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Pulmonary fibrosis treatment shows proof of principle

A pre-clinical study led by scientists at Cincinnati Children's demonstrates that in mice the drug barasertib reverses the activation of fibroblasts that cause dangerous scar tissue to build up in the lungs of people with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

5h

Churches received up to $10 billion in stimulus funding. They want more.

Churches and ministries received up to $10 billion in federal assistance during the first round of stimulus. The Catholic Church exploited a loophole to be considered a "small business" and received up to $3.5 billion in forgivable loans. With stimulus measures ending last week, up to 40 million Americans are in danger of losing their homes. Last Friday, the weekly $600 federal stimulus boost ran

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LATEST

Unlock A Universe Of Programming Jobs By Learning Linux

What do supercomputers, the New York Stock Exchange, smart toasters, and Android phones have in common? They're all powered by the Linux family of open-source operating systems. If you've ever used a device that wasn't running Mac OS X or Windows—or literally even used a website—chances are good that Linux was involved somehow. Seriously, over 95% of the top million domains are powered by Linux s

9min

Astronomers May Have Found a Star That's Just 33 Years Old

A team of astronomers have observed what they believe to be a neutron star being born following a supernova first detected in 1987, in a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way 170,000 light-years from Earth, dubbed SN 1987A. Until now, astronomers weren't sure if the neutron star survived the powerful event and didn't just collapse in on itself to form a black hole — but a new paper published last wee

9min

Self-Experimentation in the Time of COVID-19

Scientists are taking their own vaccines, an ethically murky practice that has a long and sometimes celebrated history in medicine.

18min

Your Bones Are Made Out of Exploded Stars, Scientists Say

According to new research, half the calcium in our universe came from "calcium-rich supernova." That means the stuff our teeth and bones is made from is, essentially, the remains of dead stars that blew up a long, long time ago. "These events are so few in number that we have never known what produced calcium-rich supernova," said Wynn Jacobson-Galan, Northwestern graduate student and lead author

23min

Electric cooker an easy, efficient way to sanitize N95 masks, study finds

A new study found that 50 minutes of dry heat in an electric cooker decontaminated N95 respirators inside and out while maintaining their filtration and fit. This could enable wearers to safely reuse limited supplies of the respirators.

25min

Training neural circuits early in development improves response

When it comes to training neural circuits for tissue engineering or biomedical applications, a new study suggests a key parameter: Train them young.

25min

NASA's Maven observes Martian night sky pulsing in ultraviolet light

Vast areas of the Martian night sky pulse in ultraviolet light, according to images from NASA's MAVEN spacecraft. The results are being used to illuminate complex circulation patterns in the Martian atmosphere

25min

Study finds dedicated clinics can reduce impact of flu pandemic

A new study concludes that opening clinics dedicated specifically to treating influenza can limit the number of people infected and help to 'flatten the curve,' or reduce the peak prevalence rate. While the work focused on influenza, the findings are relevant for policymakers seeking ways to reduce impacts of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

25min

DNA from an ancient, unidentified ancestor was passed down to humans living today

A new analysis of ancient genomes suggests that different branches of the human family tree interbred multiple times, and that some humans carry DNA from an archaic, unknown ancestor.

25min

A new tool for modeling the human gut microbiome

Engineers have designed a device that replicates the lining of the colon. With the device, they can grow human colon cells along with oxygen-intolerant bacteria that normally live in the human digestive tract and have been implicated in Crohn's disease.

25min

Blood test may point to patients at higher risk for COVID-19 deterioration, death

Researchers analyzed five biomarkers present in the blood of hundreds of COVID-19 patients, finding elevated levels associated with higher odds of clinical deterioration and death.

25min

Chemists build natural anti-cancer compound with lean new process

Creative chemists employ enzymes to build a complex but promising natural anti-cancer agent called cepafungin I in a lean nine steps.

25min

Research explores the impacts of mobile phones for Maasai women

For a population that herds livestock across wide stretches of wild savanna, mobile phones are a boon to their economy and life. But few studies have investigated how this new technology is impacting the lives of women in Maasai communities, which are traditionally patriarchal. In family units where men exert significant control, often over multiple wives, it is important to understand how phones

25min

Chinese Hackers Have Pillaged Taiwan's Semiconductor Industry

A campaign called Operation Skeleton Key has stolen source code, software development kits, chip designs, and more.

26min

Study: Most Americans don't have enough assets to withstand 3 months without income

A new study from Oregon State University found that 77% of low- to moderate-income American households fall below the asset poverty threshold, meaning that if their income were cut off they would not have the financial assets to maintain at least poverty-level status for three months.

32min

New tool compares rates of severe pregnancy complications across US hospitals

NIH-funded researchers have developed a new system for classifying severe maternal morbidity–life-threatening complications associated with childbirth–across U.S. hospitals. The system relies on patient discharge data to compare rates of severe maternal morbidity between different hospitals and different groups of patients.

32min

Why shaving dulls even the sharpest of razors

Engineers have studied the simple act of shaving up close, observing how a razor blade can be damaged as it cuts human hair — a material that is 50 times softer than the blade itself. They found that hair shaving deforms a blade in a way that is more complex than simply wearing down the edge over time.

35min

A new tool for modeling the human gut microbiome

Engineers have designed a device that replicates the lining of the colon. With the device, they can grow human colon cells along with oxygen-intolerant bacteria that normally live in the human digestive tract and have been implicated in Crohn's disease.

35min

Chemists build natural anti-cancer compound with lean new process

Creative chemists employ enzymes to build a complex but promising natural anti-cancer agent called cepafungin I in a lean nine steps.

35min

The Coronavirus Is New, but Your Immune System Might Still Recognize It

Some people carry immune cells called T cells that can capitalize on the virus's resemblance to other members of its family tree.

50min

Young trees have special adaptations that could save the Amazon

Some of the Amazon's smaller understory trees, juvenile members of the same species as the canopy trees, are capable of changing the way they process water to withstand drought conditions and still continue to grow up towards available light. (Pexels/) The Amazon rainforest's future is in peril. Biologists and environmental scientists have known for some time that government policies that oppress

53min

How Disney fools your brain to make lines feel magically short

Not even a FastPass, FastPass+, or MaxPass can save you from the slow crawl of time. (Muti/) Waiting in line can test even the most patient person, but the happiest place on earth can make the longest of queues fly by. All it takes is these three tricks of the mind—no Disney magic necessary. When you wait for Space Mountain, for example, walls separate riders and twist the queue back and forth. T

53min

Study finds high levels of toxic pollutants in stranded dolphins and whales

Researchers examined toxins in tissue concentrations and pathology data from 83 stranded dolphins and whales from 2012 to 2018. They looked at 11 different animal species to test for 17 different substances. The study is the first to report on concentrations in blubber tissues of stranded cetaceans of atrazine, DEP, NPE and triclosan. It also is the first to report concentrations of toxicants in a

54min

Mix of contaminants in Fukushima wastewater, risks of ocean dumping

Nearly 10 years after the Tohoku-oki earthquake and tsunami devastated Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power, radiation levels have fallen to safe levels in all but the waters closest to the shuttered power plant. A new article looks at the many radioactive elements contained in the tanks and suggests that more needs to be done to understand the potential risks of releasing wastewater from the

54min

Why shaving dulls even the sharpest of razors

Engineers have studied the simple act of shaving up close, observing how a razor blade can be damaged as it cuts human hair — a material that is 50 times softer than the blade itself. They found that hair shaving deforms a blade in a way that is more complex than simply wearing down the edge over time.

54min

People who feel dizzy when they stand up may have higher risk of dementia

Some people who feel dizzy or lightheaded when they stand up may have an increased risk of developing dementia years later, according to a new study published in the August 12, 2020, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The condition, called orthostatic hypotension, occurs when people experience a sudden drop in blood pressure when they stand up.

54min

Placebos cut distress even when you know they shouldn't

Placebos can reduce brain markers of emotional distress even when people know they are taking them, researchers report. Scientists have long documented that people often feel better after taking a treatment without active ingredients simply because they believe it's real—known as the placebo effect. Now, evidence shows that even if people are aware that their treatment is not "real"— known as non

54min

How Strong Were Ancient Humans? Modern-Day Athletes Are a Window to the Past

To uncover the habits of ancient humans, scientists are studying modern sports stars.

54min

Nasa Trojan asteroids mission on course for October 2021 launch

Lucy spacecraft has passed its system integration review and can now be assembled and tested Nasa's Lucy mission has passed a critical milestone in its development: all components of the spacecraft passed a system integration review (SIR) on 27 July, and it can now be assembled and tested in preparation for its October 2021 launch. If it succeeds in its mission, Lucy will be the first spacecraft

1h

Live Coronavirus News: Global Tracker

A photo of a crowded school hallway circulated on social media raises further alarm about the return to U.S. classrooms. France and Germany see worrisome rises in daily case counts.

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Scientists Are Using The Moon as a Giant Mirror to Search For Aliens

Moon Mirror Astronomers have a new trick in the hunt for habitable exoplanets, and it involves using the Moon as a gigantic mirror. Basically, NASA and ESA scientists used the Hubble Space Telescope to capture light that reflected off the Moon after it had traveled through the Earth's atmosphere, Space.com reports . By studying that reflection of our habitable atmosphere, the scientists suspect t

1h

Thwarting a Pandemic: COVID-19 Vaccine Strategies

Download this poster to learn about promising vaccine candidates for COVID-19!

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Analysis of renewable energy points toward more affordable carbon-free electricity

A study identifies long-term storage technologies that would enhance the affordability and reliability of renewable electricity.

1h

Hot 'Blob' Points to a Neutron Star Lurking in Supernova 1987A

Astronomers have long suspected a city-sized neutron star hides within the dusty shroud of SN 1987A. And now, they're closer than ever to proving their case.

1h

Are we medically intervening in maternity care when we don't need to?

Researchers from the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Trinity College Dublin have provided an international perspective on differences in key birth interventions as part of a European research network which aims to understand and contextualise physiological labour and birth. The studies focussed on the economic implications of reducing caesarean section rates and on the amounts of synthetic oxyt

1h

Brain noise contains unique signature of dream sleep

Dream or REM sleep is distinguished by rapid eye movement and absence of muscle tone, but electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings are indistinguishable from those of an awake brain. UC Berkeley neuroscientists have now found an EEG signature of REM sleep, allowing scientists for the first time to distinguish dreaming from wakefulness through brain activity alone. This could help in determining the p

1h

Electric cooker an easy, efficient way to sanitize N95 masks, study finds

Owners of electric multicookers may be able to add another use to its list of functions, a new study suggests: sanitization of N95 respirator masks. The University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign study found that 50 minutes of dry heat in an electric cooker, such as a rice cooker or Instant Pot, decontaminated N95 respirators inside and out while maintaining their filtration and fit. This could enab

1h

New science behind algae-based flip-flops

Sustainable flip-flops: A team of UC San Diego researchers has formulated polyurethane foams made from algae oil to meet commercial specifications for midsole shoes and the foot-bed of flip-flops. The results of their study are published in Bioresource Technology Reports and describe the team's successful development of these sustainable, consumer-ready and biodegradable materials.

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OSIRIS-REx is one rehearsal away from touching asteroid Bennu

NASA's first asteroid sampling spacecraft is making final preparations to grab a sample from asteroid Bennu's surface. Next week, the OSIRIS-REx mission will conduct a second rehearsal of its touchdown sequence, practicing the sample collection activities one last time before touching down on Bennu this fall.

2h

Starting a New Lab

Advice for new principal investigators starting their first research laboratories!

2h

Hybrid Schooling Is the Most Dangerous Option of All

It's supposed to be the perfect compromise between in-person and online education. But it may well be a public health nightmare.

2h

Analysis of renewable energy points toward more affordable carbon-free electricity

A study identifies long-term storage technologies that would enhance the affordability and reliability of renewable electricity.

2h

Global magnetic field of the solar corona measured for the first time

An international team of solar physicists, including academics from Northumbria University, in Newcastle upon Tyne, has recently measured the global magnetic field of the outer most layer of the Sun's atmosphere, the solar corona, for the first time.

2h

A new look at Mars' eerie, ultraviolet nighttime glow

An astronaut standing on Mars couldn't see the planet's ultraviolet "nightglow." But this phenomenon could help scientists to better predict the churn of Mars' surprisingly complex atmosphere.

2h

Provider access to chronic opioid prescribing resources improves guideline adherance

Results of a new study find that providers participating in an intervention with education and resources to help manage chronic opioid therapy for patients with HIV and chronic pain are more likely to adhere to national chronic opioid therapy guidelines compared to providers who do not take part. The intervention resources include a nurse care manager to work with physicians and nurse practitioner

2h

Training neural circuits early in development improves response, study finds

When it comes to training neural circuits for tissue engineering or biomedical applications, a new study suggests a key parameter: Train them young. Training of engineered neurons has many applications in bioengineering and regenerative medicine. Techniques usually involve training cells after they have fully matured. University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign researchers found that training them th

2h

NASA's Maven observes Martian night sky pulsing in ultraviolet light

Vast areas of the Martian night sky pulse in ultraviolet light, according to images from NASA's MAVEN spacecraft. The results are being used to illuminate complex circulation patterns in the Martian atmosphere.

2h

Washington dam removal means 37 more miles of salmon habitat restored

Washington's dam-busting summer is still rolling, with two more dams coming down on the Pilchuck River, opening 37 miles of habitat to salmon for the first time in more than a century.

2h

"Ample evidence" that Cape Hatteras beach closures benefit birds

The barrier islands of North Carolina's Cape Hatteras National Seashore are among the most popular recreational destinations on the Atlantic coast. Park managers strive to integrate the needs of wildlife with recreational use of the area's beaches, but in some cases, they impose restrictions on the latter in order to preserve the former—sometimes even completely closing portions of beaches to pede

2h

Washington dam removal means 37 more miles of salmon habitat restored

Washington's dam-busting summer is still rolling, with two more dams coming down on the Pilchuck River, opening 37 miles of habitat to salmon for the first time in more than a century.

2h

"Ample evidence" that Cape Hatteras beach closures benefit birds

The barrier islands of North Carolina's Cape Hatteras National Seashore are among the most popular recreational destinations on the Atlantic coast. Park managers strive to integrate the needs of wildlife with recreational use of the area's beaches, but in some cases, they impose restrictions on the latter in order to preserve the former—sometimes even completely closing portions of beaches to pede

2h

Disrupted Habitats Have More Zoonotic Disease Hosts: Study

Animals that can host pathogens dangerous to humans, such as rodents, birds, and bats, are proportionately more common in human-occupied spaces than in remote areas.

2h

Observatory returns from tropical storm Isaias lockdown to track asteroid for NASA

The Earth has one less asteroid to worry about thanks to the research of an international team of scientists at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico.

2h

Lab-grown and replanted corals to spawn in the Florida Keys

Not long after the August full moon, Florida's reefs are the scene of an annual show of sexual reproduction called the coral spawn, with coral colonies releasing masses of tiny white, pink and orange spheres into the ocean.

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Lab-grown and replanted corals to spawn in the Florida Keys

Not long after the August full moon, Florida's reefs are the scene of an annual show of sexual reproduction called the coral spawn, with coral colonies releasing masses of tiny white, pink and orange spheres into the ocean.

2h

New class of laser beam doesn't follow normal laws of refraction

Researchers have developed a new type of laser beam that doesn't follow long-held principles about how light refracts and travels. The findings could have huge implications for optical communication and laser technologies.

2h

Key to dialogue between brain cells to protect against stroke

LSU Health New Orleans research has unlocked a key fundamental mechanism in the communication between brain cells when confronted with stroke and found DHA not only protected neuronal cells and promoted their survival, but also helped maintain their integrity and stability.

2h

First record of invasive shell-boring worm in the Wadden Sea means trouble for oyster

n October 2014, the suspicion arose that the parasite worm Polydora websteri had found its way to the Wadden Sea. Researchers now confirm that they have found the shell-borer in oysters near Sylt and Texel and that it has arrived in European waters.

2h

What's in oilfield wastewater matters for injection-induced earthquakes

Specifically, he pointed out that oilfield brine has much different properties, like density and viscosity, than pure water, and these differences affect the processes that cause fluid pressure to trigger earthquakes.

2h

Tellurium makes the difference: Unusual molecular structures

The periodic system contains 118 chemical elements. However, only a few of them are of major importance in our daily lives. An international research group has now discovered astonishing and beautiful molecular structures when they used the element tellurium in ring-shaped hydrocarbon molecules. These compounds are distinguished by the fact that they are arranged in the crystal to form highly symm

2h

Scientists identify missing source of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide

Researchers report that anthropogenic sources of carbonyl sulfide (OCS), not just oceanic sources, account for much of the missing source of OCS in the atmosphere. Their findings provide better context for estimates of global photosynthesis (taking up CO2) using OCS dynamics.

2h

Algorithm created by deep learning finds potential therapeutic targets throughout genome

A team of researchers have developed an algorithm through machine learning that helps predict sites of DNA methylation – a process that can change the activity of DNA without changing its overall structure – and could identify disease-causing mechanisms that would otherwise be missed by conventional screening methods.

2h

Completing the set: 'Coupon-collection behavior' reduces sex-ratio variation among families

A new analysis of sibling records from more than 300,000 individuals suggests that some parents continue to reproduce until they have children of both sexes.

2h

Tellurium makes the difference: Unusual molecular structures

The periodic system contains 118 chemical elements. However, only a few of them are of major importance in our daily lives. An international research group has now discovered astonishing and beautiful molecular structures when they used the element tellurium in ring-shaped hydrocarbon molecules. These compounds are distinguished by the fact that they are arranged in the crystal to form highly symm

2h

Study finds high levels of toxic pollutants in stranded dolphins and whales

Researchers examined toxins in tissue concentrations and pathology data from 83 stranded dolphins and whales from 2012 to 2018. They looked at 11 different animal species to test for 17 different substances. The study is the first to report on concentrations in blubber tissues of stranded cetaceans of atrazine, DEP, NPE and triclosan. It also is the first to report concentrations of toxicants in a

2h

Few changes seen in 'Big Five' personality traits during early days of COVID-19 pandemic

A new study suggests that adults experienced few changes in 'Big Five' personality traits as a result of the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S. Angelina Sutin of Florida State University College of Medicine and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on August 6, 2020.

2h

NASA's Maven observes martian night sky pulsing in ultraviolet light

Vast areas of the Martian night sky pulse in ultraviolet light, according to images from NASA's MAVEN spacecraft. The results are being used to illuminate complex circulation patterns in the Martian atmosphere

2h

AI plays 'Mad Libs' to learn grammar the way kids do

Advanced AI systems can figure out linguistic principles on their own, without first practicing on sentences that humans have labeled for them, according to new research. "In a sense, it's nothing short of miraculous…" It's much closer to how human children learn languages long before adults teach them grammar or syntax, the researchers report. Even more surprising, however, they found that the A

2h

Gerald Lincoln obituary

My friend Gerald Lincoln, the endocrinologist and naturalist who has died aged 75, devoted his life to unravelling the mysteries of nature. Brought up on a farm in Norfolk – the son of Gertrude (nee Holmes), a geography teacher, and Ernest Lincoln, a tenant farmer – he spent his childhood in the countryside, marvelling at wildlife. He also became an adept poacher, carrying toilet paper as an alib

2h

We just figured out why shaving soft hair blunts steel razor blades

Cutting soft materials like hair can blunt even the sharpest blades surprisingly quickly, and now we know why – offering clues to designing longer-lasting razors

2h

Maps of the sun's corona could help us predict dangerous solar storms

The tenuous outermost layer of the sun, called the corona, is invisible most of the time, but its magnetic fields have been mapped for the first time

2h

Researchers hope to save seabirds by calculating the value of their excrement

To raise awareness of the importance of seabirds to people and the ecosystems we depend on, a new article looks at something that most of us find off-putting: their feces. The researchers say that the feces, known as guano and which serves as a source of fertilizer and a key contribution to marine ecosystems, could be worth more than $470 million annually.

2h

Scientists discover cells that filter and sharpen spatial signals

How do you keep orientation in a complex environment, like the city of Vienna? You can thank your brain's 'global positioning system' (GPS), the hippocampus, for this sense of orientation. To further understand its functions, scientists have analyzed single neurons of this GPS in mice. They discovered that so-called granule cells filter and sharpen spatial information.

2h

Anode material for safe batteries with a long cycle life

Researchers investigated a highly promising anode material for future high-performance batteries – lithium lanthanum titanate with a perovskite crystal structure (LLTO). Researchers can improve the energy density, power density, charging rate, safety, and cycle life of batteries without requiring a decrease of the particle size from micro to nano scale.

2h

REM sleep tunes eating behavior

Despite our broad understanding of the different brain regions activated during rapid-eye-movement sleep, little is known about what this activity serves for. Researchers have now discovered that the activation of neurons in the hypothalamus during REM sleep regulates eating behavior: suppressing this activity in mice decreases appetite.

2h

Peptide makes drug-resistant bacteria sensitive to antibiotics again

Scientists have developed a synthetic peptide that can make multidrug-resistant bacteria sensitive to antibiotics again when used together with traditional antibiotics, offering hope for the prospect of a combination treatment strategy to tackle certain antibiotic-tolerant infections. On its own, the synthetic antimicrobial peptide can also kill bacteria that have grown resistant to antibiotics.

2h

Study sheds new light on vein formation in plants

Researchers have found plant hormones known as strigolactones suppress the transportation of auxin, the main plant hormone involved in vein formation, so that vein formation occurs slower and with greater focus.

2h

Human Composting: How Our Bodies Can Nourish New Life After Death

Embalming, cremation and casket-making are far from eco-friendly. Some researchers want to return human bodies to the earth naturally.

2h

Daily briefing: Last of their kind, the tuatara genome reveals why this reptile is so remarkable

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02344-y The first tuatara genome sheds light on our reptile ancestors and epidemiologists predict the future of the coronavirus pandemic.

3h

Scientists Propose Adding Psychoactive Drug to our Water Supplies

A team of U.K. scientists has a provocative plan to prevent suicides: lace drinking water supplies with the psychoactive drug lithium, which is often prescribed as a mood stabilizer . At first bluff, it sounds like a profound medical overreach. But Vice reports that the idea has recently picked up some steam within scientific circles. It's also worth noting that some water already naturally conta

3h

Innovative method offers a new way of studying developmental cardiac biomechanics, live in 4-D

How a valveless embryonic heart tube pumps blood is a long-standing scientific mystery. Thanks to innovations in light-based technology, fresh insights are now available into the biomechanics of mammalian cardiogenesis—and in particular, the pumping dynamics of the mammalian tubular embryonic heart.

3h

Asian giant hornet complete genome released by the Agricultural Research Service

The first complete genome of the Asian giant hornet has been released by a team of Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists. ARS has made the genome available to the research community in AgDataCommons and the National Center for Biotechnology Information, even before publishing the results in a scientific journal to make the data freely accessible as quickly as possible.

3h

New class of laser beam doesn't follow normal laws of refraction

University of Central Florida researchers have developed a new type of laser beam that doesn't follow long-held principles about how light refracts and travels.

3h

For Whom the Tok Tiks

What is TikTok though? It's an app for creating and sharing short videos, but that description undersells its delight: lip-synched anthems that spawn split-screen duet replies; "challenges" that turn boring tasks into virtuosic dances; wry, incisive takedowns of national politics by teens too young to vote; pets, kids, emo kids , emo pets , and comedians. That's part of what TikTok is, anyway. It

3h

Study shows variation in hospital visitor & ICU communication policies due to COVID-19

A new study documents how 49 hospitals in a state hit hard by COVID-19 changed their visitor policies and communications with families of intensive care unit patients in the first months of the pandemic — and how those efforts varied. Virtually all hospitals put in place a "no visitors" blanket policy, but 59% of them did allow some exceptions to this rule.

3h

Arecibo Observatory returns from tropical storm Isaias lockdown to track asteroid for NASA

Arecibo's Planetary Radar Group quickly shift from storm response to track asteroid 2020 NK1. Before the Arecibo observations, 2020 NK1 was calculated to be one of the biggest threats out of all known asteroids on NASA's list of potential impactors, with about one chance in 70,000 of impacting the Earth between 2086 and 2101.

3h

Asian giant hornet complete genome released by the Agricultural Research Service

The first complete genome of the Asian giant hornet has been released by a team of Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists. ARS has made the genome available to the research community in AgDataCommons and the National Center for Biotechnology Information, even before publishing the results in a scientific journal to make the data freely accessible as quickly as possible.

3h

Jump in England virus cases highlights flaws in tracking system

Scientists warn scheme needs beefing up to prevent a second spike

3h

Ultra-fluorescent dyes give objects an eye-popping glow

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02323-3 Crystals of physically distanced dye molecules fluoresce brilliantly in a rainbow of colours.

3h

A killer parasite shows signs of drug resistance in Africa

Nature, Published online: 03 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02295-4 Malaraia parasistes isolated in Rwanda have mutations conferring resistance to a front-line drug.

3h

The Special Sauce That Makes Some Vaccines Work

Adjuvants play a crucial role in many vaccines' effectiveness. Some scientists say there needs to be more research into developing a wider variety of adjuvants because of how important they are. (Image credit: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images)

3h

The Great American Outdoors Act proves that grassroots advocacy and democracy still work

National parks are the crown jewel of America's public lands. Now, they will finally get updates to their aging infrastructures. (NPS Photo/J. Tobiason/) This story originally featured on Outdoor Life . For decades, the conservation community has been advocating for the full and permanent funding of the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), a program that uses royalties from offshore oil and g

3h

Scientists Had to Rename Genes Because They Confused Microsoft Excel

Formatting Error It turns out that the spreadsheet program Microsoft Excel is a major pain for geneticists. Because some genes have names similar to calendar dates, the program automatically reformats and totally messes up the datasets. It's a surprisingly common problem that can have a serious impact on published research, The Verge reports . Because Microsoft isn't about to update its software

3h

Methane Cloud Sitting over U.S. Southwest Threatens Indigenous Residents

An EPA proposal to weaken pollution controls could make the ongoing threat worse — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Credible assumptions replace missing data in COVID analysis

How contagious is COVID-19, and how severe is the virus for those who've caught it?

3h

Chemotherapy is used to treat less than 25% of people with localized sarcoma

UCLA researchers have found that chemotherapy is not commonly used when treating adults with localized sarcoma, a rare type of cancer of the soft tissues or bone. In a nationwide analysis of nearly 20,000 patients whose cancer had not yet spread to other organs, the scientists learned that only 22% were treated with some form of chemotherapy.

3h

Unveiled: A channel SARS-CoV-2 may use to proceed with viral replication in the host cell

By visualizing coronavirus replication in an infected host cell, researchers may have answered a long-standing question about how newly synthesized coronavirus components are able to be incorporated into fully infectious viruses.

3h

'Roaming reactions' study to shed new light on atmospheric molecules

For the first time, a team of chemists has lifted the hood on the mechanics involved in the mysterious interplay between sunlight and molecules in the atmosphere known as 'roaming reactions', which could make atmospheric modelling more accurate.

3h

New insight into the evolution of complex life on Earth

A novel connection between primordial organisms and complex life has been discovered, as new evidence sheds light on the evolutionary origins of the cell division process that is fundamental to complex life on Earth.

3h

DNA from an ancient, unidentified ancestor was passed down to humans living today

A new analysis of ancient genomes suggests that different branches of the human family tree interbred multiple times, and that some humans carry DNA from an archaic, unknown ancestor. Melissa Hubisz and Amy Williams of Cornell University and Adam Siepel of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory report these findings in a study published 6th August in PLOS Genetics.

3h

Sports settings may help engage Australian men in weight loss

Men in Australia are more likely than women to be obese, yet they are underrepresented in weight loss trials. A study published in PLOS Medicine, by Eleanor Quested at Curtin University in Perth, Australia and colleagues found that participants in a men-only, sports-themed weight loss program increased physical activity and lost more weight than men who had not participated, suggesting that men wi

3h

Why shaving dulls even the sharpest of razors

Engineers at MIT have studied the simple act of shaving up close, observing how a razor blade can be damaged as it cuts human hair — a material that is 50 times softer than the blade itself. They found that hair shaving deforms a blade in a way that is more complex than simply wearing down the edge over time.

3h

Study finds dedicated clinics can reduce impact of flu pandemic

A new study concludes that opening clinics dedicated specifically to treating influenza can limit the number of people infected and help to 'flatten the curve,' or reduce the peak prevalence rate. While the work focused on influenza, the findings are relevant for policymakers seeking ways to reduce impacts of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

3h

Identifying and contending with radioisotopes of concern at Fukushima

In this Perspective, Ken Buesseler describes the enormous challenges that remain in doing clean-up on land in Japan following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster in 2011, even as some progress has been made offshore.

3h

Surface tension, not gravity, drives viscous bubble collapse

By demonstrating that surface tension — not gravity — drives the collapse of surface bubbles in viscous liquids, a new study flips the previous understanding of how viscous bubbles pop on its head.

3h

New method makes magnetic maps of the solar corona

The twisting, ever-shifting and metrically elusive magnetic field of the Sun's ephemeral outer atmosphere can be mapped using near-infrared observations of the solar corona.

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How soft hair deforms the sharpest steel blades

Why do the edges of a steel razor dull from cutting far softer materials?

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Mix of contaminants in Fukushima wastewater, risks of ocean dumping

Nearly 10 years after the Tohoku-oki earthquake and tsunami devastated Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power, radiation levels have fallen to safe levels in all but the waters closest to the shuttered power plant. An article published August 8 in the journal Science looks at the many radioactive elements contained in the tanks and suggests that more needs to be done to understand the potential

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Research shows post-release digital movie piracy can boost ticket sales

Movie studios estimate that they lose billions of dollars to digital movie piracy. But a new marketing study from the University of Georgia finds that piracy can actually boost ticket sales in certain situations.

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Chemists build natural anti-cancer compound with efficient new process

Scripps Research chemists Hans Renata, Ph.D., and Alexander Adibekian, Ph.D., have discovered a way to efficiently create a synthetic version of a valuable natural compound called cepafungin I, which has shown promise as an anti-cancer agent.

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Chemists build natural anti-cancer compound with efficient new process

Scripps Research chemists Hans Renata, Ph.D., and Alexander Adibekian, Ph.D., have discovered a way to efficiently create a synthetic version of a valuable natural compound called cepafungin I, which has shown promise as an anti-cancer agent.

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Raphael's face reconstructed to solve tomb mystery

Art sleuths have created a 3-D reconstruction of the face of Italian painter Raphael, solving an age-old mystery over his final resting place, Rome's Tor Vergata University told AFP Thursday.

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Improving Olympic performance with asthma drugs?

One on hand, the most common health condition among Olympic athletes is asthma. On the other, asthmatic athletes regularly outperform their non-asthmatic counterparts. A new study assesses the performance-enhancement effects of asthma medication for non-asthmatics. The analysis looks at the effects of both allowed and banned asthma medications. The most common chronic disease among athletes compe

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Cutting-Edge Research Shows How Hair Dulls Razor Blades

Hair is soft compared with steel, but shaving can dull a razor surprisingly quickly. A new study examines exactly how a strand of hair can chip and crack a sharp blade. (Image credit: Gustavo Rezende Dos Santos/EyeEm/Getty Images)

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Former Astronaut Blasts Trump For Lying About NASA

In a much-criticized tweet on Wednesday, US president Donald Trump claimed that "NASA was Closed & Dead [sic] until I got it going again." A link to a NASASpaceflight tweet detailing SpaceX's successful launch of its Starship prototype accompanied the tweet — which is a striking accomplishment for Elon Musk's space startup, but only obliquely related to NASA. In fact, the tweet raised the questio

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NASA satellites capture Isaias' nighttime track into Canada

Tropical Storm Isaias has transitioned into a post-tropical storm as it moved out of the U.S. and into eastern Canada on Aug. 5 and 6. NASA created an animation of nighttime satellite imagery that shows Isaias' track up the U.S. East Coast. In addition, NASA's Aqua satellite provided a view of Isaias' powerful storms over New York and New England.

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New insight into the evolution of complex life on Earth

A novel connection between primordial organisms and complex life has been discovered, as new evidence sheds light on the evolutionary origins of the cell division process that is fundamental to complex life on Earth.

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Want your cat to stay in purrr-fect health? Watch out for heart disease

As evidenced by the countless adoring posts, cute videos and laugh-out-loud memes on social media, people love their furry feline friends. But keeping cats happy and healthy isn't always easy.

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Placebos prove powerful even when people know they're taking one

Researchers have demonstrated that placebos reduce brain markers of emotional distress even when people know they are taking one.

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Brain waves can be used to predict future pain sensitivity

Rhythms produced by the brain can reliably be used to predict how sensitive we are to pain, new research shows.

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Fossil mystery solved: Super-long-necked reptiles lived in the ocean, not on land

By CT scanning crushed fossilized skulls and digitally reassembling them, and by examining the fossils' growth rings, scientists were able to describe a new species of prehistoric sea creature. Tanystropheus hydroides, named after mythology's hydra, was a twenty-foot-long animal with a ten-foot-long neck.

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Why the 'wimpy' Y chromosome hasn't evolved out of existence

The Y chromosome has shrunken drastically over 200 million years of evolution. Even those who study it have used the word 'wimpy' to describe it, and yet it continues to stick around. An Opinion paper outlines a new theory — called the 'persistent Y hypothesis' –t o explain why the Y chromosome may be more resilient than it first appears.

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Därför blir kniven slö av tomat

Genom att studera vad som händer med ett rakblad vid rakning har forskare vid amerikanska Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, visat vad som gör eggen slö, trots att hår är 50 gånger mjukare än bladets metall.

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Why Do Razor Blades Dull So Quickly?

An MIT team tackled the mystery of why something as soft as hair can erode a steel blade, hoping to figure out how to make shaving tools last longer.

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DNA from an ancient, unidentified ancestor was passed down to humans living today

A new analysis of ancient genomes suggests that different branches of the human family tree interbred multiple times, and that some humans carry DNA from an archaic, unknown ancestor. Melissa Hubisz and Amy Williams of Cornell University and Adam Siepel of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory report these findings in a study published 6th August in PLOS Genetics.

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Mix of contaminants in Fukushima wastewater, risks of ocean dumping

Nearly 10 years after the Tohoku-oki earthquake and tsunami devastated Japan's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant and triggered an unprecedented release radioactivity into the ocean, radiation levels have fallen to safe levels in all but the waters closest to the shuttered power plant. Today, fish and other seafood caught in waters beyond all but a limited region have been found to be well wit

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Why shaving dulls even the sharpest of razors

Razors, scalpels, and knives are commonly made from stainless steel, honed to a razor-sharp edge and coated with even harder materials such as diamond-like carbon. However, knives require regular sharpening, while razors are routinely replaced after cutting materials far softer than the blades themselves.

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New insight into the evolution of complex life on Earth

A novel connection between primordial organisms and complex life has been discovered, as new evidence sheds light on the evolutionary origins of the cell division process that is fundamental to complex life on Earth.

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'Roaming reactions' study to shed new light on atmospheric molecules

A detailed study of roaming reactions—where atoms of compounds split off and orbit other atoms to form unexpected new compounds—could enable scientists to make much more accurate predictions about molecules in the atmosphere, including models of climate change, urban pollution and ozone depletion.

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Identifying local solutions in the Barotse Floodplain for sustainable agriculture development

The Barotse Floodplain in Zambia is one of Africa's largest wetlands, representing varied ecotypes and high biodiversity conservation value. However, the Lozi People who live in the region face an intense 'hungry season' from November to January when accessibility to food is very limited. This means that year-round nutrition and food security are consistently top priorities.

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Nanoparticle system captures heart-disease biomarker from blood for in-depth analysis

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a method combining sticky nanoparticles with high-precision protein measurement to capture and analyze a common marker of heart disease to reveal details that were previously inaccessible.

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Want your cat to stay in purrr-fect health? Watch out for heart disease

As evidenced by the countless adoring posts, cute videos and laugh-out-loud memes on social media, people love their furry feline friends. But keeping cats happy and healthy isn't always easy.

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News at a glance

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The long haul

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Funding quandary

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Seeing the sound

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A helix of dipoles

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Breaking and exiting

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Down the line

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Potent neutralizing antibodies from COVID-19 patients define multiple targets of vulnerability

The rapid spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has had a large impact on global health, travel, and economy. Therefore, preventative and therapeutic measures are urgently needed. Here, we isolated monoclonal antibodies from three convalescent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients using a SARS-CoV-2 stabilized prefusion spike protein. These antibodies had l

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A neutralizing human antibody binds to the N-terminal domain of the Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2

Developing therapeutics against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) could be guided by the distribution of epitopes, not only on the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the Spike (S) protein but also across the full Spike (S) protein. We isolated and characterized monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from 10 convalescent COVID-19 patients. Three mAbs showed neutralizing activities a

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Structural insight into precursor ribosomal RNA processing by ribonuclease MRP

Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a conserved eukaryotic ribonucleoprotein complex that plays essential roles in precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) processing and cell cycle regulation. In contrast to RNase P, which selectively cleaves transfer RNA–like substrates, it has remained a mystery how RNase MRP recognizes its diverse substrates. To address this question, we determined cryo–electron microscopy

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Ligand-recognizing motifs in plant LysM receptors are major determinants of specificity

Plants evolved lysine motif (LysM) receptors to recognize and parse microbial elicitors and drive intracellular signaling to limit or facilitate microbial colonization. We investigated how chitin and nodulation (Nod) factor receptors of Lotus japonicus initiate differential signaling of immunity or root nodule symbiosis. Two motifs in the LysM1 domains of these receptors determine specific recogn

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Chemical vapor deposition of layered two-dimensional MoSi2N4 materials

Identifying two-dimensional layered materials in the monolayer limit has led to discoveries of numerous new phenomena and unusual properties. We introduced elemental silicon during chemical vapor deposition growth of nonlayered molybdenum nitride to passivate its surface, which enabled the growth of centimeter-scale monolayer films of MoSi 2 N 4 . This monolayer was built up by septuple atomic la

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Sequencing of metals in multivariate metal-organic frameworks

We mapped the metal sequences within crystals of metal-oxide rods in multivariate metal-organic framework–74 containing mixed combinations of cobalt (Co), cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and manganese (Mn). Atom probe tomography of these crystals revealed the presence of heterogeneous spatial sequences of metal ions that we describe, depending on the metal and synthesis temperature used, as random (Co,

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Emergent helical texture of electric dipoles

Long-range ordering of magnetic dipoles in bulk materials gives rise to a broad range of magnetic structures, from simple collinear ferromagnets and antiferromagnets, to complex magnetic helicoidal textures stabilized by competing exchange interactions. In contrast, dipolar order in dielectric crystals is typically limited to parallel (ferroelectric) and antiparallel (antiferroelectric) collinear

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A new wrinkle on liquid sheets: Turning the mechanism of viscous bubble collapse upside down

Viscous bubbles are prevalent in both natural and industrial settings. Their rupture and collapse may be accompanied by features typically associated with elastic sheets, including the development of radial wrinkles. Previous investigators concluded that the film weight is responsible for both the film collapse and wrinkling instability. Conversely, we show here experimentally that gravity plays

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How hair deforms steel

Steels for sharp edges or tools typically have martensitic microstructures, high carbide contents, and various coatings to exhibit high hardness and wear resistance. Yet they become practically unusable upon cutting much softer materials such as human hair, cheese, or potatoes. Despite this being an everyday observation, the underlying physical micromechanisms are poorly understood because of the

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Global maps of the magnetic field in the solar corona

Understanding many physical processes in the solar atmosphere requires determination of the magnetic field in each atmospheric layer. However, direct measurements of the magnetic field in the Sun's corona are difficult to obtain. Using observations with the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter, we have determined the spatial distribution of the plasma density in the corona and the phase speed of the

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Cell-cell adhesion in plant grafting is facilitated by {beta}-1,4-glucanases

Plant grafting is conducted for fruit and vegetable propagation, whereby a piece of living tissue is attached to another through cell-cell adhesion. However, graft compatibility limits combinations to closely related species, and the mechanism is poorly understood. We found that Nicotiana is capable of graft adhesion with a diverse range of angiosperms. Comparative transcriptomic analyses on graf

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Unexpected air pollution with marked emission reductions during the COVID-19 outbreak in China

The absence of motor vehicle traffic and suspended manufacturing during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in China enabled assessment of the efficiency of air pollution mitigation. Up to 90% reduction of certain emissions during the city-lockdown period can be identified from satellite and ground-based observations. Unexpectedly, extreme particulate matter levels simultaneously occ

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Type III interferons disrupt the lung epithelial barrier upon viral recognition

Viral infections of the lower respiratory tract are a leading cause of mortality. Mounting evidence indicates that most severe cases are characterized by aberrant immune responses and do not depend on viral burden. In this study, we assessed how type III interferons (IFN-) contribute to the pathogenesis induced by RNA viruses. We report that IFN- is present in the lower, but not upper, airways of

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Type I and III interferons disrupt lung epithelial repair during recovery from viral infection

Excessive cytokine signaling frequently exacerbates lung tissue damage during respiratory viral infection. Type I (IFN-α and IFN-β) and III (IFN-) interferons are host-produced antiviral cytokines. Prolonged IFN-α and IFN-β responses can lead to harmful proinflammatory effects, whereas IFN- mainly signals in epithelia, thereby inducing localized antiviral immunity. In this work, we show that IFN

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Impaired type I interferon activity and inflammatory responses in severe COVID-19 patients

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is characterized by distinct patterns of disease progression that suggest diverse host immune responses. We performed an integrated immune analysis on a cohort of 50 COVID-19 patients with various disease severity. A distinct phenotype was observed in severe and critical patients, consisting of a highly impaired interferon (IFN) type I response (characterized b

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A short de novo synthesis of nucleoside analogs

Nucleoside analogs are commonly used in the treatment of cancer and viral infections. Their syntheses benefit from decades of research but are often protracted, unamenable to diversification, and reliant on a limited pool of chiral carbohydrate starting materials. We present a process for rapidly constructing nucleoside analogs from simple achiral materials. Using only proline catalysis, heteroar

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Broad neutralization of SARS-related viruses by human monoclonal antibodies

Broadly protective vaccines against known and preemergent human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are urgently needed. To gain a deeper understanding of cross-neutralizing antibody responses, we mined the memory B cell repertoire of a convalescent severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) donor and identified 200 SARS coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) binding antibodies that target multiple conserved sites on the sp

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Building bridges

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The proteasome controls ESCRT-III-mediated cell division in an archaeon

Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is the closest experimentally tractable archaeal relative of eukaryotes and, despite lacking obvious cyclin-dependent kinase and cyclin homologs, has an ordered eukaryote-like cell cycle with distinct phases of DNA replication and division. Here, in exploring the mechanism of cell division in S. acidocaldarius , we identify a role for the archaeal proteasome in regulatin

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Response to Comment on "Activation of methane to CH3+: A selective industrial route to methanesulfonic acid"

Roytman and Singleton argue that our proposed electrophilic mechanism for the sulfonation of methane in superacid conditions is "not plausible." We clarify certain terms that might have caused misinterpretation of our proposed mechanism and supplement the discussion. We reaffirm that an electrophilic mechanism may be operative under our reaction conditions.

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Covid-19 news: NHS unable to use 50 million masks due to safety fears

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

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Why are we fascinated by true crime stories?

True crime podcasts can get as many as 500,000 downloads per month. In the Top 100 Podcasts of 2020 list for Apple, several true crime podcasts ranked within the Top 20. Our fascination with true crime isn't just limited to podcasts, with Netflix documentaries like "Confessions of a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes" scoring high popularity with viewers. Several experts weigh in on our fascination with

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A helix of dipoles

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Hurricane Forecast: 'One of the Most Active Seasons on Record'

Scientists at NOAA updated their prediction for the 2020 hurricane season, and now expect as many as 25 named storms.

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Ellen's Celebrity Defenders Aren't Helping Her

Famous people want the world to know that Ellen DeGeneres is nice to famous people. Addressing media reports alleging a culture of harassment and bullying at DeGeneres's talk show, the singer Katy Perry tweeted Tuesday that she's "only ever had positive takeaways from my time with Ellen." Ashton Kutcher, Kevin Hart, Jay Leno, Diane Keaton, and the superstar agent Scooter Braun have all recently m

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'Extremely active' hurricane season possible for Atlantic Basin

Atmospheric and oceanic conditions are primed to fuel storm development in the Atlantic, leading to what could be an 'extremely active' season, according to forecasters.

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Chemists build natural anti-cancer compound with lean new process

Creative chemists employ enzymes to build a complex but promising natural anti-cancer agent called cepafungin I in a lean nine steps.

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Study finds benefit in more frequent HIV screenings for young men who have sex with men

A new study has found that HIV screening every three months compared to annually will improve clinical outcomes and be cost-effective among high-risk young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in the United States.

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New studies highlight racial disparities among stroke patients with COVID-19

Two new studies indicate that racial disparities related to outcomes exist among stroke patients, including one study that specifically examines stroke patients with COVID-19. The abstracts were presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 17th Annual Meeting.

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Research suggests viability of brain computer to improve function in paralyzed patient

Researchers demonstrated the success of a fully implantable wireless medical device called a stentrode brain-computer interface designed to improve functional independence in patients with severe paralysis. The abstract was presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 17th Annual Meeting.

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Survey: 66% of US adults say they'll get a COVID-19 vaccine

When a COVID-19 vaccine becomes available, 66% of adults say they will likely get it, and have their children vaccinated too, according to a new nationwide survey. The survey indicates that women, African Americans, and Republicans are more hesitant about getting a COVID-19 vaccine . The likelihood of receiving the vaccination is below 60% in 11 states: Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi,

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Team measures Mars from crust to core

Using data from NASA's InSight Lander on Mars, seismologists have made the first direct measurements of three subsurface boundaries from the crust to the core of the red planet. "Ultimately it may help us understand planetary formation," says Alan Levander, coauthor of a new study published in Geophysical Research Letters . While researchers have previously calculated the thickness of Mars' crust

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NASA's Mars Helicopter Could Revolutionize Off-Planet Exploration

In just six short months, if all goes well, NASA's Perseverance rover will touch down on the surface of Mars — where, hidden in its belly, will be a payload that could change space exploration forever. Like something out of a James Bond movie, a spring-loaded arm will flip a four pound helicopter, called Ingenuity, out of a compartment beneath the rover's debris shield. As it swings down, the cop

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"Ample evidence" that Cape Hatteras beach closures benefit birds

The National Park Service (NPS) requested that the American Ornithological Society (AOS) assemble an expert panel to produce an independent report assessing the appropriateness of the current NPS beach management plan for the barrier islands of North Carolina's Cape Hatteras National Seashore. In this new report, AOS finds evidence that, despite complaints from the public, the restrictions on recr

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Placebos prove powerful even when people know they're taking one

A team of researchers from Michigan State University, University of Michigan and Dartmouth College is the first to demonstrate that placebos reduce brain markers of emotional distress even when people know they are taking one

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Analysis of renewable energy points toward more affordable carbon-free electricity

A study identifies long-term storage technologies that would enhance the affordability and reliability of renewable electricity.

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CU researcher: Non-hormonal treatment for menopausal symptoms offers hope of relief

A non-hormonal therapy to treat hot flashes and other symptoms associated with menopause was found to be effective in a recent clinical trial, according to a published study by a team of researchers including faculty from the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

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UCF-developed new class of laser beam doesn't follow normal laws of refraction

University of Central Florida researchers have developed a new type of laser beam that doesn't follow long-held principles about how light refracts and travels. The findings, which were published recently in Nature Photonics, could have huge implications for optical communication and laser technologies.

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Digital buccaneers boost box office bang

Pirated movies circulated online after their theatrical release saw about 3% higher box office receipts because of the increase in word-of-mouth advertising.

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Hubble uses Earth as proxy for identifying oxygen on potentially habitable exoplanets

Taking advantage of a total lunar eclipse, Hubble used the Moon as a mirror to study sunlight that had passed through Earth's atmosphere. As a result, Hubble detected Earth's own brand of sunscreen – ozone – in our atmosphere. The technique simulates how scientists will search for evidence of life on planets around other stars.

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How growth rates influence the fitness of bacteria

Bacteria are survival artists: When they get nutrition, they multiply rapidly, albeit they can also survive periods of hunger. But, when they grow too quickly, their ability to survive is hampered. This research could help increase the effectiveness of antibiotics.

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Tasmanian devil research offers new insights for tackling cancer in humans

Researchers found a single genetic mutation that leads to reduced growth of a transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils in the wild. The finding gives hope for the animals' survival and could lead to new treatment for human cancers.

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40 Years Ago: Voyager 1 Approaches Saturn

The world was waiting for Voyager's encounter with Saturn's when Discover's debut issue hit newsstands in 1980. Since then, the Voyager spacecraft have boldly gone where no probes have gone before.

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Dear Diary: This Is My Life in Quarantine

The time we're living through will one day become history. This is always true, of course, but the coronavirus pandemic has, perhaps more than any other event in living memory, made people hyperaware that their present will be remembered in the future. And this new, strange sensation has compelled many to capture the moment for posterity. The urge hit Janis Whitlock, a research scientist at Corne

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No, the Yellowstone supervolcano is not 'overdue'

The supervolcano under Yellowstone produced three massive eruptions over the past few million years. Each eruption covered much of what is now the western United States in an ash layer several feet deep. The last eruption was 640,000 years ago, but that doesn't mean the next eruption is overdue. The end of the world as we know it Of the many freak ways to shuffle off this mortal coil – lightning

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Seal-eating killer whales accumulate large amounts of harmful pollutants

Research of killer whales in the southern Atlantic ocean and Mediterranean have shown that their blubber contains high levels of pollutants called PCBs, whilst killer whales found along the Norwegian coast have been assumed to be healthy and at low risk from pollution. This is because when researchers took samples from nine Norwegian killer whales in 2002, they found lower levels of pollutants tha

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Vaccine Data From Novavax

Several days after making some headlines with a press release about the data, the Novavax vaccine effort has published on Medrxiv . The is the first look at human data we have at an approach using recombinant coronavirus proteins (plus an adjuvant, in this case a proprietary saponin natural product). The protein itself is produced in the good ol' Sf9/ baculovirus cell expression system, a real wo

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Fragments of asteroids may have jumped the gap in the early solar system

Using some cosmic detective work, a team of researchers has found evidence that tiny pieces of asteroids from the inner solar system may have crossed a gap to the outer solar system, a feat once thought to be unlikely.

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Seal-eating killer whales accumulate large amounts of harmful pollutants

Research of killer whales in the southern Atlantic ocean and Mediterranean have shown that their blubber contains high levels of pollutants called PCBs, whilst killer whales found along the Norwegian coast have been assumed to be healthy and at low risk from pollution. This is because when researchers took samples from nine Norwegian killer whales in 2002, they found lower levels of pollutants tha

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A Tale of Two Seth Rogens

An American Pickle centers on an extraordinary feat of culinary science. Herschel Greenbaum (played by Seth Rogen), a Jewish immigrant living in 1920 New York, falls into a vat of pickles on his factory's closing day and is left there for 100 years. When he emerges in 2020, he's perfectly preserved if a little pungent—a sort of unfrozen caveman of the Lower East Side. A jokey, silent montage in B

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Effect of gadolinium-based contrast agent on breast diffusion-tensor imaging

An "Original Research" article published in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) concluded that the accuracy of breast cancer diagnosis via diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) was equivalent both before and after the administration of a gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA), despite a value change in DTI parameters. Due to the lack of standardization of contrast-enhanced DTI, the authors of t

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Nanoparticle system captures heart-disease biomarker from blood for in-depth analysis

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a method combining sticky nanoparticles with high-precision protein measurement to capture and analyze a common marker of heart disease to reveal details that were previously inaccessible.

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Embryonic heart development: Unprecedented insight from 4D OCT

Thanks to innovations in light-based technology, fresh insights are now available into the biomechanics of mammalian cardiogenesis–and in particular, the pumping dynamics of the mammalian tubular embryonic heart.

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Researchers take the ultimate Earth selfie

In a new study, a team of scientists set out to achieve something new in planetary photography: The group used the Hubble Space Telescope to try to view Earth as if it were an exoplanet.

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Hubble uses Earth as proxy for identifying oxygen on potentially habitable exoplanets

Taking advantage of a total lunar eclipse, astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have detected Earth's own brand of sunscreen—ozone—in our atmosphere. This method simulates how astronomers and astrobiology researchers will search for evidence of life beyond Earth by observing potential "biosignatures" on exoplanets (planets around other stars).

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The US Is Disastrously Behind in Coronavirus Testing. Again

With coronavirus infections rampant in parts of the nation, backlogs are preventing people from getting timely test results, hampering efforts to contain the virus.

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COVID-19 Is Raging. How Safe Is Your Backyard Party?

Every day, it seems, we're buried in a new avalanche of numbers, data and graphs related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Every county, state and country is grappling with interpreting and finding the best response to this data, and on a personal level, so is each one of us . To make matters worse, it's all too easy to conflate the different kinds of risks we face in everyday life. No doubt you've heard

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Thermal chaos returns quantum system to its unknown past

Building on last year's breakthrough 'time reversal' experiment, two researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Argonne National Laboratory have published a new theoretical study in Communications Physics. While their previous paper dealt with a predefined quantum state, this time the physicists have devised a way to time-reverse the evolution of an object in an arbitrary,

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Make the best of bad reviews by leveraging consumer empathy

When confronted with unfair negative reviews, firms can strategically leverage consumer empathy and benefit from potential downstream consequences.

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Non-invasive nerve stimulation boosts learning of foreign language sounds

New research by neuroscientists revealed that a simple, earbud-like device that imperceptibly stimulates the brain could significantly improve the wearer's ability to learn the sounds of a new language. This device may have wide-ranging applications for boosting other kinds of learning as well.

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Childhood connection to nature has many benefits but is not universally positive, finds review

A literature review finds that children are happier and more likely to protect the natural world when they have a greater connection to it, but this connection is complex and can also generate negative emotions linked to issues like climate change.

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Will automated vehicles cut parking revenue?

Researchers used Seattle as a case study to find the association between TNC trips and on-street parking occupancy. They found that up to a certain point, more Uber trips meant more parking occupancy. But model predictions show that once TNC trips reach about three times what they were in 2016, parking revenues will likely decline. The final report offers policy options to help cities plan accordi

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Smartphones prove to be time-saving analytical tools

Scientists use a smartphone camera to easily measure soil density — a key metric for analyzing our soils.

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How cells keep growing even when under attack

Biochemists report that a damage-containment system in stressed bacteria can become overrun and blocked, but that this leads to cells responding by turning on different pathways to make sure that normal growth continues.

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Drivers respond to pre-crash warnings with levels of attentive 'gaze'

Engineers conducted open road testing of three collision avoidance systems and demonstrated that a drivers' visual behavior in response to an alert generated from a collision avoidance system can be divided into one of four different behavioral categories: active gaze, self-conscious gaze, attentive gaze and ignored gaze.

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The pandemic has changed how criminals hide their cash—and AI tools are trying to sniff it out

When economies across the world shut down earlier this year, it wasn't only business owners and consumers who had to adapt. Criminals suddenly had a problem on their hands. How to move their money? Profits from organized crime are typically passed through legitimate businesses, often exchanging hands several times and crossing borders, until there is no clear trail back to its source—a process kn

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LSU Health discovers key to dialogue between brain cells to protect against stroke

LSU Health New Orleans research has unlocked a key fundamental mechanism in the communication between brain cells when confronted with stroke and found DHA not only protected neuronal cells and promoted their survival, but also helped maintain their integrity and stability.

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NASA satellites capture Isaias' nighttime track into Canada

Tropical Storm Isaias has transitioned into a post-tropical storm as it moved out of the U.S. and into eastern Canada on Aug. 5 and 6. NASA created an animation of nighttime satellite imagery that shows Isaias' track up the U.S. East Coast.

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ASH releases new clinical practice guidelines on acute myeloid leukemia in older adults

Today, ASH published new guidelines to help older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and their health care providers make critical care decisions, including if and how to proceed with cancer treatment and the need for blood transfusions for those in hospice care.

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Identifying local solutions in the barotse floodplain for sustainable agricultural development

To develop locally relevant strategies that improve food security, nutrition, and conservation, researchers employed a gendered ecosystem services approach in Zambia.

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GSA's journals publish nine new articles on COVID-19 and Aging

The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are continuing to publish scientific articles on COVID-19, and all are free to access. The following were published between July 7 and August 1; all are free to access.

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Inconsistent EPA regulations increase lead poisoning risk to kids, study finds

As new lead protection rules from the Environmental Protection Agency move toward finalization, research shows that tens of thousands of children are at increased risk under the current set of inconsistent standards.

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Hubble uses Earth as proxy for identifying oxygen on potentially habitable exoplanets

Taking advantage of a total lunar eclipse, Hubble used the Moon as a mirror to study sunlight that had passed through Earth's atmosphere. As a result, Hubble detected Earth's own brand of sunscreen – ozone – in our atmosphere. The technique simulates how scientists will search for evidence of life on planets around other stars.

5h

Surgical delays for very early stage breast cancer not tied to worse survival outcomes

Retrospective analysis of patients treated between 2010 and 2016 found that delays were associated with a small increase in pathological upstaging for 'stage zero' breast cancer but did not impact overall survival.

5h

Scientists identify missing source of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) report that anthropogenic sources of carbonyl sulfide (OCS), not just oceanic sources, account for much of the missing source of OCS in the atmosphere. Their findings provide better context for estimates of global photosynthesis (uptake of CO2) using OCS dynamics.

5h

Detecting season presence of sharks in the water—with eDNA

New research reveals it's possible to detect sharks moving into an area without actually seeing any of them. All that's needed is a couple liters of water.

5h

This fruit attracts birds with an unusual way of making itself metallic blue

Instead of relying solely on pigments, the metallic blue fruits of Viburnum tinus use structural color to reflect blue light, a mechanism rarely seen in plants. Researchers show that the fruits use lipid nanostructures in their cell walls, a previously unknown mechanism of structural color, to get their striking blue — which may also double as a signal to birds that the fruits are full of nutriti

5h

Detecting season presence of sharks in the water—with eDNA

New research reveals it's possible to detect sharks moving into an area without actually seeing any of them. All that's needed is a couple liters of water.

5h

Super-bright fluorescent solids can be 3D printed in any shape

There's a cheap new way to make fluorescent dyes into solid materials that glow, and it could be used to 3D print objects that guide light into solar cells

5h

Bizarre fossil with an incredibly long neck was a marine hunter

Tanystropheus had a neck three times the length of its body, and a new analysis of its skull suggests it lived in the sea, where it ambushed prey

5h

Fruit flies have special neurons that sense the wind to aid navigation

Neurons have been discovered in the brains of fruit flies that are used for working out which way to fly based on the wind. The finding could be used to help robots navigate

5h

A Poisonous Tsunami Is Screaming Across the Surface of Venus

Astronomers have discovered that a gigantic wall of poisonous clouds is sweeping across the surface of Venus every few days — and has been doing so for decades, ScienceAlert reports . It's so massive, in fact, it reaches far beyond the planet's equator to both the north and south mid latitudes at altitudes of around 50 kilometers. "If this happened on Earth, this would be a frontal surface at the

5h

The next virus pandemic is not far away

Scientists say new diseases will jump from animals unless humans change the way they live

5h

Climate change to bring longer droughts in Europe: study

Punishing two-year droughts like the record-breaking one that gripped Central Europe from 2018 to 2019 could become much more frequent if the region fails to curb greenhouse gas emissions, researchers said Thursday, affecting huge swathes of its cultivated land.

5h

Hurricane Alpha? Amped up season forecast, names may run out

Already smashing records, this year's hyperactive Atlantic hurricane season is about to get even nastier, forecasters predict. In the coming months, they expect to run out of traditional hurricane names and see about twice as much storm activity as a normal year.

5h

The Quest to Liberate $300,000 of Bitcoin From an Old Zip File

The story of a guy who wouldn't let a few quintillion possible decryption keys stand between him and his cryptocurrency.

5h

Novel 3-D printed 'reef tiles' to repopulate coral communities

Architects and marine scientists at the University of Hong Kong (HKU) have jointly developed a novel method for coral restoration making use of specially designed 3-D printed artificial 'reef tiles' for attachment by corals to enhance their chance of survival in the Hoi Ha Wan Marine Park in Hong Kong waters.

5h

Faster rates of evolution are linked to tiny genomes, study finds

Inside every cell lies a genome—a full set of DNA that contains the instructions for building an organism. Across the biological world, genomes show a staggering diversity in size. For example, the genome of the Japanese white flower Paris japonica is over 150 billion base pairs, meaning that almost 100 meters of DNA are squeezed into each cell. In comparison, single-celled prokaryotes like bacter

5h

World film premiere: Death of cell infected with tuberculosis

The tuberculosis bacterium has been around as long as mankind has.

5h

First record of invasive shell-boring worm in the Wadden Sea means trouble for oysters

In October 2014, the suspicion arose that the parasite worm Polydora websteri had found its way to the Wadden Sea. Following years of research, that suspicion has now been confirmed: the worm, that likely originates from the Asian Pacific, has arrived in European waters. Researchers from the German Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) and the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), confirm

5h

Novel 3-D printed 'reef tiles' to repopulate coral communities

Architects and marine scientists at the University of Hong Kong (HKU) have jointly developed a novel method for coral restoration making use of specially designed 3-D printed artificial 'reef tiles' for attachment by corals to enhance their chance of survival in the Hoi Ha Wan Marine Park in Hong Kong waters.

5h

Faster rates of evolution are linked to tiny genomes, study finds

Inside every cell lies a genome—a full set of DNA that contains the instructions for building an organism. Across the biological world, genomes show a staggering diversity in size. For example, the genome of the Japanese white flower Paris japonica is over 150 billion base pairs, meaning that almost 100 meters of DNA are squeezed into each cell. In comparison, single-celled prokaryotes like bacter

5h

World film premiere: Death of cell infected with tuberculosis

The tuberculosis bacterium has been around as long as mankind has.

5h

Controlling ice formation on gradient wettability surfaces for high-performance bioinspired materials

Ice-templating is a powerful technique to construct biological materials using ice nucleation and growth to obtain frozen material architectures, but scientists have been unable to control these two factors with effective methods. In a new report on Science Advances, Nifang Zhao and a team of scientists in chemical and biological engineering at Zhejiang University in China, demonstrated successive

5h

Volcanic emissions can cause changes in the atmosphere over a long time

The super volcano Los Chocoyos in Guatemala, Central America, erupted about 84,000 years ago, and was one of the largest volcanic events of the last 100,000 years.

5h

Study suggests heat waves of the future could kill millions

A team of researchers at the National Bureau of Economic Research has found evidence suggesting that if greenhouse gas emissions are not curbed, future heat waves could kill millions of people across the globe. In their paper published on the NBER website, the group describes how they compared heat related deaths in several countries during past heatwaves with projected future temperatures to lear

5h

Research explores the impacts of mobile phones for Maasai women

Mobile phones have the power to change the lives of women living in remote communities by reducing barriers to information and increasing access to local economies. However, the introduction of new technologies can hamper efforts to empower women by increasing disparities in power dynamics.

5h

First record of invasive shell-boring worm in the Wadden Sea means trouble for oysters

In October 2014, the suspicion arose that the parasite worm Polydora websteri had found its way to the Wadden Sea. Following years of research, that suspicion has now been confirmed: the worm, that likely originates from the Asian Pacific, has arrived in European waters. Researchers from the German Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) and the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), confirm

5h

Team develops peptide that makes drug-resistant bacteria sensitive to antibiotics again

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a synthetic peptide that can make multidrug-resistant bacteria sensitive to antibiotics again when used together with traditional antibiotics, offering hope for the prospect of a combination treatment strategy to tackle certain antibiotic-tolerant infections.

5h

Algorithm created by deep learning finds potential therapeutic targets throughout genome

A team of researchers from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed an algorithm through machine learning that helps predict sites of DNA methylation—a process that can change the activity of DNA without changing its overall structure—and could identify disease-causing mechanisms that would otherwise be missed by conventional screening

5h

Uncovering developmental mechanisms of elaborate petals in Nigella damascena

Researchers led by Dr. Kong Hongzhi from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the mechanisms underlying elaborate petal development and specialized character formation in Nigella damascena, and the results were recently published in The Plant Cell.

5h

How growth rates influence the fitness of bacteria

Bacteria are survival artists: When they get nutrition, they multiply rapidly, albeit they can also survive periods of hunger. But, when they grow too quickly, their ability to survive is hampered, as studies by a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) on E. coli bacteria show. The results could help increase the effectiveness of antibiotics.

5h

Scientists discover new concept of bacterial gene regulation

Bacteria are always with us: These tiny organisms are found within and on our body as is the case with all animals and plants. As part of a healthy microbiome they ensure our wellbeing. But if the microbial community gets dysbalanced, infections can follow. Even in soil and water they are a crucial component of the respective environments and their functioning.

5h

Continuing Conservation in a Planet on Lockdown

Capacity building and local community involvement are key to continuing conservation during the current pandemic

5h

Team develops peptide that makes drug-resistant bacteria sensitive to antibiotics again

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a synthetic peptide that can make multidrug-resistant bacteria sensitive to antibiotics again when used together with traditional antibiotics, offering hope for the prospect of a combination treatment strategy to tackle certain antibiotic-tolerant infections.

5h

Algorithm created by deep learning finds potential therapeutic targets throughout genome

A team of researchers from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed an algorithm through machine learning that helps predict sites of DNA methylation—a process that can change the activity of DNA without changing its overall structure—and could identify disease-causing mechanisms that would otherwise be missed by conventional screening

5h

Uncovering developmental mechanisms of elaborate petals in Nigella damascena

Researchers led by Dr. Kong Hongzhi from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the mechanisms underlying elaborate petal development and specialized character formation in Nigella damascena, and the results were recently published in The Plant Cell.

5h

How growth rates influence the fitness of bacteria

Bacteria are survival artists: When they get nutrition, they multiply rapidly, albeit they can also survive periods of hunger. But, when they grow too quickly, their ability to survive is hampered, as studies by a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) on E. coli bacteria show. The results could help increase the effectiveness of antibiotics.

5h

What will our cities look like after COVID-19?

The past few months have been a highly unusual time as people sheltered in place to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Schools, streets and stadiums fell silent, tourist hot spots became ghost towns, and sidewalk traffic largely consisted of grocery and food deliveries.

5h

Scientists discover new concept of bacterial gene regulation

Bacteria are always with us: These tiny organisms are found within and on our body as is the case with all animals and plants. As part of a healthy microbiome they ensure our wellbeing. But if the microbial community gets dysbalanced, infections can follow. Even in soil and water they are a crucial component of the respective environments and their functioning.

5h

Tellurium makes the difference

The periodic system contains 118 chemical elements. However, only a few of them, such as hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and silicon, are of major importance in our daily lives. But things become really exciting from a chemical point of view when less well-known elements are involved. An international research group from Germany and Finland discovered astonishing and beautiful molecular structu

5h

Hitting a baseball is the hardest skill to pull off in sports. Here why

Getting a hit in baseball is one of the hardest things to do regularly in sports. (Pexels/) There are few aspects of life where you can fail seven out of 10 times and still be considered great at what you do. With a 30 percent score on the MCAT, you wouldn't get into medical school. You'd likely lose money if you only won 30 percent of your Super Bowl bets. But in baseball, if you get a hit 30 pe

5h

New multiple myeloma therapy shows promise in preclinical study

A new alpha-radioimmunotherapy, 212Pb-anti-CD38, has proven effective in preventing tumor growth and increasing survival in multiple myeloma tumor-bearing mice, according to new research published in the July issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. Given the long half-life, central production and worldwide distribution of 212Pb-anti-CD38, researchers have determined that the α-radioimmunotherapy

5h

Grow faster, die sooner

Bacteria are survival artists: When they get nutrition, they multiply rapidly, albeit they can also survive periods of hunger. But, when they grow too quickly, their ability to survive is hampered, as studies by a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) on E. coli bacteria show. The results could help increase the effectiveness of antibiotics.

5h

What will our cities look like after COVID-19?

UBC planning experts Jordi Honey-Rosés and Erick Villagomez analyze the implications of COVID-19 measures on city planning and space design.

5h

Scientists identify missing source of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) report that anthropogenic sources of carbonyl sulfide (OCS), not just oceanic sources, account for much of the missing source of OCS in the atmosphere. Their findings provide better context for estimates of global photosynthesis (taking up CO2) using OCS dynamics.

5h

Chemists create the brightest-ever fluorescent materials

By formulating positively charged fluorescent dyes into a new class of materials called small-molecule ionic isolation lattices (SMILES), a compound's brilliant glow can be seamlessly transferred to a solid, crystalline state, researchers report. The advance overcomes a long-standing barrier to developing fluorescent solids, resulting in the brightest known materials in existence.

5h

This fruit attracts birds with an unusual way of making itself metallic blue

Instead of relying solely on pigments, the metallic blue fruits of Viburnum tinus use structural color to reflect blue light, a mechanism rarely seen in plants. Researchers show that the fruits use lipid nanostructures in their cell walls, a previously unknown mechanism of structural color, to get their striking blue — which may also double as a signal to birds that the fruits are full of nutriti

5h

Faster rates of evolution are linked to tiny genomes

Inside every cell lies a genome – a full set of DNA that contains the instructions for building an organism. Across the biological world, genomes show a staggering diversity in size but scientists still don't fully understand why. Now, scientists have found a link between mutation rate – how quickly the DNA sequence changes – and genome size. Writing in Current Biology, the researchers reported th

5h

Vitamin D twice a day may keep vertigo away

Taking vitamin D and calcium twice a day may reduce your chances of getting vertigo again, according to a new study.

5h

Warming climate may trigger more West Nile outbreaks in Southern California

A new study of captured mosquitoes in Los Angeles finds that West Nile infection is strongly associated with average temperature, and that temperatures above 73 degrees Fahrenheit are highly favorable for West Nile transmission. As climate change brings hotter weather to the region, it is likely that cooler, coastal neighborhoods will be pushed into the 'favorable' zone, accelerating transmission

5h

Education may be protective for people with gene for familial early onset Alzheimer's

Even for people who carry the gene for early onset Alzheimer's disease, more years of education may slow the development of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain that are associated with the disease, according to a new study.

5h

Implanted neural stem cell grafts show functionality in spinal cord injuries

Researchers report successfully implanting specialized grafts of neural stem cells directly into spinal cord injuries in mice, then documenting how the grafts grew and filled the injury sites, mimicking the animals' existing neuronal network.

5h

Fuel from disused tires

Used tires pose a serious environmental risk owing to the damage that may be caused when they are stored in the environment. They are emerging in ever greater numbers from one year to the next in developed countries so revalorizing them is a subject that is attracting great interest and is being spurred on by the increasingly stringent regulations in terms of their management.

5h

Researchers show how to make non-magnetic materials magnetic

A complex process can modify non-magnetic oxide materials in such a way to make them magnetic. The basis for this new phenomenon is controlled layer-by-layer growth of each material. An international research team with researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) reported on their unexpected findings in the journal Nature Communications.

5h

Impact of climate change on tropical fisheries would create ripples across the world

Tropical oceans and fisheries are threatened by climate change, generating impacts that will affect the sustainable development of both local economies and communities, and regions outside the tropics through 'telecoupling' of human-natural systems, such as seafood trade and distant-water fishing, says a scientific review from UBC and international researchers.

5h

Small towns have highest risk of intimate partner violence

Despite common perceptions that big cities have more violence, women living in small towns are most at risk of violence from current or former spouses and partners, according to a recent study by Washington State University criminologist Kathryn DuBois.

5h

A closer look at water-splitting's solar fuel potential

In the fight against climate change, scientists have searched for ways to replace fossil fuels with carbon-free alternatives such as hydrogen fuel.

5h

Researchers propose strategy to evaluate tumor photothermal therapy in real-time

Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a promising alternative method for cancer treatment due to advantages of non-invasiveness, precise temporal and spatial control, strong specificity and high tumor destruction efficiency.

5h

5h

Scientists: Martian Lava Tubes Large Enough to Fit Planetary Base

Holing Up In order to establish a base on Mars, settlers will be forced to survive extremely harsh conditions and an onslaught of cosmic radiation. To do that, they may end up hiding underground in caverns called lava tubes. Scientists have long suggested that hiding out in lava tubes might be the key to building safe lunar or Mars bases. But they knew very little about the tubes themselves. Now,

6h

New acid mine drainage treatment turns waste into valuable critical minerals

A new way to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) could help transform the environmental pollution problem into an important domestic source of the critical rare earth elements needed to produce technology ranging from smart phones to fighter jets, according to scientists.

6h

Scientists discover new concept of bacterial gene regulation

Microbiologist Prof. Kai Papenfort and his team at Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) discovered a new mechanism of autoregulation during gene expression that relies on small regulatory ribonucleic acids (sRNAs) and the major endoribonuclease RNase E.

6h

Blood test may point to patients at higher risk for COVID-19 deterioration, death

George Washington University researchers found five biomarkers associated with higher odds of clinical deterioration and death in COVID-19 patients. The study was published in Future Medicine.

6h

Research explores the impacts of mobile phones for Maasai women

For a population that herds livestock across wide stretches of wild savanna, mobile phones are a boon to their economy and life. But few studies have investigated how this new technology is impacting the lives of women in Maasai communities, which are traditionally patriarchal. In family units where men exert significant control, often over multiple wives, it is important to understand how phones

6h

Algorithm created by deep learning finds potential therapeutic targets throughout genome

A team of researchers have developed an algorithm through machine learning that helps predict sites of DNA methylation – a process that can change the activity of DNA without changing its overall structure – and could identify disease-causing mechanisms that would otherwise be missed by conventional screening methods.

6h

Tellurium makes the difference

The periodic system contains 118 chemical elements. However, only a few of them are of major importance in our daily lives. An international research group from Germany and Finland discovered astonishing and beautiful molecular structures when they used the element tellurium in ring-shaped hydrocarbon molecules. These compounds are distinguished by the fact that they are arranged in the crystal to

6h

Researchers: What's in oilfield wastewater matters for injection-induced earthquakes

Specifically, he pointed out that oilfield brine has much different properties, like density and viscosity, than pure water, and these differences affect the processes that cause fluid pressure to trigger earthquakes.

6h

Researchers discover sex-specific differences in neural mechanisms for glucose regulation

Researchers from Tufts have discovered neural mechanisms in mice specific to females that switch estrogen from playing a protective role in glucose metabolism to a disruptive role. The discovery could provide clues to the increased risk of insulin resistance and diabetes among post-menopausal women.

6h

COVID-19: The long road to recovery

Researchers have identified a pattern of longer-term symptoms likely to be experienced by people who were hospitalised with the COVID-19 infection. They include fatigue, breathlessness, psychological distress – including problems with concentration and memory – and a general decline in quality of life.

6h

TSMC, Foxconn Reportedly Possibly Interested in ARM Acquisition

Ever since rumors of a potential ARM sale popped up, Nvidia has been floated as the most likely (and most-interested) buyer. That may have changed. Reportedly both TSMC and Foxconn are also interested in ARM. Both companies are identified as "Key Apple suppliers" in a story at the Nikkei Asian Review , a likely-intentional reference to the company viewed as being behind their newfound interest. A

6h

Microsoft's Roots in China Have Positioned It to Buy TikTok

Alumni of the software giant's Beijing research lab are now executives at Alibaba, Tencent, SenseTime—and TikTok parent ByteDance.

6h

Even Asymptomatic People Carry the Coronavirus in High Amounts

Researchers in South Korea found that roughly 30 percent of those infected never develop symptoms yet probably spread the virus.

6h

First record of invasive shell-boring worm in the Wadden Sea means trouble for oyster

n October 2014, the suspicion arose that the parasite worm Polydora websteri had found its way to the Wadden Sea. Researchers from the German Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) and the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), confirm in a publication in Marine Biodiversity, that they have found the shell-borer in oysters near Sylt and Texel and that it has arrived in European waters.

6h

New study sheds light on evolution of hell ants from 100 million years ago

An international research team co-led by Prof. WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology (NIGPAS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has confirmed the special trap-jaw predation mechanism of hell ants, providing new insights into their evolution.

6h

Delay in breast cancer operations appears non-life-threatening for early-stage disease

A new breast cancer study brings reassuring findings for women with early-stage breast cancer who were forced to delay their cancer operations because of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A longer time from diagnosis to surgical treatment does not lower overall survival of women with early-stage breast cancer who underwent delayed operations before the pandemic, according to the st

6h

A new tool for modeling the human gut microbiome

MIT engineers designed a device that replicates the lining of the colon. With the device, they can grow human colon cells along with oxygen-intolerant bacteria that normally live in the human digestive tract and have been implicated in Crohn's disease.

6h

Cancer vs. COVID: When a pandemic upended cancer care

A team of researchers interviewed physicians and patients at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic to identify eight scenarios impacting cancer care. Using communication strategies, they created examples of language to help oncologists respond to patients empathetically.

6h

Long neck helped reptile hunt underwater

Its neck was three times as long as its torso, but had only 13 extremely elongated vertebrae: Tanystropheus, a bizarre giraffe-necked reptile which lived 242 million years ago, is a paleontological absurdity. A new study led by the University of Zurich has now shown that the creature lived in water and was surprisingly adaptable.

6h

Racial disparities in high-cost cancer treatment for children

This observational study looked at whether race and socioeconomic factors were associated with children enrolled in national clinical trials receiving high-cost proton radiotherapy for treatment of cancer.

6h

Perspectives on oncology-specific language during COVID-19 pandemic

A practical communication guide designed for oncologists to assuage the fear, anger and anxiety among patients with cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic is proposed in this qualitative study.

6h

Prioritizing cancer care during pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced oncology clinicians and administrators in the United States to set priorities for cancer care because of resource constraints. As oncology practices adapt to a contracted health care system, expertise gained from partnerships in low-resource settings can be used for guidance.

6h

Molecular viral shedding among asymptomatic, symptomatic patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection

SARS-CoV-2 molecular viral shedding in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients who were isolated in a community treatment center in South Korea is quantitatively described in this observational study.

6h

The bouncer in the brain

How do you keep orientation in a complex environment, like the city of Vienna? You can thank your brain's "global positioning system" (GPS), the hippocampus, for this sense of orientation. To further understand its functions, scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) analyzed single neurons of this GPS in mice. They discovered that so-called granule cells filter a

6h

Completing the set: 'Coupon-collection behavior' reduces sex-ratio variation among families

A new analysis of sibling records from more than 300,000 individuals suggests that some parents continue to reproduce until they have children of both sexes.

6h

New fossil discovery shows how ancient 'hell ants' hunted with headgear

A fossil recently recovered from the age of the dinosaurs is giving scientists the most vivid picture yet of how one of the most enigmatic and fearsome groups of ants to exist once used their uncanny tusk-like mandibles and diverse horns to successfully hunt down victims for nearly 20 million years, before vanishing from the planet.

6h

Fossil mystery solved: Super-long-necked reptiles lived in the ocean, not on land

By CT scanning crushed fossilized skulls and digitally reassembling them, and by examining the fossils' growth rings, scientists were able to describe a new species of prehistoric sea creature. Tanystropheus hydroides, named after mythology's hydra, was a twenty-foot-long animal with a ten-foot-long neck.

6h

Faster rates of evolution are linked to tiny genomes, study finds

Inside every cell lies a genome – a full set of DNA that contains the instructions for building an organism. Across the biological world, genomes show a staggering diversity in size but scientists still don't fully understand why.Now, scientists have found a link between mutation rate – how quickly the DNA sequence changes – and genome size. Writing in Current Biology, the researchers reported tha

6h

Researchers hope to save seabirds by calculating the value of their poop

To raise awareness of the importance of seabirds to people and the ecosystems we depend on, a Science & Society article appearing August 6 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution looks at something that most of us find off-putting: their poop. The researchers say that the poop, known as guano and which serves as a source of fertilizer and a key contribution to marine ecosystems, could be wort

6h

Chemists create the brightest-ever fluorescent materials

By formulating positively charged fluorescent dyes into a new class of materials called small-molecule ionic isolation lattices (SMILES), a compound's brilliant glow can be seamlessly transferred to a solid, crystalline state, researchers report August 6 in the journal Chem. The advance overcomes a long-standing barrier to developing fluorescent solids, resulting in the brightest known materials i

6h

Metallic blue fruits use fat to produce color and signal a treat for birds

Researchers have found that a common plant owes the dazzling blue colour of its fruit to fat in its cellular structure, the first time this type of colour production has been observed in nature.

6h

Why the 'wimpy' Y chromosome hasn't evolved out of existence

The Y chromosome has shrunken drastically over 200 million years of evolution. Even those who study it have used the word "wimpy" to describe it, and yet it continues to stick around. An Opinion paper publishing on August 6, 2020 in the journal Trends in Genetics outlines a new theory–called the 'persistent Y hypothesis'–to explain why the Y chromosome may be more resilient than it first appears

6h

This fruit attracts birds with an unusual way of making itself metallic blue

Instead of relying solely on pigments, the metallic blue fruits of Viburnum tinus use structural color to reflect blue light, a mechanism rarely seen in plants. Researchers reporting August 6 in the journal Current Biology show that the fruits use lipid nanostructures in their cell walls, a previously unknown mechanism of structural color, to get their striking blue–which may also double as a sig

6h

The trials of global research under the coronavirus

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02326-0 Researchers share how they have adapted fieldwork and collaborations in the face of travel bans and closed borders.

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Huge Shark Smacks a Tiny Boat! | Shark Week

Shark Week Begins Sunday, August 9th at 8p! Stream Shark Week Episodes on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're on Instagram! https://www.instag

6h

Move over Akita: Introducing 'Kuma mutant' mice for islet transplantation research

Scientists have used a gene editing technique to establish a novel mouse model of permanent neonatal diabetes — the immune-deficient Kuma mutant mice with a specific deletion in the Insulin2 (Ins2) gene. This model is expected to be useful for studying the mechanisms governing insulin-producing cell dysfunctions in the pancreas as well as for evaluating human stem-cell derived or interspecies-der

6h

Ammonia-rich hail sheds new light on Jupiter's weather

New Juno results suggest that the violent thunderstorms taking place in Jupiter's atmosphere may form ammonia-rich hail, or 'mushballs', that play a key role in the planet's atmospheric dynamics.

6h

Ocean heatwaves dramatically shift habitats

Marine heatwaves across the world's oceans can displace habitat for sea turtles, whales, and other marine life by 10s to thousands of kilometers. They dramatically shift these animals' preferred temperatures in a fraction of the time that climate change is expected to do the same, new research shows.

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Scientists follow the nose to solve mystery of long-necked reptile

Scans suggest Tanystropheus, which lived 242m years ago, lived in water, researchers say The mystery of an ancient reptile with a tremendously long neck has been solved, according to researchers who say the creature lived in the water. Fossils of the creature, known as Tanystropheus , were first unearthed in Germany around 150 years ago and further specimens have turned up over the decades, large

6h

The secret to this fruit's mysterious blue color

The metallic blue shade has an unusual origin

6h

Fossil captures ancient 'hell ant' in action

The prehistoric insect used "scythelike" mouthparts to clamp down on prey

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KAL's cartoon

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Sony WH-1000XM4 Review: The Best Noise-Canceling Headphones

These noise-canceling headphones silence the world better than most, and the mics are now actually usable on phone calls.

6h

A closer look at water-splitting's solar fuel potential

Scientists have gained important new insight into how the performance of a promising semiconducting thin film can be optimized at the nanoscale for renewable energy technologies such as solar fuels.

6h

Dishwasher-safe food storage containers that make meal prep a breeze

A place to store your leftovers. (Charles Deluvio via Unsplash/) There are dozens of reasons to invest in a good set of food storage containers. Saving your leftovers is cost effective, good for the environment, and saves you the time it would take to cook something fresh (or order takeout). A complete set also makes meal prep a snap, with standardized sizes, or compartments, for main and side di

6h

Study of China's ethnic minorities retracted as dozens of papers come under scrutiny for ethical violations

A legal journal has retracted a 2019 article on the facial genetics of ethnic minorities in China for ethics violations, and the publisher, Springer Nature, is investigating more than two dozen other articles for similar concerns. The article, "Y Chromosomal STR haplotypes in Chinese Uyghur, Kazakh and Hui ethnic groups and genetic features of DYS448 … Continue reading

6h

Could better 'oral posture' spare kids braces?

The shrinking human jaw isn't the result of genetics but lifestyle, and can be addressed, say researchers. For many of us, orthodontic work—getting fitted with braces, wearing retainers—was just a late-childhood rite of passage. The same went for the pulling of wisdom teeth in early adulthood. Other common conditions, including jaw pain and obstructed sleep apnea —when slack throat muscles interr

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Brain waves can be used to predict future pain sensitivity

Rhythms produced by the brain can reliably be used to predict how sensitive we are to pain, new research shows.

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Fuel from disused tyres

The journal Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews has published a study by the UPV/EHU's Department of Chemical Engineering, which describes the work relating to the catalytic pyrolysis of tyres to see which products can be obtained in this process and their possible applications as fuel.

6h

Chemists create the brightest-ever fluorescent materials

By formulating positively charged fluorescent dyes into a new class of materials called small-molecule ionic isolation lattices (SMILES), a compound's brilliant glow can be seamlessly transferred to a solid, crystalline state, researchers report August 6 in the journal Chem. The advance overcomes a long-standing barrier to developing fluorescent solids, resulting in the brightest known materials i

6h

Researchers hope to save seabirds by calculating the value of their poop

Seabird species such as gulls and pelicans are often overlooked when it comes to conservation and can struggle to capture the public eye. To raise awareness of their importance to people and the ecosystems we depend on, a Science & Society article appearing August 6 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution looks at something that most of us find off-putting: their poop. The researchers say tha

6h

Why the 'wimpy' Y chromosome hasn't evolved out of existence

Much smaller than its counterpart, the X chromosome, the Y chromosome has shrunken drastically over 200 million years of evolution. Even those who study it have used the word "wimpy" to describe it, and yet it continues to stick around even though sex chromosomes in non-mammalian vertebrates are known to experience quite a bit of evolutionarily turnover. An Opinion paper publishing on August 6 in

6h

Completing the set: 'Coupon-collection behavior' reduces sex-ratio variation among families

A new analysis of sibling records from more than 300,000 individuals suggests that some parents continue to reproduce until they have children of both sexes.

6h

Fossil mystery solved: Super-long-necked reptiles lived in the ocean, not on land

A fossil called Tanystropheus was first described in 1852, and it's been puzzling scientists ever since. At one point, paleontologists thought it was a flying pterosaur, like a pterodactyl, and that its long, hollow bones were phalanges in the finger that supported the wing. Later on, they figured out that those were elongated neck bones, and that it was a twenty-foot-long reptile with a ten-foot

6h

New fossil discovery shows how ancient 'hell ants' hunted with headgear

In findings published Aug. 6 in the journal Current Biology, researchers from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences and University of Rennes in France have unveiled a stunning 99-million-year-old fossil pristinely preserving an enigmatic insect predator from the Cretaceous Period—a 'hell ant' (haidomyrmecine)—as it embraced its unsuspecting final victim, an extinct

6h

This fruit attracts birds with an unusual way of making itself metallic blue

There's a reason why blue fruits are so rare: the pigment compounds that make fruits blue are relatively uncommon in nature. But the metallic blue fruits of Viburnum tinus, a popular landscaping plant in Europe, get their color a different way. Instead of relying solely on pigments, the fruits use structural color to reflect blue light, something that's rarely seen in plants. Researchers reporting

6h

A new AI language model generates poetry and prose

GPT-3 can be eerily human-like—for better and for worse

6h

Covid-19 testing labs are being overwhelmed

Pool-sampling may offer a solution

6h

An exception to the rule that there are no marine insects

Lice that latch onto seals survive deep-sea rides

6h

An indoor barbecue to prevent pollution problems

And avoid complaints about fumes from restaurants

6h

Researchers hope to save seabirds by calculating the value of their poop

Seabird species such as gulls and pelicans are often overlooked when it comes to conservation and can struggle to capture the public eye. To raise awareness of their importance to people and the ecosystems we depend on, a Science & Society article appearing August 6 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution looks at something that most of us find off-putting: their poop. The researchers say tha

6h

Why the 'wimpy' Y chromosome hasn't evolved out of existence

Much smaller than its counterpart, the X chromosome, the Y chromosome has shrunken drastically over 200 million years of evolution. Even those who study it have used the word "wimpy" to describe it, and yet it continues to stick around even though sex chromosomes in non-mammalian vertebrates are known to experience quite a bit of evolutionarily turnover. An Opinion paper publishing on August 6 in

6h

Completing the set: 'Coupon-collection behavior' reduces sex-ratio variation among families

A new analysis of sibling records from more than 300,000 individuals suggests that some parents continue to reproduce until they have children of both sexes.

6h

This fruit attracts birds with an unusual way of making itself metallic blue

There's a reason why blue fruits are so rare: the pigment compounds that make fruits blue are relatively uncommon in nature. But the metallic blue fruits of Viburnum tinus, a popular landscaping plant in Europe, get their color a different way. Instead of relying solely on pigments, the fruits use structural color to reflect blue light, something that's rarely seen in plants. Researchers reporting

6h

Kinetic sand kits to keep your kid entertained

Make these in your home! (Dallas Reedy via Unsplash/) Moldable, kinetic sand is an amazing, mess-free way for your kids to get creative or for you to stay focused and relieve some stress. This stuff is incredible. Like Play-doh or clay, it can help develop your child's fine motor skills and provide hours of entertainment. Best of all, you won't ever find yourself reaching for the broom because th

7h

Climate change may exacerbate allergies, autism

Climate change and disruption of the ecosystem have the potential to profoundly affect the human body, affecting allergies, autism, and autoimmune systems, researchers report. A new paper in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health details the effects of climate change on allergies, autoimmunity, and the microbiome, the beneficial microorganisms that live on and insid

7h

Sommarjobb avgörande för framtida yrkesliv

Kontakter med arbetsmarknaden via tidigare sommarjobb eller extrajobb spelar stor roll för hur och var ungdomar lyckas etablera sig på arbetsmarknaden. Möjligheten till en längre anställning är till exempel 40 procentenheter högre för den som tidigare haft någon typ av jobb eller praktik på den specifika arbetsplatsen, visar Dagmar Müllers nya avhandling i nationalekonomi vid Uppsala universitet.

7h

The best gadgets for making delicious ravioli

Choose your filling. (Davide Ragusa via Unsplash/) Experimenting in the kitchen can be a fun adventure—especially when it involves making heavenly, cheesy ravioli. If you're in the mood for cooking up this Italian staple but have no idea where to start, these four helpful gadgets have your back. They're straightforward, efficient, and will have you eating all the delicious ravioli in no time. Mak

7h

The best meal prep bags for organizing and toting your food

Take your meals with you. (Kim Deachul via Unsplach/) Whether you're packing food for a hangout in the park or a day at the office, meal prep bags are the perfect solution for fresh, organized nourishment. These handy satchels are insulated to help maintain temperature and offer roomy storage space to neatly stash your treats. You'll save money on ordering out and avoid soggy messes. Here's some

7h

Flexible management of hydropower plants would contribute to a secure electricity supply

UPV/EHU and BC3 researchers have analyzed the expected evolution of power supply and demand over the coming decades in Spain; they consider a future without nuclear and coal-based plants but with a greater share of renewable sources. They simulate security of supply in this scenario and evaluate to what extent hydro stations could help to alleviate the risk of a power supply shortage.

7h

7h

COVID-19: Immune system derails

Contrary to what has been generally assumed so far, a severe course of COVID-19 does not solely result in a strong immune reaction – rather, the immune response is caught in a continuous loop of activation and inhibition. Experts from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the University of Bonn, the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (H

7h

New CT scanning method may improve heart massage

As part of an international collaboration, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, and University of Leicester, UK, have succeeded in developing a dynamic 3D CT scanning method that shows what happens inside the body during simulated heart massage. The method could help to increase the chance of surviving a cardiac arrest.

7h

A closer look at water-splitting's solar fuel potential

Scientists have gained important new insight into how the performance of a promising semiconducting thin film can be optimized at the nanoscale for renewable energy technologies such as solar fuels.

7h

Herbicide harming marsupial health and development, research finds

Researchers exposed the adult female tammar wallabies to atrazine contaminated water throughout pregnancy, birth and lactation to help establish the extent of harm being caused by the chemical. They then examined the reproductive development of their young by assessing their growth and development to establish that the herbicide is causing major abnormalities in the male reproductive system in man

7h

Spintronics: Researchers show how to make non-magnetic materials magnetic

A complex process can modify non-magnetic oxide materials in such a way to make them magnetic. The basis for this new phenomenon is controlled layer-by-layer growth of each material.

7h

Impact of climate change on tropical fisheries would create ripples across the world

Seafood is the most highly traded food commodity globally, with tropical zone marine fisheries contributing more than 50% of the global fish catch, an average of $USD 96 billion annually. Available scientific evidence consistently shows that tropical marine habitats, fish stocks and fisheries are most vulnerable to oceanic changes associated with climate change. However, telecoupling, or linkages

7h

DNA Could Thwart Trade of the World's Most Trafficked Mammal

Pangolins are poached for their scales and meat, leading researchers to develop a set of molecular tools to help track and mitigate the trade.

7h

Tracking Pangolin Traffic Networks

Working at bushmeat markets in Africa, researchers are trying to trace the trade networks of the mammals.

7h

The Global Work Crisis: Automation, the Case Against Jobs, and What to Do About It

The alarm bell rings. You open your eyes, come to your senses, and slide from dream state to consciousness. You hit the snooze button, and eventually crawl out of bed to the start of yet another working day. This daily narrative is experienced by billions of people all over the world. We work, we eat, we sleep, and we repeat. As our lives pass day by day, the beating drums of the weekly routine t

7h

Anode material for safe batteries with a long cycle life

Researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Jilin University in Changchun/China investigated a highly promising anode material for future high-performance batteries – lithium lanthanum titanate with a perovskite crystal structure (LLTO). As the team reported in the Nature Communications journal, LLTO can improve the energy density, power density, charging rate, safety, and cycle lif

7h

Bone-anchored leg prostheses also prove to be a valuable procedure after 5-year follow-up

After above-knee amputation, there is the option of a prosthesis that is placed directly in the thigh bone. Despite the fact that bone-anchored prostheses have been used for thirty years, researchers at Radboudumc have published the first long-term evaluation. It turns out that the procedure is not without stoma problems, but that these can usually be treated with simple measures and that the impl

7h

Spintronics: Researchers show how to make non-magnetic materials magnetic

A complex process can modify non-magnetic oxide materials in such a way to make them magnetic. The basis for this new phenomenon is controlled layer-by-layer growth of each material. An international research team with researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) reported on their unexpected findings in the journal "Nature Communications".

7h

Researchers propose strategy to evaluate tumor photothermal therapy in real-time

Researchers from USTC reported an "intelligent" strategy of using organic nanoparticles to evaluate photothermal therapy efficiency on tumor in real time.

7h

BCG vaccine is safe and does not lead to an increased risk of COVID-19 symptoms

The BCG vaccine, an vaccine originally made against tuberculosis, has a general stimulating effect on the immune system and is therefore effective against multiple infectious diseases – possibly also against COVID-19. This study compared groups of volunteers who have received a BCG vaccine (or not) in the past five years (before the corona pandemic), showing that the vaccine is safe and possibly i

7h

Gut bacteria in people with Huntington's disease may be a potential drug target

A world first clinical study of the gut microbiome in people with Huntington's disease (HD) has found that it is not just a disease of the brain, but also of the body.

7h

Study gauges specific site stomach cancer risks among ethnic groups

Non-white Americans, especially Asian Americans, are at disproportionately higher risk for gastric cancer compared to non-Hispanic white Americans. A new study breaks down this risk according to specific ethnicities and locations within the stomach.

7h

Nutrition memes forget that there is no such thing as a 'healthy food'

Shareable online graphics give easy to understand breakdowns of the nutritional content of food, but they may be misleading, says James Wong

7h

Will COVID-19 spur new robot 'friends' and helpers?

Socially assistive robots seem especially promising during the pandemic, says a cognitive scientist. "In general, I don't think the public is very aware of what these robots can do to improve our lives," says Jeffrey Krichmar, professor at the University of California, Irvine. "There's more education that needs to be done. I hope COVID-19 will be a wakeup call to our robotics community to spur ne

7h

NSF grant changes raise alarm about commitment to basic research

Nature, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02272-x The US National Science Foundation's new focus on computer science could also put already-under-represented groups at a disadvantage, critics say.

7h

The Chance of Identical Fingerprints: 1 in 64 trillion

Originally published in June 1894 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

A closer look at water-splitting's solar fuel potential

Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) have gained important new insight into how the performance of a promising semiconducting thin film can be optimized at the nanoscale for renewable energy technologies such as solar fuels.

7h

NTU develops peptide that makes drug-resistant bacteria sensitive to antibiotics again

Scientists at NTU Singapore have developed a synthetic peptide that can make multidrug-resistant bacteria sensitive to antibiotics again when used together with traditional antibiotics, offering hope for the prospect of a combination treatment strategy to tackle certain antibiotic-tolerant infections. On its own, the synthetic antimicrobial peptide can also kill bacteria that have grown resistant

7h

Tasmanian devil research offers new insights for tackling cancer in humans

Researchers found a single genetic mutation that leads to reduced growth of a transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils in the wild. The finding gives hope for the animals' survival and could lead to new treatment for human cancers.

7h

Study sheds new light on vein formation in plants

An international team of researchers including the University of Adelaide, has found plant hormones known as strigolactones suppress the transportation of auxin, the main plant hormone involved in vein formation, so that vein formation occurs slower and with greater focus.

7h

Absorbed plant MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction inhibits SARS-CoV-2 replication

In a new study in Cell Discovery, Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University and two other groups from Wuhan Institute of Virology and the Second Hospital of Nanjing present a novel finding that absorbed miRNA MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction (HD) can directly target SARS-CoV-2 genes and inhibit viral replication. Drinking of HD accelerate the negative conversion of COVID-19 patients.

7h

COVID-19 a perfect storm for conspiracy theories

As COVID-19 spreads rapidly around the globe, the pandemic has given conspiracy groups a bigger platform than ever before. Researchers from QUT's Digital Media Research Centre in Australia have taken a deep dive into their world to trace wild rumours on Facebook claiming the coronavirus was caused by 5G technology. They found what was once being preached to the already converted was quickly fanned

7h

Herbicide harming marsupial health and development, research finds

Researchers exposed the adult female tammar wallabies to atrazine contaminated water throughout pregnancy, birth and lactation to help establish the extent of harm being caused by the chemical. They then examined the reproductive development of their young by assessing their growth and development to establish that the herbicide is causing major abnormalities in the male reproductive system in man

7h

Higgs Boson Gives Next-Generation Particle Its Heft

Experiments at the Large Hadron Collider suggest that muons and other "second-generation particles" obtain their mass from interacting with the Higgs, further strengthening the Standard… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Higgs Boson Gives Next-Generation Particle Its Heft

Experiments at the Large Hadron Collider suggest that muons and other "second-generation particles" obtain their mass from interacting with the Higgs, further strengthening the Standard… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Cold War spy satellite captures threat to marmots

Data from a Cold War spy satellite reveal how agriculture has destroyed the living conditions of marmots in Eurasia. Researchers used the satellite data to map the impact of agriculture on biodiversity across Eurasia. The Eurasian Steppes stretch from Europe, through Russia and to Mongolia, and includes countries such as Austria, Hungary, Moldova, Ukraine, and Kazakhstan . "Since the 1960s, there

8h

Stretching is not the key to moving better. This is.

Yeah, being able to do this is cool and all, but simply walking over to the playground without is progress, too. (GMB Fitness/Unsplash/) Moving about isn't meant to hurt. If you have normal range of motion , you should be able to stand, squat, walk, bend down, and reach over your head without any real effort or pain—and without having to warm up. Over the past year I've been working hard on movin

8h

Weightless action on the space station – power, bones and bubbles

European science progressed at a slower pace on the International Space Station in the past month. As a series of spacewalks to power up the space habitat came to an end and two of its passengers left for home Earth, intriguing bubbles puzzled researchers and left them wanting to know more.

8h

Small towns have highest risk of intimate partner violence

Despite common perceptions that big cities have more violence, women living in small towns are most at risk of violence from current or former partners. The study analyzed the responses of more than 570,000 women from the National Crime Victimization Survey from 1994-2015. Women from small towns were 27% more likely to be victims of intimate partner violence than women from the center of big citie

8h

Impact of climate change on tropical fisheries would create ripples across the world

Seafood is the most highly traded food commodity globally, with tropical zone marine fisheries contributing more than 50% of the global fish catch, an average of $USD 96 billion annually. Available scientific evidence consistently shows that tropical marine habitats, fish stocks and fisheries are most vulnerable to oceanic changes associated with climate change. However, telecoupling, or linkages

8h

Projecting early molecular signatures of AD through the convergence study of Omics and AI

Dr. Cheon Mookyung of KBRI published the research results in an international academic journal of computational biology.

8h

What a Doctor Learns From Watching You on Video Chat

In the 1880s, a few short years after the telephone's invention, futurists envisioned a modern doctor unrestricted by time and space. "That specialist would sit in a web of wires," the Johns Hopkins medical historian Jeremy Greene told me, "and take the pulse of the nation." At the time, and for decades after, medical practice remained circumscribed by geography. Black bag in tow, packed with eve

8h

UK officials urge ministers to relax US travel restrictions

Diplomats say easing of rules would boost transatlantic commerce and could smooth trade talks

8h

Lessons from two pan-African giants on how to achieve genuine nuclear disarmament

This year marks the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the US in 1945, the only time in history that nuclear bombs have been used.

8h

Non-COVID-19 doctor visits drop during pandemic

Use of non-COVID-19-related health care has declined since the beginning of the pandemic, according to a new study. That could have important implications for patient health, researchers say. The US health care system has focused on providing life-saving care for COVID-19 patients. States closed non-essential activities and people curtailed interactions outside their homes to slow the spread of t

8h

Poison control: Chasing the antidote

Pick your poison. It can be deadly for good reasons such as protecting crops from harmful insects or fighting parasite infection as medicine—or for evil as a weapon for bioterrorism. Or, in extremely diluted amounts, it can be used to enhance beauty.

8h

Er tiden for den kvantemekaniske tunnelproces nul, endelig eller imaginær?

PLUS. To nylige målinger kommer til vidt forskellig resultat for tiden for den kvantemekaniske tunnelproces. Et problem er bl.a., at tunneltiden kan defineres, beregnes og bestemmes på flere måder.

8h

Poison control: Chasing the antidote

Pick your poison. It can be deadly for good reasons such as protecting crops from harmful insects or fighting parasite infection as medicine—or for evil as a weapon for bioterrorism. Or, in extremely diluted amounts, it can be used to enhance beauty.

8h

Penn's 'Enhanced Recovery' program significantly reduces post-op opioid use

Penn Medicine researchers found that when an "Enhanced Recovery After Surgery" protocol was employed–which optimizes patients' surgical care before, during, and after surgery–the majority of patients did not need opioids for pain management at one, three, and six months after elective spinal and peripheral nerve surgery.

8h

Joe Biden Doesn't Have a Plan for That

Will we have a coronavirus vaccine by Inauguration Day, or will it still be several months off? If we do have a vaccine, will it have been competently distributed, or will America be a haphazard patchwork of immunity? Will the spread of infection, and the deaths that follow, slow or quicken? Will the economy have stabilized, or will the country be careening into the worst hole in human memory? Jo

8h

Greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping increasing

National governments have a much greater responsibility for shipping emissions than previously estimated, finds new UCL-led research.

8h

A reaction using light and two transition-metal catalysts to make anilines

A team of researchers from the University of Manchester and pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca has developed a reaction that uses light and two transition-metal catalysts to make anilines. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their process and how it can be used. Valerie Schmidt, assistant professor of chemistry at the University of California San Diego, has publishe

8h

Scales of critically endangered pangolin seized in Sumatra

An investigation led by a member of the Tiger Protection and Conservation Units—established in Sumatra by Fauna & Flora International (FFI) over two decades ago to safeguard Kerinci Seblat National Park's apex predators and their forest habitat—has resulted in the seizure of 22 kilogrammes of pangolin scales and the arrest of three men suspected of involvement in illegal trade.

8h

Ny immunterapi behandlar svår hudcancer

En ny typ av immunterapi av den elakartade hudcancern malignt melanom visar lovande resultat. Tre mycket svårt sjuka patienter är idag långtidsöverlevare, i en studie av forskare vid Karolinska Institutet och Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset. – Immunterapi går ut på att aktivera kroppens eget immunförsvar till att eliminera cancerceller. Immunterapi har gjort stora framsteg där speciellt behandli

8h

Scales of critically endangered pangolin seized in Sumatra

An investigation led by a member of the Tiger Protection and Conservation Units—established in Sumatra by Fauna & Flora International (FFI) over two decades ago to safeguard Kerinci Seblat National Park's apex predators and their forest habitat—has resulted in the seizure of 22 kilogrammes of pangolin scales and the arrest of three men suspected of involvement in illegal trade.

8h

Facebook Has More to Learn From the Ad Boycott

Rashad Robinson, an organizer behind the Stop Hate for Profit boycott, says civil rights groups can't be left to police the company by themselves.

8h

How the US Can Prevent the Next 'Cyber 9/11'

In an interview with WIRED, former national intelligence official Sue Gordon discusses Russian election interference and other digital threats to democracy.

8h

Italians evacuated over risk of falling Mont Blanc ice

Several dozen people have been evacuated in northeastern Italy as a huge chunk of a glacier in the Mont Blanc massif threatens to break off due to high temperatures.

8h

Ny Instagram-funktion kopierer TikTok: 'Det er næsten småpinligt'

Det er ikke tilfældigt, at Instagram introducerer sin nye funktion nu, vurderer ekspert.

8h

Comprehensive catalogue of the molecular elements that regulate genes

A 17-year research project has generated a detailed atlas of the genome that reveals the location of hundreds of thousands of potential regulatory regions—a resource that will help all human biology research moving forward.

8h

Why Sprawl Could Be The Next Big Climate Change Battle

Zoning for single-family homes has been tied to racial inequity and climate change, but in California, efforts to pass new laws keep falling short. (Image credit: ullstein bild/via Getty Images)

8h

Statistical evidence for temperature inversions in ultra-hot Jupiters

The thermal structure of hot gas giant exoplanet atmospheres is likely to be inverted for the hottest planets, a class of planets known as ultra-hot Jupiters. This is the conclusion from astrophysicists based at the University of Amsterdam (UvA) in collaboration with an international team from the United States and the United Kingdom.

8h

Comprehensive catalogue of the molecular elements that regulate genes

A 17-year research project has generated a detailed atlas of the genome that reveals the location of hundreds of thousands of potential regulatory regions—a resource that will help all human biology research moving forward.

8h

COVID-19 a perfect storm for conspiracy theories

As the global count of COVID-19 infections heads towards the 20M mark, the pandemic has created what the World Health Organisation calls an 'infodemic," giving conspiracy groups a bigger platform than ever before.

8h

Stellar pulsations distribute key ingredient for life

As Carl Sagan famously said, "We're made of star stuff"—but how do stars distribute their essential "stuff" for life into space? NASA's telescope on an airplane, SOFIA, is finding some answers by watching pulsating stars as they expand and contract, almost like-beating hearts.

8h

Decades-long deep giant cloud disruption discovered on Venus

A planetary-scale cloud discontinuity has been periodically lashing the depths of the thick blanket of clouds on Venus for at least 35 years, says a study with the participation of the Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA).

8h

Weird science shows unseemly way beetles escape after being eaten

A Japanese scientist shows that some beetles can wiggle out of frog's butts after being eaten whole. The research suggests the beetle can get out in as little as 7 minutes. Most of the beetles swallowed in the experiment survived with no complications after being excreted. In what is perhaps one of the weirdest experiments ever that comes from the category of "why did anyone need to know this?" s

8h

Researchers use Theta for real-time analysis of COVID-19 proteins

Argonne researchers have developed a pipeline between ALCF supercomputers and Advanced Photon Source experiments to enable on-demand analysis of the crystal structure of COVID-19 proteins.

9h

Herbicide harming marsupial health and development

The health of wallabies and kangaroos is being affected by the herbicide, atrazine, which is used widely in Australia on cereal crops and in forestation to prevent weeds, according to new research.

9h

Researchers use Theta for real-time analysis of COVID-19 proteins

Argonne researchers have developed a pipeline between ALCF supercomputers and Advanced Photon Source experiments to enable on-demand analysis of the crystal structure of COVID-19 proteins.

9h

Herbicide harming marsupial health and development

The health of wallabies and kangaroos is being affected by the herbicide, atrazine, which is used widely in Australia on cereal crops and in forestation to prevent weeds, according to new research.

9h

Monsoons help enhance the yield in East African fisheries

New research reveals the importance of the Monsoon in how abundant small pelagic fish are in East Africa.

9h

Satellites provide crucial data on crops during COVID-19

Millions of people around the world face hunger every day, and unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic is expected to make the issue of food security even worse. Satellites are helping to alleviate the situation by providing crucial information to monitor crop growth and harvesting from space.

9h

Monsoons help enhance the yield in East African fisheries

New research reveals the importance of the Monsoon in how abundant small pelagic fish are in East Africa.

9h

Researchers reveal patterns of sexual abuse in religious settings

A recent literature review by a University of Alberta cult expert and his former graduate student paints a startling and consistent picture of institutional secrecy and widespread protection of those who abuse children in religious institutions "in ways that often differ from forms of manipulation in secular settings."

9h

'It is not easy': how science and courage saved the stunning Australian Alps

Most people probably associate the Australian Alps with skiing and snow. Others might think of the Man from Snowy River legend or the engineering feats of the Snowy Hydro-Electric Scheme.

9h

In tackling the global climate crisis, doom and optimism are both dangerous | Zeke Hausfather and Richard Betts

Overheated polemics won't solve this emergency – and the apocalypse is a needlessly high bar for action Protesters march in the streets in an "extinction rebellion" against the climate crisis, with some (but not all) of their leaders claiming that climate tipping points could kill billions in the coming decades. Others dismiss the importance or reality of the crisis, while new books loudly procla

9h

New research shows religious discrimination is on the rise around the world, including in Australia

There is a theory that despite all the commotion, religious freedom faces no significant threat in Western democracies like Australia. Therefore, the argument goes, we do not need a federal Religious Discrimination Act.

9h

Study sheds new light on vein formation in plants

An international team of researchers including the University of Adelaide, has found plant hormones known as strigolactones suppress the transportation of auxin, the main plant hormone involved in vein formation, so that vein formation occurs slower and with greater focus.

9h

Beirut explosion: the disaster was exceptional but events leading up to it were not, say researchers

At the time of writing at least 100 people have lost their lives and a further 4,000 have been wounded following an explosion in the Port of Beirut. While the actual cause remains uncertain, the tragedy calls to attention the tremendous consequences of a lack of port security.

9h

Study sheds new light on vein formation in plants

An international team of researchers including the University of Adelaide, has found plant hormones known as strigolactones suppress the transportation of auxin, the main plant hormone involved in vein formation, so that vein formation occurs slower and with greater focus.

9h

Harnessing chaos could help climate modeling take leap forward

Understanding the chaotic variability of the climate and its response to climate change could help scientists better forecast changes that still elude even the most sophisticated models.

9h

Demonstrating the Mpemba effect in a controlled setting

A pair of physicists at Simon Fraser University has developed a means for demonstrating the Mpemba effect in a controlled setting. In their paper published in the journal Nature, Avinash Kumar and John Bechhoefer describe the setup they used, what it showed and other possible uses for it.

9h

NASA scientists leverage carbon-measuring instrument for Mars studies

Insights and technology gleaned from creating a carbon-measuring instrument for Earth climate studies is being leveraged to build another that would remotely profile, for the first time, water vapor up to nine miles above the Martian surface, along with wind speeds and minute particles suspended in the planet's atmosphere.

9h

The fight over the Hubble constant – podcast

When it comes to the expansion rate of the universe, trying to get a straight answer isn't easy. That's because the two best ways of measuring what's known as the Hubble constant are giving different results. As each method becomes increasingly accurate, the gap between widens. Is one of them wrong? Or is it time to rejig the Standard Model of Cosmology? Madeleine Finlay investigates the so-calle

9h

Record EOS measurement pressures shed light on stellar evolution

Using the power of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's highest-energy laser system, researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and an international team of collaborators have developed an experimental capability for measuring the basic properties of matter, such as the equation of state (EOS), at the highest pressures thus far achieved in a controlled laboratory exp

9h

What's in oilfield wastewater matters for injection-induced earthquakes

A team of geoscience researchers in the Virginia Tech College of Science has developed a new theory to explain how and why injection-induced earthquakes continue to occur even when injection rates decline.

9h

The fight over the Hubble constant

When it comes to the expansion rate of the universe, trying to get a straight answer isn't easy. That's because the two best ways of measuring what's known as the Hubble constant are giving different results. As each method becomes increasingly accurate, the gap between widens. Is one of them wrong? Or is it time to rejig the Standard Model of Cosmology? Madeleine Finlay investigates the so-called

9h

Explaining glaciers of solid methane and nitrogen on Pluto

Planetary scientist Dr. Helen Maynard-Casely and associates have reported for the first time how solid methane and nitrogen expand in response to temperature changes and resolved an historic ambiguity relating to the structure of nitrogen.

9h

Management gender diversity essential in adversity

A study by an international team of researchers suggests that gender-balanced teams help businesses, especially in adverse times.

9h

Crater investigators explore Mars from afar

What can impacts from space teach us about the red planet?

9h

Ubiquitous Solar

If you follow any science news aggregator you will see a ton of solar power news. The industry is clearly advancing quickly, and this is translating to the field – to actual production of commercial solar panels. It seems likely that the solar news of today will be the solar energy of the not-to-distant future. So what's on the horizon? One of the advances that seems likely to at least add to the

9h

Allied Irish Banks takes €1.2bn coronavirus loan loss charge

Lender says impairment will cover 'significant majority' of pandemic losses

9h

Particles from Fukushima meltdown contained plutonium

Microscopic particles emitted during the Fukushima nuclear disaster contained plutonium, according to a new study. The microscopic radioactive particles formed inside the Fukushima reactors when the melting nuclear fuel interacted with the reactor's structural concrete. Nearly ten years after meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant caused a nuclear disaster, the new information abou

9h

In COVID-19–Hit Africa, Agricultural Research Feels the Pinch

The pandemic and accompanying lockdowns have meant missing growing seasons and losing out on key data. As restrictions are partially lifted, researchers are adjusting to the new normal.

9h

Vitamin D supplements do not reduce the risk of depression

A newly-published randomized controlled trial finds vitamin D supplementation has no effect on depression. This adds to the long list of medical conditions for which vitamin D supplementation has turned out to be ineffective.

9h

The Wonderful Instagram World Where Thor Is a Drag Performer

And Meryl Streep holds a riding crop. And … Digital satirist Ronald McDonkey's images challenge the idea of fame and our relationship to it.

9h

The Feds Want These Teams to Hack a Satellite—From Home

Meet the hackers who, this weekend, will try to commandeer an actual orbiter as part of a Defcon contest hosted by the Air Force and the Defense Digital Service.

9h

Scientists May Be Using the Wrong Cells to Study Covid-19

How did an African green monkey that died in 1962 get involved in the biggest research debacle of this pandemic?

9h

Two Decades of Pandemic War Games Failed to Account for Donald Trump

The scenarios foresaw leaky travel bans, a scramble for vaccines and disputes between state and federal leaders, but none could anticipate the current levels of dysfunction in the United States — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

AI methods make COVID-19 forecasting more local

Artificial intelligence techniques have inspired a new COVID-19 forecasting model provide timely information at a more localized level. The researchers say that officials and anyone in the public can use in their decision-making processes. "We are all overwhelmed by the data , most of which is provided at national and state levels," says Xifeng Yan, an associate professor of and chair in computer

10h

Horizon Discovery introduces single cell RNAseq-linked CRISPR screening service

CRISPR-based screening technology platform to address critical gaps in target ID and validationSingle cell RNAseq-linked pooled CRISPR screening offers high-quality screening data and biological insight

10h

U.S. faces looming housing and homelessness crisis

With unemployment levels at record highs and social safety nets evaporating, America is staring down what could be its most severe housing crisis in history. Across the country, about one in seven tenants has no confidence in their ability to pay rent this month, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau. By some estimates, 19 to 23 million U.S. renters may be at risk of eviction by Sept. 30.

10h

An electrical switch for magnetism

NUS physicists have demonstrated the control of magnetism in a magnetic semiconductor via electrical means, paving the way for novel spintronic devices.

10h

Study: Women's in-class participation, performance increase with more female peers, instructors

Because 60% of biology undergraduates nationwide are female, the life sciences have long been thought to enjoy more gender equity than other STEM fields. But a new BYU study challenges the notion that all is well for gender parity in biology classrooms.

10h

10h

Were French People Born to Speak French?

No. The belief that people are suited to speak particular languages by biology is widespread—but wrong — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

10h

England's first wild beavers for 400 years can stay

The first beavers to be introduced into the wild in England for 400 years were on Thursday given permission to stay, in what campaigners hailed as a landmark move.

10h

Det store mysterium om fækale bakterier i badevandet

PLUS. Kvaliteten af det danske badevand stiger, og i år er der kun ni strande med karakteren 'ringe'. To af dem ligger i Hørsholm, hvor en kommunal medarbejder har ageret miljødetektiv i mere end ti år.

10h

The Subtle Tricks Shopping Sites Use to Make You Spend More

Through deceptive designs known as "dark patterns," online retailers try to nudge you toward purchases you wouldn't otherwise make.

10h

Could a Janky, Jury-Rigged Air Purifier Help Fight Covid-19?

Indoor-air experts think: Sure, maybe. Why the hell not? We convinced the CEO of an air filter company to give it a try.

10h

Israeli Hackers Develop Tech to Combat Domestic Violence

A three-day hackathon produced a promising set of mobile apps for helping women in crisis, and for stopping violence against women before it occurs.

10h

England's first wild beavers for 400 years can stay

The first beavers to be introduced into the wild in England for 400 years were on Thursday given permission to stay, in what campaigners hailed as a landmark move.

10h

Were French People Born to Speak French?

No. The belief that people are suited to speak particular languages by biology is widespread—but wrong — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

The Underemployment Crisis

Nannies asked to come back for two days a week instead of four. Checkout workers scheduled for 15 hours a week instead of 30. Retail employees with their shifts cut in half. As the economy reopens while the coronavirus spreads, hundreds of thousands of workers are getting back to work, but with less work than they want, need, and used to have. Not only are 18 million Americans unemployed; million

11h

In-ear nerve-stimulating device helps people learning a new language

An in-ear device that stimulates the vagus nerve helps non-native speakers learn speech sounds from Mandarin Chinese more rapidly and more effectively

11h

What Hiroshima teaches us about coronavirus and the future of humanity

The nuclear bomb told us we are the greatest threat to our own survival – and the covid-19 pandemic shows the lessons still to learn, say Anders Sandberg and Thomas Moynihan

11h

Pill Takes the Bite Out of Viper Venom

A preexisting drug could buy time for snakebite treatment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

The Workforce Is About to Change Dramatically

I n March, tens of millions of American workers—mostly in white-collar industries such as tech, finance, and media—were thrust into a sudden, chaotic experiment in working from home. Four months later, the experiment isn't close to ending. For many, the test run is looking more like the long run. Google announced in July that its roughly 200,000 employees will continue to work from home until at

11h

Meet the white, middle-class Pinterest moms who believe Plandemic | Debra Winter

Think only fringe people believe in outlandish conspiracy theories? Think again When a childhood friend, a stay-at-home mom with a flourishing Pinterest account, sent me a copy of Plandemic – a 26-minute viral video falsely claiming manipulated origins of the coronavirus and the medical dangers of vaccines – I realized that conspiracy sympathizers weren't as fringe as I thought. My friend was the

11h

A guide to the TikTokish apps that want to be the next TikTok

Last week, Alessandro Bogliari wouldn't have imagined that anyone posed a serious threat to TikTok. Yes, there were imitators and competitors out there, but Bogliari, who runs a social media agency called the Influencer Marketing Factory, thought the app was so successful that there was no way it would be overthrown in the near future. But a lot can change in just a few days on the internet. When

11h

I've Witnessed the Decline of the Republican Party

I have been immersed in national politics in Washington for five decades. Over my time here, as an academic, a congressional staffer, a think tanker, and a commentator and public figure, I have gotten to know and worked with a wide range of key actors in politics and policy. I have seen up close the changes in our politics and culture. Nothing has been more striking or significant than the transf

11h

Beware of Corporate Promises

Change is afoot in corporate America. For the past two months, everyone from Chevron to Comcast and Hershey's to Harvard Business School has put out statements containing the phrase "We stand in solidarity with the Black community," or some very close variant. The sudden outpourings of corporate sentiment were widely dismissed as meaningless, hypocritical, opportunistic, or all three. But there's

11h

Where the Pandemic Is Only Getting Worse

Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . While much of Europe and Asia has relaxed lockdown measures after overcoming the pandemic's first wave, the United States has moved firmly into its second surge. With more than 4 million confirmed coronavirus cases and upwards of 150,000 deaths, the country that was suppose

11h

Fejlindekserede V2-artikler og skadet SEO: Derfor skal du have styr på testserverens robot.txt-fil

Der er en række ting, man med fordel kan overveje, hvis man arbejder med online testsystemer. Det viste en nylig hændelse i Version2's eget setup.

11h

Cancer surgery group in China may lose second paper

After whistleblowers in China prompted the retraction of a 2018 paper that overstated the number of patients treated in a study, another journal says it's investigating a second article by the same group. Last month, as we reported, the Journal of Surgical Oncology retracted "Long‐term outcomes of 530 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients with minimally … Continue reading

11h

How to talk to kids about the coronavirus and other bad news

Family life is probably stressful right now, but it's also the perfect time to open up a dialogue with the younger members of your clan. (Pexels/) There's a lot going on outside of the comforts of our homes right now. COVID-19 cases continue to skyrocket in some states. People are taking to the streets to speak up about violence and injustice against Black Americans . Hurricane season will soon b

11h

Daily briefing: Satellites spot 11 more emperor-penguin colonies

Nature, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02317-1 View from space boosts known penguin numbers by an estimated 5–10% — but they're on unstable ice. Plus: why two decades of pandemic planning couldn't predict the chaos in the United States and how scientists can help free the world of nuclear weapons.

12h

Coronavirus Live Updates: Gov. DeWine of Ohio Tests Positive Before a Planned Trump Visit

Los Angeles may cut off power to homes or businesses that host large gatherings in defiance of orders. France and Germany see worrisome rises in daily case counts.

12h

Fast, Less Accurate Coronavirus Tests May Ease the U.S. Backlog, Experts Say

Experts are revising their views on the best methods to detect infections, setting aside long-held standards so that the spread of the virus can be more quickly tracked and contained.

12h

Spontaneous solar water splitting with decoupling of light absorption and electrocatalysis using silicon back-buried junction

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17660-0 The simultaneous management of optical, electrical, and catalytic properties is challenging for photoelectrochemical devices. Here, authors design Si back-buried junction photoelectrodes that can be series connected for unassisted water-splitting with a high solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of 15.62%.

12h

Dielectric ordering of water molecules arranged in a dipolar lattice

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17832-y Despite the apparent simplicity of a H2O molecule, the mutual ferroelectric ordering of the molecules is unresolved. Here, the authors realize a macroscopic ferroelectric phase transition in a network of dipole-dipole coupled water molecules located in nanopores of gemstone.

12h

Entropy-stabilized single-atom Pd catalysts via high-entropy fluorite oxide supports

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17738-9 Fabricating intrinsically stable single-atom catalysts (SACs) on traditional supports remains a formidable challenge in catalysis. Here, the authors propose a new strategy to construct a sintering-resistant Pd SAC on a novel equimolar high-entropy fluorite oxide.

12h

The impact of the Syrian conflict on population well-being

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17369-0 The current Syrian conflict is considered a major humanitarian crisis. Here, the authors show a decline in population well-being with the onset of the conflict, and show how this decline compares to other populations experiencing wars, civil unrest or natural disasters.

12h

Dynamic changes in the epigenomic landscape regulate human organogenesis and link to developmental disorders

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17305-2 How the epigenomic landscape linked to transcription regulates human embryonic development is unclear. Here, the authors analyse the dynamics of H3K27Ac, H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 during the period when organs first assemble as a platform for understanding noncoding developmental disorders.

12h

Subwavelength pixelated CMOS color sensors based on anti-Hermitian metasurface

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17743-y Pixel size in imaging and displays is limited by fundamental constraints that compromise performance at wavelength scales. Here the authors present subwavelength color pixel sensors based on anti-Hermitian metasurfaces relying on structural color for increased performance.

12h

Adaptation to feedback representation of illusory orientation produced from flash grab effect

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17786-1 Feedforward-feedback signal interactions are common in the brain during sensory information processing. Here, the authors show that feedback-driven representation of perceived orientation dominates visual adaptation, despite the discrepant feedforward representation of input orientation.

12h

ATP-dependent hydroxylation of an unactivated primary carbon with water

Nature Communications, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17675-7 Monooxygenases catalyse the hydroxylation of C-H bonds using oxygen as a co-substrate, which, in turn, is unavailable for anaerobic bacteria. Here, the authors report a three-step reaction cascade involving two hydroxylases and one dehydratase which hydroxylate the C26 methyl group of cholesterol with water as

12h

Elevation in the counts of IL-35-producing B cells infiltrating into lung tissue in mycobacterial infection is associated with the downregulation of Th1/Th17 and upregulation of Foxp3+Treg

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69984-y Elevation in the counts of IL-35-producing B cells infiltrating into lung tissue in mycobacterial infection is associated with the downregulation of Th1/Th17 and upregulation of Foxp3 + Treg

12h

Plasma half-life and tissue distribution of leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2 in mice

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70192-x

12h

Callosobruchus embryo struggle to guarantee progeny production

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70178-9

12h

A FACS-based approach to obtain viable eosinophils from human adipose tissue

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70093-z

12h

Anodes for Li-ion batteries prepared from microcrystalline silicon and enabled by binder's chemistry and pseudo-self-healing

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70001-5

12h

Comparative assessment of genetic diversity matrices and clustering methods in white Guinea yam (Dioscorea rotundata) based on morphological and molecular markers

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69925-9 Comparative assessment of genetic diversity matrices and clustering methods in white Guinea yam ( Dioscorea rotundata ) based on morphological and molecular markers

12h

Association between displacement and thickness of macula after vitrectomy in eyes with epiretinal membrane

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70197-6

12h

Oral and vaginal microbiota in selected field mice of the genus Apodemus: a wild population study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70249-x Oral and vaginal microbiota in selected field mice of the genus Apodemus : a wild population study

12h

Genes related to down syndrome abnormalities may protect against solid tumors

Scientists from Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago discovered that a set of genes with decreased expression in individuals with Down syndrome may lead to clinical abnormalities in this population, such as poor muscle development and heart valve problems. Impairment in these same genes may also protect people with Down syndrome from d

12h

Non-invasive nerve stimulation boosts learning of foreign language sounds

New research by neuroscientists at the University of Pittsburgh and UC San Francisco (UCSF) revealed that a simple, earbud-like device developed at UCSF that imperceptibly stimulates the brain could significantly improve the wearer's ability to learn the sounds of a new language. This device may have wide-ranging applications for boosting other kinds of learning as well.

12h

A Rift Over Carl Linnaeus Shows We Shouldn't Idolize Scientists

After a two-year fight, a leading entomology society has renamed a quiz competition named after Carl Linnaeus, a father of modern taxonomy who also helped lay a foundation for racist pseudoscience. The ordeal is a reminder that scientists — no matter their achievements — shouldn't be placed on pedestals.

12h

Can loneliness be cured with a pill? Scientists are now asking the question

Chronic loneliness has little to do with being alone, experts say – could a pharmaceutical treatment help lonely people form meaningful relationships? Shortly after relocating to Texas from California three years ago, Cheryl Webster started hosting a game night at her home as a way of meeting new people. They stopped meeting due to Covid-19, and Webster has only heard from one person in the group

12h

Spørg Fagfolket: Kan mikroovnen eller UV-lys dræbe virus på mundbindet?

Flere læsere spørger, om man ikke bare kan smide mundbindet til sterilisering i mikroovnen. Det svarer professor fra KU på.

13h

Geospatial epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in a tropical setting: an enabling digital surveillance platform

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69312-4

14h

Heterotypic immunity against vaccinia virus in an HLA-B*07:02 transgenic mousepox infection model

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69897-w

14h

Potential roles of nitrate and nitrite in nitric oxide metabolism in the eye

Scientific Reports, Published online: 05 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69272-9

14h

Trade and climate change increase pest threat to Europe's forests

Europe's forests face a growing threat from pests due to global trade and climate change, but scientists are developing techniques that can give an early warning of infestations to help combat damaging insects and diseases.

14h

Trade and climate change increase pest threat to Europe's forests

Europe's forests face a growing threat from pests due to global trade and climate change, but scientists are developing techniques that can give an early warning of infestations to help combat damaging insects and diseases.

14h

New research shows parasites 'mite' help curb the spread of invasive lizards

Native lizards may have a powerful, very tiny, secret weapon when it comes to resisting invasion by invasive species—parasites.

14h

What kind of face mask best protects against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting or giving someone Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly,

14h

New research shows parasites 'mite' help curb the spread of invasive lizards

Native lizards may have a powerful, very tiny, secret weapon when it comes to resisting invasion by invasive species—parasites.

14h

Pandemin som sprider sig bland svenska grodor

Hundratals arter har utrotats när svampsjukdomen chytrid orsakat massdöd hos groddjur över hela världen. Nu kämpar forskare för att förstå hur smittan sprids i Sverige. Ett varmare klimat kan bidra till spridning norrut – med risk att redan känsliga grodpopulationer slås ut. Det karaktäristiskt klonkande lätet från en spelande klockgroda ljöd just från vattnet några meter bort. Den lilla dammen b

14h

Virus lockdown for world's smallest and rarest wild pigs

Pygmy hogs—the world's smallest and rarest wild pig—are under a virus lockdown.

14h

Virus lockdown for world's smallest and rarest wild pigs

Pygmy hogs—the world's smallest and rarest wild pig—are under a virus lockdown.

14h

How cells keep growing even when under attack

In an unexpected new finding, biochemists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report observing that a damage-containment system in stressed bacteria can become overrun and blocked, but that this leads to cells responding by turning on very different pathways to make sure that normal growth continues.

14h

How cells keep growing even when under attack

In an unexpected new finding, biochemists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report observing that a damage-containment system in stressed bacteria can become overrun and blocked, but that this leads to cells responding by turning on very different pathways to make sure that normal growth continues.

14h

Make the best of bad reviews by leveraging consumer empathy

Researchers from Nanyang Technical University, University of Washington, and University of British Columbia published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines "unfair" negative reviews and demonstrates that they can have positive consequences for the reviewed firm.

14h

First food-grade intermediate wheatgrass released

Compared to annual crops, perennial crops provide sustainable environmental benefits such as reduced soil and water erosion, reduced soil nitrate leaching, and increased carbon sequestration. Inclusion of sustainable cropping systems into mainstream agriculture has been a challenge given the lack of food-grade perennial grain cultivars.

14h

Potentiel coronamedicin: Dansk forsker i spidsen for ny global indsats

Professor Jens Lundgren skal stå i spidsen for en global indsats, der skal afprøve medicin…

14h

First food-grade intermediate wheatgrass released

Compared to annual crops, perennial crops provide sustainable environmental benefits such as reduced soil and water erosion, reduced soil nitrate leaching, and increased carbon sequestration. Inclusion of sustainable cropping systems into mainstream agriculture has been a challenge given the lack of food-grade perennial grain cultivars.

14h

A 'Devonian' aquarium: Modern mutant fishes replicate creatures of ancient oceans

Zebrafish are a common aquarium species, of value to hobbyists and scientists alike. Researchers have now engineered an unusual change in them that has echoes of Jurassic Park—but looks alone are deceiving.

14h

A 'Devonian' aquarium: Modern mutant fishes replicate creatures of ancient oceans

Zebrafish are a common aquarium species, of value to hobbyists and scientists alike. Researchers have now engineered an unusual change in them that has echoes of Jurassic Park—but looks alone are deceiving.

14h

Alzheimers sjukdom upptäcks tidigt och säkert med enkelt blodprov

Alzheimers sjukdom är svårdiagnosticerad vilket kan försvåra möjligheten att ge bästa möjliga behandling och vård. I en internationell studie beskriver forskare ett nytt blodprov som upptäcker Alzheimers sjukdom redan innan de första symtomen utvecklats och har samma tillförlitlighet som dyra, komplicerade och mer svårtillgängliga metoder. Forskarna har hopp om att den nya metoden snart kan använd

15h

UK coronavirus live: test and trace figures due as Preston could be latest to face lockdown measures

Town faces government intervention after a rise in coronavirus rates , council's chief executive says; contact tracing figures expected amid concern over programme Global coronavirus updates – live England's contact tracers make handful of calls a month UK economy recovering faster than feared, says Bank of England UK staycation boom lifts sales of camping gear 8.40am BST Returning to the plannin

15h

'Paradise island' hosts untold botanical treasures

The first checklist of plants found on the tropical island of New Guinea reveals incredible plant diversity.

15h

Danske forskere har undersøgt: Er frosne eller friske æg bedst til kunstig befrugtning?

Har du en regelmæssig cyklus, er chancen for graviditet ikke bedre med frosne æg.

15h

Omega-3 ökar effekten av träning hos äldre kvinnor

Två grupper av aktiva och friska kvinnor mellan 65 och 70 år fick träna styrketräning två gånger i veckan under ett halvår. Den ena gruppen åt dessutom en omega-3-rik kost med bland annat fet fisk, nötter och rapsolja. Kvinnorna i båda grupperna fick starkare muskler, men de som ätit mycket omega-3 fick större förbättringar i styrka och rörelseförmåga. Dessutom ökade de sin muskelmassa, vilket kvi

15h

Bli stark för livet

Styrketräning kan förlänga livet och minska risken för hjärt- och kärlsjukdomar, diabetes och cancer. Även minnet förbättras. Ändå har styrketräning hamnat i bakvattnet av konditionsträning. Är det dags för en förändring?

15h

Beaver families win legal 'right to remain'

Fifteen beaver families have been given a permanent home on the River Otter in East Devon.

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17h

Citizen scientists help geologists to identify earthquakes and tectonic tremors

It is not yet possible to predict earthquakes, but the analysis of different types of seismic data allows scientists to pinpoint where and when each type of earthquake originated, and hence better understand when and where tectonic slip might occur via damaging earthquakes. Tens of thousands of seismic stations around the world continuously record local seismic activity, with an output that is far

17h

First food-grade intermediate wheatgrass released

University of Minnesota researchers report the release of the first commercially available intermediate wheatgrass cultivar.

17h

Make the best of bad reviews by leveraging consumer empathy

When confronted with unfair negative reviews, firms can strategically leverage consumer empathy and benefit from potential downstream consequences.

17h

Children's pester power a future target for interventions

Children's pester power may contribute to improvements in their family's food environments. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, highlights the potential for children to influence food consumption and habits at home.

17h

Childhood connection to nature has many benefits but is not universally positive, finds review

A literature review by Dr Louise Chawla, Professor Emerita at the University of Colorado, finds that children are happier and more likely to protect the natural world when they have a greater connection to it, but this connection is complex and can also generate negative emotions linked to issues like climate change.

17h

Citizen scientists help geologists to identify earthquakes and tectonic tremors

A new study shows that citizen scientists can help professionals in identifying seismic events. Citizens not only identified earthquakes, but collectively also mastered the difficult task of recognizing tremors, which previously could only be done by professional seismologists. Through the manual classification of seismic Big Data, citizens can help scientists to build catalogs and map seismic act

17h

17h

The best dough scrapers for baking, scraping, and chopping

Scrape it all up. (Nadya Spetnitskaya via Unsplash/) A dough scraper is essential for the kneading process. This tool can capture rogue flour, press other ingredients into the mixture, and manipulate dough without getting it stuck to your hands. These versatile tools have dozens of other uses—their blades are excellent for not only cutting dough into portions, but also great for slicing other ing

18h

Our 'little brain' turns out to be pretty big

A powerful MRI combined with modeling software results in a totally new view of the human cerebellum. The so-called 'little brain' is nearly 80% the size of the cerebral cortex when it's unfolded. This part of the brain is associated with a lot of things, and a new virtual map is suitably chaotic and complex. Just under our brain's cortex and close to our brain stem sits the cerebellum, also know

18h

Health Experts to F.D.A.: Make Your Vaccine Deliberations Public

A letter signed by nearly 400 health experts asked the agency to use its vaccine advisory panel when reviewing data on coronavirus trials.

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Structures of filamentous viruses infecting hyperthermophilic archaea explain DNA stabilization in extreme environments [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Living organisms expend metabolic energy to repair and maintain their genomes, while viruses protect their genetic material by completely passive means. We have used cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to solve the atomic structures of two filamentous double-stranded DNA viruses that infect archaeal hosts living in nearly boiling acid: Saccharolobus solfataricus rod-shaped…

20h

Constraining the atmospheric OCS budget from sulfur isotopes [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Carbonyl sulfide (OCS), the most abundant sulfur-containing gas in the atmosphere, is used as a proxy for photosynthesis rate estimation. However, a large missing source of atmospheric OCS has been inferred. Sulfur isotope measurements (34S/32S ratio and δ34S) on OCS are a feasible tool to distinguish OCS sources from oceanic…

20h

Identifying collagen VI as a target of fibrotic diseases regulated by CREBBP/EP300 [Medical Sciences]

Fibrotic diseases remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality, yet there are few effective therapies. The underlying pathology of all fibrotic conditions is the activity of myofibroblasts. Using cells from freshly excised disease tissue from patients with Dupuytren's disease (DD), a localized fibrotic disorder of the palm, we sought…

20h

Double threshold behavior for breakup of liquid sheets [Commentaries]

When being outside in nature in the presence of cold, windy, and rainy weather, most of us will have wondered: How do birds keep themselves warm? Not only does the wind imply a thinner thermal boundary layer over bodies, favoring heat loss, but, in addition, the impacting raindrops add considerably…

20h

Symbiosis between nanohaloarchaeon and haloarchaeon is based on utilization of different polysaccharides [Microbiology]

Nano-sized archaeota, with their small genomes and limited metabolic capabilities, are known to associate with other microbes, thereby compensating for their own auxotrophies. These diminutive and yet ubiquitous organisms thrive in hypersaline habitats that they share with haloarchaea. Here, we reveal the genetic and physiological nature of a nanohaloarchaeon–haloarchaeon association,…

20h

Two distinct pathways of pregranulosa cell differentiation support follicle formation in the mouse ovary [Developmental Biology]

We sequenced more than 52,500 single cells from embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) postembryonic day 5 (P5) gonads and performed lineage tracing to analyze primordial follicles and wave 1 medullar follicles during mouse fetal and perinatal oogenesis. Germ cells clustered into six meiotic substages, as well as dying/nurse cells. Wnt-expressing bipotential…

20h

Direct imaging of liquid domains in membranes by cryo-electron tomography [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Images of micrometer-scale domains in lipid bilayers have provided the gold standard of model-free evidence to understand the domains' shapes, sizes, and distributions. Corresponding techniques to directly and quantitatively assess smaller (nanoscale and submicron) liquid domains have been limited. Researchers commonly seek to correlate activities of membrane proteins with attributes…

20h

Photoperiod and temperature as dominant environmental drivers triggering secondary growth resumption in Northern Hemisphere conifers [Ecology]

Wood formation consumes around 15% of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions per year and plays a critical role in long-term sequestration of carbon on Earth. However, the exogenous factors driving wood formation onset and the underlying cellular mechanisms are still poorly understood and quantified, and this hampers an effective assessment of…

20h

Heuristics and optimal solutions to the breadth-depth dilemma [Neuroscience]

In multialternative risky choice, we are often faced with the opportunity to allocate our limited information-gathering capacity between several options before receiving feedback. In such cases, we face a natural trade-off between breadth—spreading our capacity across many options—and depth—gaining more information about a smaller number of options. Despite its broad…

20h

Linking neurons to immunity: Lessons from Hydra [Commentaries]

According to the Greek mythology (1), Heracles' second labor was the destruction of the Lernaean Hydra, a fearsome fire-breathing monster with a dog-like body and nine snake heads. Many had tried to slay the Lernaean Hydra but in vain: Any head that was cut off regrew and multiplied. It is…

20h

Plant richness, turnover, and evolutionary diversity track gradients of stability and ecological opportunity in a megadiversity center [Ecology]

Research on global patterns of diversity has been dominated by studies seeking explanations for the equator-to-poles decline in richness of most groups of organisms, namely the latitudinal diversity gradient. A problem with this gradient is that it conflates two key explanations, namely biome stability (age and area) and productivity (ecological…

20h

Geometric renormalization unravels self-similarity of the multiscale human connectome [Physics]

Structural connectivity in the brain is typically studied by reducing its observation to a single spatial resolution. However, the brain possesses a rich architecture organized over multiple scales linked to one another. We explored the multiscale organization of human connectomes using datasets of healthy subjects reconstructed at five different resolutions….

20h