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New species of fungus sticking out of beetles named after the COVID-19 quarantine

A comprehensive study on a group of unique ectoparasitic fungi associated with insects and other arthropods in Belgium and the Netherlands was published in the open-access, peer-reviewed scholarly journal MycoKeys. In their paper, the scientists provide identification details about a total of 140 species, including nine species that represent new country records and two species new to science, wit

5h

How the Pandemic Defeated America

Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . Image above : A masked worker cleans a New York City subway entrance. H ow did it come to this? A virus a thousand times smaller than a dust mote has humbled and humiliated the planet's most powerful nation. America has failed to protect its people, leaving them with illnes

11h

NASA Astronauts Splashdown Safely after Historic SpaceX Mission

The first-ever crew-carrying commercial orbital mission is a major spaceflight milestone — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

LATEST

ALMA captures stirred-up planet factory

Planet-forming environments can be much more complex and chaotic than previously expected. This is evidenced by a new image of the star RU Lup, made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).

2min

Ancient part of immune system may underpin severe COVID

New genetic and patient analyses suggest severe COVID is linked to overactive complement, one of the immune system's oldest branches, and excess blood clotting.

2min

NASA Astronauts Are Back on Earth After Historic SpaceX Mission

A SpaceX Dragon capsule undocked from the International Space Station (ISS) over the weekend, returning astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to Earth. The vessel descended into the atmosphere and parachuted down to the ocean without incident. Thus ended the first crewed mission with a commercial US spacecraft in years. With this success, big things are coming for both NASA and SpaceX in the nex

7min

How Dozens of Languages Help Build Gender Stereotypes

Usage patterns shape biases worldwide, whether in Japanese, Persian or English — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8min

Temporal encoding of bacterial identity and traits in growth dynamics [Microbiology]

In biology, it is often critical to determine the identity of an organism and phenotypic traits of interest. Whole-genome sequencing can be useful for this but has limited power for trait prediction. However, we can take advantage of the inherent information content of phenotypes to bypass these limitations. We demonstrate,…

14min

A TDDFT investigation of the Photosystem II reaction center: Insights into the precursors to charge separation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Photosystem II (PS II) captures solar energy and directs charge separation (CS) across the thylakoid membrane during photosynthesis. The highly oxidizing, charge-separated state generated within its reaction center (RC) drives water oxidation. Spectroscopic studies on PS II RCs are difficult to interpret due to large spectral congestion, necessitating modeling to…

14min

Dielectric response with short-ranged electrostatics [Chemistry]

The dielectric nature of polar liquids underpins much of their ability to act as useful solvents, but its description is complicated by the long-ranged nature of dipolar interactions. This is particularly pronounced under the periodic boundary conditions commonly used in molecular simulations. In this article, the dielectric properties of a…

14min

Changes in life history and population size can explain the relative neutral diversity levels on X and autosomes in extant human populations [Evolution]

In human populations, the relative levels of neutral diversity on the X and autosomes differ markedly from each other and from the naïve theoretical expectation of 3/4. Here we propose an explanation for these differences based on new theory about the effects of sex-specific life history and given pedigree-based estimates…

14min

Cognitive control increases honesty in cheaters but cheating in those who are honest [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Every day, we are faced with the conflict between the temptation to cheat for financial gains and maintaining a positive image of ourselves as being a "good person." While it has been proposed that cognitive control is needed to mediate this conflict between reward and our moral self-image, the exact…

14min

Social distancing laws cause only small losses of economic activity during the COVID-19 pandemic in Scandinavia [Economic Sciences]

This paper uses real-time transaction data from a large bank in Scandinavia to estimate the effect of social distancing laws on consumer spending in the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The analysis exploits a natural experiment to disentangle the effects of the virus and the laws aiming to contain it: Denmark…

14min

A temporal record of the past with a spectrum of time constants in the monkey entorhinal cortex [Neuroscience]

Episodic memory is believed to be intimately related to our experience of the passage of time. Indeed, neurons in the hippocampus and other brain regions critical to episodic memory code for the passage of time at a range of timescales. The origin of this temporal signal, however, remains unclear. Here,…

14min

Surface polarization effects in confined polyelectrolyte solutions [Applied Physical Sciences]

Understanding nanoscale interactions at the interface between two media with different dielectric constants is crucial for controlling many environmental and biological processes, and for improving the efficiency of energy storage devices. In this contributed paper, we show that polarization effects due to such dielectric mismatch remarkably influence the double-layer structure…

14min

Activating KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutants enhance proteasome capacity and reduce endoplasmic reticulum stress in multiple myeloma [Cell Biology]

KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations which activate p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling are found in half of myeloma patients and contribute to proteasome inhibitor (PI) resistance, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We established myeloma cell lines expressing wild-type (WT), constitutively active (CA) (G12V/G13D/Q61H), or dominant-negative (DN)…

14min

Geometric anomaly detection in data [Applied Mathematics]

The quest for low-dimensional models which approximate high-dimensional data is pervasive across the physical, natural, and social sciences. The dominant paradigm underlying most standard modeling techniques assumes that the data are concentrated near a single unknown manifold of relatively small intrinsic dimension. Here, we present a systematic framework for detecting…

14min

Complex self-assembled lattices from simple polymer blends [Commentaries]

Block copolymers having two or more polymer chains linked covalently have been extensively studied for various nanostructure fabrications. Highly symmetric body-centered cubic (bcc) packing lattice has been the only observed supramolecular spherical phase in compositionally asymmetric AB diblock copolymers for a long time. After 2010, the Frank−Kasper (F-K) σ (1)…

14min

Tuning the circadian period of cyanobacteria up to 6.6 days by the single amino acid substitutions in KaiC [Plant Biology]

The circadian clock of cyanobacteria consists of only three clock proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, which generate a circadian rhythm of KaiC phosphorylation in vitro. The adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of KaiC is the source of the 24-h period and temperature compensation. Although numerous circadian mutants of KaiC have been…

14min

Ancestral regulatory mechanisms specify conserved midbrain circuitry in arthropods and vertebrates [Neuroscience]

Corresponding attributes of neural development and function suggest arthropod and vertebrate brains may have an evolutionarily conserved organization. However, the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. Here, we identify a gene regulatory and character identity network defining the deutocerebral–tritocerebral boundary (DTB) in Drosophila. This network comprises genes homologous to those dire

14min

The creative cliff illusion [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Across eight studies, we tested whether people understand the time course of their own creativity. Prior literature finds that creativity tends to improve across an ideation session. Here we compared people's beliefs against their actual creative performance. Consistent with prior research, we found that people's creativity, on aggregate, remained constant…

14min

Optimizing immunization protocols to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Natural infections and vaccination with a pathogen typically stimulate the production of potent antibodies specific for the pathogen through a Darwinian evolutionary process known as affinity maturation. Such antibodies provide protection against reinfection by the same strain of a pathogen. A highly mutable virus, like HIV or influenza, evades recognition…

14min

A Zika virus envelope mutation preceding the 2015 epidemic enhances virulence and fitness for transmission [Microbiology]

Arboviruses maintain high mutation rates due to lack of proofreading ability of their viral polymerases, in some cases facilitating adaptive evolution and emergence. Here we show that, just before its 2013 spread to the Americas, Zika virus (ZIKV) underwent an envelope protein V473M substitution (E-V473M) that increased neurovirulence, maternal-to-fetal transmission,…

14min

Insights into the evolution of regulated actin dynamics via characterization of primitive gelsolin/cofilin proteins from Asgard archaea [Biochemistry]

Asgard archaea genomes contain potential eukaryotic-like genes that provide intriguing insight for the evolution of eukaryotes. The eukaryotic actin polymerization/depolymerization cycle is critical for providing force and structure in many processes, including membrane remodeling. In general, Asgard genomes encode two classes of actin-regulating proteins from sequence analysis, profilins and gels

14min

Hypothalamic extended synaptotagmin-3 contributes to the development of dietary obesity and related metabolic disorders [Medical Sciences]

The C2 domain containing protein extended synaptotagmin (E-Syt) plays important roles in both lipid homeostasis and the intracellular signaling; however, its role in physiology remains largely unknown. Here, we show that hypothalamic E-Syt3 plays a critical role in diet-induced obesity (DIO). E-Syt3 is characteristically expressed in the hypothalamic nuclei. Whole-body…

14min

Spatiotemporal mapping of bacterial membrane potential responses to extracellular electron transfer [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Extracellular electron transfer (EET) allows microorganisms to gain energy by linking intracellular reactions to external surfaces ranging from natural minerals to the electrodes of bioelectrochemical renewable energy technologies. In the past two decades, electrochemical techniques have been used to investigate EET in a wide range of microbes, with emphasis on…

14min

Genomic analysis of inherited hearing loss in the Palestinian population [Genetics]

The genetic characterization of a common phenotype for an entire population reveals both the causes of that phenotype for that place and the power of family-based, population-wide genomic analysis for gene and mutation discovery. We characterized the genetics of hearing loss throughout the Palestinian population, enrolling 2,198 participants from 491…

14min

Genome-wide RNA interference screening reveals a COPI-MAP2K3 pathway required for YAP regulation [Cell Biology]

The transcriptional regulator YAP, which plays important roles in the development, regeneration, and tumorigenesis, is activated when released from inhibition by the Hippo kinase cascade. The regulatory mechanism of YAP in Hippo-low contexts is poorly understood. Here, we performed a genome-wide RNA interference screen to identify genes whose loss of…

14min

Multidimensional study of the heterogeneity of leukemia cells in t(8;21) acute myelogenous leukemia identifies the subtype with poor outcome [Medical Sciences]

t(8;21)(q22;q22) acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is morphologically characterized by a continuum of heterogeneous leukemia cells from myeloblasts to differentiated myeloid elements. Thus, t(8;21) AML is an excellent model for studying heterogeneous cell populations and cellular evolution during disease progression. Using integrative analyses of immunophenotype, RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq), and singl

14min

Hidden kinetic traps in multidomain folding highlight the presence of a misfolded but functionally competent intermediate [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Although more than 75% of the proteome is composed of multidomain proteins, current knowledge of protein folding is based primarily on studies of isolated domains. In this work, we describe the folding mechanism of a multidomain tandem construct comprising two distinct covalently bound PDZ domains belonging to a protein called…

14min

Loss of Hap1 selectively promotes striatal degeneration in Huntington disease mice [Neuroscience]

Huntington disease (HD) is an ideal model for investigating selective neurodegeneration, as expanded polyQ repeats in the ubiquitously expressed huntingtin (HTT) cause the preferential neurodegeneration in the striatum of the HD patient brains. Here we report that adeno-associated virus (AAV) transduction-mediated depletion of Hap1, the first identified huntingtin-associated protein, in…

14min

In-place molecular preservation of cellulose in 5,000-year-old archaeological textiles [Anthropology]

The understanding of fossilization mechanisms at the nanoscale remains extremely challenging despite its fundamental interest and its implications for paleontology, archaeology, geoscience, and environmental and material sciences. The mineralization mechanism by which cellulosic, keratinous, and silk tissues fossilize in the vicinity of archaeological metal artifacts offers the most exquisite pres

14min

Correction for Kwak et al., Contact-ID, a tool for profiling organelle contact sites, reveals regulatory proteins of mitochondrial-associated membrane formation [Corrections]

CELL BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY Correction for "Contact-ID, a tool for profiling organelle contact sites, reveals regulatory proteins of mitochondrial-associated membrane formation," by Chulhwan Kwak, Sanghee Shin, Jong-Seok Park, Minkyo Jung, Truong Thi My Nhung, Myeong-Gyun Kang, Chaiheon Lee, Tae-Hyuk Kwon, Sang Ki Park, Ji Young Mun, Jong-Seo Kim, and Hyun-Woo Rhee,…

14min

Profile of Paul E. Turner [Profiles]

"There is a lot of power in addressing general questions in biology using the smallest inhabitants of the planet," says Paul E. Turner, the Rachel Carson Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University. Conducting interdisciplinary and experimental evolution studies of microbes, Turner and his colleagues elucidate virus evolution…

14min

JMJD5 couples with CDK9 to release the paused RNA polymerase II [Biochemistry]

More than 30% of genes in higher eukaryotes are regulated by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) promoter proximal pausing. Pausing is released by the positive transcription elongation factor complex (P-TEFb). However, the exact mechanism by which this occurs and whether phosphorylation of the carboxyl-terminal domain of Pol II is involved…

14min

ALKBH5 regulates anti-PD-1 therapy response by modulating lactate and suppressive immune cell accumulation in tumor microenvironment [Medical Sciences]

Although immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) therapy has revolutionized cancer treatment, many patients do not respond or develop resistance to ICB. N6-methylation of adenosine (m6A) in RNA regulates many pathophysiological processes. Here, we show that deletion of the m6A demethylase Alkbh5 sensitized tumors to cancer immunotherapy. Alkbh5 has effects on m6A…

14min

Molecular biology and structure of a novel penaeid shrimp densovirus elucidate convergent parvoviral host capsid evolution [Microbiology]

The giant tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon) is a decapod crustacean widely reared for human consumption. Currently, viruses of two distinct lineages of parvoviruses (PVs, family Parvoviridae; subfamily Hamaparvovirinae) infect penaeid shrimp. Here, a PV was isolated and cloned from Vietnamese P. monodon specimens, designated Penaeus monodon metallodensovirus (PmMDV). This is…

14min

Social bonds do not mediate the relationship between early adversity and adult glucocorticoids in wild baboons [Anthropology]

In humans and other animals, harsh conditions in early life can have profound effects on adult physiology, including the stress response. This relationship may be mediated by a lack of supportive relationships in adulthood. That is, early life adversity may inhibit the formation of supportive social ties, and weak social…

14min

Convergent evolution of processivity in bacterial and fungal cellulases [Biochemistry]

Cellulose is the most abundant biomass on Earth, and many microorganisms depend on it as a source of energy. It consists mainly of crystalline and amorphous regions, and natural degradation of the crystalline part is highly dependent on the degree of processivity of the degrading enzymes (i.e., the extent of…

14min

Structural basis for carotenoid cleavage by an archaeal carotenoid dioxygenase [Biochemistry]

Apocarotenoids are important signaling molecules generated from carotenoids through the action of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). These enzymes have a remarkable ability to cleave carotenoids at specific alkene bonds while leaving chemically similar sites within the polyene intact. Although several bacterial and eukaryotic CCDs have been characterized, the long-standing goal…

14min

RCP8.5 tracks cumulative CO2 emissions [Environmental Sciences]

Climate simulation-based scenarios are routinely used to characterize a range of plausible climate futures. Despite some recent progress on bending the emissions curve, RCP8.5, the most aggressive scenario in assumed fossil fuel use for global climate models, will continue to serve as a useful tool for quantifying physical climate risk,…

14min

Global enhancement of cortical excitability following coactivation of large neuronal populations [Neuroscience]

Correlated activation of cortical neurons often occurs in the brain and repetitive correlated neuronal firing could cause long-term modifications of synaptic efficacy and intrinsic excitability. We found that repetitive optogenetic activation of neuronal populations in the mouse cortex caused enhancement of optogenetically evoked firing of local coactivated neurons as well…

14min

An obȷective evaluation of the beholder's response to abstract and figurative art based on construal level theory [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Does abstract art evoke a different cognitive state than figurative art? To address this question empirically, we bridged art theory and cognitive research and designed an experiment leveraging construal level theory (CLT). CLT is based on experimental data showing that psychologically distant events (i.e., occurring farther away in space or…

14min

Profile of Amy N. Finkelstein [Profiles]

"It is a very exciting time to be an economist," says Amy Finkelstein, a professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) who was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2018. "Economics has become a rigorous science, combining theory and data to better understand how the…

16min

Explaining the low-frequency shear elasticity of confined liquids [Applied Physical Sciences]

Experimental observations of unexpected shear rigidity in confined liquids, on very low frequency scales on the order of 0.01 to 0.1 Hz, call into question our basic understanding of the elasticity of liquids and have posed a challenge to theoretical models of the liquid state ever since. Here we combine…

16min

Alternative splicing of DSP1 enhances snRNA accumulation by promoting transcription termination and recycle of the processing complex [Plant Biology]

Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are the basal components of the spliceosome and play crucial roles in splicing. Their biogenesis is spatiotemporally regulated. However, related mechanisms are still poorly understood. Defective in snRNA processing (DSP1) is an essential component of the DSP1 complex that catalyzes plant snRNA 3′-end maturation by cotranscriptional…

16min

Correction for Tzafetas et al., The intelligent knife (iKnife) and its intraoperative diagnostic advantage for the treatment of cervical disease [Corrections]

MEDICAL SCIENCES, CHEMISTRY Correction for "The intelligent knife (iKnife) and its intraoperative diagnostic advantage for the treatment of cervical disease," by Menelaos Tzafetas, Anita Mitra, Maria Paraskevaidi, Zsolt Bodai, Ilkka Kalliala, Sarah Bowden, Konstantinos Lathouras, Francesca Rosini, Marcell Szasz, Adele Savage, Julia Balog, James McKenzie, Deirdre Lyons, Phillip Bennett, David…

16min

Correction for Chaudhry et al., Cytomegalovirus inhibition of extrinsic apoptosis determines fitness and resistance to cytotoxic CD8 T cells [Corrections]

IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for "Cytomegalovirus inhibition of extrinsic apoptosis determines fitness and resistance to cytotoxic CD8 T cells," by M. Zeeshan Chaudhry, Rosaely Casalegno-Garduno, Katarzyna M. Sitnik, Bahram Kasmapour, Ann-Kathrin Pulm, Ilija Brizic, Britta Eiz-Vesper, Andreas Moosmann, Stipan Jonjic, Edward S. Mocarski, and Luka Cicin-Sain, which was first published…

16min

Modeling SHH-driven medulloblastoma with patient iPS cell-derived neural stem cells [Medical Sciences]

Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Here we describe a medulloblastoma model using Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived human neuroepithelial stem (NES) cells generated from a Gorlin syndrome patient carrying a germline mutation in the sonic hedgehog (SHH) receptor PTCH1. We found that Gorlin NES cells…

16min

RNA sectors and allosteric function within the ribosome [Chemistry]

The ribosome translates the genetic code into proteins in all domains of life. Its size and complexity demand long-range interactions that regulate ribosome function. These interactions are largely unknown. Here, we apply a global coevolution method, statistical coupling analysis (SCA), to identify coevolving residue networks (sectors) within the 23S ribosomal…

16min

Acetylated histone H4 tail enhances histone H3 tail acetylation by altering their mutual dynamics in the nucleosome [Biochemistry]

The structural unit of eukaryotic chromatin is a nucleosome, comprising two histone H2A-H2B heterodimers and one histone (H3-H4)2 tetramer, wrapped around by ∼146 bp of DNA. The N-terminal flexible histone tails stick out from the histone core and have extensive posttranslational modifications, causing epigenetic changes of chromatin. Although crystal and…

16min

A folding reaction at the C-terminal domain drives temperature sensing in TRPM8 channels [Physiology]

In mammals, temperature-sensitive TRP channels make membrane conductance of cells extremely temperature dependent, allowing the detection of temperature ranging from noxious cold to noxious heat. We progressively deleted the distal carboxyl terminus domain (CTD) of the cold-activated melastatin receptor channel, TRPM8. We found that the enthalpy change associated with channel…

16min

Correction for Nan et al., Anisotropic spin-orbit torque generation in epitaxial SrIrO3 by symmetry design [Corrections]

APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Anisotropic spin-orbit torque generation in epitaxial SrIrO3 by symmetry design," by T. Nan, T. J. Anderson, J. Gibbons, K. Hwang, N. Campbell, H. Zhou, Y. Q. Dong, G. Y. Kim, D. F. Shao, T. R. Paudel, N. Reynolds, X. J. Wang, N. X. Sun, E….

16min

Revealing the intersectoral material flow of plastic containers and packaging in Japan [Sustainability Science]

The Japanese government developed a strategy for plastics and laid out ambitious targets including the reduction of 25% for single-use plastic waste and the reuse/recycling of 60% for plastic containers and packaging by 2030. However, the current usage situation of single-use plastics including containers and packaging, which should be a…

16min

Global snow drought hot spots and characteristics [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Snow plays a fundamental role in global water resources, climate, and biogeochemical processes; however, no global snow drought assessments currently exist. Changes in the duration and intensity of droughts can significantly impact ecosystems, food and water security, agriculture, hydropower, and the socioeconomics of a region. We characterize the duration and…

16min

Stable isotopes in hair reveal dietary protein sources with links to socioeconomic status and health [Anthropology]

Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios in hair sampled from 65 communities across the central and intermountain regions of the United States and more intensively throughout 29 ZIP codes in the Salt Lake Valley, Utah, revealed a dietary divergence related to socioeconomic status as measured by cost of living, household income,…

16min

Correction for Kalish et al., Single-nucleus RNA sequencing of mouse auditory cortex reveals critical period triggers and brakes [Corrections]

NEUROSCIENCE Correction for "Single-nucleus RNA sequencing of mouse auditory cortex reveals critical period triggers and brakes," by Brian T. Kalish, Tania R. Barkat, Erin E. Diel, Elizabeth J. Zhang, Michael E. Greenberg, and Takao K. Hensch, which was first published May 13, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1920433117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117,…

16min

Global patterns and climatic controls of belowground net carbon fixation [Ecology]

Carbon allocated underground through belowground net primary production represents the main input to soil organic carbon. This is of significant importance, because soil organic carbon is the third-largest carbon stock after oceanic and geological pools. However, drivers and controls of belowground productivity and the fraction of total carbon fixation allocated…

16min

Three-dimensional reconstructions of the putative metazoan Namapoikia show that it was a microbial construction [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Strata from the Ediacaran Period (635 million to 538 million years ago [Ma]) contain several examples of enigmatic, putative shell-building metazoan fossils. These fossils may provide insight into the evolution and environmental impact of biomineralization on Earth, especially if their biological affinities and modern analogs can be identified. Recently, apparent…

16min

NFAT5, which protects against hypertonicity, is activated by that stress via structuring of its intrinsically disordered domain [Physiology]

Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells 5 (NFAT5) is a transcription factor (TF) that mediates protection from adverse effects of hypertonicity by increasing transcription of genes, including those that lead to cellular accumulation of protective organic osmolytes. NFAT5 has three intrinsically ordered (ID) activation domains (ADs). Using the NFAT5 N-terminal…

16min

Necroptosis-based CRISPR knockout screen reveals Neuropilin-1 as a critical host factor for early stages of murine cytomegalovirus infection [Immunology and Inflammation]

Herpesviruses are ubiquitous human pathogens that cause a wide range of health complications. Currently, there is an incomplete understanding of cellular factors that contribute to herpesvirus infection. Here, we report an antiviral necroptosis-based genetic screen to identify novel host cell factors required for infection with the β-herpesvirus murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV)….

16min

Unequal neutron-star mergers create unique "bang" in simulations

In a series of simulations, an international team of researchers determined that some neutron star collisions not only produce gravitational waves, but also electromagnetic radiation that should be detectable on Earth.

18min

Humans and flies employ very similar mechanisms for brain development and function

A new study led by researchers from King's College London has shown that humans, mice and flies share the same fundamental genetic mechanisms that regulate the formation and function of brain areas involved in attention and movement control.

18min

Half of low-income communities have no ICU beds

A new Penn Medicine study sheds light on yet another reason why the coronavirus pandemic is disproportionately killing the poor: Residents in low-income neighborhoods lack access to intensive care unit (ICU) beds.

18min

Women skip medications more in the US than other countries

For patients, especially those living with chronic conditions, nonadherence to prescription medicines due to cost is a common problem. By not filling prescriptions, skipping doses, delaying refills, or splitting pills, patients risk compromising the therapeutic benefit of their treatments. To understand the extent of this problem, researchers studied survey data from 11 high-income countries. They

18min

Hydrogel paves way for biomedical breakthrough

Dubbed the "invisibility cloak", engineers at the University of Sydney have developed a hydrogel that allows implants and transplants to better and more safetly interact with surrounding tissue.

18min

Greater financial integration generally not associated with better healthcare quality

New findings from a Dartmouth-led study, published in the August issue of Health Affairs, show that larger, more integrated healthcare systems do not generally deliver better quality care, and that there is significant variation in quality scores across hospitals and physician practices, regardless of whether they are independent or owned by larger systems. Policy makers should ensure that mergers

18min

How Dozens of Languages Help Build Gender Stereotypes

Usage patterns shape biases worldwide, whether in Japanese, Persian or English — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21min

This Galaxy Cluster Is Spewing a Surplus of Stars Because of a Lazy Black Hole

Rapid Fire A distant galaxy cluster has been churning out new stars at a dizzying pace — and now astronomers think they know why. 'Turns out: The cluster's supermassive black hole has been sleeping on the job, according to research published Thursday in The Astrophysical Journal Letters . While the scientists aren't exactly sure why the black hole is so quiet, they do know that its absence allows

22min

How Dozens of Languages Help Build Gender Stereotypes

Usage patterns shape biases worldwide, whether in Japanese, Persian or English — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

24min

Listen: Drugs like MDMA and LSD are transforming therapy

The latest research shows that drugs like MDMA and LSD could radically change how some people engage with therapy. In her efforts to turn a scientific lens toward these drugs, Harriet de Wit , a professor psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at the University of Chicago, has made some surprising discoveries about their applications in therapy. De Wit also examines microdosing , why it is so pop

27min

Even With a Vaccine, It Will Take Months If Not Years to Beat the Coronavirus

A coronavirus vaccine has long been described as the panacea for this pandemic. A magical shot in the arm triggers an immunity — enough immunity among us, and over time, the virus will go away, the thinking goes. But that couldn't be further from the truth, as the Washington Post reports . The harsh reality: even once we've found a vaccine, it could take months — if not years — for societies to r

29min

For solar boom, scrap silicon for this promising mineral

Engineers have found that photovoltaic wafers in solar panels with all-perovskite structures outperform photovoltaic cells made from state-of-the-art crystalline silicon, as well as perovskite-silicon tandem cells, which are stacked pancake-style cells that absorb light better.

32min

Hydrogel paves way for biomedical breakthrough

Published in Advanced Functional Materials, a University of Sydney team of biomedical engineers has developed a plasma technology to robustly attach hydrogels—a jelly-like substance which is structurally similar to soft tissue in the human body—to polymeric materials, allowing manufactured devices to better interact with surrounding tissue.

37min

Strategy for sustainable aquaculture, the world's fastest growing food sector

As the population grows, and the global standard of living improves, humanity's appetite for seafood is increasing. In 2020 seafood consumption reached an all-time high, with an average of 20kg consumed annually by every person on the planet.

39min

Analyzing pros and cons of two composite manufacturing methods

Airplane wings and wind turbine blades are typically created using bulk polymerization in composite manufacturing facilities. They are heated and cured in enormous autoclaves and heated molds as big as the finished part. Frontal polymerization is a new out-of-autoclave method that doesn't require a large facility investment. Researchers have conducted a study pitting one process against the other

39min

Child sleep problems associated with impaired academic and psychosocial functioning

A new study has found that sleep disturbances at any age are associated with diminished well-being by the time the children are 10 or 11 years old. The findings suggest health care providers should screen children for sleep problems at every age and intervene early when a sleep problem is identified.

39min

Monkeying around: Study finds older primates father far fewer babies

Infertility is a worldwide clinical problem for human health that affects 8 to 12 percent of couples. A new study from Washington University in St. Louis has implications for understanding some age-related aspects of male reproductive health in primates, including humans.

46min

Monkeying around: Study finds older primates father far fewer babies

Infertility is a worldwide clinical problem for human health that affects 8 to 12 percent of couples. A new study from Washington University in St. Louis has implications for understanding some age-related aspects of male reproductive health in primates, including humans.

49min

New research sheds light on bargaining and the 'daily deal market'

If you've ever taken advantage of a nice discount thanks to a promotion from Groupon or LivingSocial, you've tapped the power of the daily deal market yourself. You, the consumer, benefited from the prior bargaining that took place between that big online platform and the merchant, resulting in a lower price for you.

49min

Researchers investigate effect of COVID-19 on UK organized crime

The effects of COVID-19 on Child Criminal Exploitation (CCE) are being investigated by the Rights Lab at the University of Nottingham, UK.

49min

NASA obtains satellite imagery on Tropical Storm Isaias

NASA's Aqua satellite obtained visible and water vapor imagery as Tropical Storm Isaias continued moving along the east coast of Florida. On Aug. 3, Warnings and Watches stretched from Florida to Maine.

49min

Study shows demolishing vacant houses can have positive effect on neighbor maintenance

New research suggests that demolishing abandoned houses may lead nearby property owners to better maintain their homes.

49min

Semiconductor manufacturing techniques employed for new gamma-ray detector

NASA astrophysicists and engineers are adapting detectors used by earthbound supercolliders and creating them the same way electronics companies produce all modern consumer devices, including cell phones and laptops.

49min

Tropical Storm Isaias Expected To Make Landfall As A Hurricane In Carolinas

The storm has already dumped rain on Florida's east coast. It's expected to linger in North Carolina on Monday, traveling inland through the night before swirling up the Mid-Atlantic coast. (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

50min

UV Light Wands Are Supposed to Kill Viruses. But Do They Really Work?

Sellers claim that hand-held UV-C light wands sanitize surfaces, but many are underpowered and others are fakes. Here's what you need to know.

51min

Researchers discover how chlamydiae multiply in human cells

Chlamydia are bacteria that cause venereal diseases. In humans, they can only survive if they enter the cells. This is the only place where they find the necessary metabolites for their reproduction. And this happens in a relatively simple way: The bacteria create a small bubble in the cell and divide in it over several generations.

52min

Researchers collaborate on a strategy for sustainable aquaculture, the world's fastest growing food sector

As the population grows, and the global standard of living improves, humanity's appetite for seafood is increasing. In 2020 seafood consumption reached an all-time high, with an average of 20kg consumed annually by every person on the planet.

52min

AI and single-cell genomics: New software predicts cell fate

Traditional single-cell sequencing methods help to reveal insights about cellular differences and functions—but they do this with static snapshots only rather than time-lapse films. This limitation makes it difficult to draw conclusions about the dynamics of cell development and gene activity. The recently introduced method 'RNA velocity' aims to reconstruct the developmental trajectory of a cell

52min

Tackling the bioethics challenges raised by COVID-19

The diverse situations experienced by health-care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic often present serious ethical challenges. From the allocation of resources and triage protocols to health-care worker and patient rights and the management of clinical trials, new ethical questions have come to the forefront of today's global public health emergency.

54min

Hulu's original movie "Palm Springs" is the comedy we needed this summer

Two wedding guests discover they're trapped in an infinite time loop, waking up in Palm Springs over and over and over. As the reality of their situation sets in, Nyles and Sarah decide to enjoy the repetitive awakenings. The film is perfectly timed for a world sheltering at home during a pandemic. Everyone remembers Bill Murray's hilarious time loop in the 1993 film Groundhog Day . While coverin

54min

NASA satellites show two views of California's Apple Fire

NASA's satellites were working overtime as they snapped pictures of the large Apple Fire in Banning Canyon near San Bernardino, California on Aug. 02, 2020. This fire began on July 31, 2020 and the cause of the fire is still under investigation. To date the fire has consumed 20,516 acres and is 5% contained.

55min

Researchers discover how chlamydiae multiply in human cells

Chlamydia are bacteria that cause venereal diseases. In humans, they can only survive if they enter the cells. This is the only place where they find the necessary metabolites for their reproduction. And this happens in a relatively simple way: The bacteria create a small bubble in the cell and divide in it over several generations.

55min

Researchers collaborate on a strategy for sustainable aquaculture, the world's fastest growing food sector

As the population grows, and the global standard of living improves, humanity's appetite for seafood is increasing. In 2020 seafood consumption reached an all-time high, with an average of 20kg consumed annually by every person on the planet.

55min

AI and single-cell genomics: New software predicts cell fate

Traditional single-cell sequencing methods help to reveal insights about cellular differences and functions—but they do this with static snapshots only rather than time-lapse films. This limitation makes it difficult to draw conclusions about the dynamics of cell development and gene activity. The recently introduced method 'RNA velocity' aims to reconstruct the developmental trajectory of a cell

55min

Children who suffer violence or trauma age faster, study finds

Researchers discover links with earlier puberty and signs of more rapid cellular ageing Children who experience violence or trauma seem to age faster, going through puberty earlier and showing greater signs of ageing in their cells, researchers have found. They say the findings add to a growing body of work that suggests early adversity can become "biologically embedded" with the potential for ad

1h

Virologists identify potential COVID-19 treatment

New research reveals how small molecule protease inhibitors show potency against human coronaviruses.

1h

AI and single-cell genomics

The study of cellular dynamics is crucial to understand how cells develop and how diseases progress. Scientist have now created 'scVelo' – a machine learning method and open source software to estimate the dynamics of gene activity in single cells. This allows biologists to robustly predict the future state of individual cells.

1h

Chlamydia: Greedy for glutamine

If chlamydiae want to multiply in a human cell, the first thing they need is a lot of glutamine. Researchers have clarified how the pathogenic bacteria obtain this substance.

1h

Study shows demolishing vacant houses can have positive effect on neighbor maintenance

New research suggests that demolishing abandoned houses may lead nearby property owners to better maintain their homes.

1h

For solar boom, scrap silicon for this promising mineral

Engineers have found that photovoltaic wafers in solar panels with all-perovskite structures outperform photovoltaic cells made from state-of-the-art crystalline silicon, as well as perovskite-silicon tandem cells, which are stacked pancake-style cells that absorb light better.

1h

Why is stroke so deadly for people of African descent?

An international team of scientists has completed the largest analysis of stroke-risk genes ever undertaken in people of African descent.

1h

Oriole bird hybridization is a dead end

A half-century of controversy over two popular bird species may have finally come to an end. In one corner: the Bullock's Oriole, found in the western half of North America. In the other corner: the Baltimore Oriole, breeding in the eastern half. Where their ranges meet in the Great Plains, the two mix freely and produce apparently healthy hybrid offspring. But according to scientists, hybridizati

1h

New genetic cause of a form of inherited neuropathy

Inherited mutations in a gene that keeps nerve cells intact was shown, for the first time, to be a driver of a neuropathy known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. This finding presents a clearer picture of the disease's genetic underpinnings that could inform the development of gene therapies to correct it.

1h

Iron-rich meteorites show record of core crystallization in system's oldest planetesimals

New work uncovers new details about our Solar System's oldest planetary objects, which broke apart in long-ago collisions to form iron-rich meteorites. Their findings reveal that the distinct chemical signatures of these meteorites can be explained by the process of core crystallization in their parent bodies, deepening our understanding of the geochemistry occurring in the Solar System's youth.

1h

Germany-wide rainfall measurements by utilizing the mobile network

Whether in flood early-warning systems or in agriculture – rainfall measurements are of great importance. However, there is a lack of accurate data for many regions in the world due to the fact that comprehensive measurements have so far been too expensive. Researchers have now succeeded in utilizing the commercial microwave link network operated by mobile network providers for Germany-wide rainfa

1h

Simplified circuit design could revolutionize how wearables are manufactured

Researchers have demonstrated the use of a ground-breaking circuit design that could transform manufacturing processes for wearable technology.

1h

New species of fungus sticking out of beetles

A comprehensive study on a group of unique ectoparasitic fungi associated with insects and other arthropods in Belgium and the Netherlands has been published. The paper provides identification details about a total of 140 species, including nine species that represent new country records and two species new to science, with one of them named after the 2020 quarantine period, imposed to curb the CO

1h

How COVID-19 changed the way patients responded to a heart attack

Early death rate for a common form of heart attack jumped after lockdown. Substantial drop in people seeking medical help for a heart attack. Hospitals were able to maintain clinical standards. The death rate for patients who experienced what is normally a lower-risk heart attack in England rose sharply during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to an analysis of NHS data. In comparison,

1h

Monkeying around: Study finds older primates father far fewer babies

Older male rhesus monkeys sire fewer offspring, even though they appear to be mating as much as younger monkeys with similarly high social status. Sperm quality or quantity, or the survival of infants, may decline with the age of the would-be father, the new study suggests. A new study from Washington University in St. Louis has implications for understanding some age-related aspects of male repro

1h

Broad antivirals kill SARS-CoV-2, the MERS virus, and other coronaviruses in cells and mice

A team of scientists has engineered antiviral compounds that can kill several types of coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

1h

Researchers uncovered the Zika virus mutation responsible for quick spread, birth defects

A multidisciplinary team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered a Zika virus mutation that may be responsible for the explosive viral transmission in 2015/2016 and for the cause of microcephaly (babies with small heads) born to infected pregnant women. The study is currently available in Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences.

1h

Anatomy of an acne treatment

Sarecycline, a drug approved for use in the United States in 2018, is the first new antibiotic approved to treat acne in more than 40 years. Now, researchers at Yale and the University of Illinois-Chicago have discovered how its unique chemical structure makes it effective.

1h

Strong relationships in adulthood won't 'fix' effects of early childhood adversity

Harsh conditions in early life are a fundamental cause of adult stress, and according to new research from the University of Notre Dame on wild baboons, this effect is not explained by a lack of social support in adulthood.

1h

An averted glance gives a glimpse of the mind behind the eyes

Shakespeare once wrote that the "eyes are the window to your soul." But scientists have found it challenging to peer into the brain to see how it derives meaning from a look into another's eyes. Psychologists at Yale and Harvard have now found a new way to study this mystery by examining the universal and embarrassing tendency to avert one's gaze when caught looking at someone else.

1h

'Worst-case' CO2 emissions scenario is best for assessing climate risk and impacts to 2050

The RCP 8.5 carbon emissions pathway is the most appropriate for conducting assessments of climate change impacts by 2050, according to a new article published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Long dismissed as an alarmist or misleading worst-case scenario, the authors argue that is actually the closest approximation of both historical emissions and anticipated outcome

1h

Social bonds in adulthood don't mediate early life trauma

When baboons experience trauma in early life, they have higher levels of stress hormones in adulthood–a potential marker of poor health–than their peers who don't experience trauma, even if they have strong social relationships as adults, according to a study led by a University of Michigan researcher.

1h

Your hair knows what you eat and how much your haircut costs

University of Utah researchers find that stable isotopes in hair reveal a divergence in diet according to socioeconomic status (SES), with lower-SES areas displaying higher proportions of protein coming from cornfed animals. It's a way, the authors write, to assess a community's diet and their health risks.

1h

Scientists discover secret behind Earth's biodiversity hotspots

Researchers have discovered why the tropics and a handful of other areas across the globe have become the most biodiverse places on the planet.

1h

After Being Swallowed Alive, Water Beetle Stages 'Backdoor' Escape from Frog's Gut

Life's journey sometimes takes you to unexpected places — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Rutgers-led research finds bee decline threatens crop yields

Species richness among wild bees and other pollinators has been declining for 50 years. A new study found crops like apples, cherries, and blueberries to be pollination limited, meaning less pollination reduces crop yields. Conservation efforts will need to be made to stave off future losses and potential food insecurity. Bees have endured a disastrous half-century. In the winter of 2018, U.S. be

1h

All the storage you'll ever need to back up your data for under $100

140,000 hard drives crash in America every week. 93 percent of businesses that suffer data loss for over 10 days file for bankruptcy within 12 months. Four million data records are stolen or lost every single day. Data loss is an expensive problem. The enormous amount of data that is lost due to hard drive crashes creates financial headaches as well as emotional pain. There's nothing worse than l

1h

After Being Swallowed Alive, Water Beetle Stages 'Backdoor' Escape from Frog's Gut

Life's journey sometimes takes you to unexpected places — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Relieve stress through art with the help of these drawing courses

In a stressful time, art therapy has been shown to relieve stress, stimulate the brain's pleasure center, and help you become emotionally resilient. Creating art stimulates the release of dopamine, which in turn raises self-esteem levels. Pencil Kings features world-class teachers from Marvel and DreamWorks guiding you through art therapy by drawing. Creativity is a uniquely human trait. We can d

1h

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1h

Listen: A Guide to Birding

On this episode of the podcast Social Distance, Katherine Wells and James Hamblin investigate a new pandemic-compatible hobby. Listen to the episode here: Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts , Spotify , or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published. Some highlights from their conversation: Jason Ward: The birds that you're seeing in your yard or in yo

1h

Embracing the Compromises of Political Giants

A giant dies and the world left behind feels a bit more tawdry and mundane and uninspiring and small. A melancholy descends, filled with insecurity about the present and seductive nostalgia for the certainty of the past. Where have the great leaders gone, one wonders—the great causes and morality, the clarity and vision? The death of the Nobel Prize–winning Irish politician John Hume is such a mo

1h

Social bonds in adulthood don't mediate early life trauma

When baboons experience trauma in early life, they have higher levels of stress hormones in adulthood—a potential marker of poor health—than their peers who don't experience trauma, even if they have strong social relationships as adults, according to a study led by a University of Michigan researcher.

1h

Scientists discover secret behind Earth's biodiversity hotspots

The research suggests that biodiversity hotspots—such as the Daintree Rainforest in Australia and the Cloud Forests of Ecuador—are teeming with species because they have been ecologically stable for long periods of time, allowing evolution to forge ahead undisturbed.

1h

Anatomy of an acne treatment

Sarecycline, a drug approved for use in the United States in 2018, is the first new antibiotic approved to treat acne in more than 40 years. Now, researchers at Yale and the University of Illinois-Chicago have discovered how its unique chemical structure makes it effective.

1h

Bargaining and the three-way transaction defines the daily deal market

If you've ever taken advantage of a nice discount thanks to a promotion from Groupon or LivingSocial, you've tapped the power of the daily deal market yourself. You, the consumer, benefited from the prior bargaining that took place between that big online platform and the merchant, resulting in a lower price for you.

1h

Social networks can support academic success

Social networks have been found to influence academic performance: students tend to perform better with high-performers among their friends, as some people are capable of inspiring others to try harder, according to Sofia Dokuka, Dilara Valeyeva and Maria Yudkevich of the HSE University. Their paper was published in PLOS ONE.

1h

Transferrin identified as potential contributor to COVID-19 severity

Researchers have identified that a glycoprotein known as transferrin may critically contribute to severe forms of COVID-19.

1h

Evaluating the effectiveness of travel bans

A new study sheds light on how COVID-19 spreads regionally and between countries, as well as on how effective governmental measures to curb the spread of the pandemic have been to date.

1h

The six strains of SARS-CoV-2

The virus causing the COVID-19 pandemic, SARS-CoV-2, presents at least six strains. Despite its mutations, the virus shows little variability, and this is good news for the researchers working on a viable vaccine.

1h

Your hair knows what you eat and how much your haircut costs

Millimeter by millimeter, your hair is building a record of your diet. As hair strands are built from amino acids that come from your food, they preserve the chemical traces of the protein in that food. It's a strong enough record to show whether you prefer veggie burgers or double bacon cheeseburgers.

1h

'Worst-case' CO2 emissions scenario is best for assessing climate risk and impacts to 2050

The RCP 8.5 CO2 emissions pathway, long considered a "worst case scenario" by the international science community, is the most appropriate for conducting assessments of climate change impacts by 2050, according to a new article published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The work was authored by Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC) Risk Program Director Dr. Christopher Sch

1h

Social bonds in adulthood don't mediate early life trauma

When baboons experience trauma in early life, they have higher levels of stress hormones in adulthood—a potential marker of poor health—than their peers who don't experience trauma, even if they have strong social relationships as adults, according to a study led by a University of Michigan researcher.

1h

Scientists discover secret behind Earth's biodiversity hotspots

The research suggests that biodiversity hotspots—such as the Daintree Rainforest in Australia and the Cloud Forests of Ecuador—are teeming with species because they have been ecologically stable for long periods of time, allowing evolution to forge ahead undisturbed.

1h

Anatomy of an acne treatment

Sarecycline, a drug approved for use in the United States in 2018, is the first new antibiotic approved to treat acne in more than 40 years. Now, researchers at Yale and the University of Illinois-Chicago have discovered how its unique chemical structure makes it effective.

1h

Wildfires Can Poison Drinking Water–Here's How Communities Can Better Prepare

Using less plastic in water meters and other building code changes could help prevent contamination — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Twitter account of embattled #MeTooSTEM founder suspended

BethAnn McLaughlin allegedly invented a Twitter account for a nonexistent Native American scientist

1h

UK virologists criticise handling of Covid testing contracts

Exclusive: experts say decisions apparently being made on ideological grounds Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A group of Britain's leading virus experts say mistakes are being made in the handling of the Covid pandemic, with testing contracts awarded on apparently ideological grounds to private sector companies rather than based on expertise. In a letter to England's

1h

U.S. Offshore Wind Needs to Clear a Key Hurdle: Connecting to the Grid

A piecemeal approach risks overloading electrical systems and tangle of deep sea cables — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Identifying the blind spots of soil biodiversity

Soils harbour a substantial part of the world's biodiversity, yet data on the patterns and processes taking place below ground does not represent all relevant ecosystems and taxa. For example, tropical and subtropical regions largely remain a blind spot when it comes to soil biodiversity. This is one of the results of a new study published in Nature Communications and led by scientists from the Ge

1h

Anesthesiologists on the front lines of treating surgical COVID-19 patients

Despite recent reports of lower COVID-19 incidence among high-altitude populations, current data is insufficient to conclude that high altitude is protective against the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

1h

Machine learning makes drug repurposing for psychiatric disorders more effective

Researchers have correlated information on drugs, genes and diseases to identify potential candidates for psychiatric and neurological treatment. The methodology they developed will be used to search for drugs against COVID-19.

1h

New method to defend against smart home cyber attacks developed by Ben-Gurion University researchers

According to their new study published in Computers & Security, the ability to launch massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks via a botnet of compromised devices is an exponentially growing risk in the Internet of Things (IoT). Such massive attacks, possibly emerging from IoT devices in home networks, impact the attack target, as well as the infrastructure of telecommunication service

1h

3D 'map' of oxytocin receptor could bring new drugs

Researchers have determined the 3D structure of the receptor that the hormone oxytocin binds to. This knowledge could promote the development of novel drugs to treat a variety of diseases. The so-called "love hormone" or "cuddle hormone" oxytocin is involved in strengthening the mother-child relationship and regulating social bonding. It also plays an important role in various mental health disor

1h

Missing the bar? Become a master mixologist in your living room.

Neighborhood bars might be closed, but you can still enjoy your favorite cocktails at home. Sommelier Carlos Batista will teach everything you need to know about vodka, sake, tequila, wine, whiskey, and more. In his nine-course bundle, you'll learn all about flavors, how to read labels, and how to mix the perfect drink. While the term "social distancing" is on everyone's lips, some recommend the

2h

Vision training may boost batting performance

A concerted training regimen for the eyes could help athletes and others improve coordination skills, researchers report. Vision training for a group of college baseball players led to improvements in their batting practice performance, the researchers found. Players who underwent the active intervention hit the ball further and with a higher arc compared to those from the placebo group. "This wa

2h

Rutgers University adjusts grammar rules in solidarity with Black Lives Matter​

Rutgers University's English department is instituting anti-racist policies, workshops, and initiatives in solidarity with Black Lives Matter. Linguistic diversity and less emphasis on "traditional" grammar will be honored across the department's courses. Jonathan Holloway, the college's first Black president, said the school name will not change despite slaves having built the original instituti

2h

NASA satellites show two views of California's Apple Fire

NASA's satellites were working overtime as they snapped pictures of the large Apple Fire in Banning Canyon near San Bernardino, California on Aug. 02, 2020. This fire began on July 31, 2020 and the cause of the fire is still under investigation. To date the fire has consumed 20,516 acres and is 5% contained.

2h

New published study from K-State virologists identifies potential COVID-19 treatment

Yunjeong Kim and Kyeong-Ok 'KC' Chang, virologists in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University, have published a study showing a possible therapeutic treatment for COVID-19.

2h

Why Is Anyone Going to Disney World Right Now?

Almost as soon as Serena Lyn stepped back inside the Magic Kingdom, she burst into tears. It'd been four months since the theme park and crown jewel of Walt Disney World's Florida stronghold had shut down because of the coronavirus pandemic. Before the parks closed, Lyn had been visiting them twice a week; it was part of her job as a Disney blogger and an Instagrammer with more than 71,000 follow

2h

Why you might need to sport a mask inside your own home

Anthony Fauci told Congress on Friday that he was "cautiously optimistic" a vaccine for COVID-19 will be available by the late 2020 or early 2021. (Pexels/) COVID-19 cases continue to escalate in many parts of the United States, particularly southern and southwestern states like South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Texas. Over the past couple months, epicenters once confined to parts of the nort

2h

For solar boom, scrap silicon for this promising mineral

Cornell University engineers have found that photovoltaic wafers in solar panels with all-perovskite structures outperform photovoltaic cells made from state-of-the-art crystalline silicon, as well as perovskite-silicon tandem cells, which are stacked pancake-style cells that absorb light better.

2h

A framework for the future

As the population grows, and the global standard of living improves, humanity's appetite for seafood is increasing. In 2020 seafood consumption reached an all-time high, with an average of 20kg consumed annually by every person on the planet.

2h

Study reveals less connectivity between hey brain regions in people with FXTAS premutation

Investigators from the University of Kansas were able to identify brain processes specifically linked to sensorimotor issues in aging people with the FMR1 premutation.

2h

Eli Lilly is testing a way to prevent covid-19 that's not a vaccine

Nurses and patients in some US assisted living facilities will receive an antibody drug to prevent covid-19 infection, according to drug company Eli Lilly. The drug: Early in the coronavirus pandemic, companies searched the blood of covid-19 survivors for potent antibodies against the novel virus . Eli Lilly's drug is one of these Y shaped proteins—it's a natural antibody manufactured at larger s

2h

Downing Street confirms lockdowns possible for England's cities

Government says policy of restricting travel could be used to tackle specific coronavirus outbreaks

2h

Black hole fails to do its job

Astronomers have discovered what can happen when a giant black hole does not intervene in the life of a galaxy cluster. Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes they have shown that passive black hole behavior may explain a remarkable torrent of star formation occurring in a distant cluster of galaxies.

2h

Covid-19 news: New DNA and swab tests give results in 90 minutes

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

2h

Safer, longer-lasting energy storage requires focus on interface of advanced materials

Scientists seeking ways to improve a battery's ability to hold a charge longer, using advanced materials that are safe, stable and efficient, have determined that the materials themselves are only part of the solution.

2h

Study shows demolishing vacant houses can have positive effect on neighbor maintenance

New research out of Iowa State University suggests that demolishing abandoned houses may lead nearby property owners to better maintain their homes.

2h

Crustacean Genes May Solve Debate Over How Insects Evolved to Fly

Study suggests parts of the animals' backs and legs fused together to form wings. mayfly_cropped.jpg Image credits: Judy Gallagher via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Creature Monday, August 3, 2020 – 13:15 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Crustacean genes might shed light on the origin of wings in insects, a new study finds. Like the arrival of vertebrates on land, the evol

3h

Businesses grapple with how to reopen offices safely

Shift to working from home will have huge consequences for commercial property sector

3h

Outer space decor for your young astronaut

Bring the stars to you. (David Menidrey via Unsplash/) Outer space is a fascinating place for folks both young and old. We are constantly learning more about its wonders, investigating its boundaries, and learning more about ourselves along the way, which makes it a great subject for you and your child to explore. Whether you already live with a future astronaut or you are looking to introduce so

3h

Victoria's contact-tracing effort buckles under the weight of Covid-19 cases

ANU's Peter Collignon says what's important now is making sure people who test positive stay at home Stage 4 lockdown rules explained Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications Coronavirus Australia maps and cases: live numbers and statistics Victoria's rise in Covid-19 case numbers is occurring so rapidly that contact tracing can no longer be relied upon to unear

3h

Will a vaccine or recovery from the virus give us long-term immunity to Covid-19?

New evidence on how our bodies combat the virus has huge implications for the development of a coronavirus vaccine How to listen to podcasts: everything you need to know This episode first aired on Today in Focus, the Guardian's global daily news podcast. It's a familiar refrain of the past six months: "When will we get back to normal?" The premise is that once a vaccine arrives or enough people

3h

The best can openers for convenient cooking

Open sesame. (Austin Kehmeier via Unsplash/) Whether you're looking to upgrade your kitchen tools or want to try out some new gadgets just for fun, these can openers will be an efficient way to get cooking. What can seem to be such a simple appliance can actually have a big effect on the way dinner goes. Say goodbye to scary sharp edges, rusty mechanism, and sudden pops as your favorite canned in

3h

Large international study pinpoints impact of TP53 gene mutations on blood cancer severity

A large international study led by researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering has immediate clinical relevance for risk assessment and treatment of people with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia.

3h

Chlamydia: Greedy for glutamine

If chlamydiae want to multiply in a human cell, the first thing they need is a lot of glutamine. Würzburg researchers have clarified how the pathogenic bacteria obtain this substance.

3h

COPD underdiagnosed in older adults, but can be managed

"Recognizing and Treating COPD in Older Adults" the latest issue of the What's Hot newsletter from The Gerontological Society of America, addresses what is known about the prevalence, incidence, and impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in older adults.

3h

NASA puts visible and water vapor eyes on Tropical Storm Isaias

NASA's Aqua satellite obtained visible and water vapor imagery as Tropical Storm Isaias continued moving along the east coast of Florida. On Aug. 3, 2020, warnings and watches stretched from Florida to Maine.

3h

AI & single-cell genomics

The study of cellular dynamics is crucial to understand how cells develop and how diseases progress. Scientist at Helmholtz Zentrum München and Technical University of Munich (TUM) created 'scVelo' – a machine learning method and open source software to estimate the dynamics of gene activity in single cells. This allows biologists to robustly predict the future state of individual cells.

3h

Roadmap to reducing colorectal cancer deaths

The American Gastroenterological Association has outlined a strategy to increase the number of people screened via tests that are more convenient, accurate and less expensive and tailored to people's individual cancer risks.

3h

Energy demands limit our brains' information processing capacity

Our brains have an upper limit on how much they can process at once due to a constant but limited energy supply, according to a new UCL study using a brain imaging method that measures cellular metabolism.

3h

Green apple flavor in vapes enhances nicotine reward

A common green apple vape flavor enhances nicotine reward and is also rewarding itself, according to research in mice recently published in eNeuro.

3h

Survivors of Covid-19 show increased rate of psychiatric disorders, study finds

Research suggests more than half experience PTSD, anxiety, insomnia, depression or compulsive symptoms Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage More than half of people who received hospital treatment for Covid-19 were found to be suffering from a psychiatric disorder a month later, a study has found . Out of 402 patients monitored after being treated for the virus, 55% were

3h

Indigenous people are key conservationists

Grassroots knowledge from Indigenous people can help to map and monitor ecological changes and improve scientific studies, according to new research. The study in the Journal of Applied Ecology shows the importance of Indigenous and local knowledge for monitoring ecosystem changes and managing ecosystems . The team collected more than 300 indicators developed by Indigenous people to monitor ecosy

3h

Report: Even in more diverse districts, school segregation still exists

While K-12 schools across Massachusetts are looking at options for reopening this fall in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new report says public schools should also be looking at another important issue for their future: diversity.

3h

One scientist's six-point recovery plan to tackle COVID-19 anxiety

Nature, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02298-1 Fernando T. Maestre was diagnosed with anxiety during Spain's coronavirus lockdown. A change in approach to work, life and parenting helped to restore his health.

3h

Daily briefing: Safe landing for SpaceX crew cements new era in private human spaceflight

Nature, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02303-7 Crew Dragon capsule splashes down in history, 40 years since the transformative discovery of the quantum Hall effect and the evidence for prioritizing good ventilation in the fight against coronavirus.

3h

Washington state officials slam Navy's changes to military testing program that would harm more orcas

A Navy military testing program that appeared headed to routine approval has hit a wall of opposition from Washington's governor, attorney general and state agencies because of potential harm to endangered orcas in Washington waters.

3h

Bath bomb sets for a luxurious soak

Sit back and relax. (Jared Rice via Unsplash /) It's important to take time for yourself, and a healthy way to do that is with a nice long bath. A long soak is a great way to relax your muscles, warm up your body, and get away from your notifications, work emails, and social obligations. Bring your favorite book, put on a podcast, or just sit back, light a few candles, and take some deep breaths.

3h

Washington state officials slam Navy's changes to military testing program that would harm more orcas

A Navy military testing program that appeared headed to routine approval has hit a wall of opposition from Washington's governor, attorney general and state agencies because of potential harm to endangered orcas in Washington waters.

3h

An American Pickle Might Have Been Fresher in the 2010s

Seth Rogen's new movie is funny, although some gags meant to skewer hip Brooklynites seem strangely dated.

3h

Afløseren for italiensk katastrofebro åbner i dag

43 bilister styrtede i døden, da en italiensk motorvejsbro kollapsede 14. august 2018. Efter 15 måneders intenst byggeri åbner erstatningen i dag.

3h

ALMA captures stirred-up planet factory

Planet-forming environments can be much more complex and chaotic than previously expected. This is evidenced by a new image of the star RU Lup, made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).

3h

NASA finds an eye and a giant 'tail' in Typhoon Hagupit

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of Typhoon Hagupit in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean that showed the development of an eye as it quickly intensified. Imagery also showed a thick band of thunderstorms that resembled a giant tail, spiraling into the powerful storm.

3h

Kids' mental health can struggle during online school. Here's how teachers are planning ahead.

When her South Carolina high school went online this spring, Maya Green struggled through the same emotions as many of her fellow seniors: She missed her friends. Her online assignments were too easy. She struggled to stay focused.

3h

Child sleep problems associated with impaired academic and psychosocial functioning

A new study by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has found that sleep disturbances at any age are associated with diminished well-being by the time the children are 10 or 11 years old. The findings, which were published in The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, suggest health care providers should screen children for sleep problems at every age and intervene early

3h

Racial discrimination linked to suicide

New research findings from the University of Houston indicate that racial discrimination is so painful that it is linked to the ability to die by suicide, a presumed prerequisite for being able to take one's own life, and certain mental health tools – like reframing an incident – can help.

3h

NASA finds an eye and a giant 'tail' in Typhoon Hagupit

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of Typhoon Hagupit in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean that showed the development of an eye as it quickly intensified. Imagery also showed a thick band of thunderstorms that resembled a giant tail, spiraling into the powerful storm.

3h

ALMA captures stirred-up planet factory

Planet-forming environments can be much more complex and chaotic than previously expected. This is evidenced by a new image of the star RU Lup, made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).

3h

COVID-19 lockdown is unleashing people's creativity

While staying at home, many are exploring their creative sides to unprecedented levels, sharing their creations with the world in similarly novel, and sometimes collaborative, ways. People are finding amazing ways to create and to share from the safety of their homes using apps designed to promote expression and not simply distract users. Creative professionals are also stuck at home, facing unem

3h

Early Mars was covered in ice sheets, not flowing rivers, researchers say

A large number of the valley networks scarring Mars's surface were carved by water melting beneath glacial ice, not by free-flowing rivers as previously thought, according to new research. The findings effectively throw cold water on the dominant 'warm and wet ancient Mars' hypothesis, which postulates that rivers, rainfall and oceans once existed on the red planet.

3h

Drug discovery: First rational strategy to find molecular glue degraders

Targeted protein degradation (TPD) represents a novel paradigm in drug discovery that could lead to more efficient medicines to treat diseases such as cancer. 'Molecular glue degrader'are an emerging but understudied class of small molecules that have been shown to induce degradation of proteins commonly considered 'undruggable'. Researchers have described a strategy that, for the first time, enab

3h

Analyzing pros and cons of two composite manufacturing methods

Airplane wings and wind turbine blades are typically created using bulk polymerization in composite manufacturing facilities. They are heated and cured in enormous autoclaves and heated molds as big as the finished part. Frontal polymerization is a new out-of-autoclave method that doesn't require a large facility investment. Researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign conducted a st

3h

A blood test could predict who benefits from immunotherapy

A test which detects changing levels of tumour fragments in the blood may be an easy, non-invasive and quick way to predict who will benefit from immunotherapy, a treatment option for advanced cancers.

3h

Leopards, wolves vanishing from panda conservation areas: study

It may be one of the most recognisable symbols of conservation, but efforts to protect the giant panda have failed to safeguard large mammals sharing its habitats, according to research published Monday showing dramatic declines of leopards and other predators.

3h

US East Coast braces for hurricane after Florida escapes

Tropical Storm Isaias was set to regain hurricane strength Monday before slamming into the US eastern seaboard, bringing life-threatening storm surges to North and South Carolina.

3h

Leopards, wolves vanishing from panda conservation areas: study

It may be one of the most recognisable symbols of conservation, but efforts to protect the giant panda have failed to safeguard large mammals sharing its habitats, according to research published Monday showing dramatic declines of leopards and other predators.

3h

Study: Ancient Mars Was Covered in Ice Sheets, Not Rivers

According to a new study by a group of Canadian researchers published in the journal Nature Geoscience today, a large number of ancient valleys on the Martian surface were formed by water melting below massive sheets of glacial ice — not free-flowing rivers, as previous research suggests. The new research challenges the "warm and wet ancient Mars" hypothesis, which posits that Mars was once cover

3h

Oriole hybridization is a dead end: study

A half-century of controversy over two popular bird species may have finally come to an end. In one corner: the Bullock's Oriole, found in the western half of North America. In the other corner: the Baltimore Oriole, breeding in the eastern half. Where their ranges meet in the Great Plains, the two mix freely and produce apparently healthy hybrid offspring. But according to scientists from the Cor

3h

Chinese nature reserves focus so much on pandas that leopards suffer

China's conservation efforts to save giant pandas have paid off for the bears, but miserably failed leopards and other carnivores that share their home

3h

Ancient valleys on Mars may have been carved by glaciers

Some areas on Mars are covered in huge valleys that many think were carved by rivers in the planet's warmer past, but they may have actually been formed by glaciers, pointing to a chilly early Mars

3h

Virgin Orbit determines cause of rocket launch failure

Virgin Orbit said Monday it has determined what caused the failure of its debut rocket launch and is working toward a second flight that will carry small satellites for NASA.

4h

Germany-wide rainfall measurements via the mobile network

Whether in flood early-warning systems or in agriculture—rainfall measurements are of great importance. However, there is a lack of accurate data for many regions in the world due to the fact that comprehensive measurements have so far been too expensive. This could change with a new method that has just passed its practical test. Researchers at KIT (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) and the Univ

4h

A giant crane from southern Germany

Researchers from Frankfurt and Tübingen say the skull of a very large crane found at the Hammerschmiede fossil site in Allgäu, Bavaria, is more than eleven million years old. It is the earliest evidence of such a large crane in Europe, the paleontologists say. The fossil most closely resembles the skull of today's long-beaked Siberian crane, according to Gerald Mayr of the Senckenberg Research Ins

4h

Oriole hybridization is a dead end: study

A half-century of controversy over two popular bird species may have finally come to an end. In one corner: the Bullock's Oriole, found in the western half of North America. In the other corner: the Baltimore Oriole, breeding in the eastern half. Where their ranges meet in the Great Plains, the two mix freely and produce apparently healthy hybrid offspring. But according to scientists from the Cor

4h

Study calls for urgent plan to manage invasive weed which threatens livelihoods in Africa

CABI scientists have conducted research which is calling for an urgent integrated management strategy, including biological control, to fight the invasive weed Mimosa diplotricha which is threatening livelihoods in eastern and southern Africa

4h

Study calls for urgent plan to manage invasive weed which threatens livelihoods in Africa

CABI scientists have conducted research which is calling for an urgent integrated management strategy, including biological control, to fight the invasive weed Mimosa diplotricha which is threatening livelihoods in eastern and southern Africa

4h

Lucy mission one step closer to the Trojan asteroids

NASA's Lucy mission, led by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), has achieved an important milestone by passing its System Integration Review and clearing the way for spacecraft assembly. This NASA Discovery Program class mission will be the first to explore Jupiter's Trojan asteroids, ancient small bodies that share an orbit with Jupiter and hold important insights to understanding the early sola

4h

Language may undermine women in science and tech

Despite decades of positive messaging to encourage women and girls to pursue education tracks and careers in STEM, women continue to fall far below their male counterparts in these fields. A new study at Carnegie Mellon University examined 25 languages to explore the gender stereotypes in language that undermine efforts to support equality across STEM career paths. The results are available in the

4h

Unequal neutron-star mergers create unique 'bang' in simulations

When two neutron stars slam together, the result is sometimes a black hole that swallows all but the gravitational evidence of the collision. However, in a series of simulations, an international team of researchers including a Penn State scientist determined that these typically quiet—at least in terms of radiation we can detect on Earth—collisions can sometimes be far noisier.

4h

Drug discovery: First rational strategy to find molecular glue degraders

Despite enormous efforts to advance traditional pharmacology approaches, more than three quarters of all human proteins remain beyond the reach of therapeutic development. Targeted protein degradation (TPD) is a novel approach that could overcome this and other limitations, and thus represents a promising therapeutic strategy. TPD is based on small molecules, generally called 'degraders,' which ca

4h

Diverse amyloid structures and dynamics revealed by high-speed atomic force microscopy

In the human body, proteins sometimes occur in fibrillar aggregates called amyloids. Although certain amyloids are known to have a biological function, amyloid formation is often associated with pathologies, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Understanding how exactly amyloid fibrils form is crucial for gaining insights into the development of such diseases and for advancing with trea

4h

Evaluating the effectiveness of travel bans

With the reopening of flights during the summer holiday season in Europe, many countries have started to see an increase in COVID-19 infections. A new IIASA-led study sheds light on how COVID-19 spreads regionally and between countries, as well as on how effective governmental measures to curb the spread of the pandemic have been to date.

4h

Light shines on chemical production method

A team of researchers from Japan has demonstrated a light-based reaction that yields high numbers of the base chemical component required to produce bioactive compounds used in common industry products. They published their results on June 11 in Organic Letters.

4h

Mathematical modeling reveals how chitinase, a molecular monorail, obeys a one-way sign

A novel mathematical modeling method has been developed to estimate operation models of biomolecular motors from single-molecule imaging data of motion with the Bayesian inference framework. The operation mechanism of a linear molecular motor "chitinase," which moves one-way on a chitin chain with degrading the chain passed by, was elucidated by mathematical modeling of experimental imaging data w

4h

'Thanks for Flying SpaceX'

In recent years, as SpaceX launched rocket after rocket without incident, liftoff became the company's second-most-impressive feat. The truly dazzling moment came after the rocket had left the ground, and its booster—or, sometimes, two boosters—reversed course high up in the air, flipped around, and glided back down, landing upright on the ground or a barge floating in the Atlantic Ocean, ready t

4h

Drug discovery: First rational strategy to find molecular glue degraders

Despite enormous efforts to advance traditional pharmacology approaches, more than three quarters of all human proteins remain beyond the reach of therapeutic development. Targeted protein degradation (TPD) is a novel approach that could overcome this and other limitations, and thus represents a promising therapeutic strategy. TPD is based on small molecules, generally called 'degraders,' which ca

4h

That Kodak Deal

Many people have been wondering what's going on with the announcement by the Trump administration that Kodak has been contracted to produce pharmaceutical APIs here in the US. Let's line up some of the public statements about all this first, and then take a closer look. Here's the press release from Kodak after signing a "Letter of Interest" for a $765 million dollar loan for the deal. They state

4h

Bored Inside Their Spacecraft, NASA Astronauts Made Prank Calls to Pass the Time

Prank Calls While NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley were bobbing in the Gulf of Mexico , trapped inside SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule for hours on Sunday, they figured they'd pass the time by making several prank calls, according The New York Times reports . "Five hours ago we were bobbing around in a spacecraft making prank satellite phone calls to whoever we could get ahold of," Doug H

4h

Scientists solve the origin of Stonehenge's sarsen stones

Researchers have known Stonehenge's smaller bluestones came from Preseli Hills, Wales, but the source of its sarsens has remained a mystery. Using chemical analysis, scientists found at matching source at West Woods, approximately 25 kilometer north of the World Heritage Site. But mysteries remain, such as why that site was chosen. ​ Many mysteries surround Stonehenge . Who built it and what purp

4h

Why are there so many humans?

Something curious happened in human population history over the last 1 million years. First, our numbers fell to as low as 18,500 , and our ancestors were more endangered than chimpanzees and gorillas. Then we bounced back to extraordinary levels, far surpassing the other great apes. Today the total population of gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos, and orangutans is estimated to be only around 500,00

4h

Why is stroke so deadly for people of African descent?

An international team of scientists has completed the largest analysis of stroke-risk genes ever undertaken in people of African descent.

4h

Why We Need to Save the Parasites

Extinction will have lasting and far-reaching consequences for biodiversity, and subsequently for humans

4h

Landmark Math Proof Clears Hurdle in Top Erdős Conjecture

A pair of mathematicians has solved the first chunk of one of the most famous conjectures about the additive properties of whole numbers. Proposed more than 60 years ago by the legendary Hungarian mathematician Paul Erdős, the conjecture asks when an infinite list of whole numbers will be sure to contain patterns of at least three evenly spaced numbers, such as 26, 29 and 32. Erdős posed thousand

4h

Novel magnetic stirrer speaks to lab equipment

A small device, called 'Smart Stirrer', performed a function of a conventional laboratory stir bar, has an integrated microprocessor and various sensors capable of wireless and autonomous report the conversion of properties of a solution. Results are sent to a computer over Bluetooth, and any changes notify the user wirelessly.

4h

Promises found to reduce cheating in large study of adolescents

New research has found that adolescents who promised to be truthful were less likely to 'cheat' than those who did not, even when they could not be found out.

4h

How a gooey slime helps bacteria survive

Researchers found that the bacterium C. perfringens modulates the structure of its biofilm at different temperatures by regulating the expression of the novel extracellular protein BsaA. They showed the number of BsaA-producing cells decreases when the temperature increases from 25°C to 37°C, and BsaA-producing cells cover non-BsaA-producing cells to provide tolerance to external stresses. These f

4h

Blackjack: Can a quantum strategy help bring down the house?

Now researchers have shown that the weird, quantum effects of entanglement could theoretically give blackjack players even more of an edge, albeit a small one, when playing against the house.

4h

Exploring the sustainability of the Indian sugar industry

Researchers analyzed the interconnected food, water and energy challenges that arise from the sugar industry in India – the second-largest producer of sugar worldwide – and how the political economy drives those challenges.

4h

Dingoes have gotten bigger over the last 80 years, and pesticides might be to blame

The average size of a dingo is increasing, but only in areas where poison-baits are used.

4h

Surrey's simplified circuit design could revolutionise how wearables are manufactured

Researchers have demonstrated the use of a ground-breaking circuit design that could transform manufacturing processes for wearable technology.

4h

Transferrin identified as potential contributor to COVID-19 severity

The University of Kent's School of Biosciences and the Institute of Medical Virology at Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main, have identified that a glycoprotein known as transferrin may critically contribute to severe forms of COVID-19.

4h

Cannabinoids may affect activity of other pharmaceuticals

Cannabinoid-containing products may alter the effects of some prescription drugs, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. They published information that could help medical professionals make safe prescribing choices for their patients who use prescription, over-the-counter or illicit cannabinoid products.

4h

Study calls for urgent plan to manage invasive weed which threatens livelihoods in Africa

Dr Arne Witt, lead author of the study published in the journal Bothalia, said that over half of farmers surveyed in the Karonga District of Malawi believe the weed, which more than 40 years ago had already been considered to be one of the 76 worst weeds in the world, believed the M. diplotricha to have reduced crop yields.

4h

Light shines on chemical production method

A team of researchers from Japan has demonstrated a light-based reaction that yields high numbers of the base chemical component required to produce bioactive compounds used in common industry products.They published their results on June 11, 2020 in Organic Letters.

4h

Penn researchers identify new genetic cause of a form of inherited neuropathy

Inherited mutations in a gene that keeps nerve cells intact was shown, for the first time, to be a driver of a neuropathy known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. This finding is detailed in a study led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, presenting a clearer picture of the disease's genetic underpinnings that could inform the development of gene thera

4h

DNA test kits that may enlighten you

Know your family better. (Tyler Nix via Unsplash/) Your grandfather's photo albums and hand-drawn family tree is a great way to get a feel for where you come from but a DNA test will give you detailed results beyond your wildest dreams. These kits seem to be all the rage and we understand why. They are a great way to learn more about your ethnic roots, find contemporary relatives, and explore you

4h

Sous vide cookers for making gourmet meals with ease

Perfect cooks every time. (Amazon/) Sous vide is an innovative cooking process that got its start in the 1960s as a method of preserving food. Meals are vacuum-sealed in plastic and then submerged in boiling water for extended periods, allowing the ingredients to cook thoroughly without the flavors and juices escaping. Sous vide is super easy to set up, and since it's a form of slow cooking, it's

5h

Microsoft Offers to Buy TikTok Following Trump Crackdown

Make It American Over the weekend, the Trump administration gave TikTok's Chinese parent company ByteDance 45 days to sell off the app — or get kicked out of the US market, Reuters reports . Microsoft is circling the news like a shark and has officially confirmed in a blog post that it's interested in buying TikTok operations in the US, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. That means the US softwa

5h

There Are Two Ways Out of a Frog. This Beetle Chose the Back Door.

A researcher fed beetles to frogs. The encounter did not end as expected.

5h

Study: Oriole hybridization is a dead end

A half-century of controversy over two popular bird species may have finally come to an end. In one corner: the Bullock's Oriole, found in the western half of North America. In the other corner: the Baltimore Oriole, breeding in the eastern half. Where their ranges meet in the Great Plains, the two mix freely and produce apparently healthy hybrid offspring. But according to scientists from the Cor

5h

Language may undermine women in science and tech

Researchers examined gender stereotypes baked into 25 languages to explore why fewer women enter science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

5h

Drug discovery: First rational strategy to find molecular glue degraders

Targeted protein degradation (TPD) represents a novel paradigm in drug discovery that could lead to more efficient medicines to treat diseases such as cancer. "Molecular glue degrader" are an emerging but understudied class of small molecules that have been shown to induce degradation of proteins commonly considered "undruggable". CeMM Researchers have described a strategy that, for the first time

5h

Immunotherapy biomarker discovery could benefit thousands with Type 1 diabetes

Scientists at UCL have discovered new biomarkers, which may identify those people with Type 1 diabetes who would benefit from the immunotherapy drug Abatacept, a finding which could eventually help thousands manage the disease more effectively.

5h

Recommendations to improve consensus of determining brain death, death by neurologic criteria

International professional societies developed recommendations for minimum clinical standards to determine brain death/death by neurologic criteria in adults and children to improve the consistency of these criteria within and among countries.

5h

The effects of COVID-19 on emergency visits, hospitalizations

As COVID-19 swept into the U.S., hospitals across the country have reported that their emergency departments are emptying out. In a new study published Monday, Aug. 3, in JAMA Internal Medicine, a team of researchers from multiple institutions provides insights into this phenomenon.

5h

Emergency Department visits plunged as COVID-19 cases climbed, Yale study finds

A new study from researchers at Yale and the Mayo Clinic found that emergency department (ED) visits dropped significantly in March as the public responded to messages about staying home as a result of the pandemic.

5h

Pandemic drives telehealth boom, but older adults can't connect

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a significant increase in video visits between patients and their doctors, but for many older adults, the shift has cut them off from care, rather than connecting them.

5h

Dana-Farber study advances understanding of rare sarcoma

In this study, scientists discover how abnormal protein disrupts gene expression in synovial sarcoma. For the first time, scientists discover the molecular basis for the cancer-specific targeting properties of the culprit fusion protein found in synovial sarcoma

5h

Iron-mediated cancer cell activity: A new regulation mechanism

CNRS researchers at the Institut Curie have recently shown that cancer cells use a membrane protein that has been known for several decades to internalise iron. Published in Nature Chemistry (August 3rd, 2020), this work shows that the absorbed iron allows cancer cells to acquire metastatic properties.

5h

Four-stranded DNA structures found to play role in breast cancer

Four stranded DNA structures – known as G-quadruplexes – have been shown to play a role in certain types of breast cancer for the first time, providing a potential new target for personalised medicine, say scientists at the University of Cambridge.

5h

Cells relax their membrane to control protein sorting

The tension in the membrane of cells plays an important role in a number of biological processes. A localised drop in tension makes it easier for the surface to be bending inward and form invaginations that will become free vesicles inside the cell. Are the functions of these so-called endosomes also modulated by variations in tension? Scientists have answered in the affirmative thanks to a high-p

5h

Iron-rich meteorites show record of core crystallization in system's oldest planetesimals

New work uncovers new details about our Solar System's oldest planetary objects, which broke apart in long-ago collisions to form iron-rich meteorites. Their findings reveal that the distinct chemical signatures of these meteorites can be explained by the process of core crystallization in their parent bodies, deepening our understanding of the geochemistry occurring in the Solar System's youth.

5h

Early Mars was covered in ice sheets, not flowing rivers

A large number of the valley networks scarring Mars's surface were carved by water melting beneath glacial ice, not by free-flowing rivers as previously thought, according to new UBC research published today in Nature Geoscience. The findings effectively throw cold water on the dominant 'warm and wet ancient Mars' hypothesis, which postulates that rivers, rainfall and oceans once existed on the re

5h

Detection of COVID-19 viral material on environmental surfaces of an ophthalmology exam room

This study investigates the presence of SARS-CoV-2 on the environmental surfaces of an ophthalmology examination room after visits by patients who were asymptomatic and passed COVID-19 triage.

5h

Assessing telemedicine unreadiness among older adults during COVID-19 pandemic

This study uses 2018 data from the National Health and Aging Trends Study to assess how common it is for older adults in the United States to be unprepared to access video or telephone telemedicine because of disability or inexperience with technology.

5h

ED visits, hospital admissions in health care systems in early months of COVID-19 pandemic

Changes in emergency department visits and hospitalizations as the COVID-19 pandemic intensified in the U.S. are examined in this observational study that included 24 emergency departments in five health care systems in Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York and North Carolina.

5h

An insect species can actively escape from the vents of predators via the digestive system

Some prey species can escape from inside a predator after a successful attack. Kobe University ecologist Sugiura Shinji has found that the aquatic beetle Regimbartia attenuata can actively escape from the vent of the frog Pelophylax nigromaculatus via the digestive system. This is the first time that research has documented the active escape of prey from the body of a predator after being eaten.

5h

Sifting through half a million years of human history

Nature, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02285-6 Archaeologist Mina Weinstein-Evron explains how one of the world's most ancient burial sites yields 'exquisite' discoveries.

5h

Novel approach improves graphene-based supercapacitors

An efficient in situ pathway to generate and attach oxygen functional groups to graphitic electrodes for supercapacitors by inducing hydrolysis of water molecules within the gel electrolyte.

5h

Baby boomers show concerning decline in cognitive functioning

In a reversal of trends, American baby boomers scored lower on a test of cognitive functioning than did members of previous generations, according to a new nationwide study.

5h

Other mammals lose out in panda conservation drive

Several carnivorous animals have almost disappeared from areas set up to protect giant pandas.

5h

Mystery solved: Volcanoes cooled Earth 13,000 years ago

Ancient sediment found in a central Texas cave appears to solve the mystery of why the Earth cooled suddenly about 13,000 years ago, according to a new study. Some researchers believed that an extraterrestrial impact with the Earth, such as a meteor collision, caused the event, which cooled the Earth about 3 degrees centigrade (about 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit), a huge amount. But the researchers fou

5h

Retro cassette players for people who like it old-school

Listen to the classics. (Jon Tyson via Unsplash/) There has always been something to say for the cassette tape. Even if you didn't grow up in the age when a No. 2 pencil was essential to ensure you could wind up your unspooled tapes, the odds are you heard about the charm of making a mixtape with the technology. Real effort goes into creating a cassette mix; it isn't just drag and drop, but inste

5h

Odd immune system lets anglerfishes fuse males to females

New research on deep-sea anglerfishes help square their reproductive strategy, called "sexual parasitism," with the immune system. Among deep-sea anglerfishes, tiny dwarfed males become permanently attached to relatively gigantic females, fuse their tissues, and then establish a common blood circulation. In this way, the male becomes entirely dependent on the female for nutrient supply, like a de

5h

Cells relax their membrane to control protein sorting

The tension in the outer membrane of cells plays an important role in a number of biological processes. A localized drop in tension, for example, makes it easier for the surface bend inward and form invaginations that will become free vesicles inside the cell. These are delimited by a membrane that contains all proteins originally present in the invaginations. A fundamental function of these so-ca

5h

An insect species can actively escape from the vents of predators via the digestive system

Prey can evade predators and also avoid attacks. However, some can escape from inside a predator after being swallowed. For example, some animals that can survive predators' digestive systems are excreted in feces and thereby escape, albeit in a passive manner. Now, for the first time, research has documented the quick, active escape of prey from the body of a predator after being eaten.

5h

Some Beetles Survive Being Eaten, New Study Finds

The beetles apparently use their legs to speed up their trip through the frogs' entire digestive system. Pelophylax_nigromaculatus_cropped.jpg A dark-spotted frog, Pelophylax nigromaculatus. Image credits: Alpsdake via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: CC BY-SA 3.0 Creature Monday, August 3, 2020 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Scientists have for the first time seen

5h

Cells relax their membrane to control protein sorting

The tension in the outer membrane of cells plays an important role in a number of biological processes. A localized drop in tension, for example, makes it easier for the surface bend inward and form invaginations that will become free vesicles inside the cell. These are delimited by a membrane that contains all proteins originally present in the invaginations. A fundamental function of these so-ca

5h

Iron-rich meteorites show record of core crystallization in system's oldest planetesimals

New work led by Carnegie's Peng Ni and Anat Shahar uncovers new details about our Solar System's oldest planetary objects, which broke apart in long-ago collisions to form iron-rich meteorites. Their findings reveal that the distinct chemical signatures of these meteorites can be explained by the process of core crystallization in their parent bodies, deepening our understanding of the geochemistr

5h

An insect species can actively escape from the vents of predators via the digestive system

Prey can evade predators and also avoid attacks. However, some can escape from inside a predator after being swallowed. For example, some animals that can survive predators' digestive systems are excreted in feces and thereby escape, albeit in a passive manner. Now, for the first time, research has documented the quick, active escape of prey from the body of a predator after being eaten.

5h

Iron-mediated cancer cell activity: A new regulation mechanism

CNRS researchers at the Institut Curie have recently shown that cancer cells use a membrane protein that has been known for several decades to internalize iron. Published in Nature Chemistry, this work shows that the absorbed iron allows cancer cells to acquire metastatic properties.

5h

Early Mars was covered in ice sheets, not flowing rivers: study

A large number of the valley networks scarring Mars's surface were carved by water melting beneath glacial ice, not by free-flowing rivers as previously thought, according to new UBC research published today in Nature Geoscience. The findings effectively throw cold water on the dominant "warm and wet ancient Mars" hypothesis, which postulates that rivers, rainfall and oceans once existed on the re

5h

Google Pixel 4A Review: Nearly Perfect and Only $350

The 4A is an upgrade in almost every way over its predecessor, yet it's cheaper. It's our new fave Android phone.

5h

Frog Eats Beetle. Beetle Crawls Through Guts to Escape

Regimbartia attenuata doesn't take too kindly to being eaten. Once locked inside a frog's maw, it turns around and starts heading for the exit.

5h

Darolutamide in prostate cancer: Indication of considerable added benefit

The advantages in the outcome categories of mortality, morbidity and health-related quality of life are not accompanied by disadvantages.

5h

Germany-wide rainfall measurements by utilizing the mobile network

Whether in flood early-warning systems or in agriculture – rainfall measurements are of great importance. However, there is a lack of accurate data for many regions in the world due to the fact that comprehensive measurements have so far been too expensive. Researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the University of Augsburg have now succeeded in utilizing the commercial microwave link

5h

Diverse amyloid structures and dynamics revealed by high-speed atomic force microscopy

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in ACS Nano a high-speed atomic-force microscopy study of the formation of protein fibrils (amyloids) associated with pathologies in collaborated research with Showa University. Mixing different variants of a single protein and changing the acidity of its environment is shown to result in significant variations in amyloid structure and elongation rates.

5h

Evaluating the effectiveness of travel bans

With the reopening of flights during the summer holiday season in Europe, many countries have started to see an increase in COVID-19 infections. A new IIASA-led study sheds light on how COVID-19 spreads regionally and between countries, as well as on how effective governmental measures to curb the spread of the pandemic have been to date.

5h

LSU Health study suggests snap diagnoses may be more accurate

A pilot study conducted by a team of LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine faculty has found that Snapchat is an effective tool to teach residents emergency radiology.

5h

The outlook is encouraging: Researchers evaluate a pipeline of clinical trials

Amsterdam, NL, August 3, 2020 – A review of currently registered clinical trials of agents targeting Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals that there is a broad pipeline of both symptomatic and potentially disease-modifying therapies currently being evaluated. Investigators report that the outlook for patients is encouraging, given the wide range of therapeutics being clinically tested. They emphasize

5h

Iron-mediated cancer cell activity: A new regulation mechanism

CNRS researchers at the Institut Curie have recently shown that cancer cells use a membrane protein that has been known for several decades to internalize iron. Published in Nature Chemistry, this work shows that the absorbed iron allows cancer cells to acquire metastatic properties.

5h

Fluoridated Water Criticized as Socialized Medicine

Originally published in February 1955 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Iran's Covid death toll three times higher than admitted, says report

BBC says government papers reveal total is more than 42,000 – way above official toll of 17,000 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage One person is dying from Covid-19 every seven minutes in Iran, state television in the country has said, as a report claimed the overall toll from the virus was three times higher than authorities have admitted. The health ministry spokeswom

5h

How rehabilitation impacts research and care of patients with cerebral palsy

Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most common developmental movement disorders in children. It is associated with complex healthcare needs and for some a shortened life expectancy depending on the severity of the disorder and co-existing medical conditions. In this special issue of the Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine, experts present advancements made by rehabilitation medicine in the

5h

Alteration of calcium channel signaling may explain mechanism of autism spectrum disorder

Based on altering calcium channel kinetics and gene activation exhibited by the Timothy mutant, these results provide insight into the cellular mechanism that allows predicting disease risk, and genetic diagnosis of individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders.

5h

Autism spectrum disorder can be predicted from health checkups at 18 months

An early diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder, a type of developmental disorder was found to be effective from routine health checkups of infants at 18 months of age.

5h

Promises found to reduce cheating in large study of adolescents

New research has found that adolescents who promised to be truthful were less likely to 'cheat' than those who did not, even when they could not be found out.

5h

Major depressive episodes are way more common than we knew

The number of adults in the United States who suffer from major depressive episodes at some point in their life is far higher than previously believed, according to a new study. National survey data currently shows that approximately 17% of women and 10% of men report having a history of major depressive episodes (MDEs) in their lifetimes. But these data are subject to "recall error," or the tend

5h

Exploring the sustainability of the Indian sugar industry

Generations of political support for sugar cultivation have helped India become the second-largest producer of sugar worldwide. Now, the country's commitment to renewable energy could create additional benefits, like conserving natural resources and providing better nutrition to the poor.

5h

Virgin seeks to revive supersonic commercial flight—but faster

Space tourism company Virgin Galactic on Monday announced a partnership with engine-maker Rolls-Royce to build a supersonic commercial airplane that flies at three times the speed of sound.

5h

Studying the genome of mountain goats shows us how they adapted to their environment

Seeing a mountain goat in the wild of southeast Alaska for the first time, with its stark white coat and graceful posture against a lush green mountain landscape, is an unforgettable experience.

5h

New species of fungus sticking out of beetles named after the COVID-19 quarantine

A major comprehensive study on Herpomycetales and Laboulbeniales, two orders of unique ectoparasitic fungi associated with insects and other arthropods (class Laboulbeniomycetes) in Belgium and the Netherlands was published in the open-access, peer-reviewed scholarly journal MycoKeys.

5h

Studying the genome of mountain goats shows us how they adapted to their environment

Seeing a mountain goat in the wild of southeast Alaska for the first time, with its stark white coat and graceful posture against a lush green mountain landscape, is an unforgettable experience.

5h

New species of fungus sticking out of beetles named after the COVID-19 quarantine

A major comprehensive study on Herpomycetales and Laboulbeniales, two orders of unique ectoparasitic fungi associated with insects and other arthropods (class Laboulbeniomycetes) in Belgium and the Netherlands was published in the open-access, peer-reviewed scholarly journal MycoKeys.

5h

Enzym med viktig roll för SARS-CoV-2-infektion kartlagt

Enzymet ACE2 har föreslagits spela en viktig roll för SARS-CoV-2-virusets inträde i värdceller – och utveckling av sjukdomen covid-19. Uppsalaforskare har gjort en kartläggning av enzymet i hela människokroppen. I motsats till tidigare forskning visar den nya studien ingen eller mycket låga nivåer av ACE2-protein i normala luftvägar. För att förstå mottagligheten för SARS-CoV-2-infektion, och hur

6h

How ice scouring in the Antarctic disrupts ecosystems

Along the Antarctic coast, icebergs regularly break away from glaciers and plunge into the nutrient-rich waters below. Carried by currents and wind, these icebergs then scrape along the bottom of the seafloor, wiping out the marine communities in their paths. These powerful events throw marine ecosystems into chaos, causing massive die-offs in the affected areas. Researchers recently dove into thi

6h

Novel approach improves graphene-based supercapacitors

Demand for integrated energy storage devices is growing rapidly as people rely more and more on portable and wireless electronics, and the global need grows for clean energy sources such as solar and wind energies.

6h

Can a quantum strategy help bring down the house?

In some versions of the game blackjack, one way to win against the house is for players at the table to work as a team to keep track of and covertly communicate amongst each other the cards they have been dealt. With that knowledge, they can then estimate the cards still in the deck, and those most likely to be dealt out next, all to help each player decide how to place their bets, and as a team,

6h

Virgin Galactic Shows Off Sleek Supersonic Jet Concept

Going Plaid Space tourism company Virgin Galactic just announced it's working with Rolls-Royce to develop a supersonic jet meant for air travel, as CNBC reports . Recently released renders show a sleek design, reminiscent of British-French supersonic passenger airliner Concorde, which was retired in the early 2000s. In fact, the Concorde used aircraft engines built by Rolls-Royce. Mach 3 The conc

6h

The six strains of SARS-CoV-2

SARS-CoV-2 mutation rate remains low. Across Europe and Italy, the most widespread is strain G, while the L strain from Wuhan is gradually disappearing. These mutations, however, do not impinge on the process of developing effective vaccines

6h

Most GP trainees willing to use mindfulness to tackle burnout: new study

Mindfulness could help trainee GPs to build their resilience and reduce burnout, helping to reduce the number of newly qualified GPs leaving the profession, according to University of Warwick researchers.

6h

Exploring the sustainability of the Indian sugar industry

Researchers analyzed the interconnected food, water and energy challenges that arise from the sugar industry in India – the second-largest producer of sugar worldwide – and how the political economy drives those challenges.

6h

Dome A in Antarctica is the best site for optical astronomical observation on Earth

A research team led by Prof. SHANG Zhaohui from National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) has proved that .

6h

More Than a Dozen Private Boats Came Out to Greet SpaceX Astronauts After Splashdown

Astronaut Rubbernecking After NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley splashed down in the Gulf of Mexico yesterday afternoon, more than a dozen private boats came up right to the capsule to welcome the two astronauts back home, The New York Times reports. But there was one issue: those boats weren't supposed to be there. The NASA and SpaceX recovery teams at the location had to instruct boat

6h

Callaway turned to AI and a supercomputer to fix your bad golf game

This is the first time Callaway has used AI to design a full range of clubs including irons. (Callaway /) Artificial intelligence may regularly beat humans at games like chess and checkers, but it's currently helping us out when it comes to golf. Callaway used machine learning throughout the Mavrik line to introduce new design elements, some of which surprised even the veteran members of its 120-

6h

Watch: Hiroshima survivor explains why 75 years of radiation research is so important

Radiation safety standards and medical knowledge stem from study of Hiroshima bombing survivors

6h

How scientists can stop fooling themselves over statistics

Nature, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02275-8 Sampling simulated data can reveal common ways in which our cognitive biases mislead us.

6h

Construction of the World's Biggest Nuclear Fusion Plant Just Started in France

Fusion power promises to provide limitless green energy using cheap and abundant fue l, but it's a long-running joke that it's always 20 years away . Last week, though, construction started on the ITER fusion plant in France, which hopes to prove the commercial viability of fusion power . While conventional nuclear power plants generate energy by splitting atom s , nuclear fusion involves smashin

6h

Novel magnetic stirrer speaks to lab equipment

A small device, called "Smart Stirrer", performed a function of a conventional laboratory stir bar, has an integrated microprocessor and various sensors capable of wireless and autonomous report the conversion of properties of a solution. Results are sent to a computer over Bluetooth, and any changes notify the user wirelessly.

6h

Can a quantum strategy help bring down the house?

Now researchers at MIT and Caltech have shown that the weird, quantum effects of entanglement could theoretically give blackjack players even more of an edge, albeit a small one, when playing against the house.

6h

How a gooey slime helps bacteria survive

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found that the bacterium C. perfringens modulates the structure of its biofilm at different temperatures by regulating the expression of the novel extracellular protein BsaA. They showed the number of BsaA-producing cells decreases when the temperature increases from 25°C to 37°C, and BsaA-producing cells cover non-BsaA-producing cells to provide toleranc

6h

Flash floods, storm surge warning as Isaias barrels up US east coast

Tropical storm Isaias threatened to bring strong winds, flash flooding and life-threatening storm surges to North and South Carolina as it roared up the east coast of the United States on Monday.

6h

'Blinking' titanium dioxide crystals may prove useful

Researchers have created ultra-small titanium dioxide crystals that exhibit unusual "blinking" behavior. The crystals may help to produce methane and other fuels, according to a study in the journal Angewandte Chemie . The crystals, also known as nanoparticles, stay charged for a long time and could benefit efforts to develop quantum computers. "Our findings are quite important and intriguing in

6h

People hospitalized with COVID-19 have low stroke risk

People hospitalized with COVID-19 have a low risk of stroke, according to new study. While initial reports had suggested a significant risk for these patients, the new study finds the majority of afflicted patients had existing risk factors, such as high blood pressure and diabetes. The findings provide more clarity about the role COVID-19 plays in causing stroke in a diverse population of the Un

6h

Should Plants and Animals That Relocate Because of Climate Change Be Considered Invasive?

Some researchers are calling for a more nuanced approach when it comes to flora and fauna that adjust their range to accommodate a warming world

6h

Everyone Loves The Chat Box: How Climate Science Moved Online

Scientists from around the world are writing the next major United Nations climate report. Summarizing the state of the atmosphere without meeting in person is as hard as it sounds. (Image credit: Jung Yeon-Je /AFP via Getty Images)

6h

Russia claims to be ahead of rivals in race to produce Covid vaccine

Moscow says it will start production next month and mass immunisation by October Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Russian government claims to have stolen a march on dozens of global rivals – including the US and UK – in the race to produce a viable coronavirus vaccine, saying it would start production of a vaccine next month and begin mass immunisation by October

6h

Wildfires can poison drinking water: Here's how communities can be better prepared

In recent years wildfires have entered urban areas, causing breathtaking destruction.

6h

Smartphones prove to be time-saving analytical tools

Seemingly everyone has a smartphone in their pocket, and we find new uses for them every day. They can help us avoid traffic jams or connect us to family from afar. They can even translate languages on the fly.

6h

The six strains of SARS-CoV-2

The virus causing the COVID-19 pandemic, SARS-CoV-2, presents at least six strains. Despite its mutations, the virus shows little variability, and this is good news for the researchers working on a viable vaccine.

6h

Searching for where very unequal mass black hole binaries come from

The direct detection of gravitational waves from at least eleven sources during the past five years has offered spectacular confirmation of Einstein's model of gravity and space-time, while the modeling of these events has provided information on star formation, gamma-ray bursts,neutron stars, the age of the universe, and even verification of ideas about how very heavy elements are produced. The m

6h

Six things to know about NASA's Ingenuity Mars helicopter

When NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida later this summer, an innovative experiment will ride along: the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter. Ingenuity may weigh only about 4 pounds (1.8 kilograms), but it has some outsize ambitions.

6h

Experiencing childhood trauma makes body and brain age faster

Children who suffer trauma from abuse or violence early in life show biological signs of aging faster than children who have never experienced adversity, according to new research. The study examined three different signs of biological aging — early puberty, cellular aging and changes in brain structure — and found that trauma exposure was associated with all three.

6h

Anti-bullying PEACE program packs a punch

Italian high schools have reported success with a South Australian program to help victims of bullying and aggression. The Preparation, Education. Action, Coping, Evaluation (PEACE) antibullying program, developed at Flinders University, has been adapted by several state education systems in Europe, with the intervention used in 22 Italian classes in a 2019-20 study.

6h

Scientists led by NTU Singapore identify new catalysts for more efficient water splitting

A team of scientists led by NTU Singapore have discovered the parameters that determine the efficiency of a class of low-cost catalysts called spinel oxides – a discovery that breaks a bottleneck in the extraction of hydrogen from water through electrolysis, the process of splitting water with electricity. These findings bring the team a step closer to making water splitting a suitable approach fo

6h

Raising the bar on disability care

Encouraging paid workers to employ the 'right kind' of respectful personal relationship with young people with disability will lift standards in the sector, experts say. With good quality relationships, children and young adults with cognitive disability feel "valued, respected and cared about" in their daily lives and, in turn, give carers more job satisfaction and self-respect, international res

6h

Dingoes have gotten bigger over the last 80 years – and pesticides might be to blame

The average size of a dingo is increasing, but only in areas where poison-baits are used, a collaborative study led by UNSW Sydney shows.

6h

Cold-sensitive staphylococci reveal a weakness

A team from the University of Geneva has identified a new mechanism involved in the membrane synthesis of Staphylococcus aureus. When disrupted, this mechanism makes the pathogen sensitive to cold. The discovery of this physiological process could contribute to the fight against this pathogen that is difficult to treat due to its resistance to antibiotics

6h

Smartphones prove to be time-saving analytical tools

Seemingly everyone has a smartphone in their pocket, and we find new uses for them every day. They can help us avoid traffic jams or connect us to family from afar. They can even translate languages on the fly.

6h

The six strains of SARS-CoV-2

The virus causing the COVID-19 pandemic, SARS-CoV-2, presents at least six strains. Despite its mutations, the virus shows little variability, and this is good news for the researchers working on a viable vaccine.

6h

Boycotts Can't Be a Test of Moral Purity

F or some people, when they hear about some bad corporate practice, their first reaction is to consider cutting ties to the company. So it is not surprising that each time I discuss the democratic dangers of Facebook, Amazon, or Google, people always bring up personal consumer choice. Instead of policy (antitrust, data rules, outlawing arbitration), the conversation veers quickly into pride or gu

6h

Paired Comparisons Could Mean Better Witness Identifications

Compared with traditional lineup techniques, a series of two-faces-at-a-time choices led to more accurate identification by study witnesses.

7h

A new test to investigate the origin of cosmic structure

Many cosmologists believe that the universe's structure is a result of quantum fluctuations that occurred during early expansion. Confirming this hypothesis, however, has proven highly challenging so far, as it is hard to discern between quantum and classical primordial fluctuations when analyzing existing cosmological data.

7h

Ukendt dronesværm over USA's største atomkraftværk bekymrer

To gange sidste september blev USA's største atomkraftværk besøgt af en sværm af droner, der lod til at observere værket. Sikkerhedspersonalet kunne intet stille op.

7h

The Intellifuge Rotor Calculator

A free online calculator to help you calculate, convert, and configure with ease.

7h

Mathematical modeling revealed how chitinase, a molecular monorail, obeys a one-way sign

A novel mathematical modeling method has been developed to estimate operation models of biomolecular motors from single-molecule imaging data of motion with the Bayesian inference framework. The operation mechanism of a linear molecular motor "chitinase", which moves one-way on a chitin chain with degrading the chain passed by, was elucidated by mathematical modeling of experimental imaging data w

7h

Novel approach improves graphene-based supercapacitors

An efficient in situ pathway to generate andattach oxygen functional groups to graphitic electrodes for supercapacitors by inducing hydrolysis of water molecules within the gel electrolyte.

7h

Stretches of repeating DNA predispose to systemic sclerosis

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found that extended repeats of DNA in the gene FLI1 are associated with systemic sclerosis. By comparing the DNA of systemic sclerosis patients with healthy controls, they found that GA repeats over 22 are associated with the development of the disease as well as with a more severe outcome. These findings help us understand how FLI1 may contribute to the

7h

New study on development of Parkinson's disease is 'on the nose'

Scientists suggest that the initial impact of environmental toxins inhaled through the nose may induce inflammation in the brain, triggering the production of Lewy bodies that can then be spread to other brain regions. However, the relationship linking olfactory dysfunction and Parkinson's disease development remains unclear. New findings from a study add weight to this theory and identify a criti

7h

Study: Experiencing childhood trauma makes body and brain age faster

Children who suffer trauma from abuse or violence early in life show biological signs of aging faster than children who have never experienced adversity, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. The study examined three different signs of biological aging — early puberty, cellular aging and changes in brain structure — and found that trauma exposure was associat

7h

RSV vaccination of pregnant women could prevent pneumonia in babies

Professor Shabir A. Madhi of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, is the lead author of a study published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine on Thursday, 30 July 2020.The multinational, multicentre study reports on the first RSV vaccine to provide evidence that inmunisation of pregnant woman could protect young infants under six months old against severe RSV lower res

7h

UArizona-TGen led team identifies new biomarkers to diagnose and monitor brain injuries

A scientific team led by the University of Arizona and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, identified a robust set of biomarkers through proteomics and metabolomic analysis that could help guide treatment for tens of millions of patients who each year sustain brain injuries, potentially preventing severe long-term disabilities. The team's findings we

7h

Surprisingly young galaxy breaks low-oxygen record

A galaxy in the constellation Hercules that only recently started making stars has broken the record for having the lowest level of oxygen ever seen in a young galaxy. Astronomers used two Maunakea Observatories combined with machine learning to find the rare object.

7h

Sweet-taste perception changes as children develop

While adults prefer levels of sweetness similar to typical soft drinks, children and adolescents are less sensitive to the taste and prefer concentrations that are 50% sweeter, according to research by professor of food science and human nutrition M. Yanina Pepino and Julie A. Mennella of the Monell Chemical Senses Center.

7h

Interstellar medium of SDSS J2310+1855 explored with ALMA

Using the ALMA Observatory, an international team of astronomers has conducted an observational campaign of interstellar medium (ISM) in a host galaxy of a high-redshift quasar known as SDSS J231038.88+185519.7 (SDSS J2310+1855 for short). Results of the observations, published July 24 on arXiv.org, could improve the knowledge of the properties and nature of this quasar.

7h

3D mapping reveals how wounds begin to heal

Researchers have figured out for the first time how the wound healing process begins. The finding may provide new insight into fibrosis and cancer metastasis, according to a new study. For the new study, published in ACS Nano , the team discovered the way fibroblasts, or common cells in connective tissue, interact with the extracellular matrix, which provides structural support as well as biochem

7h

The US may have the most to lose if Donald Trump bans TikTok

A US ban of the Chinese video-sharing app TikTok could see countries developing their own versions of popular US-owned services as the internet splinters across national borders

7h

Dingoes have gotten bigger over the last 80 years, and pesticides might be to blame

Dingoes have gotten around 6-9 percent bigger over the past 80 years, new research from UNSW and the University of Sydney shows—but the growth is only happening in areas where poison baiting is used.

7h

Dingoes have gotten bigger over the last 80 years, and pesticides might be to blame

Dingoes have gotten around 6-9 percent bigger over the past 80 years, new research from UNSW and the University of Sydney shows—but the growth is only happening in areas where poison baiting is used.

7h

One Free Press Coalition Spotlights Journalists Under Attack – August 2020

This month's focus is on Austin Tice, an American photojournalist who has gone missing in Syria and is presumed to be alive.

7h

Fatty liver disease despite a normal weight

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found significant differences in the clinical presentation of non-obese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) based on their sex and body mass index. They found that non-obese NAFLD patients had lower muscle mass and strength (pre-sarcopenia) compared to obese NAFLD patients. Further, fat accumulation in muscles was more common among wom

7h

Neanderthal DNA contributes to genetic diversity, bringing more understanding to human evolution

The advent of DNA sequencing has given scientists a clearer insight into the interconnectedness of evolution and the web-like path that different organisms take, splitting apart and coming back together. Tony Capra, associate professor of biological sciences, has come to new conclusions about the influence of Neanderthal DNA on some genetic traits of modern humans.

7h

Cold-sensitive staphylococci reveal a weakness

Staphylococcus aureus—also known as "golden staph"—has the ability to develop in highly variable environmental conditions (on the skin, in the nose, on sterile surfaces, and so forth). Its great adaptability depends on an RNA helicase involved in the degradation of RNA messengers that have become useless. In their attempts to have a better understanding of how this helicase works, scientists from

7h

Q&A: Expert discusses environmental policies of the Bolsonaro government

Deforestation in the world's largest rainforest in Brazil has soared under President Jair Bolsonaro. In June the number of fires in the Amazon rainforest, one of the most diverse ecosystems on earth as well as a critical buffer against global warming, reached a 13-year high. After mounting criticism of Bolsonaro's environmental policies and increasing pressure from national and international inves

7h

Neanderthal DNA contributes to genetic diversity, bringing more understanding to human evolution

The advent of DNA sequencing has given scientists a clearer insight into the interconnectedness of evolution and the web-like path that different organisms take, splitting apart and coming back together. Tony Capra, associate professor of biological sciences, has come to new conclusions about the influence of Neanderthal DNA on some genetic traits of modern humans.

7h

Yes, the air was better during lockdown, study shows

If you thought that the air quality improved during the initial COVID-19 lockdown, you were right. A recently published Tufts-led study found a direct connection between the stay-at-home orders following the COVID-19 outbreak this spring with improved air quality in Somerville, Massachusetts, neighborhoods located next to Interstate 93 and busy side roads.

7h

Scientists identify new catalysts for more efficient water splitting

A team of scientists led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have discovered the parameters that determine the efficiency of a class of low-cost catalysts called spinel oxides—a discovery that breaks a bottleneck in the extraction of hydrogen from water through electrolysis, the process of splitting water with electricity.

7h

Cold-sensitive staphylococci reveal a weakness

Staphylococcus aureus—also known as "golden staph"—has the ability to develop in highly variable environmental conditions (on the skin, in the nose, on sterile surfaces, and so forth). Its great adaptability depends on an RNA helicase involved in the degradation of RNA messengers that have become useless. In their attempts to have a better understanding of how this helicase works, scientists from

7h

Florida Teenager Arrested for Leading Massive 'Bit-Con' Twitter Hack

A 17 year-old Florida teenager has been arrested for the massive Twitter hack that targeted celebrities and cryptocurrency-related businesses earlier in July. Federal law enforcement arrested student Graham Ivan Clark in Tampa on Friday after an investigation led by the FBI and DOJ. A press release from the Office of the State Attorney, Andrew Warren, states that 30 felony charges have been filed

7h

We must not wait idly for an elusive Covid-19 vaccine

A package of behavioural and drug-based interventions will save lives and better prepare us for the next crisis

8h

Age of the universe? Team says 12.6 billion years

A new approach dates the age of the universe at 12.6 billion years, researchers report. In a study published in the Astronomical Journal , researchers used empirical data, in this case observable measurements on the distance from Earth of 50 galaxies, to tweak a 90-year-old computational tool called the Hubble constant to measure the expansion of the universe. Dating the Big Bang, which gave birt

8h

Amerikanske forskere vil bore gennem Indlandsisen for at bestemme stabiliteten

Til næste år begynder amerikanerne boringer fire steder i det nordlige Grønland for at bestemme indholdet af radioaktive isotoper i fundamentet under Indlandsisen med henblik på at afgøre, hvornår området sidst var isfrit.

8h

Challenges in diagnosing hypersensitivity pneumonitis addressed in latest guidelines

More than 30 years after the last guidance on the clinical evaluation of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), the American Thoracic Society – in collaboration with the Asociación Latinoamericana de Tórax or ALAT and the Japanese Respiratory Society- has developed new guidelines for clinicians. The guidelines are available online ahead of print in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care

8h

Baby boomers show concerning decline in cognitive functioning

In a reversal of trends, American baby boomers scored lower on a test of cognitive functioning than did members of previous generations, according to a new nationwide study.

8h

Coronavirus: Sewage testing for Covid-19 begins in England

Samples will be checked for signs of the virus, to get early warnings of spikes in infection levels.

8h

Major news outlets are handing the mic to big business on climate issues

Newspapers and other media outlets haven't given equal coverage to scientists and big businesses when it comes to climate change. (Roman Kraft/Unsplash/) It may seem that the days of false equivalency in climate change journalism are behind us. It's rare to see a climate change denier or skeptic framed as an "expert" in an article. And that's for good reason—their opinions run counter to the over

8h

What Poetry Means for Doctors and Patients During a Pandemic

The poetry editor of The Journal of the American Medical Association talks about medicine, metaphor, and how literature can even improve patient outcomes.

8h

Do Your Own Research?

A recent commentary on Forbes advises: You Must Not 'Do Your Own Research' When It Comes To Science . I agree with everything the author, Ethan Siegel, says in the piece. It was a good start – but did not go far enough. For example, he did not really reach any conclusion about what people should actually do, beyond "listen to the experts." OK – how, exactly, do we do that? This is not a criticism

8h

Team finds paint, baby formula, and more in oysters

Researchers have found the widespread presence of human bacterial pathogens and human-derived microdebris materials, including plastics, kerosene, paint, talc, and milk supplement powders in oysters in Myanmar. Their new study in Science of the Total Environment concludes that coastal urbanization and lack of sewage treatment increases contamination in seafood and can cause potential health risks

8h

The 7 Best Chromebooks for Every Budget (2020)

WIRED Tested. If you're all in on Google services, these are our favorite ChromeOS laptops and 2-in-1 tablets for school, work, or home.

8h

We need to unpack the word 'race' and find new language

Race-thinking has been discredited for decades. But it is still with us. Yet race is a historical contingency, not a state of nature. One of the most sinister things about race is that its sibling, racism, not only lasts, but continues to grow. Race has so co-opted our consciousness and language that any attempt to deal with the effects of racism has been very difficult.

8h

Paired Comparisons Could Mean Better Witness Identifications

Compared with traditional lineup techniques, a series of two-faces-at-a-time choices led to more accurate identification by study witnesses. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Paired Comparisons Could Mean Better Witness Identifications

Compared with traditional lineup techniques, a series of two-faces-at-a-time choices led to more accurate identification by study witnesses. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

How a gooey slime helps bacteria survive

Bacteria have the ability to adapt to their environment to survive the host's immune defense. One such survival strategy includes the formation of a biofilm that prevents the immune system or antibiotics from reaching the bacteria. In a new study, researchers from the University of Tsukuba revealed that modulations to biofilm structure as a result of temperature changes are regulated by the produc

8h

Why coronavirus will deepen the inequality of our suburbs

COVID-19 and the growing recession concentrated in the services sector will not just increase social inequality, but accelerate the growing spatial divide in our cities. As our new research report shows, the pandemic's impacts reinforce the ongoing trend towards the suburbanisation of inequality.

8h

Natural starshades would help astronomers image exoplanets

In the past few decades, the study of extrasolar planets has grown by leaps and bounds, with the confirmation of over 4000 exoplanets. With so many planets available for study, the focus of exoplanet researchers is shifting from discovery to characterization. In the coming years, new technologies and next-generation telescopes will also enable direct imaging studies, which will vastly improve our

8h

How a gooey slime helps bacteria survive

Bacteria have the ability to adapt to their environment to survive the host's immune defense. One such survival strategy includes the formation of a biofilm that prevents the immune system or antibiotics from reaching the bacteria. In a new study, researchers from the University of Tsukuba revealed that modulations to biofilm structure as a result of temperature changes are regulated by the produc

8h

Hubble peeks at stellar treats

Looking its best ever is the star cluster NGC 2203, here imaged by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Aside from its dazzling good looks, this cluster of stars contains lots of astronomical treats that have helped astronomers puzzle together the lifetimes of stars.

8h

Scientists discover ancient enzymes evolve new tricks

Plants, herbivores, and pathogens are locked in a war for survival that is hundreds of millions of years old. Rooted in place and with no way to run, plants evolved complex, chemical-producing machinery in their cells to defend against their ambulate adversaries.

9h

Calculating the benefits of exascale and quantum computers

A quintillion calculations a second. That's one with 18 zeros after it. It's the speed at which an exascale supercomputer will process information. The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing for the first exascale computer to be deployed in 2021. Two more will follow soon after. Yet quantum computers may be able to complete more complex calculations even faster than these up-and-coming exascale c

9h

Scientists discover ancient enzymes evolve new tricks

Plants, herbivores, and pathogens are locked in a war for survival that is hundreds of millions of years old. Rooted in place and with no way to run, plants evolved complex, chemical-producing machinery in their cells to defend against their ambulate adversaries.

9h

A surprising range of climate events may be predictable years in advance

An increase in the likelihood of a "Greenland Block"—a bulge of high pressure that stalls over the massive island and can cause extreme weather both in North America and Europe—could be predictable years in advance.

9h

New study sheds light on designing of heterogeneous catalysts for selective carbon dioxide photoreduction

The use of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) as heterogeneous catalysts for photocatalytic CO2 reduction has attracted significant attention owing to their well-defined structure, high surface area and structural modularity.

9h

Mitochondrial metabolite mediates longevity through epigenomes

In a study published in Science Advances, researchers from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed that mitochondrial metabolite acetyl-CoA links mitochondrial stress to the nuclear epigenome via NuRD complex for life-span regulation in C. elegans.

9h

Scientists evaluate spatiotemporal characteristics of glacier service value in Qilian Mountains

Glaciers are an important component of the cryosphere. They are considered to be a sensitive indicator of climate change. Glaciers and their meltwater play an important role in the regulation of river runoff in the arid areas of northwest China, and constitute the material and cultural basis for the sustainable development of population, resources, ecology, environment, and the socio-economy in th

9h

Scientists find new deformation mechanism of bulk metallic glass composites

Bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs) containing in-situ formed β-Ti dendrites are promising for many applications. However, it remains challenging to effectively tune their microstructures and mechanical properties for application.

9h

How to Evaluate COVID-19 News without Freaking Out

Disinformation expert Carl Bergstrom gives tips on how to stay calm and make sense of pandemic news — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

How to Evaluate COVID-19 News without Freaking Out

Disinformation expert Carl Bergstrom gives tips on how to stay calm and make sense of pandemic news — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Migrating big astronomy data to the cloud

Nature, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02284-7 Six lessons from astronomy's embrace of cloud computing.

9h

Mitochondrial metabolite mediates longevity through epigenomes

In a study published in Science Advances, researchers from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed that mitochondrial metabolite acetyl-CoA links mitochondrial stress to the nuclear epigenome via NuRD complex for life-span regulation in C. elegans.

9h

New method to measure vibrational frequencies in molecular hydrogen ions

An international research collaboration headed by VU-scientist Jeroen Koelemeij developed a new method to measure vibrational frequencies in the molecular hydrogen ion at four hundred times higher precision than before. The results improve the understanding of the fundamental laws of physics and particles such as the proton—topics which have recently been subject to debate. The outcomes of the stu

9h

Differences between discs of active and non-active galaxies detected for the first time

A study led by researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) comparing the discs of several pairs of spiral galaxies, active and non-active, concludes that in the active discs, the rotational motion of the stars is of greater importance.

9h

Researchers develop technique for processing surfaces on an atomic scale

Nobody can shoot a bullet through a banana in such a way that the skin is perforated but the banana remains intact. However, on the level of individual atomic layers, researchers at TU Wien (Vienna) have now achieved such a feat—they developed a nano-structuring method with which certain layers of material can be perforated extremely precisely and others left completely untouched, even though the

9h

Machine learning finds a surprising early galaxy

New results achieved by combining big data captured by the Subaru Telescope and the power of machine learning have discovered a galaxy with an extremely low 1.6% oxygen abundance, breaking the previous record of the lowest abundance. The measured oxygen abundance suggests that most of the stars in this galaxy formed very recently.

9h

A simpler, high-accuracy method to detect rare circulating tumor cells in blood samples

Results from a recent study — a collaboration between Lehigh University, Lehigh Valley Cancer Institute, and Pennsylvania State University — demonstrates the potential for a new method of detecting circulating tumor cells. Unlike existing methods, which rely on an expensive and time-consuming process that involves labelling antibodies with fluorescence, this technique uses a powerful label-free

9h

We'll Never Fix Systemic Racism by Being Polite

Contrary to the sanitized version we sometimes hear about the civil rights movement, change was not achieved solely by protest marches and people singing "We Shall Overcome" — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

The Rise of the Virtual Being

On the latest episode of the Get WIRED podcast, we attend the Virtual Beings Summit and contemplate Lucy, Lil Miquela, and what it means to be human.

9h

The Hate-Fueled Rise of r/The_Donald—and Its Epic Takedown

The notorious subreddit trafficked in violent rhetoric, growing a prodigious following over five years. Here's how—and why—Reddit finally shut it down.

9h

I'm Traveling, Even Though I'm Stuck at Home

For many people, travel is a way of life. When not on the road, we dream of being on the road. As we fly home from one trip, we're planning the next. That certainly describes me. And yet, several months into the pandemic, I've realized that the essence of traveling requires no passport and no plane ticket. A good traveler can take a trip and never leave her hometown. For the past 30 years, I've s

9h

Dear Therapist: Is My Middle Child a Monster?

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My husband and I have three terrific kids, ages 6, 4, and 2. Our oldest is cautious, helpful, and precocious. Our youngest is easygoing, affectionate, and goofy. Our middle child is persistent, bold, imaginati

9h

We'll Never Fix Systemic Racism by Being Polite

Contrary to the sanitized version we sometimes hear about the civil rights movement, change was not achieved solely by protest marches and people singing "We Shall Overcome" — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Health Care Is Long Overdue for a Social Justice Reckoning

Biases in the system put the lives and well-being of women and minorities at risk — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule makes splashdown with NASA astronauts

The first astronauts to launch to the International Space Station on a commercial spacecraft have now returned, splashing down into the sea off the coast of Florida

9h

Neural Switch Flips on Aggression in Male Mice

A separate set of cells in the same region regulate sexual behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Neural Switch Flips on Aggression in Male Mice

A separate set of cells in the same region regulate sexual behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Neural Switch Flips on Aggression in Male Mice

A separate set of cells in the same region regulate sexual behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Cosmology's new advances show our voyage of discovery is far from over

An incredible map of the universe and mind-bending revelations about a supermassive black hole are evidence that the advance of science is far from over – it has plenty of new shores yet to explore

9h

Biden Goes Big Without Sounding Like It

Almost halfway through Chris Wallace's July 19 interview with Donald Trump, an exchange occurred that encapsulates the current state of the presidential race. The president claimed that his Democratic rival, Joe Biden, "wants to defund the police." Wallace contradicted him, which led a furious Trump to instruct his press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, to "get me the charter" of the unity task force

10h

Ten takeaways from ten years at Retraction Watch

As we celebrate our tenth birthday and look forward to our second decade, we thought it would be a good time to take stock and reflect on some lessons we — and others — have learned. Retractions are more common than we — or anyone else — thought they were. Two decades ago, journals were … Continue reading

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Retraction Watch turns 10: A look back, and a look forward

Ten years. On Aug. 3, 2010, we published our first post on Retraction Watch. Titled, "Why write a blog about retractions?", the welcome letter to readers outlined our hopes for the new blog. Retractions, we felt then, offered "a window into the scientific process," as well as a source of good stories for journalists. In … Continue reading

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When a Contagion Comes, Women Bear a Heavy Burden

Women are disproportionately represented on the front lines of health care delivery for millions of coronavirus cases globally. They have also been more likely to lose work, to experience child care difficulties, and to suffer abuse at home — patterns that were seen in past outbreaks, from AIDS to Ebola.

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Techtopia #158: Kvinderne bag Atari

Professor Pernille Bjørn fra Datalogisk Institut ved Københavns Universitet har opsporet 15 af de kvindelige computerspiludviklere, der var med til at udvikle populære Atari-spil som Pong, Pacman og Space Invaders. Deres historie, som hidtil har været upåagtet, dokumenteres nu på hjemmesiden Atar…

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Gatljus snuvar duvor på djupsömn

Människans sömn är indelad i stadier, bland annat REM-sömnen då vi rör på ögonen och drömmer mycket, och djupsömnen då kroppen återhämtar sig mest. Sömnstadier är exklusivt för däggdjur med bara ett undantag: fåglar, vars sömn är indelad på ett liknande sätt. Nu har forskare från Australien låtit duvor sova i sömnlabb med elektroder kopplade till hjärnan för att kunna analysera sömnens kvalitet –

10h

Coronavirus Live Updates

Some U.S. schools begin to reopen with fraught results. With a focus on the coronavirus, other deadly diseases are making a comeback.

10h

'The Biggest Monster' Is Spreading. And It's Not the Coronavirus.

Tuberculosis kills 1.5 million people each year. Lockdowns and supply-chain disruptions threaten progress against the disease as well as H.I.V. and malaria.

10h

Coronavirus vaccine tracker: how close are we to a vaccine?

More than 140 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective coronavirus vaccine Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 140 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…

11h

A new novel method for assessing intracranial pressure using non-invasive fundus images: a pilot study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70084-0

11h

The alteration of gut microbiome and metabolism in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69845-8

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Quantitative T2 MRI is predictive of neurodegeneration following organophosphate exposure in a rat model

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69991-z Quantitative T 2 MRI is predictive of neurodegeneration following organophosphate exposure in a rat model

11h

A model for the geomagnetic field reversal rate and constraints on the heat flux variations at the core-mantle boundary

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69916-w

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Ideal spectral emissivity for radiative cooling of earthbound objects

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70105-y

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Freshwater transport between the Kara, Laptev, and East-Siberian seas

Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70096-w

11h

Why did the atomic spy do it?

Nature, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02279-4 Post-crash fascism and horrific detention of refugees — a biography traces the forces that drove nuclear physicist Klaus Fuchs to treachery.

11h

What's on the agenda for post-pandemic meetings?

Nature, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02254-z Conferences could become more affordable, international and inclusive if virtual events become 'the new normal'.

11h

The quest for quantum-proof encryption just made a leap forward

Many of the things you do online every day are protected by encryption so that no one else can spy on it. Your online banking and messages to your friends are likely encrypted, for example—as are government secrets. But that protection is under threat from the development of quantum computers, which threaten to render modern encryption methods useless. Quantum machines work in a fundamentally dif

11h

Ancient part of immune system may underpin severe COVID

New genetic and patient analyses suggest severe COVID is linked to overactive complement, one of the immune system's oldest branches, and excess blood clotting.

11h

Speech processing hierarchy in the dog brain

Dog brains, just as human brains, process speech hierarchically: intonations at lower, word meanings at higher stages, according to a new study by Hungarian researchers. The study reveals exciting speech processing similarities between us and a speechless species.

11h

What kind of face mask best protects against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

11h

How to win a negotiation

There are many variables in every negotiation, which means there is no silver bullet or magic phrase you can use to win every single time. On top of that, the idea of "winning" changes depending on the situation. The key to success is being able to identify the type of negotiation and use a strategy that gets you what you want. "Successful negotiation is not about getting to yes," says former FBI

11h

Pandemic Deepens Cancer's Stress And Tough Choices

For many cancer patients, daily life can feel full of risky choices involving work, family, friends and money. Nearly every option pits the risks of catching the coronavirus against other downsides. (Image credit: FG Trade/Getty Images)

11h

Spionfotos afslører ødelæggelser fra Sovjets landbrugsreform

Med fotos fra spionsatellitter har KU-forsker vist, hvordan murmeldyr er gået støt tilbage efter sovjets aggressive udvidelser af landbruget efter WW2.

11h

Lewis acid-catalyzed asymmetric reactions of β,γ-unsaturated 2-acyl imidazoles

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17681-9 The investigation of reactivity of β,γ-unsaturated carbonyl compounds is of great synthetic value, especially in asymmetric transformations. Here, the authors report a catalytic asymmetric tandem isomerization/α-Michael addition of β,γ-unsaturated 2-acyl imidazoles in presence of chiral N,N′-dioxide metal cata

11h

High-throughput gas separation by flexible metal–organic frameworks with fast gating and thermal management capabilities

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17625-3 Separation processes in industry use substantial energy and energy-efficient purification systems should be developed for sustainability. Here the authors report a flexible metal–organic framework for high-throughput separation of CO2 from a CO2/CH4 gas mixture in a pressure vacuum swing adsorption system.

11h

An optimal posttreatment surveillance strategy for cancer survivors based on an individualized risk-based approach

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17672-w Monitoring patients for the recurrence of cancer can be costly and it is important to devise the optimum strategy for a given cancer and population. Here, the authors use nasopharyngeal cancer as a model and show using patient data an optimal follow-up schedule to detect recurrence of the cancer.

11h

as-Indaceno[3,2,1,8,7,6-ghijklm]terrylene as a near-infrared absorbing C70-fragment

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17684-6 The synthesis of hydrocarbons with attractive electronic structures remains challenging. Here, the authors describe the synthesis and properties of the C70 fragment as-indaceno[3,2,1,8,7,6-ghijklm]terrylene, which exhibits near-infrared (NIR) absorption.

11h

Cascadia low frequency earthquakes at the base of an overpressured subduction shear zone

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17609-3 Regions of the subducting oceanic crust are often considered to be overpressured, owing to fluid trapped beneath an impermeable seal along the overlying inter-plate boundary. Here, the authors show that slow slip earthquakes at the Cascadia subduction zone occur immediately below a 6-10 km-thick shear zone, in

11h

Ancient genomes in South Patagonia reveal population movements associated with technological shifts and geography

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17656-w How Indigenous populations in the southern tip of South America have changed over time has been unclear. Here the authors generate genome-wide data for 20 ancient individuals and examine how past migrations and admixture events correlate to geography and shifts in the archaeological record.

11h

Orbital angular momentum multiplexed deterministic all-optical quantum teleportation

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17616-4 All-optical quantum teleportation is a variant of the standard teleportation protocol, typically based on linear amplification of the input state. Here, the authors use an OAM mode-matched parametric amplifier to demonstrate multiplexed all-optical quantum teleportation, also on OAM-mode superpositions.

11h

A deep learning model to predict RNA-Seq expression of tumours from whole slide images

Nature Communications, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17678-4 RNA-sequencing of tumour tissue can provide important diagnostic and prognostic information but this is costly and not routinely performed in all clinical settings. Here, the authors show that whole slide histology slides—part of routine care—can be used to predict RNA-sequencing data and thus reduce the need

11h

"Anatomy of an American Failure"

As the fall approaches, and countries around the world prepare to resume their pre-pandemic lives, the planet's most powerful nation stands alone. The United States has been humbled and humiliated by its failure to protect its people and contain the coronavirus. How did it come to this? For The Atlantic 's September cover, staff writer Ed Yong undertakes an autopsy of this catastrophic failure. H

11h

Democrats Are Spending Millions to Boost a Trump Ally

T here are few Republican politicians aside from Donald Trump who Democrats abhor more than Kris Kobach, the Kansas conservative who has gained national fame as an architect of laws to force immigrants to show their papers to police and voters to prove their citizenship at the polls. Yet for the past few weeks, Democrats have come to Kobach's rescue, spending at least $4 million to help the unapo

11h

Coronavirus doctor's diary: How gardening could help in the fight against obesity

In Bradford, community schemes offer a novel approach to promoting healthy lifestyles.

12h

Covid-19: Why Hong Kong's 'third wave' is a warning

Until recently, the city was seen as a poster child in its handling of the pandemic. What went wrong?

12h

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: Women survivors of the atomic bombs

August marks the 75th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.

12h

Nile dam row: Egypt fumes as Ethiopia celebrates

Concerns grow as Nile River nations fail to reach a deal on how to share the vital waters.

12h

Properly-equipped laypersons can potentially reverse opioid overdose mortality

After tracking a cohort of community members equipped with naloxone and a smartphone application for more than a year, researchers showed that laypersons can effectively signal and respond to overdose incident to administer nasal naloxone in advance of emergency medical service (EMS) arrival. Just as CPR and early defibrillation administered by laypersons in advance of EMS contribute to positive o

12h

Plague to protein: Israeli firm seeks to put locusts on the menu

From biblical plague to modern day protein, one Israeli firm wants to make locusts a sustainable food choice in the Holy Land and beyond.

12h

Plague to protein: Israeli firm seeks to put locusts on the menu

From biblical plague to modern day protein, one Israeli firm wants to make locusts a sustainable food choice in the Holy Land and beyond.

12h

Firefighters struggle to contain blaze in southern California

More than 1,300 firefighters were battling a blaze that was burning out of control Sunday in southern California, threatening thousands of people and homes east of Los Angeles.

12h

Is Telemedicine Here to Stay?

The answer largely depends on whether Medicare and private health insurers will adequately cover virtual doctor visits once coronavirus outbreaks subside.

12h

Boycotts or buycotts? The role of corporate activism

Researchers from Texas Christian University, University of Arizona, University of Oregon, and Portland State University published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines the effect of corporate activism on financial and other types of performance to empower managers with insights they can use to chart their company's course in today's marketplace.

13h

Is less more? How consumers view sustainability claims

Researchers from City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Baptist University, and The Chinese University of Hong Kong published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that offers consumer insights to guide marketing teams' communication of products' negatively framed attributes.

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The perils and pitfalls of "doing your own research" about COVID-19 (or any other science)

Ethan Siegel at Forbes argues that you "must not 'do your own research.'" While the title grates, Siegel is correct that most of us are not really capable of "doing our own research" about most scientific and medical questions because we lack the necessary background. We must therefore be humble and be very, very careful about "doing our own research."

13h

Adverts for large polluting cars 'should be banned'

A new campaign says the government should ban adverts for large cars like sports utility vehicles.

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Ockhams rakkniv – krångla inte till det

Den enklaste förklaringen är oftast den rätta I början av 1300-talet författade den engelska franciskanermunken William av Ockham den fras som han nu är mest känd för: Pluralitas non est ponenda sine necessitate. Direkt översatt blir det ungefär Mångfald skall inte förutsättas i onödan, vilket ju i sig kan anses ganska obskyrt. En mer lättillgänglig […] The post appeared first on Vetenskap och F

14h

Niyaz Ahmad's technician did it

"it makes more sense when you have consumed twice the recommended dose of San Pedro cactus and spent four hours staring at paisley wallpaper, or so I hear from a friend." – Smut Clyde.

14h

Toilet-surfing, stillads-balance og en trappe til intetheden: Læserne fotograferer spøjs teknik

Ingeniørens fotokonkurrence efterlyser billeder af klamp, fejl og spøjse tekniske løsninger fra sommerferien.

15h

The art of making tiny holes

It sounds like a magic trick: A highly charged ion penetrates several layers of a material. It creates a big hole in the top layer, but travels through the next layer without damaging it. This new technique can be used to modify surfaces with extremely hight precision.

16h

Is less more? How consumers view sustainability claims

Communicating a product's reduced negative attribute might have unintended consequences if consumers approach it with the wrong mindset. Marketers should estimate the potential risks of such communications and carry out such communication strategically.

16h

Boycotts or buycotts? The role of corporate activism

Sociopolitical activism may risk backlash, but it may also lead to tangible positive financial outcomes, particularly when aligned with key stakeholder values.

16h

PLOS Special Collection: Successful approaches to HIV care

On July 27 2020, the US Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) launched a Special Collection of manuscripts across the open-access journals PLOS Medicine and PLOS ONE, highlighting Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program's (RWHAP) innovative approaches for data utilization and engagement of people with HIV who are not in care and not virally suppress

16h

Children's National Hospital case report sounds the alarm for antibiotic resistance

A recent meningitis case at Children's National Hospital raises serious concerns about antibiotic resistance in the common bacterium that caused it, researchers from the hospital write in a case report. Their findings, published online August 3 in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Disease Society, could change laboratory and clinical practice across the US and potentially around the globe

16h

Survey finds Americans social media habits changing as national tensions rise

A new national survey commissioned by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds more Americans are adjusting how they use social media platforms. Many participants cited stress from COVID-19 and divisive political issues as reasons for taking a social media break. The survey found more than half of Americans (56%) changed their social media habits because of tensions surrounding curren

16h

Arrhythmia-free survival is indeed survival of the fittest

In a new study, investigators report that patients undergoing atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, who are physically fit before the procedure, have a much higher chance of benefiting from the procedure and remaining in normal sinus rhythm. Less fit patients are rehospitalized more often, continue to use antiarrhythmic therapies longer, and have higher death rates than fitter patients. Their results

16h

Whale shark 'crushes' tourist in Australia

The woman is in a "serious but stable condition" after being hit by the whale during a group swim.

16h

Pandemic provokes new wave of funding for healthcare start-ups

Data suggest investors are regaining confidence in backing development of new treatments

16h

Fatigue plagues thousands suffering post-coronavirus symptoms

'Long-haul Covid' has already become mired in controversy over causes and treatment

16h

Black Holes: Going to Extremes

Once dismissed as a mathematical curiosity, black holes are so strange they almost defy belief. Since their existence was confirmed, research into the nature of black holes has opened up new vistas… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How safe is it to go back to the office?

Reducing the risk of virus transmission is key — here is what experts know so far about the health hazards

17h

UK managers forced to take pay cuts as virus put business on hold

CMI survey finds companies far from restoring normal operations

17h

Forskere: Corona-apps tvinger brugerne i armene på Googles overvågningsmaskine

Hvis du vil bruge den danske corona-app Smittestop på en androidtelefon, må du finde dig i, at Google får adgang til en række personoplysninger. Det er konklusionen fra to forskere fra School of Computer Science & Statistics, Trinity College Dublin, der har undersøgt de europæiske corona-apps, so…

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Private Boats Enter SpaceX Splashdown Area, Raising Concerns

"We need to do a better job next time" of securing the area, the NASA administrator, Jim Bridenstine, said.

18h

Dansk corona-vaccine vil være den bedste – ikke den første

PLUS. Spin-out fra Københavns Universitet håber på at gå i kliniske forsøg senere på året med, hvad de håber bliver 'verdens bedste covid-19-vaccine'. »Jeg tror ikke nødvendigvis på de hurtige vacciner,« konkluderer professor.

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Splashdown: SpaceX capsule carrying Nasa astronauts lands safely – video

US astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley, who flew to the International Space Station in SpaceX's new Crew Dragon, splashed down in the capsule in the Gulf of Mexico after a two-month voyage. The successful splashdown, the first of its kind by Nasa in 45 years, was a final key test of whether Elon Musk's spacecraft can transport astronauts to and from orbit – a feat no private company has accomp

20h

Foxes Have Dined on Our Leftovers for 30,000 Years

An analysis of fox fossils found evidence that they scavenged from wolf and bear kills until Homo sapiens supplied plenty of horse and reindeer remains.

21h

Coronavirus live news: Global cases near 18m as Melbourne braces for further lockdown measures

Residents in state of Victoria wake up after first night of curfew ; 'major incident' declared in Manchester ; Nancy Pelosi says she has no confidence in Birx over handling of pandemic . Follow the latest updates Coronavirus global report: 'response fatigue' fears as Mexico hits 9,000 daily cases Victoria announces stage four coronavirus lockdown restrictions including overnight curfew Greater Ma

21h

Young women with polycystic ovary syndrome have raised risk of heart disease

Women in their 30s and 40s with a common condition affecting how the ovaries work are more likely to get heart disease. That's the finding of a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). "Polycystic ovary syndrome isn't a life sentence – there are many ways to stay heart healthy," said study author Dr. Clare Oliver

21h

Surprising early galaxy breaks low-oxygen record

New results achieved by combining big data captured by the Subaru Telescope and the power of machine learning have discovered a galaxy with an extremely low oxygen abundance of 1.6% solar abundance, breaking the previous record of the lowest oxygen abundance. The measured oxygen abundance suggests that most of the stars in this galaxy formed very recently.

21h

How creating an 'empathy lens' makes P2P marketing communications more effective

Provider-focused P2P marketing communications increase consumers' likelihood of purchase, app download, and willingness to pay.

21h

NHS England spends £160m on new 'Covid-friendly' cancer drugs

Patients to be given treatments less likely to damage immune system and in some cases able to be taken at home NHS England is spending £160m on new "Covid-friendly" cancer drugs that will be less likely to damage the immune system and, in some cases, can be taken at home so that patients do not have to visit hospital. NHS England said 2,000 patients had already benefitted from a range of treatmen

21h

Coronavirus 90-minute tests to be provided in care homes and hospitals

Experts however have doubts about unproven swab tests for the diagnosis of flu and Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Two new tests for Covid-19 that are said to deliver results within 90 minutes are to be introduced across NHS hospitals and care homes, to speed up diagnosis ahead of winter and differentiate coronavirus infection from flu , the government says.

21h

High-speed Covid-19 tests to be rolled out across UK next week

Hospitals, care homes and labs to benefit from 90-minute turnround times

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Foxes Have Dined on Our Leftovers for 30,000 Years

An analysis of fox fossils found evidence that they scavenged from wolf and bear kills until Homo sapiens supplied plenty of horse and reindeer remains. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

How to pick the right wildlife trail camera

Whether you're keeping an eye out for hunting season or just trying to learn more about the local wildlife, trail cams can open a window into a new world. (Celine Geeurickx/Unsplash/) This story originally featured on Outdoor Life . If you think about all the components that go into building a trail camera—detection circuits, infrared emitters, view screen, lens, and the waterproof housing it com

22h

NASA Astronauts Safely Return to Earth: 'Thank You for Flying SpaceX'

Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley returned to Earth in the first water landing by an American space crew since 1975.

22h

Foxes Have Dined on Our Leftovers for 30,000 Years

An analysis of fox fossils found evidence that they scavenged from wolf and bear kills until Homo sapiens supplied plenty of horse and reindeer remains. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

824.000 har downloadet smittestop-appen: Ministerium melder om bremsede smittekæder

»Et effektivt redskab,« konkluderer Sundhedsministeriet på baggrund af en undersøgelse, hvor smittestop-brugere melder at have fået hjælp af appen.

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NASA astronauts safely splash down after first commercial crew flight to space station

Two NASA astronauts splashed down safely in the Gulf of Mexico Sunday for the first time in a commercially built and operated American crew spacecraft, returning from the International Space Station to complete a test flight that marks a new era in human spaceflight.

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