about a lack of personal protective equipment has confronted the health secretary, Matt Hancock, asking if he regrets not taking his father's concerns seriously en
14h
UAE wages war on tiny scourge threatening date palms
Said Al-Ajani looks proudly over his lush date plantation, which recently survived a plague of red weevils—a destructive insect wreaking havoc across the Middle East and North Africa.
14h
Kvanteekspert siger overraskende farvel til Google
John Martinis, der stod Google kvantecomputergennembrud, har forladt Google og er vendt hjem til sit universitet. Bruddet skyldes en forskel i ledelsesfilosof oplyser ekspert.
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UK business leaders call for clarity over ending lockdown
CBI director-general seeks 'forward guidance' on plans for return to work
14h
UBS profits jump 40% as wealth unit performs robustly
Lender warns coronavirus will hit its business as loan losses increase more than 13-fold
14h
Germany, Britain call for 'green recovery' from pandemic
Germany and Britain said Monday that efforts to revive the global economy in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic must ensure a 'green recovery' that helps the world tackle climate change.
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Perception of US democracy tanks after Trump impeachment
While President Donald Trump's impeachment gripped the country in late 2019 and early 2020, the long-term consequences of his trial and acquittal for American democracy remain yet unclear. What's clear already, however, is that both the public's and political experts' perceptions of the health of US democracy clearly declined during this period.
15h
Invasive lionfish likely to become permanent residents in the Mediterranean
An invasive species first identified in the Mediterranean Sea just eight years ago is likely to become a permanent feature of the region, a new study suggests.
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Invasive lionfish likely to become permanent residents in the Mediterranean
An invasive species first identified in the Mediterranean Sea just eight years ago is likely to become a permanent feature of the region, a new study suggests.
15h
Making sense of the viral multiverse
In November of 2019—likely, even earlier—a tiny entity measuring just a few hundred billionths of a meter in diameter began to tear apart human society on a global scale. Within a few months, the relentless voyager known as SARS-CoV-2 had made its way to every populated corner of the earth, leaving scientists and health authorities with too many questions and few answers.
15h
Model shows recycling could dramatically slash cities' need for fresh water resources
Delivering water to city dwellers can become far more efficient, according to Rice University researchers who say it should involve a healthy level of recycled wastewater.
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Making sense of the viral multiverse
In November of 2019—likely, even earlier—a tiny entity measuring just a few hundred billionths of a meter in diameter began to tear apart human society on a global scale. Within a few months, the relentless voyager known as SARS-CoV-2 had made its way to every populated corner of the earth, leaving scientists and health authorities with too many questions and few answers.
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Nissan warns of $886m loss as vehicle sales collapse
Coronavirus pandemic has forced carmaker to shut factories across the world
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A step toward a better way to make gene therapies to attack cancer, genetic disorders
A UCLA-led research team today reports that it has developed a new method for delivering DNA into stem cells and immune cells safely, rapidly and economically. The method, described in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could give scientists a new tool for manufacturing gene therapies for people with cancer, genetic disorders and blood diseases.
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A step toward a better way to make gene therapies to attack cancer, genetic disorders
A UCLA-led research team today reports that it has developed a new method for delivering DNA into stem cells and immune cells safely, rapidly and economically. The method, described in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could give scientists a new tool for manufacturing gene therapies for people with cancer, genetic disorders and blood diseases.
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Ny behandling mot Parkinsons sjukdom kan vara inom räckhåll
Parkinsons sjukdom är en svår hjärnsjukdom och lindrande mediciner som utvecklades på 1960-talet är fortfarande dagens standardbehandling. Dessa mediciner kan ge svåra biverkningar över tid och botar inte sjukdomen. En bättre behandling för sjukdomen kan uppnås genom att ersätta de döda hjärncellerna med friska och nya celler odlade i labbet. Dessa celler går in och "vikarierar för de celler som p
15h
Australia called 'gum stuck to China's shoe' by state media in coronavirus investigation stoush
Hu Xijin, editor of Global Times, responds to calls for inquiry into source of Covid-19 Sign up to get coronavirus updates delivered to your email every weekday evening Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications Australia has been described as "gum stuck to the bottom of China's shoe," by a Chinese state media editor as Beijing criticised calls for an inquiry into
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Abortion by Telemedicine: A Growing Option as Access to Clinics Wanes
The coronavirus has created a surge in demand for telemedicine of all types — including for a quietly expanding program for terminating pregnancies.
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Afgrøder sået i ensartet mønster giver højere udbytte og mindre miljøpåvirkning
Hvis landmændene sår hvede, majs, soja og andre afgrøder i mere ensartede mønstre…
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Chaga Tea
Chaga tea is made from a mushroom that rots birch trees. Health benefits are claimed on the basis of folk medicine, but there isn't a shred of scientific evidence.
15h
BP earnings plummet by two-thirds as demand collapses
UK energy major maintains its dividend despite 'brutal' environment
16h
£82bn of UK property sales put on hold
Impact of pandemic has halted nearly 400,000 housing transactions
16h
Kampen mod coronavirus vil teste datadrevet forskning på et nyt niveau
Mikroorganismer udgør i dag en af de største trusler mod jordens befolkning på højde med klima katastrofer og atomkrig.
16h
The Noble Prize for a Life Well-Lived
In honor of a beautiful and affectionate cat. RIP, beloved Max April 19, 2003 – April 24, 2020 So much acrimony and confusion and death… In the true meaning of the word, Max lived a noble life. "But he was just a cat," you say. Yes, that's true. But he was loving and kind and selfless until the very end. He was a wonderful companion, and a great source of comfort to me (especially after my part
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Sygehusenes klimaindsatser hjælper Danmark på fode igen
Presset på klimaet vokser, og konsekvenserne kan mærkes i vores samfund. Behovet for at udbrede grønne investeringer, der kan mindske de negative konsekvenser af klimaforandringer, er ikke blevet mindre under corona – tværtimod, skriver Karsten Uno Petersen.
16h
Study of nearly 10,000 women explores feasibility and safety of multi-cancer blood test
In an exploratory study of nearly 10,000 women with no history of cancer, researchers evaluating a multi-cancer blood test report that it successfully detected some cancers, including early cancers that could be localized and surgically removed.
16h
'Calamitous': domestic violence set to soar by 20% during global lockdown
Data from the UN population fund, outlining increases in abuse, FGM and child marriage, predicts a grim decade for many women Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage At least 15m more cases of domestic violence are predicted around the world this year as a result of pandemic restrictions, according to new data that paints a bleak picture of life for women over the next decad
17h
Record 50 million people internally displaced in 2019, study finds
Covid-19 is likely to impact aid for people forced from their homes by conflict and disaster around the world, experts warn Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A total of 50.8 million people around the world were recorded as internally displaced last year, forced from their homes by conflict and disaster. This is the highest number ever, and 10 million more than in 2018.
18h
New Zealand and Australia open up after coronavirus success
Governments start to lift social distancing rules after sharp falls in infections
18h
New device simulates feel of walls, solid objects in virtual reality
Today's virtual reality systems can create immersive visual experiences, but seldom do they enable users to feel anything — particularly walls, appliances and furniture. A new device developed at Carnegie Mellon University, however, uses multiple strings attached to the hand and fingers to simulate the feel of obstacles and heavy objects.
18h
Alcoholics Anonymous method can mesh well with other treatments for alcohol misuse
Most treatment providers for individuals with alcohol use disorders are well versed in either the 12-Step Alcoholics Anonymous program or in a different treatment such as cognitive behavioral therapy — but the two approaches can mesh well, according to a Baylor University researcher.
18h
Invasive lionfish likely to become permanent residents in the Mediterranean
A team of international scientists has shown the species, first seen off the coast of Cyprus in 2012, is now thriving and well-established right across southern Europe
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Hugs and kisses: Research connects affection, attachment style and marriage satisfaction
Go ahead: Give your partner a hug or cuddle while you catch some Netflix. According to recently published research from Binghamton University, State University of New York, it just might build a stronger relationship.
18h
Sexual risk behavior is reduced with involvement of parents and healthcare providers
Randomized Control Trial under an NIH grant demonstrates the efficacy of a clinic-based triadic healthcare intervention called 'Families Talking Together' to protect adolescents from sexual health risks such as unwanted pregnancy and HIV/AIDS.
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A child's home environment can impact the risk of developing depression
New research, published online today in the American Journal of Psychiatry, finds that children's rearing environment has a meaningful impact on their risk for major depression later in life, and notes the importance supporting of nurturing environments when children are at risk.
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Two-person-together MRI scans on couples investigates how touching is perceived in the brain
Researchers in Finland can now scan two people together, showing that touching synchronizes couple's brains, making them mirror each other's movements.
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New DNA test will improve tracking of Salmonella food-poisoning outbreaks
Researchers report the development of a sensitive and specific assay to detect different serotypes of Salmonella, paving the way for rapid serotyping directly from specimens. This improvement upon current testing methods can play a critical role in quickly tracing the origin of the infection. The report appears in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier.
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Covid-19: what role might air pollution play? – podcast
After a string of studies that highlight the possible link between air pollution and Covid-19 deaths , Ian Sample hears from Prof Anna Hansell about the complicated relationship between pollution, health and infection with Sars-CoV-2 Continue reading…
18h
World Coronavirus Coverage: Live Tracker
A spokesman accused U.S. politicians of "lying through their teeth," about the origins of the virus. In India, plans for a partial reopening are creating fear and uncertainty.
18h
Varmere vand får delfiner til Danmark: Legesyge flokke boltrer sig i havet omkring os
Hele tre delfinarter kan være ved at slå sig ned i danske farvande lige nu.
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Low Covid-19 death toll raises hopes Africa may be spared worst
Continent has limited confirmed virus fatalities but experts warn it is too early to draw conclusions
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Boris Bikes are booming
While tube and bus usage is down massively, bike-sharing seems to have become something of a lockdown hobby.
18h
Over 30m workers in Europe turn to state for wage support
A fifth of the workforce applies across Germany, France, UK, Italy and Spain
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Tennis organisers set to agree relief fund for players facing financial hit
ATP chair says pandemic has forced debate over prize money and merging of men's and women's tours
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Covid-19 has silver linings for Argentina's president
Fernández' gains strong approval ratings and legitimate excuse in debt negotiations
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A scandal shakes the world's largest sovereign wealth fund
The three men at the forefront of Norway's oil fund drama
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Coronavirus apps: the risk of a surveillance state
Governments are weighing a trade-off between the effectiveness of tech solutions to track the pandemic and privacy
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Locked down and longing for 'Little House on the Prairie'
How my daughter's reading list got caught up in India's fight over essential commerce
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Coronavirus: how Germany is containing the epidemic
Mass testing has managed to stem the death toll in one of Europe's most heavily populated nations
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Covid-19: what role might air pollution play? – podcast
After a string of studies that highlight the possible link between air pollution and Covid-19 deaths, Ian Sample hears from Prof Anna Hansell about the complicated relationship between pollution, health and infection with Sars-CoV-2. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
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German GPs find an interesting way to expose their lack of PPE
A Teutonic response to the global shortage of masks and other protective equipment.
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The pandemic is moment of truth for anti-vaxxers
Hardcore activists resist vaccinations but Covid-19 sharpens the dilemma for waverers
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Drugmakers race to scale up vaccine capacity
Funding bodies face a choice between established manufacturers and biotech upstarts
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Forskere: Regeringens forbud mod sprøjtemidler og gødning er ren symbolpolitik
PLUS. Ifølge to eksperter i biodiversitet, vil det gavne naturen i Danmark langt mere, hvis regeringen øgede naturbeskyttelsen i de statsej