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Career-readiness through cross-disciplinary project-based learning
WSU Everett faculty members from the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication, the Voiland College of Engineering & Architecture and the Carson College of Business observed that several industries challenge Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education to incorporate business and communication experiences to prepare students for the workplace. These recommendations encouraged WSU Ev
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Study clarifies kinship of important plant group
Asterids comprise around 100,000 flowering plants, from heather to tomatoes. Up to now, their family relationships had not yet been fully clarified. A new study by the University of Bonn, Pennsylvania State University (U.S.) and Fudan University (China) has now somewhat closed this knowledge gap. It is the world's most detailed phylogenetic analysis ever conducted for asterids. The results of the
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Acetate regulates immune cells for a precisely orchestrated immune defense
The concentration of acetate increases particularly sharply at the site of an infection in the body. As reported in the journal Cell Metabolism by a team of researchers from the University of Basel and colleagues, acetate supports the function of certain immune cells and thus helps to eliminate pathogens safely and efficiently.
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Researchers discover new electrocatalyst for turning carbon dioxide into liquid fuel
Catalysts speed up chemical reactions and form the backbone of many industrial processes. For example, they are essential in transforming heavy oil into gasoline or jet fuel. Today, catalysts are involved in over 80 percent of all manufactured products.
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Herbivores, not predators, most at risk of extinction
One million years ago, the extinction of large-bodied plant-eaters changed the trajectory of life on Earth. The disappearance of these large herbivores reshaped plant life, altered fire regimes across Earth's landscapes, and modified biogeochemical cycling in such a way that Earth's climate became slightly colder. A new study out today by Utah State University Assistant Professor of Watershed Scie
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A night in the life of a professional stargazer
A fascination with the stars is part of our human nature, but studying them is a complex task. (Pexels/) The following is an excerpt adapted from The Last Stargazers: The Enduring Story of Astronomy's Vanishing Explorers by Emily Levesque. "Have you tried turning it off and back on again?" This phrase, repeated by weary IT specialists the world over, had pos­sibly never prompted such horror. Firs
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Coronavirus SeroAssay
Multiplexed coronavirus serological testing for examining vaccine efficacy
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Herbivores, not predators, most at risk of extinction
One million years ago, the extinction of large-bodied plant-eaters changed the trajectory of life on Earth. The disappearance of these large herbivores reshaped plant life, altered fire regimes across Earth's landscapes, and modified biogeochemical cycling in such a way that Earth's climate became slightly colder. A new study out today by Utah State University Assistant Professor of Watershed Scie
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Attaching Small Weights To Pigeons Helps Them Shoot Up In The Social Hierarchy
Scientists found that attaching small weights to pigeons causes them to shoot up in the social hierarchy. The finding is important because scientists often attach trackers to pigeons.
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Career-readiness through cross-disciplinary project-based learning
Faculty members at Washington State University Everett recently developed and implemented an interdisciplinary project-based learning approach to provide students with real-world professional experience.
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Joint ASU-Hawaii state study reveals long-term human impacts on reef fish
In a new study investigating human impacts on resource fish biomass on the Island of Hawai?i, researchers from the Arizona State University Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science (GDCS) and Hawai'i Division of Aquatic Resources (DAR) observed an alarming 45% decrease in fish biomass over a decade of surveys. The scientists proposed actionable solutions to mitigate future losses. The
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How to cast a wider net for tracking space junk
Space junk isn't going away anytime soon—and neither are the problems it causes. We're poised to see more satellite launches with every passing year , which means more pieces of rocketry and spacecraft getting loose and zipping around at over 22,000 mph . At those speeds, even an object just a few centimeters long could instantly destroy a satellite, and send even more debris hurtling through spa
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Coronavirus SeroAssay
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Organoids help bridge gap between laboratory study and animal modeling of disease
A new study from the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine is the first to replicate observations of native tumor tissue in a laboratory model and validate it in the context of the whole-body physiology.
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New study may refine predicted survival outcomes and treatment in younger adults with acute leukemia
The findings of a new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute could refine an important set of prognostic and treatment recommendations for younger adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
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Turning carbon dioxide into liquid fuel
A team led by Argonne in collaboration with Northern Illinois University reports a new electrocatalyst that converts carbon dioxide and water into ethanol with very high energy efficiency, high selectivity for the desired final product and low cost.
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Herbivores, not predators, most at risk of extinction
One million years ago, the extinction of large-bodied plant-eaters changed the trajectory of life on Earth. The disappearance of these large herbivores reshaped plant life, altered fire regimes across Earth's landscapes, and modified biogeochemical cycling in such a way that Earth's climate became slightly colder.
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Influenza A virus directly modulates eosinophil responses
Eosinophils residing in the airways of mice respond to influenza A virus (IAV) infection through alterations in surface expression of various markers necessary for migration and cellular immunity responses, according to research published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology by researchers from Le Bonheur Children's Hospital and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.
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SpaceX Starship Prototype Completed 'Hop' Test Flight
The SpaceX Starship took another big step toward spaceworthiness today with a 500-foot "hop." This is one of those times when SpaceX CEO Elon Musk was definitely not overpromising. It took just a few days after the recent static fire test for SpaceX to prep the vessel for its test flight, which went off without a hitch. The SN5 is just the latest prototype of the company's next-generation Starshi
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Listen: The universe could end in 5 ways
How will the universe end? Cosmologist Katie Mack lays out five ideas in her new book. "[T]he universe is evolving, is changing," says Mack , an assistant professor in the physics department at North Carolina State University and author of The End of Everything (Scribner, 2020). "And as we follow that evolution into the future, it sort of necessarily leads to a situation where everything that we
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Warming climate may trigger more West Nile outbreaks in Southern California
A new study of captured mosquitoes in Los Angeles finds that West Nile infection is strongly associated with average temperature, and that temperatures above 73 degrees Fahrenheit are highly favorable for West Nile transmission. As climate change brings hotter weather to the region, it is likely that cooler, coastal neighborhoods will be pushed into the 'favorable' zone, accelerating transmission
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How climate change affects allergies, immune response and autism
Climate change and disruption of the ecosystem have the potential to profoundly impact the human body. Xue Ming, professor of neurology at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, who recently published a paper in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health on the effects of climate change on allergies, autoimmunity and the microbiome — the beneficial microorganisms that live
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Ammonia sparks unexpected, exotic lightning on Jupiter
NASA's Juno spacecraft — orbiting and closely observing the planet Jupiter — has unexpectedly discovered lightning in the planet's upper atmosphere, according to a multi-institutional study led by the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).
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Scientists watch water leave a crystalline sponge
Elaborate observations clarify how a crystalline sponge changes shape as it loses water. The scientists focused on a porous, crystalline material made from metal and organic building blocks—specifically, cobalt(II) sulfate heptahydrate, 5-aminoisophthalic acid and 4,4′-bipyridine. The observations let them "see" when and how three individual water molecules left the material as it dried out. Crys
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Trump's TikTok Drama Is a Distraction
As the White House zeroes in on a single app, some experts say more pressing issues are going by the wayside.
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How microbes in 'starter cultures' make fermented sausage tasty
Microbes in 'starter cultures' impart a distinctive tang and longer shelf life to food like sourdough bread, yogurt and kimchi through the process of fermentation. To get a better grasp of how microbes do this in fermented sausages, such as chorizo and pepperoni, researchers show that these tiny organisms change the composition of fatty acids in these meats, contributing to many desirable traits.
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New light on how ovarian cancer grows and evolves
Medical researchers provide new insights into how ovarian cancer grows and evolves within a person.
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Study clarifies kinship of important plant group
Asterids comprise around 100,000 flowering plants, from heather to tomatoes. Up to now, their family relationships had not yet been fully clarified. A new study has now somewhat closed this knowledge gap. It is the world's most detailed phylogenetic analysis ever conducted for asterids.
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Democrats Accused of Letting Cops Access Americans' Browsing Histories
No Privacy A group of 11 advocacy organizations, including Fight for the Future and Free Press Action, just signed a letter accusing Democratic Party leadership of throwing Americans' online privacy under the bus by concealing potentially unauthorized mass surveillance by the FBI. Specifically, the letter accuses party leaders including Congressman Adam Schiff and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelos
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Rice researchers use InSight for deep Mars measurements
Using data from NASA's InSight Lander on Mars, Rice University seismologists have made the first direct measurements of three subsurface boundaries from the crust to the core of the red planet.
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The Note20, bean-shaped earbuds, and all the other products Samsung just announced
From left to right, the new earbuds, smartwatch, Note20, and S7 tablet. (Samsung/) Samsung announced a slew of new phones, wearables, and tablets in an event streamed from South Korea this morning. The presentation, called Unpacked, included plenty of talk about the new normal that the coronavirus pandemic has led to, and featured video of remote Samsung fans applauding in the background. In brie
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New acid mine drainage treatment turns waste into valuable critical minerals
A new way to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) could help transform the environmental pollution problem into an important domestic source of the critical rare earth elements needed to produce technology ranging from smart phones to fighter jets, according to Penn State scientists.
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Researchers examine food supply chain resiliency in the Pacific during COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic exposes weaknesses in the supply chain when countries go into lockdown. Some are small, such as the toilet paper shortages early on, that, while annoying, were eventually resolved. But what happens when the effects of the pandemic reach the food systems of countries highly reliant on food imports and income from abroad, and commerce slows to a halt?
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Head back to school with '4 Be's' for mental health
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused much stress and uncertainty for students, parents, teachers and staff. "For students and the adults who care for them, the desire is so strong to have our lives return to normal, which also involves schooling," says Craig Sawchuk, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic psychologist. "School is one of the most important places that we learn and grow intellectually, socially and emoti
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Tesla Competitor Slams Cybertruck For Looking "Like a Doorstep"
One Expensive Doorstep Mark Russell, the CEO of electric truck maker Nikola Motor Company, recently took aim at Elon Musk's passion project, the Cybertruck — and he didn't mince words about his most prominent competitor. "A lot of people didn't like the look of the Cybertruck, including me," Russell told CNBC in a recent interview. "I think it looks like a doorstop, but they got lots of reservati
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Drivers respond to pre-crash warnings with levels of attentive 'gaze'
Engineers at the University of Missouri conducted open road testing of three collision avoidance systems and demonstrated that a drivers' visual behavior in response to an alert generated from a collision avoidance system can be divided into one of four different behavioral categories: active gaze, self-conscious gaze, attentive gaze and ignored gaze.
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The Groundbreaking Female Artist Who Shaped Manga History
Drawn & Quarterly In 1962, when she was still in middle school in a coastal town of Japan, the cartoonist Kuniko Tsurita sent a despairing letter to The City , a popular comics magazine. Manga was her life. The 14-year-old loved reading a variety of genres, including shōjo , which was aimed at adolescent girls, and the more male-targeted kashi-hon , which often featured grit, gore, and gunfights.
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Gut microbes shape our antibodies before we are infected by pathogens
Because the microbiota is so complex, containing hundreds of different bacterial species, it is not known how the presence of microbes in the intestine shaped the antibodies that are present even before we are challenged by an infection. Researchers have now shown how these beneficial microbes reprogram the repertoire of white blood B cells that produce antibodies and how this helps counter infect
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Sun's bubble of influence may be shaped like a deflated croissant
Scientists have developed a new prediction of the shape of the bubble surrounding our solar system using a model developed with data from NASA missions.
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Discovery shows promise for treating Huntington's Disease
Scientists have identified a new enzyme called 'TBK1' that plays a central role in regulating the degradation and clearance of the huntingtin protein and introduces chemical modifications that block its aggregation.
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Discovery could lead to more potent garlic, boosting flavor and bad breath
Their work could boost the malodorous – yet delicious – characteristics that garlic-lovers the world over savor.
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To bond with nature, kids need solitary activities outdoors
A new study found solitary activities like fishing, hunting or exploring outside are key to building strong bonds between children and nature.
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Researchers discover predictor of laser treatment success in patients with glaucoma
More than 70 million people worldwide suffer from glaucoma. Treatment options have traditionally included eye drops to reduce the fluid the eye produces or surgery to unclog the eye's drainage. But a new study provides insight into which patients might benefit most from a noninvasive treatment called selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT), which relieves pressure by using a laser to alter the eye t
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Climate change may melt the 'freezers' of pygmy owls and reduce their overwinter survival
Ecologists have discovered that the food hoards pygmy owls collect in nest-boxes ('freezers') for winter rot due to high precipitation caused by heavy autumn rains and if the hoarding has been initiated early in the autumn. The results of the study show that climate change may impair predators' foraging and thus decrease local overwinter survival.
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COVID-19 vaccine shows promise in mouse studies
A new study has found that the investigational vaccine known as mRNA-1273 protected mice from infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.
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Risk of Extinction Is Greatest for Large Herbivores: Study
Data on vertebrate species that have become, or are likely to become, extinct reveal plant eaters are most under threat.
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SpaceX flew a prototype of its Starship vehicle for the first time
SpaceX successfully flew a prototype of its next-generation Starship vehicle for the first time ever on Tuesday, a major step forward in the company's quest to eventually send people to Mars. What happened: Around 8:00pm Eastern Time, from its testing site at Boca Chica, Texas, SpaceX flew the prototype about 500 feet into the air (the company has not yet stated what the exact altitude of the tes
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Lasers may benefit glaucoma patients with higher eye pressure more
A new study provides insight into which patients with glaucoma might benefit most from a treatment that uses a laser to relieve pressure and alter eye tissue. The noninvasive treatment is called selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT). More than 70 million people worldwide suffer from glaucoma, a condition that causes a build-up of fluid and pressure inside the eye and can eventually lead to blindn
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Rice researchers use InSight for deep Mars measurements
Using data from NASA's InSight Lander on Mars, Rice University seismologists have made the first direct measurements of three subsurface boundaries from the crust to the core of the red planet.
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A one-step diagnostic may bring faster, cheaper cancer testing to remote settings
Scientists have created a rapid and affordable test for breast cancer that is designed for use in developing regions, where patients often face delayed diagnoses that worsen their outcomes.
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New method to help spot gastric cancer cells
Researchers from the Shenyang Institute of Automation (SIA) of the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) and City University of Hong Kong (CityU), in cooperation with doctors from the First Hospital of China Medical University, jointly proposed an optically induced electrokinetics (OEK) microfluidic method for label-free separation and characterization of gastric cancer cells.
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Native American stone tool technology found in Arabia
Stone fluted points dating back some 8,000 to 7,000 years ago, were discovered on archaeological sites in Manayzah, Yemen and Ad-Dahariz, Oman. Until now, the prehistoric technique of fluting had been uncovered only on 13,000 to 10,000-year-old Native American sites.
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Life at its limits
A new study led by James Bradley of the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ and Queen Mary University of London finds that microbes in the seabed survive on far less energy than has been shown ever before. The international team is publishing its results in the journal Science Advances.
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Plate tectonics goes global
A research team led by Dr. WAN Bo from the Institute of Geology and Geophysics (IGG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has revealed that plate tectonics went global 2 billion years ago.
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Herbivorous vertebrates may face most daunting extinction risk
Herbivores — not predators — may face a higher risk of extinction among mammals, birds, and reptiles, according to a new study of more than 44,000 living and extinct species. The findings suggest herbivores have consistently suffered the highest threat of extinction in the present day, the recent past, and the late Pleistocene – more so than species from any other position.
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At least five dead in US as downgraded Isaias reaches Canada
Tropical storm Isaias left at least five people dead as it pounded the US eastern seaboard with driving winds and heavy rain, leaving millions without power, before moving across Canada on Wednesday.
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Repeating earthquakes record fault weakening and healing in areas of megathrust postseismic slip
Repeating earthquakes (REs) rupture the same fault patches at different times allowing temporal variations in the mechanical behavior of specific areas of the fault to be interrogated over the earthquake cycle. We study REs that reveal fault weakening after a large megathrust earthquake in Costa Rica, followed by fault recovery. We find shorter RE recurrence intervals and larger slip areas immedi
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Widespread energy limitation to life in global subseafloor sediments
Microbial cells buried in subseafloor sediments comprise a substantial portion of Earth's biosphere and control global biogeochemical cycles; however, the rate at which they use energy (i.e., power) is virtually unknown. Here, we quantify organic matter degradation and calculate the power utilization of microbial cells throughout Earth's Quaternary-age subseafloor sediments. Aerobic respiration,
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Intercellular communication controls agonist-induced calcium oscillations independently of gap junctions in smooth muscle cells
In this study, we report the existence of a communication system among human smooth muscle cells that uses mechanical forces to frequency modulate long-range calcium waves. An important consequence of this mechanical signaling is that changes in stiffness of the underlying extracellular matrix can interfere with the frequency modulation of Ca 2+ waves, causing smooth muscle cells from healthy hum
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Life span extension by glucose restriction is abrogated by methionine supplementation: Cross-talk between glucose and methionine and implication of methionine as a key regulator of life span
Caloric restriction (CR) is known to extend life span across species; however, the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. We investigate the mechanism by which glucose restriction (GR) extends yeast replicative life span, by combining ribosome profiling and RNA-seq with microfluidic-based single-cell analysis. We discovered a cross-talk between glucose sensing and the regulation of intrace
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When floods hit the road: Resilience to flood-related traffic disruption in the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond
As sea level rises, urban traffic networks in low-lying coastal areas face increasing risks of flood disruptions. Closure of flooded roads causes employee absences and delays, creating cascading impacts to communities. We integrate a traffic model with flood maps that represent potential combinations of storm surges, tides, seasonal cycles, interannual anomalies driven by large-scale climate vari
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Rapid and robust evolution of collateral sensitivity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic-resistant mutants
The analysis of trade-offs, as collateral sensitivity, associated with the acquisition of antibiotic resistance, is mainly based on the use of model strains. However, the possibility of exploiting these trade-offs for fighting already resistant isolates has not been addressed in depth, despite the fact that bacterial pathogens are frequently antibiotic-resistant, forming either homogeneous or het
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Highly variable upper and abyssal overturning cells in the South Atlantic
The Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) is a primary mechanism driving oceanic heat redistribution on Earth, thereby affecting Earth's climate and weather. However, the full-depth structure and variability of the MOC are still poorly understood, particularly in the South Atlantic. This study presents unique multiyear records of the oceanic volume transport of both the upper ( ~3100 meters) o
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Daxx maintains endogenous retroviral silencing and restricts cellular plasticity in vivo
Tumor sequencing studies have emphasized the role of epigenetics and altered chromatin homeostasis in cancer. Mutations in DAXX , which encodes a chaperone for the histone 3.3 variant, occur in 25% of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs). To advance our understanding of physiological functions of Daxx, we developed a conditional Daxx allele in mice. We demonstrate that Daxx loss is well tol
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Nematicity with a twist: Rotational symmetry breaking in a moire superlattice
Motivated by recent reports of nematic order in twisted bilayer graphene (TBG), we investigate the impact of the triangular moiré superlattice degrees of freedom on nematicity. In TBG, the nematic order parameter is not Ising like, as in tetragonal crystals, but has a three-state Potts character related to the threefold rotational symmetry ( C 3 z ) of the moiré superlattice. We find that, even i
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Detection and isolation of free cancer cells from ascites and peritoneal lavages using optically induced electrokinetics (OEK)
Detection of free gastric cancer cells in peritoneal lavages and ascites plays a vital role in gastric cancer. However, due to the low content of cancer cells in patients' peritoneal lavages, traditional detection methods lack sensitivity and cannot satisfy clinical demand. In this study, we used an optically induced electrokinetics (OEK) microfluidic method for label-free separation and characte
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Liquid repellency enhancement through flexible microstructures
Artificial liquid-repellent surfaces have attracted substantial scientific and industrial attention with a focus on creating functional topological features; however, the role of the underlying structures has been overlooked. Recent developments in micro-nanofabrication allow us now to construct a skin-muscle type system combining interfacial liquid repellence atop a mechanically functional struc
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A single molecular descriptor to predict solution behavior of therapeutic antibodies
Despite the therapeutic success of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), early identification of developable mAb drug candidates with optimal manufacturability, stability, and delivery attributes remains elusive. Poor solution behavior, which manifests as high solution viscosity or opalescence, profoundly affects the developability of mAb drugs. Using a diverse dataset of 59 mAbs, including 43 approved p
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The Polycomb-associated factor PHF19 controls hematopoietic stem cell state and differentiation
Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are rare multipotent cells in bone marrow that are responsible for generating all blood cell types. HSCs are a heterogeneous group of cells with high plasticity, in part, conferred by epigenetic mechanisms. PHF19, a subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), is preferentially expressed in mouse hematopoietic precursors. Here, we now show that, in st
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Using the fast impact of anthropogenic aerosols on regional land temperature to constrain aerosol forcing
Anthropogenic aerosols have been postulated to have a cooling effect on climate, but its magnitude remains uncertain. Using atmospheric general circulation model simulations, we separate the land temperature response into a fast response to radiative forcings and a slow response to changing oceanic conditions and find that the former accounts for about one fifth of the observed warming of the Nor
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Herbivores at the highest risk of extinction among mammals, birds, and reptiles
As a result of their extensive home ranges and slow population growth rates, predators have often been perceived to suffer higher risks of extinction than other trophic groups. Our study challenges this extinction-risk paradigm by quantitatively comparing patterns of extinction risk across different trophic groups of mammals, birds, and reptiles. We found that trophic level and body size were sig
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Fentanyl vapor self-administration model in mice to study opioid addiction
Intravenous drug self-administration is considered the "gold standard" model to investigate the neurobiology of drug addiction in rodents. However, its use in mice is limited by frequent complications of intravenous catheterization. Given the many advantages of using mice in biomedical research, we developed a noninvasive mouse model of opioid self-administration using vaporized fentanyl. Mice re
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Molecular recognition of human islet amyloid polypeptide assembly by selective oligomerization of thioflavin T
Selective oligomerization is a common phenomenon existing widely in the formation of intricate biological structures in nature. The precise design of drug molecules with an oligomerization state that specifically recognizes its receptor, however, remains substantially challenging. Here, we used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to identify the oligomerization states of an amyloid probe thioflav
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Mandated Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination predicts flattened curves for the spread of COVID-19
Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination may reduce the risk of a range of infectious diseases, and if so, it could protect against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Here, we compared countries that mandated BCG vaccination until at least 2000 with countries that did not. To minimize any systematic effects of reporting biases, we analyzed the rate of the day-by-day increase in both confirmed
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Generation of charge current from magnetization oscillation via the inverse of voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy effect
It is well known that oscillating magnetization induces charge current in a circuit via Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. New physical phenomena by which magnetization dynamics can produce charge current have gained considerable interest recently. For example, moving magnetization textures, such as domain walls, generates charge current through the spin-motive force. Here, we examine an
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Seismological evidence for the earliest global subduction network at 2 Ga ago
The earliest evidence for subduction, which could have been localized, does not signify when plate tectonics became a global phenomenon. To test the antiquity of global subduction, we investigated Paleoproterozoic time, for which seismic evidence is available from multiple continents. We used a new high-density seismic array in North China to image the crustal structure that exhibits a dipping Mo
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Solid-phase inclusion as a mechanism for regulating unfolded proteins in the mitochondrial matrix
Proteostasis declines with age, characterized by the accumulation of unfolded or damaged proteins. Recent studies suggest that proteins constituting pathological inclusions in neurodegenerative diseases also enter and accumulate in mitochondria. How unfolded proteins are managed within mitochondria remains unclear. Here, we found that excessive unfolded proteins in the mitochondrial matrix of yea
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Overlever tur gennem mave og tarm: Lille bille kravler levende ud af numsen på frø
Den pansrede bille kan både klare mavesyre og iltmangel.
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New Guinea has the world's richest island flora
New Guinea is the most floristically diverse island in the world, an international collaboration has shown. The study presents a list of almost 14,000 plant species, compiled from online catalogues and verified by plant experts. The results are invaluable for research and conservation, and also underline the importance of expert knowledge in the digital era.
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Scientists Played a Game of Go at the Quantum Scale
Quantum Realm A team of Chinese scientists put a new twist on the ancient game Go: They shrunk it down to the quantum scale. In this new version, the classic black and white stones players use as game pieces were taken away and replaced by pairs of entangled photons, according to Phys.org . While the game is an unusual quantum experiment on its own, the researchers say that the work could herald
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Satellite images reveal land productivity changes in protected areas worldwide
Satellite observations suggest that protected areas may help conserve stable levels of land productivity. However, productivity has dropped or risen in nearly half of the total land under protection worldwide, pointing to potentially detrimental factors. Begoña de la Fuente of Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain, and colleagues from the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Italy,
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Större hot mot växtätare än mot rovdjur
Du minns säkert den så kallade näringspyramiden från biologin i skolan, den med rovdjur i toppen, växtätare i mitten och växter i botten. Näringspyramiden illustrerar att den totala vikten, biomassan, på de olika trofinivåerna i näringskedjorna minskar uppåt. Det finns alltså avsevärt färre rovdjur än växtätare vilket är en av förklaringarna till att rovdjur anses löpa störst risk att bli utrotade
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Bay Area coastal flooding triggers regionwide commute disruptions
For decades, the low-lying neighborhoods along the San Francisco Bay have experienced coastal flooding and the subsequent traffic disruptions. But a new computational model by Stanford researchers reveals that, due to the nature of road networks in the region, commuters living outside the areas of flooding may experience some of the largest commute delays.
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In ancient Arabia, some tools were created to show off skills
People living in southern Arabia some 8,000 years ago created intricate stone weapons that were not just useful, but designed to "show off" their tool-making skills, a new study suggests.
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New study reveals lower energy limit for life on Earth
An international team of researchers led by Queen Mary University of London have discovered that microorganisms buried in sediment beneath the seafloor can survive on less energy than was previously known to support life. The study has implications for understanding the limit of life on Earth and the potential for life elsewhere.
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Plate tectonics goes global
Today, the entire globe is broken up into tectonic plates that are shifting past each other, causing the continents to drift slowly but steadily. But this has not always been the case.
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Satellite images reveal land productivity changes in protected areas worldwide
Satellite observations suggest that protected areas may help conserve stable levels of land productivity. However, productivity has dropped or risen in nearly half of the total land under protection worldwide, pointing to potentially detrimental factors. Begoña de la Fuente of Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain, and colleagues from the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Italy,
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Cheap, Easy Deepfakes Are Getting Closer to the Real Thing
Using open-source software and less than $100, a researcher was able to create plausible images and audio of actor Tom Hanks.
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Implanted neural stem cell grafts show functionality in spinal cord injuries
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine report successfully implanting specialized grafts of neural stem cells directly into spinal cord injuries in mice, then documenting how the grafts grew and filled the injury sites, mimicking the animals' existing neuronal network.
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Local food
The COVID-19 pandemic exposes weaknesses in the supply chain when countries go into lockdown. Some are small, such as the toilet paper shortages early on, that, while annoying, were eventually resolved. But what happens when the effects of the pandemic reach the food systems of countries highly reliant on food imports and income from abroad, and commerce slows to a halt?
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New acid mine drainage treatment turns waste into valuable critical minerals
A new way to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) could help transform the environmental pollution problem into an important domestic source of the critical rare earth elements needed to produce technology ranging from smart phones to fighter jets, according to Penn State scientists.
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Epigenetic changes in ADNP syndrome, a cause of autism, do not indicate profound presentation of the disorder
Study Finds Epigenetic Signatures Show Little Correlation to Severity of Symptoms
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New Study Bumps Global Emperor Penguin Numbers by 10 Percent
Satellite images of penguin poop reveal eight entirely new colonies and confirm the existence of another three first reported in the 1960s.
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What Is Ammonium Nitrate, the Chemical That Exploded in Beirut?
The blast injured thousands and killed at least 78 people — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Covid-19 news: UK border rules 'accelerated' pandemic, say MPs
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Rising temps could kill millions a year by century's end
By the end of this century, tens of millions of people could die each year worldwide as a result of temperatures rising due to climate change, a new study shows. The number could potentially match the global death rate for all infectious diseases combined, researchers say. The study shows that as greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere continue to escalate, rising temperatures in the decades ahea
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Move over Akita: Introducing 'Kuma mutant' mice for islet transplantation research
Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have used a gene editing technique to establish a novel mouse model of permanent neonatal diabetes–the immune-deficient Kuma mutant mice with a specific deletion in the Insulin2 (Ins2) gene. This model is expected to be useful for studying the mechanisms governing insulin-producing cell dysfunctions in the pancreas as well as for evalua
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The Aftermath of the Beirut Explosion
Lebanese officials have now said that the August 4 explosion that devastated much of Beirut's port area was caused by a fire in a warehouse that had been storing explosive materials, reportedly including 2,700 tons of ammonium nitrate. As of today, more than 100 deaths and over 4,000 injuries have been reported. Gathered below are images of the widespread damage in Beirut, a day after the devasta
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Beirut explosion: What caused the blast and what else do we know?
Here's what we know so far about the cause of the massive blast in the port area of the city of Beirut, Lebanon, on 4 August
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Molecular forces: The surprising stretching behavior of DNA
When large forces act on a heavy beam, for example, in bridge construction, the beam will be slightly deformed. Calculating the relationship between forces, internal stresses and deformations is one of the standard tasks in civil engineering. But what happens when you apply these considerations to tiny objects—for example, to a single DNA double helix?
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Molecular forces: The surprising stretching behavior of DNA
When large forces act on a heavy beam, for example, in bridge construction, the beam will be slightly deformed. Calculating the relationship between forces, internal stresses and deformations is one of the standard tasks in civil engineering. But what happens when you apply these considerations to tiny objects—for example, to a single DNA double helix?
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Journalists' Twitter use shows them talking within smaller bubbles
Usher and Ng, journalism professors at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, identified nine clusters of journalists or "communities of practice" in their study, published online by the journal Social Media + Society.
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New Guinea has the world's richest island flora
New Guinea is the most floristically diverse island in the world, an international collaboration led by the University of Zurich has shown. The study presents a list of almost 14,000 plant species, compiled from online catalogs and verified by plant experts. The results are invaluable for research and conservation, and also underline the importance of expert knowledge in the digital era.
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New Guinea has the world's richest island flora
New Guinea is the most floristically diverse island in the world, an international collaboration led by the University of Zurich has shown. The study presents a list of almost 14,000 plant species, compiled from online catalogs and verified by plant experts. The results are invaluable for research and conservation, and also underline the importance of expert knowledge in the digital era.
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Dinosaur relative's genome linked to mammals: Curious genome of ancient reptile
Biologists have sequenced the genome of the tuatara, a lizard-like creature that lives on the islands of New Zealand.
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Manifestation of quantum distance in flat band materials
A research team found a way to measure the quantum distance of Bloch states in solids by applying magnetic field.
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SpaceX's Starship SN5 Prototype Soars in First Test Flight
The short hop could be a big leap toward future missions to Mars — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Did Einstein Understand the Limitations of Testing?
Smithsonian fellow Kimberly Probolus looks into the past and future of knowledge tests
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Ammonia-rich hail sheds new light on Jupiter's weather
New Juno results suggest that the violent thunderstorms taking place in Jupiter's atmosphere may form ammonia-rich hail, or 'mushballs,' that play a key role in the planet's atmospheric dynamics. This theory, developed using data from Juno's microwave radiometer by the Juno team, is described in two publications led by a researcher at the Laboratoire Lagrange (CNRS/Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur/U
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Trifluoroacetic acid acts as trifluoromethylating agent in arene C-H functionalization
Researchers at the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a catalytic system that directly installs the trifluoromethyl group onto arenes. The new reaction uses simple and abundant trifluoroacetic acid as the trifluoromethylating agent, and offers a milder alternative to the existing strategies.
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The universe is the same everywhere we look—even more than cosmologists predicted
No matter which direction you look in the universe, the view is basically the same if you look far enough. Our local neighborhood is populated with bright nebulae, star clusters and dark clouds of gas and dust. There are more stars toward the center of the Milky Way than there are in other directions. But across millions and billions of light-years, galaxies cluster evenly in all directions, and e
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Scientists find how clock gene wakes up green algae
A team of researchers from Nagoya University, Japan, has found the mechanism of the night-to-day transition of the circadian rhythm in green algae. The findings, published in the journal PLOS Genetics, could be applied to green algae to produce larger amounts of lipids, which are a possible sustainable source of biofuel.
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Scientists find how clock gene wakes up green algae
A team of researchers from Nagoya University, Japan, has found the mechanism of the night-to-day transition of the circadian rhythm in green algae. The findings, published in the journal PLOS Genetics, could be applied to green algae to produce larger amounts of lipids, which are a possible sustainable source of biofuel.
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2 in 3 older folks in the hospital get risky prescriptions
Two in three hospitalized seniors get prescriptions for drugs that older adults should avoid, increasing the risk of injury and adverse drug reactions, researchers report. Improving hospital prescribing practices can reduce the frequency of inappropriate medications and resulting harm, according to a new study. Potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) are drugs that seniors should avoid becau
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Uncovering our solar system's shape
Scientists have developed a new prediction of the shape of the bubble surrounding our solar system using a model developed with data from NASA missions.
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Manifestation of quantum distance in flat band materials
The geometry of an object indicates its shape or the relationship of its parts to each other. Did you know that the electrons in solids also have geometric structures? In quantum mechanics, an electron in solids takes the form of a wave with periodicity so that the periodic electronic state, so-called the Bloch state, can be characterized by specifying its energy and crystal momentum which is prop
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Nigel Weiss obituary
Astrophysicist who studied the interaction between the rotation and magnetic field of the sun behind sunspots and solar flares Nigel Weiss, who has died aged 83, was a world authority on the physics of sunspots and the mechanisms driving a cycle of solar activity that lasts for 11 years. Sunspots appear as darker, cooler patches on the sun's surface that may last from a few days to a few months. T
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Algal symbiosis could shed light on dark ocean
New research has revealed a surprise twist in the symbiotic relationship between a type of salamander and the alga that lives inside its eggs. A new paper in Frontiers in Microbiology reports that the eggs compete with the algae to assimilate carbon from their surroundings—a finding that could inform similar processes in the dark ocean.
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Algal symbiosis could shed light on dark ocean
New research has revealed a surprise twist in the symbiotic relationship between a type of salamander and the alga that lives inside its eggs. A new paper in Frontiers in Microbiology reports that the eggs compete with the algae to assimilate carbon from their surroundings—a finding that could inform similar processes in the dark ocean.
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High-sensitivity atomic force microscopy opens up for photosensitive materials
Atomic force microscopy (AFM) brought the atomic scale imaging resolution of scanning tunneling microscopy, a technique that won the Nobel Prize in Physics, to non-conducting surfaces. However, limitations remain when trying to use the technique at its most sensitive with photosensitive samples in liquids. Now researchers at Kanazawa University show how to overcome these constraints, by driving a
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Optical seismometer survives 'hellish' summit of Caribbean volcano
The heights of La Soufrière de Guadeloupe volcano can be hellish, sweltering at more than 48 degrees Celsius (120 degrees Fahrenheit) and swathed in billows of acidic gas. Researchers would like to monitor gas and steam eruptions at its summit, to learn more about the volcano's explosive potential, but conventional seismometers are destroyed quickly in the hostile environment.
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May the force be with you: Detecting ultrafast light by its force
A McGill research team has developed a new technique to detect nano-sized imperfections in materials. They believe this discovery will lead to improvements in the optical detectors used in a wide range of technologies, from cell phones to cameras and fiber optics, as well as in solar cells.
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Researchers capture X-ray images with unprecedented speed and resolution
Researchers have demonstrated a new high-resolution X-ray imaging technique that can capture the motion of rapidly moving objects and quickly changing dynamics. The new method could be used for non-destructive imaging of moving mechanical components and to capture biological processes not previously available with medical X-ray imaging.
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Interpreting the human genome's instruction manual
Berkeley Lab bioscientists are part of a nationwide research project, called ENCODE, that has generated a detailed atlas of the molecular elements that regulate our genes. This enormous resource will help all human biology research moving forward.
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IKBFU researchers study the Curonian Spit plants adaptation mechanism
IKBFU Institute of Living Systems biology scientists study protective mechanisms of the Curonian Spit wild plants. The scientists are particularly interested in a beach pea plant (Lathyrus maritimus Bigel).
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Journalists' Twitter use shows them talking within smaller bubbles
Journalists in Washington, D.C., have long been accused of living in a "Beltway bubble." Their interactions on Twitter, however, show them congregating in even smaller "microbubbles," says a recent study. The journalists within each communicate more among themselves than with journalists outside the group. That means Beltway journalism "may be even more insular than previously thought," say study
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Algal symbiosis could shed light on dark ocean
New research has revealed a surprise twist in the symbiotic relationship between a type of salamander and the alga that lives inside its eggs. A new paper in Frontiers in Microbiology reports that the eggs compete with the algae to assimilate carbon from their surroundings – a finding that could inform similar processes in the dark ocean.
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Disease-carrying animals thrive on our farmed land and in our cities
Farming and other human activities are changing the world in a way that favours animals carrying more diseases, including bats – the source of the new coronavirus
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Strange lightning on Jupiter may be caused by ammonia snowballs
The Juno spacecraft has spotted lightning on Jupiter that's unlike anything we've seen before, and it may be caused by strange, slushy balls of ammonia and ice
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City growth favours animals 'more likely to carry disease'
Turning wild spaces into farmland or cities creates opportunities for diseases to cross into humans.
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Humans have altered North America's ecosystems more than melting glaciers
Fossilized pollen reveals powerful impact of agriculture and other land use changes
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I'm not contributing to coronavirus research, and that's okay
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02316-2 Deanna Montgomery realizes she doesn't need to be at a laboratory bench to use her scientific experience — or to make a difference.
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Optical seismometer survives "hellish" summit of Caribbean volcano
The heights of La Soufrière de Guadeloupe volcano can be hellish, sweltering at more than 48 degrees Celsius (120 degrees Fahrenheit) and swathed in billows of acidic gas. Researchers would like to monitor gas and steam eruptions at its summit, to learn more about the volcano's explosive potential, but conventional seismometers are destroyed quickly in the hostile environment.
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Save black lives
The Center for Justice Research at Texas Southern University and the Black Public Defender Association today released "Save Black Lives: A Call for Racially-responsive Strategies and Resources for the Black Community during the COVID-19 Pandemic," a comprehensive report that details why public health responses and strategies to address COVID-19 must be centered around race and the criminal legal s
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May the force be with you: Detecting ultrafast light by its force
A McGill research team has developed a new technique to detect nano-sized imperfections in materials. They believe this discovery will lead to improvements in the optical detectors used in a wide range of technologies, from cell phones to cameras and fiber optics, as well as in solar cells.
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Bone drug may be beneficial for knee osteoarthritis
Bisphosphonates (a class of drugs that prevent the loss of bone density and used to treat osteoporosis and similar diseases) appear to be safe and beneficial for osteoarthritis patients.
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Alcoholism treatment is potentially effective against COVID-19
A team of chemists from HSE University and the Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry used molecular modelling to find out that two medications that have been known for a long time can be used to fight SARS-CoV-2. These are disulfiram, which is used to treat alcoholism, and neratinib, an experimental drug being used to treat breast cancer. The paper about the discovery has been available online s
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The curious genome of the tuatara, an ancient reptile in peril
International scientists and Ngātiwai, a Māori tribe, teamed up to sequence the genome of a rare reptile, the tuatara, uncovering some unique aspects of the tuatara's evolution. The genome sequence will enable comparative studies to better understand the evolution of the tuatara and its distant relatives: other reptiles, birds, and mammals. Shedding light on the tuatara's biology will help protect
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Medicare Part D favors generic prescription drugs over branded counterparts, study finds
Published this week in Health Affairs, the study led by Stacie Dusetzina, PhD, Ingram Associate Professor of Cancer Research and associate professor of Health Policy, compared Medicare Part D coverage of more than 1,360 pairs of generic and brand-name drugs. The analysis found 0.9% of plans covered only the brand name drug in 2019, compared to about 84% of plans covering only the generic drug. Rou
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Covid-19 may spread more easily in schools than thought, report warns
US health body highlights risks of reopening after outbreaks in state of Georgia and in Israel Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Coronavirus may be more easily transmitted in school and summer camp settings than previously understood, after the emergence of new details of outbreaks in the US state of Georgia and in Israel that have underscored the risks of school re op
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Five ways to turn household items into wilderness essentials
These tips might not be as valuable as knowing how to build a fire, but they're close. (Matt Whitacre/Unsplash/) This story was originally featured on Field & Stream . Sometimes the best ideas are the simplest—which is certainly the case with this collection of outdoor tricks and gear hacks that readers have sent us over the years. In the next few weeks, we'll be sharing our "greatest hits" of th
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Astronomers Say That Planets Orbiting Black Holes Are Called "Blanets"
Behold The Blanet A team of scientists was studying how new exoplanets could form around black holes when they ran into a serious problem: figuring out what to call the class of theoretical worlds. But fret not. They now have a name, ScienceAlert reports , and that dubious name is "blanet." Blanet Nine The actual process, according to the Kagoshima University scientists behind the research submit
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An inventory providing information on more than 200 viruses that infect plants in Brazil
A Brazilian scientist has produced an inventory of 219 pathogens that infect plants in Brazil, including many agriculturally important species. The annotated list, published in Biota Neotropica, is the largest compilation of information on plant viruses ever produced in Brazil. It presents descriptions of the microorganisms, data on the diseases they cause, and information on their occurrence in n
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An inventory providing information on more than 200 viruses that infect plants in Brazil
A Brazilian scientist has produced an inventory of 219 pathogens that infect plants in Brazil, including many agriculturally important species. The annotated list, published in Biota Neotropica, is the largest compilation of information on plant viruses ever produced in Brazil. It presents descriptions of the microorganisms, data on the diseases they cause, and information on their occurrence in n
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Lava tubes on Mars and the Moon are so wide they can host planetary bases
The international journal Earth-Science Reviews published a paper offering an overview of lava tubes (pyroducts) on Earth, eventually providing an estimate of the (greater) size of their lunar and Martian counterparts.
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Like Your First Quarantine Sourdough Attempt, This Exoplanet Is "Surprisingly Dense"
My Density Astronomers have observed an unusual exoplanet, some 150 light-years from Earth, that's far more dense for its size and age than thought possible. The discovery could force scientists to rethink how planets are formed. The planet, dubbed K2-25b, orbits a young M dwarf star — the most common type of star in our galaxy — in the Hyades cluster, better known as the Taurus constellation. Th
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Massey scientist suggests COVID-19 should be treated as an acute inflammatory disease
The COVID-19 pandemic has had detrimental effects on global infrastructure sectors, including economic, political, health care, education and research systems, and there is still no definitive treatment strategy for the disease. A team of scientists, including VCU Massey Cancer Center researcher Masoud Manjili, D.V.M., Ph.D., conducted a comprehensive analysis of worldwide COVID-19 data to identif
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NASA data helps uncover our solar system's shape
Scientists have developed a new prediction of the shape of the bubble surrounding our solar system using a model developed with data from NASA missions.
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Locking down shape-shifting spike protein aids development of COVID-19 vaccine
Publishing in the journal Nature, researchers from the Univ. of Texas at Austin, Moderna and the NIH explain how they developed the COVID-19 vaccine candidate mRNA-1273 and report strong positive results on its effectiveness in mice.
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High-sensitivity atomic force microscopy opens up for photosensitive materials
Research at Kanazawa University as reported in Scientific Reports demonstrates atomic force microscopy imaging that gets around the challenges of exciting very small cantilevers at their high megahertz resonance frequencies. The approach accomadates wide frequency bandwiths, and is applicable for photosensitive materials in a wide range of liquids.
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Researchers capture X-ray images with unprecedented speed and resolution
Researchers have demonstrated a new high-resolution x-ray imaging technique that can capture the motion of rapidly moving objects and quickly changing dynamics. The new method could be used for non-destructive imaging of moving mechanical components and to capture biological processes not previously available with medical x-ray imaging.
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Sustainable chemistry at the quantum level
University of Pittsburgh Associate Professor John A. Keith is using new quantum chemistry computing procedures to categorize hypothetical electrocatalysts that are "too slow" or "too expensive", far more thoroughly and quickly than was considered possible a few years ago.
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Bali sea turtles set free after poacher arrests
Around two dozen green turtles were released back to the wild in Bali on Wednesday after the endangered creatures were rescued from poachers on the Indonesian holiday island.
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Sustainable chemistry at the quantum level
Developing catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production requires a kind of Goldilocks Effect—some catalysts are too ineffective while others are too uneconomical. Catalyst testing also takes a lot of time and resources. New breakthroughs in computational quantum chemistry, however, hold promise for discovering catalysts that are "just right" and thousands of times faster than standard ap
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Bali sea turtles set free after poacher arrests
Around two dozen green turtles were released back to the wild in Bali on Wednesday after the endangered creatures were rescued from poachers on the Indonesian holiday island.
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Consumers, quats and COVID-19: Are disinfectant products safe?
In the face of a persistent global pandemic, disinfectants are more important than ever. These products sometimes rely on quaternary ammonium compounds, or "quats," to kill bacteria and viruses on surfaces. However, some scientists have started to examine these compounds for their possible toxicity in cells and animals. A new story in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the Ame
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Species that can make us ill thrive in human habitats
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02189-5 Does the conversion of natural habitats to human use favour animals that harbour agents causing human disease? A global analysis of vertebrates provides an answer to this pressing question.
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Thermal displacement by marine heatwaves
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2534-z Ocean heatwaves displace surface isotherms by tens to thousands of kilometres—comparable to shifts associated with long-term warming trends—potentially driving rapid redistributions of marine species.
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Reactions for making widely used aniline compounds break norms of synthesis
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02283-8 Chemists generally regard benzene rings as preformed units that are elaborated to build larger molecules. This idea has now been challenged in reactions for making anilines — precursors of many high-value chemical products.
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The tuatara genome reveals ancient features of amniote evolution
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2561-9 The approximately 5-Gb tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus) genome assembly provides a resource for analysing amniote evolution, and highlights the imperative for meaningful cultural engagement with Indigenous communities in genome-sequencing endeavours.
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Small lightning flashes from shallow electrical storms on Jupiter
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2532-1 Small lightning flashes detected on Jupiter by Juno have shallow origins above the 2-bar level of Jupiter's atmosphere where temperatures are too low for liquid water to exist.
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Exponentially faster cooling in a colloidal system
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2560-x A colloidal system is used to demonstrate the Mpemba effect and obtain the parameters responsible for its anomalous relaxation dynamics, which are manipulated to achieve exponentially faster cooling than typical.
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Dichotomous engagement of HDAC3 activity governs inflammatory responses
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2576-2 During the activation of mouse macrophages by lipopolysaccharides, histone deacetylase 3 controls inflammatory responses by both repressing and activating gene transcription depending on its differential association with transcription factors.
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Mucosal or systemic microbiota exposures shape the B cell repertoire
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2564-6 A mouse model of systemic versus mucosal exposure to microbial taxa reveals that the former provokes a flexible B cell response with a diverse immunoglobulin repertoire, whereas the latter generates a more-restricted response.
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An inventory of plants for the land of the unexpected
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02225-4 New Guinea has the world's richest island flora, according to the area's first plant list catalogued by experts. Completing this list poses a formidable challenge that New Guineans are best placed to take up.
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Position-specific oxidation of miR-1 encodes cardiac hypertrophy
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2586-0 The 8-oxoguanine modification of the microRNA miR-1 results in redirected recognition and silencing of target genes and leads to cardiac hypertrophy in mice.
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A measurement of the equation of state of carbon envelopes of white dwarfs
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2535-y Researchers have measured the equation of state of hydrocarbon in a high-density regime, which is necessary for accurate modelling of the oscillations of white dwarf stars.
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Zoonotic host diversity increases in human-dominated ecosystems
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2562-8 Wildlife communities in human-managed ecosystems contain proportionally more species that share human pathogens, and at a higher abundance, than undisturbed habitats, suggesting that landscape transformation creates increasing opportunities for contact between humans and potential hosts of human disease.
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A photochemical dehydrogenative strategy for aniline synthesis
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2539-7 A dual cobalt and photocatalysis system provides a way to assemble anilines from cyclohexanones and amines by progressively dehydrating the intermediate imine.
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Quantum distance and anomalous Landau levels of flat bands
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2540-1 The semiclassical quantization rule breaks down for a class of dispersionless flat bands, and their anomalous Landau level spectrum is characterized by their Hilbert–Schmidt quantum distance.
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Tuatara genome reveals diverse insights into a remarkable reptile
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02063-4 The genome sequence of an unusual reptile called the tuatara sheds light on the species' evolution and on conservation strategies. The work is a model of current best practice for collaborating with Indigenous communities.
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New Guinea has the world's richest island flora
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2549-5 A catalogue of the vascular flora of New Guinea indicates that this island is the most floristically diverse in the world, and that 68% of the species identified are endemic to New Guinea.
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Metric for marine heatwaves suggests how these events displace ocean life
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02172-0 An innovative metric has been devised to quantify the size and extent of the warm waters during marine heatwaves. It thus reflects how far ocean organisms might travel to find cooler conditions — a key factor in these warming events.
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Rescue of oxytocin response and social behaviour in a mouse model of autism
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2563-7 An autism-associated mutation in Nlgn3 results in impaired oxytocin signalling in dopaminergic neurons and altered social behavioural responses in mice, and treatment with an inhibitor of MAP kinase-interacting kinases rescues these phenotypes.
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The Winter Will Be Worse
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . Throughout the pandemic, one lodestar of public-health advice has come down to three words: Do things outside . For nearly five months now, the outdoors has served as a vital social release valve—a space where people can still eat, drink, relax, exercise, and worship togeth
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How microbes in 'starter cultures' make fermented sausage tasty
Microbes in "starter cultures" impart a distinctive tang and longer shelf life to food like sourdough bread, yogurt and kimchi through the process of fermentation. To get a better grasp of how microbes do this in fermented sausages, such as chorizo and pepperoni, researchers reporting in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry carefully show that these tiny organisms change the composition
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Germany plans to dim lights at night to save insects
Germany is planning to ban floodlights from dusk for much of the year as part of its bid to fight a dramatic decline in insect populations, it emerged Wednesday.
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Climate change may melt the 'freezers' of pygmy owls and reduce their overwinter survival
Ecologists at the University of Turku, Finland, have discovered that the food hoards pygmy owls collect in nest-boxes ("freezers") for winter rot due to high precipitation caused by heavy autumn rains if the hoarding has been initiated early in the autumn. The results of the study show that climate change may impair predators' foraging and thus decrease local overwinter survival. The study has bee
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Mulan, Tenet, and the Future of Going to the Movies
In 2020, America may ruin the American movie-going experience. But hey, if you're willing to plop down 30 bucks, you'll be able to watch Mulan next month.
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Kräftfångsterna kommer att öka något i år
Tidsserier av provfisken och klimatdata för kräftans liv, från romkorn till kräftfat, ger bra prognoser för kommande fiske. En prognos från SLU visar att årets fångst av signalkräftfiske i Vättern kommer att bli något större än förra året. SLU Aqua vid Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet (SLU) presenterar sin prognos för hur fångsterna i årets signalkräftfiske i Vättern kommer att bli. Prognosen bygger
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Germany plans to dim lights at night to save insects
Germany is planning to ban floodlights from dusk for much of the year as part of its bid to fight a dramatic decline in insect populations, it emerged Wednesday.
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Climate change may melt the 'freezers' of pygmy owls and reduce their overwinter survival
Ecologists at the University of Turku, Finland, have discovered that the food hoards pygmy owls collect in nest-boxes ("freezers") for winter rot due to high precipitation caused by heavy autumn rains if the hoarding has been initiated early in the autumn. The results of the study show that climate change may impair predators' foraging and thus decrease local overwinter survival. The study has bee
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Belgian scientists name mantis after Attenborough
Belgian scientists have named a new "very large and robust" Vietnamese sub-species of praying mantis after British television naturalist David Attenborough.
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Illegal deforestation in Brazil soars amid climate of impunity
Satellite data suggest Amazon clearings increased by at least 28% the past year
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Belgian scientists name mantis after Attenborough
Belgian scientists have named a new "very large and robust" Vietnamese sub-species of praying mantis after British television naturalist David Attenborough.
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'Save Space Camp' drive prompted by virus reaches $1.5M goal
A fundraising drive has reached its goal of bringing in $1.5 million to save Space Camp from closing because of the coronavirus pandemic, organizers said.
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Japanese anime remembers the atom bomb, decades after Hiroshima
Akira Neo Toky, the setting of the popular anime film Akira , is about to explode. (Neo Tokyo/) Frank Fuller is an adjunct professor of political science at Villanova University. This story was originally featured on The Conversation . At the end of Katsuhiro Otomo's dystopian Japanese anime film Akira , a throbbing, white mass begins to envelop Neo-Tokyo . Eventually, its swirling winds engulf t
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Computational modeling enables heart valve visualizations
Computational modeling has provided new insights into the heart's vascular system, a complex and mechanically demanding system that remains poorly understood.
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Study suggests drug overdose linked to PTSD
Drug overdoses are psychologically traumatic events that can lead to symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
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Virtual reality improves game-based navigational efficiency
Individuals playing a virtual reality (VR)-based game showed a higher navigational efficiency and less disorientation than those playing a non-VR immersive desktop version.
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Tiniest secrets of integrated circuits revealed with new imaging technique
The secrets of the tiniest active structures in integrated circuits can be revealed using a non-destructive imaging technique, shows an international team of scientists from JKU and Keysight Technologies (Austria), ETH/EPFL/PSI and IBM Research – Europe (Switzerland) and from UCL (UK).
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Gut microbes shape our antibodies before we are infected by pathogens
Because the microbiota is so complex, containing hundreds of different bacterial species, it is not known how the presence of microbes in the intestine shaped the antibodies that are present even before we are challenged by an infection. Researchers at the Department for BioMedical Research (DBMR) of the University of Bern and the Inselspital, University Hospital Bern, have now shown how these ben
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Manifestation of quantum distance in flat band materials
IBS research team found a way to measure the quantum distance of Bloch states in solids by applying magnetic field.
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NAU biologist part of international team to sequence genome of rare 'living fossil'
Northern Arizona University assistant professor Marc Tollis is one of a dozen collaborators sequencing the genome of the tuatara, a lizard-like creature that lives on the islands of New Zealand. This groundbreaking research was done in partnership with the Māori people of New Zealand,
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Practice patterns, responsiveness to common ocular complaints among ophthalmology centers during COVID-19
Practice patterns for common ocular complaints during the initial stage of the COVID-19 pandemic are reported in this observational study among comprehensive U.S. ophthalmology practices.
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Ocean heatwaves dramatically shift habitats
Marine heatwaves across the world's oceans can displace habitat for sea turtles, whales, and other marine life by 10s to thousands of kilometers. They dramatically shift these animals' preferred temperatures in a fraction of the time that climate change is expected to do the same, new research shows.
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Trifluoroacetic acid acts as trifluoromethylating agent in arene C-H functionalization
Researchers at the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a catalytic system that directly installs the trifluoromethyl group onto arenes. The new reaction uses simple and abundant trifluoroacetic acid as the trifluoromethylating agent, and offers a milder alternative to the existing strategies.
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Dinosaur relative's genome linked to mammals
Scientists from the University of Adelaide and South Australian Museum have collaborated with Otago University, New Zealand and a global team to sequence the genome of the tuatara – a rare reptile whose ancestors once roamed the earth with dinosaurs.
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Characteristics, treatment of radiation-induced hair loss in cancer patients
Characteristics and response to treatment of persistent radiation-induced hair loss in patients with primary central nervous system tumors or head and neck cancer were examined in this observational study.
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Skin findings described in patients with severe COVID-19
In this case series with four patients, the skin findings of livedo racemosa (skin discoloration) and retiform purpura are described in patients with severe COVID-19.
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The yin and yang of inflammation controlled by a single molecule
Penn Study Reveals A Molecular Mechanism That Helps The Body Mount Perfectly Balanced Responses to Deadly Infections
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Land use changes may increase disease outbreak risks
Global changes in land use are disrupting the balance of wild animal communities in our environment, and species that carry diseases known to infect humans appear to be benefiting, finds a new UCL-led study published in Nature.
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Autism: How a gene alteration modifies social behavior
A team of researchers at the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has discovered a new connection between a genetic alteration and social difficulties related to autism: A mutation in the neuroligin-3 gene reduces the effect of the hormone oxytocin. In the journal "Nature", the researchers report on a treatment approach that could normalize social behavior in autism. They have already achieved promisi
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Ammonia-rich hail sheds new light on Jupiter's weather
New Juno results suggest that the violent thunderstorms taking place in Jupiter's atmosphere may form ammonia-rich hail, or 'mushballs', that play a key role in the planet's atmospheric dynamics. This theory, developed using data from Juno's microwave radiometer by the Juno team, is described in two publications led by a CNRS researcher at the Laboratoire Lagrange (CNRS/Observatoire de la Côte d'A
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New Guinea has the world's richest island flora
New Guinea is the most floristically diverse island in the world, an international collaboration led by the University of Zurich has shown. The study presents a list of almost 14,000 plant species, compiled from online catalogues and verified by plant experts. The results are invaluable for research and conservation, and also underline the importance of expert knowledge in the digital era.
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Silk scaffolds and magnetism to generate bone tissue and be able to use it in implants
The journal Materialia has recently published the outcome of research conducted by a group of researchers including several from the Department of Physical Chemistry at the UPV-EHU's Faculty of Science and Technology and BCMaterials, and others from centers at the University of Minho (Portugal). In this work the research group developed a new composite material that can be used for tissue engineer
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To bond with nature, kids need solitary activities outdoors
A new study found solitary activities like fishing, hunting or exploring outside are key to building strong bonds between children and nature. Activities like these encourage children to both enjoy being outside and to feel comfortable there.
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Scientists build ultra-high-speed terahertz wireless chip
To enable data transmission speeds that surpass the 5th Generation (5G) standards for telecommunications, scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Osaka University in Japan have built a new chip using a concept called photonic topological insulators.
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New study to review COVID's impact on modern slavery survivors
Experts from the Rights Lab at the University of Nottingham are conducting an urgent review into how modern slavery survivors and victims are being impacted by COVID-19.
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How to predict a typhoon
Tropical cyclones, also known as typhoons, wreak havoc in Asia and the Pacific. The storms can be deadly—in 2013, Typhoon Haiyan, the strongest ever recorded, was responsible for 6,340 deaths—and cost billions in damages. Current forecast models can only predict these storms 10 days in advance, at most, and they cannot precisely predict how intense the storms will become.
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Portable book lights to illuminate your favorite passages
All the lights you'll need to read in the dark. (Awar Kurdish via Unsplash /) Any avid reader knows that squinting to see the words on a page is detrimental to the literary experience. A book light is the only way to go when it comes to combating darkness. Whether you need an extra boost of light on an airplane, can't see in the dark while you're waiting for the bus, or have a photosensitive slee
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How tumor cells evade the immune defense
Scientists are increasingly trying to use the body's own immune system to fight cancer. A new study now shows the strategies tumor cells use to evade this attack. The method developed for this work contributes to a better understanding of the "arms race" between immune defense and disease. The results could help to improve modern therapeutic approaches.
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New strategy against osteoporosis
An international research team has found a new approach that may be able to reduce bone loss in osteoporosis and maintain bone health.
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Scientists discover the switch that makes human brown fat burn energy
The receptor responsible for activating the energy-burning property of brown fat in humans has been identified. The next step is to investigate drugs that fit the receptor and trigger the response as a means to treat obesity and type-2 diabetes.
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Scientists find how clock gene wakes up green algae
Researchers have found the mechanism of the night-to-day transition of the circadian rhythm in green algae. The findings could be applied to green algae to produce larger amounts of lipids, which are a possible sustainable source of biofuel.
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Calcium-rich supernova examined with x-rays for first time
X-ray images give unprecedented view of extremely rare type of supernova. New information suggests that these supernovae start as compact stars that lose mass at the end of life. Calcium-rich supernovae are responsible for up to half the calcium in the entire universe. SN 2019ehk has the richest calcium emission of all known transients.
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Molecular forces: The surprising stretching behavior of DNA
Experiments with DNA molecules show that their mechanical properties are completely different from what those of macroscopic objects – and this has important consequences for biology and medicine. Scientists has now succeeded in explaining these properties in detail by combining ideas from civil engineering and physics.
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Deadly diseases from wildlife thrive when nature is destroyed, study finds
Rats and bats that host pandemic pathogens like Covid-19 increase in damaged ecosystems, analysis shows Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The human destruction of natural ecosystems increases the numbers of rats, bats and other animals that harbour diseases that can lead to pandemics such as Covid-19, a comprehensive analysis has found. The research assessed nearly 7,0
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Land use changes may increase disease outbreak risks
Global changes in land use are disrupting the balance of wild animal communities in our environment, and species that carry diseases known to infect humans appear to be benefiting, finds a new UCL-led study.
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Dinosaur relative's genome linked to mammals
Scientists from the University of Adelaide and South Australian Museum have collaborated with Otago University, New Zealand and a global team to sequence the genome of the tuatara—a rare reptile whose ancestors once roamed the earth with dinosaurs.
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'Thermal displacement' reflects how far species must go to follow preferred temperatures
Marine heatwaves across the world's oceans can displace habitat for sea turtles, whales, and other marine life by 10s to thousands of kilometers. They dramatically shift these animals' preferred temperatures in a fraction of the time that climate change is expected to do the same, new research shows.
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Three-quarters of migrants traveling to US through Mexico experience food insecurity
A survey of Central American migrants traveling through Mexico on their way to the United States found that 74 percent of them experienced a degree of food insecurity, ranging from having only one meal to no food at all for one day or longer. Factors associated with more severe food insecurity include more days in active transit, and the experience of illness by the migrant or their travel compani
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CUNY ISPH study sheds new light on how ovarian cancer grows and evolves
In a paper published in the journal Cancer Research, professor Levi Waldron, post-doctoral fellow Ludwig Geistlinger, and colleagues at the Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health (ISPH) at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) provide new insights into how ovarian cancer grows and evolves within a person.
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Can community members deliver naloxone to reverse opioid overdoses?
Equipped with naloxone and a smartphone app, community members can save lives in the fight against America's opioid crisis, according to a paper from researchers at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health and colleagues published this week in The Lancet journal EClinicalMedicine.
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An inventory providing information on more than 200 viruses that infect plants in Brazil
The largest database of plant viruses in Brazil serves as a tool for researchers, growers and policymakers.
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How microbes in 'starter cultures' make fermented sausage tasty
Microbes in "starter cultures" impart a distinctive tang and longer shelf life to food like sourdough bread, yogurt and kimchi through the process of fermentation. To get a better grasp of how microbes do this in fermented sausages, such as chorizo and pepperoni, researchers reporting in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry carefully show that these tiny organisms change the composition
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Incorporating solar harvesting into the side of buildings could enhance energy sustainability
If builders could incorporate solar harvesting into the siding of a building, the amount of energy from the grid that a structure would need may significantly decrease. In research published recently in Renewable Energy, a team of researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, led by Diana-Andra Borca-Tasciuc, a professor of mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering, demonstrated the pote
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Astronomers sink their teeth into special supernova
Astronomers using several telescopes at NOIRLab, including the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope, have obtained critical data on a particular type of exploding star that produces copious amounts of calcium. The calcium produced in this unique type of supernova explosion is the same calcium found in our bones and teeth and these events account for up to half of the calcium found in t
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Body weight has surprising, alarming impact on brain function
Amsterdam and Costa Mesa, CA, August 5, 2020 – As a person's weight goes up, all regions of the brain go down in activity and blood flow, according to a new brain imaging study in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.
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Climate change may melt the "freezers" of pygmy owls and reduce their overwinter survival
Ecologists at the University of Turku, Finland, have discovered that the food hoards pygmy owls collect in nest-boxes ("freezers") for winter rot due to high precipitation caused by heavy autumn rains and if the hoarding has been initiated early in the autumn. The results of the study show that climate change may impair predators' foraging and thus decrease local overwinter survival. The study has
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Taste bud cells might not be a target of SARS-CoV-2
An intriguing early symptom among some COVID-19 patients is the loss of the sense of smell and/or taste, which has led to the suspicion that the virus that causes the illness, SARS-CoV-2, could be targeting taste buds. But as researchers report in ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science , initial data from mice suggest that might not be the case.
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Researchers discover predictor of laser treatment success in patients with glaucoma
More than 70 million people worldwide suffer from glaucoma. Treatment options have traditionally included eye drops to reduce the fluid the eye produces or surgery to unclog the eye's drainage. But a new study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care provides insight into which patients might benefit most from a noninvasive treatment called selective laser trabeculopla
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New findings on enzymes with important role in SARS-CoV-2 infection
Researchers at Uppsala University have described the presence, throughout the human body, of the enzyme ACE2. This is thought to be the key protein used by the SARS-CoV-2 virus for host cell entry and development of the disease COVID-19. In contrast to previous studies, the study shows that no or very little ACE2 protein is present in the normal respiratory system. The results are presented in Mol
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Surgery during pregnancy for gallbladder infections may be safer than postponing
Although surgery during pregnancy is often feared, in the case of cholecystitis or acute gallbladder disease, surgery may lead to better outcomes for mom and baby.
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Science and Scientific Expertise Are More Important Than Ever
An engaged and well-informed public has always been the foundation of our democracy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Land use changes may increase disease outbreak risks
Global changes in land use are disrupting the balance of wild animal communities in our environment, and species that carry diseases known to infect humans appear to be benefiting, finds a new UCL-led study.
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'Thermal displacement' reflects how far species must go to follow preferred temperatures
Marine heatwaves across the world's oceans can displace habitat for sea turtles, whales, and other marine life by 10s to thousands of kilometers. They dramatically shift these animals' preferred temperatures in a fraction of the time that climate change is expected to do the same, new research shows.
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Molecular forces: The surprising stretching behavior of DNA
Experiments with DNA molecules show that their mechanical properties are completely different from what those of macroscopic objects – and this has important consequences for biology and medicine. Scientists has now succeeded in explaining these properties in detail by combining ideas from civil engineering and physics.
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Inappropriate prescriptions sending hospitalized seniors back to the ER
Two in three hospitalized seniors are prescribed drugs that should be avoided by older adults, increasing the risk of injury and adverse drug reactions. Improving hospital prescribing practices can reduce the frequency of inappropriate medications and resulting harm, according to a new study led by McGill University researchers.
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To bond with nature, kids need solitary activities outdoors
A new study found solitary activities like fishing, hunting or exploring outside are key to building strong bonds between children and nature.
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Discovery could lead to more potent garlic, boosting flavor and bad breath
Their work could boost the malodorous – yet delicious – characteristics that garlic-lovers the world over savor.
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Discovery shows promise for treating Huntington's Disease
Scientists at the lab of Professor Hilal Lashuel at EPFL have identified a new enzyme called "TBK1" who plays a central role in regulating the degradation and clearance of the huntingtin protein and introduces chemical modifications that block its aggregation. "We believe that this represents a viable target for the development of possible treatment of Huntington's disease," says Lashuel.
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Initiative to promote a culture of mobility in hospitals yields encouraging results
A paper published today in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society reported results of an initiative designed to enhance implementation of hospital mobility programs aimed at improving quality of care and outcomes for older patients.
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Lava tubes on Mars and the Moon are so wide they can host planetary bases
Researchers at the Universities of Bologna and Padua studied the subsurface cavities that lava created underground on Mars and the Moon. These cavities can shield from cosmic radiations
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Pandemic shows central banks may be better off working together
A new University of Missouri Trulaske College of Business study suggests that when different countries make similar economic decisions during financial crises, the global economy improves much more quickly than if they act in their own self-interest.
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Ancient mountains recorded in Antarctic sandstones reveal potential links to global events
A new analysis of sandstones from Antarctica indicates there may be important links between the generation of mountain belts and major transitions in Earth's atmosphere and oceans. A team of researchers analyzed the chemistry of tiny zircon grains commonly found in the Earth's continental rock record to determine their ages and chemical compositions.
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Break it down: A new way to address common computing problem
A new algorithm provides a framework for solving complex linear inverse problems that doesn't require a supercomputer and also enhances security and privacy.
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How thoughts could one day control electronic prostheses, wirelessly
The current generation of neural implants record enormous amounts of neural activity, then transmit these brain signals through wires to a computer. But, so far, when researchers have tried to create wireless brain-computer interfaces to do this, it took so much power to transmit the data that the implants generated too much heat to be safe for the patient. A new study suggests how to solve his pr
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Improved modelling of nuclear structure in francium aids searches for new physics
Thanks to new research, we now know with much greater certainty the nuclear magnetic moments of francium atoms.
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Carbon footprinting and pricing under climate concerns
Marketers can lead how their companies can use the cost and demand effects of reducing the carbon footprint of their products to determine the profit-maximizing design.
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Disparities in a common air pollutant are visible from space
As a global center for petrochemical manufacturing, Houston, Texas, experiences some of the worst air quality in the country, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Evidence suggests that air pollution disproportionately affects low-income, non-white and Hispanic residents, but it's difficult to directly observe differences in pollutants between neighborhoods. Now, researchers have
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Why Chimp Moms Flock to Caves on the Savanna
When forests and woodlands don't provide a respite from the heat, these primates find cooling centers in their arid landscape.
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Journal editor breaks protocol to thank an anonymous whistleblower
As Retraction Watch readers may recall, we've been highlighting — and championing — the work of anonymous whistleblowers throughout the 10-year history of the blog. Our support for such anonymity, however, is not universally shared. In 2011, for example, in our column at Lab Times (unfortunately no longer online), we wrote: [W]e're baffled as to … Continue reading
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J&J strikes $1bn Covid-19 vaccine deal with US
Moderna to sell some doses of its own coronavirus jab candidate for between $32 and $37
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Protecting Indigenous bush foods and medicines against biopiracy
The use of Indigenous knowledge and resources—including bush foods and bush medicines—is increasingly on-trend. Cosmetics, pharmaceutical giants and large food producers are vying for everything from access to monopoly in the modern market.
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Changes in land evaporation shape the climate
Accurate estimation of how much water is evaporated from the vegetated land surface is a challenging task. A physical-based method—such as the complementary relationship (CR) of evaporation, which explicitly accounts for the dynamic feedback mechanisms in the soil-land-atmosphere system and requires minimal data—is advantageous for tracking the ongoing changes in the global hydrological cycle and
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The role of Chinese cultural values in illegal wildlife trade interventions
A new study by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) suggests that utilizing Confucianist, Daoist, and Buddhist belief messaging in targeted campaigns could effectively change the behavior of end consumers in the East Asia illegal wildlife trade chain.
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Ancient mountains recorded in Antarctic sandstones reveal potential links to global events
A new analysis of sandstones from Antarctica indicates there may be important links between the generation of mountain belts and major transitions in Earth's atmosphere and oceans.
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The role of Chinese cultural values in illegal wildlife trade interventions
A new study by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) suggests that utilizing Confucianist, Daoist, and Buddhist belief messaging in targeted campaigns could effectively change the behavior of end consumers in the East Asia illegal wildlife trade chain.
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Fitness tracker watches may boost your anxiety
While health apps and fitness tracker watches can help shape a healthy lifestyle, they can also boost feelings of anxiety, according to a new study. The research examines the experiences of 27 heart patients who used Fitbit fitness watches to measure their sleep, heart rates, and physical activity. Although the 28-74 year-old heart patients learned more about their illnesses and were motivated to
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Sundhedsstyrelsen sætter foden ned over for DSB: Vi skal ikke rykke tættere sammen
I dag ophævede DSB pladsbilletkrav og forbud mod stående passagerer med henvisning til mundbinds-anbefalingen. Men det er en dårlig ide, mener Søren Brostrøm.
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Extra DNA May Make Unlikely Hybrid Fish Possible
Their mothers were Russian sturgeons — large carnivores with creamy bellies, short, rounded snouts, and green, dragonlike scales. Their fathers were American paddlefish — smooth-skinned filter feeders with sensitive, elongated snouts. "Sturddlefish," as these hybrids have been nicknamed since researchers in Hungary recently announced their creation , go shockingly far beyond classic crossbreeds l
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How thoughts could one day control electronic prostheses, wirelessly
The current generation of neural implants record enormous amounts of neural activity, then transmit these brain signals through wires to a computer. But, so far, when researchers have tried to create wireless brain-computer interfaces to do this, it took so much power to transmit the data that the implants generated too much heat to be safe for the patient. A new study suggests how to solve his pr
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Improved modelling of nuclear structure in francium aids searches for new physics
Thanks to new research, we now know with much greater certainty the nuclear magnetic moments of francium atoms.
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Watch SpaceX's Epic Starship Test Flight From Inside the Giant Rocket
And Now in HD Yesterday evening at its testing facilities near Boca Chica, Texas, SpaceX flew its gigantic SN5 Starship prototype to an impressive 500 feet. And now, we get to watch the event not from a shaky camera set up miles away by onlookers — but in crispy high definition video, courtesy of SpaceX, recorded by drones surveying the incredible event and even inside the giant rocket itself. In
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Rock debris protects glaciers from climate change more than previously known
A new study which provides a global estimate of rock cover on the Earth's glaciers has revealed that the expanse of rock debris on glaciers, a factor that has been ignored in models of glacier melt and sea level rise, could be significant.
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Study clarifies kinship of important plant group
Asterids comprise around 100,000 flowering plants, from heather to tomatoes. Up to now, their family relationships had not yet been fully clarified. A new study by the University of Bonn, Pennsylvania State University (USA) and Fudan University (China) has now somewhat closed this knowledge gap. It is the world's most detailed phylogenetic analysis ever conducted for asterids. The results of the s
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Scientists discover the switch that makes human brown fat burn energy
The receptor responsible for activating the energy-burning property of brown fat in humans has been identified. The next step is to investigate drugs that fit the receptor and trigger the response as a means to treat obesity and type-2 diabetes. The discovery is the result of an international collaboration, including scientists at the University of Copenhagen and Université de Sherbrooke, who publ
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How tumor cells evade the immune defense
Scientists are increasingly trying to use the body's own immune system to fight cancer. A new study by the University of Bonn and research institutions in Australia and Switzerland now shows the strategies tumor cells use to evade this attack. The method developed for this work contributes to a better understanding of the "arms race" between immune defense and disease. The results could help to im
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NIH-Moderna investigational COVID-19 vaccine shows promise in mouse studies
The investigational vaccine known as mRNA-1273 protected mice from infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, according to research published today in Nature. Scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the biotechnology company Moderna, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, along with collaborators from the University of North Carolina at Chape
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Heart regeneration using stem cells: Why irregular heartbeats occur after transplantation
Increased predominance of the matured ventricular subtype in embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in vivo elucidated why arrhythmia occurs post-transplant of hESC-CMs.
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The role of Chinese cultural values in illegal wildlife trade interventions
A new study by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) suggests that utilising Confucianist, Daoist, and Buddhist belief messaging in targeted campaigns could effectively change the behaviour of end consumers in the East Asia illegal wildlife trade chain.
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Silk scaffolds and magnetism to generate bone tissue and be able to use it in implants
Researchers from the UPV/EHU, BCMaterials and various centres in Portugal have shown that the combination of biocompatible scaffolds formed from silk components, and stimulation of cells by means of magnetism is valid for generating bone tissue. The scaffolds, which are used to support cell growth, were loaded with magnetic nanoparticles so that magnetism could be used. The results achieved are sp
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Osteopontin, a protein not always as bad as it is made out to be
In an article published in the prestigious journal Aging Cell, the UPV/EHU's Lipids & Liver research group shows that contrary to expectations, physiological levels in the liver of osteopontin, a multifunctional protein linked to various serious diseases, need to be maintained during ageing to prevent the progression of ageing-related, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
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Scientists discover novel drug target for pancreatic cancer
Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have uncovered a novel drug target, a protein called PPP1R1B, that stops the deadly spread of pancreatic cancer, called metastasis, when inhibited in mice. Published in Gastroenterology, the findings are a first step toward a potential treatment for one of the deadliest cancers known today.
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Calcium-rich supernova examined with X-rays for first time
New findings reveal that a calcium-rich supernova is a compact star that sheds an outer layer of gas during the final stages of its life. When the star explodes, its matter collides with the loose material in that outer shell, emitting bright X-rays. The overall explosion causes intensely hot temperatures and high pressure, driving a chemical reaction that produces calcium.
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Spin wave detective story redux: Researchers find more surprising behavior in a 2-D magnet
A few months ago, a team of scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) reported something surprising about a 2-D magnetic material: Behavior that had long been presumed to be due to vibrations in the lattice—the internal structure of the atoms in the material itself—is actually due to a wave of spin oscillations.
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Drivers from the world's poorest cities who keep their windows down are exposed to 80 percent more air pollution
Car users from the world's least affluent cities are exposed to a disproportionate amount of in-car air pollution because they rely heavily on opening their windows for ventilation, finds a first of its kind study from the University of Surrey.
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What is ammonium nitrate, the chemical that exploded in Beirut?
The Lebanese capital Beirut was rocked on Tuesday evening local time by an explosion that has killed at least 78 people and injured thousands more.
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When rehoming wildlife, Indigenous leadership delivers the best results
Whakapapa [genealogy] binds tākata whenua [people of the land] to the mountains, rivers, coasts and other landscapes, linking the health of the people with that of the environment. Like humans, species have whakapapa that connects them to their natural environment and to other species. If whakapapa is understood thoroughly, we can build the right environment to protect and enhance any living thing
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Is noise pollution killing whales and dolphins?
Dr Maria Morell studies their ears to discover if hearing damage led to their death.
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When rehoming wildlife, Indigenous leadership delivers the best results
Whakapapa [genealogy] binds tākata whenua [people of the land] to the mountains, rivers, coasts and other landscapes, linking the health of the people with that of the environment. Like humans, species have whakapapa that connects them to their natural environment and to other species. If whakapapa is understood thoroughly, we can build the right environment to protect and enhance any living thing
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Schools can do more to help students cope with trauma, says education report
Policymakers and schools are being urged to use social and emotional learning to help students cope with traumatic events, such as the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the recent bushfires.
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After the vicious cold snap, here are our tips to warm up while keeping your environmental footprint down
Yesterday, Australia's eastern states felt a vicious cold snap, and these wintry blasts make hunkering down in isolation at home a little easier. But as the temperature rises at home, so does our carbon footprint and energy bills.
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iOS 14's Best Privacy Feature? Catching Data-Grabbing Apps
Apple's new operating system hasn't been released to the public yet, but its new permission notifications are already shaming developers into cleaning up their acts.
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Samsung Unpacked 2020: Z Fold2, Note 20 Ultra, Galaxy Watch3, Buds Live
The company's latest portfolio is filled with powerful and expensive devices.
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TLK protein inhibition activates the innate immune system
These proteins are a potential therapeutic target for enhancing the effect of some cancer treatments.Inhibition of TLK proteins triggers the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres pathway, a common process in some of the most aggressive types of cancer, such as glioblastoma. The study, performed by the Genomic Instability and Cancer Laboratory at IRB Barcelona, has been published in the journal Cell
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New strategy against osteoporosis
An international research team has found a new approach that may be able to reduce bone loss in osteoporosis and maintain bone health.
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Molecular forces: The surprising stretching behavior of DNA
Experiments with DNA molecules show that their mechanical properties are completely different from what those of macroscopic objects – and this has important consequences for biology and medicine. Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) has now succeeded in explaining these properties in detail by combining ideas from civil engineering and physics.
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Drivers from poor cities can be exposed to 80% more air pollution
Car users from the world's least affluent cities are exposed to a disproportionate amount of in-car air pollution because they rely heavily on opening their windows for ventilation, finds a first of its kind study from the University of Surrey.
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Calcium-rich supernova examined with X-rays for first time
Half of all the calcium in the universe—including the very calcium in our teeth and bones—was created in the last gasp of dying stars.
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Defunding the police requires understanding what role policing plays in our society
Two contrasting perspectives have emerged in response to recent calls to "defund" police. One perspective—espoused by some activists on the political left—holds that policing is fatally broken, cannot be fixed through any reforms and ought to be cancelled outright through financial asphyxiation. The second perspective argues that policing takes an outsized and unnecessary share of government budge
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Ancient beavers cut trees for food first, not to build dams
By studying the wood-cutting behaviour of ancient beavers that once roamed the Canadian high Arctic, an international team of scientists has discovered that tree predation—feeding on trees and harvesting wood—evolved in these now-extinct rodents long before dam-building.
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These Scientists Just Completed a 3D 'Google Earth' for the Brain
Human brain maps are a dime a dozen these days. Maps that detail neurons in a certain region. Maps that draw out functional connections between those cells. Maps that dive deeper into gene expression. Or even meta-maps that combine all of the above. But have you ever wondered: how well do those maps represent my brain? After all, no two brains are alike. And if we're ever going to reverse-enginee
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Dampening of the Senses Is Linked to Dementia Risk
A decline in smell was the sense loss most strongly associated with such risk in a recent study. Christopher Intagliata reports.
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FT Health: Pandemic exposes looming superbug crisis
Muhammad Ali Pate of the World Bank, Covid-19 trajectory, vaccine politics
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Radio pulsations detected from the gamma-ray millisecond pulsar PSR J2039−5617
Using the Parkes telescope, an international team of astronomers has performed a monitoring campaign of a gamma-ray millisecond pulsar (MSP) known as PSR J2039−5617. The observations detected radio pulsations from this source, which sheds light on the nature of this object. The finding is reported in a paper published July 29 on arXiv.org.
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COVID-19 pandemic may delay college graduation for students of color
The COVID-19 pandemic is having a striking, paradoxical impact on low-income and minority college students. At least 30% of Black, Latino and Asian American students say the pandemic has increased their perceived value of a college education, compared to only 11% of white students. Yet, students of color and low-income students are much more likely to say they're planning to take fewer classes in
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People's experience of homelessness support proves housing and intensive help is life changing
Giving a unique insight into the lives of people trapped in the cycle of homelessness, a study including three years of interviews with people details how their lives have dramatically benefitted from three-years of housing and intensive support.
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Waning attention to climate change amid pandemic could have lasting effects
On Sept. 23, 2019, then-16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg stood before a sea of news cameras at the United Nations Climate Action Summit in New York City and told world leaders: "People are suffering. People are dying. Entire ecosystems are collapsing…How dare you continue to look away."
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Application of machine learning can optimize hurricane track forecast
When a hurricane approaches, providing a few extra hours' notice can be the difference between life and death. Now, Penn State researchers report that applying a machine learning technique to a group of possible storm paths could help meteorologists provide more accurate medium-term forecasts and issue timely warnings to communities in the path of these potentially deadly storms.
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Pandemic driving reductions won't reduce greenhouse gas emissions much
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an unprecedented shift in commuting and mobility patterns worldwide, something that has led to a false perception that the pandemic may be a boon to greenhouse gas reduction. A new analysis examines California's GHG emissions before and after the viral outbreak and finds that despite significantly less road traffic in the state, long run emissions reductions are no
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Datatilsynet godkender: Virksomhed må godt aflæse medarbejderes fingeraftryk
Datatilsynet har vurderet, at en virksomhed godt må aflæse fingeraftryk i forbindelse med adgangskontrol, hvis det er et spørgsmål om virksomhedens produktion og eksport.
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Breaking the absorption limit of silicon toward the short-wavelength infrared wavelength range via strain engineering
Silicon is widely used in the microelectronics industry although its photonics applications are restricted to the visible and partial near-infrared spectral range due to its fundamental optical bandgap. Researchers have therefore used recent advances in strain engineering to tailor material properties, including the optical bandgap. In a recent study now published on Science Advances, Ajit K. Kati
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Abandoned fibreglass boats are releasing toxins and microplastics across the world
Where do old boats go to die? The cynical answer is they are put on eBay for a few pennies in the hope they become some other ignorant dreamer's problem.
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Africa's research ecosystem needs a culture of mentoring
Sub-Saharan Africa faces a range of development challenges, including high population growth, poverty, food insecurity, and poor health. There is a clear need for qualified and skilled researchers to tackle these issues. But there is also a scarcity. For instance, Sub-Saharan Africa contributes less than 1% to global research output despite accounting for 13.5% of the global population.
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The complicated history of environmental racism
Many people understand the environment as a force of nature that cannot favor or disfavor different populations. However, similar to all things on Earth, the environment is subject to human influences. Unfortunately, these influences often tend to lower their hands to the worsts of our society including racism and classism. This can ultimately create environmental racism.
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No air, no problem: How parasites switch to life without oxygen inside host
The discovery of unique molecular mechanics allowing parasitic worms to thrive in the guts of one billion people opens the door to new treatments that are safe for the host.
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Fabrication advance: Spray-on clear coatings for cheaper smart windows
Researchers have developed a spray-on method for making conductive clear coatings, or transparent electrodes.Fast, scalable and based on cheaper materials, the new approach could simplify the fabrication of smart windows and low-emissivity glass.It can also be optimised to produce coatings tailored to the requirements of different applications of transparent electrodes, like touchscreen displays,
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Culling cancer before it stems: A novel, rapid carcinogen detection method
Testing chemical compounds for their ability to cause cancer is one way in which scientists can identify hazardous chemicals and thereby protect public health. But, standard testing methods are usually complex and time-consuming. In a new paper published in Scientific Reports, scientists have described a novel testing method based on stem cells that may allow scientists to quickly assess large num
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Calcium-rich supernova examined with x-rays for first time
X-ray images give unprecedented view of extremely rare type of supernova. New information suggests that these supernovae start as compact stars that lose mass at the end of life. Calcium-rich supernovae are responsible for up to half the calcium in the entire universe. SN 2019ehk has the richest calcium emission of all known transients
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Scientists find how clock gene wakes up green algae
Researchers at Nagoya University have found the mechanism of the night-to-day transition of the circadian rhythm in green algae. The findings could be applied to green algae to produce larger amounts of lipids, which are a possible sustainable source of biofuel.
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Superior TNOx/HRGO hybrid anode for lithium-ion batteries
In a paper published in NANO, a team of researchers from Chengdu Development Center of Science and Technology have significantly enhanced the performance of titanium niobium oxides for lithium-ion batteries. This has applications in electric vehicles and mobile electronics.
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How to predict a typhoon
An international team of researchers has developed a model that analyzes nearly a quarter of Earth's surface and atmosphere in order to better predict the conditions that birth typhoons, as well as the conditions that lead to more severe storms.
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Maldives records highest level of micro plastics on the planet
The amount of micro plastic pollution in waters around the Maldives, a global tourist hotspot known for its beautiful coastline, is amongst the highest in the world and has the potential to severely impact marine life in shallow reefs and threaten the livelihoods of island communities.
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Understanding why some children enjoy TV more than others
New research shows that children's own temperament could be driving the amount of TV they watch. The research shows how the brain responses of 10-month-old babies watching a clip from Disney's Fantasia on repeat could predict whether they would enjoy watching fast-paced TV shows six months later. The findings are important for the ongoing debate around early TV exposure.
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SpaceX: Musk's 'Mars ship' prototype aces 150m test flight
A prototype of the engine for SpaceX's next-generation Starship vehicle has made a 150m test "hop".
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Using entangled photons to play "quantum Go"
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has developed a form of the board game Go using entangled photons. They have posted a paper to the arXiv preprint server describing their game and explaining why they believe their setup could be used as a baseline for creating other quantum-based games.
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Why do humans prefer to mate in private?
Yitzchak Ben Mocha, an anthropologist with Zürich University, has conducted a study of human procreation habits as part of an effort to understand why humans prefer to mate in private. In his paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, he describes his analysis of other studies that involved human sexual practices, among other things.
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Why do humans prefer to mate in private?
Yitzchak Ben Mocha, an anthropologist with Zürich University, has conducted a study of human procreation habits as part of an effort to understand why humans prefer to mate in private. In his paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, he describes his analysis of other studies that involved human sexual practices, among other things.
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Pigeon pecking order found to be driven by weight
A team of researchers from the University of London and Monash University has found that pigeon pecking order is driven by weight and that a given pecking order can be artificially changed. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of the pecking order of domesticated pigeons and what they learned about them.
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Pigeon pecking order found to be driven by weight
A team of researchers from the University of London and Monash University has found that pigeon pecking order is driven by weight and that a given pecking order can be artificially changed. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of the pecking order of domesticated pigeons and what they learned about them.
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Research reveals microplastic content levels in seafood
Levels of plastic contamination has been found in samples of popular seafood such as prawns, oysters and crabs, with the highest content found in sardines, according to University of Queensland research.
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Maldives records highest level of micro plastic pollution on the planet
The amount of micro plastic pollution in waters around the Maldives, a global tourist destination known for its beautiful coastline, is amongst the highest in the world and has the potential to severely impact marine life in shallow reefs and threaten the livelihoods of island communities.
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The UK is dropping an immigration algorithm that critics say is racist
The news: The UK Home Office has said it will stop using an algorithm to process visa applications that critics claim is racially biased. Opponents to it argue that the algorithm's use of nationality to decide which applications get fast-tracked has led to a system in which "people from rich white countries get "Speedy Boarding"; poorer people of color get pushed to the back of the queue." Time f
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All-terrain women's sandals that take you from hiking to lounging
Sandals for your adventure. (Toa Heftiba via Unsplash/) In the past few years, sporty sandals have become more fashionable, and many have been designed in a larger range of fun colors. They're also great for trips—why pack two sets of shoes when you might only need one? Whether you're going on a tropical getaway, a camping trip, or just a walk around the corner to your favorite bodega, these styl
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The best USB hubs for charging your stuff
A place to plug in all your devices. (Amazon/) We're all in the same situation: so many gadgets that are charged by a USB connection and not nearly enough ports to keep them charged. I've got my phone and mouse connected to my laptop, a number of controller chargers and external hard drives charging through my PC and gaming systems, and my bluetooth headphones and speakers plugged directly into a
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Ekspert om eksplosion i Beirut: »Ammoniumnitrat detonerer ikke spontant«
Mindst 100 er dræbt efter at indholdet i en lagerbygning på Beirut havn røg i luften i går – men hvorfor eksploderede det?
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Lottery for ventilators
In times of acute shortages, the orthodoxy in healthcare is for scarce resources to be allocated based on who has the best chance of survival. However, Dr Diego Silva, from the University of Sydney, argues this simple utility calculus is unjust because it exacerbates existing social inequities.In a paper published in Chest Journal, Dr Silva proposes a radical departure from current convention by a
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Changes in land evaporation shape the climate
An international team of Hungarian, American and Chinese scientists have demonstrated that an existing calibration-free version of the CR method that inherently tracks the aridity changes of the environment in each step of the calculations can better detect long-term trends in continental-scale land evaporation rates than a recently developed and globally calibrated one without such dynamic adjust
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Ancient mountains recorded in Antarctic sandstones reveal potential links to global events
A new analysis of sandstones from Antarctica indicates there may be important links between the generation of mountain belts and major transitions in Earth's atmosphere and oceans. A team of researchers analyzed the chemistry of tiny zircon grains commonly found in the Earth's continental rock record to determine their ages and chemical compositions. The study was published recently in the interna
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Improved modelling of nuclear structure in francium aids searches for new physics
Thanks to researchers from The University of Queensland, we now know with much greater certainty the nuclear magnetic moments of francium atoms.
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How thoughts could one day control electronic prostheses, wirelessly
The current generation of neural implants record enormous amounts of neural activity, then transmit these brain signals through wires to a computer. But, so far, when researchers have tried to create wireless brain-computer interfaces to do this, it took so much power to transmit the data that the implants generated too much heat to be safe for the patient. A new study suggests how to solve his pr
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Break it down: A new way to address common computing problem
A new algorithm developed in the lab of Jr-Shin Li at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis provides a framework for solving complex linear inverse problems that doesn't require a supercomputer and also enhances security and privacy.
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Epidemic model shows how COVID-19 could spread through firefighting camps
To support fire agencies as they continue their mission-critical work, a team that includes Colorado State University experts has developed an epidemiological modeling exercise for the USDA Forest Service and other fire managers that demonstrates potential risks and various scenarios COVID-19 could pose for the fire management community. Their model is published in the journal Fire.
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Coronavirus pandemic shows no sign of slowing across South America
Even after four months of strict lockdowns in some South American countries, cases of covid-19 are still soaring across the continent
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Instagram Launches Reels, Its TikTok Clone, in the US
The company is wooing creators with features they know and love, on a platform President Trump doesn't publicly hate.
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Weaving Western and Indigenous knowledge together enhances conservation
Wildlife translocations will have better results if they are led, or genuinely co-led, by Indigenous peoples.
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Dampening of the Senses Is Linked to Dementia Risk
A decline in smell was the sense loss most strongly associated with such risk in a recent study. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Galileo's Lessons for Living and Working through a Plague
An outbreak in Italy in the 1630s forced him to find new ways of doing his research and connecting with his family — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dampening of the Senses Is Linked to Dementia Risk
A decline in smell was the sense loss most strongly associated with such risk in a recent study. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Weaving Western and Indigenous knowledge together enhances conservation
Wildlife translocations will have better results if they are led, or genuinely co-led, by Indigenous peoples.
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Study finds Perth's urban reptiles are accumulating toxic levels of rat poison
Curtin University-led research has found that common reptile species in Perth are accumulating rat poisons at an alarming rate, posing serious implications for the wider urban food web in Australia, and around the world.
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Study finds Perth's urban reptiles are accumulating toxic levels of rat poison
Curtin University-led research has found that common reptile species in Perth are accumulating rat poisons at an alarming rate, posing serious implications for the wider urban food web in Australia, and around the world.
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Bumblebee larval growth impaired by insecticide
Researchers from Royal Holloway have found that an insecticide used in more than 81 countries, including within the EU, could contribute to a global decline in bumblebees.
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Bumblebee larval growth impaired by insecticide
Researchers from Royal Holloway have found that an insecticide used in more than 81 countries, including within the EU, could contribute to a global decline in bumblebees.
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Archie Young obituary
Geriatrician who pioneered the idea of strength training for elderly people Unlike other exercise researchers in the 1980s who were focusing on heart health, the geriatrician Archie Young , who has died aged 73, was interested in strength and balance. To live independently and avoid falls, it is fundamental to have sufficient balance to stand upright and the muscle strength to get up from the toi
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Public Health England issues rare alert over illicit prescription drugs
Surge in tablets sold as benzodiazepines, used to treat anxiety or insomnia, linked to hospitalisations and deaths A surge in illicit prescription drugs that have been linked to hospitalisations and deaths in England has prompted health officials to issue a rare national alert. Public Health England (PHE) issued the alert to drug treatment services and healthcare providers about the availability
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Improved modelling of nuclear structure in francium aids searches for new physics
Thanks to researchers from The University of Queensland, we now know with much greater certainty the nuclear magnetic moments of francium atoms.
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Compressive shearing may start life on other planets
Massive compressive shearing forces generated by the tidal pull of Jupiter-like planets on their rocky ice-covered moons may form a natural reactor that drives simple amino acids to polymerize into larger compounds. These extreme mechanical forces strongly enhance molecule condensation reactions, opening a new arena of possibilities for the chemical origins of life on Earth and other rocky planets
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Cells under stress get into molecular 'traffic jams,' triggering a suicide pathway
When cells experience a high level of stress—for example, when they are exposed to too much UV light—ribosomes inside the cell collide and get into traffic jams. Now, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a protein that recognizes this traffic problem and pushes the cell down a path toward cell suicide.
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Study sheds new light on cell migration
The 3-D structure of the ELMO / DOCK2 complex, an important molecular machine that plays a crucial role in cell migration in the body, is now better understood thanks to new research by scientists in Montreal and the United Kingdom.
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Most Americans don't have enough assets to withstand 3 months without income
A new study from Oregon State University found that 77% of low- to moderate-income American households fall below the asset poverty threshold, meaning that if their income were cut off they would not have the financial assets to maintain at least poverty-level status for three months.
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Harbor porpoises and seal bombs
Using recordings from MBARI's deep-sea hydrophone, marine-mammal researchers have found that the sounds of seal bombs could have significant impacts on the behavior of harbor porpoises in and around Monterey Bay. Seal bombs are explosive charges (roughly equivalent to an M-80 or cherry bomb) that commercial fishers throw into the ocean to discourage sea lions from interfering with their operations
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Compressive shearing may start life on other planets
Massive compressive shearing forces generated by the tidal pull of Jupiter-like planets on their rocky ice-covered moons may form a natural reactor that drives simple amino acids to polymerize into larger compounds. These extreme mechanical forces strongly enhance molecule condensation reactions, opening a new arena of possibilities for the chemical origins of life on Earth and other rocky planets
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Cells under stress get into molecular 'traffic jams,' triggering a suicide pathway
When cells experience a high level of stress—for example, when they are exposed to too much UV light—ribosomes inside the cell collide and get into traffic jams. Now, Johns Hopkins scientists have found a protein that recognizes this traffic problem and pushes the cell down a path toward cell suicide.
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Study sheds new light on cell migration
The 3-D structure of the ELMO / DOCK2 complex, an important molecular machine that plays a crucial role in cell migration in the body, is now better understood thanks to new research by scientists in Montreal and the United Kingdom.
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Harbor porpoises and seal bombs
Using recordings from MBARI's deep-sea hydrophone, marine-mammal researchers have found that the sounds of seal bombs could have significant impacts on the behavior of harbor porpoises in and around Monterey Bay. Seal bombs are explosive charges (roughly equivalent to an M-80 or cherry bomb) that commercial fishers throw into the ocean to discourage sea lions from interfering with their operations
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Cementing the future
Cement is a mineral-based material that binds together sand and rock to form concrete. Although the use of cement stretches back into antiquity, scientists are still unclear on the exact process by which it transforms from a fresh paste into a solid. Better understanding of this transition could lead to developments in strengthening concrete as well as lowering its overall cost.
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Discovery could lead to more potent garlic, boosting flavor and bad breath
For centuries, people around the world have used garlic as a spice, natural remedy, and pest deterrent—but they didn't know how powerful or pungent the heads of garlic were until they tasted them.
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Disparities in a common air pollutant are visible from space
As a global center for petrochemical manufacturing, Houston, Texas, experiences some of the worst air quality in the country, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Evidence suggests that air pollution disproportionately affects low-income, non-white and Hispanic residents, but it's difficult to directly observe differences in pollutants between neighborhoods. Now, researchers repo
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Everett's cat
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02286-5 Trick or treat?
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Discovery could lead to more potent garlic, boosting flavor and bad breath
For centuries, people around the world have used garlic as a spice, natural remedy, and pest deterrent—but they didn't know how powerful or pungent the heads of garlic were until they tasted them.
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Rocket sees curling waves above alaskan sky
The "surfer waves" in this image, forming high above the Alaskan sky, illuminate the invisible currents in the upper atmosphere. They were measured by trimethyl-aluminum gas released during a sounding rocket launch from Poker Flat, Alaska, on Jan. 26, 2018. Scientists photograph the gas, which is not harmful to humans, after it instantaneously ignites when exposed to oxygen. The findings were publ
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Is humanity doomed because we can't plan for the long term? Three experts discuss
While the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic are still unclear, it is certain that they are a profound shock to the systems underpinning contemporary life.
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Physicist proposes way to record shutter speeds of molecule-glimpsing 'cameras'
Capturing frames of photosynthesis and other molecular gymnastics in action means reaching a shutter speed that makes fast look very, very slow—so fast that physicists are just now working their way up to it.
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Knife crime: why young people need to get a say in their rehabilitation
Knife crime hit a record high in England and Wales before the COVID-19 lockdown came into place—with police reporting 46,265 cases for the year to March. The recent report by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said this was 51% higher compared to when the data was first collected in 2011.
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Electricity data shows real-time GDP change during COVID-19 lockdown
Electricity market data can play a vital role in measuring the impact of COVID-19 and lockdown policies on GDP, according to a new study.
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Blanket of rock debris offers glaciers more protection from climate change than previously known
A new study which provides a global estimate of rock cover on the Earth's glaciers has revealed that the expanse of rock debris on glaciers, a factor that has been ignored in models of glacier melt and sea level rise, could be significant.
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Researchers work with NM small businesses to test new respirator materials
A sandwich of materials tested by Sandia National Laboratories is being manufactured into N95-like respirators that could be used in local medical facilities. The project originated from the urgent need for personal protective equipment when the COVID-19 outbreak began.
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UK Recommendations Wrong on Acupuncture
NICE draft recommendations on acupuncture don't even make sense from an EBM perspective, and utterly fail to consider SBM principles.
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A decade after the Occupy movement, a new digital archive chronicles its history—and continuing influence
Launched at Case Western Reserve University this summer, the open-source Occupy Archive offers citizens and scholars a chance to revisit the multi-faceted movement—and recognize its roots in contemporary calls for reform and justice
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ATLAS experiment reports the observation of photon collisions producing weak-force carriers
During the International Conference on High-Energy Physics (ICHEP 2020), the ATLAS collaboration presented the first observation of photon collisions producing pairs of W bosons, elementary particles that carry the weak force, one of the four fundamental forces. The result demonstrates a new way of using the LHC, namely as a high-energy photon collider directly probing electroweak interactions. It
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Clear masks help the hard of hearing, but they could benefit everybody
Founded in 2017, ClearMask makes transparent surgical masks that are FDA approved. Now it's turning its attention to pandemic equipment as well. (Courtesy of ClearMask/) Allysa Dittmar still remembers the day clearly. While undergoing a hospital procedure in 2017, the doctors, suited up in their surgical gowns and masks, asked her a number of pre-op questions. But she couldn't understand their wo
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SpaceX's prototype Mars rocket has flown for the first time
A prototype of Starship, the rocket SpaceX intends to use to bring explorers to the moon and Mars, has hopped 150 metres into the air in its first flight
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A New Hotline Offers Free Anonymous Support for Gamers
The Games and Online Harassment Hotline launched Tuesday as a resource for anyone to talk about the emotional issues that emerge all over the industry.
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An '80s File Format Enabled Stealthy Mac Hacking
The now-patched vulnerability would have let hackers target Microsoft Office using Symbolic Link—a file type that hasn't been in common use in over 30 years.
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Disparities in a common air pollutant are visible from space
As a global center for petrochemical manufacturing, Houston, Texas, experiences some of the worst air quality in the country, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Evidence suggests that air pollution disproportionately affects low-income, non-white and Hispanic residents, but it's difficult to directly observe differences in pollutants between neighborhoods. Now, researchers repo
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Averting hunger in sub-Saharan Africa requires data and synthesis
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02281-w As the United Nations warns of famine on a scale not seen in 50 years, researchers must help to build agile, inclusive data collection and analysis to inform agricultural policy.
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How the pandemic might play out in 2021 and beyond
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02278-5 This coronavirus is here for the long haul — here's what scientists predict for the next months and years.
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Kåre Mølbak er overrasket: Havde regnet med at se smittestigning tidligere
PLUS. Statsepidemiologen håber på, at kurven over covid-19-tilfælde ikke er eksponentielt stigende, men når et plateau og forbliver der over efterår og vinter.
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How to hug people in a coronavirus-stricken world
Hugging has benefits for our health that might make it worth doing despite coronavirus risks – here's how to reduce the chance you'll pass on the virus
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Beirut explosion: What is ammonium nitrate and how dangerous is it?
Ammonium nitrate has been blamed for a deadly explosion in Beirut, but what exactly is the chemical?
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Weird Mystery Seeds Arriving by Mail Sprout Biodiversity Concerns
An invasive plant expert explains what could happen if enigmatic seeds shipped from China are released — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Weird Mystery Seeds Arriving by Mail Sprout Biodiversity Concerns
An invasive plant expert explains what could happen if enigmatic seeds shipped from China are released — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Weird Mystery Seeds Arriving by Mail Sprout Biodiversity Concerns
An invasive plant expert explains what could happen if enigmatic seeds shipped from China are released — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The hack that could make face recognition think someone else is you
Researchers have demonstrated that they can fool a modern face recognition system into seeing someone who isn't there. A team from the cybersecurity firm McAfee set up the attack against a facial recognition system similar to those currently used at airports for passport verification. By using machine learning, they created an image that looked like one person to the human eye, but was identified
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Novavax has announced encouraging early results for its experimental coronavirus vaccine
The news: Maryland biotechnology company Novavax has announced encouraging results from a preliminary study of its experimental coronavirus vaccine. The trial enrolled 131 healthy volunteers in Australia, gave them either a placebo or one of four escalating doses of its vaccine, and found that everyone who received the vaccine produced a high level of antibodies against covid-19. Novavax signed a
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Immunology Is Where Intuition Goes to Die
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . Updated at 10:36 a.m. ET on August 5, 2020. There's a joke about immunology, which Jessica Metcalf of Princeton recently told me. An immunologist and a cardiologist are kidnapped. The kidnappers threaten to shoot one of them, but promise to spare whoever has made the greate
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Obama Couldn't Fix the System. Biden Must.
When the last Democratic president took office, some hoped that he would push for nuts-and bolts reform of the democratic process. Barack Obama ran to not only change the policies of the previous eight years but also to make the political system more responsive to and reflective of ordinary people. And the memory of the 2000 election debacle was relatively fresh. Surely America could no longer pu
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One Legacy of the Pandemic May Be Less Judgment of the Child-Free
A few weeks into the pandemic, a meme circulated among some of the mothers I follow on various social-media platforms. "Check in on your friends with little kids," the words in a tiny black serif font on a light-pink background read, followed by a fairly long list of things parents with young kids couldn't do, including "go for a run by themselves," "peacefully read a book or start a new project,
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Your Income Predicts How Well You Can Socially Distance
America's rich used to move around more than the poor. When Covid landed, that flipped: The wealthy now work remotely, while essential workers toil.
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Can Killing Cookies Save Journalism?
A Dutch public broadcaster got rid of targeted digital ads—and its revenues went way up.
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Inside the Courthouse Break-In Spree That Landed Two White Hat Hackers in Jail
When two men were hired to break into Iowa judicial buildings, they thought it was just another physical security audit—until they were charged with burglary.
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Don't Downplay the Role of Indigenous People in Molding the Ecological Landscape
Climate has been a major driver of changes in vegetation over thousands of years—but not the only one — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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America's Prosecutors Know What Bill Barr Did Was Wrong
What is the American public to make of Attorney General Bill Barr's congressional testimony defending his actions in the Trump ally Roger Stone's case? During Barr's appearance before the House Judiciary Committee last week, Barr claimed the mantle of fairness and compassion, arguing that the career prosecutors were out of line in seeking a nine-year sentence for this first-time offender, who is
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Europe's Euclid Space Telescope Will See Cosmos with Panoramic Vision
Launching in 2022, the wide-field observatory will be one of three next-generation facilities meant to lift the veil on dark energy, dark matter and other cosmic mysteries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Europe's Euclid Space Telescope Will See Cosmos with Panoramic Vision
Launching in 2022, the wide-field observatory will be one of three next-generation facilities meant to lift the veil on dark energy, dark matter and other cosmic mysteries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Brain fog, phantom smells and tinnitus: my 4 months (and counting) of Covid-19 | Hannah Davis
I fell sick on 25 March. Four months later, I'm still dealing with fever, cognitive dysfunction, memory issues and much more I just passed the four-month mark of being sick with Covid. I am young, and I had considered myself healthy. My first symptom was that I couldn't read a text message. It wasn't about anything complex – just trying to arrange a video call – but it was a few sentences longer
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Coronavirus Live Updates: Chicago Schools Will Start the Academic Year Remotely
Six states have entered a pact to reduce testing times. About one-third of Afghanistan's population, or roughly 10 million people, have probably been infected by the coronavirus and recovered, its health ministry said.
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Trader Joe's Knows That Petitions Aren't Commandments
Trader Joe's has long given playful foreign versions of its name to certain international product lines: Trader José, Trader Giotto, Trader Ming, and so on. One could have guessed that amidst our racial reckoning (" the Great Awokening ," as Vox 's Matthew Yglesias calls it), these names would come under attack. This happened: A 17-year-old woman spearheaded a petition that attracted more than 5,
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AI is learning when it should and shouldn't defer to a human
The context: Studies show that when people and AI systems work together, they can outperform either one acting alone. Medical diagnostic systems are often checked over by human doctors, and content moderation systems filter what they can before requiring human assistance. But algorithms are rarely designed to optimize for this AI-to-human handover. If they were, the AI system would only defer to
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Ny internationell kartläggning av barns smärta på sjukhus
Sedan 80-talet har forskare bland annat visat att barn faktiskt kan känna smärta i samband med medicinska procedurer, men också att man kan reducera och hantera smärta till exempel genom åldersanpassad information och distraktion. Trots det upplever barn fortfarande smärta och rädsla för smärta i samband med sjukhusvistelser.
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Why is the government buying Covid tests without evidence they work? Ravindra Gupta and Dami Collier
As clinical researchers, we searched for information about the UK's new 90-minute tests – but found no data about their effectiveness Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Many of us working in NHS hospitals welcomed the news earlier this week that the government had purchased 90-minute Covid-19 tests . Rapid swab tests, called LamPORE, and 5,000 machines, supplied by DnaN
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Ikke helt selvkørende: Holo forsøger med autonome busser i Nordhavnen
Mandag åbnede en rute for selvkørende busser i Nordhavns Århusgadekvarter. Ingeniøren tog med på turen, som ikke var helt uden hårde opbremsninger.
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Celebritykultur fra Julius Cæsar til Greta Thunberg… og Søren Brostrøm
Celebrities optræder ikke kun i reality-tv og tabloide medier. Tværtimod har celebritykulturen…
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A bitter aftertaste: Legal threats, alleged poisoning muddy the waters for a trial of a tea to treat malaria
Xavier Argemi first heard the claim that tea made from artemisia herbs could be useful in the treatment of malaria from a TV documentary in 2017. The documentary, featuring Lucile Cornet-Vernet, the director of the La Maison de l'Artemisia, a non-profit organization that grows artemisia and promotes its use in centers across Africa, focused on … Continue reading
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The guru business thrives as people contemplate mortality
As a second Covid-19 wave looms, have Americans given up on self-improvement?
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SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine design enabled by prototype pathogen preparedness
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2622-0
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The BXD21/TyJ recombinant inbred strain as a model for innate inflammatory response in distinct brain regions
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70213-9
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SWATH-MS-based quantitative proteomics reveals a uniquely intricate defense response in Cnaphalocrocis medinalis-resistant rice
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63470-1 SWATH-MS-based quantitative proteomics reveals a uniquely intricate defense response in Cnaphalocrocis medinalis -resistant rice
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Functional MRI study of language organization in left-handed and right-handed trilingual subjects
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70167-y
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Impaired consciousness at stroke onset in large hemisphere infarction: incidence, risk factors and outcome
Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70172-1
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Do You Want to Be a Vaccine Volunteer?
How do you sign up for a trial? Who is eligible? Will you be paid? Could an experimental shot protect you? Could you get sick? Who covers the costs if you do? Here's what you need to know.
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Heart disease medications underused among Hispanic/Latino populations with PAD
Recommended heart medications are underused among Hispanic/Latino people with peripheral artery disease (PAD).Only a quarter to slightly more than half of Hispanic/Latino study participants with PAD reported taking recommended medications to lower blood pressure and cholesterol and to prevent blood clots.
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Cannabis use shows substantial risks, no benefits for cardiovascular health; Pachowicz identifying gaps and opportunities in space research
Observational studies have found no cardiovascular benefits associated with cannabis use.Cannabis use may be linked to an increased risk of heart attacks, atrial fibrillation and heart failure; however, additional studies need to be conducted to better understand the research findings.Cannabis is classified as a Schedule I drug by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), which severely limits scien
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Coronavirus in pets, French research strategy and a duplication detector
Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02276-7 The latest science news, in brief.
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Ibram X. Kendi on "The End of Denial"
We are living in the midst of an anti-racist revolution, Ibram X. Kendi writes in a bracing cover story for The Atlantic 's September issue. This spring and summer, demonstrations calling for racial justice attracted hundreds of thousands of people in cities across the country. By June, roughly three out of four Americans were saying that "racial and ethnic discrimination" is a "big problem" in t
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Trump After Portland
W in or lose in November , Donald Trump is waging a "law and order" campaign that will leave a trail of wreckage likely to outlast his presidency. Sending paramilitary-style forces into Portland, Oregon, and threatening to do the same in other cities, is damaging the reputations of the federal agencies he oversees and deepening the divide between law-enforcement agents and the citizens they're su
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Is This the Beginning of the End of American Racism?
I. Marine One waited for the president of the United States on the South Lawn of the White House. It was July 30, 2019, not long past 9 a.m. To hear more feature stories, get the Audm iPhone app. Donald Trump was headed to historic Jamestown to mark the 400th anniversary of the first representative assembly of European settlers in the Americas. But Black Virginia legislators were boycotting the v
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Unhappy at work? How to find meaning and maintain your mental health
When most of your life is spent doing one thing, it matters if that thing is unfulfilling or if it makes you unhappy. According to research, most people are not thrilled with their jobs. However, there are ways to find purpose in your work and to reduce the negative impact that the daily grind has on your mental health. "The evidence is that about 70 percent of people are not engaged in what they
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Subduction hides high-pressure sources of energy that may feed the deep subsurface biosphere
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17342-x Geological sources of H2 and abiotic CH4 have had a critical role in the evolution of life and sustainability of the deep subsurface biosphere, yet the origins of these sources remain largely unconstrained. Here the authors show that deep serpentinization (40–80 km) during subduction generates significant amou
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Alternative meta-analysis of behavioral interventions to promote action on climate change yields different conclusions
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17613-7
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Reply to: Alternative meta-analysis of behavioural interventions to promote action on climate change yields different conclusions
Nature Communications, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17614-6
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Biotechnology Could Change the Cattle Industry. Will it Succeed?
Scientists are turning to gene editing to bypass conventional breeding practices and create cows that are healthier, meatier, and less harmful to the environment. But in the wake of several high-profile gene-editing failures in livestock and humans, will consumers deem new biotechnologies too dangerous?
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Treating fish as a public health asset can strengthen food security in lower income countries
The food and nutrient security of billions of people worldwide depend on fish being treated as a domestic public health asset instead of a commodity.
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Treating fish as a public health asset can strengthen food security in lower income countries
The food and nutrient security of billions of people worldwide depend on fish being treated as a domestic public health asset instead of a commodity.
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Lebanon death toll climbs to 100 as day of mourning begins
Country declares a 'disaster zone' after explosion rips through Beirut
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Nytt höjdrekord för däggdjur
Jan Storz och medarbetare rapporterar i tidskriften PNAS att de fångat en mus av arten Phyllotis xanthopygus rupestris på 6.739 meters höjd på toppen av den slocknade vulkanen Llullaillaco på gränsen mellan Chile och Argentina. Så högt upp lär man inte ha observerat andra däggdjur än människor ens i Himalaya. Själv har jag bara fångat Sveriges högsta (icke flygande) fluga på Kebnekaises sydtopp, s
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Brazil firefighters race to contain wetland blazes
A tractor cuts a firebreak through the vegetation of the Pantanal, the world's biggest tropical wetlands, as firefighters race to contain the blazes that have been devastating one of the most biodiverse regions on Earth.
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'Disgusting' study rating attractiveness of women with endometriosis retracted by medical journal
Fertility and Sterility took seven years to take down Italian study, which was criticised by doctors for ethical concerns and dubious justifications A widely criticised peer-reviewed study that measured the attractiveness of women with endometriosis has been retracted from the medical journal Fertility and Sterility. The study, Attractiveness of women with rectovaginal endometriosis: a case-contr
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What kind of face mask best protects against coronavirus?
Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting or giving someone Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly,
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Tropic storm Isaias whips up eastern US, killing at least 6
At least six people were killed as Tropical Storm Isaias spawned tornadoes and dumped rain Tuesday along the U.S. East Coast after making landfall as a hurricane in North Carolina, where it caused floods and fires that displaced dozens of people.
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SpaceX completes test flight of Mars rocket prototype
SpaceX on Tuesday successfully completed a flight of less than a minute of the largest prototype ever tested of the future rocket Starship, which the company hopes to use one day to colonize Mars.
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Astronauts: SpaceX Dragon capsule 'came alive' on descent
The astronauts on SpaceX's first crew flight said Tuesday that their Dragon capsule "came alive" and sounded like a beast as it descended through the atmosphere to a smooth splashdown in the Gulf of Mexico.
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Scientists discover new penguin colonies from space
A new study using satellite mapping technology reveals there are nearly 20% more emperor penguin colonies in Antarctica than was previously thought. The results provide an important benchmark for monitoring the impact of environmental change on the population of this iconic bird.
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Building dementia friendly churches
A project to help church communities become more 'dementia friendly' has had a significant impact across the country.
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Scientists discover new penguin colonies from space
A new study using satellite mapping technology reveals there are nearly 20% more emperor penguin colonies in Antarctica than was previously thought. The results provide an important benchmark for monitoring the impact of environmental change on the population of this iconic bird.
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Carbon footprinting and pricing under climate concerns
Researchers from Esade, University of St. Gallen, HEC Paris, and Columbia University published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that explores the conundrum faced by firms that want to reduce their impact on the climate: Green products and their popularity with consumers can lead to an increase in sales and, with it, an increased carbon footprint for the organization as a whole.
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The three strategic priorities of marketing excellence
Researchers from University of Mannheim and University of Texas—Austin published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines the nature and effectiveness of marketing excellence as a business strategy. The study addresses two fundamental questions: How do managers understand and exercise marketing excellence? and How do investors evaluate marketing excellence?
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Cloudsat takes a slice from tropical storm Isaias
NASA's CloudSat passed over Tropical Storm Isaias as it was strengthening back into a hurricane on Aug. 3, and before it made landfall in North Carolina. CloudSat revealed areas of heavy rain and ice particles in high, powerful clouds.
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Increase in immigration has little impact on the wages of US citizens
A new study in Review of Economic Studies suggests that a large increase in the stock of immigrants to the United States would have little impact on the wages of native US citizens. Allowing for more high-skill immigration could be detrimental to some highly skilled workers in the country, but disproportionately beneficial to low skilled workers.
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Bird nests attract flying insects and parasites due to higher levels of carbon dioxide
Flying insects and parasites are often vectors for disease, but a mosquito needs to first find someone before they can bite them. In a recent study published in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, researchers examined bird nests in order to understand how insects and parasites detect gases such as carbon dioxide and methane as a way to locate their hosts.
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Bird nests attract flying insects and parasites due to higher levels of carbon dioxide
Flying insects and parasites are often vectors for disease, but a mosquito needs to first find someone before they can bite them. In a recent study published in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, researchers examined bird nests in order to understand how insects and parasites detect gases such as carbon dioxide and methane as a way to locate their hosts.
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Are vultures spreaders of microbes that put human health at risk?
A new analysis published in IBIS examines whether bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that are present in wild vultures cause disease in the birds, and whether vultures play a role in spreading or preventing infectious diseases to humans and other animal species.
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Small trees offer hope for rainforests
Small trees that grow up in drought conditions could form the basis of more drought-resistant rainforests, new research suggests.
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Are vultures spreaders of microbes that put human health at risk?
A new analysis published in IBIS examines whether bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that are present in wild vultures cause disease in the birds, and whether vultures play a role in spreading or preventing infectious diseases to humans and other animal species.
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Tracking humanity's latest toxins in stranded whales and dolphins
As humanity develops new types of plastics and chemicals, researchers are constantly trying to keep up with understanding how these contaminants affect the environment and wildlife. A new study gives a first look at the presence and potential effects of these pollutants in stranded dolphins and whales along the coast of the southeastern United States.
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Many states lack election flexibility needed to address pandemic safety concerns
Many states continue to lack the policies and preparations needed to address safety concerns of holding elections in November, despite the lessons learned in recent 2020 primary elections that were disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic, according to new research from the RAND Corporation.
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Tracking humanity's latest toxins in stranded whales and dolphins
As humanity develops new types of plastics and chemicals, researchers are constantly trying to keep up with understanding how these contaminants affect the environment and wildlife. A new study gives a first look at the presence and potential effects of these pollutants in stranded dolphins and whales along the coast of the southeastern United States.
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Did the election of Donald Trump affect Europeans' support for US trade agreement?
A survey conducted immediately before and after the 2016 US presidential election reveals that the election of Donald Trump had a negative effect on Europeans' image of the United States, but it did not seem to affect the willingness of Europeans to sign a trade and investment agreement with the country.
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Germany's Synlab to lift Covid-19 testing capacity for the winter
Private equity-owned group wins contract to test players for European football tournaments
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Don't demolish old buildings, urge architects
Knocking down defunct structures sends a wrecking ball through carbon targets, architects say.
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Ten Rules for Reading a Scientific Paper
submitted by /u/MostlyAffable [link] [comments]
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Community Feedback Thread (Aug 03 – Aug 10)
Hi all, In a continued effort to improve this sub, the mods want to encourage you all to let us know what we can do to make r/cogsci the best forum for cognitive science on the internet! All grievances, suggestions and rants are welcome 🙂 If you have an unrelated idea to share, a question about the industry, feel free to comment here as well – we want to hear from you! submitted by /u/MostlyAffa
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Proportionality Bias: Big Events ≠ Big Cause [Not Always]
submitted by /u/thinkingyeti [link] [comments]
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Phosphorus-rich stars with unusual abundances are challenging theoretical predictions
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17649-9 Current models of Galactic chemical evolution under predict the phosphorus we observe in our Solar System. Here, the authors show the discovery of 15 phosphorus-rich stars with a peculiar abundance pattern that challenges the present stellar nucleosynthesis theoretical predictions, but which could explain the
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Whom to sacrifice for Human Challenge Trials?
Science elites are demanding human challenge trials NOW. Science journalists cheer them on. Should healthy volunteers be infected with the Coronavirus? And if yes, who exactly will it be?
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Though concerned about COVID-19, cigar smokers are smoking more, survey finds
An online survey of cigar smokers found while the majority responded they intended to quit smoking due to concerns about elevated health risks if they contracted COVID-19, more than twice as many reported they increased rather than decreased their tobacco use since the pandemic's onset.
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Real-time imaging can help prevent deadly dust explosions
Researchers at Purdue University have developed an image- and video-based application using OpenCV algorithms that detect explosible suspended dust concentration. The app uses a camera or a video recording device to image and determine suspended dust, as well as accurately distinguish it from normal background noise.
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Consumption of a blueberry enriched diet by women for six weeks alters determinants of human muscle progenitor cell function
A new research study, published in the Journal of Nutrition, investigated how serum from subjects consuming a diet enriched with blueberries would affect the cells responsible for muscle growth and repair. The emerging study, "," was conducted at Cornell University.
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Building dementia friendly churches
A project to help church communities become more 'dementia friendly' has had a significant impact across the country.The Dementia Friendly Church programme began as a collaboration between Peter Kevern, Professor of Values in Health and Social Care at Staffordshire University, and the Anglican Diocese of Lichfield in 2012.
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Understanding why some children enjoy TV more than others
New research shows that children's own temperament could be driving the amount of TV they watch.The research shows how the brain responses of 10-month-old babies watching a clip from Disney's Fantasia on repeat could predict whether they would enjoy watching fast-paced TV shows six months later.The findings are important for the ongoing debate around early TV exposure.
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Carbon footprinting and pricing under climate concerns
Marketers can lead how their companies can use the cost and demand effects of reducing the carbon footprint of their products to determine the profit-maximizing design.
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Rethink needed for treatment of Severe and Enduring Anorexia Nervosa
Concerns over ineffective traditional treatments have prompted calls to better understand the complex processes underpinning Severe and Enduring Anorexia Nervosa (SE-AN). SE-AN is a subgroup of people whose anorexia nervosa has become chronic, severe, and enduring – and while traditional clinical models of treatment for eating disorders focus on medical recovery, many people in this subgroup never
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The three strategic priorities of marketing excellence
Investors value marketing excellence more highly than they value strategies based on market orientation and marketing capabilities.
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Smartphones prove to be time-saving analytical tools
Scientists use a smartphone camera to easily measure soil density — a key metric for analyzing our soils
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COVID-19 rates higher among minority, socioeconomically disadvantaged children
Minority and socioeconomically disadvantagedchildren have significantly higher rates of COVID-19 infection, a new study led byChildren's National Hospital researchers shows. These findings, reported online August5 in Pediatrics, parallel similar health disparities for the novel coronavirus that have beenfound in adults, the authors state.
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Increase in immigration has little impact on the wages of US citizens
A new study in Review of Economic Studies suggests that a large increase in the stock of immigrants to the United States would have little impact on the wages of native US citizens. Allowing for more high-skill immigration could be detrimental to some highly skilled workers in the country, but disproportionately beneficial to low skilled workers.
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Study suggests pregnancy and ovarian function are risk factors for coronary artery disease
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death in both men and women. Women are more susceptible to CAD during the menopause transition because of loss of ovarian function leading to estrogen deficiency. A new study suggests the risk of CAD could be identified earlier by looking at reproductive risk factors. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North
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Did the election of Donald Trump affect Europeans' support for US trade agreement?
A survey conducted immediately before and after the 2016 US presidential election reveals that the election of Donald Trump had a negative effect on Europeans' image of the United States, but it did not seem to affect the willingness of Europeans to sign a trade and investment agreement with the country.
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Are vultures spreaders of microbes that put human health at risk?
A new analysis published in IBIS examines whether bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that are present in wild vultures cause disease in the birds, and whether vultures play a role in spreading or preventing infectious diseases to humans and other animal species.
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Neuroendocrine markers of grief
Researchers have examined what's currently known about the neuroendocrine effects of grief and whether biological factors can predict complicated or prolonged grief after the death of a loved one. The findings appear in the Journal of Neuroendocrinology.
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Antibiotics linked to higher heart disease risk in individuals with type 1 diabetes
Results from a study published in the Journal of Internal Medicine suggest that bacterial infections may elevate the risk of coronary heart disease in individuals with type 1 diabetes.
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Study examines skin diseases in older adults
In a study of 552 adults aged 70 to 93 years old, 80% of participants had at least one skin disease that required treatment, and the most common conditions were fungal skin infections, rosacea, actinic keratosis, and eczema.
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Lung-specific risk factors may increase hip fracture risk in individuals who smoke
Smoking has been linked to a higher risk of bone fractures. Researchers have now identified certain lung-related factors that may help to predict an individual smoker's fracture risk. The findings are published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.
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Gout diagnoses rising worldwide
The prevalence of gout — a form of arthritis characterized by severe pain, redness, and tenderness in joints–increased across the world at an alarming rate from 1990 to 2017, according to an analysis published in Arthritis & Rheumatology.
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HPV vaccination linked to lower risk of precancerous condition
Vaccination against the human papilloma virus (HPV) reduces the risk of a condition that often leads to cervical cancer, according to an analysis of Danish health registry data.
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Rheumatoid arthritis linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes
A recent analysis of a US commercial insurance database found that adults with rheumatoid arthritis had a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than other individuals, including those with other types of arthritis.
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Trajectories of antidepressant medication use during pregnancy
In an analysis of women who started pregnancy when taking antidepressant medications, investigators identified three trajectories of antidepressant dispensing during pregnancy: more than half stopped their treatment, a quarter maintained their treatment throughout pregnancy, and one-fifth discontinued it for a minimum of three months and then resumed it during the postpartum period.
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Men scoring higher on 'man box' scale are prone to violence, mental illness
Study finds that men who harbor more harmful attitudes about masculinity — including beliefs about aggression and homophobia — also tend toward bullying, sexual harassment, depression and suicidal thoughts.
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Many states lack election flexibility needed to address pandemic safety concerns
The coronavirus pandemic poses unprecedented safety challenges to the nation's elections and significantly disrupted elections held this spring. A new study finds that many states continue to lack the policies and preparations needed to address safety concerns of holding elections in November. The analysis also concludes that all the options available to improve safety during the 2020 election hav
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Bird nests attract flying insects and parasites due to higher levels of carbon dioxide
Researchers in Spain have examined bird nests in order to understand how flying insects and parasites detect gases as a way to locate their hosts. The study found that nests that had higher concentrations of carbon dioxide attracted more biting midges, a type of insect that carries a common blood parasite that infects local birds. The findings have implications regarding how diseases spread, which
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Tracking humanity's latest toxins in stranded whales and dolphins
As humanity develops new types of plastics and chemicals, researchers are constantly trying to keep up with understanding how these contaminants affect the environment and wildlife. A new study gives a first look at the presence and potential effects of these pollutants in stranded dolphins and whales along the coast of the southeastern United States.
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The Case for Rapid At-Home COVID Testing for Everyone – Facts So Romantic
The time it takes to ship COVID test samples to central labs and back is a burden—people risk infection as they wait days, sometimes weeks, for results. Photograph by MIA Studio / Shutterstock Imagine that every morning your child and her classmates take a COVID-19 test that offers results within a half hour, showing the transmission risk for that day. Those who might infect others stay home. The
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Dinosaurs suffered from cancer, study confirms
The fibula was originally discovered in 1989, though at the time scientists believed the damaged bone had been fractured. After reanalyzing the bone, and comparing it with fibulas from a human and another dinosaur, a team of scientists confirmed that the dinosaur suffered from the bone cancer osteosarcoma. The study shows how modern techniques can help scientists learn about the ancient origins o
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The Atlantic Daily: The TikTok Scuffle Tells a Bigger Story
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Arsh Raziuddin / The Atlantic Generation Z can continue to lip-synch away merrily—for now. The president reversed course on threats to ban TikTok, saying he'll instead allow the Chinese-owned soc
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Myndigheder stopper giftig håndsprit ved grænsen – står bag dødsfald i USA
PLUS. Giftig træsprit i produkter til hånddesinfektion er et stigende problem i USA, hvor det er skyld i indlæggelser og dødsfald. Miljøstyrelsen har nu for første gang fundet stoffet i håndsprit ved den danske grænse.
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Scientists discover new penguin colonies from space
A new study using satellite mapping technology reveals there are nearly 20% more emperor penguin colonies in Antarctica than was previously thought. The results provide an important benchmark for monitoring the impact of environmental change on the population of this iconic bird.
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Climate change: Satellites find new colonies of Emperor penguins
A search from space discovers new colonies of the Antarctic bird that has an uncertain future.
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Incredible: Watch SpaceX Fly Full-Scale Starship Prototype to 500 Feet
Lift-Off! SpaceX has successfully flown its massive SN5 Starship prototype at its Boca Chica, Texas testing grounds to a planned height of 150 meters, or roughly 500 feet. "Mars is looking real," SpaceX CEO Elon Musk tweeted in response to the news. And it was quite the sight — a livestream showed the gigantic cylindrical stainless steel structure float up into the air, leaving a massive dust clo
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Coronavirus live news: Trump pressed on false death rate claim as Europe faces second wave
US president flounders in media briefing and TV interview; France could lose control any time; Nadal withdraws from US Open. Follow all the developments US: Biden tells Trump to 'step up and do your job' 'We're fighting a ghost': six months on victories over virus remain fragile US: Trump on the ropes over Covid-19 figures in TV interview 1.38am BST From Charlotte Graham-McLay , our correspondent
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Spot robot turns 'Fluffy' in new factory floor job
BBC Click's Jen Copestake looks at the best of the week's technology stories.
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Machine learning could improve hurricane prediction
Applying a machine learning technique to a group of possible storm paths could help meteorologists provide more accurate medium-term hurricane forecasts. This approach could also help them issue timely warnings to communities in the path of these potentially deadly storms, report researchers. In a new study, the researchers used machine learning to remove certain groups of hurricane predictions f
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Study suggests embryos could be susceptible to coronavirus
Genes that are thought to play a role in how the SARS-CoV-2 virus infects our cells have been found to be active in embryos as early as during the second week of pregnancy, say scientists at the University of Cambridge and the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The researchers say this could mean embryos are susceptible to COVID-19 if the mother gets sick, potentially affecting the chan
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Angels in disguise: Angelfishes hybridize more than any other coral reef species
A new study highlights the remarkably high incidence of and tendency toward hybridisation in the angelfish family (even between divergent species), more so than in any other group of coral reef fishes.
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Monarchs raised in captivity may be worse at migrating than wild monarchs raised outdoors
New research provides clearer picture of the migration behavior of commercially and wild-derived monarchs and the effects of indoor rearing on ability to fly south.
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Scientists discover new penguin colonies from space
A new study using satellite mapping technology reveals there are nearly 20% more emperor penguin colonies in Antarctica than was previously thought. The results provide an important benchmark for monitoring the impact of environmental change on the population of this iconic bird.
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Small trees offer hope for rainforests
Small trees that grow up in drought conditions could form the basis of more drought-resistant rainforests, new research suggests.
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How to get your kids used to face masks
Having kids wearing a mask doesn't have to be a daily battle, says a nursing expert. Masks are an important school supply this year, especially if local school districts are planning on having in-person classes and activities this fall. "This is new to them, so be patient as they adjust and learn." Meg Sorg , a clinical assistant professor and a board-certified pediatric nurse practitioner in Pur
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4 tips to help kids go back to school during COVID-19
There are ways to ease the transition back to school for kids, parents, and caregivers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Not all children will have had the same experience during the pandemic. When they return to school or start online classes, circumstances will change—again. Navigating the changes has been like to traveling through a storm, says Adria Dunbar , an assistant professor of counselor ed
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Quantum cosmology explains anomalies beyond Einstein's physics
Quantum cosmology accounts for two major mysteries about the properties of the universe at the largest-scales, researchers report. Quantum cosmology is a theory that uses quantum mechanics to extend gravitational physics beyond Einstein's theory of general relativity. While Einstein's theory of general relativity can explain a large array of fascinating astrophysical and cosmological phenomena, s
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MPs say lack of early UK quarantine helped to accelerate pandemic
Government accused of allowing thousands of infected people into the country in February and March
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Scientists support plea to shut pubs, not schools
Children's Commissioner calls for government to 'put children first' if new lockdown is imposed
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Monarchs raised in captivity may be worse at migrating than wild monarchs raised outdoors
A hallmark of summer, monarch butterflies are a familiar sight in the Midwest, and many butterfly enthusiasts are eager to do what they can to support the declining monarch population. A new study at the University of Chicago provides new insight into the effects that raising monarchs in captivity might have on their ability to migrate south at the end of the summer, and cautions that some methods
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Angels in disguise: Angelfishes hybridize more than any other coral reef species
Renowned journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B has a new front cover fish: the marine angelfish. It commands star power due to a new study highlighting the remarkably high incidence of and tendency for hybridisation in this family (even between divergent species), more so than in any other group of coral reef fishes.
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Mizuho chief predicts wave of Covid M&A and succession shake-ups
Tatsufumi Sakai warns that Japanese companies must adapt their businesses to a 'with-corona' era that could last years
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SpaceX: Nasa crew describe rumbles and jolts of return to Earth
Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley describe returning to Earth from the ISS in SpaceX's vehicle.
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Monarchs raised in captivity may be worse at migrating than wild monarchs raised outdoors
A hallmark of summer, monarch butterflies are a familiar sight in the Midwest, and many butterfly enthusiasts are eager to do what they can to support the declining monarch population. A new study at the University of Chicago provides new insight into the effects that raising monarchs in captivity might have on their ability to migrate south at the end of the summer, and cautions that some methods
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Angels in disguise: Angelfishes hybridize more than any other coral reef species
Renowned journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B has a new front cover fish: the marine angelfish. It commands star power due to a new study highlighting the remarkably high incidence of and tendency for hybridisation in this family (even between divergent species), more so than in any other group of coral reef fishes.
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'Fall Guys: Ultimate Knockout' Is a Freewheeling Breath of Fresh Air
Surviving three or four rounds of this multiplayer knock-out game makes you feel like a total athlete, even as a pirate-costumed bean
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Radboudumc research leads to simplified dosage of HIV medicine for children
Children living with HIV can benefit from an adapted, simpler combination therapy. It is now clear that the use of one, widely available, pill of dolutegravir in children yields equally good treatment results as a combination of several, less readily available pills of that drug. Especially in countries where the number of infections is high and good care is less accessible, this makes it easier t
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What really happens in your body and brain when you orgasm?
An orgasm is described as a feeling of intense pleasure that happens during sexual activity. By studying the brain activity of people experiencing orgasms, researchers have been able to pinpoint some of the key changes that occur. These changes include heightened sensitivity to areas of the brain that control how we feel pain, making us less sensitive to it. An orgasm is described as a feeling of
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