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Exactly 75 years ago, time was up for the Nazis
These U.S. Army maps detail the progress of the Allied war effort, on both the Eastern and Western Front. They show the enormous gains by the Red Army, and much slower progress across Italy. After D-Day, the Germans fought hard to contain Allied advances in the West, but these maps are testament to the hopelessness of their cause. Exactly three quarters of a century ago, this was the most importa
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Schizophrenia related to abnormal fatty metabolism in the brain
Researchers have discovered a deficiency in the brains of people with schizophrenia that could lead to the development of new drug therapies. A postmortem comparison revealed that schizophrenia was associated with lower than normal levels of S1P, a type of fatty molecule found in the white matter of the brain.
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Hopes rise on coronavirus drug remdesivir
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01295-8 Despite conflicting data, results from largest trial that show the antiviral speeds up recovery will make the treatment a standard of care in the United States.
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LATEST

'Gargantuan' hail in Argentina may have smashed world record
A supercell thunderstorm pelted a city center in Argentina a few years ago with hailstones so large scientists suggested a new category to describe them — gargantuan hail.
11min
Learning from fish and flags to inform new propulsion strategies
Recent research has found relationships between frequencies and the passive dynamics at play when vehicles move in air or water toward a better understanding of how to use these forces to enhance performance. Understanding this fluid-structure interaction at a very basic level, could help inform new aircraft and submarine designs with a very different kind of locomotion.
11min
Engineers make a promising material stable enough for use in solar cells
A research team has found a way to make halide perovskites stable enough by inhibiting the ion movement that makes them rapidly degrade, unlocking their use for solar panels as well as electronic devices.
11min
Arteries respond in opposite ways for males and females
A protein known to expand blood vessels — key to controlling conditions like high blood pressure — actually has different functions in males and females, new UC Davis Health research shows. Conducted using arterial cells from mice, the study is the first to identify sex-based distinctions in how the protein — Kv2.1 — works.
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Tuning into dolphin chatter could boost conservation efforts
Researchers have moved an important step closer to using sound rather than sight to track individual dolphin activity. Their study, which has potential implications for dolphin communities around the world, investigated whether there was a way to attribute unique whistles to individual bottlenose dolphins living in Western Australia's Swan River.
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Conservation goals may be stymied by a lack of land for biodiversity offsetting
Developers may struggle to find enough land to offset the biodiversity impacts of future development, according to a new study.
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Major trial shows breast cancer drug can hit prostate cancer Achilles heel
A drug already licensed for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers is more effective than targeted hormone therapy at keeping cancer in check in some men with advanced prostate cancer, a major clinical trial reports. Olaparib, a pill lacking the side effects of chemotherapy, can target an Achilles heel in prostate cancers with a weakness in their ability to repair damaged DNA.
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Important flowering plants for city-dwelling honey bees
Trees, shrubs and woody vines are among the top food sources for honey bees in urban environments, according to an international team of researchers. By using honey bees housed in rooftop apiaries in Philadelphia, the researchers identified the plant species from which the honey bees collected most of their food, and tracked how these food resources changed from spring to fall. The findings may be
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Can a 'machine' sort the COVID-19 research deluge?
An artificial intelligence platform could help sort through the growing mass of published COVID-19 research, researchers report. More than 50,000 academic articles have been written about COVID-19 since the virus appeared in November. The volume of new information isn't necessarily a good thing. Not all of the recent coronavirus literature has undergone peer review, and the sheer number of articl
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Family stories can help kids deal with crisis
In times of great stress, stories, especially family stories, sustain us—and can help children of all ages weather hard times—an expert says. Family reminiscing is especially important, says Robyn Fivush, director of the Family Narratives Lab in Emory University's psychology department. When children learn family stories it creates a shared history, strengthens emotional bonds and helps them make
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Simulating borehole ballooning helps ensure safe drilling of deep-water oil, gas
A device which simulates borehole ballooning, a detrimental side effect of deep-water drilling operations, is expected to ensure safe and efficient operations. If not prevented, borehole ballooning can lead to irreversible damage and serious drilling accidents, which can result in reservoir pollution and huge economic loss. In Review of Scientific Instruments, researchers present a device that can
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Coronavirus live news: more cases of 'Covid-linked' syndrome in children as UK deaths top Spain and France
Nearly 100 cases of unusual illness in at least six countries; UK adds deaths outside hospital to official figure; Trump says he won't extend social distancing rules. Follow the latest updates Coronavirus latest: at a glance Trump says he won't extend distancing guidelines as deaths pass 60,000 Revealed: the inside story of the UK's Covid-19 crisis Australia coronavirus updates – live See all our
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The Atlantic Daily: What Georgia Will Teach America
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . DUSTIN CHAMBERS / BLOOMBERG VIA GETTY In some ways, shutting it all down was the easy part. Now government leaders must look ahead, toward the gradual reopening of public life—and the extraordina
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The pieces of the puzzle of covid-19's origin are coming to light
How they fit together, though, remains mysterious
56min
Party Royale, Travis Scott, and Fortnite's 'Third Place'
As the online game is proving with Travis Scott and Party Royale, digital places are every bit as legitimate as their analog counterparts.
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Online classes exacerbate China's rural-urban education gap
School closures hit poor children hardest — and threaten Beijing's anti-poverty goals
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Norway to cut oil production by 13%
Move in response to drop in prices and demand and honours unofficial pact with Opec
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Innovative approach offers option for treating upper tract urothelial cancer
An innovative form of local chemotherapy using a mitomycin-containing reverse thermal gel offers a kidney-sparing treatment option for low-grade upper tract urothelial cancer.
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New evidence for optimizing malaria treatment in pregnant women
The research, published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases is the fruit of joint project between investigators from around the world to conduct the largest individual patient data meta-analysis to date under the WWARN umbrella. The study found that artemether-lumefantrine (AL) and other artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) were significantly more effective than quinine, the current
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'Make physical activity part of children's routine' during lockdown
Parents and carers should ensure that physical activity is part of the routine for children and families during the COVID-19 lockdown, according to an international study involving the University of Strathclyde.
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First pregnancy complications linked to increased risk of future premature birth
Women whose first baby is born at full term, but who experience complications in pregnancy, have an increased risk of preterm delivery (before 37 weeks) in their next pregnancy, finds a study from Norway published by The BMJ today.
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Certain diabetes drugs may protect against serious kidney problems
Use of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors to treat type 2 diabetes may help to lower the risk of serious kidney problems, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
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Rivalry Renewed: The Wizard vs the Seabrooke | Deadliest Catch
Longtime rivals Keith Colburn and Scott Campell Jr. butt heads over crab grounds. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitter
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Author Correction: TNF-α and INF-γ primed canine stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles alleviate experimental murine colitis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63115-3
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Author Correction: Revealing universal quantum contextuality through communication games
Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64337-1
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Author Correction: Maximizing and stabilizing luminescence from halide perovskites with potassium passivation
Nature, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2272-2
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Teams of bacteria have working memories remarkably like ours
Groups of bacteria that stick together, known as a biofilm, have a strong working memory, according to new research. (CDC/) Tiny organisms do extraordinary things. Bacteria can both help bring life to soil and wreak havoc on a human digestive system during a bout with food poisoning. However, we don't normally think of microbes like bacteria as being smart. Groundbreaking new research, though, su
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A step closer to eradicating malaria
Strategies that treat households in the broad vicinity of a recent malaria case with anti-malarial drugs, insecticides, or both could significantly reduce malaria in low-transmission settings.
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AAN updates recommendation on closure of common heart defect after stroke
New guidance from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) concludes that closure of a common heart defect called a patent foramen ovale (PFO) may be recommended for some people who have had a stroke. The updated practice advisory is published in the April 29, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Georgia Tech researcher pays a high price for mismanaging an NSF grant
Health data analytics expert to appear in federal court—and could lose her job
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Remdesivir seems to shorten covid hospital stays and may save lives
The good news started trickling out early this morning, first in a vague company press release and then, by midday, from the White House. A drug called remdesivir appears to actually work against the coronavirus that causes covid-19. The news was delivered to President Donald Trump by Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), who said covid-19 patie
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Superoxide produces hydroxyl radicals that break down dissolved organic matter in water
According to a study published in Water Research in April 2020, superoxide produces hydroxyl radicals in lake water. Hydroxyl radicals break down poorly biodegradable organic matter such as humic substances and anthropogenic pollutants.
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Learning from fish and flags to inform new propulsion strategies
Recent research by Andres J. Goza at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign found relationships between frequencies and the passive dynamics at play when vehicles move in air or water toward a better understanding of how to use these forces to enhance performance. Understanding this fluid-structure interaction at a very basic level, could help inform new aircraft and submarine designs with
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Mind-controlled arm prostheses that 'feel' are now a part of everyday life
For the first time, people with arm amputations can experience sensations of touch in a mind-controlled arm prosthesis that they use in everyday life. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine reports on three Swedish patients who have lived, for several years, with this new technology — one of the world's most integrated interfaces between human and machine.
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Mapping health risks for people with mental disorders
Researchers now have the ability to map the risks of general medical conditions such as heart and lung diseases, diabetes and cancer for people with mental disorders.
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Screen time isn't hurting kids socially, study finds
The dominate cultural assumption claims screen time devastates children's social skills. A recent study in the American Journal of Sociology suggests today's children are as socially skilled as the preceding peers. Parents need to set screen limits, but research shows they should set limits for themselves, too. Every good parent has a worrier in them. They worry whether their children are eating
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New Coronavirus Test Offers Advantages: Just Spit and Wait
Saliva tests like the one developed by Rutgers are less painful for patients and less risky to medical workers.
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Texas Twister Cuts Destructive Path Visible From Space
Even though the tornado was not as powerful as others spawned by a supercell storm system in the South, it scoured out a path visible to the Landsat-8 satellite.
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Chinese Kids Are Wearing Adorable Social-Distancing Hats at School
As China is slowly clawing itself back to normal after a devastating battle with the coronavirus, educators are getting creative to ensure that kids aren't in danger of infecting each other in the class room. Images recently uploaded to Chinese social media show school children wearing adorable hats with two long protrusions on either side, to encourage social distancing, CNET reports . First gra
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Protes med känsel förenklar vardagen
Köra snöskoter, ratta en grävskopa och laga bilar är exempel på saker som tre patienter med en ny svensk tankestyrd protes med inbyggd känsel klarar av. En ny studie i tidskriften New England Journal of Medicine, som följt patienterna under tre års användning, visar att protesen förenklar vardagslivet.
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'Gargantuan' hail in Argentina may have smashed world record
A supercell thunderstorm pelted a city center in Argentina a few years ago with hailstones so large scientists suggested a new category to describe them — gargantuan hail.
3h
Computational techniques explore 'the dark side of amyloid aggregation in the brain'
As physicians and families know too well, though Alzheimer's disease has been intensely studied for decades, too much is still not known about molecular processes in the brain that cause it. Now researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst say new insights from analytic theory and molecular simulation techniques offer a better understanding of amyloid fibril growth and brain pathology.
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Remdesivir: early findings on experimental coronavirus drug offer 'quite good news'
Preliminary results of US government trial show patients who received drug recovered faster than others Hopes of an effective drug treatment for coronavirus patients have risen following positive early results from a trial of remdesivir, a drug first tried in Ebola patients. Data from the trial on more than 1,000 severely ill patients in 75 hospitals around the world show that patients put on the
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Facebook shares soar on 'signs of stability'
Social media group says advertising plunge that began in March appears to have abated
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Best of SARS-CoV-2
This collection of articles from The Scientist uncovers some of the latest SARS-CoV-2 research
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Researchers measure cancer cell mechanics in living animals using nanoparticles
Researchers developed a first-of-its-kind nanoparticle-based in vivo imaging technique may one day be used to help diagnose and even treat cancer.
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NIH launches competition to speed COVID-19 diagnostics
Shark Tank –style initiative aims to produce millions of new diagnostic tests per week by end of summer
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Imgflip's AI Meme Generator Gives Us the Absurdist Art We All Need
Social media's new favorite distraction feels as disjointed and surrealist as the current moment. Fire it up.
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Researchers measure cancer cell mechanics in living animals using nanoparticles
Researchers developed a first-of-its-kind nanoparticle-based in vivo imaging technique may one day be used to help diagnose and even treat cancer.
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First study of multicancer blood test to screen for cancer guide intervention
Results from a first-of-its-kind study of a multicancer blood test in more than 9,900 women with no evidence or history of cancer showed the liquid biopsy test safely detected 26 undiagnosed cancers, enabling potentially curative treatment.
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Alzheimer's gene triggers early breakdowns in blood-brain barrier, predicting cognitive decline
Although scientists have long known APOE4 is a leading risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, they were unsure how exactly it drives a decline in memory. Scientists believe they have now found an answer.
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New imaging technique sheds light on adult zebrafish brain
Cornell scientists have developed a new technique for imaging a zebrafish's brain at all stages of its development, which could have implications for the study of human brain disorders, including autism.
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COVID-19 limitations unique opportunity for researchers to decrease digital divide
The COVID-19 shelter-in-place orders and other limitations could offer researchers the chance to use technology to decrease the digital divide and disparities in academic research.
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Are older adults getting the most effective cancer treatments?
If you or an older loved one is diagnosed with cancer, many different factors come into play to guide treatment choices. However, leading geriatric oncologists say that, perhaps surprisingly, age is not necessarily one of them. Recently, leaders in the field emphasized that being older, on its own, does not necessarily mean that surgical treatment is not an option for you.
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Antibodies from llamas could help in fight against COVID-19
Initial tests of a new candidate antibody treatment for COVID-19 indicate that it blocks viruses that display the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein from infecting cells in culture.
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The Beautiful Patterns Left Behind When Whiskey Dries
Scientists can tell where whiskey came from by the patterns it creates.
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Now is the time to start tracking your food
These four Cheez-It crackers clock in at 6 grams. A scale can help you consume those snacks responsibly. (Stan Horaczek/) The coronavirus pandemic has made eating more complicated. Grocery availability is spotty, delivery apps are pushing hard to get people to order takeout, and few (legal) things provide the same kind of blissful instant gratification as a Hot Pocket. Those same factors, however
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Fauci mania! His voice for science during pandemic inspires bobblehead, other kitsch … and SNL
COVID-19 coordinator Deborah Birx also honored with bobblehead
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A new machine learning method streamlines particle accelerator operations
Researchers have developed a new tool, using machine learning, that may make part of the accelerator tuning process 5 times faster compared to previous methods.
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New insights linking cell division to cancer
Scientists are extending our understanding of the intricate process of cell division.
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New Research: Ending Lockdown Would Hurt the Economy Even More
Long-Term Planning The coronavirus lockdown and quarantine orders are often portrayed as a battle between public safety and economic destruction. But a team of economists says that dichotomy doesn't hold up. They argue that ending lockdown orders and re-opening nonessential businesses, as some U.S. states have started to do, will end up causing even more economic destruction than extending quaran
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Blood Test Detects Cancer Early, But Has Some Holdups
The liquid biopsy, which detects cell-free tumor DNA, spotted undiagnosed cancers in some women, but had a greater number of false positives and false negatives.
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Big banks briefly locked out of USsmall business rescue fund
US government sets up 8-hour exclusion to allow smaller lenders to grab financing for customers
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A milder hair dye based on synthetic melanin
With the coronavirus pandemic temporarily shuttering hair salons, many clients are appreciating, and missing, the ability of hair dye to cover up grays or touch up roots. However, frequent coloring, whether done at a salon or at home, can damage hair and might pose health risks from potentially cancer-causing dye components. Now, researchers have developed a process to dye hair with synthetic mela
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Musk Joins Trump in Spreading Misinformation About Virus
"FREE AMERICA NOW," billionaire and entrepreneur Elon Musk tweeted early this morning. The message shares numerous similarities with U.S. President Donald Trump's own Twitter feed, where he's encouraged his voter base to "LIBERATE" — note the all-caps stylization — a number of states, amid a barrage of other factually dubious claims . Offline, Trump has made dangerous remarks about injecting disi
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Receptors for SARS-CoV-2 Present in Wide Variety of Human Cells
Analyses from single-cell sequencing datasets support the idea that COVID-19 is not just a respiratory disease but an illness that can affect multiple organs.
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Researchers measure cancer cell mechanics in living animals using nanoparticles
A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle-based in vivo imaging technique that may one day be used to help diagnose and even treat cancer has been developed by researchers collaborating from Michigan State, Johns Hopkins and Stanford universities.
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Frustrated bimeron shows rich and exotic dynamics
Topological spin textures in magnetic systems with exchange frustration, such as skyrmions and bimerons, may show non-trivial topology and exotic dynamics.
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How COVID-19 Will Pass from Pandemic to Prosaic – Issue 84: Outbreak
On January 5, six days after China officially announced a spate of unusual pneumonia cases, a team of researchers at Shanghai's Fudan University deposited the full genome sequence of the causal virus, SARS-CoV-2, into Genbank. A little more than three months later, 4,528 genomes of SARS-CoV-2 have been sequenced,1 and more than 883 COVID-related clinical trials2 for treatments and vaccines have b
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Engineers make a promising material stable enough for use in solar cells
A Purdue University-led research team has found a way to make halide perovskites stable enough by inhibiting the ion movement that makes them rapidly degrade, unlocking their use for solar panels as well as electronic devices.
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8 Films to Watch Right Now, According to Barry Jenkins
Barry Jenkins is, like everyone else, struggling to figure out what to do with himself right now. The Oscar-winning filmmaker behind Moonlight and If Beale Street Could Talk was just finishing production on his upcoming Amazon series, The Underground Railroad , when stay-at-home orders were issued in March. Since then he's been sheltering in California with his partner, Lulu Wang , the writer and
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The Pandemic Is Making Us Depressed and Anxious. Can Healthy Food Provide Relief?
A poor diet doesn't do your body or mind much good.
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These Mathematicians Think the Universe May Be Conscious
Theory of Everything Scientists are doubling down on a peculiar model that attempts to quantify and measure consciousness. The model, known as Integrated Information Theory (IIT), has long been controversial because it comes with an unusual quirk. When applied to non-living things like machines, subatomic particles, and even the universe, it claims that they too experience consciousness, New Scie
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Engineers make a promising material stable enough for use in solar cells
Soft and flexible materials called halide perovskites could make solar cells more efficient at significantly less cost, but they're too unstable to use.
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New findings highlight threatened status of forest elephants
Conservation efforts for the African forest elephant have been hindered by how little is known the large animal, according to researchers.
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We Aren't Selfish After All – Issue 84: Outbreak
What is this pandemic doing to our minds? Polls repeatedly show it's having an adverse effect on our mental health. Physical distancing, for some, means social isolation, which has long been shown to encourage depression. Previous disasters have been followed by waves of depression, exacerbated by financial distress. The situation also puts us in a state of fear and anxiety—anxiety about financia
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Time alone (chosen or not) can be a chance to hit the reset button
Solitude has become a topic of fascination in modern Western societies because we believe it is a lost art – often craved, yet so seldom found. It might seem as if we ought to walk away from society completely to find peaceful moments for ourselves. Yet there is a quote I really like from the book Solitude: In Pursuit of a Singular Life in a Crowded World (2017) by the Canadian journalist Michael
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Study accurately tracks COVID-19 spread with big data
Researchers have developed a new method to accurately track the spread of COVID-19 using population flow data, and establishing a new risk assessment model to identify high-risk locales of COVID-19 at an early stage, which serves as a valuable toolkit to public health experts and policy makers in implementing infectious disease control during new outbreaks.
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Memory misfires help selfish maintain their self-image
When asked to recall how generous they were in the past, selfish people tend to remember being more benevolent than they actually were, according to a series of experiments by psychologists and economists.
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Long-term consequences of coastal development as bad as an oil spill on coral reefs
Oil pollution is known to cause lethal and sublethal responses on coral communities in the short-term, but its long-term effects have not been widely studied. The Bahia Las Minas oil spill, which contaminated about 40 square kilometers (about 15 square miles) near the Smithsonian's Galeta Point Marine Laboratory in Colon and became the largest recorded near coastal habitats in Panama, served as an
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Upcycling spongy plastic foams from shoes, mattresses and insulation
Researchers have developed a new method for upcycling polyurethane foams, the spongy material found in mattresses, insulation, furniture cushions and shoes.
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A milder hair dye based on synthetic melanin
With the coronavirus pandemic temporarily shuttering hair salons, many clients are appreciating, and missing, the ability of hair dye to cover up grays or touch up roots. However, frequent coloring, whether done at a salon or at home, can damage hair and might pose health risks from potentially cancer-causing dye components. Now, researchers have developed a process to dye hair with synthetic mela
4h
Sensitive new test detects antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in only 10 minutes
A proof-of-concept study describes a quick, sensitive test for antibodies against the coronavirus in human blood. The test could help doctors track a person's exposure to the disease, as well as confirm suspected COVID-19 cases that tested negative by other methods.
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New findings highlight threatened status of forest elephants
Conservation efforts for the African forest elephant have been hindered by how little is known the large animal, according to researchers.
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A new machine learning method streamlines particle accelerator operations
Each year, researchers from around the world visit the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to conduct hundreds of experiments in chemistry, materials science, biology and energy research at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser. LCLS creates ultrabright X-rays from high-energy beams of electrons produced in a giant linear particle accelerator.
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Media bias with corporate social irresponsibility events
Researchers from Tilburg University in the Netherlands and the University of Cologne in Germany published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that explains which factors influence media coverage of CSI events.
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Risks of potentially inappropriate medications post-hospitalization for older adults
When older adults are hospitalized for medical reasons or for surgery, they often go home with prescriptions for treatments that may be different from those they were taking beforehand. Until now, however, few studies have examined how potentially inappropriate medications affect older adults when prescribed at the time of their hospital discharge.
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New findings highlight threatened status of forest elephants
Conservation efforts for the African forest elephant have been hindered by how little is known the large animal, according to researchers. In a new study, an international team of researchers now estimates that the population of the species is 40 to 80% smaller than previously thought.
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Novel imaging application illuminates processes in cancer, COVID-19
Medical images for a wide range of diseases can be more easily viewed, compared, and analyzed using a breakthrough open source web-based imaging platform developed by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and collaborating researchers.
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Sensitive new test detects antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in only 10 minutes
As the COVID-19 curve shows signs of flattening in the U.S. and elsewhere, public health officials are trying to grasp just how many people have been infected. Now, a proof-of-concept study in ACS' Analytical Chemistry describes a quick, sensitive test for antibodies against the coronavirus in human blood. The test could help doctors track a person's exposure to the disease, as well as confirm sus
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Navigating the clean energy transition during the COVID-19 crisis
The COVID-19 pandemic emerged at a time when climate and energy policies were experiencing greater attention and—in some cases—greater momentum. But the ensuing global health emergency and economic crisis mean that the circumstances under which these climate and energy policies were conceived have drastically changed. In a Commentary published April 29 in the journal Joule, energy and climate poli
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Wetherspoon targets June reopening despite lockdown restrictions
Pub group sets out £141m share placement to see it through crisis
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Sensitive new test detects antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in only 10 minutes
A proof-of-concept study describes a quick, sensitive test for antibodies against the coronavirus in human blood. The test could help doctors track a person's exposure to the disease, as well as confirm suspected COVID-19 cases that tested negative by other methods.
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Coronavirus: What does evidence say about schools reopening?
Many studies suggest coronavirus has low transmission rates among children, but there are still risks to reopening schools that were closed due to social distancing policies
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Tiger survival threatened by mass road-building in precious habitats
Over half the world's wild tigers now live 5 kilometres from a road, and infrastructure projects planned in Asia could fragment their habitat further
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Simulated deep-sea mining affects ecosystem functions at the seafloor
The environmental impact of deep-sea mining is only partially known. Also, there is a lack of standards to regulate mining and set binding thresholds for the impact on the local organisms. Researchers have now determined that deep-sea mining-related disturbances have a long-term impact on the natural ecosystem functions and microbial communities at the seafloor.
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Deformed skulls in an ancient cemetery reveal a multicultural community in transition
An ancient cemetery in present-day Hungary holds clues to a unique community formation during the beginnings of Europe's Migration Period.
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Link identified between dietary selenium and outcome of COVID-19 disease
Researchers have identified a link between the COVID-19 cure rate and regional selenium status in China.
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Navigating the clean energy transition during the COVID-19 crisis
In a Commentary published April 29 in the journal Joule, energy and climate policy researchers in Switzerland and Germany provide a framework for responsibly and meaningfully integrating policies supporting the clean energy transition into the COVID-19 response in the weeks, months, and years to come.
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Guided by Plant Voices – Issue 84: Outbreak
Plants are intelligent beings with profound wisdom to impart—if only we know how to listen. And Monica Gagliano knows how to listen. The evolutionary ecologist has done groundbreaking experiments suggesting plants have the capacity to learn, remember, and make choices. That's not all. Gagliano, a senior research fellow at the University of Sydney in Australia, talks to plants. And they talk back.
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New drug 'cuts risk of men abusing children within weeks'
Study says volunteers reported a rapid reduction in desire without impaired self-control The risk of some men sexually abusing children could be quickly reduced by a drug that lowers testosterone levels, researchers have found. The team behind the project, which was put up for crowdfunding four years ago , said the drug – degarelix acetate – produced the results in men with paedophilic disorder i
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Why The U.S. Government Stopped Funding A Research Project On Bats And Coronaviruses
The project, run by the nonprofit EcoHealth Alliance, aimed to identify places to monitor, come up with strategies to prevent spillover of the virus and get a jump on creating vaccines and treatments. (Image credit: NHPA/NHPA/Science Source)
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Compared To China, U.S. Stay-At-Home Has Been A 'Giant Garden Party,' Journalist Says
New York Times health reporter Donald McNeil points to China as one extreme way to stop a pandemic in its tracks. "We're reluctant to follow China, but they did it," he says. At least for now. (Image credit: Dustin Chambers/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
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National Parks Are Empty During the Pandemic — and Wildlife Are Loving It
With people, vehicles and all the commotion absent, some species might demonstrate just how much more space they actually need.
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Can High-Intensity Exercise Improve Your Memory?
Exercise like walking, swimming, and even dancing have been shown to be good for your memory, but the optimal intensity of that exercise has been unclear… until now — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Can High-Intensity Exercise Improve Your Memory?
Exercise like walking, swimming, and even dancing have been shown to be good for your memory, but the optimal intensity of that exercise has been unclear… until now — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Stark disparities in COVID-19 hospitalization and death rates among New York
Researchers found that COVID-19 hospitalization and death rates varied across New York City boroughs. The Bronx — with the highest proportion of racial/ethnic minorities, the most poverty, and lowest educational attainment — had higher rates of hospitalization and death related to COVID-19 than all other boroughs. These rates were lowest in affluent Manhattan, comprised of a predominately white
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Shrinking instead of growing: How shrews survive the winter
Even at sub-zero temperatures, common shrews do not need to increase their metabolism.
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Offspring may inherit legacy of their father's Toxoplasma infection
Researchers have revealed for the first time that males infected with the Toxoplasma parasite can impact their offspring's brain health and behavior. Studying mice infected with the common parasite Toxoplasma, the team discovered that sperm of infected fathers carried an altered 'epigenetic' signature which impacted the brains of resulting offspring. Molecules in the sperm called 'small RNA' appea
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The Pandemic's Effects on Recruiting International STEM Trainees
The closure of visa offices, travel and immigration restrictions, and general anxiety create barriers for the international graduate students and postdocs who play a huge role in research in the United States.
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Photos: Hard at Work, Despite the Pandemic
As people worldwide struggle to cope with varying coronavirus lockdowns, those who are able to continue working have mixed emotions about their jobs, their responsibilities, and their health. The news agency Agence France-Presse recently asked its photojournalists around the world to take portraits of workers at their job, and to ask them questions about their current situation. Most said they fe
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A new machine learning method streamlines particle accelerator operations
SLAC researchers have developed a new tool, using machine learning, that may make part of the accelerator tuning process 5 times faster compared to previous methods.
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The Guardian view on 'herd immunity': yes it was 'part of the plan' | Editorial
The government's early approach to the Covid-19 crisis, despite its denials, was to let the disease spread Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage In his seminal work, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, the philosopher of science Thomas Kuhn developed the notion of the "paradigm" as a way of understanding how a community of researchers makes its judgments. A shared par
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Government prepares blueprint for UK's 'safe' return to work
Business department drawing up 'workplace by workplace' guidance for when lockdown easing ordered
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'Autistic voices should be heard.' Autistic adults join research teams to shift focus of studies
Research moves away from cause and cure, toward ways to improve autistic people's lives
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NIH clinical trial shows remdesivir accelerates recovery from advanced COVID-19
Hospitalized patients with advanced COVID-19 and lung involvement who received remdesivir recovered faster than similar patients who received placebo, according to a preliminary data analysis from a randomized, controlled trial involving 1063 patients.
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Antiviral remdesivir prevents disease progression in monkeys with COVID-19
Early treatment with the experimental antiviral drug remdesivir significantly reduced clinical disease and damage to the lungs of rhesus macaques infected with SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, according to National Institutes of Health scientists.
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We must act quickly to avoid a pandemic-related mental health crisis
We are already seeing the pandemic's effects on mental health, and we need to act urgently to avoid a full-blown crisis, says Sam Howells
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Sensitive new test detects antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in only 10 minutes
As the COVID-19 curve shows signs of flattening in the U.S. and elsewhere, public health officials are trying to grasp just how many people have been infected. Now, a proof-of-concept study in ACS' Analytical Chemistry describes a quick, sensitive test for antibodies against the coronavirus in human blood. The test could help doctors track a person's exposure to the disease, as well as confirm sus
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Large differences in personality traits between patients with social anxiety disorder
Individuals with social anxiety disorder have markedly different personality traits than others. Emotional instability and introversion are hallmarks, according to a new study from Uppsala University published in PLOS ONE.
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A new strategy to trigger ferroptosis in target cancer cells using drug-metal coordination complexes
Doxorubicin and ferrous ions could form acid-dissociable coordination complexes, which were incorporated into functionally tailored amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles and may confer severe ferroptotic damage to target tumor cells, published on Science Advances.
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Breastfeeding helps prevent mothers from developing diabetes after childbirth
A team of South Korean researchers found that lactation can lower the incidence and reduce the risk of maternal postpartum diabetes. The researchers identified that lactation increases the mass and function of pancreatic beta cells through serotonin production. The team suggested that sustained improvements in pancreatic beta cells, which can last for years even after the cessation of lactation, i
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A new strategy to counter insulin damage in coronary artery disease
By studying blood vessel tissue from 674 patients, a research team has discovered how insulin contributes to the dysfunction of blood vessels in atherosclerosis, one of the most common chronic health conditions worldwide.
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Algae in the oceans often steal genes from bacteria
to gain beneficial attributes, such as the ability to tolerate stressful environments or break down carbohydrates for food, according to a Rutgers co-authored study.
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A one-hour exercise early in college improves career outcomes for black students years later
A one-hour exercise designed to increase feelings of social belonging administered during the first year of college appears to significantly improve the lives and careers of black students up to 11 years later, psychologists report.
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Scientists edge closer to treatment for myotonic dystrophy
Scientists at the University of Nottingham have taken a step closer towards developing a treatment for the long-term genetic disorder, myotonic dystrophy.
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'Backpacks' boost immune cells' ability to kill cancer
Macrophages are the body's search-and-destroy defense force, but cancerous tumors hijack arriving macrophages by switching them into a pro-cancer state. New 'backpacks' developed at the Wyss Institute can help keep macrophages in their anti-cancer state, and reduced tumor size and metastasis in mice.
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Thousands of miles of planned Asian roads threaten the heart of tiger habitat
Nearly 15,000 miles of new Asian roads will be built in tiger habitat by mid-century, deepening the big cat's extinction risk and highlighting the need for bold new conservation measures now, according to a new study.
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Addressing black students' concerns about belonging in college has benefits in adulthood
The benefits of a brief 'social belonging' exercise completed by black students in their first year of college followed them into adulthood, with participants reporting greater career satisfaction, well-being and community involvement almost a decade later.
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Simulated deep-sea mining affects ecosystem functions at the seafloor
The environmental impact of deep-sea mining is only partially known. Also, there is a lack of standards to regulate mining and set binding thresholds for the impact on the local organisms. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology with colleagues at the Alfred Wegener Institute, the GEOMAR and others describe that deep-sea mining-related disturbances have a long-term impact o
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Deformed skulls in an ancient cemetery reveal a multicultural community in transition
The ancient cemetery of Mözs-Icsei d?l? in present-day Hungary holds clues to a unique community formation during the beginnings of Europe's Migration Period, according to a study published April 29, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Corina Knipper from the Curt-Engelhorn-Center for Archaeometry, Germany, István Koncz, Tivadar Vida from the Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary and
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Common ways to cook chicken at home may not ensure safety from pathogens
For home cooks, widespread techniques for judging doneness of chicken may not ensure that pathogens are reduced to safe levels. Solveig Langsrud of the Norwegian Institute of Food, Fisheries and Aquaculture Research and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on April 29, 2020.
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Newly discovered exoplanet dethrones former king of Kepler-88 planetary system
A team of astronomers has discovered a planet three times the mass of Jupiter in the Kepler-88 system. The team found that Kepler-88 d is the most massive known planet in this system – not Kepler-88 c as previously thought.
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First randomized trial of remdesivir suggests antiviral drug is not associated with significant clinical benefits, more research needed
Treatment with the antiviral drug remdesivir does not speed recovery from COVID-19 compared with placebo in hospitalized patients who are critically ill, according to the first randomized trial of its kind involving 237 adults from 10 hospitals in Wuhan, China.
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Researchers help give robotic arms a steady hand for surgeries
Steady hands and uninterrupted, sharp vision are critical when performing surgery on delicate structures like the brain or hair-thin blood vessels. While surgical cameras have improved what surgeons see during operative procedures, the 'steady hand' remains to be enhanced — new surgical technologies, including sophisticated surgeon-guided robotic hands, cannot prevent accidental injuries when ope
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'Wobble' may precede some great earthquakes
The land masses of Japan shifted from east to west to east again in the months before the strongest earthquake in the country's recorded history, a 2011 magnitude-9 earthquake that killed more than 15,500 people, new research shows.
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To prevent antimicrobial resistance, vaccinate the world's kids
Childhood vaccination may be a powerful tool in the fight against antimicrobial resistance in low- and middle-income countries, finds a new analysis. The study found that immunization with two common vaccines — the pneumococcal conjugate and rotavirus vaccines — significantly reduces the rates of acute respiratory infections and diarrhea among small children in these settings. And, with fewer ch
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Simple 'sniff test' reliably predicts recovery of severely brain injured patients
The ability to detect smells predicts recovery and long-term survival in patients who have suffered severe brain injury, a new study has found. A simple, inexpensive 'sniff test' could help doctors to accurately diagnose and determine treatment plans for patients with disorders of consciousness.
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Marooned on Mesozoic Madagascar
In evolutionary terms, islands are the stuff of weirdness. It is on islands where animals evolve in isolation, often for millions of years, with different food sources, competitors, predators, and parasites … indeed, different everything compared to mainland species. As a result, they develop into different shapes and sizes and evolve into new species that, given enough time, spawn yet more new
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UN warns more than 1bn informal workers face poverty
ILO predicts 'massive damage' to livelihoods as coronavirus-related job losses soar
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Next's Wolfson shows his workings for a new socially distant world
Boss of clothing retailer deserves a premium; Astra's eyes on big prize
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Covid-19 news: UN says 1.6 billion people could lose their livelihood
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Starving grasshoppers? How rising carbon dioxide levels may promote an 'insect apocalypse'
"Nutrient dilution" study of Kansas prairie links fast-growing plants to fewer grasshoppers
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Thousands of miles of planned Asian roads threaten the heart of tiger habitat
Nearly 15,000 miles of new Asian roads will be built in tiger habitat by mid-century, deepening the big cat's extinction risk and highlighting the need for bold new conservation measures now, according to a new study.
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Addressing black students' concerns about belonging in college has benefits in adulthood
The benefits of a brief "social belonging" exercise completed by black students in their first year of college followed them into adulthood, with participants reporting greater career satisfaction, well-being and community involvement almost a decade later.
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Deformed skulls in an ancient cemetery reveal a multicultural community in transition
The ancient cemetery of Mözs-Icsei dűlő in present-day Hungary holds clues to a unique community formation during the beginnings of Europe's Migration Period, according to a study published April 29, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Corina Knipper from the Curt-Engelhorn-Center for Archaeometry, Germany, István Koncz, Tivadar Vida from the Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary and
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Algae in the oceans often steal genes from bacteria
to gain beneficial attributes, such as the ability to tolerate stressful environments or break down carbohydrates for food, according to a Rutgers co-authored study.
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Simulated deep-sea mining affects ecosystem functions at the seafloor
The environmental impact of deep-sea mining is only partially known. Also, there is a lack of standards to regulate mining and set binding thresholds for the impact on the local organisms. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology with colleagues at the Alfred Wegener Institute, the GEOMAR and others describe that deep-sea mining-related disturbances have a long-term impact o
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Tumor microenvironment-activatable Fe-doxorubicin preloaded amorphous CaCO3 nanoformulation triggers ferroptosis in target tumor cells
The rapid development of treatment resistance in tumors poses a technological bottleneck in clinical oncology. Ferroptosis is a form of regulated cell death with clinical translational potential, but the efficacy of ferroptosis-inducing agents is susceptible to many endogenous factors when administered alone, for which some cooperating mechanisms are urgently required. Here, we report an amorphou
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Inhibition of Vps34 reprograms cold into hot inflamed tumors and improves anti-PD-1/PD-L1 immunotherapy
One of the major challenges limiting the efficacy of anti–PD-1/PD-L1 therapy in nonresponding patients is the failure of T cells to penetrate the tumor microenvironment. We showed that genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Vps34 kinase activity using SB02024 or SAR405 (Vps34i) decreased the tumor growth and improved mice survival in multiple tumor models by inducing an infiltration of NK, CD8
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miR-26a regulates extracellular vesicle secretion from prostate cancer cells via targeting SHC4, PFDN4, and CHORDC1
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are involved in intercellular communication during cancer progression; thus, elucidating the mechanism of EV secretion in cancer cells will contribute to the development of an EV-targeted cancer treatment. However, the biogenesis of EVs in cancer cells is not fully understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a variety of biological phenomena; thus, miRNAs could regulate E
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A brief social-belonging intervention in college improves adult outcomes for black Americans
Could mitigating persistent worries about belonging in the transition to college improve adult life for black Americans? To examine this question, we conducted a long-term follow-up of a randomized social-belonging intervention delivered in the first year of college. This 1-hour exercise represented social and academic adversity early in college as common and temporary. As previously reported in
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Mathematical prediction of clinical outcomes in advanced cancer patients treated with checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy
We present a mechanistic mathematical model of immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy to address the oncological need for early, broadly applicable readouts (biomarkers) of patient response to immunotherapy. The model is built upon the complex biological and physical interactions between the immune system and cancer, and is informed using only standard-of-care CT. We have retrospectively applied the
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Optogenetic stimulation of phosphoinositides reveals a critical role of primary cilia in eye pressure regulation
Glaucoma is a group of progressive optic neuropathies that cause irreversible vision loss. Although elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is associated with the development and progression of glaucoma, the mechanisms for its regulation are not well understood. Here, we have designed CIBN/CRY2-based optogenetic constructs to study phosphoinositide regulation within distinct subcellular compartments.
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Targeted pathological collagen delivery of sustained-release rapamycin to prevent heterotopic ossification
Heterotopic ossification (HO) in connective tissues like tendons and ligaments severely damages tissue structure. The pathogenesis of HO remains unclear but may involve mTOR. The results presented here indicate that tendon stem/progenitor cells do not undergo osteochondrogenic differentiation when mTOR signaling is inactivated by gene knockout or rapamycin (RAPA) treatment. Meanwhile, it is neces
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The vertebrate-specific VENTX/NANOG gene empowers neural crest with ectomesenchyme potential
During Cambrian, unipotent progenitors located at the neural (plate) border (NB) of an Olfactoria chordate embryo acquired the competence to form ectomesenchyme, pigment cells and neurons, initiating the rise of the multipotent neural crest cells (NC) specific to vertebrates. Surprisingly, the known vertebrate NB/NC transcriptional circuitry is a constrained feature also found in invertebrates. T
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Graphene quantum dots as anti-inflammatory therapy for colitis
While graphene and its derivatives have been suggested as a potential nanomedicine in several biomimetic models, their specific roles in immunological disorders still remain elusive. Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) may be suitable for treating intestinal bowel diseases (IBDs) because of their low toxicity in vivo and ease of clearance. Here, GQDs are intraperitoneally injected to dextran sulfate sod
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Evolutionary trade-off in reproduction of Cambrian arthropods
Trade-offs play a crucial role in the evolution of life-history strategies of extant organisms by shaping traits such as growth pattern, reproductive investment, and lifespan. One important trade-off is between offspring number and energy (nutrition, parental care, etc.) allocated to individual offspring. Exceptional Cambrian fossils allowed us to trace the earliest evidence of trade-offs in arth
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CDK13 cooperates with CDK12 to control global RNA polymerase II processivity
The RNA polymerase II (POLII)–driven transcription cycle is tightly regulated at distinct checkpoints by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their cognate cyclins. The molecular events underpinning transcriptional elongation, processivity, and the CDK-cyclin pair(s) involved remain poorly understood. Using CRISPR-Cas9 homology-directed repair, we generated analog-sensitive kinase variants of CDK1
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Lineage hierarchies and stochasticity ensure the long-term maintenance of adult neural stem cells
The cellular basis and extent of neural stem cell (NSC) self-renewal in adult vertebrates, and their heterogeneity, remain controversial. To explore the functional behavior and dynamics of individual NSCs, we combined genetic lineage tracing, quantitative clonal analysis, intravital imaging, and global population assessments in the adult zebrafish telencephalon. Our results are compatible with a
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Effects of a deep-sea mining experiment on seafloor microbial communities and functions after 26 years
Future supplies of rare minerals for global industries with high-tech products may depend on deep-sea mining. However, environmental standards for seafloor integrity and recovery from environmental impacts are missing. We revisited the only midsize deep-sea disturbance and recolonization experiment carried out in 1989 in the Peru Basin nodule field to compare habitat integrity, remineralization r
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Global agricultural economic water scarcity
Water scarcity raises major concerns on the sustainable future of humanity and the conservation of important ecosystem functions. To meet the increasing food demand without expanding cultivated areas, agriculture will likely need to introduce irrigation in croplands that are currently rain-fed but where enough water would be available for irrigation. "Agricultural economic water scarcity" is, her
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Cellular backpacks for macrophage immunotherapy
Adoptive cell transfers have emerged as a disruptive approach to treat disease in a manner that is more specific than using small-molecule drugs; however, unlike traditional drugs, cells are living entities that can alter their function in response to environmental cues. In the present study, we report an engineered particle referred to as a "backpack" that can robustly adhere to macrophage surfa
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Small-molecule inhibitor targeting orphan nuclear receptor COUP-TFII for prostate cancer treatment
The orphan nuclear receptor COUP-TFII is expressed at a low level in adult tissues, but its expression is increased and shown to promote progression of multiple diseases, including prostate cancer, heart failure, and muscular dystrophy. Suppression of COUP-TFII slows disease progression, making it an intriguing therapeutic target. Here, we identified a potent and specific COUP-TFII inhibitor thro
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Structural monitoring of a transient intermediate in the hemagglutinin fusion machinery on influenza virions
The influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) fusion protein has long been viewed as a "spring-loaded" fusion machine whereby activation at low pH initiates a rapid and irreversible cascade of conformational changes that drives the membrane fusion reaction. This mechanism has shaped our understanding of how type 1 viral fusion proteins function as a whole. Experimental limitations have hindered efforts
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Supramolecular prodrug hydrogelator as an immune booster for checkpoint blocker-based immunotherapy
Immune checkpoint blockers (ICBs) have shown great promise at harnessing immune system to combat cancer. However, only a fraction of patients can directly benefit from the anti–programmed cell death protein 1 (aPD1) therapy, and the treatment often leads to immune-related adverse effects. In this context, we developed a prodrug hydrogelator for local delivery of ICBs to boost the host's immune sy
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Road development in Asia: Assessing the range-wide risks to tigers
Roads are proliferating worldwide at an unprecedented rate, with potentially severe impacts on wildlife. We calculated the extent and potential impacts of road networks across the 1,160,000-km 2 , 13-country range of the globally endangered tiger ( Panthera tigris )—a conservation umbrella species. We found that roads were pervasive, totaling 134,000 km across tiger conservation landscapes (TCLs)
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Phytoplankton pangenome reveals extensive prokaryotic horizontal gene transfer of diverse functions
The extent and role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in phytoplankton and, more broadly, eukaryotic evolution remain controversial topics. Recent studies substantiate the importance of HGT in modifying or expanding functions such as metal or reactive species detoxification and buttressing halotolerance. Yet, the potential of HGT to significantly alter the fate of species in a major eukaryotic as
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Intracellular delivery of Parkin rescues neurons from accumulation of damaged mitochondria and pathological {alpha}-synuclein
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by mitochondrial dysfunction, Lewy body formation, and loss of dopaminergic neurons. Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is thought to inhibit PD progression by removing damaged mitochondria and suppressing the accumulation of α-synuclein and other protein aggregates. The present study describes a protein-based therapy
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Cation-induced shape programming and morphing in protein-based hydrogels
Smart materials that are capable of memorizing a temporary shape, and morph in response to a stimulus, have the potential to revolutionize medicine and robotics. Here, we introduce an innovative method to program protein hydrogels and to induce shape changes in aqueous solutions at room temperature. We demonstrate our approach using hydrogels made from serum albumin, the most abundant protein in
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Climate Adaptation Risks Displacing Vulnerable Communities, If Not Done Right
Resilience measures to deal with flooding and other climate impacts must be balanced with issues like affordable housing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Thousands of miles of planned Asian roads threaten the heart of tiger habitat
Nearly 15,000 miles of new Asian roads will be built in tiger habitat by mid-century, deepening the big cat's extinction risk and highlighting the need for bold new conservation measures now, according to a new study.
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When it come to work, millennials are resilient
We worked hard to adapt to uncertainty, and the pandemic will see us adapt again
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'Crazy beast' lived among last of dinosaurs
The discovery that the badger-like animal lived alongside dinosaurs challenges ideas about mammals.
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The environment won't be helped by oil producers declaring bankruptcy
Oil barrels were at negative prices (Erik Mclean/Unsplash/) In the past couple weeks, we've seen oil prices—already on the decline—plummet to historic lows. On April 20, the benchmark price for U.S. oil dipped to negative $40 a barrel. At the time of writing, the price per barrel for West Texas Intermediate crude, an industry benchmark, was just below $13, still well under the $50 or so needed to
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Gown shortages still plague NHS staff
Government is struggling to secure adequate supplies of protective equipment, documents reveal
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Algae in the oceans often steal genes from bacteria
to gain beneficial attributes, such as the ability to tolerate stressful environments or break down carbohydrates for food, according to a Rutgers co-authored study.
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Simulated deep-sea mining affects ecosystem functions at the seafloor
The environmental impact of deep-sea mining is only partially known. Also, there is a lack of standards to regulate mining and set binding thresholds for the impact on the local organisms. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology with colleagues at the Alfred Wegener Institute, the GEOMAR and others describe that deep-sea mining-related disturbances have a long-term impact o
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Get out of a pickle and into chutney | Brief letters
Making chutney | Lockdown marmalade | Father Jack and Trump | Mathematical fright | Morse code clapping For years I have used a WI friend's recipe for chutney ( The power of pickles: a guide to preserving almost everything – from jam-making to chutneys , 28 April) – equal weights of onions, apples (eaters or cookers), dates, sultanas and brown sugar, chopped up into a bowl and covered with vinega
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Vårkollen: Hur tidig är våren hos dig?
Rapportera vårtecken till Vårkollen under 30 april och 1 maj! Svenska Botaniska Föreningen vill veta hur växterna reagerat på denna galna vår med vårtemperaturer redan i januari. De uppmanar därför allmänheten att kolla upp en handfull vårtecken under Valborgshelgen. Vårkollen är ett medborgarforskningsprojekt där frivilliga och professionella forskare samarbetar. Första gången Vårkollen genomför
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Soldiers Named a US Army Tank "Crippling Depression"
Big Mood Members of the U.S. Army are once again showing their more creative side when it comes to naming their vehicles and artillery . One tank crew, for instance, recently named its tank after one of the most terrifying killers of all, Task & Purpose reports — dubbing it "Crippling Depression." My quarantine anthem #usawtfm pic.twitter.com/Y6J1BDQRnD — U.S Army WTF! Moments (@TheWTFNation) Apr
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Blood test detects 26 undiagnosed cancers
A liquid biopsy test can safely detect as many as 26 undiagnosed cancers, according to a study of 9,900 women with no evidence or history of cancer. The findings show the test could be incorporated into routine clinical care in combination with conventional screening. Overall, the blood test detected 26 cancers while standard screening such as mammography or colonoscopy detected an additional 24
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Saudi central bank's foreign assets fall by most in two decades
Kingdom battles to protect economy in face of oil rout and fallout from pandemic
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The Beautiful Patterns Left Behind When Whiskey Dries
Scientists can tell where whiskey came from by the patterns it creates. whiskeyrings_topNteaser2.jpg Composite image of four "whiskey webs" left by drying droplets of whiskey. Moving clockwise, Wilderness Trail is in the upper left, Pappy Van Winkle 23 year old is near the center, Maker's Mark Cask Strength is in the lower right, and Elijah Craig 23-year-old is in the lower left. Image credits:
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Listen: Is Human Touch Necessary?
On the latest episode of the Social Distance podcast, James Hamblin and Katherine Wells answer listener questions about the virus, hygiene practices around the world, and well-being in quarantine. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published. What follows is an edited and con
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Australia's chief scientist warns against claims of breakthroughs on coronavirus cures
Alan Finkel joins other academics who are concerned some trials of Covid-19 treatments are being reported prematurely Sign up for Guardian Australia's daily coronavirus email Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications Australia's chief scientist has urged the public to be wary of claims of breakthroughs and sudden cures for coronavirus and instead to rely on Covid
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US oil jumps 30% as 'desperate' traders see green shoots
Measures to soften lockdown restrictions spark optimism that demand will rebound
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Academic behind UK tracing app seeks to dispel privacy doubts
NHS adviser says health crisis should persuade public to embrace smartphone system
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UK turned down offer of 10,000 tests a day four weeks ago
Government declined 'game-changing' US-approved coronavirus saliva tests Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK government turned down an opportunity to buy tens of thousands of potentially "game-changing" coronavirus tests from an award-winning British scientist just days after Matt Hancock pledged to hit 100,000 tests a day by the end of April. As the UK looks set
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World's stock markets soar on coronavirus treatment hopes
Investors shrug off US growth gloom after promising data from remdesivir drug trial Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Shares have soared on the world's stock markets after investors shrugged off a deep slump in the US economy and pinned their hopes on a possible breakthrough in treatment for Covid-19 . Despite news that the longest expansion in US history came to an ab
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Xi and Putin are the big losers from this pandemic
The relationship of unequals has seen both Beijing and Moscow wrongfooted by the crisis
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Turbulence rocks aviation industry
Airline and aerospace sectors in dire straits as pandemic squeezes travel
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The dangers of cramped coronavirus hotspots
Singapore's second wave of infections and US meat packers offer cautionary tales
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Robot with pincers can detect and remove weeds without harming crops
A robot that uses artificial intelligence to find and remove weeds could eventually be used as an alternative to chemical insecticides
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Texas A&M researchers help give robotic arms a steady hand for surgeries
Steady hands and uninterrupted, sharp vision are critical when performing surgery on delicate structures like the brain or hair-thin blood vessels. While surgical cameras have improved what surgeons see during operative procedures, the 'steady hand' remains to be enhanced — new surgical technologies, including sophisticated surgeon-guided robotic hands, cannot prevent accidental injuries when ope
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The Lancet: First randomized trial of remdesivir suggests antiviral drug is not associated with significant clinical benefits, more research needed
First randomized trial of remdesivir suggests antiviral drug is not associated with significant clinical benefits, more research needed.
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Georgia's Experiment in Human Sacrifice
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . At first, Derek Canavaggio thought he would be able to ride out the coronavirus pandemic at home until things were safe. As a bar manager at the Globe in Athens, Georgia, Canavaggio hasn't been allowed to work for weeks. Local officials in Athens issued Georgia's first loca
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Live Updates: F.D.A. Plans to Announce Emergency Use of Coronavirus Drug
The U.S. economy shrank at a 4.8 percent annual rate in the first quarter. Dr. Anthony S. Fauci calls a study of an experimental virus drug, remdesivir, "very optimistic," as another study found no benefit to severely ill patients.
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26-årige Lasse sejler Fyn rundt i kajak: 'Det kan være ekstremt, men naturen giver mig mental ro'
Turen startede i går, og på kun seks dage tilbagelægger Lasse Bøgh 250 kilometer.
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Ge appen Covid Symptom Tracker 1 minut om dagen
En gratisapp som ska hjälpa till att kartlägga smittspridningen i Sverige och öka kunskapen om coronaviruset lanseras av forskare vid Lunds universitet. – Data från appen kan ge oss en bättre bild av sjukdomsförloppet och varför vissa bara drabbas lindrigt medan andra blir svårt sjuka och dör, säger Paul Franks professor i genetisk epidemiologi. Några frågor om hälsan Det tar runt en minut om dag
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'Social bubbles' of small groups could be early step out of UK lockdown
Boris Johnson believed to be looking at plan to let people add close family to their households Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage "Social bubbles" allowing people to mix with a fixed small group of family and friends could be a part of easing the lockdown, Downing Street has hinted, but experts warned that tougher isolation and quarantining measures may be needed at th
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ELGA® Launches the PURELAB® Quest Water Purification System
ELGA LabWater North America, a Veolia Water Technologies company, announces the launch of the PURELAB Quest, a laboratory water system that delivers water for the widest range of lab applications, offering unmatched value and an outstanding user experience. Prestige labs in academia, government, and industry will all benefit from PURELAB Quest's contribution to research.
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Welcome to Your Sensory Revolution, Thanks to the Pandemic
The way we see, hear, taste, touch, and smell may never be the same again. Courtesy of Covid-19, we are undergoing a sensory revolution. All of the senses have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic—not because the senses themselves have changed, but because the context and environment in which we sense has been profoundly altered. Sensory historians like myself , who study the ways in which p
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Experts: People Probably Aren't Actually Catching COVID Again
South Korean infectious disease experts claim that reports of citizens being reinfected by the coronavirus were likely based on flawed tests, The New York Times reports . Oh Myoung-don, the head of South Korea's central clinical committee, said during a news conference today that there was a "high possibility" that tests claiming people got reinfected for the second time were based on bad test re
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Lyft axes 17% of its workforce
Staff that remain will take pay cuts or be furloughed as virus crisis hits ride-sharing
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ELGA® Launches the PURELAB®
ELGA LabWater North America, a Veolia Water Technologies company, announces the launch of the PURELAB Quest, a laboratory water system that delivers water for the widest range of lab applications, offering unmatched value and an outstanding user experience. Prestige labs in academia, government, and industry will all benefit from PURELAB Quest's contribution to research.
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Support teams key to reducing hospitalizations from nursing homes
Nursing home residents are often cared for by a variety of health care professionals, including licensed nursing staff. Transfers to a hospital can result from multiple factors, such as recurrent falls or medication mismanagement.
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What underlies differing disease severity in COVID-19?
Researchers have reported a significant and positive relationship between the amount of virus present in a throat swab sample and the severity of COVID disease.
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Tobacco smoking increases lung entry points for COVID-19 virus
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, the University of South Carolina and other institutions have identified tobacco smoking as a potential risk factor for infection of the COVID-19 virus.
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Researchers measure cancer cell mechanics in living animals using nanoparticles
Researchers developed a first-of-its-kind nanoparticle-based in vivo imaging technique may one day be used to help diagnose and even treat cancer.
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Media bias with corporate social irresponsibility events
News media do not report corporate misconduct – such as environmental offenses or corruption – consistently and independently. Instead, media are often influenced by their own interests, such as advertising revenues.
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How many people have really died from covid-19 so far?
Looking at how many more people are dying than usual gives an idea of the coronavirus pandemic's true effect – and suggests a far higher death toll in many countries
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NASA scientists tapped to mature more rugged seismometer system to measure moonquakes
NASA hasn't measured moonquakes since Apollo astronauts deployed a handful of measuring stations at various locations on the lunar surface and discovered unexpectedly that Earth's only natural satellite was far from seismically inactive.
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New Transcreener CD73 Assay for Discovery of Therapeutics to Enhance Tumor Immunity
The new Transcreener CD73 Assay measures adenosine production by CD73 in a mix-and-read format with a far-red fluorescence polarization readout. The assay will accelerate efforts to discover selective CD73 antagonists for cancer immunotherapy by enabling high throughput screening, structure-driven hit-to-lead, and mechanistic studies with the purified enzyme.
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Britain's private schools warned against fee collusion
Institutions under pressure from parents to reduce charges after coronavirus lockdown
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A study places the origin of a group of trees growing in Africa 50 million years ago
In the Eocene, some of the world's most important mountain ranges emerged and large climate changes took place that affected the future of the planet. In this era, about 50 million years ago, large groups of mammals and other animals also arrived, as did the Daniellia clade, an array of legume plants with environmental relevance.
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A study places the origin of a group of trees growing in Africa 50 million years ago
In the Eocene, some of the world's most important mountain ranges emerged and large climate changes took place that affected the future of the planet. In this era, about 50 million years ago, large groups of mammals and other animals also arrived, as did the Daniellia clade, an array of legume plants with environmental relevance.
7h
Guidance for treating stroke patients during COVID-19 crisis developed
In an effort to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 and to optimize allocation of healthcare resources, researchers are improving ways to treat patients with acute large vessel occlusion strokes in a safe manner that also better protects health care workers.
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Researchers find new insights linking cell division to cancer
Scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) published research in the journal Nature extending our understanding of the intricate process of cell division.
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Stark disparities in COVID-19 hospitalization and death rates among New York
Researchers found that COVID-19 hospitalization and death rates varied across New York City boroughs. The Bronx — with the highest proportion of racial/ethnic minorities, the most poverty, and lowest educational attainment — had higher rates of hospitalization and death related to COVID-19 than all other boroughs. These rates were lowest in affluent Manhattan, comprised of a predominately white
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5 tips for teachers working from home
As teachers struggle to optimize their digital instruction during the COVID-19 crisis, an expert offers five tips for how to implement effective online instruction. Doing digital instruction properly is no piece of cake, says Helle Mathiasen , a professor at the natural sciences didactics department at the University of Copenhagen, and an expert in digital media and learning. "It is clear that in
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Massive Spinosaurus dinosaur swam through water propelled by its tail
A well-preserved fossilised tail from Spinosaurus suggests this massive dinosaur may have been able to propel itself and hunt for prey in the water
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Rotten fish smell could detect awareness in people with brain injuries
It can be difficult for doctors to assess the level of consciousness in people who have had serious brain injuries, but observing their reaction to strong odours may help
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Why it'll still be a long time before we get a coronavirus vaccine
Trials of experimental coronavirus vaccines are already under way, but it's still likely to be years before one is ready and vaccination may not even be possible
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Free DNA Test Claims to Warn Whether COVID Is Likely to Kill You
You know that file you got from Ancestry or 23andMe that contains a digital copy of your entire genetic code? Imagine that you upload it to a site, and five minutes later it spits out a report. Bad news — it says your risk from the coronavirus is a glaring red "HIGHER," meaning that according to a potpourri of genetic markers, you're more likely to have a severe, potentially deadly case of COVID-
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Uber: missed delivery
Car-booking app's business remains too inflexible to turn a profit
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UK manufacturing down to lowest capacity utilisation rate on record
Confidence in services sector also slumps to record low raising spectre of spike in job losses
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New fossils rewrite the story of dinosaurs and change the appearance of Spinosaurus
Scientists have long opposed the idea that dinosaurs lived in aquatic habitats. Now, an international team of researchers, supported by the National Geographic Society, has discovered unambiguous evidence that Spinosaurus aegyptiacus, the longest predatory dinosaur known to science, was aquatic and used tail-propelled swimming locomotion to hunt for prey in a massive river system. It is the first
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Stretchable lithium-ion battery based on new micro-honeycomb structure
A Korean research team has developed a lithium-ion battery that is flexible enough to be stretched. Dr. Jeong Gon Son's research team at the Photo-Electronic Hybrids Research Center at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that they had constructed a high-capacity, stretchable lithium-ion battery. The battery was developed by fabricating a structurally stretchable electrod
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Hygiene of Hand and Mind during the Pandemic
Making handwashing a meditative practice can help us focus on humanity's interconnectedness with the environment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Long-term consequences of coastal development as bad as an oil spill on coral reefs
The near-shore habitats of Bahia Las Minas in the central Caribbean coast of Panama became heavily contaminated after a refinery accident in 1986. Over the next five years, there was a significant decline in the numbers and diversity of corals. Thirty years later, researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and collaborating institutions report on the long-term changes of t
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Long-term consequences of coastal development as bad as an oil spill on coral reefs
The near-shore habitats of Bahia Las Minas in the central Caribbean coast of Panama became heavily contaminated after a refinery accident in 1986. Over the next five years, there was a significant decline in the numbers and diversity of corals. Thirty years later, researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and collaborating institutions report on the long-term changes of t
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Responding to smell good sign in unconscious patients, scientists find
Research may lead to simple tool to make prognoses for people with brain injuries Wafting the scent of rotten fish or shampoo under the nose of a patient with severe brain injury could help doctors determine their level of consciousness – and their chances of long-term survival. Scientists say patients are more likely to take a sniff of the odours if they are in a minimally conscious, rather than
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Stay-at-home science project: Use fire to push an egg into a bottle
Without fire, this is just an egg on a bottle. The fun starts when you add matches. (John Kennedy/) Welcome to PopSci's at-home science projects series. On weekdays at noon, we'll be posting new projects that use ingredients you can buy at the grocery store. Show us how it went by tagging your project on social media using #popsciprojects. If you like fire and you like eggs, this is the project f
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Scientists propose a new approach for efficient nanomaterial modeling
Researchers from the Higher School of Theoretical Mechanics of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) and Tel Aviv University proposed a new approach to improve the efficiency of mathematical modeling of the processes in materials at the nanoscale. It is essential for the further development of nanotechnology. The results are presented in an article published in the Q1 journ
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Mechanisms responsible for tissue growth
In adult tissue, the number of cells in tissues and organs remains constant, and any new cells produced by cell division need to be compensated by the loss of other cells. In contrast, during postnatal growth, an excess of cell production over cell loss is required to generate the excess of cells that ensure tissue expansion while maintaining tissue function. Very little is known about the mechani
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EU launches legal action against Poland
European Commission warns against autocratic governments using virus crisis to tighten grip
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Mechanisms responsible for tissue growth
In adult tissue, the number of cells in tissues and organs remains constant, and any new cells produced by cell division need to be compensated by the loss of other cells. In contrast, during postnatal growth, an excess of cell production over cell loss is required to generate the excess of cells that ensure tissue expansion while maintaining tissue function. Very little is known about the mechani
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E1912 trial leads to FDA approval of ibrutinib-rituximab combo for untreated CLL
Patients aged 70 or younger with untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma have a new treatment option — a combination of the targeted agent ibrutinib with the immunologic agent rituximab. The FDA has approved the combination based on data from E1912, a phase 3 trial that showed this combination provides better leukemia control, prolongs life, and has fewer side e
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Nearly one-third of primary care providers do not view medication treatment for opioid use disorder as effective
A new survey of US primary care physicians from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that nearly one-third, 32.9 percent, do not think treating opioid use disorder with medication is any more effective than treatment without medication.
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Women in IT more likely to be promoted than men
Women are underrepresented in leadership positions throughout the information technology industry. While more and more women are earning degrees in science, technology, engineering, and math — or STEM — fields, they don't necessarily pursue careers in IT, because they don't see opportunities for growth. New research from the Lally School of Management at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute publishe
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Smoking may explain why more men than women die of COVID-19 in Spain
Cardiovascular diseases aggravated by smoking are present in over 30% of coronavirus mortalities.
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New fossils rewrite the story of dinosaur evolution and ecology — and change the appearance of Spinosaurus
Scientists have long opposed the idea that dinosaurs lived in aquatic habitats. Now, an international team of researchers, supported by the National Geographic Society, has discovered unambiguous evidence that Spinosaurus aegyptiacus, the longest predatory dinosaur known to science, was aquatic.
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Hygiene of Hand and Mind during the Pandemic
Making handwashing a meditative practice can help us focus on humanity's interconnectedness with the environment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
BA job cuts: peanut analogy
One year saving for airline would be just 5 per cent of ex-fuel operating costs
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Five principles for a successful restart of the UK
We need a phased return to business if we are to avoid having to go back into full lockdown
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Dansk analyseapparat bliver ombygget: Skal teste for coronavirus
PLUS. På 14 dage har det danske medicoselskab Qlife modificeret sit transportable analyseinstrument, så det kan teste for SARS-CoV-2 på cirka 20 minutter.
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Easy-to-use multi-cookers for fast, delicious meals
Multi-cookers that'll change how you eat. (Amazon/) The evolution of the mythical one-pot dish is as old as cooking itself, beginning way back when our ancestors first threw some ingredients into a pot and lit a fire underneath it. This time-saving, convenient, and downright delicious style of cooking is the backbone of every stew and roast from here to eternity, and thanks to smart-home technolo
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Why don't some coronavirus patients sense their alarmingly low oxygen levels?
Doctors try to find the best way to treat "happy hypoxics"
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Are we living in a dystopia?
Dystopian fiction is hot. Sales of George Orwell's "1984" and Margaret Atwood's "The Handmaid's Tale" have skyrocketed since 2016. Young adult dystopias—for example, Suzanne Collins' "The Hunger Games," Veronica Roth's "Divergent," Lois Lowry's classic, "The Giver" – were best-sellers even before.
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Friends Are Breaking Up Over Social Distancing
Staying home whenever possible and limiting up-close interactions with people who don't live with you is, unquestionably, the correct thing to do in order to slow the spread of COVID-19. That doesn't mean everyone is doing it. People are still having parties , going to protests , and attending whatever public events haven't been canceled, even at the risk of getting arrested —and it's fair to ass
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Why Trump Was Deaf to All the Warnings He Received
"There has been so much unnecessary death in this country," President Donald Trump said Monday at his daily coronavirus briefing . "It could have been stopped and it could have been stopped short, but somebody a long time ago, it seems, decided not to do it that way. And the whole world is suffering because of it." The remark is classic Trump—warning darkly but vaguely about unidentified enemies—
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The best screwdriver sets for fixing your life
Save money and Earth's resources by repairing things instead of replacing them. (Artur Tumasjan via Unsplash/) Anyone who has ever tried to tighten a screw on their eyeglasses with their fingernail knows that our instinct to fix things often overrides whether or not we have the right tools. Screws are everywhere from shelf brackets to furniture to watch casings, but unfortunately there isn't one
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Climate Change Threatens Drinking Water Quality Across the Great Lakes
Warmer waters, heavier storms and nutrient pollution are a triple threat to Great Lakes cities' drinking water. The solution: Cutting nutrient releases and installing systems to filter runoff.
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Nairobi flies: unpacking the mystery of a small beetle with huge burn power
A huge swarm of small black and red insects were recently seen in a town called Kabarnet, in western Kenya.
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Därför skämtar vi om corona
Det är inget nytt fenomen vi ser. Men omfattningen av coronaskämt känns kanske överväldigande på grund av nya former av spridning. Vi skämtar om Corona-öl, om hur det är att leva isolerat från varandra, om hur vi bunkrade toapapper.
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Professional musicians are not right-brained
Professional jazz musicians are seen in EEGs as using mostly their left brain hemisphere, which is considered the logical/analytical side. The right hemisphere may be more suitable to the sort of creative invention required of people still learning how to play. Is the study's conclusion about jazz, or is it about competence? The cliché is that creativity happens in the right hemisphere of the bra
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Nairobi flies: unpacking the mystery of a small beetle with huge burn power
A huge swarm of small black and red insects were recently seen in a town called Kabarnet, in western Kenya.
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Ultra-precision nano-sensor could detect iron disorders
Chronic iron imbalances—having either too little or too much iron in the blood—can result in medical conditions ranging from anaemia and haemochromatosis through to more severe diseases, such as cancer, Parkinson's Disease and Alzheimer's Disease.
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Trapping urban coyotes to see if they can be 'hazed' away from human neighborhoods
After weeks of sleepless nights spent scrutinizing grainy images relayed from our remote cameras, mostly of waving grass and tumbling leaves, finally, there it is. A live coyote with a loop around it's neck. On October 8, 2019, my colleagues and I caught the first member of the University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources pack, #19CU001.
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Training linked to stronger promotion chances for women in IT over work performance
Job performance has long been understood to be the primary equalizing factor affecting promotions for men and women in the workplace, but research shows, women don't gain as much from the same performance improvements as men do. New research in the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research shows training plays an important part in promotions for women in the field of information technology.
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White-faced capuchin monkeys come down from the trees on Panama's Coiba Island
Crossing a 23-kilometer stretch of ocean from mainland Panama to Coiba, the largest offshore island in the Eastern Pacific, a group of intrepid biologists hoped to find species never reported there before. But in addition to discovering new species, the 2015 Coiba BioBlitz crew was surprised to find that capuchin monkeys spent so much time on the ground there.
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Forest Service debuts state-by-state statistics on carbon
For the first time, a new publication by the USDA Forest Service delivers an overview of the status and trends of greenhouse gas emissions and removals from forest land, woodlands, hardwood products, and urban trees nationally for 49 U.S. states.
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Trapping urban coyotes to see if they can be 'hazed' away from human neighborhoods
After weeks of sleepless nights spent scrutinizing grainy images relayed from our remote cameras, mostly of waving grass and tumbling leaves, finally, there it is. A live coyote with a loop around it's neck. On October 8, 2019, my colleagues and I caught the first member of the University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources pack, #19CU001.
8h
White-faced capuchin monkeys come down from the trees on Panama's Coiba Island
Crossing a 23-kilometer stretch of ocean from mainland Panama to Coiba, the largest offshore island in the Eastern Pacific, a group of intrepid biologists hoped to find species never reported there before. But in addition to discovering new species, the 2015 Coiba BioBlitz crew was surprised to find that capuchin monkeys spent so much time on the ground there.
8h
Bizarre 66 million-year-old fossil from Madagascar provides clues on early mammals
A remarkably complete, 3-D fossil found in Madagascar has revealed clues about a group of early mammals of the Southern Hemisphere known as gondwanatherians. Guillermo Rougier, PhD, a paleontologist specializing in the study of the skull and teeth of ancient mammals, was part of an international team of scientists that has identified the bizarre creature as Adalatherium, translated as 'crazy beast
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Drug reduces the risk of child sexual abuse
A drug that lowers levels of the male hormone testosterone in the body reduces the risk of men with pedophilic disorder sexually abusing children, a study from Karolinska Institutet published today in the journal JAMA Psychiatry shows.
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APOE4 triggers early breakdowns in the blood-brain barrier
Although scientists have long known APOE4 is a leading risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, they were unsure how exactly it drives a decline in memory. USC scientists believe they have found an answer.
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Marooned on Mesozoic Madagascar
In evolutionary terms, islands are the stuff of weirdness. It is on islands where animals evolve in isolation, often for millions of years, with different food sources, competitors, predators, and parasites…indeed, different everything compared to mainland species. As a result, they develop into different shapes and sizes and evolve into new species that, given enough time, spawn yet more new sp
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New insight into bacterial structure to help fight against superbugs
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have produced the first high-resolution images of the structure of the cell wall of bacteria, in a study that could further understanding of antimicrobial resistance.
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To prevent antimicrobial resistance, vaccinate the world's kids
Childhood vaccination may be a powerful tool in the fight against antimicrobial resistance in low- and middle-income countries, finds a new analysis led by researchers University of California, Berkeley. The study found that immunization with two common vaccines — the pneumococcal conjugate and rotavirus vaccines — significantly reduces the rates of acute respiratory infections and diarrhea amon
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'Wobble' may precede some great earthquakes, study shows
The land masses of Japan shifted from east to west to east again in the months before the strongest earthquake in the country's recorded history, a 2011 magnitude-9 earthquake that killed more than 15,500 people, new research shows.
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Internet searches for unproven COVID-19 therapies in US
In this observational study, researchers examine internet searches indicative of shopping for chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, including after high-profile endorsements.
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Trump and public demand for unproven COVID-19 therapies
A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine finds that public demand for two unproven COVID-19 therapies massively increased following endorsements by President Donald Trump and entrepreneur Elon Musk.
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Simple 'sniff test' reliably predicts recovery of severely brain injured patients
The ability to detect smells predicts recovery and long-term survival in patients who have suffered severe brain injury, a new study has found. A simple, inexpensive 'sniff test' could help doctors to accurately diagnose and determine treatment plans for patients with disorders of consciousness.
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Does accelerated subduction precede great earthquakes?
A strange reversal of ground motion preceded two of the largest earthquakes in history. This is the result of a new study led by Jonathan Bedford of GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences. Together with international geoscientists he investigated signals recorded in Chile and Japan capturing the movement of GNSS stations before the great Maule quake in 2010 and the Tohoku-oki earthquake in 201
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Implant-free optogenetics minimizes brain damage during neuronal stimulation
A minimally invasive optogenetic technique that does not require brain implants successfully manipulated the activity of neurons in mice and monkeys, researchers report April 29 in Neuron. The researchers first genetically engineered neurons to produce a newly developed, extremely light-sensitive protein called SOUL. They then demonstrated that it is possible to shine light through the skull to al
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Very good dogs don't necessarily make very good co-workers
Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, many of us are working from home in close proximity to our human children or fur babies.
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Coronavirus is revitalising the concept of community for the 21st century
With more than a third of the world's population in lockdown, there are widespread fears of social breakdown. As a historian of loneliness, I have recently been interviewed by journalists in Brazil, France, Chile and Australia, all pondering the same problems: what will the long-term effects of social isolation be? What techniques or habits might help us learn how to be alone?
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Archaeologists have a lot of dates wrong for North American indigenous history – but new techniques are correcting it
Columbus famously reached the Americas in 1492. Other Europeans had made the journey before, but the century from then until 1609 marks the creation of the modern globalized world.
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U.S. Pays Steep Import Duty on…Railroad Ties?
Originally published in January 1909 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Lockdown reveals Paris gems hidden in plain sight
Singing blackbirds on the Champs-Elysées and rustling leaves of poplars along the Seine can also be heard
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Very good dogs don't necessarily make very good co-workers
Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, many of us are working from home in close proximity to our human children or fur babies.
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This COVID-19 Vaccine Could Be Ready by September
As various teams race to develop a vaccine for the coronavirus, one group at Oxford University says that — if everything goes perfectly — theirs could be available as soon as September. The vaccine was demonstrated to be effective in macaques, primates often used in biomedical research because they're similar to humans, but has yet to be tested in people, The New York Times reports . But with sch
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Newly discovered exoplanet dethrones former king of Kepler-88 planetary system
Our solar system has a king. The planet Jupiter, named for the most powerful god in the Greek pantheon, has bossed around the other planets through its gravitational influence. With twice the mass of Saturn, and 300 times that of Earth, Jupiter's slightest movement is felt by all the other planets. Jupiter is thought to be responsible for the small size of Mars, the presence of the asteroid belt,
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Facebook claims its new chatbot beats Google's as the best in the world
For all the progress that chatbots and virtual assistants have made, they're still terrible conversationalists. Most are highly task-oriented: you make a demand and they comply. Some are highly frustrating: they never seem to get what you're looking for. Others are awfully boring: they lack the charm of a human companion. It's fine when you're only looking to set a timer. But as these bots become
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Exploring dynamical phase transitions with cold atoms in an optical cavity
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2224-x Interactions between light and an ensemble of strontium atoms in an optical cavity can serve as a testbed for studying dynamical phase transitions, which are currently not well understood.
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Convergent genes shape budding yeast pericentromeres
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2244-6 The three-dimensional structure of pericentromeres in budding yeast is defined by convergent genes, which mark pericentromere borders and trap cohesin complexes loaded at centromeres, generating an architecture that allows correct chromosome segregation.
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Plant 22-nt siRNAs mediate translational repression and stress adaptation
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2231-y Characterization of 22-nucleotide short interfering RNAs in plants finds that they accumulate in response to environmental stress, causing translational repression, inhibition of plant growth and enhanced stress responses.
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Tail-propelled aquatic locomotion in a theropod dinosaur
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2190-3 Discovery that the giant theropod dinosaur Spinosaurus has a large flexible tail indicates that it was primarily aquatic and swam in a similar manner to extant tail-propelled aquatic vertebrates.
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APOE4 leads to blood–brain barrier dysfunction predicting cognitive decline
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2247-3 Breakdown of the blood–brain barrier in individuals carrying the ε4 allele of the APOE gene, but not the ε3 allele, increases with and predicts cognitive impairment and is independent of amyloid β or tau pathology.
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Brain control of humoral immune responses amenable to behavioural modulation
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2235-7 Neuronal activities in the central amygdala and paraventricular nucleus are transmitted via the splenic nerve to increase plasma cell formation after immunization, and this process can be behaviourally enhanced in mice.
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Two-dimensional halide perovskite lateral epitaxial heterostructures
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2219-7 An epitaxial growth strategy that improves the stability of two-dimensional halide perovskites by inhibiting ion diffusion in their heterostructures using rigid π-conjugated ligands is demonstrated, and shows near-atomically sharp interfaces.
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Childhood vaccines and antibiotic use in low- and middle-income countries
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2238-4 Pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccines have reduced antibiotic consumption substantially among children under five years old in low- and middle-income countries; however, this effect could be doubled if all countries were to implement vaccination programmes and meet universal vaccine coverage targets.
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Olfactory sniffing signals consciousness in unresponsive patients with brain injuries
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2245-5 Odorant-dependent sniff responses predicted the long-term survival rates of patients with severe brain injury, and discriminated between individuals who were unresponsive and in minimally conscious states.
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Risk factor for Alzheimer's disease breaks the blood–brain barrier
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01152-8 People who carry the gene variant APOE4 are at higher-than-average risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. It emerges that this variant is linked to defects in the blood–brain barrier and subsequent cognitive decline.
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LEM2 phase separation promotes ESCRT-mediated nuclear envelope reformation
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2232-x Following cell division, phase separation of the transmembrane adaptor LEM2 ensures that the ESCRT machinery remodels microtubules and seals the nuclear envelope.
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Editorial Expression of Concern: Quantized Majorana conductance
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2252-6
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Manganese catalyst enables exploration of the magic methyl effect
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01167-1 The addition of a methyl group to a drug molecule can greatly alter the drug's pharmacological properties. A catalyst has been developed that enables this 'magic methyl effect' to be rapidly explored for drug discovery.
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Reply to: On the signature of a 70-solar-mass black hole in LB-1
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2217-9
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On the signature of a 70-solar-mass black hole in LB-1
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2216-x
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The architecture of the Gram-positive bacterial cell wall
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2236-6 Using high-resolution atomic force microscopy of live cells, the authors present an updated view of the cell walls of both Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis.
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A lower X-gate in TASK channels traps inhibitors within the vestibule
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2250-8 The X-ray crystal structure of the potassium channel TASK-1 reveals the presence of an X-gate, which traps small-molecule inhibitors in the intramembrane vestibule and explains their low washout rates from the channel.
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CRISPR screen in regulatory T cells reveals modulators of Foxp3
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2246-4 A CRISPR-based screening platform was used to identify previously uncharacterized genes that regulate the regulatory T cell-specific master transcription factor Foxp3, indicating that this screening method may be broadly applicable for the discovery of other genes involved in autoimmunity and immune responses to cancer.
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Podcast: A sniff test for consciousness, and how to cut antibiotics use — with vaccines
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01297-6 Hear the latest science updates, brought to you by Nick Howe and Shamini Bundell.
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Skeleton of a Cretaceous mammal from Madagascar reflects long-term insularity
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2234-8 Adalatherium hui, a newly discovered gondwanatherian mammal from Madagascar dated to near the end of the Cretaceous period, shows features consistent with a long evolutionary trajectory of isolation in an insular environment.
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Brain–spleen connection aids antibody production
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01168-0 Elucidating how the brain controls peripheral organs in the fight against infection is crucial for our understanding of brain–body interactions. A study in mice reveals one such pathway worthy of further investigation.
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Months-long thousand-kilometre-scale wobbling before great subduction earthquakes
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2212-1 Observed reversals in GNSS surface motions suggests greatly enhanced slab pull in the months preceding the great subduction earthquakes in Maule (Chile, 2010) and Tohoku-oki (Japan, 2011) of moment magnitudes 8.8 and 9.0.
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A New Chatbot Tries a Little Artificial Empathy
A bot created by Facebook aims to make conversation with people more natural, though it also could enable better fakes.
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Bone proteomics could reveal how long a corpse has been underwater
When a dead body is found, one of the first things a forensic pathologist tries to do is estimate the time of death. There are several ways to do this, including measuring body temperature or observing insect activity, but these methods don't always work for corpses found in water. Now, researchers are reporting a mouse study in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research showing that certain proteins in bo
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Marooned on Mesozoic Madagascar: Researchers discover 66-million-year-old 'crazy beast'
In evolutionary terms, islands are the stuff of weirdness. It is on islands where animals evolve in isolation, often for millions of years, with different food sources, competitors, predators, and parasites…indeed, different everything compared to mainland species. As a result, they develop into different shapes and sizes and evolve into new species that, given enough time, spawn yet more new sp
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'Wobble' may precede some great earthquakes, study shows
The land masses of Japan shifted from east to west to east again in the months before the strongest earthquake in the country's recorded history, a 2011 magnitude-9 earthquake that killed more than 15,500 people, new research shows.
9h
New insight into bacterial structure to help fight against superbugs
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have produced the first high-resolution images of the structure of the cell wall of bacteria, in a study that could further understanding of antimicrobial resistance.
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New insight into bacterial structure to help fight against superbugs
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have produced the first high-resolution images of the structure of the cell wall of bacteria, in a study that could further understanding of antimicrobial resistance.
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Earth 'wobbled' before two major earthquakes
It's not clear, though, whether this will happen again.
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'Crazy beast' fossil discovered in Madagascar
Mammal lived with dinosaurs on Gondwanaland.
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Queueing rules!
German study examines how venue-entrance bottlenecks affect us.
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Seeing nature on a screen can improve your mood
If you can't go outside, do the next best thing.
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New research to make better batteries
We want them doing more, for longer.
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Hubble captures ATLAS disintegrating
It's the sharpest view yet of what might have been.
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Training linked to stronger promotion chances for women in IT over work performance
Job performance has long been understood to be the primary equalizing factor affecting promotions for men and women in the workplace, but research shows, women don't gain as much from the same performance improvements as men do. New research in the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research shows training plays an important part in promotions for women in the field of information technology.
9h
HKU-led study accurately tracks COVID-19 spread with big data
An international research team led by the University of Hong Kong (HKU) developed a new method to accurately track the spread of COVID-19 using population flow data, and establishing a new risk assessment model to identify high-risk locales of COVID-19 at an early stage, which serves as a valuable toolkit to public health experts and policy makers in implementing infectious disease control during
9h
A diet of high-iron beans improves health of anemic women in Rwanda
A new study involving women of reproductive age in Rwanda, where 19% of that demographic is anemic, showed that a diet including high-iron beans can improve iron status and physical performance relatively quickly.
9h
Molecular switch plays crucial role in learning from negative experiences
Neurobiologists at KU Leuven have discovered how the signalling molecule Neuromedin U plays a crucial role in our learning process. The protein allows the brain to recall negative memories and, as such, learn from the past. The findings of their study on roundworms have been published in the journal Nature Communications.
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Data-based COVID-19 transmission model suggests social distancing worked in Wuhan and Shanghai
A new COVID-19 transmission model, based on contact survey data from nearly 1200 people in the cities of Wuhan and Shanghai, China, suggests that strict social distancing measures implemented there were sufficient to curtail the transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Dental care and oral health under the clouds of COVID-19
DR Clinical & Translational Research has published an invited commentary by researchers at the University of Rochester, Eastman Institute for Oral Health, NY, USA on dental care and the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), including the provision of dental care and protecting patients and staff during the pandemic.
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How the pandemic trapped domestic violence victims in hell
Under lockdown, vulnerable families are imprisoned in a cage of terror, stress and abuse
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Corona-succes på Island: Få intensivpatienter døde
PLUS. Lang færre intensivpatienter med Covid-19 på Island er døde i forhold til andre lande. Succesen skyldes bred test af befolkningen, vurderer specialist, da læger så kan behandle tidligt i sygdomsforløbet.
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Heat-friendly microbes provide efficient way to biodegrade plastic
Researchers in China have engineered a microbe that shows promise as the foundation of an efficient way to break down polyethylene terephthalate (PET), a common plastic fiber used to manufacture clothing and disposable consumer products. The researchers published their findings in Microbial Biotechnology on April 28, 2020.
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COVID-19: A wake-up call to rebalance the drug supply chain?
Over 80% of chemicals used to make pharmaceuticals sold in Europe originate from China or India, according to the European Fine Chemicals Group. When COVID-19 emerged in Wuhan and spread across the globe, experts worried about disruption of the drug supply chain. Now, nations are rethinking their dependence on other countries for pharmaceutical ingredients and finished drugs, according to an artic
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Heat-friendly microbes provide efficient way to biodegrade plastic
Researchers in China have engineered a microbe that shows promise as the foundation of an efficient way to break down polyethylene terephthalate (PET), a common plastic fiber used to manufacture clothing and disposable consumer products. The researchers published their findings in Microbial Biotechnology on April 28, 2020.
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UK plans phased return when schools reopen
Education secretary unable to confirm date but rules out lessons in the summer holidays
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Fredbergs fyring: Kold luft mellem Silkeborg-overlæger og sygehusledelse
Overlægegruppen på Regionshospitalet i Silkeborg ønskede ikke at tale med hospitalsledelsen på Hospitalsenhed Midt, da ledelsen i dag kl. 8 mødte op til morgenkonference.
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'We're Literally Killing Elders Now'
M y grandmother's grandmother, as family lore has it, died in the flu pandemic of 1918. This month, my own grandmother was killed by another disease for the history books. My Meemaw, a 94-year-old former nurse who could name every player on the Minnesota Twins, sewed dresses for my American Girl doll, and kept careful count of the juncos at her bird feeder, died on April 18 of complications relat
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Scientists Find Airborne Coronavirus Floating in Wuhan Hospital
Chinese scientists have found new evidence that the coronavirus could spread through the air in airborne droplets, The New York Times reports . As detailed in a paper published in the journal Nature on Monday, scientists from Wuhan University and Hong Kong found viral RNA of the virus floating in two different areas of two Wuhan hospitals during the outbreak dating back to February and March. The
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New lunar map should help U.S. return to Moon
Combining old maps with new data, the USGS has produced a definitive blueprint of the lunar surface. The new map will help scientists and astronauts find their way around the Moon. NASA's aim is to land the first woman on the Moon as early as 2024. Future missions Why is everybody so eager to get to Mars when the Moon is right next door? Perhaps Musk et al. are attracted by the planet's redness.
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Model can predict hospital resilience for natural disasters, pandemics
CSU researchers have created a modeling tool that could help cities understand the full functionality and recovery of a healthcare system in the wake of a natural disaster. The model has wider implications for use in pandemics.
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Link identified between dietary selenium and outcome of COVID-19 disease
An international team of researchers, led by Professor Margaret Rayman at the University of Surrey, has identified a link between the COVID-19 cure rate and regional selenium status in China.
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Researchers devise new model to track COVID-19's spread
Yale University researchers and colleagues in Hong Kong and China have developed an approach for rapidly tracking population flows that could help policymakers worldwide more effectively assess risk of disease spread and allocate limited resources as they combat the COVID-19 pandemic.
9h
Newly discovered exoplanet dethrones former king of Kepler-88 planetary system
A team of astronomers led by the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy has discovered a planet three times the mass of Jupiter in the Kepler-88 system. Using W. M. Keck Observatory on Maunakea, Hawaii, the team found that Kepler-88 d is the most massive known planet in this system – not Kepler-88 c as previously thought.
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Feeling burned out? The contributors could be more related to depression than you think
According to an article published by a team of researchers from the Medical College of South Carolina, Harvard Medical School and the University of Michigan in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, similar factors cause both medical intern burnout and depression. These findings can be used to identify and treat burnout as well as mitigate the risk of burnout by modifying workplace factors.
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The unexpected way COVID-19 is screwing up weather reports
Weather radar stations, like this one in South Dakota, capture data on local storms and events. But planes and satellites can provide more regional projections by capturing atmospheric metrics. (Eric Kurth, NOAA/NWS/ER/WFO/Sacramento/) This story originally published on Flying . The drop in airline operations across the US and around the world has had an impact on weather reporting, particular wi
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Absent Wolves, Ecosystems Changed. Can New Wolves Restore Things?
The notion that returning wolves hold the power to repair decades of ecosystem damage is immensely popular — and it has long driven wolf reintroduction efforts in the West. But many researchers warn this is a dangerous oversimplification, and that wolves alone can't be expected to restore altered landscapes.
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Nasal biomarkers predict severity of pollen-specific allergy symptoms
It is not only people with allergies, but also a subgroup of people without one that suffer in spring and have nasal problems from contact with pollen. A new study shows that biomarkers in the nose can predict the severity of the symptoms that will occur in spring even before the pollen season starts.
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Improving immunotherapy for cancer
One of the reasons why cancer develops is because regulatory cells inhibit the body's immune defense. Researchers under the helm of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have discovered a mechanism for identifying regulatory cells in tumor tissue that suppress an immune response. Their findings may contribute to improving diagnosis and immunotherapy of cancer.
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Bone proteomics could reveal how long a corpse has been underwater
When a dead body is found, one of the first things a forensic pathologist tries to do is estimate the time of death. There are several ways to do this, including measuring body temperature or observing insect activity, but these methods don't always work for corpses found in water. Now, researchers are reporting a mouse study in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research showing that certain proteins in bo
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KIST develops stretchable lithium-ion battery based on new micro-honeycomb structure
The microscale reentrant-honeycomb shaped, graphene-based electrode is characterized by an accordion-like structural stretchability. A stretchable gel electrolyte and stretchable separator are also developed for all-component stretchable full cells, applying for future stretchable devices.
9h
A study places the origin of a group of trees growing in Africa 50 million years ago
The research looked into the evolution of the Daniellia clade, a set of trees with environmental importance, and confirms that more than half its species are endangered
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Physio support in COVID-19 recovery
New physiotherapy guidelines are targeting COVID-19 patient recovery for respiratory management, exercise and mobilisation in acute hospital wards and Intensive Care Units. The new guidelines published in Australian Journal of Physiotherapy aim to prevent complications of the respiratory system and muscle deconditioning, speed up recovery from mechanical ventilation, and improve long-term physical
9h
RSNA AI challenge breaks new ground
An unprecedented collaboration among two medical societies and over 60 volunteer neuroradiologists has resulted in the generation of the largest public collection of expert-annotated brain hemorrhage CT images, according to a report published in Radiology: Artificial Intelligence. Leaders of the project expect the dataset to help speed the development of machine learning (ML) algorithms to aid in
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New genes linked to severe childhood speech disorder
An international study has discovered nine new genes linked to the most severe type of childhood speech disorder, apraxia.
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New MDS subtype proposed based on presence of genetic mutation
In a special report published today in the journal Blood, an international working group of experts in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) proposes — for the first time — the recognition of a distinct subtype of MDS based on the presence of a nonheritable genetic mutation that causes the disease. The mutation is found in approximately one in every five patients with MDS.
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Molecular engineering metal coordination interactions for strong, tough, fast-recovery hydrogels
Load bearing tissues such as muscles and cartilages typically show high elasticity, toughness and fast recovery rates. However, combining such mechanical properties in the lab to build synthetic biomaterials is fundamentally challenging. In a new study now published on Science Advances, Wenxu Sun and a research team in physics, engineering mechanics and smart devices in China, developed a strong,
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Reproducing core conditions suggests Earth's outer core less dense than liquid iron
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan and France has found evidence that suggests the Earth's outer core is made of more than just liquid iron. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes simulating conditions in the outer core and testing its properties and what they found.
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Local farms, stores fill gap for groceries
Reports of rivers of wasted milk and fields of rotting onions no longer needed by restaurants showed the limitations of the food industry to quickly pivot during times of great stress, but local farms and stores have stepped in to fill consumers needs.
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Energy Use in the Coronavirus Era: N.Y.C. Is Waking Up Later
Some 400 special electric meters in New York apartments provide a shifting view of power use while people are stuck inside.
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What Other Coronaviruses Tell Us About SARS-CoV-2
COVID-19 and the virus that causes it, SARS-CoV-2, have focused the public's attention on coronaviruses like never before. But medical researchers have more than half a century of experience with this family of viruses — by the time they identified the first human version in 1965, multiple animal coronaviruses were already known to exist. Since then, dozens of additional coronaviruses have been d
9h
Research highlights impact of plastic pollution on marine life
New research from Queen's University Belfast and Liverpool John Moores University reveals how the microplastic pollution crisis is threatening biodiversity.
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6 Best Board Games You Can Play With Friends Over Zoom (Video Chat)
Don't let the Covid-19 quarantine turn you into a hermit. Video chat with some friends and play a game together.
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COVID lockdown could leave disadvantaged children with 'learning loss' of six months
School closures during the coronavirus lockdown could leave disadvantaged children with "learning loss" of up to six months, leading social mobility experts have warned.
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Research highlights impact of plastic pollution on marine life
New research from Queen's University Belfast and Liverpool John Moores University reveals how the microplastic pollution crisis is threatening biodiversity.
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Asteroid 1998 OR2 to safely fly past Earth this week
A large near-Earth asteroid will safely pass by our planet on Wednesday morning, providing astronomers with an exceptional opportunity to study the 1.5-mile-wide (2-kilometer-wide) object in great detail.
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Spitzer Telescope reveals the precise timing of a black hole dance
Black holes aren't stationary in space; in fact, they can be quite active in their movements. But because they are completely dark and can't be observed directly, they're not easy to study. Scientists have finally figured out the precise timing of a complicated dance between two enormous black holes, revealing hidden details about the physical characteristics of these mysterious cosmic objects.
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Getting kids moving, and learning
Children are set to move more, improve their skills, and come up with their own creative tennis games with the launch of HomeCourtTennis, a new initiative to assist teachers and coaches with keeping kids active while at home.Part one of the initiative, Games-making, will be introduced across Australia via a series of videos for teachers and coaches.
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Heat-friendly microbes provide efficient way to biodegrade plastic
Researchers in China have engineered a microbe that shows promise as the foundation of an efficient way to break down polyethylene terephthalate (PET), a common plastic fiber used to manufacture clothing and disposable consumer products.
10h
Radboudumc researchers publish new insights into COVID-19
Researchers at the Radboud university medical center seem to have found an essential mechanism in the disease process of COVID-19, which has so far been overlooked. If the insight is correct, it probably has important consequences for the treatment of the disease. In an international collaborative effort it is now being investigated whether the new insights and treatments do indeed have an effect
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Scientists explore links between genetics, gut microbiome and memory
Scientists have traced the molecular connections between genetics, the gut microbiome and memory in a mouse model bred to resemble the diversity of the human population. Researchers from two US Department of Energy national laboratories identified lactate, a molecule produced by all species of one gut microbe, as a key memory-boosting molecular messenger.
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Mechanisms responsible for tissue growth
Publication in Cell: Researchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) uncover the mechanisms mediating postnatal tissue development. They found that a unique developmental stem cell population mediates tissue expansion by a constant self-duplication throughout postnatal development.
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Millions of US workers at risk of infections on the job
A University of Washington researcher calculates that 14.4 million workers face exposure to infection once a week and 26.7 million at least once a month in the workplace, pointing to an important population needing protection as the novel coronavirus disease, COVID-19, continues to break out across the US.
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Scientists proposed a new approach for efficient nanomaterials' modeling
Researchers proposed a new approach to improve the efficiency of mathematical modeling of the processes in materials at the nanoscale. It is essential for the further development of nanotechnology. The results are presented in an article published in the Q1 journal Mechanics Research Communications.
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ETRI develops world's top-class 400-Gbps optical engine
The Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) in South Korea has succeeded to develop a world's top-class 400-Gbps transmitting/receiving optical engine. It enables real-time high definition video streaming for 100,000 viewers simultaneously. Thus the optical engine can be applied for data centers that accommodate thousands of servers.
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Memory misfires help selfish maintain their self-image
When asked to recall how generous they were in the past, selfish people tend to remember being more benevolent than they actually were, according to a series of experiments by Yale psychologists and economists at University of Zurich published April 29, 2020 in the journal Nature Communications.
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How a Warming Climate Could Affect the Spread of Diseases Similar to COVID-19
A hotter planet could change the relationship among infectious agents, their hosts and the human body's defense mechanisms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How a Warming Climate Could Affect the Spread of Diseases Similar to COVID-19
A hotter planet could change the relationship among infectious agents, their hosts and the human body's defense mechanisms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Small businesses locked out of government grant scheme
English companies with shared offices excluded from coronavirus rescue package
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Remdesivir Shows Only Modest Benefits in Coronavirus Trial
The F.D.A. is likely to issue an emergency approval, a senior official said. Despite conflicting results from other studies, markets soared.
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Researchers identify periods in asynchronous polars
A polar is a highly magnetic type of cataclysmic variables containing an accreting white dwarf and a low-mass donor star. Due to the magnetism, the white dwarf would synchronously spin, however, there are still several asynchronous polars well confirmed with their angular velocities of the white dwarfs more or less than their orbital ones.
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HD 38170 is a magnetic B-type star, observations suggest
An international team of astronomers has conducted spectropolarimetric observations of four stars identified by the MOBSTER (Magnetic OB[A] Stars with TESS: probing their Evolutionary and Rotational properties) project. The study found that one of the investigated objects is a magnetic B-type star. The finding is detailed in a paper published April 21 on the arXiv pre-print server.
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Study suggests elephants may get drunk naturally after all
A team of researchers at the University of Calgary has found that variations in ethanol metabolism abilities in different species may account for the "myth" of natural animal intoxication. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes comparing mutations in the ADH7 gene in multiple species and what they found by doing so.
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Study suggests elephants may get drunk naturally after all
A team of researchers at the University of Calgary has found that variations in ethanol metabolism abilities in different species may account for the "myth" of natural animal intoxication. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes comparing mutations in the ADH7 gene in multiple species and what they found by doing so.
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Are salt deposits a solution for nuclear waste disposal?
Researchers testing and modeling to dispose of the current supply of waste.
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Evidence of Late Pleistocene human colonization of isolated islands beyond Wallace's Line
A new article published in Nature Communications applies stable isotope analysis to a collection of fossil human teeth from the islands of Timor and Alor in Wallacea to study the ecological adaptations of the earliest members of our species to reach this isolated part of the world. Because the Wallacean islands are considered extreme, resource poor settings, archaeologists believed that early seaf
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Tuning into dolphin chatter could boost conservation efforts
Researchers from Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Australia and Curtin University have moved an important step closer to using sound rather than sight to track individual dolphin activity. Their study, which has potential implications for dolphin communities around the world, investigated whether there was a way to attribute unique whistles to individual bottlenose dolphins living in Western Austra
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Arteries respond in opposite ways for males and females
A protein known to expand blood vessels — key to controlling conditions like high blood pressure — actually has different functions in males and females, new UC Davis Health research shows. Conducted using arterial cells from mice, the study is the first to identify sex-based distinctions in how the protein — Kv2.1 — works.
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Forest Service debuts state-by-state statistics on carbon
Overview of the status and trends of greenhouse gas emissions and removals from forest land, woodlands, hardwood products, and urban trees nationally gets 49 times better with new state-by-state reporting.
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BIM & Lean Construction well-established in major firms but lacking within industry's SMEs
Construction's SMEs, who make up 80% of the industry often working as sub-contractors for larger firms, are in danger of missing out on cutting-edge techniques, according to new research.
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Mobile phones found to host cocktail of live germs, aiding spread of diseases
A new study warns mobile phones could be acting as 'Trojan horses' for coronavirus and urges billions of users worldwide to decontaminate their devices daily. The research, led by Associate Professor Lotti Tajouri of Bond University, reviewed 56 studies from 24 countries and found phones host a staggering cocktail of live germs.
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Ultra-precision nano-sensor could detect iron disorders
The University of Sydney's Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials Research Unit and the Australian Research Centre for Innovative BioEngineeing have developed a hypersensitive nano-sensor to detect harmful 'free' iron disorders. The test could lead to earlier, more accurate disease diagnosis.
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White-faced capuchin monkeys come down from the trees on Panama's Coiba Island
An arboreal lifestyle is thought to be central to primate origins, and most extant primate species still live in the trees. Nonetheless, terrestrial locomotion is a widespread adaptation that has arisen repeatedly within the primate lineage. The absence of terrestriality among the New World monkeys (Platyrrhini) is thus notable and raises questions about the ecological pressures that constrain the
10h
Pollen shows which plants bees in the city need most
Trees, shrubs, and woody vines are among the top food sources for honey bees in urban environments, according to a new study. The findings may help homeowners, beekeepers, and urban land managers hoping to sustain honey bees and other bee and pollinator species. Researchers used honey bees housed in rooftop apiaries in Philadelphia to identify plant species from which honey bees collected most of
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Why we adopt and then ditch online security tips
New research digs into why many people who try to follow expert advice on cybersecurity and privacy end up only doing so halfway or giving up altogether. To find out why people adopt and then sometimes abandon online safety measures, researchers surveyed more than 900 people about their use of 30 commonly recommended practices to guard against security, privacy, and identity theft risks. The rese
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Intercrops enhance soil moisture availability in rubber agroforestry systems
Rubber-based agroforestry systems have been developed in Southeast Asia for ecological and economic benefits. However, the water consumption characteristics of different agroforestry practices are still unclear in this region.
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'Will You Help Save My Brother?': The Scramble to Find Covid-19 Plasma Donors
A doctor stricken with Covid-19 was running out of options. His family mounted a search for a donor whose plasma might help.
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Quantum autoencoders to denoise quantum measurements
Many research groups worldwide are currently trying to develop instruments to collect high-precision measurements, such as atomic clocks or gravimeters. Some of these researchers have tried to achieve this using entangled quantum states, which have a higher sensitivity to quantities than classical or non-entangled states.
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4-billion-year-old nitrogen-containing organic molecules discovered in Martian meteorites
A research team including research scientist Atsuko Kobayashi from the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) at Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, and research scientist Mizuho Koike from the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science at Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, have found nitrogen-bearing organic material in carbonate minerals in a Martian meteorite. This organic material has most l
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Intercrops enhance soil moisture availability in rubber agroforestry systems
Rubber-based agroforestry systems have been developed in Southeast Asia for ecological and economic benefits. However, the water consumption characteristics of different agroforestry practices are still unclear in this region.
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A quantum approach to imaging and sensor problems faced by biologists and clinicians
A host of diseases—like meningitis, diabetes, cystic fibrosis, Alzheimer's disease, even some cancers—are ultimately caused by problems at the cellular level. Hence, understanding what is happening inside cells is essential. Observing cells under a microscope helps, but what medical researchers would really like to do is see processes inside cells in minute detail.
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Drop in oil demand may not help climate emission targets
Global oil prices have crashed to record lows in recent days as demand plummets amid the enforced lockdown.
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'Strange effect' raises possibility of smaller, smarter optical filters
Polarization, in sync. On the macro, everyday level, it reads as an oxymoron. To the University of Nebraska–Lincoln's Xia Hong and her fellow nanoscientists, though, the apparent contradiction makes a kind of harmonious sense. And it might just spur the development of smaller, more versatile optical filters that are especially adept at playing with a trick of the light.
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Catching nuclear smugglers: Fast algorithm could enable cost-effective detectors at borders
A new algorithm could enable faster, less expensive detection of weapons-grade nuclear materials at borders, quickly differentiating between benign and illicit radiation signatures in the same cargo.
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Listening for right whales in the ocean deeps
Scientists are using algorithms and machine learning to listen for the distinct calls of one of the world's most endangered animals in a bid to identify where they are and shield them from one of their greatest threats.
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Listening for right whales in the ocean deeps
Scientists are using algorithms and machine learning to listen for the distinct calls of one of the world's most endangered animals in a bid to identify where they are and shield them from one of their greatest threats.
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Goodbye to the crowded office: How coronavirus will change the way we work together
As lockdowns are relaxed around the world and people return to their workplaces, the next challenge will be adapting open office spaces to the new normal of strict personal hygiene and physical distancing.
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First spotted lanternfly hatches reported: Expert provides tips for pest management
Even before the recent news of the season's first confirmed spotted lanternfly hatches in the Philadelphia region, homeowners in many parts of Pennsylvania were gearing up for their annual battle with the destructive pest.
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First spotted lanternfly hatches reported: Expert provides tips for pest management
Even before the recent news of the season's first confirmed spotted lanternfly hatches in the Philadelphia region, homeowners in many parts of Pennsylvania were gearing up for their annual battle with the destructive pest.
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Evolution of bacterial movement revealed
An international team with researchers from Leiden revealed how a bacterium repurposed an internal system to control its movements. Movement control is very important in host invasion, which can lead to disease. Publication on 27 April in Nature Communications.
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U.S. carbon dioxide emissions have dropped to unprecedented low during pandemic
As the demand for transportation fuels has plummeted in the last month due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a Northern Arizona University scientist says the dramatic decrease in local air pollution and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels above cities is significant, measurable and could be historic, depending on how long commuters and other drivers stay off the road.
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Evolution of bacterial movement revealed
An international team with researchers from Leiden revealed how a bacterium repurposed an internal system to control its movements. Movement control is very important in host invasion, which can lead to disease. Publication on 27 April in Nature Communications.
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Can this biomarker flag autism in newborns?
A biomarker in newborns may signal autism spectrum disorder months or even years symptoms or diagnosis, according to a new study. Researchers found that infants diagnosed with autism later in childhood had very low levels of a neuropeptide associated with the disorder in their cerebrospinal fluid. Experts say the earlier a child is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, the sooner interventions
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Artificial intelligence finds best drug combo fast
To more quickly identify drug combinations, such as those that might treat COVID-19, researchers have come up with an artificial intelligence platform called IDentif.AI. Traditionally, when dangerous new bacterial and viral infections emerge, the response is to develop a treatment that combines several different drugs. However, this process is laborious and time-consuming, with drug combinations
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Investors digest conflicting studies into Gilead's potential virus drug
Paper in 'The Lancet' confirmed remdesivir failed to help patients in first randomised clinical trial
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Rymdteleskopet Hubble fyller 30 år
Inte långt efter att rymdteleskopet Hubble hade byggts färdigt inträffade en katastrof för amerikansk rymdfart. Rymdfärjan Challenger exploderade vid uppskjutningen i januari 1986, och alla ombord dog. Detta ledde till att rymdfärder stoppades i flera år, och därmed blev också teleskopet försenat. När det väl sändes upp i rymden 1990 visade sig nästa problem: teleskopets huvudspegel hade ett fel s
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The World's Most Interesting Insects
A new title from Smithsonian Books highlights the diversity of Earth's 10 to 100 million insect species
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Show of strength
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01227-6 These institutions lead in natural-sciences research in journals tracked by the Index.
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Rising stars in life sciences 2020
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01234-7 These institutions have achieved a high increase in research output in the Nature Index since 2015.
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Rising stars in Earth and environmental sciences 2020
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01237-4 These institutions have achieved high increases in research output in the Nature Index since 2015.
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Fast-rising research institutions 2020
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01232-9 These institutions have achieved significant increases in research output in the Nature Index since 2015.
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Fastest movers since 2015
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01228-5 Chinese institutions dominate the rising stars ranks, as heavily funded initiatives to create world-class universities pay off.
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Leading research institutions 2020
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01230-x These institutions achieved the highest overall research output in the Nature Index.
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Rising stars in chemistry 2020
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01235-6 These institutions have achieved high increases in research output in the Nature Index since 2015.
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A guide to the Nature Index
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01238-3 A description of the terminology and methodology used in this supplement, and a guide to the functionality available free online at natureindex.com.
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Measures of merit
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01226-7 With the release of the Nature Index 2020 Annual Tables, we celebrate the institutions and countries producing high-quality research in the natural sciences.
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Fast-rising academic institutions 2020
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01233-8 These institutions have achieved significant increases in overall research output in the Nature Index since 2015.
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Ten countries with high-performing hubs of natural-sciences research
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01229-4 The United States leads, but China is closing the gap, with large gains in output since 2015.
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The ten leading countries in natural-sciences research
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01231-w These countries achieved the highest overall research output in 2019 in the Nature Index.
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Rising stars in physical sciences 2020
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01236-5 These institutions have achieved high increases in research output in the Nature Index since 2015.
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Biofabrication drives tissue engineering in 2019
In the quest to engineer replacement tissues and organs for improving human health, biofabrication has emerged as a crucial set of technologies that enable the control of precise architecture and organization.
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Long-term consequences of coastal development as bad as an oil spill on coral reefs
Oil pollution is known to cause lethal and sublethal responses on coral communities in the short-term, but its long-term effects have not been widely studied. The Bahia Las Minas oil spill, which contaminated about 40 square kilometers (about 15 square miles) near the Smithsonian's Galeta Point Marine Laboratory in Colon and became the largest recorded near coastal habitats in Panama, served as an
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Spørg Fagfolket: Findes der et helt sort materiale?
En læser vil gerne vide, om der findes materialer, som opsluger alt lys. Det svarer fysiker fra DTU Fotonik på.
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'So what?': Bolsonaro shrugs off Brazil's rising coronavirus death toll
Outrage at president's response to news that more than 5,000 people have lost their lives Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage More than 5,000 Brazilians have lost their lives to the coronavirus – even more people than in China, if its official statistics are to be believed. But on Tuesday night Brazil's president shrugged off the news. "So what?" Jair Bolsonaro told repo
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Government rushes out request for experts to work with Sage panel
Notice sent to universities amid concern over lack of expertise in parts of Covid-19 advisory group Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The government has rushed out a request to universities to help expand the pool of scientific experts who are advising ministers during the coronavirus crisis, following concerns about the lack of expertise in some areas. Researchers at
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What Great Zombie Movies Say About This 'Zombie' 'Apocalypse'
Together, they teach us one crucial thing: You are not a zombie—yet.
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What Singapore Can Tell the World About Personal Liberty
In a state of emergency, more than a few of us will find ourselves cutting deals with god, the devil, or the government alike.
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Amazon Smart Oven Review: Don't Let It Anywhere Near Your Kitchen
Connected kitchen gadgets are supposed to streamline cooking, but this one just gave me a headache.
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Boeing cuts jobs and production as aircraft demand sinks
'We will be a smaller company for a while,' says chief David Calhoun
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Gardening tool sets that will help your flowers, herbs, and vegetables thrive
These tools will help you create an outdoor space that blossoms, blooms, and fruits. (Amazon/) There's never been a better time to invest a little energy in cultivating your garden and discovering the creative potential of your backyard. Whether you're a new gardener or have a seasoned green thumb, everyone can appreciate that good tools make a world of difference. Why spend time struggling when
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Higher thrombus risk in men with obesity in adolescence
Men with a history of obesity in their late teens are, in adult life are more at risk of a blood clot (thrombus) in a leg or lung, according to a new study. The risk rises successively and is highest in those who were severely obese in adolescence.
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A Harder Look at Alzheimer's Causes and Treatments
Amyloid, the leading target for dementia therapy, faces skepticism after drug failures — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A Harder Look at Alzheimer's Causes and Treatments
Amyloid, the leading target for dementia therapy, faces skepticism after drug failures — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Researchers analyze how the fungus that causes verticillium wilt attacks olive trees
Researchers from the Universities of Valencia and Cordoba, as well as from the Institute for Sustainable Agriculture of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), have studied the fungus that causes verticilosis, a disease that kills millions of olive trees. Through the observation of the olive root microbiome, they conclude that verticillium wilt is driven by a wide community of microorganisms
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Going beyond political borders to protect threatened animals
During a global extinction crisis and rapidly changing world, many nations are now looking to harden their borders to restrict the movement of people.
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Researchers analyze how the fungus that causes verticillium wilt attacks olive trees
Researchers from the Universities of Valencia and Cordoba, as well as from the Institute for Sustainable Agriculture of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), have studied the fungus that causes verticilosis, a disease that kills millions of olive trees. Through the observation of the olive root microbiome, they conclude that verticillium wilt is driven by a wide community of microorganisms
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Going beyond political borders to protect threatened animals
During a global extinction crisis and rapidly changing world, many nations are now looking to harden their borders to restrict the movement of people.
11h
MRI scanning assists with next generation battery design
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide an effective way of supporting the development of the next generation of high-performance rechargeable batteries, according to new research.
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Study: Convert emergency shelter space into long-term affordable housing
A program to convert emergency shelter space into long-term affordable housing showed incredible benefits for the community's most vulnerable, prompting a call from Western researchers to push for additional permanent housing solutions in emergency shelters nationwide.
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Coronavirus: Outcry as Spanish beach sprayed with bleach
Environmentalists say a misguided attempt to protect residents has damaged a sensitive ecosystem.
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US GDP falls 4.8% in worst economic decline since 2008
Contraction exceeds economists' forecasts for a 4% decline in output
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Hong Kong police break up pro-democracy demonstration
Easing of coronavirus measures raises possibility of fresh protests
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Video: How does soap kill the coronavirus?
We have all been advised during the coronavirus outbreak to wash our hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "many diseases and conditions are spread by not washing hands with soap and clean, running water."
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Video: How does soap kill the coronavirus?
We have all been advised during the coronavirus outbreak to wash our hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, "many diseases and conditions are spread by not washing hands with soap and clean, running water."
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How growth of the scientific enterprise influenced a century of quantum physics
Austrian quantum theorist Erwin Schrödinger first used the term "entanglement," in 1935, to describe the mind-bending phenomenon in which the actions of two distant particles are bound up with each other. Entanglement was the kind of thing that could keep Schrödinger awake at night; like his friend Albert Einstein, he thought it cast doubt on quantum mechanics as a viable description of the world.
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Economic damage could be worse without lockdown and social distancing, study finds
The worst thing for the economy would be not acting at all to prevent disease spread, followed by too short a lockdown, according to research based on US data.
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Lord May of Oxford obituary
Influential chief scientific adviser to the government who made politicians and scientists think about the public they served If you asked Bob May, Lord May of Oxford, to explain the bewildering eclecticism of his scientific interests, he would say that he liked playing games and solving puzzles. His idea of play was anything but frivolous: to him mathematics was "no more – and no less – than thin
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Disease Has Never Been Just Disease for Native Americans
As the death toll from COVID-19 mounts, people of color are clearly at greater risk than others. Among the most vulnerable are Native Americans. To understand how dire the COVID-19 situation is becoming for these communities, consider the situation unfolding for the Navajo Nation, a people with homelands in Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah. As of April 23, 1,360 infections and 52 deaths had been rep
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First study of multicancer blood test to screen for cancer guide intervention
Results from a first-of-its-kind study of a multicancer blood test in more than 9,900 women with no evidence or history of cancer showed the liquid biopsy test safely detected 26 undiagnosed cancers, enabling potentially curative treatment.
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Upcycling spongy plastic foams from shoes, mattresses and insulation
Researchers have developed a new method for upcycling polyurethane foams, the spongy material found in mattresses, insulation, furniture cushions and shoes.
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A milder hair dye based on synthetic melanin
With the coronavirus pandemic temporarily shuttering hair salons, many clients are appreciating, and missing, the ability of hair dye to cover up grays or touch up roots. However, frequent coloring, whether done at a salon or at home, can damage hair and might pose health risks from potentially cancer-causing dye components. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed a proces
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New recycling method could make polyurethane sustainable
Polyurethanes (PUs) are used in many products, such as mattresses, insulation, footwear and construction materials. Wear and replacement of these products generates lots of waste and creates demand for new PUs, often made from toxic building blocks. A few methods have attempted to recycle PU waste, but these techniques result in lower-value products. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science
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The Complicated Legacy of Herbert Spencer, the Man Who Coined 'Survival of the Fittest'
Spencer's ideas laid the groundwork for social Darwinism, but scholars say there was much more to the Victorian Age thinker than that
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Evidence of Late Pleistocene human colonization of isolated islands beyond Wallace's Line
What makes our species unique compared to other hominins? High profile genetic, fossil and material culture discoveries present scientists working in the Late Pleistocene with an ever-more complex picture of interactions between early hominin populations. One distinctive characteristic of Homo sapiens, however, appears to be its global distribution. Exploring how Homo sapiens colonized most of the
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SpaceX Will Test 'VisorSat' System to Make Starlink Satellites Invisible
SpaceX is already the world's largest single satellite operator with more than 400 of its Starlink internet nodes zipping around the Earth, but that's only the start. The company hopes to have a fleet of thousands of satellites in just a few years, and that has astronomers worried. We've already seen these clouds of manmade material interfere with observations, and the problem will only get worse
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European business and consumer confidence craters
Coronavirus crisis drives economic indicator down at record rate to near all-time lows
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The Cloud Heart
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-00856-1 A new lease of life.
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Människan är motsägelsefull i Cormac McCarthys romaner
Den amerikanske författaren Cormac McCarthy, med verk som Blood Meridian, Städerna på Slätten och Vägen kan förvirra sina läsare. Han beskriver människan som en medveten individ med förmåga att påverka den globala utvecklingen – och samtidigt som en helt obetydlig varelse utan ansvar när saker och ting går snett. Denna motsättning är en nyckel till hans texter och det är den som gör hans böcker s
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A milder hair dye based on synthetic melanin
With the coronavirus pandemic temporarily shuttering hair salons, many clients are appreciating, and missing, the ability of hair dye to cover up grays or touch up roots. However, frequent coloring, whether done at a salon or at home, can damage hair and might pose health risks from potentially cancer-causing dye components. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed a proces
12h
Upcycling spongy plastic foams from shoes, mattresses and insulation
Researchers have developed a new method for upcycling polyurethane foams, the spongy material found in mattresses, insulation, furniture cushions and shoes.
12h
The US Supreme Court Rules That Laws Can't Be Paywalled
The ruling over Georgia's official law code sets an important precedent that will help secure the right to publish other legally significant public documents.
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Best Bar Accessories (2020): Shakers, Strainers, Juicers, and More
Crafting a good cocktail is a game of milliliters (and great technique). It helps to have the right bar equipment to make a winner.
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Physicists Clear the Air With a Sweet Frickin' Laser Beam
Fast laser pulses produce a shock wave in air that pushes water vapor aside. That clears channels in clouds for transmitting optical data from satellites.
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Global job losses rise sharply as coronavirus lockdowns are extended
UN agency estimates lost working hours are now equivalent to more than 300m full-time jobs
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Stort arkitektfirma hacket: Trues til at betale løsesum
Et af verdens førende arkitektfirmaer er blevet hacket af gruppen "Light". Hvis ikke virksomheden betaler en løsesum inden for 24 timer, så truer de kriminelle med at offentliggøre meget følsomme stjålne filer.
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Scientists calculate crystal structure of superhard molybdenum borides
In their search for new superhard compounds, researchers have carried out a prediction of stable molybdenum borides and their crystal structures. They revealed that the highest borides contain four to five boron atoms per each molybdenum atom. The estimated Vickers hardness of MoB5 is 37 to 39 GPa, which makes it a potential superhard material. The study was published in The Journal of Physical Ch
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Researchers unlock genomic secrets of scaly-foot snail
Despite an extreme environment characterized by high pressure, high temperature, strong acidity and low oxygen levels resembling living conditions in prehistoric times, hydrothermal vents harbor a diverse population of creatures, most of which have potential for biomedical and other kinds of research. Among other inhabitants of this difficult environment, the scaly-foot snail, also known as "sea p
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Surveying the lipid landscape with newly unveiled lipid analysis software
Researchers increasingly aim at using the manifold functions of lipids in our bodies, e.g., as blood fats or in blood coagulation, to better understand and predict diseases. An international team around Robert Ahrends at the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna has now presented a groundbreaking tool for efficient lipid analysis in the journal Nature Communications. Their software Lipi
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Scientists study growth rate effect of gut bacteria on degradation of dietary fiber
It is known that approximately 80% of the human immune system functions within the gastrointestinal tract. Gut bacteria and their metabolites play a fundamental role in the interaction between gut and other organs. Since the organic acids produced by colon bacteria (acetate, lactate, propionate, succinate and butyrate) activate a number of immune and hormonal processes, the microbiota composed of
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Initial motivation is a key factor for learning in massive open online courses
Since MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) started the OpenCourseWare movement by publishing its course materials as open educational resources, many types of initiatives have been developed to open access to education via the use of digital technologies. Among other resources, MOOCs have proliferated. These offer specialized online courses (often free) to an unlimited number of students. H
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Crops sown in a uniform spatial pattern produce higher yields and reduce environmental impact
Higher yields and fewer weeds are possible if farmers sow wheat, maize, soy and other crops in more uniform spatial patterns, according to University of Copenhagen researchers. More precise sowing can also help reduce herbicide use and fertilizer runoff.
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Researchers unlock genomic secrets of scaly-foot snail
Despite an extreme environment characterized by high pressure, high temperature, strong acidity and low oxygen levels resembling living conditions in prehistoric times, hydrothermal vents harbor a diverse population of creatures, most of which have potential for biomedical and other kinds of research. Among other inhabitants of this difficult environment, the scaly-foot snail, also known as "sea p
12h
Surveying the lipid landscape with newly unveiled lipid analysis software
Researchers increasingly aim at using the manifold functions of lipids in our bodies, e.g., as blood fats or in blood coagulation, to better understand and predict diseases. An international team around Robert Ahrends at the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna has now presented a groundbreaking tool for efficient lipid analysis in the journal Nature Communications. Their software Lipi
12h
Scientists study growth rate effect of gut bacteria on degradation of dietary fiber
It is known that approximately 80% of the human immune system functions within the gastrointestinal tract. Gut bacteria and their metabolites play a fundamental role in the interaction between gut and other organs. Since the organic acids produced by colon bacteria (acetate, lactate, propionate, succinate and butyrate) activate a number of immune and hormonal processes, the microbiota composed of
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Crops sown in a uniform spatial pattern produce higher yields and reduce environmental impact
Higher yields and fewer weeds are possible if farmers sow wheat, maize, soy and other crops in more uniform spatial patterns, according to University of Copenhagen researchers. More precise sowing can also help reduce herbicide use and fertilizer runoff.
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Coronavirus: Fears for future of endangered chimps in Nigeria
Devastated by hunting and logging, the chimps now face threats from coronavirus, says conservationist.
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Stroke in COVID-19 Patients
A case series of five patients with COVID-19 and young strokes sparks many questions.
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US eyes China military as it tightens tech export rules
Move designed to keep US chips out of the hands of the People's Liberation Army
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Coronavirus threatens Deutsche's plan to return to profitability
Germany's largest lender is braced for a drop in revenue and a jump in loan provisions
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Praktiserende læger vender tomlen ned til videokonsultationer i nyt pilotprojekt
For meget bøvl med teknikken gør, at praktiserende læger ikke anbefaler at udbrede videokonsultationer, viser erfaringer fra pilotprojekt. Men så overhalede COVID-19 virkeligheden os, siger projektleder.
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Robert May, former UK chief scientist and chaos theory pioneer, dies aged 84
Friends and colleagues pay tribute to gifted polymath whose achievements spanned biology, physics and public policy Lord May of Oxford obituary Pioneering Australian scientist Robert May, whose work in biology lead to the development of chaos theory, has died at age 84. Known as one of Australia's most accomplished scientists, he served as the chief scientific adviser to the United Kingdom, was p
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How a Landmark Physics Paper from the 70's Uncannily Describes the COVID-19 Pandemic
Phil Anderson's article More is Different describes how different levels of complexity require new ways of thinking—and as the virus multiplies and spreads, that's just what the human race… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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GE results show scale of impact from global aviation crisis
Jet engine maker warns of worse ahead with air travel rebound 'likely not soon'
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When data viz goes psychotic
Is now really the time for whirlwind charts? Well why not.
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Särskilt värdefull ängsflora på gamla vägkanter
Vägkanter kan vara en viktig livsmiljö för ängsväxter som trivs i öppet landskap. Och ju äldre vägarna är desto bättre, visar ny forskning. Den stora minskningen av arealen naturbetesmark och äng under de senaste 200 åren utgör ett hot mot alla de växter som behöver ett öppet landskap. Det är känt sedan tidigare att vägkanter kan vara en viktig livsmiljö för dessa växter. Enligt en ny studie från
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Flyktingkrisen 2015 konfronterade den svenska självbilden
Våren 2015 fanns det enligt Stefan Löfven ingen gräns för antalet asylsökanden som Sverige kunde ta emot. I november samma år var tonen en annan. Den svenska politiska tvärvändningen har studerats i en nyutkommen bok. Sverige avvek länge från den generella trenden i Europa. Före 2015 hade Sverige varken begränsat sin asylpolitik eller asylsökandes rättigheter. Tvärtom hade den rödgröna regeringsk
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Planes Are Still Flying, but Covid-19 Recovery Will Be Tough
Air travel is down more than 90 percent from last year, and analysts say the rebound will be slower than following 9/11 or the financial crisis.
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Stewart Brand Is 81—and He Doesn't Want to Go on a Ventilator
The legendary thinker and founder of the *Whole Earth Catalog* raises a public conversation about end-of-life care during the Covid-19 pandemic.
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Microbe Mappers Are Tracking Covid-19's Invisible Traces
Armies of microbiologists are swabbing subways, ATMs, and hospitals in search of the novel coronavirus. Their data could help cities reopen responsibly.
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You Thought You Were Free, but History Found You
Editor's Note: This is the first in a series of commencement addresses commissioned by The Atlantic for students who will not be able to attend their graduations because of the pandemic. Class of 2020: As I stand here on this glorious spring morning, wearing my day pajamas and staring out the window at my garbage cans, I can't help thinking something's wrong. Isn't there supposed to be some sheet
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Why the Coronavirus Is So Confusing
O n March 27 , as the U.S. topped 100,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19, Donald Trump stood at the lectern of the White House press-briefing room and was asked what he'd say about the pandemic to a child. Amid a meandering answer, Trump remarked , "You can call it a germ, you can call it a flu, you can call it a virus. You know, you can call it many different names. I'm not sure anybody even knows
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No, the Post-9/11 Era Is Not Over
The 9/11 Era Is Over In the bowels of the CIA, there is a sign that reads every day is september 12th. "As a New Yorker who witnessed the 9/11 attacks, I once felt that way myself," Ben Rhodes wrote earlier this month , "but by the time I saw the sign, during the second term of the Obama administration, it seemed to ignore all the things that our country had gotten wrong because of that mindset.
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Efficiency Is Biting Back
The global quarantine, an optimist might argue, is pushing us toward a more web-mediated world. Millions of people who had seldom, if ever, used videoconferencing before March are now doing their jobs without a long commute, taking classes without getting on a school bus, or consulting a doctor without first sitting in a waiting room full of sick people. These changes are, by some standards, a fo
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How a Landmark Physics Paper from the 70's Uncannily Describes the COVID-19 Pandemic
Phil Anderson's article More is Different describes how different levels of complexity require new ways of thinking—and as the virus multiplies and spreads, that's just what the human race… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Topologisk superledning i nanotråde: Et skridt på vejen til en ny form for kvantebit
PLUS. Forskere på Københavns Universitet kombinerer to effekter på ny måde i bestræbelserne på at udvikle et fundament for en særlig form for qubit til kvantecomputere.
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How a Landmark Physics Paper from the 70's Uncannily Describes the COVID-19 Pandemic
Phil Anderson's article More is Different describes how different levels of complexity require new ways of thinking—and as the virus multiplies and spreads, that's just what the human race… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Light after the lockdown — the future of fashion
In the first of a new series, we look at how the crisis will revolutionise brands, fashion weeks and personal style
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Machine That Keeps Livers Alive for a Week Can Repair Damaged Organs
A new device could ultimately increase the number of usable livers for transplants and could perhaps preserve other types of organs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Genetic Engineering Could Make a COVID-19 Vaccine in Months Rather Than Years
Candidates are speeding toward human trials — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Sinister Logic of Trump's Immigration Freeze
M ore than a decade before he became Franklin D. Roosevelt's running mate, the Texas Democrat John Nance Garner tried to convince the biggest immigrant hater in Congress that his state desperately needed Mexican labor. "I do not mean to say by that, Mr. Chairman, that the character of the people that would come in under this resolution are particularly desirable citizens; I won't make that statem
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Conservation goals may be stymied by a lack of land for biodiversity offsetting
Developers may struggle to find enough land to offset the biodiversity impacts of future development, according to a University of Queensland study.
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COVID-19 anerkendes nu som arbejdsskade
En ny vejledning fra Arbejdstilsynet slår fast, at sundhedspersonale kan få anerkendt COVID-19 som arbejdsskade. For praktiserende læger gælder særlige vilkår alt efter, hvordan de er ansat.
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Conservation goals may be stymied by a lack of land for biodiversity offsetting
Developers may struggle to find enough land to offset the biodiversity impacts of future development, according to a University of Queensland study.
13h
MRI scanning assists with next generation battery design
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide an effective way of supporting the development of the next generation of high-performance rechargeable batteries, according to research led by the University of Birmingham.
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Dansk opfinder fritlægger hænder i realtid: Lader fingeren pege på andres skærme
PLUS. Danske iværksættere har udviklet en algoritme, der er i stand til at fritlægge billeder i realtid, så en tekniker kan pege direkte på en maskine på afstand via et videoopkald. Det er ekstra aktuelt her midt i corona-krisen, hvor behovet for fjern-support af maskiner er eksploderet.
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States Are Using the Pandemic to Roll Back Americans' Rights
The coronavirus pandemic has led governments around the world to adopt draconian measures. Some of these, such as social-distancing mandates, are, quite obviously, bona fide and necessary efforts to control the rate of virus spread. Others, however, pretty clearly constitute a form of pandemic political opportunism, such as in Hungary, where the national Parliament dissolved itself after granting
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News Brief: Economic Data, Meat Shortage Concerns, Research Funds Pulled
We get a measure of how much damage COVID-19 has done to the economy. President Trump orders meat processors to stay open. And, the government terminates funding for a coronavirus research project.
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Peer review bandits purloin again, this time in chemistry
A pair of researchers in India have lost a 2017 paper published by the UK's Royal Society of Chemistry after an inquiry found that they'd stolen the guts of the work from an unpublished manuscript one of them had reviewed for another journal. The article in question, "Tri-s-triazine (s-heptazine), a novel electron-deficient core for soft … Continue reading
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Coronavirus: Scottish government suggests covering face in shops
Nicola Sturgeon says there may be "some benefit" in wearing a cloth face covering in enclosed areas.
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Elixirs for times of plague and bullion shortage
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01223-w Spectacular alchemical scrolls record ideas of flux in times of massive upheaval — medical, social, economic and political. By Jennifer Rampling.
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Almen mediciner kastet ud i coronafrontlinjen med kort varsel
Cecilie Bryld har en baggrund som speciallæge i almen medicin og har de seneste fire år arbejdet som socialmediciner på Frederiksberg Hospital. De seneste seks uger har hun undersøgt patienter med symptomer på COVID-19 i Bispebjerg Hospitals Corona Checkpoint – hør hvordan hun har oplevet at være en del af frontlinjen.
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Lad den positive telemedicinske udvikling slå rod
Det ville være glædeligt, hvis den positive telemedicinske udvikling under coronakrisen slog rod, især hvis det bliver en erstatning for anden fysisk behandling og ikke bare et supplement, skriver Kjels Møller Pedersen.
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Coronavirus is speeding up the disappearance of cash
Pandemic boosts shift towards digital wallets and currencies
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Covid-19 creates new words that enter everyday language
In times of emergency, previously unfamiliar terms rapidly enter daily life
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The U.S. Is Now Resorting to Plan C
Brian Kemp, the Republican governor of Georgia, has faced harsh criticism for lifting emergency restrictions on retail stores—and inexplicably including tattoo parlors among the establishments that can reopen. But Kemp isn't the only governor who's been second-guessed. Gretchen Whitmer of Michigan has permitted the playing of golf , albeit without carts and with strict social distancing between g
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In 1950, Americans Had Aspic. Now We Have Dalgona Coffee.
Allison Ward used to grab coffee during her commute to work. The 34-year-old, a project manager at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, told me she needs caffeine every day, and that ever since the coronavirus pandemic put the city on lockdown, she's been missing her Starbucks fix. Then she learned about dalgona coffee. The recipe—made of equal parts instant coffee, sugar, and hot water, whi
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Ny forening skal styrke energisektorens it-sikkerhed
Energinet, Dansk Energi og Dansk Fjernvarme går sammen om at imødegå den øgede cybertrussel mod energisektoren.
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Time runs short for UK to recruit tens of thousands of fruit pickers
Low take-up of jobs by local workers risks produce rotting in fields
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Australia defies China with renewed calls for coronavirus inquiry
Diplomatic skirmish alarms business as Canberra accuses Beijing of 'economic coercion'
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Storpack ger matsvinn
Att välja portionsförpackat och mindre förpackningar är mer klimatsmart. Det visar en kartläggning av matsvinn hos svenska hushåll. Studien visar också att konsumenters osäkerhet kring datummärkning och hållbarhet hos livsmedel bidrar stort till att mat slängs i onödan. – Förpackningar målas ofta upp som en stor miljöbov, men är nödvändiga för att transportera och skydda maten. Vi borde i stället
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Haplotype-resolved genomes provide insights into structural variation and gene content in Angus and Brahman cattle
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15848-y Taurine and indicine cattle have different desirable traits making them better adapted to different climates across the world. Here, Low et al. describe a pipeline to produce haplotype-resolved, chromosome-level genomes of Angus and Brahman cattle breeds from a crossbred individual and report on comparisons of
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Coronavirus Live Updates: Grim G.D.P. Data Does Not Fully Capture Pandemic's Effects
The G.D.P. plummeted, but because widespread layoffs and shutdowns hit at the end of the quarter, economists say it will fall much further. Officially, more than 53,000 have died, according to The Times's count, but death rates suggest the true toll is far greater.
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MRI scanning assists with next generation battery design
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide an effective way of supporting the development of the next generation of high-performance rechargeable batteries, according to research led by the University of Birmingham.
14h
Conservation goals may be stymied by a lack of land for biodiversity offsetting
Developers may struggle to find enough land to offset the biodiversity impacts of future development, according to a University of Queensland study. UQ's Dr. Laura Sonter said the challenges were evident worldwide and could significantly limit the ability to achieve global conservation goals.
14h
Evidence of Late Pleistocene human colonization of isolated islands beyond Wallace's Line
What makes our species unique compared to other hominins? High profile genetic, fossil and material culture discoveries present scientists working in the Late Pleistocene with an ever-more complex picture of interactions between early hominin populations. One distinctive characteristic of Homo sapiens, however, appears to be its global distribution. Exploring how Homo sapiens colonized most of the
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E-cigarette users experience vascular damage similar to that of smokers of combustible cigarettes
Young adults using e-cigarettes experienced arterial stiffness and blood vessel damage similar to those who smoke traditional cigarettes.There was no evidence that using e-cigarettes reduced the cardiovascular injury associated with the use of combustible tobacco products.Researchers said longer-term research is needed to determine if vascular damage from e-cigarettes alone changes over time.
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Massively multiplexed nucleic acid detection using Cas13
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2279-8
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Population flow drives spatio-temporal distribution of COVID-19 in China
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2284-y
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Local conditions and policy design determine whether ecological compensation can achieve No Net Loss goals
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15861-1 Countries are adopting ecological compensation policies aimed at achieving no net loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Here, Sonter and colleagues apply spatial simulation models to case studies in Australia, Brazil, Indonesia, and Mozambique to show that compensation alone is not sufficient to preserve
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Partial impairment of insulin receptor expression mimics fasting to prevent diet-induced fatty liver disease
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15623-z Hyper-insulinemia associated with excess calorie intake may cause metabolic dysfunction. Here the authors report that mice with partially reduced insulin receptor expression in peripheral tissues are protected from and experience reversal of fatty liver disease.
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Assessing the impact of ETS trading profit on emission abatements based on firm-level transactions
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15996-1 Carbon emission trading is an important market-based policy instrument to reduce GHG emission using reward-punishment mechanism. Here the authors show that the EU emission trading schemes operate at its designed purpose and there is a positive and linear relationship between firm profits and the firms' efforts
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Motivated misremembering of selfish decisions
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15602-4 People often prioritize their own interests, but also like to see themselves as moral. Here the authors show how distortions in memory might resolve this tension by demonstrating that people tend to remember being more generous in the past than they actually were.
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Super-tough MXene-functionalized graphene sheets
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15991-6 Poor mechanical properties of reduced graphene oxide sheets hinder development of flexible energy storage systems. MXene functionalised graphene oxide with Ti-O-C bonding and additional crosslinking is here reported to dramatically increase toughness for flexible supercapacitors.
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Inferring spatial and signaling relationships between cells from single cell transcriptomic data
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15968-5 Dissociation of tissues allows high-throughput expression profiling of single cells, but spatial information is lost. Here the authors apply an unbalanced and structured optimal transport method to infer spatial and signalling relationships between cells from scRNA-seq data by integrating it with spatial imagin
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Taking stock of national climate policies to evaluate implementation of the Paris Agreement
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15414-6 To evaluate the effectiveness of current national policies in achieving global temperature targets is important but a systematic multi-model evaluation is still lacking. Here the authors identified a reduction of 3.5 GtCO2 eq of current national policies relative to a baseline scenario without climate policies
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The intensification of Arctic warming as a result of CO2 physiological forcing
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15924-3 Plants respond to increasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere by stomatal closure which causes a reduction of evapotranspiration and thus latent heat flux. Here, the authors show that this CO2 physiological forcing strengthens Arctic warming through increasing sea ice loss and local feedbacks.
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Efter COVID-19: Drop den generelle behandlingsgaranti
Drop den generelle behandlingsgaranti og erstat den med en behandlingsgaranti for livstruende sygdomme, skriver Enhedslistens sundhedsordfører.
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Polymorphisms in miRNA binding sites involved in metabolic diseases in mice and humans
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64326-4
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Long-term fertilization alters soil properties and fungal community composition in fluvo-aquic soil of the North China Plain
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64227-6
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On the Thermal Performance of a Fractal Microchannel Subjected to Water and Kerosene Carbon Nanotube Nanofluid
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64142-w
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4-Hydroxyestrone, an Endogenous Estrogen Metabolite, Can Strongly Protect Neuronal Cells Against Oxidative Damage
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-62984-y
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Performance of metabonomic serum analysis for diagnostics in paediatric tuberculosis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64413-6
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Show evidence that apps for COVID-19 contact-tracing are secure and effective
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01264-1 Governments see coronavirus apps as key to releasing lockdowns. In exchange for people's health data, they must promise to work together to develop the highest standards of safety and efficacy.
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UK minister admits main coronavirus focus was NHS rather than care homes
George Eustice denies care homes were overlooked but says there was 'a real focus' on NHS Latest UK coronavirus news See all our coronavirus coverage A cabinet minister has acknowledged the government focused more on the NHS than care homes in the early stages of the outbreak, as the UK prepares to publish daily death figures for the community as well as hospitals. As the outbreak continues to wo
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Indian companies hit back at rule to deter Chinese takeovers
Authorities in talks with tech groups and venture capital firms over concerns about impact on fundraising
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Blackstone makes new investment in coronavirus-hit casinos
Private equity group acquires 10% stake in Australia's Crown Resorts
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Creative process: Are you in a period of 'woodshedding'?
Creative types can feel an overwhelming sense of pressure to be prolific, especially in times like these when, in theory, free time is abundant. Creativity is a resource that takes different forms and like other resources, it has its limits. According to Elizabeth Alexander, poet and president of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, it's common for artists to have gaps in the chronology of their work
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How to preserve jobs as retention schemes wind down
Programmes should be flexible and help workers move to in-demand sectors
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Poll: Half Of Americans Financially Affected By Coronavirus
An NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds 50% say they or someone in their household has lost hours or a job due to the pandemic. They also say their governors are doing a better job it than Trump. (Image credit: John Locher/AP)
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Next warns coronavirus recovery will be slower than expected
Sales of full-price clothing in shops drops by more than half in first quarter
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BA to cut up to 12,000 jobs as aviation outlook darkens
Parent company IAG warns it will take 'several years' to return to 2019 passenger levels
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Poaching could increase under virus lockdowns: watchdog
Poaching of endangered species could rebound as authorities divert their attention to enforcing coronavirus lockdown measures, an international wildlife watchdog said Wednesday, reporting stockpiling of ivory and other animal products as borders remain shut.
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»Vanvittigt høj« EU-grænse for dieselpartikler stiller danske politikere i dilemma
PLUS. Ifølge en endnu ikke offentliggjort rapport vil det være 'gratis' for erhvervslivet, hvis Danmark læner sig op ad EU's grænseværdi for diesel­partikler i arbejdsmiljøet. Sundhedseksperter kalder det »helt ude i hampen« og stiller danske politikere over for et svært valg.
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Poaching could increase under virus lockdowns: watchdog
Poaching of endangered species could rebound as authorities divert their attention to enforcing coronavirus lockdown measures, an international wildlife watchdog said Wednesday, reporting stockpiling of ivory and other animal products as borders remain shut.
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Ulrich Fredberg fyret i Silkeborg
Ledende overlæge i Diagnostisk Center på Regionshospitalet Silkeborg, Ulrich Fredberg, indgår fratrædelsesaftale med hospitalsledelsen.
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Lockdown is distorting our memories – but there are ways to regain control | Julia Shaw
In the absence of life's daily landmarks, we can stop our brains creating false memories by staging memorable events at home Since the lockdown began, time and memory seem to have lost all meaning . In March, the days seemed incredibly long, interspersed by daily news that had radical effects on our lives. I found myself saying things like, "can you believe it's only been three days since we went
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Underused coronavirus tests, controversial vaccine study and Arctic emergency
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01220-z The latest science news, in brief.
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They remember: Communities of microbes found to have working memory
submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]
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Where do you see the future of EVs in this era of cheap oil prices?
Given that the oil prices went into negative for the first time in the history of mankind, wouldn't this impede the very sales and research fundings of the electric vehicles? Also, should the government make use of this opportunity to drag out the taxes they impose on EVs for whatsoever reasons? submitted by /u/PsyKite [link] [comments]
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Covid-19 The Worst Case Political Reaction
submitted by /u/dirk_bruere [link] [comments]
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New metasurface-enhanced laser emits 'super-chiral' light
submitted by /u/amanda_bay [link] [comments]
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NASA Wants to Photograph the Surface of an Exoplanet
submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]
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Reversing Ageing: New Studies Show it Can be Done
submitted by /u/Buck-Nasty [link] [comments]
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Britain breaks record for coal-free power generation | Business
submitted by /u/Throwawayforstuff207 [link] [comments]
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Coronavirus could trigger 'largest ever annual fall in CO2'
submitted by /u/MayonaiseRemover [link] [comments]
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Is Fusion Really Close To Reality? Yes, Thanks To Machine Learning
submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]
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Coronavirus map of the US: latest cases state by state
• Coronavirus: world map of deaths and cases • See all our coronavirus coverage • Coronavirus – latest global updates The number of confirmed cases of Covid-19 continues to grow in the US. Mike Pence, the vice-president, is overseeing the US response to the coronavirus. So far, 80% of patients experience a mild form of the illness, which can include a fever and pneumonia, and many of these cases
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FDA advarer om brug af hydroxyklorokin udenfor hospitaler
Den amerikanske sundhedsmyndighed FDA advarer læger om at forsøge at behandle COVID-19-patienter med hydroxyklorokin og klorokin uden for hospitalerne.
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New insights into how genes control courtship and aggression
Fruit flies, like many animals, engage in a variety of courtship and fighting behaviors. Now, Salk scientists have uncovered the molecular mechanisms by which two sex-determining genes affect fruit fly behavior. The male flies' courtship and aggression behaviors, they showed, are mediated by two distinct genetic programs. The findings, both published in eLife on April 21, 2020, demonstrate the com
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New insights into how genes control courtship and aggression
Fruit flies, like many animals, engage in a variety of courtship and fighting behaviors. Now, Salk scientists have uncovered the molecular mechanisms by which two sex-determining genes affect fruit fly behavior. The male flies' courtship and aggression behaviors, they showed, are mediated by two distinct genetic programs. The findings, both published in eLife on April 21, 2020, demonstrate the com
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'I hope he doesn't feel too lonely' — COVID-19 hits people with intellectual disabilities hard
My brother was supposed to move into his first "independent" home in mid-March. In his late 20s, and a person with an intellectual disability, he had finally gathered up the courage and the will to move out of our family home and live in a group home. Because of the coronavirus pandemic, my brother's move is now delayed indefinitely, and his world remains mostly his bedroom. He can't go to his pa
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Kan man printe sig til håb?
Danmark har fejlet, fordi man ikke havde en plan "B" i forhold til værnemidler. Mit postulat er, at "de skøre" læger og sygeplejersker ikke har fået lov til at være i spil mod COVID-19 og byde ind med løsninger, skriver Mikkel Præst.
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