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High microplastic concentration found on ocean floor
Mediterranean sediments are shown to have up to 1.9 million tiny plastic pieces per square metre.
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Ancient 'crazy beast' mammal classified as new species
Gondwanatherians were mammals that roamed present-day Madagascar. The new species likely resembled a badger and was about the size of a cat, which was relatively big for its time. The discovery highlights how isolation often leads to strange, evolutionarily distinct creatures. After discovering an extraordinarily well-preserved fossil, scientists have classified a new species of extinct mammal: A
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Coronavirus live news: Trump claims to have evidence virus started in Wuhan lab as UK is 'past the peak'
US government experts say virus 'not manmade or genetically modified'; Germany and Spain ease lockdowns; outbreak increasing in Africa. Follow the latest updates Coronavirus latest: at a glance Johnson promises plan next week for return to schools and work Australia coronavirus updates – live See all our coronavirus coverage 12.15am BST Hello and welcome to today's live coverage of coronavirus ne
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Low-income workers disproportionally affected by COVID-19
Low-income workers in developing countries face a higher risk of income loss during the COVID-19 lockdown as it is less possible to conduct their jobs from home, suggests a new study from UCL, Bank of Thailand, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and GRIPS, Tokyo.
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NHS 'turning a blind eye' to labor rights violations in the trade of masks and gloves
Yet there is a murkier scandal about the procurement of these everyday items that the NHS has yet to face, writes Jane Feinmann, freelance journalist in The BMJ today.
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Coronavirus death rate far higher for black Caribbean people
Data reinforce concerns that Covid-19 has exposed inequalities between ethnic groups
14min
High cost of cancer drugs not always justified
Do high prices of some cancer medicines have a higher benefit than those drugs with lower prices? An international UZH study has concluded that, in general, there is no correlation between costs of a cancer drugs and their clinical benefit. The researchers are therefore calling for the clinical benefit of drugs to be better reflected in pricing.
39min
Study estimates cost of cancer care for Syrian refugees in wake of COVID-19
A new study shows the cost of cancer care for Syrian refugees in host nations for the first time, as researchers urge resources to be provided in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Plant extract combo may relieve hangover symptoms
A plant extract combination of fruits, leaves, and roots may help to relieve hangover symptoms, reveals research published online in BMJ Nutrition Prevention & Health.
39min
Different trigger points for seeking healthcare may explain gender divide
Men might not be more reluctant to see a doctor than women are, as is popularly believed, but may simply have different trigger points for seeking healthcare, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
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Do Peer Reviewers Prefer Significant Results?
An experiment on peer reviewers at a psychology conference suggests a positive result premium which could drive publication bias
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Author Correction: The Effect of a Substrate Material on Composition Gradients of Fe-Ni Films obtained by Electrodeposition
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64609-w
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Author Correction: GGA2 interacts with EGFR cytoplasmic domain to stabilize the receptor expression and promote cell growth
Scientific Reports, Published online: 01 May 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64604-1
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The ADL Calls Out Steam for Giving Extremists a Pass
The nonprofit has identified hundreds of profiles that espouse hate, with little attempt from the gaming platform to stop them.
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Nasa picks Bezos's Blue Origin and Musk's SpaceX to build new lunar landers
Alabama company Dynetics also chosen for moon landing project, as three firms prepare to compete Nasa has selected three private space companies to lead the development of lunar landers for its forthcoming moon landings. The three companies are Blue Origin , owned by Amazon's CEO, Jeff Bezos; Elon Musk's SpaceX; and Dynetics, based in Huntsville, Alabama, Nasa announced on Thursday. Continue read
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Which States Are Reopening, Which Remain on Lockdown, and Why
There's not a national plan to restart US businesses. That's led to inconsistencies among governors' orders, and some confusion among residents.
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Coffee plants have a small but consistent core microbiome of fungi and bacteria
These scientists explored the tissues of coffee roots to look for signs of a 'core microbiome,' or for signs of microbes, such as bacteria and fungi, that form partnerships with the coffee plant.
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Gilead to produce 1m courses of remdesivir by year's end
Biotech group's shares have soared this year on hopes drug could be used to treat coronavirus
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FDA Approves NASA Ventilator for Use on COVID Patients
VITAL A ventilator developed by NASA engineers and designed to save COVID-19 patients was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today under authority of the agency's Emergency Use Authorization . "This FDA authorization is a key milestone in a process that exemplifies the best of what government can do in a time of crisis," NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said in a statement .
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Scientists Build Rocket Engine Powered by Spiraling Explosions
Ring Of Fire For the first time, scientists have tested an experimental rocket engine that they say could change the way we launch spacecraft. The engine, called a rotating detonation rocket engine, propels itself through a continuous series of powerful explosions, according to a University of Central Florida press release . Based on what the researchers found, they say it could make rockets both
2h
Defining geographic regions with commuter data
A new mathematical approach uses data on people's commutes between and within US counties to identify important geographic regions. Mark He of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and colleagues present this work in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on April 29, 2020.
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Eyes send an unexpected signal to the brain
New research has found that a subset of retinal neurons sends inhibitory signals to the brain. Before, researchers believed the eye only sends excitatory signals.
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First results from NASA's ICESat-2 mission map 16 years of melting ice sheets
By comparing new measurements from NASA's ICESat-2 mission with the original ICESat mission, which operated from 2003 to 2009, scientists were able to measure precisely how the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have changed over 16 years.
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Autopsies provide crucial information for fighting COVID-19
A mortuary at Dover Air Force Base (William M. Plate Jr./) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . In the fight against disease, the dead are rarely thought of as an active part of war. But especially when it comes to an emerging virus like SARS-CoV-2, deceden
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Experts apply microbiome research to agricultural science to increase crop yield
In an effort to increase crop yield, scientists at Northern Arizona University's Pathogen and Microbiome Institute (PMI) are working with Purdue University researchers to study the bacterial and fungal communities in soil to understand how microbiomes are impacting agricultural crops. They believe technological advances in microbiome science will ultimately help farmers around the world grow more
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Research reveals possibly active tectonic system on the moon
Strange spots scattered across the moon's nearside where bedrock is conspicuously exposed are evidence of seismic activity set in motion 4.3 billion years ago that could be ongoing today, the researchers say.
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Water is key in catalytic conversion of methane to methanol
Scientists reveal new details that explain how a highly selective catalyst converts methane, the main component of natural gas, to methanol, an easy-to-transport liquid fuel and feedstock for making plastics, paints, and other commodity products. The findings could aid the design of even more efficient/selective catalysts to make methane conversion an economically viable and environmentally attrac
2h
Gravitational waves could prove the existence of the quark-gluon plasma
According to modern particle physics, matter produced when neutron stars merge is so dense that it could exist in a state of dissolved elementary particles. This state of matter, called quark-gluon plasma, might produce a specific signature in gravitational waves. Physicists have now calculated this process using supercomputers.
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Superfast method for ceramic manufacturing could open door to AI-driven material discovery
Scientists have reinvented a 26,000-year-old manufacturing process into an innovative approach to fabricating ceramic materials that has promising applications for solid-state batteries, fuel cells, 3D printing technologies, and beyond.
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Overlæge om nyt remdesivir-resultat: Fire dages hurtigere helbredelse er markant
PLUS. Stort remdesivir-forsøg med dansk deltagelse viser lovende takter. Overlæge savner sammenligning med andre studier og har fået et legat til netop at gøre dette.
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Pandemiplan før corona-krisen: Regioner skal have lagre af FFP3-masker
Regioner skulle have lagre af værnemidler og de ansatte i kommunerne skulle bruge FFP3-masker ved influenzaepidemi, slår beredskabsplan fast. Men planen blev ikke fulgt. »Ekstremt problematisk« mener formand for intensivlægerne. Vi har prioriteret behandling over et pandemi-lager, siger regionerne.
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Amazon warns virus costs could wipe out surging sales
Company says it could spend $4bn more in next quarter to keep workers safe and products moving
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Myndigheder på slingrekurs om værnemidler: Faglige organisationer kræver redegørelse
I pandemiplan før corona-krisen vejledte Sundhedsstyrelsen sundheds- og plejepersonalet til at bruge de mest sikre åndedrætsværn. Men da pandemien ramte, blev vejledningerne ændret markant. Læger og sosu'er kræver forklaring. Myndigheder svarer tilbage med larmende tavshed.
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Use your isolation downtime to start your writing career
While writing requires creativity, there are science-backed guidelines that can help you master the craft. Finding your voice involves recognizing the audience you're trying to reach. Reading, a requirement for becoming a powerful writer, has been shown to increase your intelligence and empathy . How are you spending your time isolating at home? This moment presents many challenges to all of us.
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Gentler, safer hair dye based on synthetic melanin
Northwestern University researchers have developed a new hair dye process that is much milder than traditional hair dyes by using synthetic melanin to mimic natural human hair pigmentation.
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New discovery explains how the prostate gland regenerates itself
Androgen-deprivation therapy, a mainstay of prostate cancer treatment, may give prostate cells new growth abilities, scientists at Memorial Sloan Kettering have found.
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Cracking the Lyme disease code
The next time a tick feeds on you, researchers hope to make sure persistent arthritis caused by Lyme disease doesn't linger for a lifetime.
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Scientists find highest ever level of microplastics on seafloor
An international research project has revealed the highest levels of microplastic ever recorded on the seafloor, with up to 1.9 million pieces in a thin layer covering just 1 square meter.
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Spacewatch: Hubble space telescope turns 30
Telescope has made substantial scientific contributions to almost every branch of astronomy This year, the Hubble space telescope is celebrating its 30th anniversary in orbit. Launched on 24 April 1990 onboard the space shuttle Discovery, it was deployed into orbit a day later. Since then, Hubble has been extraordinarily successful , making substantial scientific contributions to almost every bra
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Coronavirus Updates: 30 Million Americans Applied For Unemployment In Past 6 Weeks
More than 30 million Americans have applied for unemployment in just six weeks. NPR's economics and science correspondents update on the latest developments in the coronavirus crisis.
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UBC discovery opens new avenues for designing drugs to combat drug-resistant malaria
For the first time, UBC researchers have shown a key difference in the three-dimensional structures of a key metabolic enzyme in the parasite that causes malaria compared to its human counterpart.
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A rainbow of layered paints could help buildings to keep their cool
Nature, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01249-0 A simple design allows heat-reflective paints to move beyond plain white.
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How catastrophic outburst floods may have carved Greenland's 'grand canyon'
For years, geologists have debated how and when canyons under the Greenland Ice Sheet formed, especially one called 'Greenland's Grand Canyon.' Its shape suggests it was carved by running water and glaciers, but until now its genesis remained unknown, scientists say.
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Sun is less active than similar stars
By cosmic standards the sun is extraordinarily monotonous. For the first time, the scientists compared the sun with hundreds of other stars with similar rotation periods. Most displayed much stronger variations. This raises the question whether the sun has been going through an unusually quiet phase for several millennia.
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Strip Clubs Are Offering "Drive-Thru" Experiences During Pandemic
A strip club in Oregon called Lucky Devil Lounge has created a "drive-thru" strip club experience to keep its business going during the pandemic, Oregon Live reports . Customers slowly drive through a tent that contains four dancers and a DJ. The first 50 cars get a free roll of toilet paper. "You pull in and you get one or two songs with the gogos, then we bring your food out to you and then you
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Racial inequalities in liver cancer deaths soared after launch of hepatitis C drugs
Before and after the introduction of lifesaving drugs for hepatitis C, researchers found that from 1979 to 1998, racial inequalities in mortality from liver cancer in the US were declining. But, from 1998 to 2016, of the 16,770 deaths from liver cancer among blacks, the excess relative to whites increased from 27.8 percent to 45.4 percent. Concurrently, racial inequalities in death decreased for m
3h
COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
Availability of Telemedicine Services Across Hospitals in the United States in 2018: A Cross-sectional Study.
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Obese adults facing Medicaid expansion gap
Despite overall increases in insurance coverage for low-income individuals in Medicaid expansion states, some gaps remain for individuals who are obese.
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COVID-19 diagnostic tests highlighted in special report
As the new coronavirus continues to claim lives, the race is on to develop fast, convenient and accurate diagnostic tests for COVID-19. Now, researchers from CAS, a division of the American Chemical Society specializing in scientific information solutions, have compiled a special report published in ACS Central Science. Drawing from published journal articles and a variety of other published resou
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How Do Supermassive Black Holes Form? You Can Sketch Galaxies to Help Astronomers Find Out
Tracing out the shape of a galaxy may offer clues to the size of its supermassive black hole. And a new study shows citizen scientists are actually better at it than computer algorithms.
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The sun is too quiet, which may mean dangerous solar storms in future
Stars that are similar to the sun in every way we can measure are mostly more active than the sun, which hints that the sun's activity may ramp up someday, risking solar eruptions
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Ocean currents are sweeping microplastics into the deep sea
Slow-moving underwater currents are leading to build ups of microplastics in biologically rich areas on the sea floor
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Amazon Buys Thermal Cameras to Scan Workers For Fevers
Blacklisted In order to try and spot coronavirus infections among its workforce, Amazon bought 1,500 heat-sensing security cameras that it plans to install in its facilities. The thermal cameras, manufactured by the Chinese corporation Dahua, are reportedly able to track workers' temperature from a distance, allowing Amazon to flag anyone who develops a fever, Reuters reports . But it's a controv
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COVID-19: What's happening in US prisons?
Join Big Think Live for a discussion with human rights advocate and best-selling author Shaka Senghor. Learn how the COVID-19 outbreak is affecting the prison population and why it has been described as a "ticking time bomb." In an exclusive segment for Big Think Edge subscribers, Senghor will share 8 lessons learned during his own experience in solitary confinement, adapted for the isolation era
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Framing Hope Through a Photographer's Lens
Marine biologist Cristina Mittermeier discovered that visual storytelling, rather than data sets, allowed her to be a better advocate for the ocean
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During Coronavirus, Trump Sits on Clean Energy Loans
As Congress rushes out trillions of dollars to prop up businesses, the Energy Department is holding on to tens of billions in clean energy loans.
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Musk, Bezos win NASA contracts for Moon lander
NASA on Thursday awarded almost $1 billion in contracts to three space companies including those owned by Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos to develop lunar landers as the United States seeks to return human beings to the Moon.
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Balancing impacts of range-shifting species: Invasives vs biodiversity
For many years, the conservation community has embraced the idea that improving connectivity, that is, creating corridors so species can follow their preferred climate, will benefit biodiversity, says Toni Lyn Morelli at the University of Massachusetts Amherst's Climate Adaptation Science Center.
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Climate-smart agricultural practices increase maize yield in Malawi
Climate change creates extreme weather patterns that are especially challenging for people in developing countries and can severely impact agricultural yield and food security. International aid organizations have invested billions of dollars in promoting climate-smart agriculture (CSA) practices, but the effects of those programs are rarely documented.
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Balancing impacts of range-shifting species: Invasives vs biodiversity
For many years, the conservation community has embraced the idea that improving connectivity, that is, creating corridors so species can follow their preferred climate, will benefit biodiversity, says Toni Lyn Morelli at the University of Massachusetts Amherst's Climate Adaptation Science Center.
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Balancing impacts of range-shifting species: Invasives vs. biodiversity
For many years, the conservation community has embraced the idea that improving connectivity, that is, creating corridors so species can follow their preferred climate, will benefit biodiversity, says Toni Lyn Morelli at UMass Amherst's Climate Adaptation Science Center. But, 'I also work with invasive species experts and conservationists who know that new species can be problematic.' One communit
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Children who have difficult relationships with their moms are clingy towards teachers
Children who experience 'dependent' or clingy relationships with their preschool teachers tend to also have difficulties in their relationships with their mothers finds researchers at the NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. The research, published in peer-reviewed academic research journal Attachment and Human Behavior, went even further to find that later in elemen
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Climate-smart agricultural practices increase maize yield in Malawi
Climate change creates extreme weather patterns that are especially challenging for people in developing countries and can severely impact agricultural yield and food security. International aid organizations have invested billions of dollars in promoting climate-smart agriculture (CSA) practices, but the effects of those programs are rarely documented. A new University of Illinois study helps pro
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Global Air Pollution Drop, Electronic Skin and Brain Machines
A month's worth of cool science stories, summed up Global Air Pollution Drop, Electronic Skin and Brain Machines Video of Global Air Pollution Drop, Electronic Skin and Brain Machines Earth Thursday, April 30, 2020 – 15:30 Alistair Jennings, Contributor (Inside Science) — In this monthly science recap, Alistair Jennings from Inside Science sums up some of the most interesting recent science top
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Astronomers could spot life signs orbiting long-dead stars
To help future scientists make sense of what their telescopes are showing them, astronomers have developed a spectral field guide for rocky worlds orbiting white dwarf stars.
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First-of-its-kind demonstration unlocks further discovery for quantum technologies
Hidden within countless materials are valuable properties that will enable the next generation of technologies, like quantum computing and improved solar cells.
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Superfast method for ceramic manufacturing could open door to AI-driven material discovery
Scientists in the University of Maryland (UMD)'s Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) have reinvented a 26,000-year-old manufacturing process into an innovative approach to fabricating ceramic materials that has promising applications for solid-state batteries, fuel cells, 3-D printing technologies, and beyond.
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Antarctica And Greenland Are Losing Thousands Of Gigatons of Ice — That's A Lot
A new NASA satellite is providing a detailed look at how much polar ice is melting, raising sea levels around the world. (Image credit: NASA/Jeremy Harbeck)
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Pandemic plan tackles fake news, racism, and isolation
Researchers have outlined ways to manage different facets of life under the spread of the COVID-19 virus, including how we can combat racially driven bias and fake news and how we can increase cooperation and better manage stress. The plan in the journal Nature Human Behaviour considers research stretching over the past half century to offer insights about how to address current circumstances. "T
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Johnson seeks route out of coronavirus tunnel
PM confronted with major political decision on reopening UK economy without triggering second peak of infections
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Nasa names companies to develop Moon landers for human missions
The space agency announces the companies that will work on landers to return astronauts to the Moon.
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NASA has selected three lunar landers to bring humans to the moon
NASA has awarded $967 million to three space flight companies – Blue Origin, Dynetics, and SpaceX – to build lunar landers that will be part of the Artemis programme to send humans to the moon by 2024
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Argentina's 'gargantuan' hail may be biggest ever
Researchers investigating a 2018 hail storm have found one hailstone likely measured between 7.4 and 9.3 inches across, potentially setting a new world record. The supercell thunderstorm pelted a city center in Argentina with hailstones so large scientists suggested a new category to describe them: gargantuan hail. The current record belongs to a hailstone that measured 8 inches across, or about
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Persistent and worsening insomnia may predict persistent depression in older adults
Older adults with depression may be at much higher risk of remaining depressed if they are experiencing persistent or worsening sleep problems, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
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Unlocking promising properties to create future technologies
At Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, researchers working at the intersection of materials science, chemical engineering, and physics are uncovering new and innovative ways to unlock those promising and useful abilities using light, temperature, pressure, or magnetic fields.The groundbreaking discovery of an optical version of quantum hall effect (QHE), published today in Physical Review X, demonst
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NASA space laser missions map 16 years of ice sheet loss
Using the most advanced Earth-observing laser instrument NASA has ever flown in space, scientists have made precise, detailed measurements of how the elevation of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have changed over 16 years.
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Alternate light 5 times more effective in detecting bruises on victims of color
As a consequence of COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, rates of domestic abuse have increased. Improved procedures are needed to increase effectiveness of detecting bruises for people of color. A George Mason University study found alternate light was five times better at detecting bruises on diverse skin tones. Alternate light could be the tool that helps address this disparity in detecting bruises ac
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Russia's PM tests positive for coronavirus
Mikhail Mishustin reveals diagnosis as cases in country top 100,000
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Covid-19 and the workforce: Critical workers, productivity, and the future of AI
In less than two months, covid-19 created arguably the world's largest collective shift in social activity and working practices. Research firm Global Workplace Analytics estimated in a 2018 report that 4.3 million people in the US worked remotely, representing just 3.2% of the country's workforce. In a March 2020 poll of 375 executives by MIT Technology Review Insights, over two-thirds reported
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Health systems are in need of radical change; virtual care will lead the way
The covid-19 pandemic has shown us how much health care is in need of not just tweaking but radical change. The pressure on global health systems, providers, and staff has already been increasing to unsustainable levels. But it also illustrates how much can be achieved in times of crisis: for example, China and the UK recently built thousands of extra beds in intensive care units, or ICUs, in les
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How to convert your DSLR camera into a webcam for free
Your Canon DSLR will outshine your webcam's picture quality. (Canon /) Social distancing suddenly made webcams extremely important. People are flocking to video-chatting services and big tech companies like Facebook, Google, and Microsoft are providing users with an ever-increasing arsenal of options when it comes to face-to-face calling. Chances are, the webcam on your computer wasn't ready for
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Let's Create an Elite Scientific Body to Advise on Global Catastrophes
Call it the Science Readiness Reserves—a group that will anticipate and prepare for rare but disastrous events like pandemics, asteroid strikes and more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Boris Johnson promises road map out of lockdown
Prime minister says UK past peak of infections but he will not risk lifting restrictions too soon
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New players in the programmed cell death mechanism
Skoltech researchers have identified a set of proteins that are important in the process of apoptosis, or programmed cell death. These newly identified proteins can become targets in the development of drugs against cancer or other diseases.
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How catastrophic outburst floods may have carved Greenland's 'grand canyon'
For years, geologists have debated how and when canyons under the Greenland Ice Sheet formed, especially one called 'Greenland's Grand Canyon.' Its shape suggests it was carved by running water and glaciers, but until now its genesis remained unknown, scientists at UMass Amherst and Denmark's Center for Ice and Climate say.
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What's the Science Behind Why We Hiccup?
Lots of things seem to trigger the involuntary reflex known as the hiccups, but does science understand why that reflex happens in the first place? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Let's Create an Elite Scientific Body to Advise on Global Catastrophes
Call it the Science Readiness Reserves—a group that will anticipate and prepare for rare but disastrous events like pandemics, asteroid strikes and more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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People put on ventilators for covid-19 may need lengthy rehabilitation
Healthcare systems need to prepare for the extensive physiotherapy and mental rehabilitation that people put on ventilators for covid-19 will need as they recover
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Bankers win assurances on rules for UK bounce back loans
Lenders want clarity on course of action in event of default or fraud
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'Make physical activity part of children's routine' during lockdown
Parents and carers should ensure that physical activity is part of the routine for children and families during the COVID-19 lockdown, according to a new study.
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Fauci Says It's 'Doable' To Have Millions Of Doses Of COVID-19 Vaccine By January
Noting that trials are still in the early phase, Dr. Anthony Fauci says the plan is to develop a vaccine that is safe and effective — and can be quickly scaled up for distribution. (Image credit: Chris Kleponis/Polaris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
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The Guardian view on Johnson's Covid-19 plan: doubt, deny and dismiss | Editorial
Rather than admit responsibility for being behind the curve, ministers instead seek to delegitimise the media for asking questions about why Britain failed Ibsen's 19th-century play An Enemy of the People is a political drama about a physician who tries to save his town from water pollution only to wind up as a scapegoat. For the doctor the issue is health; after testing the water supply he urges
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This Engineer Published Scientific Papers Using a Lego Microscope
For Yuksel Temiz, photographing extremely tiny subjects is just part of his job as a microelectronics engineer at IBM's Zurich Research Laboratory. Temiz works on minuscule devices that use microfluidics: a type of tiny, liquid-based circuitry that, instead of using metal wires, directs the flow of liquid through hair-thin channels like a microscopic canal system. Specifically, Temiz and his team
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NASA Selects Companies to Develop Human Lunar Landers
Blue Origin, Dynetics and SpaceX will each design and build spacecraft that could return astronauts to the Moon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Virginia Tech researchers link rare medical condition to its cause
Using CRISPR genome editing in zebrafish, scientists with the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC linked an undiagnosed human disease with a rare genetic mutation that causes craniofacial abnormalities. The research began after a study of a 6-year-old girl identified through the National Institutes of Health Undiagnosed Diseases Program.
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What does the 'R' number of coronavirus actually signify?
One figure in particular is being closely scrutinised as ministers decide when to end lockdown R, or the "effective reproduction number", is a way of rating a disease's ability to spread. It's the average number of people on to whom one infected person will pass the virus. For an R of anything above 1, an epidemic will grow exponentially. Anything below 1 and an outbreak will fizzle out – eventua
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There Was No One Like Irrfan Khan
In 1986, when the director Mira Nair was scouting for her film Salaam Bombay! at the National School of Drama in New Delhi, she fixed her gaze on a young man from Jaipur. "I noticed his focus, his intensity, his very remarkable look—his hooded eyes," she later recalled of seeing Irrfan Khan. Though she cast him, she soon decided that he was too towering at more than six feet, that he seemed too w
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Ending the daily work commute may not cut energy usage as much as one might hope
A mass move to working-from-home accelerated by the coronavirus pandemic might not be as beneficial to the planet as many hope, according to a new study.
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A new way to accurately estimate COVID-19 death toll
A new mathematical model has been created to estimate the death toll linked to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States and could be used around the world.
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Clinicians warn of the dangers of equating COVID-19 with high altitude pulmonary edema
Early reports of COVID-19 symptoms and the compelling need to quickly identify treatment options and curb the growing number of critically ill patients have led to erroneous and potentially dangerous comparisons between COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases like high altitude pulmonary edema, or HAPE.
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NHS chiefs set out plans for post-crisis return to normality
Routine operations ban to be eased but capacity to handle virus resurgence will remain
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Vampire bats practice social distancing when they feel ill
Vampire bats are social creatures that build relationships through grooming and food sharing, but when they feel ill they self-isolate and call out for contact far less
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Research Brief: New recycling method could make polyurethane materials sustainable
Researchers at the University of Minnesota are part of a national team in the Center for Sustainable Polymers that has found a better way to recycle a versatile plastic material, called polyurethanes, that could prevent the material from becoming waste.
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Superfast method for ceramic manufacturing could open door to AI-driven material discovery
Scientists have reinvented a 26,000-year-old manufacturing process into an innovative approach to fabricating ceramic materials that has promising applications for solid-state batteries, fuel cells, 3D printing technologies, and beyond.
5h
Stroke experts offer guidelines for treatment during pandemic
Stroke researchers at the University of Cincinnati have released a new report recommending the proper protocol for delivering lifesaving treatment to stroke patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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A new approach to measuring inequalities in development
A new study by researchers from IIASA and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology for the first time systematically explored and compared the use of the Human Life Indicator as a viable alternative to the conventional Human Development Index as a means of measuring progress in development.
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Gladstone scientists identify a new potential reservoir of latent HIV
In a recent paper in PLOS Pathogens, Gladstone Visiting Scientist Nadia Roan, Ph.D., and her team describe a class of cells that preferentially support latent infection by HIV. These cells are characterized by a surface protein called CD127 and are found in tissues such as lymph nodes, which are thought to harbor a larger share of the HIV reservoir than blood does.
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New clinical review casts doubt on use of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19
In its May issue, The FASEB Journal is publishing a comprehensive review on the science and clinical experiences with the drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, first introduced as effective weapons against malaria, rheumatoid arthritis, and the autoimmune disease lupus. Recent anecdotal reports suggested these drugs might be effective against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the cause of the COVID-19 pan
5h
Water is key in catalytic conversion of methane to methanol
Scientists reveal new details that explain how a highly selective catalyst converts methane, the main component of natural gas, to methanol, an easy-to-transport liquid fuel and feedstock for making plastics, paints, and other commodity products. The findings could aid the design of even more efficient/selective catalysts to make methane conversion an economically viable and environmentally attrac
5h
Scientists find highest ever level of microplastics on seafloor
An international research project has revealed the highest levels of microplastic ever recorded on the seafloor, with up to 1.9 million pieces in a thin layer covering just 1 square meter.
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Data from 2 space lasers comprehensively estimate polar ice loss and sea level rise
Ice sheet losses from Greenland and Antarctica have outpaced snow accumulation and contributed approximately 14 millimeters to sea level rise over 16 years (2003 to 2019), a new analysis of data from NASA's laser-shooting satellites has revealed.
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A census of star brightness: The sun is less active and variable than similar stars
By analyzing the brightness variations of 369 solar-like stars, researchers have concluded that the sun is less magnetically active and shows less variability in its brightness than similar stars in the galaxy.
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Seafloor currents may direct microplastics to biodiversity hotspots of the deep
Microplastic particles entering the sea surface were thought to settle to the seafloor directly below them, but now, a new study reveals that slow-moving currents near the bottom of the ocean direct the flow of plastics, creating microplastic hotpots in sediments of the deep sea.
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Eyes send an unexpected signal to the brain
New research, led by Northwestern University, has found that a subset of retinal neurons sends inhibitory signals to the brain. Before, researchers believed the eye only sends excitatory signals.
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Sun is less active than similar stars
By cosmic standards the sun is extraordinarily monotonous. This is the result of a study presented by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in the upcoming issue of Science. For the first time, the scientists compared the sun with hundreds of other stars with similar rotation periods. Most displayed much stronger variations. This raises the question whether the sun ha
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New Princeton study takes superconductivity to the edge
The existence of superconducting currents, or supercurrents, along the exterior of a superconductor, has been surprisingly hard to find. Now, researchers at Princeton have discovered these edge supercurrents in a material that is both a superconductor and a topological semi-metal. This evidence for topological superconductivity could help provide the foundation for applications in quantum computin
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First results from NASA's ICESat-2 mission map 16 years of melting ice sheets
By comparing new measurements from NASA's ICESat-2 mission with the original ICESat mission, which operated from 2003 to 2009, scientists were able to measure precisely how the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have changed over 16 years.
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Nasa space lasers track melting of Earth's ice sheets
US space agency satellites follow the melting trends in Antarctica and Greenland over 16 years.
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It's Slowly Dawning on Trump That He's Losing
It's far too early to know who will win the 2020 presidential election, but at the moment, President Donald Trump is losing. There's ample polling to back that up. RealClearPolitics's average has the presumptive Democratic nominee, Joe Biden, up 6.3 percent on Trump. Polling averages in each of the potentially decisive states show Biden up, too, save North Carolina—and even there, the most recent
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Germany postpones decision on reopening schools
Merkel urges caution and Danish authorities note spike in virus reproduction rate since pupils returned to class
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The Sun Is a Bit Boring, Which May Make It Special
The sun seems a little less active than hundreds of similar stars in our galaxy, which could play a role in why life exists in our solar system.
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Speedy ceramic sintering
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An unexpected order
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Small-molecule defense
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IL-13 hits the gym
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Undetected cases
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Pairs on the edge
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Speedy ceramic sintering
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An unexpected order
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Small-molecule defense
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IL-13 hits the gym
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Undetected cases
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Pairs on the edge
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Mending broken hearts
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A pseudo-real combination
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A poisonous relationship
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SARS-CoV-2 in Iceland
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The tuberculous tickle
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Substantial undocumented infection facilitates the rapid dissemination of novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2)
Estimation of the prevalence and contagiousness of undocumented novel coronavirus [severe acute respiratory syndrome–coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)] infections is critical for understanding the overall prevalence and pandemic potential of this disease. Here, we use observations of reported infection within China, in conjunction with mobility data, a networked dynamic metapopulation model, and Bayesia
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The effect of human mobility and control measures on the COVID-19 epidemic in China
The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak expanded rapidly throughout China. Major behavioral, clinical, and state interventions were undertaken to mitigate the epidemic and prevent the persistence of the virus in human populations in China and worldwide. It remains unclear how these unprecedented interventions, including travel restrictions, affected COVID-19 spread in China. We u
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Regenerative potential of prostate luminal cells revealed by single-cell analysis
Androgen deprivation is the cornerstone of prostate cancer treatment. It results in involution of the normal gland to ~90% of its original size because of the loss of luminal cells. The prostate regenerates when androgen is restored, a process postulated to involve stem cells. Using single-cell RNA sequencing, we identified a rare luminal population in the mouse prostate that expresses stemlike g
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Precision measurement of the neutral pion lifetime
The explicit breaking of the axial symmetry by quantum fluctuations gives rise to the so-called axial anomaly. This phenomenon is solely responsible for the decay of the neutral pion 0 into two photons (), leading to its unusually short lifetime. We precisely measured the decay width of the process. The differential cross sections for 0 photoproduction at forward angles were measured on two targe
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Three-dimensional cross-nanowire networks recover full terahertz state
Terahertz radiation encompasses a wide band of the electromagnetic spectrum, spanning from microwaves to infrared light, and is a particularly powerful tool for both fundamental scientific research and applications such as security screening, communications, quality control, and medical imaging. Considerable information can be conveyed by the full polarization state of terahertz light, yet to dat
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Water-promoted interfacial pathways in methane oxidation to methanol on a CeO2-Cu2O catalyst
Highly selective oxidation of methane to methanol has long been challenging in catalysis. Here, we reveal key steps for the pro­motion of this reaction by water when tuning the selectivity of a well-defined CeO 2 /Cu 2 O/Cu(111) catalyst from carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide to methanol under a reaction environment with methane, oxygen, and water. Ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrosco
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The Sun is less active than other solar-like stars
The magnetic activity of the Sun and other stars causes their brightness to vary. We investigated how typical the Sun's variability is compared with other solar-like stars, i.e., those with near-solar effective temperatures and rotation periods. By combining 4 years of photometric observations from the Kepler space telescope with astrometric data from the Gaia spacecraft, we were able to measure
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A general method to synthesize and sinter bulk ceramics in seconds
Ceramics are an important class of materials with widespread applications because of their high thermal, mechanical, and chemical stability. Computational predictions based on first principles methods can be a valuable tool in accelerating materials discovery to develop improved ceramics. It is essential to experimentally confirm the material properties of such predictions. However, materials scr
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A noncanonical inhibitory circuit dampens behavioral sensitivity to light
Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) drive diverse, light-evoked behaviors that range from conscious visual perception to subconscious, non–image-forming behaviors. It is thought that RGCs primarily drive these functions through the release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate. We identified a subset of melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs) in mice that release the inh
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Ferromagnetic order beyond the superconducting dome in a cuprate superconductor
According to conventional wisdom, the extraordinary properties of the cuprate high-temperature superconductors arise from doping a strongly correlated antiferromagnetic insulator. The highly overdoped cuprates—whose doping lies beyond the dome of superconductivity—are considered to be conventional Fermi liquid metals. We report the emergence of itinerant ferromagnetic order below 4 kelvin for dop
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Evidence for an edge supercurrent in the Weyl superconductor MoTe2
Edge supercurrents in superconductors have long been an elusive target. Interest in them has reappeared in the context of topological superconductivity. We report evidence for the existence of a robust edge supercurrent in the Weyl superconductor molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe 2 ). In a magnetic field B , fluxoid quantization generates a periodic modulation of the edge condensate observable as a "f
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Clocking your work
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Interleukin-13 drives metabolic conditioning of muscle to endurance exercise
Repeated bouts of exercise condition muscle mitochondria to meet increased energy demand—an adaptive response associated with improved metabolic fitness. We found that the type 2 cytokine interleukin-13 (IL-13) is induced in exercising muscle, where it orchestrates metabolic reprogramming that preserves glycogen in favor of fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial respiration. Exercise training–med
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Antimicrobial peptides: Application informed by evolution
Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are essential components of immune defenses of multicellular organisms and are currently in development as anti-infective drugs. AMPs have been classically assumed to have broad-spectrum activity and simple kinetics, but recent evidence suggests an unexpected degree of specificity and a high capacity for synergies. Deeper evaluation of the molecular evolution and pop
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News at a glance
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The coronavirus czar
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'Microplastic Hot Spots' Are Tainting Deep-Sea Ecosystems
Scientists found 2 million microplastic particles in a square meter of sediment, as currents drag debris into seafloor versions of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.
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Satellites map melting ice sheets
A new view of Greenland and Antarctica.
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Microplastic hotspots on the seafloor
Study shows how ocean currents transport them.
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Sun 'less active' than similar stars
Solar census compares 369 candidates.
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Measuring different responses to COVID-19
Analysis looks at six countries and six curves.
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Deep Ocean Currents Carry Plastic Microfibers Into Seafloor Hot Spots
Researchers discover hot spot off the coast of Italy with up to 1.9 million pieces of plastic per square meter. box_isseafloor_sized.jpg Researchers gathered and tested sediment samples, like the one shown here, from the Mediterranean off the coast of Italy. Image credits: Image courtesy of Ian Kane. Earth Thursday, April 30, 2020 – 14:00 Joshua Learn, Contributor (Inside Science) — The deep wa
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Microplastics found in greater quantities than ever before on seabed
Currents act as conveyor belts that concentrate microplastics in hotspots, study suggests Scientists have discovered microplastics in greater quantities than ever before on the seabed, and gathered clues as to how ocean currents and deep-sea circulation have carried them there. Microplastics – tiny pieces of plastic less than 5mm in size – are likely to accumulate most densely on the ocean floor
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Water is key in catalytic conversion of methane to methanol
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and collaborators have revealed new details that explain how a highly selective catalyst converts methane, the main component of natural gas, to methanol, an easy-to-transport liquid fuel and feedstock for making plastics, paints, and other commodity products. The findings could aid the design of even more efficient/selec
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Scientists find highest ever level of microplastics on seafloor
An international research project has revealed the highest levels of microplastic ever recorded on the seafloor, with up to 1.9 million pieces in a thin layer covering just 1 square meter.
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Researchers detect a supercurrent at the edge of a superconductor with a topological twist
A discovery that long eluded physicists has been detected in a laboratory at Princeton. A team of physicists detected superconducting currents—the flow of electrons without wasting energy—along the exterior edge of a superconducting material. The finding was published in the May 1 issue of the journal Science.
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First results from ICESat-2 mission map 16 years of melting ice sheets
Using the most advanced Earth-observing laser instrument NASA has ever flown in space, a team of scientists led by the University of Washington has made precise measurements of how the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have changed over 16 years.
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A new approach to measuring inequalities in development
A new study by researchers from IIASA and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology for the first time systematically explored and compared the use of the Human Life Indicator as a viable alternative to the conventional Human Development Index as a means of measuring progress in development.
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Study shows our sun is less active than similar stars
By cosmic standards the sun is extraordinarily monotonous. This is the result of a study presented by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in the upcoming issue of Science. For the first time, the scientists compared the sun with hundreds of other stars with similar rotation periods. Most displayed much stronger variations. This raises the question whether the sun ha
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More roads, fewer tigers, study suggests
Researchers estimate impact of Asian growth.
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15 platters that matter
Rare images of planet-forming discs.
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Astronomers capture rare images of planet-forming disks around stars
Astronomers have captured images of the inner rims of planet-forming disks located hundreds of light years away. These disks of dust and gas, similar in shape to a music record, form around young stars. The images shed new light on how planetary systems are formed.
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Telecommuting Could Outlive the Pandemic, Lowering Emissions
If the coronavirus ushers in a societal shift toward more telework, that could mean fewer cars on U.S. roads — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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SpaceX Wins Large NASA Contract for Starship Moon Missions
NASA announced today that it has awarded three massive contracts to develop lunar landing systems in an effort to return American astronauts to the Moon's surface as soon as 2024, as Ars Technica reports . "With these contract awards, America is moving forward with the final step needed to land astronauts on the Moon by 2024, including the incredible moment when we will see the first woman set fo
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Boris Johnson gives update on steps to defeat coronavirus
UK prime minister takes helm at coronavirus daily press conference on his return to work
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No blue skies for super-hot planet WASP-79b
The weather forecast for the giant, super-hot Jupiter-size planet WASP-79b is steamy humidity, scattered clouds, iron rain, and yellow skies.
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New Fossils Prove Spinosaurus Was an Underwater Terror
Credit: Kumiko https://www.flickr.com/photos/kmkmks/27388394090/ CC BY-SA 2.0 We're all familiar with Tyrannosaurus Rex, a massive theropod dinosaur from the Cretaceous period and star of several movies about dinosaurs eating people. However, there were even larger, potentially more terrifying beasts on Earth all those millions of years ago. Spinosaurus was even bigger than the T-rex, and new dis
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Remdesivir Shows Promise in Largest of Several Clinical Trials
Gilead's experimental antiviral drug shortened the average time it took COVID-19 patients to recover in a NIAID-sponsored trial. There was weak evidence that it also helped reduce deaths.
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Coronavirus Drug Remdesivir Shortens Recovery, But Is Not a Magic Bullet
Despite conflicting data, the highly anticipated results will make the treatment a standard of care in the United States — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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COVID surprise: Kids are doing all the stuff their helicopter parents used to do for them
The coronavirus pandemic may have a silver lining: It shows how insanely resourceful kids really are. Let Grow, a non-profit promoting independence as a critical part of childhood, ran an "Independence Challenge" essay contest for kids. Here are a few of the amazing essays that came in. Download Let Grow's free Independence Kit with ideas for kids. Worried that the pandemic is ruining kids? That
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BA job cuts signal depth of crisis for airline sector
Post-Brexit Britain will need a viable industry to support global role
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Catastrophic outburst floods carved Greenland's 'Grand Canyon'
Buried a mile beneath Greenland's thick ice sheet is a network of canyons so deep and long that the largest of these has been called Greenland's "Grand Canyon." This megacanyon's shape suggests it was carved by running water prior to widespread glaciation, but exactly when and how the island's grandest canyon formed are topics of intense debate.
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Vår sol är bland de lugnaste stjärnorna
Solens ljusstyrka skiftar litegrann över tid på grund av magnetisk aktivitet som bland annat orsakar solfläckar – men variationen är så liten, bara bråkdelar av en procent, att vi inte märker det. Mätningar av solfläckarna finns sedan 140 år tillbaka, och radioaktiva isotoper visar att solen inte varit mycket mer aktiv på åtminstone 9000 år. Astronomer har länge frågat sig om solen är likadan som
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US reopening/stocks: dicing with disaster
Bullish investors and gung-ho governors are setting themselves up for a big reality check
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Cancer patients without insurance or with Medicaid don't get the same trial benefits
Cancer patients with no health insurance or those enrolled in Medicaid, the federal low-income health insurance program, see smaller survival benefits from experimental therapies in clinical trials, according to study results published today in JAMA Network Open.
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COVID-19 personal protective equipment causes serious skin injuries
A new study of medical staff treating COVID-19-infected patients found 42.8% experienced serious skin injury related to the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), including masks, goggles, face shields, and protective gowns.
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Cardiorespiratory fitness assessment improves accuracy of health predictions
According to a new study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, published by Elsevier, taking cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) into account along with traditional risk factors such as age, sex, blood pressure, cholesterol, and smoking, improves the accuracy of mortality risk assessment.
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Fed extends $600bn main street lending programme
Larger and riskier borrowers will be allowed to tap rescue fund for midsized businesses
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Covid-19 news: Global CO2 emissions could fall 8 per cent in 2020
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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NASA Picks Moon Lander Proposals by SpaceX, Blue Origin, Others
It seems unlikely the space agency will meet President Trump's goal of a return to the lunar surface by the end of 2024.
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Daily briefing: Bizarre Spinosaurus was a swimming dinosaur
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01306-8 New fossil suggests Spinosaurus was a 'river monster' powered by a fin-like tail. Plus: hopeful signs from the largest and most rigorous remdesivir trial yet and trace the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus through its mutations.
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Israel's Arab Moment
During the 2006 war between Israel and Hezbollah, the Lebanese Islamist militia, I was sitting in a restaurant in the city of Haifa when the siren warning of an incoming rocket interrupted my meal. Arab and Jewish diners found shelter in the narrow kitchen, crowding against one another in awkward silence. "Coexistence," one woman finally said, with palpable irony. Today, Israel faces its first na
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LA Offers Free Coronavirus Test to Every Resident
Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti announced on Wednesday that all city and county residents can get a free COVID-19 test, NPR reports . The announcement makes LA the first major city in the US to offer free universal testing — rather than just those who are experiencing symptoms or had to be hospitalized. Free COVID-19 testing is available to any L.A. County resident. https://t.co/13jZaOOegy — Mayo
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Er engelske fodboldspillere dårlige til at score på straffe?
PLUS. Tysk grundighed og statistiske analyser kaster nyt lys over gammel fodboldmyte.
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AI Designs Computer Chips for More Powerful AI
Google's breakthrough could dramatically accelerate the design cycle for intelligent machines.
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Promising drug against Covid-19 unlikely to be available in UK soon
Trial of remdesivir shows fewer deaths and shorter hospital stays Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The first drug against Covid-19 to show promise in trials, reducing the time seriously ill people take to recover in hospital, is unlikely to be available widely in the UK soon, it has emerged. Forty-six people in the UK have received remdesivir as part of the European a
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Cracking the Lyme disease code
The next time a tick feeds on you, Washington State University researchers hope to make sure persistent arthritis caused by Lyme disease doesn't linger for a lifetime.
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Catastrophic outburst floods carved Greenland's 'Grand Canyon'
Buried a mile beneath Greenland's thick ice sheet is a network of canyons so deep and long that the largest of these has been called Greenland's 'Grand Canyon.' This megacanyon's shape suggests it was carved by running water prior to widespread glaciation, but exactly when and how the island's grandest canyon formed are topics of intense debate.
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Pushing the origin of speech back by 20 million years
Researchers find traces of something like our arcuate fasciculus in macaque brains. Since the last ancestor we shared with macaques was 25-30 million years ago, this would push speech way back. The study suggests human speech began in the auditory cortex and eventually extended to include the executive-function areas of the brain. As far as we know, humans alone are capable of speech as we know i
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Scores of coronavirus vaccines are in competition — how will scientists choose the best?
Nature, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01247-2 Developers and funders are laying the groundwork for efficacy trials, but only a handful of vaccines are likely to make the cut.
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Coronavirus Live Updates: As Federal Guidelines Expire, States Struggle to Reopen
Beaches could close in California. Dr. Fauci says he is optimistic that a vaccine could be available as early as January.
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Most people's mental health conditions morph into others over time
As many as 86 per cent of people meet the criteria for a psychiatric diagnosis by middle age – and in many cases, a different diagnosis at some other time
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How coronavirus is affecting your dreams – and what to do about it
Lockdown measures and pandemic-related anxiety may be making you have more vivid dreams. Evidence suggests talking about them can help
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Study on firms' return policies offers guidance on pricing, returns, refunds
Because customers who shop online cannot try on their purchases, a third of all Internet sales get returned. But handling these returns is costly, giving retailers that have both physical stores and digital sales a clear advantage over retailers that operate only online. A new study examined the decisions around the pricing and return policies of a retailer with both stores and online sales to hel
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NASA's Webb Telescope to unravel riddles of a stellar nursery
A bustling stellar nursery in the picturesque Orion Nebula will be a subject of study for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, scheduled to launch in 2021. A team led by Mark McCaughrean, the Webb Interdisciplinary Scientist for Star Formation, will survey an inner region of the nebula called the Trapezium Cluster. This cluster is home to a thousand or so young stars, all crammed into a space only 4
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Investors punish for social irresponsibility depending on proportion of company execs with law degrees
Corporate social irresponsibility (CSI) and other questionable business practices that ultimately harm stakeholders occur frequently, drawing vastly different reactions from investors.
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Study on firms' return policies offers guidance on pricing, returns, refunds
A new study examined the decisions around the pricing and return policies of a retailer with both stores and online sales to help explain why some firms opt to fully refund customers for their returns while others charge a fee for online returns. The findings offer guidance to retailers about pricing and policies on returns and refunds.
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Machine learning enhances light-matter interactions in dielectric nanostructures
The discovery has promising possibilities for the development of a wide range of photonic devices and applications including those involved in optical sensing, optoacoustic vibrations, and narrowband filtering.
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A world first: Assessing kidney quality before transplantation using photoacoustic imaging
Demand for kidney transplants is so high that doctors now routinely accept damaged donor kidneys, with limited means to assess their quality. A new, non-invasive, photoacoustic imaging technique allows doctors to 'see' kidney scarring quickly and accurately with a simple scan. An upcoming, landmark clinical trial will test the new technique on donor kidney quality. The technology could potentially
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Telemedicine transforms response to COVID-19 pandemic in disease epicenter
A rapid increase in 'virtual' visits during the COVID-19 pandemic could transform the way physicians provide care in the United States going forward, according to a new study led by researchers from NYU Grossman School of Medicine.
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Compound offers complete pain relief in mice
A new compound designed to treat chronic pain offered complete relief when tested in mice, researchers say. Between 7 and 10% of the world's population suffers from chronic pain originating from damaged nerves. Now, researchers have found a new way to treat the severely debilitating disease. Researchers have worked for more than a decade to design, develop, and test a drug that provides complete
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Electronic fabric lets you play Tetris with your arm
Researchers have created ultrathin, stretchable electronic material that is gas permeable, allowing the material to "breathe." They designed the material specifically for use in biomedical or wearable technologies, since the gas permeability allows sweat and volatile organic compounds to evaporate away from the skin, making it more comfortable for users—especially for long-term wear. "The gas per
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Baby walkers to help your little one start cruising
First steps to first steps. (Amazon/) When your little ones start pulling up on the couch, you know it is only a matter of time before they launch off and take their first steps. Perhaps your baby is perfectly happy scooching around on all fours, and you'd like to give them some encouragement to get upright. You can take a break from holding their hands all the time by setting them up with a baby
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Top-secret U.S. space plane about to leave Earth for years
The U.S. Air Force is preparing to launch its X-37B space drone made by Boeing. The spacecraft is like a mini-space shuttle and is used to test technologies. X-37B's missions are highly classified, leading to speculation about their purpose. The U.S. Space Force is about to launch the sixth mission of the secretive X-37B space plane. Where will the plane go and what will it do? Specific details a
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Robert May, Theoretical Ecologist Who Advised UK Gov't, Dies
The Australian physicist-turned-biologist served as a top scientist in the UK government and president of the Royal Society, among other prestigious appointments.
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Researchers offer ways to address life under COVID-19
An international team of researchers has outlined ways to manage different facets of life under the spread of the COVID-19 virus, ranging from how we can combat racially driven bias and fake news to how we can increase cooperation and better manage stress.
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Better understanding of nature's nanomachines may help in design of future drugs
Many of the drugs and medicines that we rely on today are natural products taken from microbes like bacteria and fungi. Within these microbes, the drugs are made by tiny natural machines—mega-enzymes known as nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). A research team led by McGill University has gained a better understanding of the structures of NRPSs and the processes by which they work. This impr
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Does 'participatory budgeting' lead to political patronage?
Participatory Budgeting began in Brazil in 1988 and then, in 2011, New York City adopted the practice, giving citizens an opportunity to determine priorities for public spending in their communities.
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Astronomers could spot life signs orbiting long-dead stars
The next generation of powerful Earth- and space-based telescopes will be able to hunt distant solar systems for evidence of life on Earth-like exoplanets—particularly those that chaperone burned-out stars known as white dwarfs.
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Cultivating cooperation through kinship
While the capability for organisms to work together is by no means novel, humans possess an unparalleled capacity for cooperation that seems to contradict Darwinian evolutionary principles. Humans often exhibit traits—such as sympathy, loyalty, courage, and patriotism—that prioritize collective well-being over individual fitness, and often cooperation occurs among individuals with no shared biolog
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HRM practices a predictor for business resilience after layoffs
As retrenchments continue to cloud the foreseeable future of businesses worldwide, new research from the University of South Australia, the University of Melbourne and RMIT indicates that some businesses will fare better than others—and it's all dependent on their type of human resource management system.
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How Quickly an Unfounded Fear Can Become Reasonable Caution
Upon my return to Taiwan from New York last month, I had to undergo a 14-day quarantine. I intended to use my time wisely. I was finally going to finish edits to my novel, which had taken a back seat to other things in my life—teaching, freelance work. But of course, that's not what happened. Confronted with the realities of self-quarantine, I discovered I couldn't bear to look at my book. My dif
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The Irresistible Intimacy of Normal People
O nce, a woman who works in publishing told me that the metric for a hit book is whether, after reading it, you feel immediately compelled to pass it on. After I read Sally Rooney's Normal People late last year, I was determined to press it into the hands of everyone I knew; uselessly so, it turned out, because most had already read it and had the same impulse. Rooney has her detractors, many of
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BA warns Gatwick staff it may not resume flights there
Airline's operations at London's second biggest airport face brunt of 12,000 job cuts
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Better understanding of nature's nanomachines may help in design of future drugs
Many of the drugs and medicines that we rely on today are natural products taken from microbes like bacteria and fungi. Within these microbes, the drugs are made by tiny natural machines—mega-enzymes known as nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). A research team led by McGill University has gained a better understanding of the structures of NRPSs and the processes by which they work. This impr
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Researchers offer ways to address life under COVID-19
Researchers have outlined ways to manage different facets of life under the spread of the COVID-19 virus, ranging from how we can combat racially driven bias and fake news to how we can increase cooperation and better manage stress.
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Blood clotting a significant cause of death in patients with COVID-19
A new study has found that Irish patients admitted to hospital with severe COVID-19 infection are experiencing abnormal blood clotting that contributes to death in some patients.
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Machine learning enhances light–Matter interactions in dielectric nanostructures
A paper published in Advanced Photonics "Enhanced light–matter interactions in dielectric nanostructures via machine-learning approach," suggests that machine-learning techniques can be used to enhance metasurfaces, optimizing them for nonlinear optics and optomechanics. The discovery has promising possibilities for the development of a wide range of photonic devices and applications including tho
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Scientists suggest using machine learning to predict materials' properties
Researchers from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) in collaboration with colleagues from Southern Federal University and Indian Institute of Technology-Madras (IIT Madras) suggested using machine learning methods to predict the properties of artificial sapphire crystals—a unique material widely used in microelectronics, optics and electronics. The results of the study we
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Transatlantic slavery introduced infectious diseases to the Americas
The remains of three slaves found in Mexico contain the earliest signs of the hepatitis B virus and yaws bacteria in the Americas, suggesting transatlantic slavery introduced these diseases
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Does 'participatory budgeting' lead to political patronage?
Researchers ask whether 'Participatory Budgeting' in New York City has become a vehicle for vote-getting by municipal legislators.
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Stay-at-home science project: Craft handmade blubber
Fatty (but warm) hands. (Purbita Saha/) Welcome to PopSci 's at-home science projects series. On weekdays at noon, we'll be posting new projects that use ingredients you can buy at the grocery store. Show us how it went by tagging your project on social media using #popsciprojects. When a gray whale swims from Alaska to Mexico in December to start a family, it doesn't stop for a single meal or sn
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Deep Brain Optogenetic Control Without Implants
Engineering an ultra-sensitive light-activated ion channel into brain cells allows for the control of neurons in live animals without a brain-implanted light source.
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Galileo's Lessons for Living and Working Through a Plague
An outbreak in Italy in the 1630s forced him to find new ways of doing his research and connecting with family — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Oasis and Warehouse chains close with loss of more than 1,800 jobs
Retail brands' online outlets, stores and concessions in UK to shut 'indefinitely'
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Investors punish for social irresponsibility depending on proportion of company execs with law degrees
The extent to which investors punish firms for corporate social irresponsibility is associated with the proportion of top management executives in a firm who have a law degree, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.
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Better understanding of nature's nanomachines may help in design of future drugs
Many of the drugs and medicines that we rely on today are natural products taken from microbes like bacteria and fungi. Within these microbes, the drugs are made by tiny natural machines known as nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). A research team led by McGill University has gained a better understanding of the structures of NRPSs and the processes by which they work. This improved understa
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Pharmacists warn against malarial drugs as a cure for coronavirus
Early reports that anti-malarial drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine could be used to prevent and cure the virus have received a caution from Huddersfield pharmacists in an article published in the British Journal of Pharmacy.
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Working as peer-support specialist helps people with criminal and psychiatric histories
As houses of detention increasingly turn to early-release initiatives in the pandemic, a study explores a hopeful reintegration path for the formerly incarcerated with mental illness.
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Galileo's Lessons for Living and Working Through a Plague
An outbreak in Italy in the 1630s forced him to find new ways of doing his research and connecting with family — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Naked mole-rats need carbon dioxide to avoid seizures and here's why
African naked mole-rats are sometimes referred to as animal superheroes. They resist cancer, tolerate pain, and live a remarkably long time. They're also known for their ability to handle high levels of carbon dioxide and can go for several minutes without oxygen. But researchers say they may have found the mole-rats' kryptonite: they need high levels of carbon dioxide to function.
7h
The story of three African slaves during Spanish colonialism, as told by their bones
Scientists tell the story of three 16th century African slaves identified from a mass burial site in Mexico City. Using a combination of genetic, osteological, and isotope analyses, the scientists determined from where in Africa they were likely captured, the physical hardships they experienced as slaves, and what novel pathogens they may have carried with them across the Atlantic.
7h
'Breathable' electronics pave the way for more functional wearable tech
Engineering researchers have created ultrathin, stretchable electronic material that is gas permeable, allowing the material to 'breathe.' The material was designed specifically for use in biomedical or wearable technologies, since the gas permeability allows sweat and volatile organic compounds to evaporate away from the skin, making it more comfortable for users — especially for long-term wear.
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About Remdesivir and About "Game-Changers"
We've had several releases of remdesivir data, and this was not exactly one of those controlled-release formulations. No, this was more in the "chaotic mess" category, with news items coming from several sources with partial information. I decided not to blog on it until the loud banging noises stopped, and I'm glad I did, since I would have had to have revised (several times) whatever piece I ma
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The White House Is Trying to Shut Down NASA's Last Mars Rover
Pack It Up U.S. President Trump's proposed 2021 budget could spell doom for the country's Mars exploration missions, including its last Mars rover. It's an unusual move for a President who has repeatedly urged NASA to send a crewed mission to Mars — and even offered the space agency unlimited funding to do so. But the proposed budget cuts would debilitate several ongoing missions, Scientific Amer
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New-Voter Registration Is Plummeting
G amers playing Nintendo's Animal Crossing encountered an unusual sight late one afternoon last week. The massively popular online video game allows participants to customize their appearance, and in their onscreen avatar, some of the players were sporting political swag. A few wore T-shirts with the name NextGen or NGA , for the liberal organizing group NextGen America. Some wore hats that read
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Nanodevices for the brain could thwart formation of Alzheimer's plaques
Researchers designed a nanodevice with the potential to prevent peptides from forming dangerous plaques in the brain in order to halt development of Alzheimer's disease.
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Astronomers could spot life signs orbiting long-dead stars
To help future scientists make sense of what their telescopes are showing them, Cornell University astronomers have developed a spectral field guide for rocky worlds orbiting white dwarf stars.
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Catching nuclear smugglers: Fast algorithm could enable cost-effective detectors at borders
A new algorithm could enable faster, less expensive detection of weapons-grade nuclear materials at borders, quickly differentiating between benign and illicit radiation signatures in the same cargo.
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Reduced obesity for weighted-vest wearers
Scientists have found a new method of reducing human body weight and fat mass using weighted vests. The new study indicates that there is something comparable to built-in bathroom scales that contributes to keeping our body weight and, by the same token, fat mass constant.
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The best headphones for editing audio and video
Hear what you're working with. (ConvertKit via Unsplash/) When you're editing audio or video, a proper set of headphones designed specifically for the task is essential for doing it right. The most common headphones produced for consumer use often accentuate different elements of the sonic spectrum to enhance the user's listening experience, editing headphones are typically designed to be as accu
7h
Mexico's economy shrinks under pressure from coronavirus
Analysts fear government's timid fiscal response will prolong the pain
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Tiny zaps could steady human hands for robotic surgery
Delivering small, yet perceptible buzzes of electrical currents to fingertips can give surgeons an accurate perception of distance to contact when they're using robotic arms for surgeries, researchers report. The insight enabled users to control robotic fingers precisely enough to gently land on fragile surfaces. Steady hands and uninterrupted, sharp vision are critical when performing surgery on
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Common Sense Comes Closer to Computers
One evening last October, the artificial intelligence researcher Gary Marcus was amusing himself on his iPhone by making a state-of-the-art neural network look stupid. Marcus' target, a deep learning network called GPT-2, had recently become famous for its uncanny ability to generate plausible-sounding English prose with just a sentence or two of prompting. When journalists at The Guardian fed it
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Children of the pandemic: How will kids be shaped by the coronavirus crisis?
Drawing on past crises, psychologists launch studies—and offer solutions
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Researchers offer ways to address life under COVID-19
An international team of researchers has outlined ways to manage different facets of life under the spread of the COVID-19 virus, ranging from how we can combat racially driven bias and fake news to how we can increase cooperation and better manage stress.
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Wake Forest Baptist shares key elements needed in setting up designated COVID-19 unit
In an effort to rapidly provide specialized care for patients with coronavirus-like symptoms while protecting the safety of health care workers, doctors at Wake Forest Baptist Health created a special respiratory isolation unit from an existing 24-bed medical-surgical unit in the hospital in Winston-Salem.
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Temple scientists regenerate neurons in mice with spinal cord injury and optic nerve damage
Each year thousands of patients face life-long losses in sensation and motor function from spinal cord injury and related conditions in which axons are badly damaged or severed. New research in mice by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine Temple University (LKSOM) shows, however, that gains in functional recovery from these injuries may be possible, thanks to a molecule known as Lin28,
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9/11 research reveals effective strategies to cope with COVID-19 stress
Research into mass trauma events, like the 9/11 terror attacks, suggests effective ways to cope during the current COVID-19 crisis, according to research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
8h
'Breathable' electronics pave the way for more functional wearable tech
Engineering researchers have created ultrathin, stretchable electronic material that is gas permeable, allowing the material to 'breathe.' The material was designed specifically for use in biomedical or wearable technologies, since the gas permeability allows sweat and volatile organic compounds to evaporate away from the skin, making it more comfortable for users — especially for long-term wear.
8h
UCF researchers develop groundbreaking new rocket-propulsion system
A University of Central Florida researcher and his team have developed an advanced new rocket-propulsion system once thought to be impossible.The system, known as a rotating detonation rocket engine, will allow upper stage rockets for space missions to become lighter, travel farther, and burn more cleanly.The result were published this month in the journal Combustion and Flame.
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Blood clotting a significant cause of death in patients with COVID-19
A study led by clinician scientists at RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences has found that Irish patients admitted to hospital with severe COVID-19 infection are experiencing abnormal blood clotting that contributes to death in some patients.
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The digital diagnostic helper: Apple Watch detects severe coronary ischemia
Apple watches have long been able to record electrocardiograms (ECGs) and send warnings in the event of an irregular heart rhythm such as atrial fibrillation. Now a team of cardiologists from the Cardiopraxis Mainz and the Department of Cardiology of the University Medical Center Mainz discovered that, with the help of an Apple Watch, cardiac arrhythmias as well as coronary ischemia can be identif
8h
Some of the latest climate models provide unrealistically high projections of future warming
A new study from University of Michigan climate researchers concludes that some of the latest-generation climate models may be overly sensitive to carbon dioxide increases and therefore project future warming that is unrealistically high.
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African skeletons from early colonial Mexico tell the story of first-generation slaves
Three 16th-century skeletons from a mass burial in Mexico City highlight the role of the transatlantic slave trade in introducing and disseminating new pathogens to the Americas. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia in Mexico analyzed skeletal features, genetic data and isotopes to explore the life history of thr
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Mole-rats' failure to social distance offers clue for treating some neurological disorders
A new study into why African naked mole-rats shun social distancing in favor of crowded sleeping arrangements provides insight into what may be occurring in the brains of people with certain neurological conditions, including autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. The work could point toward useful therapies in treating these disorders.
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The story of three African slaves during Spanish colonialism, as told by their bones
In a study appearing April 30 in the journal Current Biology, scientists tell the story of three 16th century African slaves identified from a mass burial site in Mexico City. Using a combination of genetic, osteological, and isotope analyses, the scientists determined from where in Africa they were likely captured, the physical hardships they experienced as slaves, and what novel pathogens they m
8h
Naked mole-rats need carbon dioxide to avoid seizures and here's why
African naked mole-rats are sometimes referred to as animal superheroes. They resist cancer, tolerate pain, and live a remarkably long time. They're also known for their ability to handle high levels of carbon dioxide and can go for several minutes without oxygen. But researchers reporting in Current Biology on April 30 say they may have found the mole-rats' kryptonite: they need high levels of ca
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Fauci: This COVID Drug Might Actually Work
A coronavirus vaccine is likely still years out — but that isn't discouraging research into potentially life-saving drug treatments for COVID-19 patients. One drug in particular is currently drawing the attention of experts. White House health advisor Anthony Fauci said yesterday that early trials of antiviral drug remdesivir, produced by Gilead Sciences, showed "quite good news," as CNBC reports
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How Much Neanderthal DNA do Humans Have?
Our ancestors interbred with Neanderthals, and evidence of these ancient liaisons can still be found in the DNA of people living today.
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Early Remdesivir Data for Covid-19 Is Finally Here
Preliminary findings from a major clinical trial of the antiviral drug indicate it speeds recovery time for some patients. But much more testing lies ahead.
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Watch: DIY ventilator uses hardware store parts
Mechanical engineers have built a ventilator prototype from commonly available parts that only cost around $200. The project could help alleviate developing world concerns about medical equipment shortages, the researchers say. The experimental mechanical ventilator prototype can be assembled with high volume, in-stock materials and without advanced engineering training, says Ricardo Mejia-Alvare
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Three men were buried in Mexico 500 years ago. DNA and bones reveal their stories of enslavement
Born and raised in West Africa, the men survived violence and chronic disease in the Americas
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Author Correction: Tumours with PI3K activation are resistant to dietary restriction
Nature, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2215-y
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The Coronavirus Conspiracy Boom
COVID-19 has created a perfect storm for conspiracy theorists. Here we have a global pandemic, a crashing economy, social isolation, and restrictive government policies: All of these can cause feelings of extreme anxiety, powerlessness, and stress, which in turn encourage conspiracy beliefs. For more than a month, an urban legend that the pandemic was predicted in an early-'80s Dean Koontz thrill
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Ending the daily work commute may not cut energy usage as much as one might hope
A mass move to working-from-home accelerated by the Coronavirus pandemic might not be as beneficial to the planet as many hope, according to a new study by the Centre for Research into Energy Demand Solutions (CREDS).
8h
Research helps police understand child to parent abuse more than ever before
Researchers have provided detailed insights and recommendations to help one of the UK's largest police forces recognise, report and analyse instances of violence from children towards parents.
8h
Naked mole-rats need carbon dioxide to avoid seizures and here's why
African naked mole-rats are sometimes referred to as animal superheroes. They resist cancer, tolerate pain, and live a remarkably long time. They're also known for their ability to handle high levels of carbon dioxide and can go for several minutes without oxygen. But researchers reporting in Current Biology on April 30 say they may have found the mole-rats' kryptonite: they need high levels of ca
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The pieces of the puzzle of covid-19's origin are coming to light
How they fit together, though, remains mysterious
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Smokers seem less likely than non-smokers to fall ill with covid-19
That may point towards a way of treating it
8h
African forest elephants are in more trouble than we thought
The African forest elephant population size is smaller than believed, leaving the species in an even graver position than previously acknowledged, researchers report. The researchers come to this conclusion based on one of the largest known populations being 40 to 80% smaller than previously suggested. Lack of knowledge about the African forest animal has hindered conservation efforts, according
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The Sahara Desert was once flooded with history's most vicious dinosaurs
Huge predatory dinosaurs—like the abelisaur, a short-snouted predatory dinosaur and the pterosaur, both pictured here—once roamed regions of what is now the Sahara Desert. (Artwork by Davide Bonadonna, under the scientific supervision of Simone Maganuco and Nizar Ibrahim/) During these times of quarantine, last month feels like 100 million years ago. But if you were to actually go back to that pe
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Researchers are developing potential treatment for chronic pain
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have developed a new way to treat chronic pain which has been tested in mice. With a compound designed and developed by the researchers themselves, they can achieve complete pain relief.
8h
Marine litter in the Bay of Biscay
The scientific journal 'Marine Pollution Bulletin' has just published 'Microplastics in the Bay of Biscay: an overview', a piece of work by the 'Materials+Technologies' research group (GMT) of the Faculty of Engineering – Gipuzkoa. It is the first scientific paper that analyses all the research studies conducted until now about the presence of microplastics in the Bay of Biscay. It includes the re
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Business this week
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KAL's cartoon
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Politics this week
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As Georgia Reopens, Virus Study Shows Black Residents May Bear Brunt
A C.D.C. report released Wednesday suggests that the African-American community in the state is especially vulnerable to infection.
8h
Naked mole-rats need carbon dioxide to avoid seizures and here's why
African naked mole-rats are sometimes referred to as animal superheroes. They resist cancer, tolerate pain, and live a remarkably long time. They're also known for their ability to handle high levels of carbon dioxide and can go for several minutes without oxygen. But researchers reporting in Current Biology on April 30 say they may have found the mole-rats' kryptonite: they need high levels of ca
8h
Some of the latest climate models provide unrealistically high projections of future warming
A new study from University of Michigan climate researchers concludes that some of the latest-generation climate models may be overly sensitive to carbon dioxide increases and therefore project future warming that is unrealistically high.
8h
African skeletons from early colonial Mexico tell the story of first-generation slaves
Five centuries after Charles I of Spain authorized the transport of the first African slaves to the Viceroyalty of New Spain, the ancestry of the hundreds of thousands of abducted and enslaved people forms an integral part of the genetic and cultural heritage of the Americas. The origins and experiences of those enslaved individuals, however, remains largely unknown.
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Gravitational waves could prove the existence of the quark-gluon plasma
Neutron stars are among the densest objects in the Uiverse. If our Sun, with its radius of 700,000 kilometres were a neutron star, its mass would be condensed into an almost perfect sphere with a radius of around 12 kilometres. When two neutron stars collide and merge into a hyper-massive neutron star, the matter in the core of the new object becomes incredibly hot and dense. According to physical
8h
Does cannabis help you sleep?
Marijuana is commonly used to help people fall asleep, but does the science back that up?
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Lawyers warn employers could face legal claims after lockdown eases
Inadequate protection measures expected to lead to action from workers over Covid-19
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Randomised test of 100,000 to help decide end of UK lockdown
Home testing kits will be sent out next week to clear up 'Wild West' of Covid-19 estimates Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A randomly selected group of 100,000 people in England will be tested for Covid-19 in an attempt to quantify whether transmission levels of the virus are low enough to exit the lockdown. The tests, next week, will provide a national snapshot of t
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The Dire Diplomacy of the Global 'Race for a Vaccine'
Stopping this pandemic will depend on scientists' ability to form partnerships across borders. President Trump has only made us weaker at this game.
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Nanoparticles enter living cells to gather cancer clues
A new imaging technique sends nanoparticles into living cells to reveal important information about cell structure—including how tumor cells physically change as they form a tumor. The technique captures mechanical properties in living subjects that probe fundamental relationships between physics and in vivo (in a living organism) biology. The results appear in the journal Materials Today . "We e
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Here's Why Elon Musk Keeps Complaining About Quarantine
After a Trump-like Twitter rampage about the coronavirus lockdown, billionaire and Tesla CEO Elon Musk had another meltdown during a Wednesday call with analysts and investors. Long story short, the mercurial entrepreneur doesn't seem motivated by civil liberties. Instead, he's angry that his factory is shut down — and he's willing to put lives at risk to open it back up again. "We are a bit worr
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Research helps police understand child to parent abuse more than ever before
Researchers have provided detailed insights and recommendations to help one of the UK's largest police forces recognise, report and analyse instances of violence from children towards parents.
8h
Gravitational waves could prove the existence of the quark-gluon plasma
According to modern particle physics, matter produced when neutron stars merge is so dense that it could exist in a state of dissolved elementary particles. This state of matter, called quark-gluon plasma, might produce a specific signature in gravitational waves. Physicists at Goethe University Frankfurt and the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies have now calculated this process using super
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Guide released for supporting the mental health of frontline COVID-19 staff
COVID-19 healthcare workers will be psychologically impacted by their work during the pandemic and will require psychological support from multiple levels in their organisations, according to a review by researchers from Queen Mary University of London, London's Air Ambulance and Barts Health NHS Trust, and a London-based A&E doctor.
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Energy generated on offshore wind turbine farms, and conveyed ashore as hydrogen fuel
Researchers at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Engineering -Vitoria-Gasteiz have proposed using the energy generated on offshore wind turbine farms to produce hydrogen in situ instead of conveying it ashore by cable. They have shown that this is technically possible and economically viable. They have also confirmed that incorporating some very low-cost components significantly improves wind turbine effic
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The ova of obese women have lower levels of omega-3 fatty acids
A study conducted by researchers from the UPV/EHU, Cruces Hospital, the IVI Clinic Bilbao and Biocruces Bizkaia shows that the oocytes of obese or overweight women have a different composition of fatty acids. This difference in levels could be linked to poor IVF outcomes and could suggest that the offspring of overweight women have an unfavourable environment even before conception.
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New report: Advancing the 2030 Agenda in African cities through knowledge co-production
The challenges of sustainable urban development in African cities can best be met through an innovative approach that crosses boundaries between science, policy and society, according to a new report published by the International Science Council (ISC) today.
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Study helps arboreta, botanical gardens meet genetic diversity conservation goals
In a groundbreaking study, an international team of 21 scientists led by Sean Hoban, Ph.D., Conservation Biologist at The Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Illinois, evaluated five genera spanning the plant tree of life (Hibiscus, Magnolia, Pseudophoenix, Quercus and Zamia) to understand how much genetic diversity currently exists in collections in botanical gardens and arboreta worldwide.
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Double bubbles pierce with less trouble
Two microscopic bubbles are better than one at penetrating soft materials, concludes a new study by engineers at the University of California, Riverside.
8h
Creating buzz with potential end-users helps entrepreneurs with crowdfunding campaigns
Entrepreneurs launching a crowdfunding campaign to fund new product development benefit by reaching out early to engage with potential end-users, say business researchers from three universities.
8h
Study helps arboreta, botanical gardens meet genetic diversity conservation goals
In a groundbreaking study, an international team of 21 scientists led by Sean Hoban, Ph.D., Conservation Biologist at The Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Illinois, evaluated five genera spanning the plant tree of life (Hibiscus, Magnolia, Pseudophoenix, Quercus and Zamia) to understand how much genetic diversity currently exists in collections in botanical gardens and arboreta worldwide.
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AMC Theatres Splits With Universal After 'Trolls World Tour' VOD Release
Meanwhile, Netflix is making a short about social distancing.
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Double bubbles pierce with less trouble
Two microscopic bubbles penetrate soft materials better than one, concludes a new study by engineers. Optical cavitation uses a laser to form bubbles in a liquid that expand rapidly then collapse. The new article shows two bubbles produce long, fine jets that penetrate far enough with only five pulses to make cavitation potentially suitable for transfection or needle-free injections.
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Can Your Community Handle a Natural Disaster and Coronavirus at the Same Time?
If the forecasts are right, the U.S. could be facing more natural disasters this year — on top of the coronavirus pandemic. Local governments aren't prepared.
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Groovy photoelectrodes: How a textured surface can dramatically boost performance
In the present context of concerning CO2 levels and sustainability issues, the search for efficient and clean alternatives for producing energy continues. Among the most attractive ecofriendly fuels known, hydrogen stands out and there is much potential for its use. But researchers are yet to come up with a cost-efficient and scalable method to produce large amounts of hydrogen, and a hydrogen eco
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VCU study finds that many published psychology experiments lack evidence of validity
An examination of nearly 350 published psychological experiments found that nearly half failed to show that they were based on a valid foundation of empirical evidence, suggesting that a wide swath of psychological science is based on an 'untested foundation.'
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Lipophilic guanylhydrazone analogues as promising trypanocidal agents: An extended SAR study
In this report, a team of researchers lead by Dr. Grigoris Zoidis at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens (Athens, Greece), in collaboration with researchers at the Ruder Boskovic Institute (Zagreb (Croatia), and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (London, United Kingdom) have attempted to extend the structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of a number of lipoph
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Intricate magnetic configuration of 3D nanoscale gyroid networks revealed
A multinational team of researchers from Tohoku University and institutions in the UK, Germany and Switzerland has revealed the magnetic states of nanoscale gyroids, 3D chiral network-like nanostructures. The findings add a new candidate system for research into unconventional information processing and emergent phenomena relevant to spintronics.
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Groovy photoelectrodes: How a textured surface can dramatically boost their performance
Water molecules can be split to produce hydrogen–a clean fuel–by leveraging solar energy and materials that can convert it into electricity. In a new study, scientists from the Nagoya Institute of Technology, Japan, reveal that creating a textured surface greatly enhances the energy conversion performance of one such material, opening the door to making solar-to-hydrogen conversion technology a
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Optical 'nanomixer': Scientists propose new method for mixing liquids
Every now and then, scientists need to control the process of mixing liquids in vessels so small that the thinnest needle or even a hair wouldn't fit in there. At the same time, controlling the diffusion speed of molecules in the so-called microreactors is extremely important for the purposes of designing new drugs, conducting biological experiments and even to perform fast disease detection tests
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Scientists suggest using machine learning to predict materials' properties
Researchers suggested using machine learning methods to predict the properties of artificial sapphire crystals. It is a unique material widely used in microelectronics, optics and electronics. The results of the study were published in the Journal of Electronic Science and Technology and the illustration from the article hit the coverpage of the journal.
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Protein mystery of three brain diseases unraveled
The accumulation of one particular protein in the brain is at the basis of three very different age-related conditions. Until recently, nobody understood how this was possible. Research now reveals that the shape of the protein determines the clinical picture.
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Catch rate is a poor indicator of lake fishery health
Fishery collapses can be difficult to forecast and prevent due to hyperstability, a phenomenon where catch rates remain high even as fish abundance declines. In a recent Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences study, researchers conducted a whole-lake experiment to reveal the causes of hyperstability in recreational fisheries. Fish habitat preferences were found to leave them vulnerable
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Catch rate is a poor indicator of lake fishery health
Fishery collapses can be difficult to forecast and prevent due to hyperstability, a phenomenon where catch rates remain high even as fish abundance declines. In a recent Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences study, researchers conducted a whole-lake experiment to reveal the causes of hyperstability in recreational fisheries. Fish habitat preferences were found to leave them vulnerable
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Sårbarheder i flere WordPress-plugins gør det muligt at snyde til eksamen
It-sikkerhedseksperter fra Check Point havde succes med at udnytte sårbarheder i WordPress-plugins til at opnå enhver hackers barndomsdrøm.
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Undertakers face shortages of body bags and PPE as demand soars
Funeral directors fear under-reporting of Covid-19 deaths in care homes leaves them vulnerable to infection
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Professor modsiger kollegerne: Forbud imod at sprøjte, gøde og pløje beskyttede engarealer har en effekt
PLUS. Hvis man vil værne om den danske biodiversitet, skal der laves tiltag der er målrettet de truede arter, men også for den almindelige natur, og her kan regeringens forslag om et forbud virke, vurderer professor fra Københavns Universitet.
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CSI Prussia: Detective Finds Thief Who Stole Barrel of Coins
Originally published in April 1856 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Fragility of the Global Nurse Supply Chain
Daisy Doronila's journey to the United States was, in many ways, typical of a nurse from the Philippines. The youngest of three, she first left her home country to work in Abu Dhabi, where one of her sisters was employed at a bank, before making her way to California in 1990. There, she cared for patients at the Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center, a troubled facility that served the poore
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A new solvent system: Hydrothermal molten salt
In a new report on Science Advances, T. Voisin and a research team in the Scientific Research National Center and the Institute of Technology and Energy Management in France, proposed a new solvent system. The hydrothermal molten salt (HyMoS) system, is composed of a molten salt in pressurized water and is able to change the solubility of inorganics in supercritical water. The scientists used sodi
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Alabama student names NASA's first Mars helicopter
An Alabama high school student named NASA's first Mars helicopter that will be deployed to the red planet later this summer.
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We can't rely on rampant consumerism to get us out of this mess
Hyperconsumption adds to environmental destruction that brings people into contact with animal viruses that can spark pandemics. We have to avoid the temptation to rely on it to get us out, writes Graham Lawton
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Big data to help predict individual trauma patient outcome
China's National Center for Trauma Medicine are using big data to help identify trauma patients who could experience potential adverse health events in the emergency department through the aid of a clinical decision support system.
9h
Double bubbles pierce with less trouble
Two microscopic bubbles penetrate soft materials better than one, concludes a new study by engineers at UC Riverside. Optical cavitation uses a laser to form bubbles in a liquid that expand rapidly then collapse. The new paper shows two bubbles produce long, fine jets that penetrate far enough with only five pulses to make cavitation potentially suitable for transfection or needle-free injections.
9h
Creating buzz with potential end-users helps entrepreneurs with crowdfunding campaigns
Entrepreneurs launching a crowdfunding campaign to fund new product development benefit by reaching out early to engage with potential end-users, say business researchers from three universities.
9h
Study helps arboreta, botanical gardens meet genetic diversity conservation goals
In a groundbreaking study, an international team of 21 scientists evaluated five genera spanning the plant tree of life (Hibiscus, Magnolia, Pseudophoenix, Quercus and Zamia) to understand how much genetic diversity currently exists in collections in botanical gardens and arboreta worldwide.
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Coronavirus deaths: how does Britain compare with other countries? | David Spiegelhalter
It's tempting to try to construct a league table, but we'll have to wait months, if not years, for the true picture • Coronavirus latest updates • See all our coronavirus coverage At prime minister's questions on Wednesday, Keir Starmer said he had added up a total of 27,241 coronavirus deaths so far, leaving the UK "possibly on track to have the worst death rate in Europe". Is he right? Unfortun
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The World's Biggest Social Virtual Reality Gathering Is Happening Right Now
It's one of the most under-appreciated science fiction films of the past decade, but Luc Besson's Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (also the most expensive independent film ever made) subtly depicts a compelling vision for the way tools like augmented and virtual reality devices may intersect with the future of online shopping. Image Credit: Aaron Frank The scene takes place in Big Mar
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Jaguar Envisions Car Design for a Post-Pandemic World
Julian Thomson, the automaker's director of design, shares his predictions for what drivers can look forward to.
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An Online Exhibition Celebrates Photography's Rising Stars
The Circulation(s) Festival, which showcases the field's most promising up-and-comers, is staging an exhibition entirely on social media.
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Do Your Genes Predispose You to COVID-19?
Individual differences in genetic makeup may explain our susceptibility to the new coronavirus and the severity of the disease it causes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Do Your Genes Predispose You to COVID-19?
Individual differences in genetic makeup may explain our susceptibility to the new coronavirus and the severity of the disease it causes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Do Your Genes Predispose You to COVID-19?
Individual differences in genetic makeup may explain our susceptibility to the new coronavirus and the severity of the disease it causes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Coronavirus vaccine: an epidemic of nationalism
First country to get a vaccine could have an economic as well as a health advantage
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'Breathable' electronics pave the way for more functional wearable tech
Engineering researchers have created ultrathin, stretchable electronic material that is gas permeable, allowing the material to "breathe." The material was designed specifically for use in biomedical or wearable technologies, since the gas permeability allows sweat and volatile organic compounds to evaporate away from the skin, making it more comfortable for users—especially for long-term wear.
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Pandemic hasn't slowed Florida's python captures, even with fewer hunters on the prowl
With fewer python hunters working in South Florida during the coronavirus lockdown, one likely consequence could be fewer snakes captured over the past couple of months.
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De bar viktväst och minskade sin fetma
Forskare från Göteborgs universitet har hittat en ny metod att gå ned i vikt och minska sin fettmassa. Personerna som ingick i deras studie instruerades att bära en viktväst åtta timmar per dag under tre veckor. I övrigt skulle de leva som vanligt. Resultaten tyder på att det finns en slags inbyggd badrumsvåg som bidrar till att hålla kroppsvikten och därmed fettmassan konstant. Forskarnas hypote
9h
Pandemic hasn't slowed Florida's python captures, even with fewer hunters on the prowl
With fewer python hunters working in South Florida during the coronavirus lockdown, one likely consequence could be fewer snakes captured over the past couple of months.
9h
The Weird Partisan Math of Vote-by-Mail
Research says that expanding mail-in voting doesn't help Democrats. So why are Republicans so afraid of it?
9h
Radiation-detecting plastic gets ingredient to stay in the clear
Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have identified a straightforward change to the formula for radiation-detecting plastic. The change prevents "fogging," which reduces the lifetime of the plastics used to detect nuclear material transiting through the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's radiation detectors.
9h
Clinically applicable math model predicts patient outcomes to cancer immunotherapy
A group of our cancer and mathematics researchers at Houston Methodist have developed a clinically applicable mathematical model to predict patient outcomes to cancer immunotherapy.
9h
GSA's journal's add two articles on COVID-19 and aging; plus webinar on confronting ageism
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are now publishing scientific articles on COVID-19. The following were published between April 21 and 29; all are free to access.
9h
Understanding the diversity of cancer evolution based on computational simulation
Understanding the principles of cancer evolution is important in designing a therapeutic strategy. A research group at The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) announced a new simulation model that describes various modes of cancer evolution in a unified manner.
9h
Imaging nematic transitions in iron pnictide superconductors
Researchers at Stanford University have recently carried out an in-depth study of nematic transitions in iron pnictide superconductors. Their paper, published in Nature Physics, presents new imaging data of these transitions collected using a microscope they invented, dubbed the scanning quantum cryogenic atom microscope (SQCRAMscope).
9h
Dozens of existing drugs being tested as possible virus treatments
Research paper published in journal Nature identifies number of alternative treatments
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Hunt for COVID-19 treatment leads to Winter the llama
The hunt for an effective treatment for COVID-19 has led one team of researchers to an unlikely ally: a llama named Winter and her antibodies. The team reports their findings about a potential avenue for a coronavirus treatment involving llamas in the journal Cell . The paper is currently available online as a "pre-proof," which means it is peer-reviewed but undergoing final formatting. The resea
10h
Forskere udvikler potentiel behandling til kroniske smerter
Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har udviklet en ny måde at behandle kroniske smerter på,…
10h
HRM practices a predictor for business resilience after layoffs
As retrenchments continue to cloud the foreseeable future of businesses worldwide, new research from the University of South Australia, the University of Melbourne and RMIT indicates that some businesses will fare better than others — and it's all dependent on their type of human resource management system.
10h
Ending the daily work commute may not cut energy usage as much as one might hope
A mass move to working-from-home accelerated by the Coronavirus pandemic might not be as beneficial to the planet as many hope, according to a new study by the Centre for Research into Energy Demand Solutions (CREDS).
10h
Cultivating cooperation through kinship
Extensive cooperation among biologically unrelated individuals is uniquely human. It would be surprising if this uniqueness were not related to other uniquely human characteristics, yet current theories of human cooperation tend to ignore the human aspects of human behavior. This paper presents a theory of cooperation that draws on social, cultural, and psychological aspects of human uniqueness fo
10h
Smoking during pregnancy results in an increased risk of asthma even in adulthood
A recently completed study indicates that smoking by pregnant mothers caused roughly an 1.5-fold asthma risk in their offspring at the ages between 31 and 46.
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Novel method produces life-saving T cells from mesenchymal stromal cells
A new study released today in STEM CELLS suggests for the first time that regulatory T-cells (Treg) induced by mesenchymal stromal cells can yield an abundant replacement for naturally occurring T-cells, which are vital in protecting the body from infection.
10h
Heart attack, stroke risk declines among people with diabetes
The rate of heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular complications has improved among people with diabetes over the past 20 years, narrowing the gap in cardiovascular mortality rates between individuals with and without diabetes, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
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Older men with sarcopenia are more likely to develop diabetes over time
Older men who have lower lean body mass as they age are more prone to developing diabetes, while similar findings were not found in older women, according to a new study published in Journal of the Endocrine Society.
10h
New evidence for optimizing malaria treatment in pregnant women
The research, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases is the fruit of joint project between investigators from around the world to conduct the largest individual patient data meta-analysis to date under The WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) umbrella. The study found that artemether-lumefantrine (AL) and other artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) were significantly mor
10h
Old Drugs May Find a New Purpose: Fighting the Coronavirus
A "drug repurposing" strategy uncovers dozens of compounds that have the unexpected potential to combat the virus.
10h
Those Facebook 'challenges' can expose you to hackers
Oversharing on social media threatens your online security, warns Dan Lin. "We cannot go out and socialize during this pandemic, so people are turning to social media to share what is going on with their lives," says Lin , an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and director of the I-Privacy Laboratory at the College of Engineering at the University of Missouri. "Bu
10h
A spin on a topological insulator: Hybrid approach to magnetic topological states of matter
Controlling the interactions at the interface of a magnetic/topological insulator heterostructure is an outstanding challenge with implications in fundamental science and technology. A research led by the ICN2 Atomic Manipulation and Spectroscopy Group and the Physics and Engineering of Nanodevices Group, in collaboration with the Supramolecular Nanochemistry and Materials Group, the CFM-San Sebas
10h
New players in the programmed cell death mechanism
Skoltech researchers have identified a set of proteins that are important in the process of apoptosis, or programmed cell death. These newly identified proteins can become targets in the development of drugs against cancer or other diseases.
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Intricate magnetic configuration of 3-D nanoscale gyroid networks revealed
A multinational team of researchers from Tohoku University and institutions in the UK, Germany and Switzerland has revealed the magnetic states of nanoscale gyroids, 3-D chiral network-like nanostructures. The findings add a new candidate system for research into unconventional information processing and emergent phenomena relevant to spintronics.
10h
New moves: Cells interact with each other differently from how scientists believed
New research show cells move and interact with each other in a way that is counter to what scientists have always believed.
10h
Terrible luck: The only person ever killed by a meteorite—back in 1888
What are your chances of getting smacked – and killed—by a meteorite? One astronomer put the odds of death by space rock at 1 in 700,000 in a lifetime, while others say it's more like 1 in 1,600,000.
10h
New players in the programmed cell death mechanism
Skoltech researchers have identified a set of proteins that are important in the process of apoptosis, or programmed cell death. These newly identified proteins can become targets in the development of drugs against cancer or other diseases.
10h
New moves: Cells interact with each other differently from how scientists believed
New research show cells move and interact with each other in a way that is counter to what scientists have always believed.
10h
Making safe choices: DNA repair mechanisms avoid chromosomal combinations predisposed to disease
Homologous recombination is an essential process of DNA repair to maintain genomic integrity of the organism. Now, researchers from Japan have identified mechanisms that choose between alternate pathways of DNA repair to limit anomalous and deleterious chromosomal combinations that may be predisposed to cancer and genetic diseases.
10h
A novel RNA interference mechanism dictates plant response to external stress
With RNA being the core carrier of genetic information in life, understanding how RNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) transmits responses to external stress may be better understood following new research led by Southern University of Science and Technology.
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A SARS-CoV-2 protein interaction map reveals targets for drug repurposing
Nature, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2286-9
10h
Forget the Techlash. The Lawlash Is Long Overdue
If we look closer, we may realize it's not really the "tech" we're upset about.
10h
Motorola Edge Plus Review: 2-Day Battery (And Some Quirks)
Motorola's first flagship in years is fantastic in many ways, but has a lot of quirks for a $1,000 phone.
10h
Naked and Unafraid to Exercise in Virtual Reality
Get over yourself and try VR workouts already. It's private, liberating, and doesn't require gym shorts.
10h
Covid Is Pushing Startups to Execute Long-Term Plans ASAP
WIRED editor in chief Nicholas Thompson talks to DoorDash CEO Tony Xu about how delivery services are adapting their operations over a matter of weeks—even days.
10h
China's first Mars Lander is going to be called 'Tianwen'
Friday April 24th was China's "Space Day," celebrated on the 50 year anniversary of their first satellite launch. This past Friday, China marked the occasion with the announcement of the name for their first Mars Lander: Tianwen.
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Video: Can wormholes act like time machines?
Time travel into the past is a tricky thing. We know of no single law of physics that absolutely forbids it, and yet we can't find a way to do it, and if we could do it, the possibility opens up all sorts of uncomfortable paradoxes (like what would happen if you killed your own grandfather).
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Playing pool with neutrinos: Certain interactions look similar to the game
Hard to believe you can play pool with neutrinos, but certain neutrino interaction events are closer to the game than you think.
10h
Half of water and sediment samples from Bay of Biscay contain microplastics
The scientific journal Marine Pollution Bulletin has just published "Microplastics in the Bay of Biscay: an overview," a piece of work by the Materials+Technologies research group (GMT) of the Faculty of Engineering—Gipuzkoa. It is the first scientific paper that analyzes all the research studies conducted until now about the presence of microplastics in the Bay of Biscay. It includes the results
10h
Making safe choices: DNA repair mechanisms avoid chromosomal combinations predisposed to disease
Homologous recombination is an essential process of DNA repair to maintain genomic integrity of the organism. Now, researchers from Japan have identified mechanisms that choose between alternate pathways of DNA repair to limit anomalous and deleterious chromosomal combinations that may be predisposed to cancer and genetic diseases.
10h
A novel RNA interference mechanism dictates plant response to external stress
With RNA being the core carrier of genetic information in life, understanding how RNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) transmits responses to external stress may be better understood following new research led by Southern University of Science and Technology.
10h
Superoxide produces hydroxyl radicals that break down dissolved organic matter in water
According to a study published in Water Research in April 2020, superoxide produces hydroxyl radicals in lake water. Hydroxyl radicals break down poorly biodegradable organic matter such as humic substances and anthropogenic pollutants.
10h
Clearing up a supermassive (black hole) confusion
Black holes are among the most enigmatic objects in our universe. These mysterious celestial bodies do not emit any light of their own and are thus incredibly difficult to spot. In fact, one can only detect black holes based on the effects that they have on their surroundings. Black-holes come in various flavors and sizes, from 'small' stellar-mass black holes to supermassive black holes found in
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Irrigation expansion could feed 800 million more people
Water scarcity, a socio-environmental threat to anthropogenic activities and ecosystems alike, affects large regions of the globe. However, it is often the most vulnerable and disadvantaged populations that suffer the severest consequences, highlighting the role of economic and institutional factors in water scarcity. In this way, researchers generally consider not only the physical constraints bu
10h
Masks and Emasculation: Why Some Men Refuse to Take Safety Precautions
They think it makes them look weak, and avoiding that is evidently more important to them than demonstrating responsible behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Switchbacks and spikes: Parker Solar Probe data consistent with 20-year-old theory
Continued analysis of Parker Solar Probe data is starting to create a clearer picture of the sun's magnetic activity, which may bolster our ability to predict dangerous solar events.
10h
Masks and Emasculation: Why Some Men Refuse to Take Safety Precautions
They think it makes them look weak, and avoiding that is evidently more important to them than demonstrating responsible behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Tankestyrda armproteser med känsel en del av vardagen
Amputerade patienter kan uppleva konstgjord känsel i tankestyrda armproteser. Tre svenskar har sedan flera år en sådan protes – som innehåller ett av världens mest integrerade gränssnitt mellan människa och maskin. En studie visar nu att proteserna fungerar på ett naturligt sätt i patienternas dagliga liv. Framstegen är världsunika: Patienterna har levt sina vanliga liv, med tankestyrda proteser,
10h
Four essentials for composting outdoors
Convert browns, greens, and water into rich compost. (Markus Spiske via Unsplash/) Anyone can compost outdoors by making a pile surrounded by wood or wire, using a composter, or starting a worm farm to feast on your food scraps. Over a period of months to years, cultivate a mix of browns from your yard (like dead leaves and twigs), water, and greens (like food waste and coffee grounds). You'll lo
10h
Nanodevices for the brain could thwart formation of Alzheimer's plaques
Alzheimer's disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, affecting one in 10 people over the age of 65. Scientists are engineering nanodevices to disrupt processes in the brain that lead to the disease.
10h
News story: Researchers use magnetism to keep drugs at disease sites
The researchers were able to use magnetism to hold 'magnetically responsive' microscopic drug carriers at chosen sites, even in the presence of external forces, such as flowing liquid, which would normally displace them.
10h
Samband mellan luktsinnet och covid-19?
Forskningsrapporter och anekdoter visar att personer som drabbas av covid-19 kan få nedsatt lukt- och smaksinne. Forskare vid Stockholms universitet ska i ett stort internationellt samarbete undersöka sambandet. Och efterlyser deltagare som haft, eller tror att de haft sjukdomen. Har du drabbats av det nya coronaviruset? Om du vet, eller tror, att du har det kan du vara med i den nya studien Följ
10h
Lockdown contraction is not following usual script
More affluent places are seeing some of the largest declines in spending
10h
US jobless claims hit 30m on coronavirus lockdowns
More than 3.8m Americans filed new claims for first-time benefits in week six of lockdowns
10h
COVID-19 – This is the Harm
Perhaps the most persistent and annoying question promoters of science-based medicine get is, "What's the harm?" The implication is we should just let people use their Reiki or magic potions if it makes them feel like they are doing something, as long as the treatment is not directly physically harmful. As you can see, I have been addressing it for years , including the fact that I will have to a
10h
Example found of evolutionary tradeoff in ancient shrimp-like species
A team of researchers with members affiliated with institutions in China, Germany and France has found an example of evolutionary tradeoff in Cambrian arthropods. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes how they compared egg and cluster sizes in a closely related species of ancient shrimp and what they learned from it.
10h
Example found of evolutionary tradeoff in ancient shrimp-like species
A team of researchers with members affiliated with institutions in China, Germany and France has found an example of evolutionary tradeoff in Cambrian arthropods. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes how they compared egg and cluster sizes in a closely related species of ancient shrimp and what they learned from it.
10h
Ökad risk för blodpropp hos män som haft fetma som unga
Män med fetma i övre tonåren löper ökad risk för blodpropp i ben eller lunga senare i livet, visar en studie från Göteborgs universitet. Risken ökar stegvis och är som störst hos dem som haft grav fetma som unga. Blodpropp i ben eller lunga, så kallad venös tromboembolism (VTE), är en av våra vanligaste hjärt-kärlsjukdomar. Risken ökar med stigande ålder och totalt drabbas 5-10 procent av befolkn
10h
Mental health providers struggle to adapt during COVID-19
A survey of community-based mental health providers highlights the adaptions they're making to continue service. Some community-based mental health providers in New Jersey don't have the necessary funds for the telehealth technology they need to reach patients or the personal protective equipment (PPE) required to protect staff, according to the survey. Mental health providers—who work primarily
10h
Clinicians warn of the dangers of equating COVID-19 with high altitude pulmonary edema
Early reports of COVID-19 symptoms and the compelling need to quickly identify treatment options and curb the growing number of critically ill patients have led to erroneous and potentially dangerous comparisons between COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases like high altitude pulmonary edema, or HAPE.
11h
The p-hackers toolkit
P -hacking is a common and persistent problem in research, with impacts on the scientific literature, reporting, and practice in medicine. But what is it, really?
11h
ECB in fresh push to lend to banks at ultra-low rates
Central bank holds interest rates and says eurozone economy could shrink by up to 12%
11h
Sådan håndterer du angst i en coronatid
Angst har flere ansigter. Krisen forstørrer problemerne for særligt én type angst. Den…
11h
Moxie Is the Robot Pal You Dreamed of as a Kid
Four years ago, Paolo Pirjanian set out to "reinvent" companion robots. Now he's ready for the world to meet his creation.
11h
The Kids of 'Teenager Therapy' Just Want You to #Feel
In the desert of ignored teen emotions, five high school podcasters have become a go-to resource on everything from dating to depression.
11h
Trek Checkpoint SL 7: The Next High-Tech Gravel Racer
An advanced frame design and a wireless drivetrain put this bike at the top of the list for any cyclist who loves adventure riding or racing.
11h
Mars Needs Money: White House Budget Could Prompt Retreat from Red Planet
Proposed cuts could end decades of U.S. leadership in exploring that world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Mars Needs Money: White House Budget Could Prompt Retreat from Red Planet
Proposed cuts could end decades of U.S. leadership in exploring that world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Coronaepidemien udskyder evaluering af omdiskuteret styrelse
Evalueringen af Styrelsen for Patientsikkerheds strammerkurs skulle have været i gang for længst, men er nu udskudt på ubestemt tid på grund af COVID-19. Formanden for Lægeforeningen opfordrer indtrængende sundhedsministeren tage affære.
11h
Air quality near busy Australian roads up to 10 times worse than official figures
Air quality on Australia's roads matters. On any given day (when we're not in lockdown) people meet, commute, exercise, shop and walk with children near busy streets. But to date, air quality monitoring at roadsides has been inadequate.
11h
Vi får brug for en stærk psykiatri både under og efter coronavirus
Kronikken 'Coronakrisen peger på at mange psykiatribrugere ikke hører til i psykiatrien' rummer nogle farlige konklusioner og problematiske argumenter, skriver psykiater.
11h
Hidden symmetry found in chemical kinetic equations
Rice University researchers have discovered a hidden symmetry in the chemical kinetic equations scientists have long used to model and study many of the chemical processes essential for life.
11h
Eva Wickham obituary
My wife, Eva Wickham, who has died aged 76, worked for the Inner London Education Authority in Lambeth as an educational psychologist for two decades from 1971. When Ilea was abolished in 1990, she moved to Wandsworth's educational psychology service, where she remained until her retirement in 2006. She had a deep aversion to doing nothing and in retirement she soon found herself chairing the gov
11h
Chris Patten urges UK to investigate origins of coronavirus in China
Ex-Hong Kong governor also says China is 'turning screws' on city during pandemic Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage There is an "overwhelming case" to send a multilateral mission to Wuhan to investigate the coronavirus's origins and spread, the former British governor to Hong Kong has told Dominic Raab. Chris Patten wrote to the foreign secretary this week to raise his
11h
UK minister admits it is 'probable' virus testing target will not be met
Government only halfway towards pledge of 100,000 daily tests as deadline looms
11h
Hidden symmetry found in chemical kinetic equations
Rice University researchers have discovered a hidden symmetry in the chemical kinetic equations scientists have long used to model and study many of the chemical processes essential for life.
11h
Algae tasked with producing COVID-19 test kits
Researchers at Western and Suncor are teaming up to use algae as a way to produce serological test kits for COVID-19 – a new process that overcomes shortfalls of existing processes while saving money.
11h
Algae tasked with producing COVID-19 test kits
Researchers at Western and Suncor are teaming up to use algae as a way to produce serological test kits for COVID-19 – a new process that overcomes shortfalls of existing processes while saving money.
11h
Why unemployment claims don't capture the full economic impact of COVID-19
As the coronavirus pandemic continues to grow, few Americans have been left untouched. Even those lucky enough to stay healthy are facing economic uncertainty or, in many cases, financial ruin.
11h
Illycaffè expects coronavirus hit to revenues despite online boost
Lockdowns and restrictions set to halt Italian coffee maker's 17-year growth trajectory
11h
If You Think Preparedness Is Expensive, the Pandemic Puts Things in Perspective
Here are lessons COVID-19 has taught us — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
China faces wave of calls for relief on 'Belt and Road' loans
Bankers will consider suspending interest payments but writing off loans is unlikely
12h
Google executive took part in Sage meeting, tech firm confirms
Attendance of Demis Hassabis raises further questions about secretive group advising UK government on Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Google has confirmed that one of its senior executives participated in the UK government's scientific advisory group on Covid-19, raising further questions about the composition of the secretive committee. Demis Hassabis, a co
12h
'We will survive. We have to': a letter to my fellow healthcare workers
I feel powerless but also hopeful, and want to say thank you to all my hospital colleagues from consultants to cleaners Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage This is a terrible time to be working in a hospital. It may be the first time in years you are working in one again. People are asking for you in the middle of one of the worst periods in healthcare in the past 60 yea
12h
Crisis requires co-ordinated digital response
We need citizens and customers to demand partnership across sectors
12h
UK government won't say how many covid-19 contact tracers it has hired
The UK government has refused to say how many covid-19 contact tracers it has employed, with less than three weeks to go until its target of recruiting 18,000 of them by mid-May
12h
3 Things to Consider Before Signing Up for a Free Trial
Companies are blasting us with free trial offers while we're stuck at home. That's a good thing—until the bills show up.
12h
The Cubicle Is Back. Blame (or Thank) the Coronavirus
As businesses reopen, social distancing rules will lead to new partitions between workspaces, reminiscent of the fabric-clad dividers of the 1980s.
12h
A Company That Helps You Find Job B
The tech-training and incubator company Bitwise, based in Fresno in California's agricultural Central Valley, has been an important test case for the proposition that new, valuable, job-creating and wealth-expanding businesses can arise anywhere, not just in the few familiar "superstar" cities. Deb Fallows and I have written frequently about Bitwise since first visiting its (then-tiny) headquarte
12h
Google og Apple frigiver smitteopsporings-løsning
Apple og Google har frigivet en betaversion af en API, der kan hjælpe med smitteopsporing.
12h
Analyse: Naturgaskunderne holder godt fast ved deres gasfyr
PLUS. Det kræver bastante virkemidler for at få naturgas-kunderne til at udskifte deres gasfyr med mere bæredygtige løsninger, også selvom det indebærer økonomiske gevinster, viser ny rapport fra Energifonden.
12h
A new way to accurately estimate COVID-19 death toll
A Rutgers engineer has created a mathematical model that accurately estimates the death toll linked to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States and could be used around the world.
12h
Män drabbas hårdare än kvinnor av covid-19
Trots att män och kvinnor är lika mottagliga för coronaviruset drabbas männen hårdare. Skillnader i immunförsvar och höga nivåer av enzymet ACE2 tros vara en del av förklaringen.
12h
If You Think Preparedness Is Expensive, the Pandemic Puts Things in Perspective
Here are lessons COVID-19 has taught us — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Atlanta Isn't Ready to Reopen—And Neither Is Georgia
Atlanta faces unusual challenges as we cope with the ongoing pandemic. The political reality is that we are a blue city in a red state, trying to balance public-health concerns in a diverse environment while getting our economy back on track as soon as possible. As the mayor of Georgia's largest city, I expressed opposition to Governor Brian Kemp's recent order allowing certain businesses—dine-in
12h
Utan gröna satsningar kan oljepriset skjuta i höjden
Prisraset på olja är historiskt. Men även om kraschen leder till att oljebrunnar pluggas igen för gott, är det inte alls säkert att det påskyndar en grön omställning. De oljeproducenter som överlever kan sälja olja dyrt om några år – om vi inte minskar fossilberoendet. Det är framförallt det kraftigt minskade bilåkandet till följd av Coronakrisen som ligger bakom den minskade efterfrågan på bensi
12h
Footstep Sensors Identify People by Gait
The supersensitive system can also glean clues about health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Daily briefing: A graphical guide to the eight types of coronavirus vaccine in development
Nature, Published online: 29 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01300-0 There are at least eight types of vaccine being tried against COVID-19 — this is how each of them works. Plus, a call for COVID-19 stimulus measures to focus on a healthier tomorrow, and the hazards lurking in unused buildings' stagnant water
12h
Coronavirus har ikke givet overdødelighed i Danmark – men statistikken skjuler ukendte covid-19-dødsfald
PLUS. Nedlukningen kan have medført en generel underdødelighed, som maskerer et mørketal blandt dødfundne og døde på plejehjem. Lægeformand og statsobducent vil have ligene testet.
12h
Lovande resultat för coronamedicin i stor studie
Den amerikanska hälsovårdsmyndigheten, NIH, har släppt preliminära resultat av en forskningsstudie med en medicin mot coronaviruset.
12h
Coronavirus UK: how many confirmed cases are there in my area?
Latest figures from public health authorities on the spread of Covid-19 in the United Kingdom. Find out how many confirmed cases have been reported near you Coronavirus – live news updates Find all our coronavirus coverage here How to protect yourself from infection Please note: these are government figures on numbers of confirmed cases – some people who report symptoms are not being tested, and
12h
Footstep Sensors Identify People by Gait
The supersensitive system can also glean clues about health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Future detectors to detect millions of black holes and the evolution of the universe
Gravitational-wave astronomy provides a unique new way to study the expansion history of the Universe. On 17 August 2017, the LIGO and Virgo collaborations first detected gravitational waves from a pair of neutron stairs merging. The gravitational wave signal was accompanied by a range of counterparts identified with electromagnetic telescopes.
12h
Researchers create hybrids of six yeast species to combine useful traits
Researchers at the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have developed a method to combine traits from up to six different yeast species in a single hybrid strain—a yeast that could carry more tools for a specific job, such as producing biofuels.
12h
Coronavirus: what do scientists know about Covid-19 so far?
Medical researchers have been studying everything we know about Covid-19. What have they learned – and is it enough to halt the pandemic? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Coronaviruses have been causing problems for humanity for a long time. Several versions are known to trigger common colds and more recently two types have set off outbreaks of deadly illnesses: sever
12h
The TB epidemic teaches us that the battle against Covid-19 won't be won in hospitals alone | Salmaan Keshavjee, Aaron Shakow and Tom Nicholson
A community approach of 'search, treat and prevent' was crucial to stopping the spread of tuberculosis in the developed world There were three great pandemics in the 20th century. The influenza pandemic of 1918 and the HIV pandemic during the 1980s and 1990s get the most attention. But the third, tuberculosis, was the deadliest by far and in many communities, it's not yet over. TB has much to tea
12h
Researchers create hybrids of six yeast species to combine useful traits
Researchers at the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have developed a method to combine traits from up to six different yeast species in a single hybrid strain—a yeast that could carry more tools for a specific job, such as producing biofuels.
12h
A new way to accurately estimate COVID-19 death toll
A Rutgers engineer has created a mathematical model that accurately estimates the death toll linked to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States and could be used around the world.
13h
Reduced obesity for weighted-vest wearers
Scientists from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have found a new method of reducing human body weight and fat mass using weighted vests. The new study indicates that there is something comparable to built-in bathroom scales that contributes to keeping our body weight and, by the same token, fat mass constant.
13h
To Safely Reopen, Make the Workweek Shorter. Then Keep It Shorter.
Even as COVID-19 cases mount, companies are making plans to reopen. Everyone is keen to get back to work, but epidemiologists caution that a rush to recommence business as usual could spark a second wave of fatalities, and that employers need to implement measures to prevent virus transmission among workers, or between workers and customers. Much of the planning—by real-estate companies, architec
13h
Groundhog Day Was a Horror Movie All Along
In February, during the Super Bowl, Jeep ran an ad doing what Super Bowl ads so often will: It converted a beloved cultural product into a marketing message. This time around, the alchemy on offer involved the 1993 film Groundhog Day . Cheerfully soundtracked with the film's most memorable song, Sonny and Cher's "I Got You Babe," the spot featured Bill Murray reprising the role of Phil Connors, t
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Covid hoaxes are using a loophole to stay alive—even after content is deleted
Since the onset of the pandemic, the Technology and Social Change Research Project at Harvard Kennedy's Shorenstein Center, where I am the director, has been investigating how misinformation, scams, and conspiracies about covid-19 circulate online. If fraudsters are now using the virus to dupe unsuspecting individuals, we thought, then our research on misinformation should focus on understanding
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Flagship US medical academy backs EU global virus response
Head of US National Academy of Medicine helped trigger von der Leyen's drive to raise €7.5bn
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Rebuilding better after Covid-19, part 1
Create fairer, more productive labour markets as economies go back to work
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Dinosaur tail reveals gigantic swimming predator
Nature, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01304-w New bones suggest Spinosaurus is the only known aquatic dinosaur.
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Journal retracts paper on gender dysphoria after 900 critics petition
A journal has retracted a controversial paper that questioned what it called the "existing dogma" about gender. The article, "A new theory of gender dysphoria incorporating the distress, social behavioral, and body-ownership networks," was written by Stephen Gliske, a physicist-turned-neuroscientist at the University of Michigan. Gliske's paper, which received a modest amount of media attention, …
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New STM technique points way to new and purer pharmaceuticals
A research project led by chemists at the University of Warwick first used ultrahigh resolution scanning tunnelling microscopy to see the exact location of atoms and bonds within a molecule, and then employed these incredibly precise images to determine the interactions that bond molecules to one another.
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27 Days in Tokyo Bay: What Happened on the Diamond Princess
The cruise ship captivated the world as it docked in Yokohama, harboring Covid-19—and 3,711 people who became subjects in a life-and-death quarantine experiment.
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Ancient supernovas may have pierced moon rocks with star shrapnel
Early astronomers noticed this star detonate in 1572. While any dust it expelled hasn't had nearly enough time to reach the moon, early explosions could have punched holes in lunar rocks. ( X-ray: NASA/CXC/RIKEN & GSFC/T. Sato et al; Optical: DSS/) Astronomers usually mine starlight for information. Flickers in the light that reaches earth regularly unveil new vignettes of distant systems—such as
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An arts director and a kart-track operator on keeping the show on the road
In this FT series, people share their stories of this extraordinary time
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The golden age of Jared Kushner
President's son-in-law embodies everything that is wrong with America's coronavirus response
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Coronavirus Live Updates
The president says federal guidelines on social distancing won't be renewed. Beaches could close in California. Trump officials are said to have urged spy agencies to link a Wuhan lab to the virus.
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Long-term consequences of one anastomosis gastric bypass on esogastric mucosa in a preclinical rat model
Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64425-2
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Generation of two successive attosecond pulses in separate spectral domains
Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64373-x
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Reconfiguration of magnetic domain structures of ErFeO3 by intense terahertz free electron laser pulses
Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64147-5 Reconfiguration of magnetic domain structures of ErFeO 3 by intense terahertz free electron laser pulses
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Analyzing the advantages of subcutaneous over transcutaneous electrical stimulation for activating brainwaves
Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64378-6
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Population history in Okinawa based on JC virus and ALDH2 genotypes
Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64194-y
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Replication analysis of variants associated with multiple sclerosis risk
Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64432-3
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Interfacial dielectric layer as an origin of polarization fatigue in ferroelectric capacitors
Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64451-0
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Making safe choices: It's in our DNA
Researchers from Osaka University demonstrate the important role of DNA replication machinery in recombination pathway choice at the centromere of chromosomes to limit gross chromosomal rearrangements. In experiments conducted on fission yeast, the researchers revealed how DNA replication mechanisms, by inhibiting Rad52-mediated single-strand annealing, limit the formation of anomalous chromosomes
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New STM technique points way to new and purer pharmaceuticals
A research project led by chemists at the University of Warwick first used ultrahigh resolution scanning tunnelling microscopy to see the exact location of atoms and bonds within a molecule, and then employed these incredibly precise images to determine the interactions that bond molecules to one another.
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Two new AHA statements focus on heart failure: How social determinants can affect outcomes; impact on caregivers
Adverse social factors, such as insurance status, food insecurity, lack of funds for medication and others, may lead to worse heart failure outcomes.Caregiving by family and friends of people with heart failure is increasingly complicated, is progressively more challenging and takes a financial, physical and emotional toll on caregivers.
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The cooperative action of CSB, CSA, and UVSSA target TFIIH to DNA damage-stalled RNA polymerase II
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15903-8 The response to DNA damage-stalled RNA polymerase II leads to the assembly of the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) complex on actively transcribed strands. Here, the authors reveal the complex assembly mechanism of the TCR complex in human cells.
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Exceptionally high biosphere productivity at the beginning of Marine Isotopic Stage 11
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15739-2 Biosphere productivity is an important component of the CO2 cycle, but how it has varied over past glacial-interglacial cycles is not well known. Here, the authors present new data that shows that global biosphere productivity was 10 to 30% higher during Termination V compared to younger deglaciations.
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Controlled packing and single-droplet resolution of 3D-printed functional synthetic tissues
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15953-y Precise patterning of lipid-stabilised aqueous droplets is a key challenge in building synthetic tissue designs. Here, the authors show how the interactions between pairs of droplets direct the packing of droplets within 3D-printed networks, enabling the formation of synthetic tissues with high-resolution featu
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Timed inhibition of CDC7 increases CRISPR-Cas9 mediated templated repair
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15845-1 Altering cellular responses to double-strand breaks in DNA could rebalance CRISPRediting outcomes. Here, the authors use a pooled CRISPR screen to identify inhibition of CDC7 as a strategy to improve HDR outcomes.
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Downstream changes in river avulsion style are related to channel morphology
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15859-9 River avulsions are dramatic events that can cause the loss of many human lives. The authors here investigate how river avulsion style changes with river morphology, and how these changes impact flooding and stratigraphy.
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Highly parallel and efficient single cell mRNA sequencing with paired picoliter chambers
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15765-0 Single-cell RNA-seq can reveal accurate and precise cell types and states. Here the authors present an scRNA-seq platform, Paired-seq, which uses differential flow resistance to achieve 95% cell utilisation efficiency for improved cell-free RNA removal and gene detection.
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Model-driven generation of artificial yeast promoters
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15977-4 A small set of promoters is used for most genetic construct design in S. cerevisiae. Here, the authors develop a predictive model of promoter activity trained on a data set of over one million sequences and use it to design large sets of high-activity promoters.
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The impact of antimalarial resistance on the genetic structure of Plasmodium falciparum in the DRC
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 April 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-15779-8 The genome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains a record of past evolutionary forces. Here, using 2537 parasite sequences from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the authors demonstrate how drug pressure and human movement have shaped the present-day parasite population.
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Reckitt posts record sales growth as disinfectant demand surges
Group ramps up production of cleaning and sanitising goods amid coronavirus crisis
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As Georgia Reopens, Virus Study Shows Black Residents May Bear Brunt
A C.D.C. report released Wednesday suggests that the African-American community in the state is especially vulnerable to infection.
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Kæmpe potentiale: Halvdelen af Danmark kan varmes op af vand fra undergrunden
Under den danske muld ligger et kæmpe uudnyttet potentiale. Varmt vand fra undergrunden kan nemlig…
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A Next-Generation Coronavirus Test Raises Hopes And Concerns
An antigen test could be quick, and much simpler and cheaper than the PCR tests now used to spot people infected with the novel coronavirus. But some scientists worry about an antigen test's accuracy. (Image credit: Sergii Iaremenko/Science Photo Library/Getty Images)
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Droner dropper GPS'en og bliver fabrikkens flyvende transportbånd
PLUS. Droner kan på sigt konkurrere med transportbånd, AGV'er og robotter til intern logistik i industrien, hvor pladsen på fabriksgulvet ofte bliver trang. Hos Teknologisk Institut styrer de droner med LED-lys under loftet.
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Can Genetic Engineering Bring Back the American Chestnut?
The tree helped build industrial America before disease wiped out an estimated three billion or more of them. To revive their lost glory, we may need to embrace tinkering with nature.
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A Throwback Way to Win a Pandemic Election
T o win a pandemic election , progressives are going quaint. The coronavirus outbreak has seemingly turned the 2020 election into a battle for digital supremacy, forcing campaigns to reach voters without rallies, door-knocks, or much of any in-person politicking . Former Vice President Joe Biden is running for president from his basement , and Zoom is the new town square (as well as the new offic
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Kids today are lacking these psychological nutrients
When it comes to the rules and restrictions placed on children, author and Stanford Graduate School of Business lecturer Nir Eyal argues that they have a lot in common with another restricted population in society: prisoners. These restrictions have contributed to a generation that overuses and is distracted by technology. Self-determination theory, a popular theory of human motivation, says that
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Our Chemical Regulatory Program Is Broken. Here's How to Fix It.
Under existing law, U.S. manufacturers have no legal obligation to test or assess the toxicity of their own chemicals. That burden rests almost exclusively with the underfunded and understaffed Environmental Protection Agency. Fortunately, there's a better way: shifting the responsibility to manufacturers.
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Kan vi hindra nästa pandemi?
Tidigt utpekades fladdermöss som ursprungsbärare av coronaviruset. Senaste teorin är att viruset gått till människan via hundar – som ätit fladdermöss som fångats och slaktats. Virusövervakning i vilda djur kan hindra nya pandemier, tror forskare. Samtidigt som covid-19 fortsätter skörda liv söker forskare svar på frågan: Hur kunde detta ske? Kunskapen behövs för att besvara en än viktigare fråga
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AstraZeneca and Oxford university combine on coronavirus vaccine
Partnership that would prioritise UK could produce 100m doses by year-end if treatment was effective
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Until we have a vaccine for coronavirus, treatments like remdesivir are our only hope | Jennifer Rohn
Conflicting evidence from early trials is the norm in science. We must be patient as the data unfolds Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Drug discovery and testing, even under normal circumstances, is a high-risk process full of red herrings and dashed hopes. In the throes of a global pandemic, the stakes are even higher and the risks remain the same. So although the ne
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Major upgrades of particle detectors and electronics prepare CERN experiment to stream a data tsunami
For a gargantuan nuclear physics experiment that will generate big data at unprecedented rates—called A Large Ion Collider Experiment, or ALICE—the University of Tennessee has worked with the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory to lead a group of U.S. nuclear physicists from a suite of institutions in the design, development, mass production and delivery of a significant upgrade o
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Sainsbury's defers dividend decision and cancels bonuses
Supermarket group expects prolonged weakness in non-food sales
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Fetma ökar snabbt i Sverige
En undersökning av knappt en halv miljon svenskars BMI visar att sedan 1995 har fetma ökat med 86 procent och svår fetma med 158 procent. Siffrorna bygger på mätt vikt och längd, inte självskattningar och är högre än Folkhälsomyndighetens statistik.
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Kvinnor i uniform? Så återskapas det amerikanska inbördeskriget i Skandinavien
Att skriva sin avhandling har bokstavligen inneburit en strid på slagfältet för historikern Marie Bennedahl. Hon har studerat hur människor skapar historia, vad som händer när det amerikanska inbördeskriget återskapas i Skandinavien. Hur tolkas kriget? Vilka oskrivna regler gäller för kvinnor och män i lägerlivet? Det amerikanska inbördeskriget utkämpades mellan 1861 och 1865, och har sedan dess
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Less air pollution means thousands fewer die
European countries under coronavirus lockdown have seen 11,000 fewer deaths in April compared to the same period last year due to a sharp drop in fossil fuel pollution, according to research released Friday.
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COVID-19 to cause record emissions fall in 2020: IEA
COVID-19 is expected to cause global energy emissions to fall a record eight percent this year due to an unprecedented drop in demand for coal, oil and gas, the International Energy Agency said Thursday.
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Here's how long-distance runners are different from the rest of us
For many, running a marathon is seen as the ultimate amateur athletic achievement; for others, it's just the start. Ultramarathon runners often take on courses of incredibly impressive length, running 50 or 100 kilometres at one time or over several days. Clearly this is physically demanding, and only those in seriously good shape will be able to take on such challenges — ultramarathon running in
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Remdesivir: the antiviral drug is being touted as a possible coronavirus treatment – but will it work?
Hopes are high for the drug and US expert Dr Anthony Fauci says it shows promise. But there are conflicting reports Sign up for Guardian Australia's daily coronavirus email Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications Coronavirus Australia maps and cases: live numbers and statistics Of the antiviral, antibiotic, antiretroviral and anti-malarial medicines being studi
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The commercial consequences of collective layoffs
Researchers from Erasmus University Rotterdam and IESE Business School published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that empirically demonstrates the effects of collective layoff announcements on sales, advertising effectiveness, and consumers' price sensitivity.
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'Gargantuan' hail in Argentina may have smashed world record
A supercell thunderstorm pelted a city center in Argentina a few years ago with hailstones so large scientists suggested a new category to describe them—gargantuan hail.
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Danske Bank cuts outlook as loan impairments jump 10-fold
Danish lender swings to first-quarter loss amid hit from pandemic
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Reducing greenhouse gas emissions using microwave plasma technology
A multi-disciplinary collaborative relationship, developed between Penn State EMS Energy Institute researchers and a Pittsburgh-based start-up company, may hold the answer to reducing global greenhouse gas emissions while also paving the way to disrupt the chemical and material industries.
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Bermudagrass harvest management options with poultry litter fertilization
When fertilizing bermudagrass with poultry litter, turfgrass managers must consider limiting the buildup of soil P or drawing down soil test P through cut-and-carry forage. In a previous study that provided turfgrass with 122 kg ha-1 P in poultry litter, researchers found that Tifton 44 bermudagrass cut every 49 days at 3-cm stubble height recovered 23% of the P applied. Bermudagrass P removal is
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New imaging technique sheds light on adult zebrafish brain
Cornell scientists have developed a new technique for imaging a zebrafish's brain at all stages of its development, which could have implications for the study of human brain disorders, including autism.
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Bermudagrass harvest management options with poultry litter fertilization
When fertilizing bermudagrass with poultry litter, turfgrass managers must consider limiting the buildup of soil P or drawing down soil test P through cut-and-carry forage. In a previous study that provided turfgrass with 122 kg ha-1 P in poultry litter, researchers found that Tifton 44 bermudagrass cut every 49 days at 3-cm stubble height recovered 23% of the P applied. Bermudagrass P removal is
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New imaging technique sheds light on adult zebrafish brain
Cornell scientists have developed a new technique for imaging a zebrafish's brain at all stages of its development, which could have implications for the study of human brain disorders, including autism.
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Glencore cuts capex as coronavirus forces production curbs
Group has halted work at number of mines due to pandemic
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Lloyds profits plunge as it ramps up loan provisions
Bank books £1.4bn in charges to cover expected credit losses as coronavirus takes toll
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Eurozone economy shrinks by fastest rate on record
GDP fall illustrates damage inflicted by coronavirus lockdowns as ECB prepares to meet
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Att bemöta existentiell ensamhet i sin yrkesroll
När man närmar sig livets slut blir existentiella frågor allt viktigare och händelser som skapar grund för existentiell ensamhet är vanligt förekommande – som att behöva flytta ifrån sitt hem, att man förlorar en partner eller genomgår en annan ofrivillig separation. I en avhandling från Malmö universitet har undersökts hälso- och sjukvårdspersonals upplevelser av existentiell ensamhet hos sköra ä
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Shell cuts dividend for first time since second world war
Oil price collapse triggered by coronavirus pandemic almost halves Anglo-Dutch group's earnings
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Clean air in Europe during lockdown 'leads to 11,000 fewer deaths'
Study into effects of coronavirus curbs also finds less asthma and preterm births The improvement in air quality over the past month of the coronavirus lockdown has led to 11,000 fewer deaths from pollution in the UK and elsewhere in Europe, a study has revealed. Sharp falls in road traffic and industrial emissions have also resulted in 1.3m fewer days of work absence, 6,000 fewer children develo
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South Korea reports no new local coronavirus cases
Seoul credited for deploying rapid testing and contact tracing to contain outbreak
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Så samlar bin pollen i stan
Ett amerikanskt forskarteam har detaljstuderat honungsbin som lever i Philadelphia, en stad med närmare två miljoner invånare. Forskarnas undersökningar visar att tidigt på våren samlar bina pollen från inhemska växter men ju längre säsongen fortskrider, desto mer beroende blir de av introducerade prydnadsväxter. En annan slutsats är att fleråriga växter är mer betydelsefulla än ett-och tvååriga v
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Our pandemic subconscious: why we seem to be dreaming much more – and often of insects
Stress can affect the quality and length of sleep. Scientists have been collecting dream data during the coronavirus crisis, with surprising results From going to bed too late thanks to endless scrolling through theories about the pandemic, to waking up in the night worrying, it is safe to say that Covid-19 is wreaking havoc with our sleep. A major survey conducted by King's College London with I
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Coronavirus R: Is this the crucial number?
The number at the heart of the decision whether to lift lockdown.
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Antarctic meteorites yield global bombardment rate
UK scientists provide a new estimate for the amount of space rock falling to Earth each year.
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Coronavirus leads to 'staggering' drop in global energy demand
Fall could be the equivalent of India's total annual consumption, IEA says
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Frisøren er åben og udgroningen skal væk: Men er det overhovedet en god idé at farve hår?
Permanent hårfarve kan stadig indeholde nogle af de samme ting som i 1880'erne.
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Coronavirus 30 April: at a glance
A summary of the biggest developments in the global coronavirus outbreak Follow our latest coronavirus blog for live news and updates Key developments in the global coronavirus outbreak today include: Continue reading…
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Dealing with loneliness during the pandemic
Mental health disorders are on the rise during the COVID-19 pandemic. Lack of social contact is anti-instinctual behavior for humans, yet it is needed during this particular crisis. How we cope with social distancing and sheltering at home will in large part dictate how long this crisis lasts. There have been many comparisons between the COVID-19 pandemic and previous historical incidents. Obviou
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Financial flexibility and market dislocations
A quick look at a new working paper on the coronavirus pandemic's effect on equities.
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Coronavirus webcams: see the world through tourist, traffic and wildlife cameras
What web cameras show us from dawn to dusk on a single day of lockdown
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New AI enables teachers to rapidly develop intelligent tutoring systems
Intelligent tutoring systems have been shown to be effective in helping to teach certain subjects, such as algebra or grammar, but creating these computerized systems is difficult and laborious. Now, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have shown they can rapidly build them by, in effect, teaching the computer to teach.
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The commercial consequences of collective layoffs
Layoff firms experience adverse changes in sales, advertising effectiveness, and price sensitivity. On average, sales in the layoff country are 8.7% lower following a collective layoff announcement than the predicted levels absent the announcement.
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Bermudagrass harvest management options with poultry litter fertilization
Managing Harvests of 'Russell' and 'Tifton 44' Bermudagrass Receiving Broiler Litter for Phosphorus Removal and Nutritive Value
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Fecal transplantation improves outcomes in patients with multi-drug resistant organisms
Transferring fecal matter from the digestive systems of healthy donors to extremely ill patients who had previously been infected with drug-resistant bacteria resulted in shorter hospital stays, fewer bloodstream infections and infections that were easier to treat, according to research that was selected for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2020. DDW® data will be published in the May
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Changes to gut microbiome may slow cancer growth in smokers
Changes to the gut microbiome interacted with the immune system to slow the growth of cancer in mice exposed to cigarette smoke, according to research that was selected for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2020. DDW® data will be published in the May online supplements to Gastroenterology and GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.
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Study finds highly elevated levels of fatty liver disease for 9/11 first responders
Toxin exposure appears to have contributed to dramatically higher rates of fatty liver disease among first responders to the attack on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, according to research that was selected for presentation at Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) 2020. DDW® data will be published in the May online supplements to Gastroenterology and GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.
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Astronomers capture rare images of planet-forming disks around stars
An international team of astronomers has captured fifteen images of the inner rims of planet-forming disks located hundreds of light years away. These disks of dust and gas, similar in shape to a music record, form around young stars. The images shed new light on how planetary systems are formed.
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Cardiovascular impairment in COVID-19
Anti-inflammatory therapies should be used to treat COVID-19 patients that are at risk of, or have developed, cardiovascular problems, recommend leading cardiologists from Beijing, China, who have detailed the different ways that COVID-19 could trigger serious inflammatory-related cardiovascular issues in patients. The researchers provide clinicians with treatment guidance and highlight potential
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World Coronavirus Tracker: Live Coverage
Yet half a billion people around the world could be pushed into poverty because of the pandemic, the United Nations says.
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Covid-19: What has the BCG vaccine got to do with it? – podcast
Sarah Boseley talks to Prof Helen McShane about why there has been interest in the tuberculosis vaccine and whether it could play a role in protecting us against Covid-19 Continue reading…
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'The days never end': life under lockdown in one of Italy's poorest communities
The Zen neighbourhood, on the outskirts of Palermo, feels abandoned by the government — and the mafia have moved in Alongside the postcard-perfect images of Italy's silent and deserted Renaissance squares under lockdown , there are the filthy streets of the Zen neighbourhood on the northern outskirts of Palermo. In one of the poorest districts in Europe, a stronghold of the local mafia, there app
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Rapportera vårtecken till Vårkollen
Vårkollen är ett medborgarforskningsprojekt där frivilliga och professionella samarbetar. Det genomfördes för första gången 2015. Varje år brukar man få in tusentals observationer från hela landet om blommande vitsippor, tussilago, sälg och hägg samt om björkarnas lövsprickning.
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Astronomers capture rare images of planet-forming disks around stars
An international team of astronomers has captured 15 images of the inner rims of planet-forming disks located hundreds of light-years away. These disks of dust and gas, similar in shape to a music record, form around young stars. The images shed new light on how planetary systems are formed. They were published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.
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Emissions Declines Will Set Records This Year. But It's Not Good News.
An "unprecedented" fall in fossil fuel use, driven by the Covid-19 crisis, is likely to lead to a nearly 8 percent drop, according to new research.
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Renewable power surges as pandemic scrambles global energy outlook, new report finds
Biggest drop in demand for fossil fuels since Great Depression, IEA says
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India: the millions of working poor exposed by pandemic
More than 140m migrant workers have lost jobs since the lockdown began and now face destitution
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Covid-19: What has the BCG vaccine got to do with it?
Sarah Boseley talks to Prof Helen McShane about why there has been interest in the tuberculosis vaccine and whether it could play a role in protecting us against Covid-19. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
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Investors: never let a crisis go to waste
Covid-19 underlines the folly of investing in equities for income
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Wizz Air chief bullish over recovery in air travel
Váradi echoes Ryanair's O'Leary in upbeat outlook as low-cost airline restarts flights from Luton on Friday
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Apollo's credit machine faces its biggest test
Leon Black wanted to buy a bank. Then he came up with something even better.
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Academics probe links between coronavirus and toxic air pollution
Studies suggest correlation between dangerous levels of particulate matter and Covid-19 mortality rates
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What is behind Erdogan's coronavirus diplomacy?
Turkey has sent medical aid to 55 countries including the UK, US and China
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Joe Biden seeks to stir up drama over his running mate
Democrat's stay-at-home campaign struggles to divert attention from Trump during health crisis
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How central and eastern Europe contained coronavirus
Swift action and mandatory masks contributed to lower death toll than elsewhere on continent
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How will the lockdowns end? FT journalists answer your questions
Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson, Hannah Kuchler and Gideon Rachman assess the next stage of the coronavirus crisis
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BlackRock's growing clout carries risks for asset manager
Group faces increased scrutiny as central banks ask it to help run stimulus packages
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Europe's biggest economies hone details on easing out of lockdown
Germany, Italy, France and Spain have all indicated when and how they intend to loosen stay-at-home restrictions
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Remdesivir: Five things to know about the antiviral drug
Gilead's potential treatment for coronavirus stirs investor hopes but evidence on its effectiveness is mixed
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Further reading
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UK retailers miss out on coronavirus support schemes
Banks reluctant to lend more to sector already struggling before the pandemic
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Coronavirus forces investor rethink on social issues
The ESG spotlight has turned to how companies treat their employees, customers and suppliers
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How coronavirus broke America's healthcare system
The US spends $3.6tn a year on health. Why does the pandemic threaten so many of its hospitals?
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Australia's biggest pension fund says investors will withdraw billions
Executive points to 'heaps of liquidity' as members get access to cash due to coronavirus
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Efter afsløring af kritisk CPR-hul: Ministerium kræver svar fra IF Forsikring
Datatilsynet bebuder også, at sagen ikke er død for dem endnu, selvom tilsynet én gang har ladet den ligge i skuffen.
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Ny rapport slår fast: Danskernes naturgasfyr skal skrottes hurtigst muligt
PLUS. Ifølge rapport fra Energifonden er det vitalt for vores klimamål at få individuel gasopvarmning udfaset