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UBCO researchers link advertising to uptick in youth vaping

UBC researchers are raising the alarm about the increase of vaping among teenagers and how e-cigarette marketing strategies target youth. Assistant Professor Laura Struik, who teaches in UBC Okanagan's School of Nursing, recently published a paper examining why teens take up vaping and whether advertising capitalizes on those reasons.

6h

The dangers of the chemical imbalance theory of depression

A study at Harvard's McLean Hospital claims that using the language of chemical imbalances worsens patient outcomes. Though psychiatry has largely abandoned DSM categories, professor Joseph E Davis writes that the field continues to strive for a "brain-based diagnostic system." Chemical explanations of mental health appear to benefit pharmaceutical companies far more than patients. The pharmacolo

9h

Alle køber dem: Sådan virker mundbindet

Det kommer i alle farver, størrelser og materialer. Men hvordan er det præcist, at mundbindet holder virussen i skak, når vi færdes sammen ude i det offentlige rum?

6h

LATEST

Singapore crushes massive ivory haul on eve of World Elephant Day

Singapore began destroying nine tonnes of seized ivory Tuesday, the largest such action globally in recent years, including contraband tusks that came from more than 300 African elephants.

9min

Singapore crushes massive ivory haul on eve of World Elephant Day

Singapore began destroying nine tonnes of seized ivory Tuesday, the largest such action globally in recent years, including contraband tusks that came from more than 300 African elephants.

12min

Inside the mind of an animal

Nature, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02337-x Neuroscientists are scrutinizing huge piles of data to learn how brains create emotions and other internal states such as aggression and desire.

15min

The structural basis of Focal Adhesion Kinase activation on lipid membranes unravelled

* Patients with glioma – a very common type of tumour originating in the brain – see improvement in survival rates with combined treatment of radiotherapy plus temozolomide* Researchers found a novel mechanism on how tumours evade chemotherapy through genomic rearrangements of the MGMT DNA repair gene* This finding is potentially relevant for updating the methods used to monitor temozolomide effic

17min

Kun hver ottende corona-smittet bruger Smittestop-app

Næsten en million brugere har nu hentet den danske smittestop-app, men kun én ud af otte smittede har brugt den til at advare sine kontakter – og andelen er faldet over de seneste uger.

23min

Daily briefing: The physics of the tragic explosion in Beirut

Nature, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02368-4 A blast-injury specialist explores the tragic chemistry and physics of the Beirut explosion. Plus, front-line physicians tussle over unproven coronavirus treatments and a question of bias in pulse oximeters.

29min

Nye billeder afslører vand under overfladen på dværgplaneten Ceres

Forskere har fundet forekomster af hydrohalit på Ceres. Det tydes som et tegn på, at der er saltvand under overfladen.

30min

Millennial Futures Are Bleak. Incarceration Is to Blame.

The oldest Millennials turn 40 this year, and their prospects are not looking much brighter than when they were recession-battered 20-somethings. Millennials, born from 1980 to 1996, are the best-educated generation in American history, and the most indebted for it. They are the largest adult generation, at 22 percent of the U.S. population, and yet hold only 3 percent of the country's wealth (wh

36min

Erin Brockovich Wants to Know What You're Drinking

Lauren Tamaki T wenty years ago , Erin Brockovich was released, and the brash, unvarnished legal assistant turned activist at the heart of the film—memorably portrayed by Julia Roberts in micro-miniskirts and vertiginous high heels—had the surreal experience of becoming a household name almost overnight. "Let me be the first to tell you that life takes an interesting turn when your name becomes a

36min

San Francisco Was Uniquely Prepared for Covid-19

Why did an American city beset by inequality and dysfunction face the onset of the pandemic so well? Because history left it ready for this moment.

36min

17 Learning Tools For Your Next Outdoor Excursion

Ever wonder how underwater creatures make light? Or what a Carolina leaf-roller eats? Our list of apps, podcasts and websites will help you figure out what's going on in the great outdoors.

57min

Higher Covid-19 Rates Seen in Health Care Workers of Color

A new study on Covid-19 in health care workers contains stark findings: People of color are twice as likely to get the virus than White counterparts, more likely to report inadequate PPE, and more often work with Covid-positive patients. And just seeing Covid patients increased infection rates five-fold.

1h

Covid-19: tracking the spread of a virus in real time – podcast

Central to infectious disease control is tracking the spread of a pathogen through the population. In Cambridge, UK, researchers are looking at genetic mutations in samples from Covid-19 patients to rapidly investigate how and where hospital transmissions are occurring. Dr Estée Török tells Nicola Davis what this real-time pathological detective work can reveal about the origins of an outbreak Co

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Nationwide vitamin D status in older Brazilian adults and its determinants: The Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Aging (ELSI)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70329-y

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Characterization of gap-plasmon based metasurfaces using scanning differential heterodyne microscopy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70395-2

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Increases in cholecystectomy for gallstone related disease in South Africa

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69812-3

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Chemical profile and phytotoxic action of Onopordum acanthium essential oil

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70463-7

1h

Self-organisation and convection of confined magnetotactic bacteria

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70270-0

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A Markov chain model of particle deposition in the lung

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70171-2

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Establishment of an experimental model for MHC homo-to-hetero transplantation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69784-4

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Effect of irreversible electroporation parameters and the presence of a metal stent on the electric field line pattern

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70308-3

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The dwarf planet Ceres might be home to an underground ocean of water

Ceres, the largest asteroid in the solar system, seems to have liquid water seeping onto its surface, according to a new paper in Nature Astronomy . Data from NASA's Dawn orbiter, the study suggests, show signs that it may be harboring an ocean deep underground. The background: Ceres, a dwarf planet located in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, was studied intensely by the Dawn orbiter f

1h

Enzyme discovered in the gut could lead to new disease biomarker

Enzymes used by bacteria to break down mucus in the gut could provide a useful biomarker for intestinal diseases, according to new research published in Nature Communications.

1h

Malaria discovery could expedite antiviral treatment for COVID-19

New research into malaria suggests targeting enzymes from the human host, rather than from the pathogen itself, could offer effective treatment for a range of infectious diseases, including COVID-19.

1h

Home monitoring program improves survival between surgeries for babies with certain heart defects

Home monitoring programs for infants who have undergone the first of multiple surgeries to mend a single ventricle heart defect – called the 'interstage' period – have led to a 40% decrease in deaths.Interstage Home Monitoring (IHM) programs help families care for babies who have had surgery for hypoplastic left heart syndrome and other forms of single ventricle heart disease.

1h

Covid-19: tracking the spread of a virus in real time

Central to infectious disease control is tracking the spread of a pathogen through the population. In Cambridge, UK, researchers are looking at genetic mutations in samples from Covid-19 patients to rapidly investigate how and where hospital transmissions are occurring. Dr Estée Török tells Nicola Davis what this real-time pathological detective work can reveal about the origins of an outbreak. He

1h

At Least 97,000 Children Tested Positive For Coronavirus In Last 2 Weeks Of July

President Trump falsely claimed that children are "almost immune" from the coronavirus, but a new review of state data finds child cases are up 40%. (Image credit: beastfromeast/Getty Images)

1h

Coronavirus: time to re-imagine academic publishing

Nature, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02330-4

1h

Coronavirus: full peer review in hours

Nature, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02333-1

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Coronavirus: indexed data speed up solutions

Nature, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02331-3

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Denmark recycling plan will cut waste by two-thirds

Nature, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02332-2

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Space-charge-limited electron and hole currents in hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17868-0 Space-charge-limited currents are widely used to characterize charge transport in semiconductors. Here, the authors characterize space-charge-limited electron and hole currents in metal-halide perovskites, applicable in emerging solar cells. The currents are strongly influenced by the high permittivity and ion

1h

In vitro Cas9-assisted editing of modular polyketide synthase genes to produce desired natural product derivatives

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17769-2 Several different genetic strategies have been reported for the modification of polyketide synthases but the highly repetitive modular structure makes this difficult. Here the authors report on an adapted Cas9 reaction and Gibson assembly to edit a target region of the polyketide synthases gene in vitro.

1h

Within-individual phenotypic plasticity in flowers fosters pollination niche shift

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17875-1 Floral phenotypes impact interactions between plants and pollinators. Here, the authors show that Moricandia arvensis displays discrete seasonal plasticity in floral phenotype, with large, lilac flowers attracting long-tongued bees in spring and small, rounded, white flowers attracting generalist pollinators i

1h

Endogenous activity modulates stimulus and circuit-specific neural tuning and predicts perceptual behavior

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17729-w Endogenous brain states influence perception. In this manuscript the authors use human intracranial recordings to provide mechanistic insight into this process by showing that endogenous brain activity facilitates neural tuning and behavior in a stimulus and circuit specific manner.

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Publisher Correction: Low replicability can support robust and efficient science

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17924-9

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Pupil-linked arousal signals track the temporal organization of events in memory

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17851-9 Although everyday life unfolds continuously, we tend to remember past experiences as discrete events. Here, the authors show that dynamic, pupil-linked arousal states track the encoding of such episodes, as revealed by changes in memory for the temporal order and duration of recent event sequences.

1h

Prominent members of the human gut microbiota express endo-acting O-glycanases to initiate mucin breakdown

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17847-5 Epithelial cells that line the gut secrete complex glycoproteins that form a mucus layer to protect the gut wall from enteric pathogens. Here, the authors provide a comprehensive characterisation of endo-acting glycoside hydrolases expressed by mucin-degrading members of the microbiome that are able to cleave

1h

TMBIM6/BI-1 contributes to cancer progression through assembly with mTORC2 and AKT activation

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17802-4 TMBIM6, a member of the transmembrane BI-1 motif-containing family of proteins, is overexpressed in many cancer types. Here, the authors show that TMBIM6 regulates AKT activation through mTORC2 assembly and ribosome association and identify an antagonist of TMBIM6 with anti-tumor properties.

1h

Covid vaccine tracker: when will we have a coronavirus vaccine?

More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine – here is their progress Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…

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Enzyme discovered in the gut could lead to new disease biomarker

Enzymes used by bacteria to break down mucus in the gut could provide a useful biomarker for intestinal diseases, according to new research published in Nature Communications.

1h

Enzyme discovered in the gut could lead to new disease biomarker

Enzymes used by bacteria to break down mucus in the gut could provide a useful biomarker for intestinal diseases, according to new research published in Nature Communications.

1h

Flera olika immunceller aktiveras vid svår covid-19

Forskare vid Karolinska Institutet har genomfört avancerade analyser av immunsystemets aktivering hos svårt sjuka covid-19-patienter. På så vis har de lyckats identifiera flera celltyper som har en central funktion i immunförsvarets reaktion på det nya coronaviruset och överreaktion vid svår sjukdom. – De här fynden är värdefulla för att vi bättre ska kunna utvärdera patienter i kliniken, men ock

1h

Mystery solved: Bright areas on Ceres come from salty water below

NASA's Dawn spacecraft gave scientists extraordinary close-up views of the dwarf planet Ceres, which lies in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. By the time the mission ended in October 2018, the orbiter had dipped to less than 22 miles (35 kilometers) above the surface, revealing crisp details of the mysterious bright regions Ceres had become known for.

1h

What kind of face mask best protects against coronavirus?

Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply

1h

Danmarks første hybride betonbil er klimavenlig – men dyr

Tromlen kører på el og moteren på HVO-brændstof. Unicons nye rotérlastbiler er mere klimavenlige, men også væsentligt dyrere end traditionelle rotérlastbiler.

2h

Vaccine for major common cold virus could be ready for use by 2024

A clinical trial involving 420 people suggests that a vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus – a major cause of common colds – is safe and effective

2h

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Some Humans Are Carrying DNA From an Unknown Ancient Ancestor

Our family tree is hellishly complicated.

2h

New model shows how voting behavior can drive political parties apart

Over the last few decades, the divide between the two major political parties in the United States has deepened. Studies of Congressional voting patterns show that politicians take increasingly polarized positions, and that those positions drift farther and farther apart over time. Not voters, though. Since the 1960s, voters have stayed in the middle, usually preferring centrist or moderate positi

2h

Aqua Satellite shows extent of Apple Fire's burn scar

On Aug. 9, 2020 NASA's Aqua satellite imaged the Apple Fire near Big Bear Lake in California using its false-color bands in order to be able to distinguish burn scars from the surrounding area more easily. The combination of reflectance bands 7, 2, and 1 on the MODIS instrument are most useful for distinguishing burn scars from naturally low vegetation or bare soil and enhancing floods. The MODIS

2h

How boundaries become bridges in evolution

There's a paradox within the theory of evolution: The life forms that exist today are here because they were able to change when past environments disappeared. Yet, organisms evolve to fit into specific environmental niches.

2h

How boundaries become bridges in evolution

There's a paradox within the theory of evolution: The life forms that exist today are here because they were able to change when past environments disappeared. Yet, organisms evolve to fit into specific environmental niches.

3h

Citizens prefer teachers and administrators to take the hit during economic crisis

With schools around the world looking into various cost-cutting measures in the midst of the COVID-10 pandemic, new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that citizens prefer teachers and administrative staff to be at the frontline of school spending cuts during times of economic crisis.

3h

Study: Increased presence of law enforcement officers in schools does not improve safety

Concern over the safety of students, teachers, and administrators in U.S. schools continues to grow, in part as a result of school shootings. In response, partnerships between schools and law enforcement agencies have increasingly placed school resource officers (SROs) in schools to boost security. Amid controversy over this practice, a new longitudinal study sought to learn more about the impact

3h

Nyt videncenter samler eksperter i hudkræft

Offentlige og private institutioner går sammen om at etablere videncenter, der skal udvikle nye metoder til forebyggelse og behandling af hudkræft.

3h

For Doctors of Color, Microaggressions Are All Too Familiar

"They ask you if you're coming in to take the trash out — stuff they wouldn't ask a physician who was a white male."

3h

Stonehenges ursprung avslöjat med ny metod

Megalit. Ordet betyder bokstavligen "stor sten" på grekiska, och används för att beskriva stenblock av typen som gett Stonehenge sitt ikoniska utseende. Stenarna restes under samma, relativt korta period cirka 2 500 år före vår tideräkning och varje sten väger runt 20 ton. Bergarten kallas sarsen, en sorts sandsten som är ovanlig i närområdet.

3h

Visual Stress

The Opticalm Clinic claims to diagnose and treat visual stress with colored lenses and other aids. Visual stress is a poorly defined, questionable condition and Opticalm's claims are not backed by scientific evidence.

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Ny metod kan stoppa herpesvirus

Forskare i Lund har upptäckt en ny metod för att behandla alla humana herpesvirus. Den nya bredspektrum-metoden riktar sig mot fysikaliska egenskaper i virusets arvsmassa i stället för som i tidigare behandlingsmetoder, mot virala proteiner. Det unika med den nya behandlingen är att den inte leder till resistens och verkar oberoende av mutationer i virusets arvsmassa.

3h

Impact heat driven volatile redistribution at Occator crater on Ceres as a comparative planetary process

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17184-7 Dawn mission's second extended phase provided high resolution observations of Occator crater of the dwarf planet Ceres. Here, the authors show stereo imaging and topographic maps of this crater revealing the influence of crustal composition on impact related melt and hydrothermal processes, and compare feature

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Researchers show mathematically how to best reopen your business after lockdown

In the U.S., where the curve of infections has not yet flattened since the beginning of the pandemic, 158,000 people have died from COVID-19 already. And despite the choice by all US states to gradually ease lockdown from late May onwards to save the economy, 14 million Americans have lost their job, while the economic output in the second quarter of 2020 dropped by 9.5%. To help entrepreneurs dec

6h

Citizens prefer teachers and administrators to take the hit during economic crisis

With schools around the world looking into various cost-cutting measures in the midst of the COVID-10 pandemic, new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that citizens prefer teachers and administrative staff to be at the frontline of school spending cuts during times of economic crisis.

6h

Study points out opioid risks for patients transitioning to skilled nursing facilities

Hospital patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities often bring a high-dose painkiller prescription with them, suggesting more attention should be paid to opioid safety for those patients.

6h

Early neural activity associated with autism

Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, have found evidence of signature brain activity in infants that predicted ASD symptoms later at 18 months old. The work, led by Shafali Jeste, MD, at UCLA appears in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier.

6h

Mathematical patterns developed by Alan Turing help researchers understand bird behavior

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have used mathematical modelling to understand why flocks of long-tailed tits segregate themselves into different parts of the landscape.

6h

Excess weight among pregnant women may interfere with child's developing brain

Obesity in expectant mothers may hinder the development of the babies' brains as early as the second trimester, a new study finds.

6h

Researchers show mathematically how to best reopen your business after lockdown

Model shows that Covid-19 can stay under control inside your company only if social distancing, PPE, and other measures are implemented for employees not working from home. These measures will also protect your net profit.

6h

Mathematical patterns developed by Alan Turing help researchers understand bird behavior

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have used mathematical modelling to understand why flocks of long-tailed tits segregate themselves into different parts of the landscape.

6h

Tony Blair: Three priorities for the developing world to beat Covid-19

The toughest stage of the pandemic lies ahead for poorer countries and rich governments must help

6h

Is it time to call time on time zones?

Silicon Valley has given us the tools to conquer space. But time is proving a tougher adversary

6h

Mathematical patterns developed by Alan Turing help researchers understand bird behavior

Scientists from the University of Sheffield have used mathematical modelling to understand why flocks of long-tailed tits segregate themselves into different parts of the landscape.

6h

What the rest of the world can learn from South Korea's COVID-19 response

As the world continues to closely monitor the newest coronavirus outbreak, the government of South Korea has been able to keep the disease under control without paralyzing the national health and economic systems.

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An ancient association? Crickets disperse seeds of early-diverging orchid Apostasia nipponica

A professor presents evidence of the apparently unusual seed dispersal system by crickets and camel crickets in Apostasia nipponica (Apostasioideae), acknowledged as an early-diverging lineage of Orchidaceae.

8h

New approach to treating osteoarthritis advances

Injections of a natural 'energy' molecule prompted regrowth of almost half of the cartilage lost with aging in knees, a new study in rodents shows.

8h

Miscarriage risk increases each week alcohol is used in early pregnancy

Each week a woman consumes alcohol during the first five to 10 weeks of pregnancy is associated with an incremental 8% increase in risk of miscarriage, according to a new study.

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Aalborg Universitet hacket: »De kan have skaffet sig adgang til forskning og alle andre oplysninger«

I sidste uge lukkede Aalborg Universitet ned for alle interne it-systemer på grund af en såkaldt 'kritisk hændelse'. Nu viser en aktindsigt, at ukendte hackere måske har haft adgang til blandt andet forskningsdata, HR og økonomisystem.

8h

Self-driving cars to race for $1.5 million at Indianapolis Motor Speedway ​

The Indy Autonomous Challenge will task student teams with developing self-driving software for race cars. The competition requires cars to complete 20 laps within 25 minutes, meaning cars would need to average about 110 mph. The organizers say they hope to advance the field of driverless cars and "inspire the next generation of STEM talent." The Indianapolis Motor Speedway has hosted thousands o

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Sexless in the City – Facts So Romantic

Together, the data imply that the post-pandemic cityscape may be less sexy than the countryside. Photograph by Tero Vesalainen / Shutterstock The pandemic is making its way into every corner of our lives—even the bedroom. While many parts of the world gradually return to normal, the United States still wrestles with the fallout of a mismanaged response to the new coronavirus. As 20 million Americ

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The Atlantic Daily: Brace for a Potential 'Blue Shift'

GETTY / THE ATLANTIC The pandemic is complicating the very act of voting. As Election Day 2020 approaches, prepare for problems—and a possible last-minute twist as the votes are tallied. Our writers explain: Brace for a potential "blue shift" in the days after the election. In recent cycles, votes counted last have tended to skew Democratic—sometimes to the point of reversing the outcome. "The ef

10h

Aspirin may accelerate progression of advanced cancers in older adults

For older adults with advanced cancer, initiating aspirin may increase their risk of disease progression and early death.

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McKee CTE staging scheme accurate in diagnosing severity, location of disease

Since 2008, researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and VA Boston Healthcare System have studied Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), a progressive brain disease associated with repetitive head impacts that has been diagnosed after death in the brains of American football players and other contact sport athletes as well as members of the armed services

10h

Study pinpoints five most likely causes of post-traumatic stress in police officers

A combination of genetic and emotional differences may lead to post-traumatic stress (PTS) in police officers, a new study finds. Based on biological studies of officers in major cities, the study showed that the most significant PTS predictors are the tendency to startle at sudden sounds, early career displays of mental health symptoms (e.g., anxiety and depression), and certain genetic differenc

10h

The White House Announces a Plan to Speed the Rollout of 5G

The Pentagon will share part of the wireless spectrum, allowing telecom carriers to reach more areas with fewer cell towers.

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Coronavirus live news: Global cases top 20m as WHO chief says 'it's never too late to turn outbreak around'

Deaths likely to pass 750,000 this week, says WHO; US weekly deaths fall 16%; EU health agency calls for new lockdowns; Follow the latest updates France extends mask use as Greece says it is in second wave Global report: Covid cases worldwide near 20 million World map: which countries have the most cases and deaths? See all our coronavirus coverage 1.23am BST Donald Trump was abruptly escorted ou

11h

How boundaries become bridges in evolution

The mechanisms that make organisms locally fit and those responsible for change are distinct and occur sequentially in evolution.

11h

Google's Pixel 4 Is One of the Best Phones, and It's $250 Off

Google's discontinued handset likely won't be available much longer, but it will still get years of software support.

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Nepal lockdown halved health facility births and increased stillbirths and newborn deaths

COVID-19 response has resulted in major reductions in health facility births in Nepal and widened inequalities, with significantly increased institutional stillbirth and neonatal mortality, according to a new study in the Lancet Global Health.The research was led Dr Ashish KC and Nepal colleagues with Uppsala University, Sweden, and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. It is the first

11h

Fatal cardiac arrests could be hiding opioid overdose deaths in the US

A study in San Francisco has found that 17 per cent of deaths ascribed to cardiac arrest were actually caused by drug overdose, most commonly opioids

12h

Belarus Has Shut Down the Internet Amid a Controversial Election

Human rights organizations have blamed the Belarusian government for widespread outages.

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Ammonia 'mushballs' could spark strange lightning on Jupiter

These storms are thought to contain a kind of water-ammonia hail ('mushballs') specific to Jupiter's atmosphere, which drags the ammonia down into the deep atmosphere and may explain the presence of shallow lightning flashes. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill/) The forecast for Jupiter's weather is cloudy with a chance of "mushballs." The swirl-shrouded planet is host to violent storms th

12h

How a Small Brewery Can Survive COVID-19

Here is one more item about a bellwether business category that until recently had been an indicator of downtown renewal and locally focused entrepreneurship—and which now is figuring out how and whether it can survive. I am talking about the small, independent, start-up breweries and distilleries whose numbers have increased by the thousands in the past decade—but many of whose members are now j

12h

Stronger rains in warmer climate could lessen heat damage to crops, says study

Intensified rainstorms predicted for many parts of the United States as a result of warming climate may have a modest silver lining: they could more efficiently water some major crops, and this would at least partially offset the far larger projected yield declines caused by the rising heat itself.

13h

Mouthwashes could reduce the risk of coronavirus transmission, study shows

Results from cell culture experiments show that commercially available preparations have an effect on Sars-Cov-2 viruses.

13h

Alligators May Be Able to Survive Venomous Snake Bites

Alligator blood inhibits a key toxin in the venom of vipers such as rattlesnakes and copperheads. slinky-gator_cropped.jpg Image credits: Rajkiran via Flickr Rights information: CC BY-ND 2.0 Creature Monday, August 10, 2020 – 17:15 Joshua Learn, Contributor (Inside Science) — New research shows alligator blood has properties that may help the aquatic reptiles survive venomous snake bites. "This

13h

NASA's Aqua Satellite shows extent of Apple Fire's burn scar

On Aug. 9, 2020 NASA's Aqua satellite imaged the Apple Fire near Big Bear Lake in California using its false-color bands in order to be able to distinguish burn scars from the surrounding area more easily.

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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine

1. Initial weeks of pandemic saw a swift increase in virtual visits, sharp decrease in in-person visits at the VA ; 2. Researchers report cases of myasthenia gravis associated with COVID-19 infection.

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Scientists Made Mice Glow in the Dark to Study Mitochondria

Powerhouse Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell — but if something dampers their output, it can be difficult to determine why. To better investigate mitochondrial function, a team of researchers from Switzerland's Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne developed a method to make mice glow in the dark, like fireflies . Their work was published today in the journal Nature Chemical Biology

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Ceres: An Ocean World in the Asteroid Belt

Liquid water, once thought unique to Earth, may be common on icy worlds throughout the solar system.

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New York City Subway System Asks Apple to Improve Masked Face ID

Mask On New York City's subway-running Metropolitan Transit Agency, fed up with folks taking off their masks to unlock their iPhones, wants Apple to improve their iPhones' facial recognition features. In a letter to CEO Tim Cook obtained by The Associated Press , Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) Chairman Patrick Foye complained that too many riders were seen removing their masks to unl

13h

New guidelines redefine 'obesity' to curb fat shaming

New guidelines published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal argue that obesity should be defined as a condition that involves high body mass index along with a corresponding physical or mental health condition. The guidelines note that classifying obesity by body mass index alone may lead to fat shaming or non-optimal treatments. The guidelines offer five steps for reframing the way doct

13h

Celebrate the Smithsonian's 174th Birthday With a Look at Its First Collections

Historic museum specimens help us learn more about what a species once was like and what it could be like in the future

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Analysis of Ugandan cervical carcinomas, an aid for understudied sub-Saharan women

Cervical cancer kills more than 300,000 middle-aged women a year, and 19 of the 20 nations with the highest death rates are sub-Saharan countries. Now an international team, including Akinyemi I. Ojesina, M.D., Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham, has published the first comprehensive genomic study of cervical cancers in sub-Saharan Africa, with a focus on tumors from 212 Ugandan patients w

13h

Electronic components join forces to take up 10 times less space on computer chips

Electronic filters are essential to the inner workings of our phones and other wireless devices. They eliminate or enhance specific input signals to achieve the desired output signals. They are essential, but take up space on the chips that researchers are on a constant quest to make smaller. A new study demonstrates the successful integration of the individual elements that make up electronic fil

13h

New research reveals previously hidden features of plant genomes

An international team has decoded the full genome for the black mustard plant — research that will advance breeding of oilseed mustard crops and provides a foundation for improved breeding of wheat, canola and lentils.

13h

Agriculture replaces fossil fuels as largest human source of sulfur in the environment

New research identifies fertilizer and pesticide applications to croplands as the largest source of sulfur in the environment — up to 10 times higher than the peak sulfur load seen in the second half of the 20th century, during the days of acid rain.

13h

Photosynthetic hacks can boost crop yield, conserve water

Plants are factories that manufacture yield from light and carbon dioxide — but parts of this complex process, called photosynthesis, are hindered by a lack of raw materials and machinery. To optimize production, scientists have resolved two major photosynthetic bottlenecks to boost plant productivity by 27 percent in real-world field conditions, according to a new study. This photosynthetic hack

13h

Personal connections key to climate adaptation

Connections with friends and family are key to helping communities adapt to the devastating impact of climate change on their homes and livelihoods. The research found people are more empowered to deal with the impact of encroaching sea-levels and dwindling fish stocks when they see others doing the same.

13h

New model shows how voting behavior can drive political parties apart

If voters gravitate toward the center of the political spectrum, why are the parties drifting farther apart? A new model reveals a mechanism for increased polarization in US politics, guided by the idea of 'satisficing'– that people will settle for a candidate who is 'good enough.'

13h

Study: Increased presence of law enforcement officers in schools does not improve safety

A new longitudinal study sought to learn more about the impact of school resource officers (SROs). The study found that schools that increased staffing levels of SROs were more likely to record increases in crimes and to exclude students from school in response to those crimes than schools without increases in SRO staffing levels; moreover, the increases in crimes and exclusions recorded persisted

13h

How boundaries become bridges in evolution

The mechanisms that make organisms locally fit and those responsible for change are distinct and occur sequentially in evolution.

13h

New machine learning tool predicts devastating intestinal disease in premature infants

Researchers from Columbia Engineering and the University of Pittsburgh have developed a sensitive and specific early warning system for predicting necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in premature infants before the life-threatening intestinal disease occurs. The prototype predicts NEC accurately and early, using stool microbiome features combined with clinical and demographic information. 'The lessons

13h

Youth's risks from first-time opioid prescriptions may not be as high as once thought

Young adults and adolescents who are prescribed opioids for the first time may be at a slightly greater risk of developing a substance-related problem later in life, according to a new study co-authored by Indiana University researchers. However, the risk may not be as high as previously thought.

13h

E.P.A. to Lift Obama-Era Controls on Methane, a Potent Greenhouse Gas

The reversal is the latest move in the Trump administration's ongoing effort to weaken environmental rules, but it could be quickly undone after the November election.

13h

Study: Dwarf Planet Ceres is an Ocean World

According to several new studies published today in the journal Nature , Ceres, the largest object in the asteroid belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, likely holds massive reservoirs of sea water underneath its surface. Yes: An ocean planet. A team of researchers found evidence of an "extensive reservoir" of brine beneath the surface of the 20-million-year-old Occator crater on Ceres usi

13h

Electronic components join forces to take up 10 times less space on computer chips

Electronic filters are essential to the inner workings of our phones and other wireless devices. They eliminate or enhance specific input signals to achieve the desired output signals. They are essential, but take up space on the chips that researchers are on a constant quest to make smaller. A new study demonstrates the successful integration of the individual elements that make up electronic fil

13h

Imaging method highlights new role for cellular 'skeleton' protein

While your skeleton helps your body to move, fine skeleton-like filaments within your cells likewise help cellular structures to move. Now, researchers have developed a new imaging method that lets them monitor a small subset of these filaments, called actin.

14h

Study rating attractiveness of women with endometriosis is not yet retracted

Despite media reports announcing the retraction of a much-criticized study of whether women with endometriosis were more attractive than other women, the study has yet to be retracted by the journal. Last week, several news outlets, picking up on a story in The Guardian, said the study, first published in 2013 in Fertility and Sterility, … Continue reading

14h

Gene therapy targets inner retina to combat blindness

Batten disease is a group of fatal, inherited lysosomal storage disorders that predominantly affect children. The most prevalent form is CLN3 disease, for which there is no cure. Retinal degeneration and resulting vision loss is one of the symptoms.

14h

There's still a lot of COVID-19 data that we don't have

The best actions to limit COVID-19 exposure include social distancing, hand washing, and finally the much-debated mask wearing. (Kutan Ural/Unsplash/) Manal Mohammed is a lecturer in medical microbiology at the University of Westminster. This story originally featured on The Conversation . Although political leaders have closed borders in response to COVID-19, scientists are collaborating like ne

14h

Let's scan the whole planet with LiDAR | Chris Fisher

We have archives of films, newspapers, even seeds — what if we could make one for the entire surface of the earth? Drawing on his experience mapping an ancient city in the Honduran jungle, archaeologist Chris Fisher makes the case for scanning the whole planet with LiDAR — a technology that uses lasers shot from an airplane to map the ground — in order to preserve our cultural and ecological he

14h

Utilizing agtech plant labs for human testing could help fight pandemic, study says

Just as redeploying a fleet of small British fishing boats helped during the Battle of Dunkirk, marshalling the research equipment and expertise of the many agtech labs around the world could help combat pandemics, say the authors of a just-published article in Nature Biotechnology.

14h

Biology blurs line between sexes, behaviors

Biological sex is typically understood in binary terms: male and female. However, there are many examples of animals that are able to modify sex-typical biological and behavioral features and even change sex. A new study, which appears in the journal Current Biology, identifies a genetic switch in brain cells that can toggle between sex-specific states when necessary, findings that question the id

14h

DNA from an unknown ancestor found in modern humans

A new study of the genomes of Modern Humans, Neanderthals, and Denisovans suggests the three were interbreeding quite often. The study also found DNA from an unidentified, archaic human ancestor which we inherited from the Denisovans. Homo Erectus is the most likely source of this DNA. Modern Humans are the last members of the genus Homo . While we've managed to outlast an extensive list of cousi

14h

Study finds Americans prize party loyalty over democratic principles

It is conventional wisdom that Americans cherish democracy—but a new study by Yale political scientists reports that only a small fraction of U.S. voters are willing to sacrifice their partisan and policy interests to defend democratic principles.

14h

Utilizing agtech plant labs for human testing could help fight pandemic, study says

Just as redeploying a fleet of small British fishing boats helped during the Battle of Dunkirk, marshalling the research equipment and expertise of the many agtech labs around the world could help combat pandemics, say the authors of a just-published article in Nature Biotechnology.

14h

Biology blurs line between sexes, behaviors

Biological sex is typically understood in binary terms: male and female. However, there are many examples of animals that are able to modify sex-typical biological and behavioral features and even change sex. A new study, which appears in the journal Current Biology, identifies a genetic switch in brain cells that can toggle between sex-specific states when necessary, findings that question the id

14h

How to get more cancer-fighting nanoparticles to where they are needed

University of Toronto Engineering researchers have discovered a dose threshold that greatly increases the delivery of cancer-fighting drugs into a tumor.

14h

'I can't afford tuition': College students face financial strains, health concerns from pandemic ahead of fall semester

Brittany Goddard's final semester at Howard University isn't the dream ending she imagined in Washington, D.C.

14h

How schools will have to 'adapt creatively' this fall

As K-12 school leaders finalize decisions for what fall 2020 will look like, the coronavirus pandemic—still surging unabated across the United States—complicates every possible solution. Beneath all is an impossibly high-stakes debate, pitting the risks to public health against the importance of sustaining academic and social growth of students. Going into fall, I don't think there's a school dis

14h

Study: Americans prize party loyalty over democratic principles

It is conventional wisdom that Americans cherish democracy — but a new study by Yale political scientists reports that only a small fraction of U.S. voters are willing to sacrifice their partisan and policy interests to defend democratic principles.

14h

GI symptoms linked to behavioral problems in children, especially those with autism

A new UC Davis Health study found that common gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation and bloating are linked to troubling sleep problems, self-harm and physical complaints in preschool children. According to the study, published Aug. 6 in Autism Research, these GI symptoms are much more common and potentially disruptive in young kids with autism.

14h

Dwarf planet Ceres is an 'ocean world' with sea water beneath surface, mission finds

Ceres, believed to be a barren space rock, has an 'extensive reservoir' of brine beneath its surface, images show The dwarf planet Ceres – long believed to be a barren space rock – is an ocean world with reservoirs of sea water beneath its surface, the results of a major exploration mission showed on Monday. Ceres is the largest object in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and has its own

14h

Schooling is critical for cognitive health throughout life

New research suggests that education provides little to no protection against the onset of cognitive declines later in life. It can, however, boost the cognitive skills people develop earlier in life, pushing back the point at which age-related dementia begins to impact a person's ability to care for themselves.

15h

Non-fasting blood test can help screen youth for prediabetes and diabetes

A simple blood test that does not require overnight fasting has been found to be an accurate screening tool for identifying youth at risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease risk later in life.

15h

Forest growth in drier climates will be impacted by reduced snowpack

A new study suggests that future reductions in seasonal snowpack as a result of climate change may negatively influence forest growth in semi-arid climates, but less so in wetter climates.

15h

New global study shows 'best of the last' tropical forests urgently need protection

The world's 'best of the last' tropical forests are at significant risk of being lost, according to a new article. Of these pristine forests that provide key services — including carbon storage, prevention of disease transmission and water provision — only a mere 6.5 percent are formally protected.

15h

NIST's SAMURAI measures 5G communications channels precisely

Engineers have developed a flexible, portable measurement system to support design and repeatable laboratory testing of fifth-generation (5G) wireless communications devices with unprecedented accuracy across a wide range of signal frequencies and scenarios.

15h

Stereotypes in language may shape bias against women in STEM

A new study digs into 25 languages to explore the gender stereotypes in language that undermine efforts to support equality across science, technology, engineering, and mathematics careers. Despite decades of positive messaging to encourage women and girls to pursue education tracks and careers in STEM, women continue to fall far below their male counterparts in these fields. "Young children have

15h

Hagia Sophia 'time tunnel' linked Ottoman and Roman Empires

Narratives of conquest don't fully explain the lasting legacy of Hagia Sophia, a cathedral-turned-mosque-turned-museum in Turkey that is once again a mosque, argues historian Ali Yaycıoğlu. With the conversion last month of the architecturally stunning edifice into a working mosque, Turkish President Recep Erdoğan fulfilled a long-held hope of many Turkish Muslims and of his own political party.

15h

New study documents increasing frequency, cost, and severity of gunshot wounds

The rise in firearm violence has coincided with an increase in the severity of injuries firearms inflict as well as the cost of operations.

15h

Oxytocin can help prevent osteoporosis

In a laboratory experiment with rats, Brazilian researchers succeeded in reversing natural processes associated with aging that lead to loss of bone density and strength.

15h

Agtech to the rescue in a pandemic: adapting plant labs for human testing

Just as redeploying a fleet of small British fishing boats helped during the Battle of Dunkirk, marshalling the research equipment and expertise of the many agtech labs around the world could help combat pandemics, say the authors of a just-published article in Nature Biotechnology. Sophisticated agtech labs and equipment used for crop and animal breeding, seed testing, and monitoring of plant and

15h

Researchers characterize important regulators of tissue inflammation, fibrosis and regeneration

Although macrophages (cells involved in the detection and destruction of bacteria and other harmful organisms as well as dead cells) are classified as immune cells functioning in the activation and resolution of tissue inflammation, it is now clear that they are critically involved in a variety of disease processes, such as chronic inflammatory diseases, tumor growth and metastasis and tissue fibr

15h

TB vaccine research could benefit the elderly and diabetics

A study of older mice with type 2 diabetes has yielded highly promising results for researchers investigating potential new vaccines for tuberculosis (TB). A team of researchers from Australia, Bangladesh and France investigated a potential vaccine, BCG::RD1, and found it highly protective when administered directly into the lungs of diabetic mice, which were then exposed to TB.

15h

Indigenous property rights protect the Amazon rainforest

One way to cut back on deforestation in the Amazon rainforest – and help in the global fight against climate change – is to grant more of Brazil's indigenous communities full property rights to tribal lands. This policy focus is suggested by the findings of a new study in PNAS.

15h

Poverty alleviation efforts are shaping the success of environmental targets

Social protection programs can facilitate progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) but can also create trade-offs across divergent social and environmental goals that can undermine their effectiveness, say the authors of new research published in the journal PNAS. This is one of the largest studies on the sustainability implications of social protection, funded by the Grantham Cen

15h

Algal blue light switch control of electrical excitation in plants

What is the role and molecular basis of electrical signaling in higher plants? This can now be investigated non-invasively for the first time. The new method has been published in the journal PNAS.

15h

Air pollution impacts the health of wild pollinators

We have almost no idea how air pollution affects other organisms who breathe the same air as we do. In some of the first research in the world to try to address the physiological and molecular impacts of air pollution on our wild plants and animals, scientists from the Bangalore Life Science Cluster show that air pollution could be devastating for organisms we rely on most for our own survival – l

15h

Monkeys' Attraction to Burned Grasslands May Offer Clues to Human Ancestors' Mastery of Fire

A new study finds monkeys enter charred savannahs to avoid predators, lending support to a controversial theory about what drew hominins to blazes

15h

'Its body looked like a warzone.' Air pollution could kill off critical honey bees in India

Study is first to detail impacts of dirty air on insect health

15h

Past evidence supports complete loss of Arctic sea-ice by 2035

A new study supports predictions that the Arctic could be free of sea ice by 2035.

15h

Confused by whole grain labels on food packaging? Study finds you're not alone

Whole grain labels are confusing to consumers, according to a new study that found many made the wrong choice when asked to pick the healthier option based on product labels. The researchers say the results provide legal evidence for changes in labeling policies.

15h

Gulf war illness, chronic fatigue syndrome distinct illnesses, Georgetown study suggests

A brain imaging study of veterans with Gulf War illness (GWI) and patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) (sometimes called myalgic encephalomyelitis), has shown that the two illnesses produce distinctly different, abnormal patterns of brain activity after moderate exercise.

15h

How fish stocks will change in warming seas

New research out today highlights the future effects of climate change on important fish stocks for south-west UK fisheries.

15h

New treatment targets found for blinding retinal disease

When the eye isn't getting enough oxygen in the face of common conditions like premature birth or diabetes, it sets in motion a state of frenzied energy production that can ultimately result in blindness, and now scientists have identified new points where they may be able to calm the frenzy and instead enable recovery.

15h

Study finds ATV-related head and neck injuries among youth continue to remain high

A new study analyzed data regarding ATV-related head and neck injuries treated in U.S. emergency departments from 1990 through 2014 involving patients younger than 18 years of age.

15h

Fragmented forests: Tree cover, urban sprawl both increased in Southeast Michigan over the past 30 years

The extent of Southeast Michigan's tree canopy and its urban sprawl both increased between 1985 and 2015, according to a new study that used aerial photos and satellite images to map individual buildings and small patches of street trees.

15h

Climate change: Warming world will be 'devastating' for frozen peatlands

Huge stocks of greenhouse gases tied up in peatlands could be released as the world warms.

15h

Over a Billion Android Devices Are at Risk of Data Theft

Qualcomm has released a fix for the flaws in its Snapdragon chip, which attackers might exploit to monitor location or render the phone unresponsive.

15h

Algal blue light switch control of electrical excitation in plants

Optogenetics denotes the manipulation of cellular processes by light-based biological techniques. An international research team led by the Würzburg plant scientists Rainer Hedrich, Georg Nagel and Dirk Becker has succeeded in applying this method to higher plants: Light impulses can now be used to trigger electrical excitation in plants.

15h

Indigenous property rights protect the Amazon rainforest

One way to cut back on deforestation in the Amazon rainforest—and help in the global fight against climate change—is to grant more of Brazil's indigenous communities full property rights to tribal lands. This policy focus is suggested by a new University California of San Diego study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

15h

Poverty alleviation efforts are shaping the success of environmental targets

Social protection programs can facilitate progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) but can also create trade-offs across divergent social and environmental goals that can undermine their effectiveness, say the authors of new research published in the journal PNAS. This is one of the largest studies on the sustainability implications of social protection, funded by the Grantham Cen

15h

Air pollution impacts the health of wild pollinators

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), nine of the world's 10 most polluted cities are in India. Yet, researchers have almost no idea how air pollution is affecting non-human organisms. In some of the first research to address the physiological and molecular impacts of air pollution on wild plants and animals, scientists from the Bangalore Life Science Cluster show that air pollution co

15h

Discovery transforms understanding of hydrogen depletion at the seafloor

The discovery in the 1970s of hydrothermal vents, where volcanoes at the seafloor produce hot fluid exceeding 350 degrees Celsius, or 662 degrees Fahrenheit, fundamentally changed the understanding about Earth and life. Yet, life at and underneath the seafloor is still very much a mystery today.

15h

New Climate Paper: Maybe Let's Let Venice Sink?

Absolutely Atlantian How much effort should we place on preserving heritage as the world around us changes? "How much effort," asks a press release from North Carolina State University, "should be spent trying to keep Venice looking like Venice?" Rather than spending increasing resources to keep Venice looking like Venice, a new proposal published in the journal Climate Change suggests World Heri

15h

Algal blue light switch control of electrical excitation in plants

Optogenetics denotes the manipulation of cellular processes by light-based biological techniques. An international research team led by the Würzburg plant scientists Rainer Hedrich, Georg Nagel and Dirk Becker has succeeded in applying this method to higher plants: Light impulses can now be used to trigger electrical excitation in plants.

15h

Air pollution impacts the health of wild pollinators

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), nine of the world's 10 most polluted cities are in India. Yet, researchers have almost no idea how air pollution is affecting non-human organisms. In some of the first research to address the physiological and molecular impacts of air pollution on wild plants and animals, scientists from the Bangalore Life Science Cluster show that air pollution co

15h

Schooling is critical for cognitive health throughout life

New research suggests that education provides little to no protection against the onset of cognitive declines later in life. It can, however, boost the cognitive skills people develop earlier in life, pushing back the point at which age-related dementia begins to impact a person's ability to care for themselves.

16h

How Close Are We To Making Babies from Bone Marrow?

A popular Discover Magazine story from 2007 raised the possibility of using stem cells to produce human sperm. Where does the science of reproduction via stem cells stand today?

16h

New study confirms the power of Deinosuchus and its 'teeth the size of bananas'

A new study, revisiting fossil specimens from the enormous crocodylian, Deinosuchus, has confirmed that the beast had teeth 'the size of bananas', capable to take down even the very largest of dinosaurs.

16h

Explosive nuclear astrophysics

An international team has made a key discovery related to 'presolar grains' found in some meteorites. This discovery has shed light on stellar explosions and the origin of chemical elements. It has also provided a new method for astronomical research.

16h

HPV strains may impact cervical cancer prognosis

An analysis of cervical cancers in Ugandan women has uncovered significant genomic differences between tumors caused by different strains of human papillomavirus (HPV), signifying HPV type may impact cervical cancer characteristics and prognosis.

16h

Biology blurs line between sexes, behaviors

Biological sex is typically understood in binary terms: male and female. However, there are many examples of animals that are able to modify sex-typical biological and behavioral features and even change sex. A new study identifies a genetic switch in brain cells that can toggle between sex-specific states when necessary, findings that question the idea of sex as a fixed property.

16h

Exact climate data from the past

Corals and cave carbonates can reveal the temperatures that prevailed at the Earth's surface at the time they formed. An international team of geoscientists has developed a new method that makes it possible to identify whether the composition of these deposits was exclusively controlled by temperature, or if the formation process itself exerted an additional control. The new method allows scientis

16h

COVID-19 makes US housing crisis even worse

With unemployment levels at record highs and social safety nets evaporating, America is staring down what could be the most severe housing crisis in the nation's history. Across the country, about one in seven tenants has no confidence in their ability to pay rent this month, according to data from the US Census Bureau. Some estimates suggest 19 to 23 million US renters may be at risk of eviction

16h

Why do US COVID patients have more abnormal liver tests?

In a new study, patients with COVID-19 presented with abnormal liver tests at much higher rates than suggested by earlier research. The researchers also discovered that higher levels of liver enzymes—proteins released when the liver is damaged—were associated with poorer outcomes for these patients, including ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and death. Previous studies in China found that a

16h

Moonquakes and marsquakes: How we peer inside other worlds

Eavesdropping on the shudders and groans echoing deep inside alien worlds like Mars and the moon is revealing what lies far beneath their surfaces and could teach us more about how our own planet formed.

16h

Nearly 100,000 U.S. kids tested positive for COVID-19 in the second half of July

Epidemiologists are still unsure of how easily COVID-19 can be spread among children in a school setting. (Unsplash /) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on enjoying summer activities , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and advice on which masks to buy . Schools and businesses continue to grapple with how to reopen safely as the pandemic still spikes

16h

Mysteriet om p-pillen: Kan de give dig psykiske bivirkninger?

Mere end hver tredje kvinde mistænker p-piller for at have givet dem bivirkninger.

16h

Reducing urinary protein for patients with rare kidney disease slows kidney decline

New findings show that reducing the amount of protein in the urine of patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis can significantly slow declines in kidney function and extend time before patients' kidneys fail.

16h

What the rest of the world can learn from South Korea's COVID-19 response

As the world continues to closely monitor the newest coronavirus outbreak, the government of South Korea has been able to keep the disease under control without paralyzing the national health and economic systems. CU Denver researcher Jongeun You reviewed South Korea's public health policy to learn how the country managed coronavirus from January through April 2020.

16h

Coronavirus transmission risk increases along wildlife supply chains

Coronaviruses were detected in a high proportion of bats and rodents in Viet Nam from 2013 to 2014, with an increasing proportion of positive samples found along the wildlife supply chain from traders to large markets to restaurants, according to a study published August 10, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Amanda Fine of the Wildlife Conservation Society and colleagues.

16h

Adaptive mutations repeat themselves in tiny crustaceans of Lake Baikal

Researchers showed that parallel evolution driven by adaptations can be detected at the whole-genome level. Lake Baikal is home to hundreds of species of endemic amphipods that evolved from several species in their distant ancestry and embrace a variety of ecological niches from predators to planktonic forms and parasites. Parallels were found even between forms with totally different lifestyles.

16h

Nutritional screening a potential tool for determining heart attack, angina prognosis

In a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology of more than 5,000 acute coronary syndromes (ACS) patients, 71.8% were considered malnourished by at least one nutrition screening test, and worsening malnutrition status was associated with higher mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), such as another heart attack or stroke.

16h

Noel Rose, Who Demonstrated Autoimmunity Exists, Dies at 92

The Johns Hopkins University researcher bucked the prevailing idea that the body would not launch an immune response against its own tissues, and in doing so established an entirely new scientific discipline.

16h

Conferences failing to protect LGBT+ researchers

Nature, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02325-1 Promoting equity, diversity and inclusion at meetings requires more than a code of conduct, analysis finds.

16h

Minority Report-Style Crime-Predicting AI Predictably Sucks At Its Job

Saw It Coming The UK government has been funneling millions of dollars into a prediction tool for violent crime that uses artificial intelligence. Now, officials are finally ready to admit that it has one big flaw: It's completely unusable. Also: Predictably (ironically), riddled with ethical problems, as Wired reports . Police have already stopped developing the system called "Most Serious Viole

16h

A Growing Oil Spill Off the Coast of Mauritius

The MV Wakashio, a bulk carrier ship loaded with about 4,000 tons of fuel oil, ran aground off the coast of Mauritius, in the Indian Ocean, on July 25. After sitting on a reef for days, battered by waves while awaiting salvage workers, the vessel has leaked an increasing amount of oil near a marine park and populated beaches. Mauritius has declared a "state of environmental emergency," as the gro

16h

'We're in one of the cataclysmic times of change': first female NSF director on discrimination and COVID-19

Nature, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02314-4 One-time head of the US National Science Foundation Rita Colwell speaks out on sexism — and how her experiences as a leader in science can inform pandemic response.

16h

Dietary control of the healing of injury-induced inflammation

The purpose of this review is to describe the molecular components of the Resolution Response and how different dietary factors can either optimize or inhibit their actions.

16h

How to get more cancer-fighting nanoparticles to where they are needed

University of Toronto Engineering researchers have discovered a dose threshold that greatly increases the delivery of cancer-fighting drugs into a tumour.

16h

Covid-19 news: Coronavirus not seasonal and will bounce back, says WHO

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

16h

UK government abandons centralised contact tracing in England

'Ringfenced' teams to work with local councils after successful trials

17h

Dwarf planet Ceres is an ocean world: study

The dwarf planet Ceres—long believed to be a barren space rock—is an ocean world with reservoirs of sea water beneath its surface, the results of a major exploration mission showed Monday.

17h

Prenatal depression alters child's brain connectivity, affects behavior

Altered brain connectivity may be one way prenatal depression influences child behavior, according to new research in JNeurosci.

17h

A Pandemic Journey That Puts Odysseus to Shame

Shortly after he arrived on the RV Polarstern at the end of February, Alexey Niubom learned he would not be going home as planned. The 32-year-old engineer from St. Petersburg, Russia, was among roughly 100 crew members staffing the third leg of a yearlong Arctic research campaign aboard the German icebreaker. From the outset, the trip unfolded like a Jules Verne novel, beginning with a four and

17h

The best professional-level sewing machines

Fix and create. (J Williams via Unsplash/) When you start getting serious about your crafting, home decor, and fashion sewing projects, it may be time to consider investing in a professional level sewing machine. Heavy duty machines can handle big jobs and thick fabrics with speed and accuracy. Built in metal frames will ensure the stability and structure needed for many years of use. Endless cre

17h

Shampoo brushes that break down build-up and exfoliate the scalp

Stimulate the scalp. (Tim Mossholder via Unsplash/) While there's nothing wrong with relying on your fingers to wash your hair, there's something extra luxurious and satisfying about using a specially-design shampoo brush when you're getting sudsy in the shower or bath. The brushes featured below are created specifically with hair and scalp health in mind: they stimulate the scalp and promote blo

17h

Gene manipulation using algae could grow more crops with less water

Enhanced photosynthesis holds promise of higher yields in a drought-afflicted future Tobacco plants have been modified with a protein found in algae to improve their photosynthesis and increase growth, while using less water, in a new advance that could point the way to higher-yielding crops in a drought-afflicted future. The technique focuses on photosynthesis, the complex process by which plant

17h

The U.S. Needs to Address Its Climate Migration Problem

With rising seas threatening coastal communities, federal watchdog warns the government's scattershot approach needs revising — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

Deep learning and metamaterials make the invisible visible

By combining purpose-built materials and neural networks, researchers at EPFL have shown that sound can be used in high-resolution imagery.

17h

New study warns: We have underestimated the pace at which the Arctic is melting

Arctic sea ice is melting more quickly than once assumed. Today's climate models have yet to incorporate the steep rise in temperatures that have occurred over the past 40 years. This, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Copenhagen and other institutions.

17h

Exact climate data from the past

Corals precipitate their calcareous skeletons (calcium carbonate) from seawater. Over thousands of years, vast coral reefs form due to the deposition of this calcium carbonate. During precipitation, corals prefer carbonate groups containing specific variants of oxygen (chemical symbol: O). For example, the lower the water temperature, the higher the abundance of a heavy oxygen variant, known as is

17h

Rare 'boomerang' earthquake observed along Atlantic Ocean fault line

Scientists have tracked a 'boomerang' earthquake in the ocean for the first time, providing clues about how they could cause devastation on land.

17h

Forest growth in drier climates will be impacted by reduced snowpack, study finds

A new study suggests that future reductions in seasonal snowpack as a result of climate change may negatively influence forest growth in semi-arid climates, but less so in wetter climates.

17h

NASA finds strong storms in developing Tropical Storm Mekkhala

After Tropical Depression 07W formed close to the western Philippines, it moved away and strengthened into a tropical storm in the South China Sea. NASA's Terra satellite provided a look at the strength of the storms that make up the tropical cyclone.

17h

Breaking molecular traffic jams with finned nanoporous materials

Thousands of chemical processes used by the energy industry and for other applications rely on the high speed of catalytic reactions, but molecules frequently are hindered by molecular traffic jams that slow them down. Now an entirely new class of porous catalysts has been invented, using unique fins to speed up the chemistry by allowing molecules to skip the lines that limit the reaction.

17h

New research reveals previously hidden features of plant genomes

An international team led by the Plant Phenotyping and Imaging Research Centre (P2IRC) at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and researchers at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) has decoded the full genome for the black mustard plant—research that will advance breeding of oilseed mustard crops and provide a foundation for improved breeding of wheat, canola and lentils.

17h

International team develops new method to determine origin of stardust in meteorites

Analysis of meteorite content has been crucial in advancing our knowledge of the origin and evolution of our solar system. Some meteorites also contain grains of stardust. These grains predate the formation of our solar system and are now providing important insights into how the elements in the universe formed.

17h

Forest growth in drier climates will be impacted by reduced snowpack, study finds

A new study suggests that future reductions in seasonal snowpack as a result of climate change may negatively influence forest growth in semi-arid climates, but less so in wetter climates.

17h

New research reveals previously hidden features of plant genomes

An international team led by the Plant Phenotyping and Imaging Research Centre (P2IRC) at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and researchers at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) has decoded the full genome for the black mustard plant—research that will advance breeding of oilseed mustard crops and provide a foundation for improved breeding of wheat, canola and lentils.

17h

Evolutionary assimilation of foreign DNA in a new host

All life is subject to evolution in the form of mutations that change the DNA sequence of an organism's offspring, after which natural selection allows the 'fittest' mutants to survive and pass on their genes to future generations. These mutations can generate new abilities in a species, but another common driving force for evolution is horizontal gene transfer (HGT)—the acquisition of DNA from a

17h

Protective Macbook cases to prolong your laptop's life

Protect your laptop. (Sahil Patel via Unsplash/) When you buy a new MacBook, your first thought might not always be to also buy a case to protect it. But if you want your new computer to last, a protective case can significantly reduce damage and increase its lifespan. The best cases lock tightly onto your device and resist impact, while providing enough ventilation to enable your machine to with

17h

Evolutionary assimilation of foreign DNA in a new host

All life is subject to evolution in the form of mutations that change the DNA sequence of an organism's offspring, after which natural selection allows the 'fittest' mutants to survive and pass on their genes to future generations. These mutations can generate new abilities in a species, but another common driving force for evolution is horizontal gene transfer (HGT)—the acquisition of DNA from a

17h

Stronger rains in warmer climate could lessen heat damage to crops, says study

Intensified rainstorms predicted for many parts of the United States as a result of warming climate may have a modest silver lining: they could more efficiently water some major crops, and this would at least partially offset the far larger projected yield declines caused by the rising heat itself. The conclusion, which goes against some accepted wisdom, is contained in a new study published this

17h

New study confirms the power of Deinosuchus and its 'teeth the size of bananas'

A new study, revisiting fossil specimens from the enormous crocodylian, Deinosuchus, has confirmed that the beast had teeth "the size of bananas," capable of taking down even the very largest of dinosaurs.

17h

Landmarks facing climate threats could 'transform,' expert says

How much effort should be spent trying to keep Venice looking like Venice—even as it faces rising sea levels that threaten the city with more frequent extreme flooding?

17h

Theoretical study shows that matter tends to be ordered at low temperatures

Classical phase transitions are governed by temperature. One of the most familiar examples is the phase transitions of water from solid to liquid to gas. However, other parameters govern phase transitions when temperatures approach absolute zero, including pressure, the magnetic field, and doping, which introduce disorder into the molecular structure of a material.

17h

Seeing chemical reactions with music

Albert Einstein once said, "I see my life in terms of music." Perhaps inspired by his words, scientists at the Center for Self-assembly and Complexity (CSC), within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea) now see chemical reactions in the presence of music. The IBS research team has reported that audible sound can control chemical reactions in solution by continuously supplying energy s

17h

New global study shows 'best of the last' tropical forests urgently need protection

The world's 'best of the last' tropical forests are at significant risk of being lost, according to a paper released today in Nature Ecology and Evolution. Of these pristine forests that provide key services—including carbon storage, prevention of disease transmission and water provision—only a mere 6.5 percent are formally protected.

17h

Past evidence supports complete loss of Arctic sea ice by 2035

A new study, published this week in the journal Nature Climate Change, supports predictions that the Arctic could be free of sea ice by 2035.

17h

Fireflies shed light on the function of mitochondria

Tiny factories float inside our cells and provide them with almost all the energy they need: the mitochondria. Their effectiveness decreases when we get older, but also when we face many diseases such as diabetes, cancer or Parkinson's. This is why scientists are increasingly interested in how they work. At EPFL, a team has developed a protocol to measure their activity live in living animals. Des

17h

Fireflies shed light on the function of mitochondria

Tiny factories float inside our cells and provide them with almost all the energy they need: the mitochondria. Their effectiveness decreases when we get older, but also when we face many diseases such as diabetes, cancer or Parkinson's. This is why scientists are increasingly interested in how they work. At EPFL, a team has developed a protocol to measure their activity live in living animals. Des

17h

Biology blurs line between sexes, behaviors

Biological sex is typically understood in binary terms: male and female. However, there are many examples of animals that are able to modify sex-typical biological and behavioral features and even change sex. A new study, which appears in the journal Current Biology, identifies a genetic switch in brain cells that can toggle between sex-specific states when necessary, findings that question the id

17h

Non-fasting blood test can help screen youth for prediabetes and diabetes

A simple blood test that does not require overnight fasting has been found to be an accurate screening tool for identifying youth at risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease risk later in life.

17h

The Ultimate Air Jaws Breach! | Shark Week

Stream Air Jaws: Ultimate Breach-Off on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/air-jaws-ultimate-breach-off Stream Shark Week Episodes on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter:

17h

Restaurant customers frown on automatic gratuities, particularly after good service

Automatic gratuities leave restaurant patrons with a bad taste, even when the meal and the service were excellent, new research from Washington State University indicates.

17h

Successful school instruction is digital—but not exclusively

Secondary school students perform better in natural sciences and mathematics and are more motivated when digital tools are used in instruction. However, success depends on the design of the tools used. Success levels are higher when children and young adults do not study alone and when digital instruction is accompanied by paper-based teaching materials, according to the conclusion reached by one

17h

Personal connections key to climate adaptation

Connections with friends and family are key to helping communities adapt to the devastating impact of climate change on their homes and livelihoods, a new study shows.

17h

Scientists Are Using an "AI Bird Watcher" to Solve a Solar Farm Bird Massacre Mystery

AI Bird Watcher Solar energy! 'Might be completely renewable and green and great for the planet, sure. It could also, however, be deadly — if you're a bird . But really: A 2016 study found that large solar farms in the US accounted for the death of almost 140,000 birds every year. For a while, we only had our best guess as to why solar farms were killing birds at such a scale — for instance, they

17h

Kamala Harris Did What She Had To

The racial-justice movement sparked by the murder of George Floyd has had two quite different effects on Joe Biden's presidential campaign. It has intensified the pressure on Biden to choose a Black woman as his running mate. And it has also intensified the pressure on him to choose a running mate with a history of challenging police brutality. Those two political imperatives are now colliding in

18h

Forest growth in drier climates will be impacted by reduced snowpack, PSU study finds

A new study suggests that future reductions in seasonal snowpack as a result of climate change may negatively influence forest growth in semi-arid climates, but less so in wetter climates.

18h

Quality of care at rural hospitals may not differ as much as reported

A research team found that differences in diagnosis coding practices has resulted in artificially inflated mortality rate comparisons to other hospitals.

18h

Landmarks facing climate threats could 'transform'

Researchers asked whether heritage sites threatened by climate change should be allowed to adapt and 'transform.'

18h

Breaking molecular traffic jams with finned nanoporous materials

Researchers are reporting the invention of a new class of porous catalysts that will speed up reactions, breaking the molecular traffic jam that can slow them down. The discovery has immediate relevance to industry for a host of applications, including the production of fuels, chemicals for plastics and polymers, and reactions that make molecules for food, medicine and personal care products.

18h

Brain noise holds signal of dreamy sleep

Researchers have pulled a signal out of the noise that uniquely defines dreaming, or REM sleep. The finding may potentially make it easier to monitor people with sleep disorders, as well as unconscious coma patients or those under anesthesia. Each year, hundreds of thousands of people undergo overnight studies to diagnose problems with their sleep, most of them hooked up to an electroencephalogra

18h

Breaking molecular traffic jams with finned nanoporous materials

Researchers are reporting the invention of a new class of porous catalysts that will speed up reactions, breaking the molecular traffic jam that can slow them down. The discovery has immediate relevance to industry for a host of applications, including the production of fuels, chemicals for plastics and polymers, and reactions that make molecules for food, medicine and personal care products.

18h

NASA detects unexpected lightning storms in Jupiter's upper atmosphere

The Juno space probe orbiting Jupiter has observed lightning at impossibly high points in the Jovian atmosphere. The findings, combined with other atmopsheric data, led to the creation of a new model of the atmosphere. The findings answer a few questions about Jupiter, but create many more. Since 2016, NASA's Juno spacecraft has been observing Jupiter's atmosphere, magnetosphere, and gravitationa

18h

COVID-19 does not directly damage taste bud cells

A new study from the Regenerative Bioscience Center at the University of Georgia is the first to suggest that .

18h

Evolutionary assimilation of foreign DNA in a new host

Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego used genetic engineering and laboratory evolution to test the functionality of DNA placed into a new species and study how it can mutate to become functional if given sufficient evolutionary time.

18h

Roger Williams obituary

Physician who created the UK's first liver transplant programme and worked with George Best to highlight the dangers of alcohol The six-decade career of Roger Williams, who has died at the age of 88 after suffering a heart attack, lay at the heart of an astonishing transformation in liver medicine. In 1968, while a hepatologist at King's College hospital in London, he teamed up with the Cambridge

18h

Did you solve it? Carry on camping

The solutions to today's hard ones Earlier today I set you the following puzzle: Six friends – Babs, Charles, Hattie, Joan, Kenneth and Sid – are going camping in France. They are travelling across the Channel on a magic carpet that can take only two people at a time. So, in order for everyone to get across there will need to be 9 trips in total from their starting point in England: 5 across carr

18h

When Bugs Crawl Up the Food Chain

We usually think of insects as meals for vertebrates such as frogs. But arthropods may turn the tables more often than you think.

18h

Go ahead and use TikTok all you want

Cuddle up with TikTok. What else is there to do? (Stan Horaczek /) TikTok is a fun, silly place. To scroll through it is to take in a sensational amount of people dancing and lip-syncing. There's a video of Cameron Diaz's wine drinking challenge , a very polite kid named Grey , and a clip from Taylor Swift's "Love Story" that you'll hear way too much. There are even frogs. It's addictive and ridi

18h

Dwarf planet Ceres may be home to an underground ocean

New analysis of data from the Dawn spacecraft suggests there may be a liquid water ocean beneath the Occator crater on Ceres, the largest asteroid in the solar system

18h

Fabric repels both oil and water thanks to clever silicone coating

By studying a fabric's weave, it's possible to design an environmentally friendly silicone coating for the individual fibres that makes the material oil and water-repellent

18h

Detailed molecular workings of a key system in learning and memory formation

Biochemists report how they used advanced sequencing technology to clear up uncertainty and determine all variants of a single protein/enzyme known as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in the hippocampus, the brain's memory center.

18h

Individual differences in the brain

If selection reinforces a behavior, brain activities soon change as well.

18h

Globally, only half of women get treatment for preventable killer of newborns

Only half of pregnant women worldwide who need a 50-year-old treatment that prevents an often-fatal disease in fetuses and newborns receive it, researchers have found.

18h

You should switch to a browser that has its own VPN

With a VPN, it'll be hard for people and companies to figure out where you are. And not just because you're using a white phone, wearing a white shirt, and standing in front of a white wall. (NordWood Themes/Unsplash/) Put a virtual private network (VPN) between you and the internet, and your connection to the web becomes much more difficult to track and locate—whether the potential eavesdropper

18h

NASA's Mars Mole is Officially "Dug In"

After spending over a year of trying to bury itself into the surface of Mars to take the Red Planet's temperature, the "mole" attached to NASA's InSight Mars lander is finally officially "in" and buried in sand according to an update by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). Back in June, the DLR team pulled the mole out of the Martian soil in to check up on it, and decided to get back to drilling do

18h

Explosive nuclear astrophysics

An international team has made a key discovery related to 'presolar grains' found in some meteorites. This discovery has shed light on stellar explosions and the origin of chemical elements. It has also provided a new method for astronomical research.

18h

Stronger rains in warmer climate could lessen heat damage to crops, says study

Intensified rainstorms predicted for many parts of the United States as a result of warming climate may have a modest silver lining: they could more efficiently water some major crops, and this would at least partially offset the far larger projected yield declines caused by the rising heat itself.

18h

New study confirms the power of Deinosuchus and its 'teeth the size of bananas'

A new study, revisiting fossil specimens from the enormous crocodylian, Deinosuchus, has confirmed that the beast had teeth "the size of bananas", capable to take down even the very largest of dinosaurs.

18h

HPV strains may impact cervical cancer prognosis

An analysis of cervical cancers in Ugandan women has uncovered significant genomic differences between tumours caused by different strains of human papillomavirus (HPV), signifying HPV type may impact cervical cancer characteristics and prognosis.

18h

Landmarks facing climate threats could 'transform,' expert says

Researchers asked in a viewpoint published in Climatic Change whether heritage sites threatened by climate change should be allowed to adapt and 'transform.'

18h

The Dark Side of Being a Female Shark Researcher

Being a scientist should not require developing the grit to continually endure misogyny, discrimination, harassment, assault or bullying — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Trying to Tame the Klamath River Filled It with Toxic Algae

The Karuk tribe and its allies are working to undo damage from a century of river development — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Nanocatalysts that remotely control chemical reactions inside living cells

The enzymes responsible for catalytic reactions in our body's biological reactions are difficult to use for diagnosis or treatment as they react only to certain molecules or have low stability. Many researchers anticipate that if these issues are ameliorated or if artificial catalysts are developed to create a synergetic effect by meeting the enzymes in the body, there will be new ways to diagnose

18h

NASA finds strong storms in developing Tropical Storm Mekkhala

After Tropical Depression 07W formed close to the western Philippines, it moved away and strengthened into a tropical storm in the South China Sea. NASA's Terra satellite provided a look at the strength of the storms that make up the tropical cyclone.

18h

Breast cancer cells use message-carrying vesicles to send oncogenic stimuli to normal cells

According to a Wistar study, breast cancer cells starved for oxygen send out messages that induce oncogenic changes in surrounding normal epithelial cells.

18h

Patient experiences in medical imaging and radiation therapy: The importance of skilled patient care professionals

I went into the MRI bracing for the wave of panic I knew would come as soon as I was strapped down and inside the machine." In "A Tale of Two MRIs" by patient Lelainia Lloyd, her experiences–good and bad–are shared as part of an upcoming special issue of the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, published by Elsevier.

18h

Breaking molecular traffic jams with finned nanoporous materials

Researchers at the University of Houston are reporting the invention of a new class of porous catalysts that will speed up reactions, breaking the molecular traffic jam that can slow them down. The discovery has immediate relevance to industry for a host of applications, including the production of fuels, chemicals for plastics and polymers, and reactions that make molecules for food, medicine and

18h

New USask-led research reveals previously hidden features of plant genomes

An international team led by the Plant Phenotyping and Imaging Research Centre (P2IRC) at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and researchers at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) has decoded the full genome for the black mustard plant–research that will advance breeding of oilseed mustard crops and provides a foundation for improved breeding of wheat, canola and lentils.

18h

Retesting for COVID-19: UPMC shares its experience

In the first large, multicenter analysis of its kind, the 40-hospital UPMC health system today reported its findings on clinician-directed retesting of patients for presence of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. While retesting was uncommon, the UPMC analysis found that patients positive for COVID-19 stayed positive for an average

18h

Detailed molecular workings of a key system in learning and memory formation

UMass Amherst biochemist Margaret Strattob and colleagues report how they used advanced sequencing technology to clear up uncertainty and determine all variants of a single protein/enzyme known as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in the hippocampus, the brain's memory center.

18h

Theoretical study shows that matter tends to be ordered at low temperatures

Scientists found that in actual materials, there's no such thing as a critical point at which a quantum phase transition occurs in a genuine zero field because of the persistence of the residual magnetic field created by the many-body interaction.

18h

19h

Oxytocin may play a role in protecting against Alzheimer's

While the exact cause of Alzheimer's remains unknown, researchers are targeting toxic beta-amyloid buildup. A recent study on mice found oxytocin could be a protective agent against plaque buildup. Though more research needs to be conducted, this is a hopeful sign in our fight against a crippling disease. While Americas watch the battle for the most cognitively-fit president unfold on social medi

19h

Mitochondria May Hold Keys to Anxiety and Mental Health

Carmen Sandi recalls the skepticism she faced at first. A behavioral neuroscientist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, she had followed a hunch that something going on inside critical neural circuits could explain anxious behavior, something beyond brain cells and the synaptic connections between them. The experiments she began in 2013 showed that neurons involved in anxiet

19h

Previously undescribed lineage of Archaea illuminates microbial evolution

Scientists describe a previously unknown phylum of aquatic Archaea that are likely dependent on partner organisms for growth while potentially being able to conserve some energy by fermentation.

19h

Aquatic robots can remove contaminant particles from water

Scientists have developed a 1cm by 1cm wireless artificial aquatic polyp, which can remove contaminants from water. Apart from cleaning, this soft robot could be also used in medical diagnostic devices by aiding in picking up and transporting specific cells for analysis.

19h

Learning capabilities of drone swarms

Researchers developed a reinforcement learning approach that will allow swarms of unmanned aerial and ground vehicles to optimally accomplish various missions while minimizing performance uncertainty.

19h

Biodiversity may limit invasions: Lessons from lizards on Panama Canal islands

Introduced species can become invasive, damaging ecosystems and disrupting economies through explosive population growth. One mechanism underlying population expansion in invasive populations is 'enemy release', whereby the invader experiences relaxation of agonistic interactions with other species, including parasites.

19h

Nanocatalysts that remotely control chemical reactions inside living cells

The enzymes responsible for catalytic reactions in our body's biological reactions are difficult to use for diagnosis or treatment as they react only to certain molecules or have low stability. Many researchers anticipate that if these issues are ameliorated or if artificial catalysts are developed to create a synergetic effect by meeting the enzymes in the body, there will be new ways to diagnose

19h

Math shows how brain stays stable amid internal noise and a widely varying world

A new theoretical framework shows that many properties of neural connections help biological circuits produce consistent computations.

19h

New tools in the fight against lethal citrus disease

Scientists are closer to gaining the upper hand on Huanglongbing, a disease that has wiped out citrus orchards across the globe. New models of the bacterium linked to the disease reveal control methods that were previously unavailable.

19h

Restaurant customers frown on automatic gratuities, particularly after good service

Automatic gratuities leave restaurant patrons with a bad taste, even when the meal and the service were excellent, new research indicates.

19h

How maths modelling helps efforts to eradicate banana bunchy top virus

Modelling the predicted movements of pervasive sap-sucking tiny insects before they infest banana crops has the potential to become a key tactic in the fight against a devastating virus, according to new research. Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) is an aphid-transmitted banana disease that has been in Australia since 1913. Researchers have designed a model that tracked the probability of a banana pl

19h

Grasshopper jumping on Bloch sphere finds new quantum insights

New research has (pardon the pun) put a new spin on a mathematical analogy involving a jumping grasshopper and its ideal lawn shape. This work could help us understand the spin states of quantum-entangled particles.

19h

Land-use change disrupts wild plant pollination on a global scale

Human changes to the environment have been linked to widespread pollinator declines. New research shows that intensive land use will further decrease pollination and reproductive success of wild plants, especially of those plants that are highly specialized in their pollination.

19h

Climate change: Satellites record history of Antarctic melting

European spacecraft track in fine detail the thinning that's occurred at the continent's edge.

19h

Go ahead and use TikTok all you want

Cuddle up with TikTok. What else is there to do? (Stan Horaczek /) TikTok is a fun, silly place. To scroll through it is to take in a sensational amount of people dancing and lip-syncing. There's a video of Cameron Diaz's wine drinking challenge , a very polite kid named Grey , and a clip from Taylor Swift's "Love Story" that you'll hear way too much. There are even frogs. It's addictive and ridi

19h

SAMURAI measures 5G communications channels precisely

Engineers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a flexible, portable measurement system to support design and repeatable laboratory testing of fifth-generation (5G) wireless communications devices with unprecedented accuracy across a wide range of signal frequencies and scenarios.

19h

Individual differences in the brain

If selection reinforces a behavior, brain activities soon change as well.

19h

Globally, only half of women get treatment for preventable killer of newborns

Only half of pregnant women worldwide who need a 50-year-old treatment that prevents an often-fatal disease in fetuses and newborns receive it, Columbia researchers have found.

19h

Rare 'boomerang' earthquake observed along Atlantic Ocean fault line

Scientists have tracked a 'boomerang' earthquake in the ocean for the first time, providing clues about how they could cause devastation on land.

19h

AI-enhanced precision medicine identifies novel autism subtype

A novel precision medicine approach enhanced by artificial intelligence has laid the groundwork for what could be the first biomedical screening and intervention tool for a subtype of autism, reports a new study. The approach is believed to be the first of its kind. Today, autism is diagnosed based only on symptoms and by the time a physician identifies it, it's often when early and critical brain

19h

New global study shows 'best of the last' tropical forests urgently need protection

The world's 'best of the last' tropical forests are at significant risk of being lost, according to a paper released today in Nature Ecology and Evolution. Of these pristine forests that provide key services–including carbon storage, prevention of disease transmission and water provision–only a mere 6.5 percent are formally protected.

19h

Agriculture replaces fossil fuels as largest human source of sulfur in the environment

New research identifies fertilizer and pesticide applications to croplands as the largest source of sulfur in the environment — up to 10 times higher than the peak sulfur load seen in the second half of the 20th century, during the days of acid rain.

19h

Past evidence supports complete loss of Arctic sea-ice by 2035

A new study, published this week in the journal Nature Climate Change, supports predictions that the Arctic could be free of sea ice by 2035.

19h

Genomic sequencing as a standalone newborn screening tool falls short

With the rise of genomic sequencing, health technology companies are promising parents they can detect rare metabolic disorders in newborns who, despite a healthy appearance, may need immediate treatment.

19h

Fireflies shed light on the function of mitochondria

By making mice bioluminescent, EPFL scientists have found a way to monitor the activity of mitochondria in living organisms.

19h

Seeing chemical reactions with music

Audible sound enables chemical coloring and the coexistence of different chemical reactions in a solution.

19h

Personal connections key to climate adaptation

Connections with friends and family are key to helping communities adapt to the devastating impact of climate change on their homes and livelihoods. The research found people are more empowered to deal with the impact of encroaching sea-levels and dwindling fish stocks when they see others doing the same.

19h

Imaging method highlights new role for cellular "skeleton" protein

While your skeleton helps your body to move, fine skeleton-like filaments within your cells likewise help cellular structures to move. Now, Salk researchers have developed a new imaging method that lets them monitor a small subset of these filaments, called actin.

19h

Agriculture replaces fossil fuels as largest human source of sulfur to the environment

Historically, coal-fired power plants were the largest source of reactive sulfur, a component of acid rain, to the biosphere. A new study shows that fertilizer and pesticide applications to croplands are now the most important source of sulfur to the environment.

19h

Light swirls provide insights into the quantum world

A new method uses swirls of light to observe previously invisible quantum states of electrons. It was developed by physicists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and an international team of researchers. It delivers new insights into electron motion, which is crucial for material properties such as electrical conductivity, magnetism and molecular structures. The free electron lase

19h

UBC helps Arc'teryx stay green and dry with next-generation water-repellent fabrics

A sustainable, non-toxic and high-performance water-repellent fabric has long been the holy grail of outdoor enthusiasts and clothing companies alike. New research from UBC Okanagan and outdoor apparel giant Arc'teryx is making that goal one step closer to reality with one of the world's first non-toxic oil and water-repellent performance textile finishes.

19h

Cannabis use in pregnancy linked to a greater risk of autism

In the largest study of its kind, researchers found that children whose mothers reported using cannabis during pregnancy were at greater risk of autism. The incidence of autism was 4 per 1000 person-years among children exposed to cannabis in pregnancy, compared to 2.42 among unexposed children.

19h

Space invaders as MOFs act as liquids

Modified metal organic frameworks that can behave as porous liquids offer new possibilities for gas separation technologies.

19h

Scientists develop first quantum algorithm to characterize noise across large systems

Quantum systems are notoriously prone to errors and noise. In order to overcome this and build a functional quantum computer, physicists should ideally understand the noise across an entire system. That has been out of reach until now, with Dr Robin Harper and colleagues developing the first system-wide quantum algorithm to characterise noise.

19h

Multi-species bacterial communities bounce back from environmental disturbances

Perturbations in the environment are common, and communities consisting of several species seem to find their way around the crisis. Species immigration is beneficial for community recovery.

19h

Using air to amplify light

In a promising breakthrough for the future of communications, EPFL researchers have developed a technology that can amplify light in the latest hollow-core optical fibers.

19h

Third breakthrough demonstrates photosynthetic hacks can boost yield, conserve water

Plants are factories that manufacture yield from light and carbon dioxide–but parts of this complex process, called photosynthesis, are hindered by a lack of raw materials and machinery. To optimize production, scientists from the University of Essex have resolved two major photosynthetic bottlenecks to boost plant productivity by 27 percent in real-world field conditions, according to a new stud

19h

Breakthrough technology purifies water using the power of sunlight

A research team, led by Australia's Monash University, has been able to transform brackish water and seawater into safe, clean drinking water in less than 30 minutes using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and sunlight.

19h

Assessing training in health disparities

This survey study described and compared the curriculum on health disparities from the perspective of program directors and perceptions of training among internal medicine residents.

19h

Emergency visits for thunderstorm-related respiratory illnesses

Researchers used atmospheric and lightning data for all counties in the continental United States from 1999 through 2012 to see if increases in emergency department visits for respiratory illnesses among older adults happen in the days surrounding thunderstorms because vulnerable groups and those with common chronic respiratory diseases may be susceptible to the atmospheric changes caused by these

19h

Clarifying consequences of COVID-19 in pregnant women, newborns, children

This Viewpoint describes the need to understand the outcomes of the COVID-19 pandemic on pregnant women, newborns and children.

19h

An ancient association? Crickets disperse seeds of early-diverging orchid Apostasia nipponica

Associate Professor SUETSUGU Kenji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science) presents evidence of the apparently unusual seed dispersal system by crickets and camel crickets in Apostasia nipponica (Apostasioideae), acknowledged as an early-diverging lineage of Orchidaceae. These findings are published on August 11 in the online edition of Evolution Letters.

19h

NASA sees compact Tropical Storm Jangmi exiting East China Sea

Tropical Storm Jangmi was exiting the East China Sea and moving toward the Sea of Japan when NASA's Aqua satellite measured the strength of the system.

19h

NASA infrared data confirms depression became Tropical Storm Elida

After Tropical Depression 09E formed near the coast of southwestern Mexico, infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite helped confirm its transition to a tropical storm.

19h

Fragmented forests: Tree cover, urban sprawl both increased in Southeast Michigan over the past 30 years

The extent of Southeast Michigan's tree canopy and its urban sprawl both increased between 1985 and 2015, according to a new University of Michigan study that used aerial photos and satellite images to map individual buildings and small patches of street trees.

19h

Nanocatalysts that remotely control chemical reactions inside living cells

The enzymes responsible for catalytic reactions in our body's biological reactions are difficult to use for diagnosis or treatment as they react only to certain molecules or have low stability. Many researchers anticipate that if these issues are ameliorated or if artificial catalysts are developed to create a synergetic effect by meeting the enzymes in the body, there will be new ways to diagnose

19h

Discovery of massless electrons in phase-change materials provides next step for future electronics

Researchers have found electrons that behave as if they have no mass, called Dirac electrons, in a compound used in rewritable discs, such as CDs and DVDs. The discovery of 'massless' electrons in this phase-change material could lead to faster electronic devices.

19h

Previously undescribed lineage of Archaea illuminates microbial evolution

In a publication in Nature Communications last Friday, NIOZ scientists Nina Dombrowski and Anja Spang and their collaboration partners describe a previously unknown phylum of aquatic Archaea that are likely dependent on partner organisms for growth while potentially being able to conserve some energy by fermentation. In contrast to initial analyses, this study shows that the new phylum is part of

19h

Previously undescribed lineage of Archaea illuminates microbial evolution

In a publication in Nature Communications last Friday, NIOZ scientists Nina Dombrowski and Anja Spang and their collaboration partners describe a previously unknown phylum of aquatic Archaea that are likely dependent on partner organisms for growth while potentially being able to conserve some energy by fermentation. In contrast to initial analyses, this study shows that the new phylum is part of

19h

Study links cannabis use during pregnancy to autism risk

Research suggests 50% greater risk for children whose mothers report using cannabis Children born to mothers who report using cannabis during pregnancy have about a 50% greater risk of developing autism, research suggests. While the team behind the work said more research was needed to unpick whether cannabis itself was behind the link, they said the results were concerning. Continue reading…

19h

Why Beirut's ammonium nitrate blast was so devastating

Nature, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02361-x The tragedy is one of the largest industrial accidents involving the explosive chemical, and it hit Lebanon amid the coronavirus pandemic and an economic crisis.

19h

Stock Cults and the Coronavirus

Let's take a few minutes to talk about biopharma stocks in general – or to be more precise, about some of the people who invest in biopharma stocks. There's a lot of weird behavior in this area, and the pandemic has amplified it. I refer specifically to the "stock cult" mentality that will be familiar to anyone who writes about the market, about drug trials and approvals, anything that touches on

19h

Imaging method highlights new role for cellular 'skeleton' protein

While your skeleton helps your body to move, fine skeleton-like filaments within your cells likewise help cellular structures to move. Now, Salk researchers have developed a new imaging method that lets them monitor a small subset of these filaments, called actin.

19h

Third breakthrough demonstrates photosynthetic hacks can boost yield, conserve water

Plants are factories that manufacture yield from light and carbon dioxide—but parts of this complex process, called photosynthesis, are hindered by a lack of raw materials and machinery. To optimize production, scientists from the University of Essex have resolved two major photosynthetic bottlenecks to boost plant productivity by 27 percent in real-world field conditions, according to a new study

19h

Multi-species bacterial communities bounce back from environmental disturbances

Scientists from Finland and Germany used bacteria as an example to study how communities consisting of several species respond to disturbances in their laboratory environment. Similar kinds of perturbations can occur in the human gut when antibiotic medication is applied, resulting, for example, in diarrhea. Also global warming and extreme weather conditions such as persistent drought periods can

19h

Crickets disperse seeds of early-diverging orchid Apostasia nipponica, suggesting an ancient association

Associate Professor Suetsugu Kenji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science) has found unusual seed dispersal systems by crickets and camel crickets in Apostasia nipponica (Apostasioideae), acknowledged as an early-diverging lineage of Orchidaceae. These findings were published on August 11 in the online edition of Evolution Letters.

19h

From nanocellulose to gold

When nanocellulose is combined with various types of metal nanoparticles, materials are formed with many new and exciting properties. They may be antibacterial, change color under pressure, or convert light to heat.

19h

Key to harmonious pet relationships: Pheromones

We are all familiar with the old adage 'fighting like cats and dogs', but a new scientific study now reveals how you can bid farewell to those animal scraps and foster a harmonious relationship between your pet pooch and feline friend.

19h

NIST's SAMURAI measures 5G communications channels precisely

Engineers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a flexible, portable measurement system to support design and repeatable laboratory testing of fifth-generation (5G) wireless communications devices with unprecedented accuracy across a wide range of signal frequencies and scenarios.

19h

Countering anti-vaccination influences from social media – with conversation

What effect, if any, do anti-vaccination social media messages have on actual vaccination behavior? A new study using big data and survey results from the 2018-19 flu season finds strong associations between regional social media messages and vaccination attitudes and behavior. But when there are negative associations between social media content and vaccination, real-life discussions with family

19h

NASA sees compact Tropical Storm Jangmi exiting East China Sea

Tropical Storm Jangmi was exiting the East China Sea and moving toward the Sea of Japan when NASA's Aqua satellite measured the strength of the system.

19h

NASA infrared data confirms depression became Tropical Storm Elida

After Tropical Depression 09E formed near the coast of southwestern Mexico, infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite helped confirm its transition to a tropical storm.

19h

Quality of care at rural hospitals may not differ as much as reported, study suggests

A Brown University School of Public Health research team found that differences in diagnosis coding practices has resulted in artificially inflated mortality rate comparisons to other hospitals.

19h

Agriculture replaces fossil fuels as largest human source of sulfur to the environment

Historically, coal-fired power plants were the largest source of reactive sulfur, a component of acid rain, to the biosphere. A new study recently publishing Aug. 10 in the journal Nature Geoscience shows that fertilizer and pesticide applications to croplands are now the most important source of sulfur to the environment.

19h

Imaging method highlights new role for cellular 'skeleton' protein

While your skeleton helps your body to move, fine skeleton-like filaments within your cells likewise help cellular structures to move. Now, Salk researchers have developed a new imaging method that lets them monitor a small subset of these filaments, called actin.

19h

Third breakthrough demonstrates photosynthetic hacks can boost yield, conserve water

Plants are factories that manufacture yield from light and carbon dioxide—but parts of this complex process, called photosynthesis, are hindered by a lack of raw materials and machinery. To optimize production, scientists from the University of Essex have resolved two major photosynthetic bottlenecks to boost plant productivity by 27 percent in real-world field conditions, according to a new study

19h

Multi-species bacterial communities bounce back from environmental disturbances

Scientists from Finland and Germany used bacteria as an example to study how communities consisting of several species respond to disturbances in their laboratory environment. Similar kinds of perturbations can occur in the human gut when antibiotic medication is applied, resulting, for example, in diarrhea. Also global warming and extreme weather conditions such as persistent drought periods can

19h

Research team helps Arc'teryx stay green and dry with next-generation water-repellent fabrics

A sustainable, non-toxic and high-performance water-repellent fabric has long been the holy grail of outdoor enthusiasts and clothing companies alike. New research from UBC Okanagan and outdoor apparel giant Arc'teryx is making that goal one step closer to reality with one of the world's first non-toxic oil and water-repellent performance textile finishes.

19h

Using air to amplify light

In a promising breakthrough for the future of communications, EPFL researchers have developed a technology that can amplify light in the latest hollow-core optical fibers.

19h

Light swirls provide insights into the quantum world

A new method uses swirls of light to enable researchers to observe previously invisible quantum states of electrons. The method was developed by physicists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and an international team of researchers. It promises to deliver new insights into electron motion, which is crucial in understanding material properties such as electrical conductivity, magn

19h

Metal organic frameworks made to act as liquids

Innovative materials called metal organic frameworks (MOFs) could become much more versatile following research that shows that they can be manipulated as liquids.

19h

Crickets disperse seeds of early-diverging orchid Apostasia nipponica, suggesting an ancient association

Associate Professor Suetsugu Kenji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science) has found unusual seed dispersal systems by crickets and camel crickets in Apostasia nipponica (Apostasioideae), acknowledged as an early-diverging lineage of Orchidaceae. These findings were published on August 11 in the online edition of Evolution Letters.

19h

Scientists develop first quantum algorithm to characterize noise across large systems

Quantum systems are notoriously prone to errors and noise. In order to overcome this and build a functional quantum computer, physicists should ideally understand the noise across an entire system. That has been out of reach until now, with Dr. Robin Harper and colleagues developing the first system-wide quantum algorithm to characterize noise.

19h

The Science Books We're Reading in Fall 2020

Is there anything better than cozying up with a great new read on a brisk autumn day? Fall into the day in the life of an astronaut, wartime science or the ever-changing brain.

19h

Mike Tyson Puts a Shark Into Tonic Immobility! | Shark Week

Stream Tyson vs Jaws on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/tyson-vs-jaws Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/Discovery https

19h

Baby Shark & Clown Fish, Bluetang

Meet and dance with Baby Shark and special friends from the ocean, Clownfish, and Bluetang! Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/Discovery https://www.instagram.co

19h

From nanocellulose to gold

When nanocellulose is combined with various types of metal nanoparticles, materials are formed with many new and exciting properties. They may be antibacterial, change color under pressure, or convert light to heat.

19h

Captive beluga whales released into Iceland sea sanctuary

Two beluga whales from a Shanghai aquarium have returned to the sea in an Icelandic sanctuary, conservationists said Monday, expressing hopes of creating a model for rehoming some 300 belugas currently in captivity.

20h

Knowledge is power: Learning more about COVID-19 can reduce your pandemic stress

A new study finds that the more people know about COVID-19, the less pandemic-related stress they have. The study also found that making plans to reduce stress was also effective for older adults – but not for adults in their 40s or younger.

20h

Army advances learning capabilities of drone swarms

Army researchers developed a reinforcement learning approach that will allow swarms of unmanned aerial and ground vehicles to optimally accomplish various missions while minimizing performance uncertainty.

20h

Aquatic robots can remove contaminant particles from water

Scientists from WMG at the University of Warwick, led by Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands, developed a 1cm by 1cm wireless artificial aquatic polyp, which can remove contaminants from water. Apart from cleaning, this soft robot could be also used in medical diagnostic devices by aiding in picking up and transporting specific cells for analysis.

20h

Captive beluga whales released into Iceland sea sanctuary

Two beluga whales from a Shanghai aquarium have returned to the sea in an Icelandic sanctuary, conservationists said Monday, expressing hopes of creating a model for rehoming some 300 belugas currently in captivity.

20h

Treasure-hunter finds 3,000-year-old hoard in Scotland

An amateur treasure-hunter has uncovered one of the most significant Bronze Age hoards ever found in Scotland, including jewelry and a 3,000-year-old sword, authorities said Monday.

20h

Land-use change disrupts wild plant pollination on a global scale

Human changes to the environment have been linked to widespread pollinator declines. New research published in Nature Communications shows that intensive land use will further decrease pollination and reproductive success of wild plants, especially of those plants that are highly specialized in their pollination. An international team of scientists led by researches from the German Center for Inte

20h

Amazon's Constellation of 3,236 Satellites Has Astronomers Very, Very Freaked Out

Amazon was approved by the Federal Communications Commission to launch 3,326 satellites as part of its planned Kuiper constellation. That's roughly 600 more satellites than the total number currently in orbit, as The New York Times reports . But who's counting? Astronomers are. And they're worried. The news comes just a week after SpaceX launched its latest batch of 57 Starlink satellites, bringi

20h

Dofter avslöjar vilken skog som är viktigast att bevara

Skogsområden så opåverkade av mänsklig aktivitet att de i stort fungerar som urskog, är livsviktiga för den biologiska mångfalden. System med doftfällor för nyckelarter, skulle snabbt kunna identifiera denna speciellt skyddsvärda skog, menar forskare vid Högskolan i Gävle. – Det finns väldigt få orörda skogar kvar, och för att vi ska få ett motståndskraftigt samhälle i framtiden måste vi rädda de

20h

Land-use change disrupts wild plant pollination on a global scale

Human changes to the environment have been linked to widespread pollinator declines. New research published in Nature Communications shows that intensive land use will further decrease pollination and reproductive success of wild plants, especially of those plants that are highly specialized in their pollination. An international team of scientists led by researches from the German Center for Inte

20h

Inside the ice giants of space

A new theoretical method paves the way to modeling the interior of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, thanks to computer simulations on the water contained within them. The tool, developed by scientists from SISSA in Trieste and the University of California at Los Angeles and recently published in Nature Communications, allows one to analyze thermal and electric processes occurring at physical con

20h

Wheat and couch grass can extract toxic metals from contaminated soils

Irina Shtangeeva is a researcher at the Department of Soil Science and Soil Ecology, St Petersburg University. She has studied the ability of wheat and couch grass to accumulate toxic substances. Both plants are capable of absorbing various chemical elements from contaminated soils. Although the plants were able to accumulate high concentrations of toxicants, they could survive under negative envi

20h

Hong Kong's Most Brazen Arrest Yet

As Hong Kong began to absorb the gravity of a new national-security law forced upon it by Beijing, Carrie Lam, Hong Kong's chief executive , told a reporter that the city's residents needn't worry. The city's Basic Law, its mini-constitution, she said last month , "clearly stated" that the "people of Hong Kong should be able to continue to enjoy the freedom of speech, freedom of press, of publica

20h

Forskere: Hedebølger kan blive en stor dræber om 80 år

Ekstrem varme vil blive en lige så stor dræber i år 2100 som smitsomme sygdomme er i dag.

20h

Discovery of massless electrons in phase-change materials provides next step for future electronics

Researchers have found electrons that behave as if they have no mass, called Dirac electrons, in a compound used in rewritable discs, such as CDs and DVDs. The discovery of "massless" electrons in this phase-change material could lead to faster electronic devices.

20h

The brains of nonpartisans are different from those who register to vote with a party

The brains of people with no political allegiance are different from those who strongly support one party, major new research shows.

20h

Previously undescribed lineage of Archaea illuminates microbial evolution

In a publication in Nature Communications last Friday, NIOZ scientists Nina Dombrowski and Anja Spang and their collaboration partners describe a previously unknown phylum of aquatic Archaea that are likely dependent on partner organisms for growth while potentially being able to conserve some energy by fermentation.

20h

Grasshopper jumping on Bloch sphere finds new quantum insights

New research at the University of Warwick has (pardon the pun) put a new spin on a mathematical analogy involving a jumping grasshopper and its ideal lawn shape. This work could help us understand the spin states of quantum-entangled particles.

20h

The CNIO pave the way for a future gene therapy to reverse pulmonary fibrosis associated with ageing

"Our results indicate that a new therapy may be developed to prevent the development of pulmonary fibrosis associated with ageing," says CNIO's Maria Blasco, principal investigator of the study* Lung tissue of patients with pulmonary fibrosis does not regenerate because the cells involved in lung generation have damaged telomeres, the ends of the chromosomes. The new study describes a gene therapy

20h

Citrus Flavoring Is Weaponized Against Insect-Borne Diseases

The E.P.A. has approved nootkatone, which is found in cedars and grapefruit. It repels ticks, mosquitoes and other dangerous bugs for hours, but is safe enough to eat.

20h

Grasshopper jumping on Bloch sphere finds new quantum insights

New research at the University of Warwick has (pardon the pun) put a new spin on a mathematical analogy involving a jumping grasshopper and its ideal lawn shape. This work could help us understand the spin states of quantum-entangled particles.

20h

Scientists reveal pheromones are key to harmonious pet relationships

We are all familiar with the old adage "fighting like cat and dog", but a new scientific study now reveals how you can bid farewell to those animal scraps and foster a harmonious relationship between your pet pooch and feline friend.

20h

BLM Supporters More Likely to Combat Hate in Videogames, Too

But our new survey found that just 20 percent of gamers say they stand up to harassment when they see it.

20h

Scientists reveal pheromones are key to harmonious pet relationships

We are all familiar with the old adage "fighting like cat and dog", but a new scientific study now reveals how you can bid farewell to those animal scraps and foster a harmonious relationship between your pet pooch and feline friend.

20h

'Morality pills' may be the US's best shot at ending the coronavirus pandemic, according to one ethicist

COVID-19 is a collective risk. It threatens everyone, and we all must cooperate to lower the chance that the coronavirus harms any one individual. Among other things, that means keeping safe social distances and wearing masks. But many people choose not to do these things, making spread of infection more likely.

20h

Understanding vacuum fluctuations in space

An international research team from Germany and France has created structures in which light fields interact with electrons so strongly that the quantum vacuum itself is significantly altered. Using extremely short bursts of light, they interrupted this coupling much faster than the timescale of a vacuum fluctuation and observed an intriguing ringing of the emitted electromagnetic field, indicatin

20h

Researchers use nanocellulose to create materials with new properties

When nanocellulose is combined with various types of metal nanoparticles, materials are formed with many new and exciting properties. They may be antibacterial, change color under pressure, or convert light to heat.

20h

The Secret to a Long, Healthy Life Is in the Genes of the Oldest Humans Alive

The first time I heard nematode worms can teach us something about human longevity, I balked at the idea. How the hell can a worm with an average lifespan of only 15 days have much in common with a human who lives decades? The answer is in their genes—especially those that encode for basic life functions, such as metabolism. Thanks to the lowly C. elegans worm, we've uncovered genes and molecular

20h

Land-use change disrupts wild plant pollination on a global scale

Human changes to the environment have been linked to widespread pollinator declines. New research published in Nature Communications shows that intensive land use will further decrease pollination and reproductive success of wild plants, especially of those plants that are highly specialized in their pollination.

20h

From nanocellulose to gold

When nanocellulose is combined with various types of metal nanoparticles, materials are formed with many new and exciting properties. They may be antibacterial, change colour under pressure, or convert light to heat. The research is published in Advanced Functional Materials.

20h

Fighting like cats and dogs?

We are all familiar with the old adage "fighting like cat and dog", but a new scientific study now reveals how you can bid farewell to those animal scraps and foster a harmonious relationship between your pet pooch and feline friend.

20h

Exact climate data from the past

Corals and cave carbonates can reveal the temperatures that prevailed at the Earth's surface at the time they formed. An international team of geoscientists led by Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany, has developed a new method that makes it possible to identify whether the composition of these deposits was exclusively controlled by temperature, or if the formation process itself exerted an addit

20h

Technology can help speed soil recovery after oil spills

After an oil spill or leak, it's important to act fast. If the oil has gotten into soil, scientists need to rapidly assess how much oil there is and how far it spread. It's a process that has always been costly and time-consuming.

20h

Artificial intelligence sheds light on membrane performance

Membrane separations have long been recognized as energy-efficient processes with a rapidly growing market. In particular, organic solvent nanofiltration (OSN) technology has shown considerable potential when applied to various industries, such as petrochemicals, pharmaceuticals and natural products. The energy consumed by these industries accounts for 10 to 15 percent of the world's entire energy

20h

Danske KOL-forskere vil finde alternativer til binyrebarkhormon

Overlæge Jens Ulrik Stæhr Jensen fra Herlev og Gentofte Hospital har fået 10 mio. kr. fra Novo Nordisk Fonden til at finde nye og bedre måder at behandle KOL på. Bevillingen er en del af Novo Nordisk Fondens store forskningslederprogram.

20h

Mouthwashes could reduce the risk of coronavirus transmission

Sars-Cov-2 viruses can be inactivated using certain commercially available mouthwashes. This was demonstrated in cell culture experiments. High viral loads can be detected in the oral cavity and throat of some Covid-19 patients. The use of mouthwashes that are effective against Sars-Cov-2 could thus help to reduce the viral load and possibly the risk of coronavirus transmission over the short term

20h

Magnesium alloy with eddy-thermal effect for novel tumor magnetic hyperthermia therapy

Magnetic hyperthermia therapy (MHT) as a noninvasive local treatment strategy is able to ablate tumors. There is still a demand to find new magnetocaloric agents with strong AMF-induced heating performance and excellent biocompatibility. The eddy thermal effect of magnesium alloy (MgA) could be employed for MHT to effectively ablate tumors was reported by scientists based in China. Considering the

20h

Inside the ice giants of space

A new theoretical method paves the way to modelling the interior of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, thanks to computer simulations on the water contained within them. The tool, developed by scientists from SISSA in Trieste and the University of California at Los Angeles, allows one to analyse thermal and electric processes occurring at physical conditions that are often impossible to reproduce

20h

Wheat and couch grass can extract toxic metals from contaminated soils

Irina Shtangeeva is a researcher at the Department of Soil Science and Soil Ecology, St Petersburg University. She has studied the ability of wheat and couch grass to accumulate toxic substances. Both plants were capable of absorbing various chemical elements from contaminated soils. Although the plants were able to accumulate high concentrations of toxicants, they could survive under negative env

20h

Miscarriage risk increases each week alcohol is used in early pregnancy

Each week a woman consumes alcohol during the first five to 10 weeks of pregnancy is associated with an incremental 8% increase in risk of miscarriage, according to a study by Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) researchers.

20h

Nanocatalysts that remotely control chemical reactions inside living cells

POSTECH professor In Su Lee's research team develops a magnetic field-induced heating 'hollow nanoreactors'.

20h

Change isn't a good thing for Japanese rheumatoid arthritis patients

Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a common complication of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that dramatically increases the risk of death. In a recent study led by Osaka University, researchers identified a genetic variant that increases the risk of ILD among Japanese RA patients, most likely by altering the expression of the RPA3 gene and triggering scarring of lung tissue. Identifying risk variants as

20h

Time-reversal of an unknown quantum state

Physicists have long sought to understand the irreversibility of the surrounding world and have credited its emergence to the time-symmetric, fundamental laws of physics. According to quantum mechanics, the final irreversibility of conceptual time reversal requires extremely intricate and implausible scenarios that are unlikely to spontaneously occur in nature. Physicists had previously shown that

21h

Region Sjælland får ny chef for Sundhedsstrategisk Planlægning

Mads Ellegaard Christensen afløser Peder Rings som direktør for Sundhedsstrategisk Planlægning i Region Sjælland.

21h

Lars Østergaard skal bidrage til coronaudredning

Ledende overlæge Lars Østergaard fra Aarhus Universitetshospital bliver en del af et ekspertpanel, der skal granske de danske myndigheders håndtering af coronaudbruddet.

21h

Restordre på hjertemedicin øger risiko for fejldosering

Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed opfordrer praktiserende læger til ekstra opmærksomhed ved dosisændringer af Digoxin

21h

SSI-notat: Frygt for superspredere stoppede åbning af nattelivet

Tirsdag kunne Ingeniøren fortælle, at SSI anbefalede at stoppe genåbningen. Nu kan begrundelsen læses i en skrivelse til politikerne.

21h

The first evidence of vector meson spin alignment in heavy-ion collisions

The ALICE collaboration is a large group of researchers from over 100 physics institutes worldwide that focuses on the study of quark-gluon plasma using data collected by the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) detector. ALICE is a heavy-ion detector designed to examine the physics of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy densities, which is part of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) p

21h

Scientists probe the role of archaea in the human microbiome

All multicellular living beings carry an unimaginably large number of microorganisms in and on their bodies. The microbiome, i.e. the totality of these microorganisms, forms a unit together with the host organism, the so-called metaorganism. This metaorganism has developed during the course of evolution by mutual exchange of its components. The interaction between the body and symbiotic microorgan

21h

Researchers discover how genome controls early human development

A team led by scientists from the University of Manchester has discovered how our genome controls the development of many of the organs critical to human life.

21h

Scientists probe the role of archaea in the human microbiome

All multicellular living beings carry an unimaginably large number of microorganisms in and on their bodies. The microbiome, i.e. the totality of these microorganisms, forms a unit together with the host organism, the so-called metaorganism. This metaorganism has developed during the course of evolution by mutual exchange of its components. The interaction between the body and symbiotic microorgan

21h

Researchers discover how genome controls early human development

A team led by scientists from the University of Manchester has discovered how our genome controls the development of many of the organs critical to human life.

21h

How maths modelling helps efforts to eradicate banana bunchy top virus, QUT study

Modelling the predicted movements of pervasive sap-sucking tiny insects before they infest banana crops has the potential to become a key tactic in the fight against a devastating virus, according to QUT research. Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) is an aphid-transmitted banana disease that has been in Australia since 1913. QUT researchers have designed a model that tracked the probability of a banan

21h

Fragmented forests: Tree cover, urban sprawl both increased in Southeast Michigan over the past 30 years

The extent of Southeast Michigan's tree canopy and its urban sprawl both increased between 1985 and 2015, according to a new University of Michigan study that used aerial photos and satellite images to map individual buildings and small patches of street trees.

21h

Tel Aviv University scientists reduce metastatic spread following tumor removal surgery

A research group from Tel Aviv University (TAU) successfully reduced metastatic spread following tumor removal surgery in colorectal cancer patients. Using a short medication treatment around the time of the surgery, the researchers were able to reduce body stress responses and physiological inflammation during this critical period, preventing the development of metastases in the years following t

21h

New tools in the fight against lethal citrus disease

Scientists are closer to gaining the upper hand on Huanglongbing, a disease that has wiped out citrus orchards across the globe. New models of the bacterium linked to the disease reveal control methods that were previously unavailable.

21h

Confused by whole grain labels on food packaging? Study finds you're not alone

Whole grain labels are confusing to consumers, according to a new study that found many made the wrong choice when asked to pick the healthier option based on product labels. The researchers, from Tufts University and NYU, say the results provide legal evidence for changes in labeling policies.

21h

Research suggests greater access to specific HIV and tuberculosis medications is needed

A specific combination of HIV and TB treatments, difficult to obtain in certain parts of the world, decreased mortality risk for patients with HIV and multidrug-resistant TB.

21h

New tools in the fight against lethal citrus disease

Scientists are closer to gaining the upper hand on a disease that has wiped out citrus orchards across the globe. New models of the bacterium linked to the disease reveal control methods that were previously unavailable.

21h

New tools in the fight against lethal citrus disease

Scientists are closer to gaining the upper hand on a disease that has wiped out citrus orchards across the globe. New models of the bacterium linked to the disease reveal control methods that were previously unavailable.

21h

Ancient sea creatures spent years crossing the ocean on rafts – we've worked out how it was possible

The English town of Lyme Regis is part of the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site. It was here in the 1830s that William Buckland, better known for the discovery of the first dinosaur, Megalosaurus, collected fossils with another pioneering palaeontologist, Mary Anning.

21h

Mesmerized by maritime marvels

Nature, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02340-2 Marine biologist Greg Rouse is elated to have been on a research cruise that discovered the world's longest creature.

21h

De novo synthesis of a wide range of nucleoside analogs using simple achiral starting materials

A team of researchers from Simon Fraser University and Merck & Co. has developed a de novo synthesis technique for creating a wide range of nucleoside analogs using simple achiral starting materials. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their technique and ways it can be used. Gavin Miller with Keele University has published a Perspective piece in the same journal i

21h

Moog Music Subharmonicon Review: A Strange but Wild Musical Escape

Moog Music's Subharmonicon is a mashup of two legendary synths that can help unblock your stifled creativity.

21h

De novo synthesis of a wide range of nucleoside analogs using simple achiral starting materials

A team of researchers from Simon Fraser University and Merck & Co. has developed a de novo synthesis technique for creating a wide range of nucleoside analogs using simple achiral starting materials. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their technique and ways it can be used. Gavin Miller with Keele University has published a Perspective piece in the same journal i

21h

Strong bonds later can't erase early trauma for baboons

When baboons experience trauma in early life, they have higher levels of stress hormones in adulthood health than their peers who don't experience trauma, even if they have strong social relationships as adults, according to a new study. Higher levels of stress hormones in adulthood could be a potential marker of poor health. For the new study, researchers examined the links between childhood adv

21h

Restaurant customers frown on automatic gratuities, particularly after good service

Automatic gratuities leave restaurant patrons with a bad taste, even when the meal and the service were excellent, new research from Washington State University indicates.

21h

Successful school instruction is digital – but not exclusively

Secondary school students perform better in natural sciences and mathematics and are more motivated when digital tools are used in instruction. However, success depends on the design of the tools used. Success levels are higher when children and young adults do not study alone and when digital instruction is accompanied by paper-based teaching materials, according to the conclusion reached by one

21h

Biodiversity may limit invasions: Lessons from lizards on Panama Canal islands

Introduced species can become invasive, damaging ecosystems and disrupting economies through explosive population growth. One mechanism underlying population expansion in invasive populations is 'enemy release', whereby the invader experiences relaxation of agonistic interactions with other species, including parasites.

21h

Globular cluster Palomar 3 probed by Russian astronomers

By conducting deep photometric and medium-resolution spectroscopic observations, Russian astronomers have investigated Palomar 3, a distant galactic globular cluster. Results of this observational campaign provide more insights into the properties of this cluster, which could be essential in improving our understanding of its origin. The study was published July 31 on arXiv.org.

21h

The Robot Scientists Are Coming. But That's Not a Bad Thing

A small but growing crop of machines is learning to design and carry out its own experiments. How will this change the future of research?

21h

Sparrows' storm stress a harbinger of climate-change impact

Sparrows show increased stress when exposed to more numerous and more severe winter storms, says a Western study that tested the songbirds' resilience to the effects of climate change.

21h

A novel strategy for using compounds as 'anti-evolution' drugs to combat antibiotic resistance

The rise of antibiotic resistance in many pathogens has been driven by the spread of a small number of strains, suggesting that some bacteria may be genetically pre-disposed to evolving resistance. Researchers at Oxford University have tested this hypothesis by quantifying differences in evolvability between pathogen strains and by searching for "potentiator" genes that accelerate the evolution of

21h

Wagyu beef passes the taste test of science

The unique flavor, texture and aroma of Australia's famous Wagyu beef can now be marketed using a world-first flavor profile developed by The University of Queensland in partnership with the Australian Agricultural Company (AACo).

21h

Dedicated clinics can 'flatten the curve' in flu pandemics

Opening clinics dedicated specifically to treating influenza can limit the number of people infected and help to "flatten the curve," or reduce the peak prevalence rate, a new study shows. While the work focused on influenza, the findings are relevant for policymakers seeking ways to reduce impacts of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. "Dedicated clinics would have less of an impact than intervention

21h

Sparrows' storm stress a harbinger of climate-change impact

Sparrows show increased stress when exposed to more numerous and more severe winter storms, says a Western study that tested the songbirds' resilience to the effects of climate change.

21h

Real-world applications for atom interferometric quantum sensors

Experts in quantum cold-atom sensors are delving deep underground in a new project aimed at harnessing quantum gravity sensing technology in harsh underground borehole environments.

21h

A novel strategy for using compounds as 'anti-evolution' drugs to combat antibiotic resistance

The rise of antibiotic resistance in many pathogens has been driven by the spread of a small number of strains, suggesting that some bacteria may be genetically pre-disposed to evolving resistance. Researchers at Oxford University have tested this hypothesis by quantifying differences in evolvability between pathogen strains and by searching for "potentiator" genes that accelerate the evolution of

21h

NASA maps Beirut blast damage

NASA's Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team, in collaboration with the Earth Observatory of Singapore, used satellite-derived synthetic aperture radar data to map the likely extent of damage from a massive Aug. 4 explosion in Beirut. Synthetic aperture radar data from space shows ground surface changes from before and after a major event like an earthquake. In this case, it is being use

21h

Wagyu beef passes the taste test of science

The unique flavor, texture and aroma of Australia's famous Wagyu beef can now be marketed using a world-first flavor profile developed by The University of Queensland in partnership with the Australian Agricultural Company (AACo).

21h

Deprived of oxygen, layers of bacteria get creative

Bacteria are found living nearly everywhere on our planet, from the inside of human intestines to the soil to deep underwater. When scientists study bacteria in the lab, they most often examine individual bacterial cells as they grow rapidly in liquid cultures. However, bacteria in nature usually exist in the form of structures called biofilms—dense populations of cells attached to each other and

21h

Deprived of oxygen, layers of bacteria get creative

Bacteria are found living nearly everywhere on our planet, from the inside of human intestines to the soil to deep underwater. When scientists study bacteria in the lab, they most often examine individual bacterial cells as they grow rapidly in liquid cultures. However, bacteria in nature usually exist in the form of structures called biofilms—dense populations of cells attached to each other and

21h

Spotted lanternfly task force brings together expertise of scientists, agencies

Since its unwelcome arrival in Pennsylvania several years ago, the spotted lanternfly has been eating away at agricultural commodities, landscapes and the commonwealth's bottom line.

21h

Eardrum implants made from pig guts could fix chronic glue ear

Glue ear, a condition caused by sticky fluid in the middle part of the ear, can burst the eardrum in severe cases, and tissue taken from pig intestines could be used to patch up the hole

21h

Using porous crystals to harvest light

Drawing inspiration from photosynthesis, KAUST researchers have developed a new spin on metal organic frameworks (MOFs) that could help solar cells to gather more energy from the Sun.

22h

Spotted lanternfly task force brings together expertise of scientists, agencies

Since its unwelcome arrival in Pennsylvania several years ago, the spotted lanternfly has been eating away at agricultural commodities, landscapes and the commonwealth's bottom line.

22h

Life after coal: The decline and rise of West Virginia coal country

In the West Virginia coalfields—on the edge of which my aunt and uncle live, and where I spent holidays and vacations as a kid—the economic mood ranges from depressed to apocalyptic. At one point, more than 100,000 West Virginians worked in the mines that produced well-paying jobs and gave people money to spend. That money spilled over into other sectors: retail, construction, and education, to na

22h

Reforming 'dad leave' is a baby step towards greater gender equality

Grattan Institute research published today shows the average 25-year-old woman who goes on to have a child can expect to earn A$2 million less by the time she is 70 than the average 25-year-old man who becomes a father. For childless women and men, the lifetime gap is about A$300,000.

22h

When English becomes the global language of education we risk losing other, often better, ways of learning

The English language in education today is all-pervasive. "Hear more English, speak more English and become more successful" has become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

22h

How maths modelling helps efforts to eradicate banana bunchy top virus

Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) is an aphid-transmitted banana disease that has been in Australia since 1913 and has been contained by biosecurity agencies to southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales. Badly affected plants will not produce fruit if left unchecked and entire plantations can become infested. BBTV cannot be cured and infected plants must be destroyed.

22h

A never-before-seen image of the coronavirus copy machine

Exactly how viruses replicate is a complex puzzle with many missing pieces. And in the age of the pandemic, solving it has become a matter of acute urgency.

22h

Sharing food aids monkey business

It may be only a shared banana in a tree, but the latest research from the University of St Andrews suggests this sharing of food between monkeys could be the equivalent of humans taking a prospective date out to dinner.

22h

Why most Aboriginal people have little say over clean energy projects planned for their land

Huge clean energy projects, such as the Asian Renewable Energy Hub in the Pilbara, Western Australia, are set to produce gigawatts of electricity over vast expanses of land in the near future.

22h

How maths modelling helps efforts to eradicate banana bunchy top virus

Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) is an aphid-transmitted banana disease that has been in Australia since 1913 and has been contained by biosecurity agencies to southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales. Badly affected plants will not produce fruit if left unchecked and entire plantations can become infested. BBTV cannot be cured and infected plants must be destroyed.

22h

A never-before-seen image of the coronavirus copy machine

Exactly how viruses replicate is a complex puzzle with many missing pieces. And in the age of the pandemic, solving it has become a matter of acute urgency.

22h

Sharing food aids monkey business

It may be only a shared banana in a tree, but the latest research from the University of St Andrews suggests this sharing of food between monkeys could be the equivalent of humans taking a prospective date out to dinner.

22h

Two-for-one energy from photons, now better than ever

In the twisting and turning of long organic molecules, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers have found a promising group of materials for tomorrow's super-efficient solar cells.

22h

Can boosting the immune system treat COVID-19?

Boosting the immune system could offer a potential treatment strategy for COVID-19, according to a new study. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to claim lives around the world, much research has focused on the immune system's role in patients who become seriously ill. A popular theory has it that the immune system gets so revved up fighting the virus that, after several days, it produces a so-ca

22h

Math shows how brain stays stable amid internal noise and a widely varying world

A new theoretical framework shows that many properties of neural connections help biological circuits produce consistent computations.

22h

Snorkeling masks for your next underwater adventure

See underwater in pools or the ocean. (Greg Rosenke via Unsplash /) Snorkeling or scuba diving should be all about taking in beautiful aquatic views, and not about water accidentally shooting into your nose, mouth, or eyes. Diving masks shield your face as you explore the depths of the ocean, allowing you to soak in all the sights through protective lenses. Whether you're a first-time diver or an

22h

Australia is cracking down on foreign interference in research. Is the system working?

Nature, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02188-6 Pioneering guidelines aren't enough to prevent overseas militaries such as China's from co-opting the country's science, say some experts.

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This ancient reptile had a super long neck to sneak up on unsuspecting fish

Researchers identify two prehistoric reptiles with "extraordinarily" long neck which would have been a burden on land but an advantage underwater, allowing the reptiles to approach their prey sneakily. (Emma Finley-Jacob/) Around 242 million years ago, a reptile with a neck three times the length of its trunk dwelled in present-day Europe and Asia. Since paleontologists first discovered the speci

22h

'Jeg er ikke forsker, men jeg optræder nu og da som en på tv'

Det her er historien om en gruppe mænd, der i årtier har forsøgt at få os alle sammen til at tvivle på effekten af klimaforandringerne.

22h

Why Wikipedia Decided to Stop Calling Fox a 'Reliable' Source

The move offered a new model for moderation. Maybe other platforms will take note.

22h

Why Do Solar Farms Kill Birds? Call in the AI Bird Watcher

Solar facilities kill tens of thousands of birds every year, and no one is quite sure why. An artificial-intelligence-powered birder is on the case.

22h

Ny behandling ska lindra cannabis-abstinens

Cannabis är den vanligaste narkotikaklassade drogen i Sverige och bedöms vara måttligt beroendeframkallande. Av de som använder drogen varje dag utvecklar ungefär en av tre ett beroende och ett avbrott kan orsaka abstinenssymtom som irritabilitet och sömnsvårigheter. Medan abstinens från heroin kan dämpas med metadon, saknas ett liknande läkemedel för cannabis. Hjälpen som erbjuds består istället

22h

23-etagers højhus på Amager: Tvivl om fundamentet

Grundejeren og entreprenørfirmaet bag næsten 90 meter højt byggeri på Amager er blevet politianmeldt.

22h

Coronakrise belaster patienter med kroniske sygdomme

Undersøgelse viser, at mange danskere med kroniske sygdomme frygter, at deres liv ikke bliver som før coronaudbruddet.

22h

Forest Fires Are Setting Chernobyl's Radiation Free

In the clear, calm, early hours of May 15, 2003, three miles west of the hulking ruins of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, Vasyl Yoschenko was bustling around a stand of Scotch pines planted 30 years earlier. The trees were spindly and closely spaced, but he was skinny enough to move easily among them, taking samples of biomass and litter. Just beyond the trees, he tinkered with the horizontal

23h

Scientists introduce Raman-activated cell sorter for high-throughput discovery of enzymes

Enzymes are molecules that catalyze metabolism. Discovering and mining enzymes, such as those producing oils or fixing carbon dioxide, have been a key mission of the biotechnology industry. However, this can be very slow and tedious.

23h

Creative block of molecular evolution: Adaptive mutations repeat themselves in tiny crustaceans of Lake Baikal

A group of scientists from Skoltech and the Institute for Information Transmission Problems of RAS (IITP RAS) showed, using Lake Baikal amphipods as an example, that parallel evolution driven by adaptations can be detected at the whole-genome level. The research was published in the Genome Biology and Evolution journal.

23h

Scientists introduce Raman-activated cell sorter for high-throughput discovery of enzymes

Enzymes are molecules that catalyze metabolism. Discovering and mining enzymes, such as those producing oils or fixing carbon dioxide, have been a key mission of the biotechnology industry. However, this can be very slow and tedious.

23h

Creative block of molecular evolution: Adaptive mutations repeat themselves in tiny crustaceans of Lake Baikal

A group of scientists from Skoltech and the Institute for Information Transmission Problems of RAS (IITP RAS) showed, using Lake Baikal amphipods as an example, that parallel evolution driven by adaptations can be detected at the whole-genome level. The research was published in the Genome Biology and Evolution journal.

23h

Image: Barred spiral galaxy NGC 4907

The barred spiral galaxy known as NGC 4907 shows its starry face from 270 million light-years away to anyone who can see it from the Northern Hemisphere. This is a new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope of the face-on galaxy, displaying its beautiful spiral arms, wound loosely around its central bright bar of stars.

23h

July 2020 set heat records for many U.S. states

It was an unusually steamy month for the country—even for July. Some states recorded their hottest July ever as others tied with previous years.

23h

Construction Process Builds Brain Circuits

A novel technique turns brain cells into circuit components — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

Bill Gates Is Still Optimistic

On the Get WIRED podcast, the philanthropist and Microsoft cofounder tackles everything from Covid-19 vaccine development to TikTok.

23h

Covid-19 Drug Research Is a Big Huge Mess

Scientists have been studying treatments for the disease for half a year. Lack of coordination and a broken system mean they still don't know very much.

23h

Field Trip's App Wants to Guide Your Next Psychedelic Journey

Field Trip offers supervised, in-clinic drug experiences to treat some mental illnesses. But if you want to keep your social distance, an app to stand watch could be the next-best thing.

23h

Forget about blame with miscarriage: its function is entirely natural

Many women blame themselves after pregnancy loss and some societies point the finger too, but fertility medicine is busting such miscarriage myths

23h

Crunch, rip, freeze or decay — how will the Universe end?

Nature, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02338-w Astrophysicist Katie Mack's book explores all the ways the cosmos could destroy itself.

23h

Audio long-read: Pluto's dark side is overflowing with secrets

Nature, Published online: 07 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02327-z Images sent back by the New Horizons spacecraft reveal much about this mysterious dwarf planet's far side and hint at the existence of a subterranean ocean.

23h

Construction Process Builds Brain Circuits

A novel technique turns brain cells into circuit components — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

Biden's Disability Plan Could Close the Equal-Pay Loophole

F or 15 years, Ross Ryan traveled an hour from his Oregon home to clean bathrooms, mop floors, and take out trash at noisy car dealerships and cavernous state buildings from 4 p.m. until midnight. His employer paid him about 60 cents per completed task—and it was legal. Ryan's employer was a sheltered workshop, a program that exclusively employs people with disabilities for less than minimum wage

23h

Dear Therapist: I Don't Want My Sister in My Bridal Party

Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My younger sister is a few years younger than I am. Growing up, I had to care for my younger sister, and tension resulted from me having to include her when playing with friends, etc., despite not wanting to.

23h

What Is MasterClass Actually Selling?

Image above, clockwise from top left : MasterClass instructors Serena Williams (who teaches tennis on the platform); Natalie Portman (acting); Gordon Ramsay (cooking); Malcolm Gladwell (writing) S ometimes an advertisement is so perfectly tailored to a cultural moment that it casts that moment into stark relief, which is how I felt upon first seeing an ad for the mega-best-selling writer James Pa

23h

Could We Force the Universe to Crash?

If we're all living in a simulation, as some have suggested, it would be a good, albeit risky, way to find out for sure — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

Amazon Is a Private Government. Congress Needs to Step Up.

At a hearing of the House's antitrust subcommittee recently, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos seemed rattled to discover that his appearance was not a public-relations exercise but a deposition. Bezos, who devoted much of his five-minute opening statement to talking about his childhood, appeared unprepared to field questions about his sprawling empire, which dominates online retail in the United States,

23h

Construction Process Builds Brain Circuits

A novel technique turns brain cells into circuit components — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Is a successful contact tracing app possible? These countries think so.

If contact tracing apps are following Gartner's famous hype cycle , it's hard to avoid the conclusion they are now firmly in the "trough of disillusionment." Initial excitement that they could be a crucial part of the arsenal against covid-19 has given way to fears it could all come to nothing, despite large investments of money and time. Country after country has seen low take-up, and in the cas

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Coronavirus Live Updates

The Trump administration is ordering schools on Native American reservations to reopen. California's chief health officer has resigned.

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Paper earns expression of concern after author blames COVID-19 restrictions for not being able to find raw data

The pandemic ate our data. A group of researchers in India whose findings in a 2015 paper evidently looked too good to be true have received an expression of concern because they claim Covid-19 restrictions have made it impossible to recover their raw data. The article, "Possible role of P-glycoprotein in the neuroprotective mechanism of … Continue reading

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How to Show Kids the Joy of Reading

Editor's Note: In the next five years, most of America's most experienced teachers will retire. The Baby Boomers are leaving behind a nation of more novice educators. In 1988, a teacher most commonly had 15 years of experience. Less than three decades later, that number had fallen to just three years leading a classroom . The Atlantic 's "On Teaching" project is crisscrossing the country to talk

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The 'Blue Shift' Will Decide the Election

A s polling places closed on November 6, 2018, the expected "blue wave" looked more like a ripple. Not only had some of the highest-profile Democratic candidates lost, but the party's gains in the House and the Senate looked smaller than anticipated. The wave, it turned out, simply hadn't crested yet. Over the ensuing weeks, as more ballots were counted, Democrats kept winning races—eventually ne

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Mauritius races to clean up oil as ship leaking fuel breaks up

Salvage crews raced against time Monday to prevent a second disastrous oil spill off the picture-perfect coastline of Mauritius, with a damaged tanker carrying thousands of tonnes of fuel at risk of splitting apart.

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In Afghanistan, a Drug Sparks Hope — and Charges of Quackery

In a June 9 press conference, the Afghan Ministry of Public Health issued a warning about a popular herbal drug for Covid-19 purveyed by one clinic: It doesn't work and may be addictive. In a country where herbal practitioners are deeply respected, people took to the streets to protest the loss of the clinic.

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Starship flyver: Se rumskibet "hoppe" 150 meter og lande blidt

Efter eksplosion og designændringer er Starship nu i live. På første test-tur holdt svejsningerne ved raptor-motorens kegleformede ophæng.

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Discovery of naturally chiral surfaces for safer pharmaceuticals

In the 1960s, the sedative thalidomide was widely popular as one of the only non-barbiturate, over-the-counter sleep-aids on the market. When doctors started noticing that it also helped alleviate morning sickness in pregnant women, many began recommending it to patients for this off-label use. What followed was a world-wide explosion in the numbers of children being born with phocomelia—shortened

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Regulated expression and function of the GABAB receptor in human pancreatic beta cell line and islets

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69758-6 Regulated expression and function of the GABA B receptor in human pancreatic beta cell line and islets

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Dynamic viscosity recovery of electrospinning solution for stabilizing elongated ultrafine polymer nanofiber by TEMPO-CNF

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69136-2

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Associations of childhood experiences with event-related potentials in adults with autism spectrum disorder

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70409-z

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Environmentally controlled magnetic nano-tweezer for living cells and extracellular matrices

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70428-w

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Hemispheric asymmetry of the dayside aurora due to imbalanced solar insolation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70018-w

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Expanding cancer predisposition genes with ultra-rare cancer-exclusive human variations

Scientific Reports, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70494-0

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Detectorist 'shaking with happiness' after Bronze Age find

A metal detectorist discovers a rare hoard of Bronze Age artefacts during an expedition near Peebles.

1d

New approach to treating osteoarthritis advances

Injections of a natural 'energy' molecule prompted regrowth of almost half of the cartilage lost with aging in knees, a new study in rodents shows.

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Brain activity during psychological stress may predict chest pain in people with heart disease

The brain's reaction to stress could be an important indicator of angina (chest pain) among people with known heart disease.The effects of psychological stress on brain activity could potentially impact the severity of angina long after the stressful event has occurred.Activity in the inferior frontal lobe of the brain and psychological stress factors explained angina severity better than traditio

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Orbital-selective Dirac fermions and extremely flat bands in frustrated kagome-lattice metal CoSn

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17462-4 The understanding of kagome bands, which are characterized by Dirac-like bands capped by a flat band, remains largely elusive. Here, Liu et al. report the observation of a flat band and Dirac bands as ideal features of kagome bands in CoSn, revealing orbital-selective character.

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Electronic correlations and flattened band in magnetic Weyl semimetal candidate Co3Sn2S2

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17234-0 How electron correlation interplays with topological states remains rarely explored. Here, the authors report flat band arising due to electron correlations in magnetic Weyl semimetal Co3Sn2S2 from a combined optical-spectroscopy and simulation study.

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Reconfigurable structured light generation in a multicore fibre amplifier

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17809-x Structured light is a valuable addition to many optical applications. Here, the authors introduce a method for producing tailorable structured light beams at the output of a multicore fiber amplifier by controlling the input to each fiber core.

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Topological flat bands in frustrated kagome lattice CoSn

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17465-1 The experimental realization of lattice-born flat bands with nontrivial topology has been elusive. Here, the authors observe topological flat bands near the Fermi level in a kagome metal CoSn, with flat bands as well as Dirac bands originating from 3d orbitals in a frustrated kagome geometry.

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Nanoscale mechanism of UO2 formation through uranium reduction by magnetite

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17795-0 In anoxic environments, soluble hexavalent uranium is reduced and immobilized, however, the underlying molecular-scale reduction mechanism remains unknown. Here, the authors find that U reduction can occur on the surface of magnetite via transient U nanowire structures which collapse into ordered UO2 nanoclust

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Developmental potential of aneuploid human embryos cultured beyond implantation

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17764-7 Aneuploidy, abnormal chromosome number, is a major cause of early pregnancy loss. Here the authors determine the extent of post-implantation development of human embryos with common aneuploidies in culture, finding developmental arrest of monosomy 21 embryos, and trophoblast hypo-proliferation in trisomy 16 em

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3D printable tough silicone double networks

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17816-y Additive manufacturing processing requirements pose restrictions on materials and joining chemically dissimilar components. Here the authors use silicone double networks that participate in orthogonal crosslinking mechanisms for independent control of the shape forming process and final mechanical properties.

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Turbulent hydrodynamics in strongly correlated Kagome metals

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17663-x Viscous electron fluids are predicted in strongly correlated systems but remain challenging to realize. Here, the authors predict enhanced effective Coulomb interaction and reduced ratio of the shear viscosity over entropy density in a Kagome metal, inferring turbulent flow of viscous electron fluids.

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Whale migration: 'Super rare' whale encounter on the Great Barrier Reef

A dive instructor has recorded his 'special moment' with a humpback whale.

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Save The Whales. Save The Tigers. Save The Tapeworms?

Scientists say parasites are important parts of ecosystems, but many are at risk of extinction. So, they're calling for a parasite conservation movement. (Image credit: Chelsea Wood)

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On the Shores of Cape Cod, Where the Oyster Is Their World

Pollution, development and overharvesting have greatly diminished America's natural oyster habitat. Aquaculture and adaptable farmers have changed the game.

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