Search Posts

Nyheder2020august11

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS?
Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

Kæmpe stjerneskuds-show i aften og nat: Sådan ser du hundredvis af ildkugler

Holder vejrudsigten, kan du se både store og små stjerneskud.

1h

Russia's fast-track coronavirus vaccine draws outrage over safety

Nature, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02386-2 The immunization could be dangerous because it hasn't been tested in large trials, say researchers.

1h

MSG promotes significant sodium reduction and enjoyment of better-for-you foods, according to new study

A new study published in the Journal of Food Science suggests monosodium glutamate (MSG) can be used to significantly reduce sodium while also promoting the enjoyment of better-for-you foods like grains and vegetables.

4h

LATEST

Primate voice boxes are evolving at rapid pace

Scientists have discovered that the larynx, or voice box, of primates is significantly larger relative to body size, has greater variation, and is under faster rates of evolution than in other mammals.

2min

Primate voice boxes are evolving at rapid pace

Scientists have discovered that the larynx, or voice box, of primates is significantly larger relative to body size, has greater variation, and is under faster rates of evolution than in other mammals.

5min

Study: Machine learning can predict market behavior

Machine learning can assess the effectiveness of mathematical tools used to predict the movements of financial markets, according to new Cornell research based on the largest dataset ever used in this area.

19min

Russia Approves Coronavirus Vaccine Before Completing Tests

The country became the first in the world to approve a possible vaccine against the virus, despite warnings from the global authorities against cutting corners.

20min

Daily briefing: Russia approves 'reckless' coronavirus vaccine

Nature, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02392-4 Scientists say the world's first coronavirus vaccine approved for widespread use is dangerously rushed. Plus: how neuroscientists are investigating animals' emotions and desires.

22min

The 14 Least and Most Effective Kinds of Masks: Ranked! By Scientists!

A team of Duke University researchers figured out a simple, cheap way to test the effectiveness of masks in curbing the spread of the coronavirus. And they ranked the best (and worst) of them. Spoiler alert: You may wanna ditch that neck gaiter. Also, your bandanna. The researchers found that wearing a neck gaiter or bandanna might actually end up being worse than wearing no mask at all, as the W

25min

Watch: Simple test shows masks reduce droplet spray

A simple, low-cost technique shows visual proof that face masks are effective in reducing droplet emissions during normal wear. Eric Westman was one of the first champions of masking as a means to curtail the spread of coronavirus, working with a local non-profit to provide free masks to at-risk and under-served populations in the greater Durham, NC community. But Westman, a physician at Duke Uni

26min

Great Whites Surround Shark Cage! | Shark Week

Stream Abandoned Waters on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/abandoned-waters Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/Discovery

31min

AI-Generated Sound Effects Are Now Fooling Human Ears

Turing Test If you'll permit us to spoil a little bit of movie magic, many of the sound effects you hear in film and TV are actually recreated and edited in later by Foley artists. Now, researchers are attempting to create sound effect-generating artificial intelligence to see if they can do their jobs well enough to fool the general population. In a recent study, a small cohort of participants f

32min

Research exposes new vulnerability for SARS-CoV-2

Using nanometer-level simulations, researchers have discovered a positively charged site (known as the polybasic cleavage site) located 10 nanometers from the actual binding site on the spike protein. The positively charged site allows strong bonding between the virus protein and the negatively charged human-cell receptors.

33min

End the Mars Monopoly

Paul Byrne loves Mars. He wrote his doctoral thesis and several research papers about the planet. Most of his graduate students study Mars. And yet, earlier this year, he posed this question on Twitter: "If you could end the pandemic by destroying one of the planets, which one would you choose and why would it be Mars?" What does Byrne, a planetary scientist at North Carolina State University, ha

37min

COMBAT study preliminary results show response of 32% in treatment of pancreatic tumors

Working with an international team of researchers, HonorHealth Research Institute and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, were instrumental in one of the first clinical trials showing how pancreatic cancer patients can benefit from immunotherapy, according to a four-year study published in a premier scientific journal, Nature Medicine.

40min

The Guardian view on artificial intelligence's revolution: learning but not as we know it | Editorial

GPT-3, the software behind the world's best non-human writer, is a giant step forward for machines. What about humanity? Bosses don't often play down their products. Sam Altman, the CEO of artificial intelligence company OpenAI, did just that when people went gaga over his company's latest software: the Generative Pretrained Transformer 3 (GPT-3). For some, GPT-3 represented a moment in which one

44min

Study: Young Vapers Far More Likely to be Diagnosed With COVID-19

According to a new Stanford study published today in the J ournal of Adolescent Health , young adults who vape are very more likely to be diagnosed with COVID-19 than those who don't. The researchers found that young adults aged 13 to 24 who use e-cigarette products are five times more likely to be diagnosed with COVID-19 than other non-vaping young adults. Those who vape and also smoke cigarette

46min

Research exposes new vulnerability for SARS-CoV-2

Using nanometer-level simulations, researchers have discovered a positively charged site (known as the polybasic cleavage site) located 10 nanometers from the actual binding site on the spike protein. The positively charged site allows strong bonding between the virus protein and the negatively charged human-cell receptors.

54min

Pasteurization inactivates COVID-19 virus in human milk: new research

A new study has confirmed what researchers already suspected to be the case: heat inactivates SARS-CoV-2 in human milk.

54min

Most close relatives of birds neared the potential for powered flight but few crossed its thresholds

New research has resulted in an updated evolutionary tree of early birds and their closest relatives to reconstruct powered flight potential, showing it evolved at least three times. Many ancestors of the closest bird relatives neared the thresholds of powered flight potential, suggesting broad experimentation with wing-assisted locomotion before flight evolved.

54min

Gluten in wheat: What has changed during 120 years of breeding?

In recent years, the number of people affected by celiac disease, wheat allergy or gluten or wheat sensitivity has risen sharply. But why is this the case? Could it be that modern wheat varieties contain more immunoreactive protein than in the past? A new study is helping to answer this question.

54min

New method to determine the origin of stardust in meteorites

Scientists have made a key discovery thanks to stardust found in meteorites, shedding light on the origin of crucial chemical elements.

54min

'A Smoking Gun': Infectious Coronavirus Retrieved From Hospital Air

Airborne virus plays a significant role in community transmission, many experts believe. A new study fills in the missing piece: Floating virus can infect cells.

1h

Researchers developing first oral anthrax vaccine for livestock, wildlife

There may soon be a new weapon in the centuries-old battle against anthrax in wildlife thanks to groundbreaking work at the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVMBS).

1h

Severe flooding displaces scores of thousands in Somalia

Severe flooding continues to displace thousands of people in Somalia.

1h

Antibody therapies could be a bridge to a coronavirus vaccine — but will the world benefit?

Nature, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02360-y Monoclonal antibodies are complex and expensive to produce, meaning poor countries might be priced out.

1h

In the Bird World, It Takes Big Brains or Big Guts to Survive in Extremes

An ecologist brings his background to bear on bird brains.

1h

Researchers developing first oral anthrax vaccine for livestock, wildlife

There may soon be a new weapon in the centuries-old battle against anthrax in wildlife thanks to groundbreaking work at the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVMBS).

1h

Long-term risks of joint implants

Using highly complex analytical techniques, a group of researchers were able to observe in detail how different metals are released from joint implants and accumulate in the surrounding bone tissue. Findings showed a steady release of metals from various implant components. In contrast to previous assumptions, this was not related to the degree of mechanical stress involved.

1h

Infographic: What is ME/CFS?

The COVID-19 pandemic is sparking renewed efforts to study the underlying causes of this complex, debilitating disease, which might be triggered by the novel coronavirus.

1h

How a Fruit in Your Garden Gets Its Shiny Blue Color

Slabs of fat help give Viburnum tinus its gleam.

1h

Long-term risks of joint implants

Using highly complex analytical techniques, a group of researchers were able to observe in detail how different metals are released from joint implants and accumulate in the surrounding bone tissue. Findings showed a steady release of metals from various implant components. In contrast to previous assumptions, this was not related to the degree of mechanical stress involved.

1h

NASA's planet Hunter completes its primary mission

NASA's TESS has completed its primary mission, imaging about 75% of the starry sky during a two-year-long survey. TESS has found 66 new planets, nearly 2,100 candidates, and much more.

1h

NASA-NOAA satellite night-time animation shows intensification of hurricane Elida

A new animation of night-time imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed how the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Elida transformed into a hurricane over a three-day period.

1h

Ultraviolet communication to transform Army networks

Of ever-increasing concern for operating a tactical communications network is the possibility that a sophisticated adversary may detect friendly transmissions. Army researchers developed an analysis framework that enables the rigorous study of the detectability of ultraviolet communication systems, providing the insights needed to deliver the requirements of future, more secure Army networks.

1h

'Insect apocalypse' may not be happening in US

Scientists have been warning about an 'insect apocalypse' in recent years, noting sharp declines in specific areas—particularly in Europe. A new study shows these warnings may have been exaggerated and are not representative of what's happening to insects on a larger scale.

1h

Physicists cast doubt on neutrino theory

University of Cincinnati physicists, as part of an international research team, are raising doubts about the existence of an exotic subatomic particle that failed to show up in twin experiments.

1h

Texas A&M researchers developing first oral anthrax vaccine for livestock, wildlife

There may soon be a new weapon in the centuries-old battle against anthrax in wildlife thanks to groundbreaking work at the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences.

1h

'Insect apocalypse' may not be happening in US

Scientists have been warning about an 'insect apocalypse' in recent years, noting sharp declines in specific areas—particularly in Europe. A new study shows these warnings may have been exaggerated and are not representative of what's happening to insects on a larger scale.

1h

Researchers find clues to clarify why cohesine has a role in cancer and cardiac development

Ana Losada, from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), is the scientist who identified cohesin in vertebrates, a protein that is essential in cell division. Losada has studied cohesin since she identified it in vertebrates in 1998, at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York. "It is fascinating," she says. "Now we know that cohesin plays a role in several types of cancer, and a

1h

Protein uses two antiviral strategies to ward off infections

To protect humans against infection, a protein called MARCH8 tags the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) for destruction while it merely holds HIV hostage, a new study in eLife shows.

1h

Recipe for success: Interaction proteomics become a household item

Proteins in human cells do not function in isolation and their interactions with other proteins define their cellular functions. Therefore, detailed understanding of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is the key for deciphering regulation of cellular networks and pathways, in both health and disease.

1h

Modelling parasitic worm metabolism suggests strategy for developing new drugs against infection

Scientists have revealed a way to eradicate parasitic worms by stopping them from using alternative metabolism pathways provided by bacteria that live within them, according to new findings published today in eLife.

1h

Coronavirus lockdown lessons from single-parent scientists

Nature, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02387-1 Researchers share tips on how to juggle career obligations alongside childcare and home-schooling.

1h

Research exposes new vulnerability for SARS-CoV-2

Northwestern University researchers have uncovered a new vulnerability in the novel coronavirus' infamous spike protein—illuminating a relatively simple, potential treatment pathway.

1h

Researchers find clues to clarify why cohesine has a role in cancer and cardiac development

Ana Losada, from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), is the scientist who identified cohesin in vertebrates, a protein that is essential in cell division. Losada has studied cohesin since she identified it in vertebrates in 1998, at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York. "It is fascinating," she says. "Now we know that cohesin plays a role in several types of cancer, and a

1h

Research finds TSA may have missed thousands of firearms at checkpoints in 2016-2018

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has reported that it found 4,432 firearms in carry-on baggage at airport security checkpoints in 2019, and more than 20,000 firearms since 2014. New research published in the INFORMS Journal on Applied Analytics suggests that they could have found even more.

1h

NASA's planet Hunter completes its primary mission

On July 4, NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) finished its primary mission, imaging about 75% of the starry sky as part of a two-year-long survey. In capturing this giant mosaic, TESS has found 66 new exoplanets, or worlds beyond our solar system, as well as nearly 2,100 candidates astronomers are working to confirm.

1h

Protein uses two antiviral strategies to ward off infections

To protect humans against infection, a protein called MARCH8 tags the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) for destruction while it merely holds HIV hostage, a new study in eLife shows.

1h

Recipe for success: Interaction proteomics become a household item

Proteins in human cells do not function in isolation and their interactions with other proteins define their cellular functions. Therefore, detailed understanding of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is the key for deciphering regulation of cellular networks and pathways, in both health and disease.

1h

NASA finds a wispy, wind-sheared Tropical Depression 06W

NASA's Terra satellite revealed that a wispy looking Tropical Depression 06W in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean was being battered by wind shear. That wind shear is not expected to wane and the storm is expected to weaken.

1h

Investigating a thermal challenge for MOFs

To the naked eye, metal organic frameworks (MOFs) look a little like sand. But if you zoom in, you will see that each grain looks and acts more like a sponge—and serves a similar purpose. MOFs are used to absorb and hold gases, which is useful when trying to filter toxic gases out of the air or as a way to store fuel for natural gas- or hydrogen gas-powered engines.

1h

Car passengers can reduce pollution risk by closing windows and changing route

Drivers and passengers can inhale significantly lower levels of air pollution by setting their vehicle's ventilation systems more effectively and taking a 'cleaner' route to their destination, a new study reveals.

1h

NASA finds Jangmi now an Extra-Tropical Storm

NASA's Aqua satellite obtained a visible image of Tropical Storm Jangmi after it transitioned into an extra-tropical storm.

1h

A new way to fabricate MXene films that block electromagnetic interference

The proliferation and miniaturization of electronics in devices, wearables medical implants and other applications has made technologies for blocking electromagnetic interference (EMI) especially important, while making their implementation more challenging. While EMI can cause disruptions in communication in critical applications, resulting in potentially disastrous consequences, traditional EMI

1h

Modelling parasitic worm metabolism suggests strategy for developing new drugs against infection

Scientists have revealed a way to eradicate parasitic worms by stopping them from using alternative metabolism pathways provided by bacteria that live within them, according to new findings published today in eLife.

1h

When It Comes to Real Estate Investing, Don't Play by the Old Rules

For a long time, when it came to building wealth through real estate investing , there were two different sets of rules. There was the set of rules that regular people had to play by. And then there was the set of rules that the one percent had to play by. However, thanks to new financial technologies and changing SEC regulations, things are finally starting to change. Today, cutting edge online

1h

AI mimics the way doctors think to make better medical diagnoses

Most medical AI systems make treatment recommendations based on correlations between symptoms and illnesses – a new AI system uses causation instead, like doctors do

1h

Ordinary bricks laced with conductive fibres can store energy

Regular bricks can be turned into energy storage devices through a process that uses their red pigment to create a network of conductive fibres inside the bricks

1h

What Ever Happened to the Gospel of Jesus's Wife?

At a September 2012 academic conference in Rome, Karen King, a historian at Harvard Divinity School, made a major announcement. She had discovered a fragment of papyrus that bore a shocking phrase: "Jesus said to them, My wife." If the scrap was authentic, it had the potential to upend centuries of Roman Catholic tradition. The journalist Ariel Sabar covered King's 2012 presentation for Smithsoni

1h

Quantum particles timed as they tunnel through a solid

Quantum particles can tunnel through seemingly impassable barriers, popping up on the other side. Quantum tunneling is not a new discovery, but there's a lot that's unknown about it. By super-cooling rubidium particles, researchers use their spinning as a magnetic timer. When it comes to weird behavior, there's nothing quite like the quantum world. On top of that world-class head scratcher entang

1h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Human cerebellum and neocortex The folded cerebellar surface (Purkinje cell layer) cut through the right hemisphere (inside is white). The coexpansion of the brain's neocortex and cerebellum is a defining feature of human evolution. Much smaller than the cerebrum, the human cerebellar cortex contains so many small and tightly packed…

1h

When DNA gets in the way: A cautionary note for DNA contamination in extracellular RNA-seq studies [Biological Sciences]

With great interest, we read the paper by Zhou et al. (1) describing a methodology that enables extracellular RNA sequencing (exRNA-seq) from extremely low input (Small Input Liquid Volume Extracellular RNA Sequencing [SILVER-seq]). We were intrigued by the high number of detected genes compared to our previous studies (2, 3)…

1h

Reply to Verwilt et al.: Experimental evidence against DNA contamination in SILVER-seq [Biological Sciences]

To evaluate any possible DNA contamination in Small Input Liquid Volume Extracellular RNA Sequencing (SILVER-seq), we carried out three types of tests. First, we tested the effectiveness of SILVER-seq's DNase treatment step. Without DNase treatment, five of the five tested serum samples exhibited detectable cell-free DNA (cfDNA; Fig. 1A). After…

1h

Profile of Paul E. Turner [Profile]

"There is a lot of power in addressing general questions in biology using the smallest inhabitants of the planet," says Paul E. Turner, the Rachel Carson Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University. Conducting interdisciplinary and experimental evolution studies of microbes, Turner and his colleagues elucidate virus evolution…

1h

Profile of Amy N. Finkelstein [Profile]

"It is a very exciting time to be an economist," says Amy Finkelstein, a professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) who was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2018. "Economics has become a rigorous science, combining theory and data to better understand how the…

1h

Double threshold behavior for breakup of liquid sheets [Commentary]

When being outside in nature in the presence of cold, windy, and rainy weather, most of us will have wondered: How do birds keep themselves warm? Not only does the wind imply a thinner thermal boundary layer over bodies, favoring heat loss, but, in addition, the impacting raindrops add considerably…

1h

Heterogeneous folding and stretched kinetics [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

It has been over half a century since Anfinsen et al. (1) outlined in a series of papers their groundbreaking discovery that the amino acid sequence of a globular protein determines its native structure. This hypothesis laid the foundation for a thermodynamic view of protein folding, where the native state…

1h

In vivo observation of peroxiredoxins oligomerization dynamics [Biochemistry]

Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are the most common and widely distributed peroxidases found in nature. While they are diverse in sequence and quaternary structure, they all share a common theme in their catalytic mechanism: the peroxidatic cysteine (CP) reacts with hydroperoxides to form a sulfenic acid, which is frequently reduced back through…

1h

Seasonal climate change and marmot demography [Population Biology]

Seasons strongly influence the life cycles of many species on Earth, and it is therefore not surprising that some of the best evidence we have of the ecological response to recent climate change comes from studies of phenology, the timing of seasonal events (1). We know, however, less about the…

1h

Polygenic inheritance, GWAS, polygenic risk scores, and the search for functional variants [Genetics]

The reconciliation between Mendelian inheritance of discrete traits and the genetically based correlation between relatives for quantitative traits was Fisher's infinitesimal model of a large number of genetic variants, each with very small effects, whose causal effects could not be individually identified. The development of genome-wide genetic association studies (GWAS)…

1h

When possible, report a Fisher-exact P value and display its underlying null randomization distribution [Applied Biological Sciences]

In randomized experiments, Fisher-exact P values are available and should be used to help evaluate results rather than the more commonly reported asymptotic P values. One reason is that using the latter can effectively alter the question being addressed by including irrelevant distributional assumptions. The Fisherian statistical framework, proposed in…

1h

Bacterial synthesis of C3-C5 diols via extending amino acid catabolism [Applied Biological Sciences]

Amino acids are naturally occurring and structurally diverse metabolites in biological system, whose potentials for chemical expansion, however, have not been fully explored. Here, we devise a metabolic platform capable of producing industrially important C3-C5 diols from amino acids. The presented platform combines the natural catabolism of charged amino acids…

1h

Atomic-scale observations of electrical and mechanical manipulation of topological polar flux closure [Applied Physical Sciences]

The ability to controllably manipulate complex topological polar configurations such as polar flux-closures via external stimuli may allow the construction of new electromechanical and nanoelectronic devices. Here, using atomically resolved in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy, we find that the polar flux-closures in PbTiO3/SrTiO3 superlattice films are mobile and can…

1h

Hydrogels as dynamic memory with forgetting ability [Applied Physical Sciences]

The memory of our brain, stored in soft matter, is dynamic, and it forgets spontaneously to filter unimportant information. By contrast, the existing manmade memory, made from hard materials, is static, and it does not forget without external stimuli. Here we propose a principle for developing dynamic memory from soft…

1h

The unusual structure of Ruminococcin C1 antimicrobial peptide confers clinical properties [Biochemistry]

The emergence of superbugs developing resistance to antibiotics and the resurgence of microbial infections have led scientists to start an antimicrobial arms race. In this context, we have previously identified an active RiPP, the Ruminococcin C1, naturally produced by Ruminococcus gnavus E1, a symbiont of the healthy human intestinal microbiota….

1h

Mechanistic basis of substrate-O2 coupling within a chitin-active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase: An integrated NMR/EPR study [Biochemistry]

Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) have a unique ability to activate molecular oxygen for subsequent oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds. To provide insight into the mode of action of these industrially important enzymes, we have performed an integrated NMR/electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study into the detailed aspects of an AA10 LPMO–substrate…

1h

Aggresomal sequestration and STUB1-mediated ubiquitylation during mammalian proteaphagy of inhibited proteasomes [Biochemistry]

The 26S proteasome, a self-compartmentalized protease complex, plays a crucial role in protein quality control. Multiple levels of regulatory systems modulate proteasomal activity for substrate hydrolysis. However, the destruction mechanism of mammalian proteasomes is poorly understood. We found that inhibited proteasomes are sequestered into the insoluble aggresome via HDAC6- and…

1h

Protein nanoribbons template enamel mineralization [Biochemistry]

As the hardest tissue formed by vertebrates, enamel represents nature's engineering masterpiece with complex organizations of fibrous apatite crystals at the nanometer scale. Supramolecular assemblies of enamel matrix proteins (EMPs) play a key role as the structural scaffolds for regulating mineral morphology during enamel development. However, to achieve maximum tissue…

1h

Combined metabolome and transcriptome analysis reveals key components of complete desiccation tolerance in an anhydrobiotic insect [Biochemistry]

Some organisms have evolved a survival strategy to withstand severe dehydration in an ametabolic state, called anhydrobiosis. The only known example of anhydrobiosis among insects is observed in larvae of the chironomid Polypedilum vanderplanki. Recent studies have led to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying anhydrobiosis and the…

1h

Cumulative mechanism of several major imatinib-resistant mutations in Abl kinase [Biochemistry]

Despite the outstanding success of the cancer drug imatinib, one obstacle in prolonged treatment is the emergence of resistance mutations within the kinase domain of its target, Abl. We noticed that many patient-resistance mutations occur in the dynamic hot spots recently identified to be responsible for imatinib's high selectivity toward…

1h

Flow-accelerated platelet biogenesis is due to an elasto-hydrodynamic instability [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Blood platelets are formed by fragmentation of long membrane extensions from bone marrow megakaryocytes in the blood flow. Using lattice-Boltzmann/immersed boundary simulations we propose a biological Rayleigh–Plateau instability as the biophysical mechanism behind this fragmentation process. This instability is akin to the surface tension-induced breakup of a liquid jet but…

1h

Unroofing site-specific {alpha}-synuclein-lipid interactions at the plasma membrane [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Parkinson's disease is associated with α-synuclein (α-syn), a cytosolic protein enriched in presynaptic terminals. The biological function of α-syn remains elusive; however, increasing evidence suggests that the protein is involved in the regulation of synaptic vesicle fusion, signifying the importance of α-syn–lipid interactions. We show that α-syn preferentially binds to…

1h

Rational design to control the trade-off between receptor affinity and cooperativity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cooperativity enhances the responsiveness of biomolecular receptors to small changes in the concentration of their target ligand, albeit with a concomitant reduction in affinity. The binding midpoint of a two-site receptor with a Hill coefficient of 1.9, for example, must be at least 19 times higher than the dissociation constant…

1h

A structural framework for unidirectional transport by a bacterial ABC exporter [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter of mitochondria (Atm1) mediates iron homeostasis in eukaryotes, while the prokaryotic homolog from Novosphingobium aromaticivorans (NaAtm1) can export glutathione derivatives and confer protection against heavy-metal toxicity. To establish the structural framework underlying the NaAtm1 transport mechanism, we determined eight structures by X-ray crystallo

1h

Molecular basis of the selective processing of short mRNA substrates by the DcpS mRNA decapping enzyme [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The 5′ messenger RNA (mRNA) cap structure enhances translation and protects the transcript against exonucleolytic degradation. During mRNA turnover, this cap is removed from the mRNA. This decapping step is catalyzed by the Scavenger Decapping Enzyme (DcpS), in case the mRNA has been exonucleolyticly shortened from the 3′ end by…

1h

The human cerebellum has almost 80% of the surface area of the neocortex [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The surface of the human cerebellar cortex is much more tightly folded than the cerebral cortex. It was computationally reconstructed for the first time to the level of all individual folia from multicontrast high-resolution postmortem MRI scans. Its total shrinkage-corrected surface area (1,590 cm2) was larger than expected or previously…

1h

InsP7 is a small-molecule regulator of NUDT3-mediated mRNA decapping and processing-body dynamics [Cell Biology]

Regulation of enzymatic 5′ decapping of messenger RNA (mRNA), which normally commits transcripts to their destruction, has the capacity to dynamically reshape the transcriptome. For example, protection from 5′ decapping promotes accumulation of mRNAs into processing (P) bodies—membraneless, biomolecular condensates. Such compartmentalization of mRNAs temporarily removes them from the translatable.

1h

Regulation of myonuclear positioning and muscle function by the skeletal muscle-specific CIP protein [Cell Biology]

The appropriate arrangement of myonuclei within skeletal muscle myofibers is of critical importance for normal muscle function, and improper myonuclear localization has been linked to a variety of skeletal muscle diseases, such as centronuclear myopathy and muscular dystrophies. However, the molecules that govern myonuclear positioning remain elusive. Here, we report…

1h

Mitochondria-lysosome contacts regulate mitochondrial Ca2+ dynamics via lysosomal TRPML1 [Cell Biology]

Mitochondria and lysosomes are critical for cellular homeostasis, and dysfunction of both organelles has been implicated in numerous diseases. Recently, interorganelle contacts between mitochondria and lysosomes were identified and found to regulate mitochondrial dynamics. However, whether mitochondria–lysosome contacts serve additional functions by facilitating the direct transfer of metabolites

1h

Cxcl9l and Cxcr3.2 regulate recruitment of osteoclast progenitors to bone matrix in a medaka osteoporosis model [Cell Biology]

Bone homeostasis requires continuous remodeling of bone matrix to maintain structural integrity. This involves extensive communication between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts to orchestrate balanced progenitor cell recruitment and activation. Only a few mediators controlling progenitor activation are known to date and have been targeted for intervention of bone disorders…

1h

The optic nerve lamina region is a neural progenitor cell niche [Developmental Biology]

Retinal ganglion cell axons forming the optic nerve (ON) emerge unmyelinated from the eye and become myelinated after passage through the optic nerve lamina region (ONLR), a transitional area containing a vascular plexus. The ONLR has a number of unusual characteristics: it inhibits intraocular myelination, enables postnatal ON myelination of…

1h

The esophageal gland mediates host immune evasion by the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni [Developmental Biology]

Schistosomes are parasitic flatworms that cause schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease affecting over 200 million people. Schistosomes develop multiple body plans while navigating their complex life cycle, which involves two different hosts: a mammalian definitive host and a molluscan intermediate host. Their survival and propagation depend upon proliferation and differentiation…

1h

Ancestral roles of atypical cadherins in planar cell polarity [Developmental Biology]

Fat, Fat-like, and Dachsous family cadherins are giant proteins that regulate planar cell polarity (PCP) and cell adhesion in bilaterians. Their evolutionary origin can be traced back to prebilaterian species, but their ancestral function(s) are unknown. We identified Fat-like and Dachsous cadherins in Hydra, a member of phylum Cnidaria a…

1h

News Feature: Finding a vaccine for misinformation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

With deliberate deception a growing threat online, social scientists are devising ways to fight back with "cognitive inoculations" In early March, after a wave of coronavirus cases struck a Muslim congregation in India, the hashtag #CoronaJihad went viral on Indian Twitter, and Islamophobic messages began to surge on social media….

1h

Seismic refraction tracks porosity generation and possible CO2 production at depth under a headwater catchment [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

In weathered bedrock aquifers, groundwater is stored in pores and fractures that open as rocks are exhumed and minerals interact with meteoric fluids. Little is known about this storage because geochemical and geophysical observations are limited to pits, boreholes, or outcrops or to inferences based on indirect measurements between these…

1h

The hemispheric contrast in cloud microphysical properties constrains aerosol forcing [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The change in planetary albedo due to aerosol−cloud interactions during the industrial era is the leading source of uncertainty in inferring Earth's climate sensitivity to increased greenhouse gases from the historical record. The variable that controls aerosol−cloud interactions in warm clouds is droplet number concentration. Global climate models demonstrate that…

1h

Randomized trial shows healthcare payment reform has equal-sized spillover effects on patients not targeted by reform [Economic Sciences]

Changes in the way health insurers pay healthcare providers may not only directly affect the insurer's patients but may also affect patients covered by other insurers. We provide evidence of such spillovers in the context of a nationwide Medicare bundled payment reform that was implemented in some areas of the…

1h

Thinner biological tissues induce leaflet flutter in aortic heart valve replacements [Engineering]

Valvular heart disease has recently become an increasing public health concern due to the high prevalence of valve degeneration in aging populations. For patients with severely impacted aortic valves that require replacement, catheter-based bioprosthetic valve deployment offers a minimally invasive treatment option that eliminates many of the risks associated with…

1h

Noninvasive wearable electroactive pharmaceutical monitoring for personalized therapeutics [Engineering]

To achieve the mission of personalized medicine, centering on delivering the right drug to the right patient at the right dose, therapeutic drug monitoring solutions are necessary. In that regard, wearable biosensing technologies, capable of tracking drug pharmacokinetics in noninvasively retrievable biofluids (e.g., sweat), play a critical role, because they…

1h

Overcoming Rayleigh-Plateau instabilities: Stabilizing and destabilizing liquid-metal streams via electrochemical oxidation [Engineering]

Liquids typically form droplets when exiting a nozzle. Jets––cylindrical streams of fluid—can form transiently at higher fluid velocities, yet interfacial tension rapidly drives jet breakup into droplets via the Rayleigh–Plateau instability. Liquid metal is an unlikely candidate to form stable jets since it has enormous interfacial tension and low viscosity….

1h

Temporal changes guided by mesenchymal stem cells on a 3D microgel platform enhance angiogenesis in vivo at a low-cell dose [Engineering]

Therapeutic factors secreted by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) promote angiogenesis in vivo. However, delivery of MSCs in the absence of a cytoprotective environment offers limited efficacy due to low cell retention, poor graft survival, and the nonmaintenance of a physiologically relevant dose of growth factors at the injury site. The…

1h

Targeting nanoparticles to the brain by exploiting the blood-brain barrier impermeability to selectively label the brain endothelium [Engineering]

Current strategies to direct therapy-loaded nanoparticles to the brain rely on functionalizing nanoparticles with ligands which bind target proteins associated with the blood–brain barrier (BBB). However, such strategies have significant brain-specificity limitations, as target proteins are not exclusively expressed at the brain microvasculature. Therefore, novel strategies which exploit alternati

1h

COVID-19 lockdowns cause global air pollution declines [Environmental Sciences]

The lockdown response to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused an unprecedented reduction in global economic and transport activity. We test the hypothesis that this has reduced tropospheric and ground-level air pollution concentrations, using satellite data and a network of >10,000 air quality stations. After accounting for the effects of…

1h

Hedgehog signaling is necessary and sufficient to mediate craniofacial plasticity in teleosts [Evolution]

Phenotypic plasticity, the ability of a single genotype to produce multiple phenotypes under different environmental conditions, is critical for the origins and maintenance of biodiversity; however, the genetic mechanisms underlying plasticity as well as how variation in those mechanisms can drive evolutionary change remain poorly understood. Here, we examine the…

1h

Co-option of the lineage-specific LAVA retrotransposon in the gibbon genome [Evolution]

Co-option of transposable elements (TEs) to become part of existing or new enhancers is an important mechanism for evolution of gene regulation. However, contributions of lineage-specific TE insertions to recent regulatory adaptations remain poorly understood. Gibbons present a suitable model to study these contributions as they have evolved a lineage-specific…

1h

A hierarchical Bayesian mixture model for inferring the expression state of genes in transcriptomes [Evolution]

Transcriptomes are key to understanding the relationship between genotype and phenotype. The ability to infer the expression state (active or inactive) of genes in the transcriptome offers unique benefits for addressing this issue. For example, qualitative changes in gene expression may underly the origin of novel phenotypes, and expression states…

1h

Spatial and morphological reorganization of endosymbiosis during metamorphosis accommodates adult metabolic requirements in a weevil [Evolution]

Bacterial intracellular symbiosis (endosymbiosis) is widespread in nature and impacts many biological processes. In holometabolous symbiotic insects, metamorphosis entails a complete and abrupt internal reorganization that creates a constraint for endosymbiont transmission from larvae to adults. To assess how endosymbiosis copes—and potentially evolves—throughout this major host-tissue reorganizat

1h

DNA methylation enables transposable element-driven genome expansion [Genetics]

Multicellular eukaryotic genomes show enormous differences in size. A substantial part of this variation is due to the presence of transposable elements (TEs). They contribute significantly to a cell's mass of DNA and have the potential to become involved in host gene control. We argue that the suppression of their…

1h

A genome-wide case-only test for the detection of digenic inheritance in human exomes [Genetics]

Whole-exome sequencing (WES) has facilitated the discovery of genetic lesions underlying monogenic disorders. Incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity suggest a contribution of additional genetic lesions to clinical manifestations and outcome. Some monogenic disorders may therefore actually be digenic. However, only a few digenic disorders have been reported, all discovered by…

1h

Early IL-1 receptor blockade in severe inflammatory respiratory failure complicating COVID-19 [Immunology and Inflammation]

Around the tenth day after diagnosis, ∼20% of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)−associated pneumonia evolve toward severe oxygen dependence (stage 2b) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (stage 3) associated with systemic inflammation often termed a "cytokine storm." Because interleukin-1 (IL-1) blocks the production of IL-6 and other proinflammatory cytokines,…

1h

Microbial tryptophan metabolites regulate gut barrier function via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor [Immunology and Inflammation]

Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are associated with dysbiosis of the gut microbiome. Emerging evidence suggests that small-molecule metabolites derived from bacterial breakdown of a variety of dietary nutrients confer a wide array of host benefits, including amelioration of inflammation in IBDs. Yet, in many…

1h

LRCH1 deficiency enhances LAT signalosome formation and CD8+ T cell responses against tumors and pathogens [Immunology and Inflammation]

CD8+ T cells play pivotal roles in eradicating pathogens and tumor cells. T cell receptor (TCR) signaling is vital for the optimal activation of CD8+ T cells. Upon TCR engagement, the transmembrane adapter protein LAT (linker for activation of T cells) recruits other key signaling molecules and forms the "LAT…

1h

Kinetically distinct processing pathways diversify the CD8+ T cell response to a single viral epitope [Immunology and Inflammation]

The source proteins from which CD8+ T cell-activating peptides are derived remain enigmatic. Glycoproteins are particularly challenging in this regard owing to several potential trafficking routes within the cell. By engineering a glycoprotein-derived epitope to contain an N-linked glycosylation site, we determined that optimal CD8+ T cell expansion and function…

1h

CD4 T cell-intrinsic role for the T helper 17 signature cytokine IL-17: Effector resistance to immune suppression [Immunology and Inflammation]

Untoward effector CD4+ T cell responses are kept in check by immune regulatory mechanisms mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. CD4+ T helper 17 (Th17) cells, characterized by IL-17 production, play important roles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases (such as arthritis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, among…

1h

FEN1 endonuclease as a therapeutic target for human cancers with defects in homologous recombination [Medical Sciences]

Synthetic lethality strategies for cancer therapy exploit cancer-specific genetic defects to identify targets that are uniquely essential to the survival of tumor cells. Here we show RAD27/FEN1, which encodes flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), a structure-specific nuclease with roles in DNA replication and repair, and has the greatest number of synthetic…

1h

Kruppel-like factor 17 upregulates uterine corin expression and promotes spiral artery remodeling in pregnancy [Medical Sciences]

Spiral artery remodeling is an important physiological process in the pregnant uterus which increases blood flow to the fetus. Impaired spiral artery remodeling contributes to preeclampsia, a major disease in pregnancy. Corin, a transmembrane serine protease, is up-regulated in the pregnant uterus to promote spiral artery remodeling. To date, the…

1h

A CRAF/glutathione-S-transferase P1 complex sustains autocrine growth of cancers with KRAS and BRAF mutations [Medical Sciences]

The Ras/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway is an essential signaling cascade for various refractory cancers, such as those with mutant KRAS (mKRAS) and BRAF (mBRAF). However, there are unsolved ambiguities underlying mechanisms for this growth signaling thereby creating therapeutic complications. This study shows that a vital component of the pathway CRAF is directly…

1h

Two distinct amphipathic peptide antibiotics with systemic efficacy [Medical Sciences]

Antimicrobial peptides are important candidates for developing new classes of antibiotics because of their potency against antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Current research focuses on topical applications and it is unclear how to design peptides with systemic efficacy. To address this problem, we designed two potent peptides by combining database-guided discovery with structure-based…

1h

Stochastic bacterial population dynamics restrict the establishment of antibiotic resistance from single cells [Microbiology]

A better understanding of how antibiotic exposure impacts the evolution of resistance in bacterial populations is crucial for designing more sustainable treatment strategies. The conventional approach to this question is to measure the range of concentrations over which resistant strain(s) are selectively favored over a sensitive strain. Here, we instead…

1h

RTP4 inhibits IFN-I response and enhances experimental cerebral malaria and neuropathology [Microbiology]

Infection by malaria parasites triggers dynamic immune responses leading to diverse symptoms and pathologies; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these reactions are largely unknown. We performed Trans-species Expression Quantitative Trait Locus analysis to identify a large number of host genes that respond to malaria parasite infections. Here we functionally…

1h

Absence of cGAS-mediated type I IFN responses in HIV-1-infected T cells [Microbiology]

The DNA sensor cGAS catalyzes the production of the cyclic dinucleotide cGAMP, resulting in type I interferon responses. We addressed the functionality of cGAS-mediated DNA sensing in human and murine T cells. Activated primary CD4+ T cells expressed cGAS and responded to plasmid DNA by upregulation of ISGs and release…

1h

Selective translation by alternative bacterial ribosomes [Microbiology]

Alternative ribosome subunit proteins are prevalent in the genomes of diverse bacterial species, but their functional significance is controversial. Attempts to study microbial ribosomal heterogeneity have mostly relied on comparing wild-type strains with mutants in which subunits have been deleted, but this approach does not allow direct comparison of alternate…

1h

CACNA1S haploinsufficiency confers resistance to New World arenavirus infection [Microbiology]

Understanding the genetics of susceptibility to infectious agents is of great importance to our ability to combat disease. Here, we show that voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are critical for cellular binding and entry of the New World arenaviruses Junín and Tacaribe virus, suggesting that zoonosis via these receptors could occur….

1h

HCMV-induced signaling through gB-EGFR engagement is required for viral trafficking and nuclear translocation in primary human monocytes [Microbiology]

Previous analysis of postentry events revealed that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) displays a unique, extended nuclear translocation pattern in monocytes. We determined that c-Src signaling through pentamer engagement of integrins is required upon HCMV entry to avoid sorting of the virus into late endosomes and subsequent degradation. To follow up on…

1h

A multilayered repair system protects the mycobacterial chromosome from endogenous and antibiotic-induced oxidative damage [Microbiology]

Oxidative damage to DNA is a threat to the genomic integrity and coding accuracy of the chromosomes of all living organisms. Guanine is particularly susceptible to oxidation, and 8-oxo-dG (OG), when produced in situ or incorporated by DNA polymerases, is highly mutagenic due to mispairing with adenine. In many bacteria,…

1h

Progression from remodeling to hibernation of ribosomes in zinc-starved mycobacteria [Microbiology]

Zinc starvation in mycobacteria leads to remodeling of ribosomes, in which multiple ribosomal (r-) proteins containing the zinc-binding CXXC motif are replaced by their motif-free paralogues, collectively called C− r-proteins. We previously reported that the 70S C− ribosome is exclusively targeted for hibernation by mycobacterial-specific protein Y (Mpy), which binds…

1h

Ancestral regulatory mechanisms specify conserved midbrain circuitry in arthropods and vertebrates [Neuroscience]

Corresponding attributes of neural development and function suggest arthropod and vertebrate brains may have an evolutionarily conserved organization. However, the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. Here, we identify a gene regulatory and character identity network defining the deutocerebral–tritocerebral boundary (DTB) in Drosophila. This network comprises genes homologous to those dire

1h

Gene coexpression patterns predict opiate-induced brain-state transitions [Neuroscience]

Opioid addiction is a chronic, relapsing disorder associated with persistent changes in brain plasticity. Reconfiguration of neuronal connectivity may explain heightened abuse liability in individuals with a history of chronic drug exposure. To characterize network-level changes in neuronal activity induced by chronic opiate exposure, we compared FOS expression in mice…

1h

Essential and sex-specific effects of mGluR5 in ventromedial hypothalamus regulating estrogen signaling and glucose balance [Neuroscience]

The ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) plays chief roles regulating energy and glucose homeostasis and is sexually dimorphic. We discovered that expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) in the VMH is regulated by caloric status in normal mice and reduced in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mutants, which are severely obese…

1h

Single-cell RNA-seq analysis revealed long-lasting adverse effects of tamoxifen on neurogenesis in prenatal and adult brains [Neuroscience]

The CreER/LoxP system is widely accepted to track neural lineages and study gene functions upon tamoxifen (TAM) administration. We have observed that prenatal TAM treatment caused high rates of delayed delivery and fetal mortality. This substance could produce undesired results, leading to data misinterpretation. Here, we report that administration of…

1h

REM sleep stabilizes hypothalamic representation of feeding behavior [Neuroscience]

During rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, behavioral unresponsiveness contrasts strongly with intense brain-wide neural network dynamics. Yet, the physiological functions of this cellular activation remain unclear. Using in vivo calcium imaging in freely behaving mice, we found that inhibitory neurons in the lateral hypothalamus (LHvgat) show unique activity patterns during…

1h

Elevated energy requirement of cone photoreceptors [Neuroscience]

We have used recent measurements of mammalian cone light responses and voltage-gated currents to calculate cone ATP utilization and compare it to that of rods. The largest expenditure of ATP results from ion transport, particularly from removal of Na+ entering outer segment light-dependent channels and inner segment hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated…

1h

In climate news, statements from large businesses and opponents of climate action receive heightened visibility [Political Sciences]

Whose voices are most likely to receive news coverage in the US debate about climate change? Elite cues embedded in mainstream media can influence public opinion on climate change, so it is important to understand whose perspectives are most likely to be represented. Here, I use plagiarism-detection software to analyze…

1h

Objecting to experiments even while approving of the policies or treatments they compare [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

We resolve a controversy over two competing hypotheses about why people object to randomized experiments: 1) People unsurprisingly object to experiments only when they object to a policy or treatment the experiment contains, or 2) people can paradoxically object to experiments even when they approve of implementing either condition for…

1h

Machine learning uncovers the most robust self-report predictors of relationship quality across 43 longitudinal couples studies [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Given the powerful implications of relationship quality for health and well-being, a central mission of relationship science is explaining why some romantic relationships thrive more than others. This large-scale project used machine learning (i.e., Random Forests) to 1) quantify the extent to which relationship quality is predictable and 2) identify…

1h

Biased hate crime perceptions can reveal supremacist sympathies [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

People may be sympathetic to violent extremism when it serves their own interests. Such support may manifest itself via biased recognition of hate crimes. Psychological surveys were conducted in the wakes of mass shootings in the United States, New Zealand, and the Netherlands (total n = 2,332), to test whether…

1h

Cognitive control increases honesty in cheaters but cheating in those who are honest [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Every day, we are faced with the conflict between the temptation to cheat for financial gains and maintaining a positive image of ourselves as being a "good person." While it has been proposed that cognitive control is needed to mediate this conflict between reward and our moral self-image, the exact…

1h

General learning ability in perceptual learning [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Developing expertise in any field usually requires acquisition of a wide range of skills. Most current studies on perceptual learning have focused on a single task and concluded that learning is quite specific to the trained task, and the ubiquitous individual differences reflect random fluctuations across subjects. Whether there exists…

1h

The moral barrier effect: Real and imagined barriers can reduce cheating [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

This research presents a nudge-based approach to promoting honest behavior. Specifically, we introduce the moral barrier hypothesis, which posits that moral violations can be inhibited by the introduction of spatial boundaries, including ones that do not physically impede the act of transgressing. We found that, as compared to a no…

1h

Opinion: It's ethical to test promising coronavirus vaccines against less-promising ones [Social Sciences]

With multiple candidate vaccines against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) entering efficacy testing, researchers and ethicists should come to grips with the distinctive medical ethics questions that could arise. An important one is determining the most ethical way to proceed when comparing a purportedly promising vaccine against a…

1h

A century of educational inequality in the United States [Social Sciences]

The "income inequality hypothesis" holds that rising income inequality affects the distribution of a wide range of social and economic outcomes. Although it is often alleged that rising income inequality will increase the advantages of the well-off in the competition for college, some researchers have provided descriptive evidence at odds…

1h

No clear association emerges between intergenerational relationships and COVID-19 fatality rates from macro-level analyses [Social Sciences]

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 originated in Wuhan, China at the end of 2019 and rapidly spread in more than 100 countries. Researchers in different fields have been working on finding explanations for the unequal impact of the virus and deaths from the associated coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)…

1h

Wheat yield potential in controlled-environment vertical farms [Sustainability Science]

Scaling current cereal production to a growing global population will be a challenge. Wheat supplies approximately one-fifth of the calories and protein for human diets. Vertical farming is a possible promising option for increasing future wheat production. Here we show that wheat grown on a single hectare of land in…

1h

The carbon footprint of household energy use in the United States [Sustainability Science]

Residential energy use accounts for roughly 20% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the United States. Using data on 93 million individual households, we estimate these GHGs across the contiguous United States and clarify the respective influence of climate, affluence, energy infrastructure, urban form, and building attributes (age, housing type,…

1h

Nonstandard conditionally specified models for nonignorable missing data [Systems Biology]

Data analyses typically rely upon assumptions about the missingness mechanisms that lead to observed versus missing data, assumptions that are typically unassessable. We explore an approach where the joint distribution of observed data and missing data are specified in a nonstandard way. In this formulation, which traces back to a…

1h

Correction for Nan et al., Anisotropic spin-orbit torque generation in epitaxial SrIrO3 by symmetry design [Correction]

APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Anisotropic spin-orbit torque generation in epitaxial SrIrO3 by symmetry design," by T. Nan, T. J. Anderson, J. Gibbons, K. Hwang, N. Campbell, H. Zhou, Y. Q. Dong, G. Y. Kim, D. F. Shao, T. R. Paudel, N. Reynolds, X. J. Wang, N. X. Sun, E….

1h

Correction for Kwak et al., Contact-ID, a tool for profiling organelle contact sites, reveals regulatory proteins of mitochondrial-associated membrane formation [Correction]

CELL BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY Correction for "Contact-ID, a tool for profiling organelle contact sites, reveals regulatory proteins of mitochondrial-associated membrane formation," by Chulhwan Kwak, Sanghee Shin, Jong-Seok Park, Minkyo Jung, Truong Thi My Nhung, Myeong-Gyun Kang, Chaiheon Lee, Tae-Hyuk Kwon, Sang Ki Park, Ji Young Mun, Jong-Seo Kim, and Hyun-Woo Rhee,…

1h

Correction for Chaudhry et al., Cytomegalovirus inhibition of extrinsic apoptosis determines fitness and resistance to cytotoxic CD8 T cells [Correction]

IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for "Cytomegalovirus inhibition of extrinsic apoptosis determines fitness and resistance to cytotoxic CD8 T cells," by M. Zeeshan Chaudhry, Rosaely Casalegno-Garduno, Katarzyna M. Sitnik, Bahram Kasmapour, Ann-Kathrin Pulm, Ilija Brizic, Britta Eiz-Vesper, Andreas Moosmann, Stipan Jonjic, Edward S. Mocarski, and Luka Cicin-Sain, which was first published…

1h

Correction for Kalish et al., Single-nucleus RNA sequencing of mouse auditory cortex reveals critical period triggers and brakes [Correction]

NEUROSCIENCE Correction for "Single-nucleus RNA sequencing of mouse auditory cortex reveals critical period triggers and brakes," by Brian T. Kalish, Tania R. Barkat, Erin E. Diel, Elizabeth J. Zhang, Michael E. Greenberg, and Takao K. Hensch, which was first published May 13, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1920433117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117,…

1h

A century ago, it was a Florida landscape shrub. Now, it's a pest plant that keeps spreading

Decorative landscaping in the early 1900s introduced a new shrub to Florida whose young leaves were pink and whose berries were a deep purple. The plant, called shoebutton ardisia, started invading forests and wetlands within decades. It continues spreading throughout southern Florida, capable of taking over ecosystems that otherwise support native animals and beckon tourists.

1h

Russia Approves World's First Coronavirus Vaccine

Some researchers express skepticism given the lack of data about the vaccine's safety and efficacy, and the country plans to vaccinate healthcare workers, teachers, and others even before testing is complete.

1h

Rare Megamouth Shark Arrives at the Smithsonian

Studying and eventually preserving the megamouth will help researchers learn more about the puzzling species

1h

X-rays indicate that water can behave like a liquid crystal

Scientists at Stockholm University have discovered that water can exhibit a similar behavior to that of a liquid crystal when illuminated with laser light. This effect originates by the alignment of water molecules, which exhibit a mixture of low- and high-density domains that are more or less prone to alignment. The results, reported in Physics Review Letters, are based on a combination of experi

1h

A century ago, it was a Florida landscape shrub. Now, it's a pest plant that keeps spreading

Decorative landscaping in the early 1900s introduced a new shrub to Florida whose young leaves were pink and whose berries were a deep purple. The plant, called shoebutton ardisia, started invading forests and wetlands within decades. It continues spreading throughout southern Florida, capable of taking over ecosystems that otherwise support native animals and beckon tourists.

1h

The best paring knives for cutting, dicing, and peeling

For detail work. (Louis Hansel via Unsplash/) Though it doesn't get as much attention as larger chef's knives, a great paring knife can be life-changing. Their size allows them to be nimble workhorses for peeling and dicing smaller fruits, vegetables, and herbs, and mincing garlic. They're also essential for more intricate kitchen work, like de-seeding fruit, de-vining shrimp, or segmenting citru

1h

The best mandolines for a superior slice

These slicers offer consistency and ease. (Wilhelm Gunkel via Unsplash/) Sometimes a knife just won't cut it when it comes to getting thinly sliced produce. A mandoline can give you a slim, uniform sliver that will cook evenly every time. Many mandolines have extra features to customize your cuts, making them a great tool for creating appetizing meals that will look and taste great. Here are some

1h

UK Court Slams Automatic Facial Recognition Tech as "Unlawful"

Recognize! After a drawn out legal battle, a London court deemed it unlawful for police to use automatic facial recognition to surveil crowds. The court ruled that the South Wales Police's facial recognition tools had too few controls on them, BBC News reports, and went even further to note that police failed to ensure the facial recognition algorithm didn't perpetuate racial bias. Even if a prop

1h

Study ties gun purchases to fear of firearm regulations, kicks off major research

A new study finds that the decision to purchase a gun after mass shootings is driven by fear of stricter regulations on gun purchase and ownership more than by a desire to protect oneself. The work is led by Maurizio Porfiri, Institute professor at NYU Tandon, his second in a year to examine causative factors driving consumer firearm-purchase behavior.

1h

'Insect apocalypse' may not be happening in US

Scientists have been warning about an 'insect apocalypse' in recent years, noting sharp declines in specific areas — particularly in Europe. A new study shows these warnings may have been exaggerated and are not representative of what's happening to insects on a larger scale.

1h

NASA-NOAA satellite night-time animation shows intensification of hurricane Elida

A new animation of night-time imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed how the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Elida transformed into a hurricane over a three-day period.

1h

Ultraviolet communication to transform Army networks

Of ever-increasing concern for operating a tactical communications network is the possibility that a sophisticated adversary may detect friendly transmissions. Army researchers developed an analysis framework that enables the rigorous study of the detectability of ultraviolet communication systems, providing the insights needed to deliver the requirements of future, more secure Army networks.

1h

Plant-based meats improve some cardiovascular risk factors compared with red meat

Swapping out red meat for certain plant-based meat alternatives can improve some cardiovascular risk factors, according to a new study by researchers at Stanford Medicine.

1h

Air pollution cuts 2 years off life expectancy

A new analysis shows particulate pollution cuts global life expectancy by nearly two years, relative to what it would be if air quality met the World Health Organization guideline. The COVID-19 pandemic underscores more than any time in recent history how important it is to protect public health. Yet, as countries race to develop a coronavirus vaccine, another everyday killer continues to threate

1h

Does your favorite mask actually work? Researchers now have a way to tell.

Researchers found that simple multi-layered cloth masks and surgical masks work well enough to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. (Pixabay/) Until 2020, if your job or health didn't require it, it's likely that you never thought about wearing a protective face covering. Now, as the airborne coronavirus remains a threat in most of the world, how to wear a mask and which one is best are at the

1h

Skillnader mellan råttor och möss ger nya insikter om manligt föräldraskap

Råttor och möss har mycket gemensamt, men skiljer sig åt i hanarnas beteende när de fått barn. Medan råtthanen inte bryr sig, tar muspappan hand om sina små, plockar upp dem när de gått vilse, för dem till boet och ser till att de håller sig varma. Forskare vid Stockholms universitet har spårat skillnaden till gnagarpappornas olika nivåer av "moderskapshormonet" prolaktin. Hur föräldraskap utövas

1h

Don't crush that ant—it could plant a wildflower

New findings show how ants choose and protect the seeds they disperse

2h

Dog crates to keep your pup safe and comfortable

A second home for Fido. (Tomasz Filipek via Unsplash/) We know it's never fun to put your pooch in their crate or cage, but it's unavoidable at times. It's super important to find a cage that is comfortable for your pup no matter their size, shape, or breed. Below are a few of the sturdiest cages we could find, so next time you can throw in a few of your good boy's favorite toys or treats and res

2h

Atrial fibrillation less deadly than it used to be, but still cause for concern: BU study

A first-of-its-kind study by researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) shows a decline in deaths related to atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat) over the last 45 years.

2h

New guidelines for managing mucositis now available

New guidelines are now available to provide healthcare professionals with better tools to manage mucositis, a common and often debilitating complication of cancer therapy.

2h

How to Mine the Oceans Sustainably

Deep-sea minerals, including nickel, copper, manganese and cobalt, are crucial to building clean-energy technologies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Research exposes new vulnerability for SARS-CoV-2

Using nanometer-level simulations, the researchers discovered a positively charged site (known as the polybasic cleavage site) located 10 nanometers from the actual binding site on the spike protein. The positively charged site allows strong bonding between the virus protein and the negatively charged human-cell receptors.

2h

How airplanes counteract St. Elmo's Fire during thunderstorms

An MIT study finds windy conditions can weaken St. Elmo's fire, the phenomenon when electrically conductive structures spontaneously emit a flash of blue light, when it's generated by aircraft and other ungrounded objects.

2h

Racial, socioeconomic disparities fuel increased infant mortality rates in California

While infant mortality rates (IMR) decreased overall from 2007 to 2015 in California, disparities in infant death rates have increased in some groups, including among obese mothers, those who smoke and African American women, according to a new study published in PLOS One.

2h

CNIO and CNIC find clues to clarify why cohesine has a role in cancer and cardiac development

In 1998, Spanish researcher Ana Losada, currently at CNIO, identified cohesin in vertebrates, a protein essential for chromosome segregation in dividing cells. Today, we know that cohesin has a role in cancer* Cohesin is so important that it has been evolutionarily conserved for millions of years* Losada and Paco Real from CNIO, and Miguel Manzanares from CBMSO are publishing their recent findings

2h

Research finds TSA may have missed thousands of firearms at checkpoints in 2014-2016

CATONSVILLE, MD, August 11, 2020 – The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has reported that it found 4,432 firearms in carry-on baggage at airport security checkpoints in 2019, and more than 20,000 firearms since 2014. New research published in the INFORMS Journal on Applied Analytics suggests that they could have found even more.

2h

Dark Frontiers: The Science of Black Holes

Scientific American presents a conversation about black holes with Yale University astrophysicist Priyamvada Natarajan. To be discussed: a short history of black holes; the black hole bestiary; new observations and discoveries and what comes next. Please visit our website to discover the latest advances in science and technology: http://bit.ly/30Z4ZpZ Discover world-changing science with a subscr

2h

Maybe Netflix and Amazon Should Just Buy Theater Chains

The rules banning movie studios from owning cinemas have been overturned—just in time for theaters in need of a bailout.

2h

Amazon Deforestation Falls Where Land Is Under Indigenous Control

President Jair Bolsonaro's government, meanwhile, has worked to erode Indigenous protections and ownership — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Causes of higher risk of stress fractures in female runners

A pair of new studies identify overlooked physiological factors and lack of knowledge around wellness as contributors to risk of stress fracture in women who run.

2h

NASA's planet Hunter completes its primary mission

NASA's TESS has completed its primary mission, imaging about 75% of the starry sky during a two-year-long survey. TESS has found 66 new planets, nearly 2,100 candidates, and much more.

2h

Combining genetic information with EMRs to pinpoint childhood epilepsies

A team of researchers further bridged the gap between genomic information and clinical outcome data by systematically linking genetic information with electronic medical records, focusing on how genetic neurological disorders in children develop over time.

2h

Protein uses two antiviral strategies to ward off infections

To protect humans against infection, a protein called MARCH8 tags the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) for destruction while it merely holds HIV hostage, a new study in eLife shows.

2h

Rare glassy metal discovered during quest to improve battery performance

Materials scientists studying recharging fundamentals made an astonishing discovery that could open the door to better batteries, faster catalysts and other materials science leaps.

2h

RCSI research finds air pollution in Ireland associated with strokes

Scientists have found that air pollution in the winter is associated with more hospitalisations for all strokes in Dublin.

2h

Scientists replace malfunctioning 'vacuum cleaner' cells linked to neurological disorders

Malfunctioning microglia are associated with a range of neurological diseases. Replacing these immune cells when they are broken potentially opens up a new era for treating such disorders.

2h

Filtration efficiency of hospital face mask alternatives during COVID-19 pandemic

Researchers performed a series of FFE (fitted filtration efficiency) evaluations for a wide range of 29 respirators and face masks used by health care facilities, including expired N95 respirators, N95 respirators that have undergone sterilization, imported respirators approved by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, respirators not listed as approved, and surgical or procedure mas

2h

SARS-CoV-2 infection among health care workers in hospital

This study sought to establish the rate of COVID-19 among health care workers through widespread screening for SARS-CoV-2 exposure in a large community hospital.

2h

Researchers create mask filtration effectiveness hierarchy

Infection prevention experts at the UNC Medical Center set out to gather evidence on the fitted filtration efficiency of dozens of different types of masks and mask modifications, including masks sterilized for reuse, expired masks, novel masks sourced from domestic and overseas sources, and homemade masks.

2h

Network of sounds: New research reveals the magic secret of human networks

A group of Israeli researchers recruited 16 violinists to study the behavior of a human network and find out what sets it apart from other networks, such as animals, computers and other objects. The results combine science and aesthetics and also evoke thoughts about the spread of the coronavirus.

2h

Stanford experts recommend strict, costly approaches for reopening schools

The American Academy of Pediatrics recently highlighted the importance of students' returning to the classroom in its COVID-19 return-to-school guidance. Jason Wang, MD, PhD, of Stanford Health Policy also believes it's time for kids in the United States to get back to school. But he believes school districts could better protect their 55 million K-12 students by adhering to an additional set of s

2h

Immunotherapy-resistant cancers eliminated in mouse study

In a mouse study, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that an antibody that targets the protein TREM2 empowers tumor-destroying immune cells and improves the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy.

2h

Operational considerations on academy guidance for K-12 school reentry

Guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics on K-12 school reentry are discussed in this Viewpoint.

2h

K-12 virtual schooling, COIVD-19 and student success

This Viewpoint advises parents on how to assess virtual schooling options for their children for the fall semester during the COVID-19 pandemic.

2h

Using physics to improve root canal efficiency

In Physics of Fluids, scientists report calculations with a model of a conical-shaped root canal inside a tooth. A crucial step in this common dental procedure is irrigation, or rinsing, of the root canal cavity with an antibacterial solution, and the researchers used computational fluid dynamics to determine the effect of temperature on the cleaning efficiency: Higher temperatures can, to a point

2h

AI with 'imagination' could help doctors with diagnosis, particularly for complex case

Babylon has built Artificial Intelligence with 'imagination' that could soon help doctors with diagnosis, particularly for complex cases. The AI uses causal machine learning rather than correlations to support doctors with diagnosis in simulated cases. In the study when diagnosing 1671 written cases, 44 doctors averaged 71.40%, the old AI scored 72.52%, and the new AI scored 77.62%.

2h

ECMO for patients with COVID-19, severe respiratory failure

We present our experience in using single-access, dual-stage venovenous ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation), with an emphasis on early extubation of patients while they received ECMO support.

2h

Storing energy in red bricks

Red bricks — some of the world's cheapest and most familiar building materials — can be converted into energy storage units that can be charged to hold electricity, like a battery, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis. Chemists have developed a method to make or modify "smart bricks" that can store energy until required for powering devices. A proof-of-concept publis

2h

Why does COVID-19 impact only some organs, not others?

In severe cases of COVID-19, damage can spread beyond the lungs and into other organs, such as the heart, liver, kidney and parts of the neurological system. Beyond these specific sets of organs, however, the virus seems to lack impact. Ernesto Estrada aimed to uncover an explanation as to how it is possible for these damages to propagate selectively rather than affecting the entire body. He discu

2h

Vaping linked to COVID-19 risk in teens and young adults, Stanford-led study finds

Vaping is linked to a substantially increased risk of COVID-19 among teenagers and young adults, according to a new study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

2h

Changes in use of high-dose biotin supplements among US adults

Nationally representative survey data were used to examine changes over nearly two decades in daily use of high-dose biotin supplements, which are marketed as stimulating growth of hair and nails.

2h

Multifocal contact lenses slow myopia progression in children

Children wearing multifocal contact lenses had slower progression of their myopia, according to results from a clinical trial funded by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health. The findings support an option for controlling the condition, also called nearsightedness, which increases the risk of cataracts, glaucoma and retinal detachment later in life. Investigators of

2h

Young nearsighted kids benefit from bifocal contact lenses, study shows

Bifocal contact lenses aren't just for aging eyes anymore. In nearsighted kids as young as 7 years old, multifocal contact lenses with a heavy dose of added reading power can dramatically slow further progression of myopia, new research has found.

2h

Fear of stricter regulations spurs gun sales after mass shootings, new analysis suggests

In a new study appearing August 11 in the journal Patterns, investigators used data science to study why gun sales tend to go up after a mass shooting. By working with spatio-temporal data from all the states in the US, they determined that the increase in firearm purchases after mass shootings is driven by a concern about regulations rather than a perceived need for protection.

2h

Digital content on track to equal half Earth's mass by 2245

As we use resources to power massive computer farms and process digital information, our technological progress is redistributing Earth's matter from physical atoms to digital information. Eventually, we will reach a point of full saturation, a period in our evolution in which digital bits will outnumber atoms on Earth, a world "mostly computer simulated and dominated by digital bits and computer

2h

Masks, PPE materials should be hydrophilic

Since the COVID-19 virus spreads through respiratory droplets, researchers set out to explore how droplets deposited on face masks or frequently touched surfaces dry. Droplets can be expelled via the mouth or nose and studies have shown a substantially reduced chance of infection once they dry. In Physics of Fluids, the researchers publish their findings that surface wetting properties to reduce t

2h

Social Distancing From the Stars

Astronomers treasure the beauty of our jobs. We may spend much of our time poring over data and digging into the language of math and physics to describe the cosmos, but we also get the unique opportunity to travel to some of the darkest corners of the world for our research. Most of us can't resist taking a few moments during a busy visit to a remote observatory to drink in our surroundings. We

2h

Powerhouses: nanotechnology turns bricks into batteries

Research could pave way for cheap supercapacitor storage of renewable energy The humble house brick has been turned into a battery that can store electricity, raising the possibility that buildings could one day become literal powerhouses. The new technology exploits the porous nature of fired red bricks by filling the pores with tiny nanofibres of a conducting plastic that can store charge. The

2h

Energy storing bricks for stationary PEDOT supercapacitors

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17708-1 Fired brick is a universal building material, produced by thousand-year-old technology, which throughout history has seldom served any other purpose. Here, the authors show that bricks can store energy after chemical treatment to convert their iron oxide content into conducting polymer nanofibers.

2h

Synchronization of complex human networks

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17540-7 Understanding the synchronization of human networks is important in many aspects, but current research is suffering from limited control and noisy environments. Shahal et al. show a quantitative study with full control over the network connectivity, coupling strength and delay among interacting violin players.

2h

Skepticism Greets Putin's Announcement Of Russian Coronavirus Vaccine

It's the first country to approve a COVID-19 vaccine, but it has not finished Phase III trials to assess safety and effectiveness in the general population. (Image credit: Alexey Nikolsky/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images)

2h

Researchers Study Violinists To Learn How Humans Act in Synchrony

The violin players' abilities could shed light on everything from epidemics to the spread of fake news. violinists_cropped.jpg Image credits: Stokkete/ Shutterstock Human Tuesday, August 11, 2020 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Violinists were able to play together and stay in sync even when scientists played tricks on them during experiments. The musicians' capabilities

2h

Tesla Competitor, Lucid, Claims Their Car Will Have a 517 Mile Range

517 Miles Tesla competitor Lucid Motors claims its Air electric sedan will have a whopping 517 miles (832 km) on a single charge, beating out Tesla's current range king, the Model S with an estimated 402 miles. The California-based startup is still planning to make an official announcement of a production version of the Air in September, with first deliveries scheduled for early 2021, according t

2h

Baby-mounted cameras teach AI to 'see' through a child's eyes

An AI has learned to recognise objects using video captured by a head-mounted camera worn by young children for a few hours per week over their first 3 years of life

2h

A New Survey Links Vaping to Higher Covid-19 Risk

A Stanford University report shows that teens and young adults who use e-cigarettes are five to seven times more likely to test positive for the virus.

2h

Why does COVID-19 impact only some organs, not others?

In severe cases of COVID-19, damage can spread beyond the lungs and into other organs, such as the heart, liver, kidney and parts of the neurological system. Beyond these specific sets of organs, however, the virus seems to lack impact.

3h

Recipe for success — interaction proteomics become a household item

A research team from University of Helsinki introduces a new optimised and integrated interaction proteomics protocol that combines two state-of-the art methods to allow rapid identification of protein-protein interactions and more.

3h

NASA finds a wispy, wind-sheared Tropical Depression 06W

NASA's Terra satellite revealed that a wispy looking Tropical Depression 06W in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean was being battered by wind shear. That wind shear is not expected to wane and the storm is expected to weaken.

3h

Clemson doctoral candidate uses rockets to surf the Alaskan sky

Postdoc researcher Rafael Mesquita and a multi-institutional research team documented "surfer waves" in the upper atmosphere that create a pipeline of energy between layers in space.

3h

Brain-NET, a deep learning methodology, accurately predicts surgeon certification scores based on neuroimaging data

In a new article in IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, researchers demonstrated how a deep learning framework they call "Brain-NET" can accurately predict a person's level of expertise in terms of their surgical motor skills, based solely on neuroimaging data.

3h

Untapped potential for TikTok to convey COVID-19 guidance

Research published in DeGruyter's International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health suggests TikTok is rich with untapped educational potential. The platform could play a vital role in conveying important health information alongside lip-syncing videos and viral dance challenges, the paper's authors say.

3h

Digital content on track to equal half Earth's mass by 2245

As we use resources, such as coal, oil, natural gas, copper, silicon and aluminum, to power massive computer farms and process digital information, our technological progress is redistributing Earth's matter from physical atoms to digital information—the fifth state of matter, alongside liquid, solid, gas and plasma.

3h

Using physics to improve root canal efficiency

Scientists used computational fluid dynamics to determine the effect of temperature on root canal cleaning efficiency. Higher temperatures can, to a point, improve cleansing, but this benefit falls off if the temperature gets too high.

3h

Why does COVID-19 impact only some organs, not others?

In severe cases of COVID-19, damage can spread beyond the lungs and into other organs, such as the heart, liver, kidney and parts of the neurological system. Beyond these specific sets of organs, however, the virus seems to lack impact.

3h

Fear of stricter regulations spurs gun sales after mass shootings, new analysis suggests

It's commonly known that gun sales go up after a mass shooting, but two competing hypotheses have been put forth to explain why that's the case: is it because people fear more violence and want to protect themselves, or is it because mass shootings trigger discussions about tighter gun regulations, which sends people out to stock up? In a new study appearing August 11 in the journal Patterns, inve

3h

Making masks and PPE with hydrophilic surfaces, could reduce infection risk

Since the COVID-19 virus spreads through respiratory droplets, researchers in India set out to explore how droplets deposited on face masks or frequently touched surfaces, like door handles or smartphone touch screens, dry.

3h

Network of sounds: New research reveals the magic secret of human networks

A group of Israeli researchers recruited 16 violinists to study the behavior of a human network and find out what sets it apart from other networks, such as animals, computers, and other objects. The results combine science and esthetics, and also evoke thoughts about the spread of the coronavirus.

3h

Congrats, Jellyfish, the Seas Are Yours! (Now, What Are You Going to Do with Them?)

In a future ravaged by climate change, one animal may come out on top: jellyfish.

3h

Why Hasn't Africa Gone Digital?

One major reason is a lack of reliable, affordable electricity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Monarchs from east and west fly differently, but still mate

Even though eastern and western monarch butterflies fly differently, they are genetically the same, a new study shows. Each year, millions of monarch butterflies migrate across eastern North America to fly from as far north as the US-Canadian border to overwinter in central Mexico—covering as much as 3,000 miles. Meanwhile, on the other side of the Rocky Mountains, western monarchs generally fly

3h

I Was Sanctioned by China

It is a bit disorienting to wake up early expecting to go out for a walk, and find that you have been personally targeted for sanctions by the most powerful authoritarian state in the world. As friends began emailing and texting me Monday morning, I learned that I had been placed on a list of leaders of prodemocracy organizations and members of Congress to be punished by the Chinese government in

3h

How to build a resilient future using ancient wisdom | Julia Watson

In her global exploration of Indigenous design systems, architect Julia Watson researches enduring innovations that could help us counter the challenges of climate change. From floating villages to living root bridges that strengthen over time, Watson introduces us to some of these resilient solutions — and shows how they can teach us to design with nature, instead of against it.

3h

Study shows inbreeding reduces cooperation in banded mongooses

Inbreeding can reduce cooperation in banded mongooses according to a recent study by researchers.

3h

Diabetes-COVID-19 paper retracted for lack of ethical approval

An allegation of plagiarism in a paper about Covid-19 in people with diabetes led to a retraction, but not for lifted text. Earlier this year, the journal Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, a Mary Ann Liebert title, published "No deleterious effect of lockdown due to COVID-19 pandemic on glycaemic control, measured by glucose monitoring, in adults … Continue reading

3h

Shaq Swims With a Whale Shark! | Shark Week

Stream ShaqAttack on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/shaqattack Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/Discovery https://www

3h

Baby Shark & Hammerhead Shark

There are many different types of sharks in the ocean. Meet Baby Shark's new shark friend, Hammerhead Shark! Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/Discovery https:/

3h

Study shows inbreeding reduces cooperation in banded mongooses

Inbreeding can reduce cooperation in banded mongooses according to a recent study by researchers.

3h

SUTD researchers create heart cells from stem cells using 3D printing

SUTD researchers 3D printed a micro-scaled physical device to demonstrate a new level of control in the directed differentiation of stem cells, enhancing the production of cardiomyocytes.

3h

Long-term risks of joint implants

Using highly complex analytical techniques, a group of researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin were able to observe in detail how different metals are released from joint implants and accumulate in the surrounding bone tissue. Findings showed a steady release of metals from various implant components. In contrast to previous assumptions, this was not related to the degree of mechanic

3h

NASA finds Jangmi now an Extra-Tropical Storm

NASA's Aqua satellite obtained a visible image of Tropical Storm Jangmi after it transitioned into an extra-tropical storm.

3h

Lab-created molecule achieves positive results in the treatment of arthritis

Tested in mice with genetically induced arthritis, the substance decreased the area affected, reduced local swelling, and assuaged the pain associated with the inflammatory process.

3h

Modelling parasitic worm metabolism suggests strategy for developing new drugs against infection

Scientists have revealed a way to eradicate parasitic worms by stopping them from using alternative metabolism pathways provided by bacteria that live within them, according to new findings published today in eLife.

3h

Study shows inbreeding reduces cooperation in banded mongooses

Inbreeding can reduce cooperation in banded mongooses according to a recent study by researchers.

3h

Give Your Home a Stylish, Futuristic Feel With These Limited by Saatchi Art Astronaut Prints

If you've been sheltering in place for the last several months, there's a good chance you're getting sick of looking at your walls. This is nothing new. Humans have been using art to spruce up their walls ever since the days of cave painting. And now you can join this tradition by sprucing up your home with limited edition prints from the Limited by Saatchi Art series, which has a decidedly more

3h

The Return of Anonymous

At the end of May , as protests against the police killing of George Floyd got under way, reports started to circulate that the shadowy hacker group Anonymous was back . The rumors began with a video depicting a black-clad figure in the group's signature Guy Fawkes mask. "Greetings, citizens of the United States," the figure said in a creepy, distorted voice. "This is a message from Anonymous to

3h

Universities should learn from assessment methods used during the pandemic—and cut down on exams for good

Timed written examinations continue to dominate university assessment. In most professions, the need to recall and write down specific information from memory under timed conditions is rare. Yet every year across the world students are crammed into exam halls to do just that.

3h

Russia Says It Has Approved an Untested COVID Vaccine

Russian president Vladimir Putin has announced that the country has approved a coronavirus vaccine, becoming the first country in the world to do so. Throwing caution to the wind, the vaccine has yet to complete Phase 3 trials, a vital step most experts believe is critical to proving a vaccine both safe and effective. Just last week, the World Health Organization reiterated the need for caution,

3h

DTU-ekspert undrer sig: Dyre bredbåndssatellitter kan ikke bruges til nyt britisk navigationssystem

PLUS. Storbritannien vil lave alternativt navigationssystem med bredbåndssatellitter fra det konkursramte OneWeb. Men det er ikke sådan lige til, lyder det fra danske og internationale satellit-eksperter.

3h

Inspire Your Toddler's STEM Career With This 'Goodnight Moon' Parody

Astronomer Kimberly Arcand releases her new children's book 'Goodnight Exomoon'

3h

Gluten in wheat: What has changed during 120 years of breeding?

In recent years, the number of people affected by celiac disease, wheat allergy or gluten or wheat sensitivity has risen sharply. But why is this the case? Could it be that modern wheat varieties contain more immunoreactive protein than in the past? Results from a study by the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich and the Leibniz Institute of Plant Geneti

3h

The Moon and stars are a compass for nocturnal animals – but light pollution is leading them astray

Many nocturnal animal species use light from the moon and stars to migrate at night in search of food, shelter or mates. But in our recent study we uncovered how artificial light is disrupting these nightly migrations.

3h

Molecules in urine allow doctors to monitor skin cancer

What if you could simply provide a urine sample rather than undergo a painful surgical procedure to find out if your cancer was responding to treatment? It may seem too good to be true, but researchers at Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, have identified fluorescent molecules in urine that may allow patients with malignant melanoma to do just that.

3h

Researchers find clues to SARS-CoV-2 infection, why it impacts patients differently

Previously, scientists have determined that entry of SARS-CoV-2 into cells occurs through a receptor on the cell surface, known as ACE2. But the McMaster-Waterloo team has found that the ACE2 receptor is at very low levels in human lung tissue.

3h

Investigating a thermal challenge for MOFs

New research led by an interdisciplinary team across six universities examines heat transfer in MOFs and the role it plays when MOFs are used for storing fuel. The findings were recently published in Nature Communications.

3h

Car passengers can reduce pollution risk by closing windows and changing route

Drivers and passengers can inhale significantly lower levels of air pollution by setting their vehicle's ventilation systems more effectively and taking a 'cleaner' route to their destination, a new study reveals.

3h

Stanford study reveals immune-system paralysis in severe COVID-19 cases

A Stanford study shows that in severely ill COVID-19 patients, 'first-responder' immune cells, which should react immediately to signs of viral or bacterial presence in the body, instead respond sluggishly.

3h

A new way to fabricate MXene films that block electromagnetic interference

A multi-institution research team led by Andre ? D. Taylor, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering demonstrated a novel approach to MXene fabrication that could lead to methods for at-scale production of MXene freestanding films: drop-casting onto prepatterned hydrophobic substrates. Their method led to a 38% enhancement of EMI shielding efficien

3h

The Moon and stars are a compass for nocturnal animals – but light pollution is leading them astray

Many nocturnal animal species use light from the moon and stars to migrate at night in search of food, shelter or mates. But in our recent study we uncovered how artificial light is disrupting these nightly migrations.

3h

England planning proposals aim to tackle housing crisis – but overlook key issues

The government has published proposals for a radical reform of the planning system in England. This reform could have significant implications for our built and natural environments, as well as for local democracy.

3h

Organocatalyst that controls radical reactions for complex and bulky compound synthesis

Organocatalysts consisting of organic compounds without metal elements are receiving much attention as next generation catalysts in the hope of reducing environmental burden and coping with exhaustion/rising prices of rare metals. However, it is difficult for an organocatalyst to control radical reactions involving a single electron with high reactivity. Thus, reaction processes mediated by organo

3h

Scotland's exam result crisis: assessment and social justice in a time of COVID-19

Anger and confusion followed the release of this year's Scottish Qualification Agency (SQA) results, the first of the UK nations to publish school results in the aftermath of COVID-19. About one quarter of teacher-recommended grades were changed: most were downgraded, and this was more likely to happen to pupils in poorer areas. This controversy shows that assessment is not neutral: the system of

3h

Is police use of face recognition now illegal in the UK?

The UK Court of Appeal has determined that the use of a face-recognition system by South Wales Police was "unlawful", which could have ramifications for the widespread use of such technology across the UK

3h

How to Make Gene-Hacked Rainbow Cotton That Stretches Like Yoga Pants

Imagine this: You're on a drive through cotton country. The sun's out, top's down. It's a beautiful, totally normal day. Only, what was once a sea of white puff balls has transformed into a multi-hued swirl. Lines of deep purple, bright yellow, midnight blue. All the colors in the rainbow—and your t-shirt drawer, as it so happens. Today, you'd do well to check your water. But in the future, color

4h

Gluten in wheat: What has changed during 120 years of breeding?

In recent years, the number of people affected by coeliac disease, wheat allergy or gluten or wheat sensitivity has risen sharply. But why is this the case? Could it be that modern wheat varieties contain more immunoreactive protein than in the past? Results from a study by the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich and the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genet

4h

Surrey academics develop a new method to determine the origin of stardust in meteorites

Scientists have made a key discovery thanks to stardust found in meteorites, shedding light on the origin of crucial chemical elements.

4h

Oil-soluble transition metal-based catalysts tested for in-situ oil upgrading

The results of the study showed that the good catalytic properties of the new transition metal catalysts, as well as their low cost and easy accessibility, make them a potential solution in the aquathermolysis reaction and heavy oil recovery.

4h

Project Raphael brings improved health to disadvantaged populations

Project Raphael, a novel social incubator for improving health in disadvantaged regions, was developed by Bar-Ilan University to create academic-community partnerships that define and address the most pressing health needs in northern Israel. Raphael offers local community and health organizations an opportunity to define the most pressing problems in their communities, and develop creative soluti

4h

New research may help identify sex trafficking networks

Characterizing traits of online activity may help to rescue victims of sex trafficking. While scientists have tried to help pinpoint outfits participating in trafficking, few scientific studies have looked of how the digital infrastructure behind the online sex market operates. A paper from Mayank Kejriwal, a research assistant professor at the USC Information Sciences Institute and Yao Gu (curren

4h

How building features impact veterans with PTSD

The built environment, where someone lives (private) or works (public), influences a person's daily life and can help, or hinder, their mental health. This is especially true for those with mental health conditions such as PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder.

4h

Bees use shark 'supersense' to help find food

Flying insects such as bees and moths have secret senses that allow them to 'feel' nearby flowers and navigate over long distances, according to new research.

4h

The structural basis of focal adhesion kinase activation on lipid membranes unravelled

A research team led by Daniel Lietha has just published in The EMBO Journal the mechanistic details of the activation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on lipid membranes. Lietha started this research during his work at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO) and has culminated it in his current institution, the Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas Margarita Salas (CIB-CSIC).

4h

Bees use shark 'supersense' to help find food

Flying insects such as bees and moths have secret senses that allow them to 'feel' nearby flowers and navigate over long distances, according to new research.

4h

The structural basis of focal adhesion kinase activation on lipid membranes unravelled

A research team led by Daniel Lietha has just published in The EMBO Journal the mechanistic details of the activation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) on lipid membranes. Lietha started this research during his work at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO) and has culminated it in his current institution, the Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas Margarita Salas (CIB-CSIC).

4h

Five tips for boosting diversity on campus

Nature, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02367-5 Universities and those who work there must reimagine spaces, behaviour and processes to promote a sense of belonging for everyone, say Danielle McCullough and Ruth Gotian.

4h

Dolphin study shows mammals age at different rates

A team of researchers from Epitracker, Inc. and Seraphina Therapeutics, Inc., working with the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program, has found that dolphins age at different rates. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of captive dolphins over a 25-year period and what they learned about them.

4h

Dolphin study shows mammals age at different rates

A team of researchers from Epitracker, Inc. and Seraphina Therapeutics, Inc., working with the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program, has found that dolphins age at different rates. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of captive dolphins over a 25-year period and what they learned about them.

4h

Air pollution could be making honey bees sick, says study

Whether it's exhaust fumes from cars or smoke from power plants, air pollution is an often invisible threat that is a leading cause of death worldwide. Breathing air laced with heavy metals, nitrogen oxides and fine particulate matter has been linked to a range of chronic health conditions, including lung problems, heart disease, stroke and cancer.

4h

Organocatalyst that controls radical reactions for complex and bulky compound synthesis

In catalytic reactions with organocatalysts, it is difficult to control radical reactions. We designed a thiazolium-type N-heterocyclic carbene catalyst having an N-neopentyl group. This catalyst was found to actively control radical reactions and enabled production of more than 35 species of bulky dialkyl ketones from an aliphatic aldehyde and an aliphatic carboxylic acid derivative through a rad

4h

Cricket umpires fumble on T20 calls

Cricket umpires struggle to please everyone at the best of time but the different formats of the game make it even harder for them, especially when it comes to LBW decisions. A PhD candidate in QUT's School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences has used data from Cricket Australia to conclude umpires are less accurate in calling LBW in T20 matches. His findings have just been published.

4h

Right under your nose: A more convenient way to diagnose Alzheimer's disease

Scientists from the Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Republic of Korea, discover a new way to diagnose Alzheimer's disease by analyzing the levels of specific proteins in nasal discharge. This simple and inexpensive method could help in timely diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, in order to start treatment as soon as possible, thus delaying disease progression.

4h

Giant photothermoelectric effect in silicon nanoribbon photodetectors

The photoelectric conversion has essential applications in energy and information devices. It is reported that up to 40% of the energy loss comes from heat dissipation and poor light absorption. Chinese and American scientists have successfully realized the giant photothermoelectric effect in silicon nanomaterials, which can harvest the excessive energy of photogenerated hot carriers and is promis

4h

Increased breast cancer risk in obesity linked to fat cell chemicals

Obesity increases the release of tumour-promoting molecules from fat tissue and is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, according to a study published in Endocrine-Related Cancer. The study found that fat tissue from people with obesity released increased amounts of extracellular vesicles (EV's) enriched in harmful and inflammatory molecules into the blood stream, which can alter br

4h

X-rays indicate that water can behave like a liquid crystal

Scientists at Stockholm University have discovered that water can exhibit a similar behavior like a liquid crystal when illuminated with laser light. This effect originates by the alignment of water molecules, which exhibit a mixture of low- and high-density domains that are more or less prone to alignment. The results, reported in Physics Review Letters on the 11th of August 2020, are based on a

4h

Most close relatives of birds neared the potential for powered flight but few crossed its thresholds

An international study led by HKU Research Assistant Professor Dr. Michael Pittman produced an updated evolutionary tree of early birds and their closest relatives to reconstruct powered flight potential, showing it evolved at least three times. Many ancestors of the closest bird relatives neared the thresholds of powered flight potential, suggesting broad experimentation with wing-assisted locomo

4h

Study unveils the unstable nature of some topological phases

In recent years, physicists worldwide have been conducting studies exploring the characteristics and dynamics of topological phases of matter that could enable the development of quantum devices and other new technologies. Some of these phases are supported by what is known as the time-reversal symmetry (TRS) of microscopic laws of nature.

4h

Air pollution could be making honey bees sick, says study

Whether it's exhaust fumes from cars or smoke from power plants, air pollution is an often invisible threat that is a leading cause of death worldwide. Breathing air laced with heavy metals, nitrogen oxides and fine particulate matter has been linked to a range of chronic health conditions, including lung problems, heart disease, stroke and cancer.

4h

Avian tree of life better resolved

Researchers led by Manfred Gahr of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen have investigated the relationship of bird families. For the first time, they have been able to clarify the relationship of all families of non-passerine birds and almost all families of passerine birds. The new family tree is based on gene sections that do not code for proteins, but contain sequences that are

4h

Use of neonicotinoids found to reduce some bird populations

A trio of researchers, two with the University of Illinois, the other Auburn University, has found that the use of neonicotinoid pesticides on farm crops leads to reductions in some bird populations. In their paper published in the journal Nature Sustainability, Yijia Li, Ruiqing Miao, and Madhu Khanna describe their study of neonicotinoid use and its effects on local bird populations.

4h

Perseid Meteor Shower 2020: Watch It Peak Tonight

Meteor showers can light up night skies from dusk to dawn, and if you're lucky you might be able to catch a glimpse.

4h

Avian tree of life better resolved

Researchers led by Manfred Gahr of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen have investigated the relationship of bird families. For the first time, they have been able to clarify the relationship of all families of non-passerine birds and almost all families of passerine birds. The new family tree is based on gene sections that do not code for proteins, but contain sequences that are

4h

Use of neonicotinoids found to reduce some bird populations

A trio of researchers, two with the University of Illinois, the other Auburn University, has found that the use of neonicotinoid pesticides on farm crops leads to reductions in some bird populations. In their paper published in the journal Nature Sustainability, Yijia Li, Ruiqing Miao, and Madhu Khanna describe their study of neonicotinoid use and its effects on local bird populations.

4h

Targeting the bacteria inside insects for improved pest management

Any home gardener knows of the long-running battle against insect pests.

4h

The Russian Vaccine

Many will have heard Russia's announcement that they have approved a coronavirus vaccine. I've already had several people ask me what I think of it, so let me be clear: I think it's a ridiculous publicity stunt. If it's supposed to make Russia look like some sort of biotechnology powerhouse, then as far as I'm concerned it does the opposite. It makes them look desperate, like the nation-state equ

4h

To change coronavirus behaviours, think like a marketer

COVID-19 has been a humbling experience. From a frayed pandemic early-warning system to a shortage of personal protective equipment for front-line workers, public health experts have been playing catch up.

4h

Targeting the bacteria inside insects for improved pest management

Any home gardener knows of the long-running battle against insect pests.

4h

Russia says it has a covid vaccine called "Sputnik-V"

Russia has cleared a vaccine against covid-19 for emergency use on health-care workers this fall. Fast advance: Russian president Vladimir Putin said during a meeting on Tuesday that the newly registered vaccine "has passed all the necessary tests" and that one of his daughters had received the inoculation. "She has taken part in the experiment," Putin said, according to the Associate d Press. Va

4h

Rates of dog bites in children up during COVID-19 pandemic

Greater rates of Colorado's children are going to the pediatric emergency department as a result of dog bites during the COVID-19 pandemic. The incidence of visits for dog bites to Children's Hospital Colorado's emergency department in spring 2020 was nearly triple that of last year's rates at the same time. Moreover, high rates of dog bite injuries have continued even as statewide stay-at-home or

4h

Clot permeability linked to first-attempt success of aspiration thrombectomy

A multicenter study reports that clot perviousness, or permeability – the ability for contrast used during the initial imaging workup to seep through a clot, as estimated by CT imaging – is associated with "first-pass success" in large vessel occlusion (LVO) strokes initially treated with an aspiration thrombectomy approach. LVO stroke treatment success using a stent retriever-first approach to re

4h

Classifying galaxies with artificial intelligence

Astronomers have applied artificial intelligence (AI) to ultra-wide field-of-view images of the distant Universe captured by the Subaru Telescope, and have achieved a very high accuracy for finding and classifying spiral galaxies in those images. This technique, in combination with citizen science, is expected to yield further discoveries in the future.

4h

Pasteurization inactivates COVID-19 virus in human milk: new research

A new study has confirmed what researchers already suspected to be the case: heat inactivates SARS-CoV-2 in human milk.

4h

Kenya's coast is losing huge amounts of seagrass. But all isn't lost

The UN environmental program has released a report warning that fishing trawlers, seaweed farming, and tourism off the coast of Kenya is threatening the survival of seagrasses. Moina Spooner, from The Conversation Africa, asked Lillian Daudi to explain why the grasses are important and what must be done to protect them.

4h

Coronavirus: health secretary Alex Azar expects US vaccine by December

Azar plays down significance of Russian vaccine progress Health secretary predicts 'tens of millions of doses' by year's end The US health secretary, Alex Azar, said on Tuesday morning that America hopes to have a coronavirus vaccine approved by December and tamped down Russia's celebrations over unveiling its own vaccine after rapid development. "The point is not to be first," Azar said. "The po

4h

Brännande smak

Det som ger den brännande upplevelsen när man äter spansk peppar (chili) är framför allt ett ämne som heter capsaicin, och också några närbesläktade ämnen. Att det känns brännande är ingen tillfällighet. Receptorproteinet TRPV1 i munslemhinnan reagerar på samma sätt på hetta, genom att släppa kalciumjoner genom ett membran.

4h

Kenya's coast is losing huge amounts of seagrass. But all isn't lost

The UN environmental program has released a report warning that fishing trawlers, seaweed farming, and tourism off the coast of Kenya is threatening the survival of seagrasses. Moina Spooner, from The Conversation Africa, asked Lillian Daudi to explain why the grasses are important and what must be done to protect them.

4h

Syv kommuner er i særligt corona-fokus

Myndighederne har ekstra fokus på Aarhus, Ringsted Silkeborg, Glostrup, Nyborg, Solrød og Sorø kommuner, efter at nye tal viser, at der er 20 eller flere nye coronatilfælde pr. 100.000.

4h

Livet i havet

[no content]

4h

4h

Listan: Rekordmånga söker till högskolan hösten 2020

Antal personer anmälda till högskoleutbildningar höstterminer 2007–2020, vid sista anmälningsdag. Källa: UHR

4h

Radio relics detected in the galaxy cluster SPT-CL J2032−5627

Using the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), astronomers have performed observations of a cluster of galaxies known as SPT-CL J2032−5627. They identified two radio relics that could improve our knowledge about this cluster. The finding is reported in a paper published August 3 on arXiv.org.

4h

COVID-19 could have a lasting, positive impact on workplace culture

The COVID-19 lockdown has become synonymous with working from home for many people. While some research has suggested that remote work can be isolating, it also makes the competing priorities that workers are juggling very visible—even sometimes literally so due to the popularity of video calls.

4h

The brain's autocomplete feature oversimplifies complex issues and impedes tolerance

Enter any of the following words into your browser's search bar: progressive, liberal, conservative, evangelical, right wing, gay, straight, Muslim, Republican or Democrat. Do you notice that other terms that the algorithms think are related appear automatically?

4h

How airplanes counteract St. Elmo's Fire during thunderstorms

At the height of a thunderstorm, the tips of cell towers, telephone poles, and other tall, electrically conductive structures can spontaneously emit a flash of blue light. This electric glow, known as a corona discharge, is produced when the air surrounding a conductive object is briefly ionized by an electrically charged environment.

4h

Secrets of Antarctic lake's microbes revealed

UNSW Science Professor Rick Cavicchioli is an expert in microbes and why they are so important—just last year, he led an urgent call for the world to stop ignoring this "unseen majority" in Earth's biodiversity and ecosystem when addressing climate change.

4h

Understanding the surface chemistry of SARS-CoV-2

Better understanding of the surface chemistry of the SARS-CoV-2 virus is needed to reduce transmission and accelerate vaccine design.

4h

Study reveals how lichens stayed together, split up, swapped partners, and changed form over 250 million years

Lichens may be the most easily overlooked life forms in nature. If you spend much time outside, you probably see some every day, although you might not know it—most people are likely to think they're moss. However, lichens aren't plants (which mosses are), but rather fungi that team up with algae and/or cyanobacteria to form a kind of composite organism. Although they rank relatively low on the bi

4h

Regionshospital Nordjylland får ny lægefaglig direktør

Søren Pihlkjær Hjortshøj bliver en del af hospitalsledelsen på Regionshospital Nordjylland sammen med hospitalsdirektør Henrik Larsen og plejefaglig direktør Charlotte Fuglesang.

4h

Understanding the surface chemistry of SARS-CoV-2

Better understanding of the surface chemistry of the SARS-CoV-2 virus is needed to reduce transmission and accelerate vaccine design.

4h

Study reveals how lichens stayed together, split up, swapped partners, and changed form over 250 million years

Lichens may be the most easily overlooked life forms in nature. If you spend much time outside, you probably see some every day, although you might not know it—most people are likely to think they're moss. However, lichens aren't plants (which mosses are), but rather fungi that team up with algae and/or cyanobacteria to form a kind of composite organism. Although they rank relatively low on the bi

4h

We don't know how accurate the UK's new rapid coronavirus tests are

Two new tests that diagnose covid-19 within 90 minutes are being rolled out by the UK government – and while both are promising, neither is supported by publicly available, independent evidence

4h

11 Supposedly Fun Things We'll Never Do the Same Way Again

The pandemic could change unexpected parts of our lives for years to come, experts say.

4h

Insect apocalypse? Not so fast, at least in North America

In recent years, the notion of an insect apocalypse has become a hot topic in the conservation science community and has captured the public's attention. Scientists who warn that this catastrophe is unfolding assert that arthropods—a large category of invertebrates that includes insects—are rapidly declining, perhaps signaling a general collapse of ecosystems across the world.

5h

Antibiotic resistance: How drug misuse in livestock farming is a problem for human health

Rearing animals for food takes time and requires hard work to maintain their health and well-being. Just as in humans, farm animals sometimes get sick and require drugs to treat infections. But organisms that cause infections are becoming increasingly resistant to the available drugs. This antimicrobial resistance increases the more a drug is used, and when it is used inappropriately.

5h

EULAR: Timely detection of axial spondyloarthritis

Axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) is associated with chronic back pain. Although the first symptoms frequently occur at an early age, often many years pass until the correct diagnosis is made. This is unsatisfactory as late diagnosis can lead to a poorer prognosis, more severe disease outcomes and delaying the start of effective therapies, thus impairing the quality of life of patients with axSpA.

5h

Insect apocalypse? Not so fast, at least in North America

In recent years, the notion of an insect apocalypse has become a hot topic in the conservation science community and has captured the public's attention. Scientists who warn that this catastrophe is unfolding assert that arthropods—a large category of invertebrates that includes insects—are rapidly declining, perhaps signaling a general collapse of ecosystems across the world.

5h

Antibiotic resistance: How drug misuse in livestock farming is a problem for human health

Rearing animals for food takes time and requires hard work to maintain their health and well-being. Just as in humans, farm animals sometimes get sick and require drugs to treat infections. But organisms that cause infections are becoming increasingly resistant to the available drugs. This antimicrobial resistance increases the more a drug is used, and when it is used inappropriately.

5h

Senolytics: A New Weapon in the War on Aging

Anti-aging drugs that remove harmful cells from our bodies could treat a range of diseases that plague the elderly.

5h

Cracking the Neural Code with Phantom Smells

Scientists used light to evoke an odor directly in a mouse brain—no nose involved — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Our Planet, Our Choice

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

How Scientists Solved One of the Greatest Open Questions in Quantum Physics

The story of a macroscopic quantum system and a mathematical odyssey — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Cracking the Neural Code with Phantom Smells

Scientists used light to evoke an odor directly in a mouse brain—no nose involved — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Aarhus Universitetshospital tager skånsomme hjerte-lungemaskiner i brug

Hjertekirurgerne på Aarhus Universitetshospital påviser, at såkaldte MINI-hjerte-lunge-maskiner er mere skånsomme for patienterne.

5h

Baggrund: Putin klar med vaccine inden endelige kliniske forsøg er gennemført

PLUS. Russerne vil producere i første omgang 30 mio. vacciner og senere skalere op til 170 mio. vacciner

5h

The Forged Gospel of Jesus's Wife, Hidden Castes and Other New Books to Read

These five August releases may have been lost in the news cycle

5h

Scientists create compact particle accelerators that drive electron beams nearer speed of light

Scientists have successfully developed a pocket-sized particle accelerator capable of projecting ultra-short electron beams with laser light at more than 99.99% of the speed of light.

5h

Black, Latino renters far more likely to be facing housing displacement during pandemic

A new study of the magnitude, pattern and causes of COVID-19's impact on California housing reveals that Blacks and Latinos are more than twice as likely as whites to be experiencing rent-related hardships.

5h

Excluding undocumented immigrants from stimulus funds cost $10 billion in economic activity

A UCLA study published today found the exclusion of undocumented residents and their families from the $1,200 stimulus payments given to taxpayers a result of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a loss of $10 billion in potential economic output.

5h

A warming California sets the stage for future floods

By the 2070s, global warming will increase extreme rainfall and reduce snowfall in the Sierra Nevada, delivering a double whammy that will likely overwhelm California's reservoirs and heighten the risk of flooding in much of the state, according to a new study by UCLA climate scientists.

5h

Flavonoids' presence in sorghum roots may lead to frost-resistant crop

Flavonoid compounds—produced by the roots of some sorghum plants—positively affect soil microorganisms, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest the discovery is an early step in developing a frost-resistant line of the valuable crop for North American farmers.

5h

Flavonoids' presence in sorghum roots may lead to frost-resistant crop

Flavonoid compounds—produced by the roots of some sorghum plants—positively affect soil microorganisms, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest the discovery is an early step in developing a frost-resistant line of the valuable crop for North American farmers.

5h

'As the tundra burns, we cannot afford climate silence': a letter from the Arctic | Victoria Herrmann

I study the Arctic. The decision to withdraw from the Paris climate accord is reprehensible – but we can't give up hope When you stand facing an exposed edge of permafrost, you can feel it from a distance. It emanates a cold that tugs on every one of your senses. Permanently bound by ice year after year, the frozen soil is packed with carcasses of woolly mammoths and ancient ferns. They're unable

5h

3 ways to study better, according to cognitive research

Whether you are a student or the parent of one contending with coronavirus school closures, this year "back to school" means studying under some unusual circumstances.

5h

Impact of COVID-19 has created stark discrepancies in students' experiences of taking A Levels, says new study

Research from the University of Birmingham and University of Nottingham has indicated some stark discrepancies in students' experiences of taking A-levels this year.

5h

How to Stay One Step Ahead of Donald Trump

T he joke, a throwaway quip , somehow captured the man and the moment—the end of one era, and the beginning of another. It was January 2017, and then–British Prime Minister Theresa May was in the White House, the first foreign leader to visit the new president of the United States, Donald Trump. For May, the trip had gone well: Pleasantries had been exchanged, faux pas avoided, commitments to NAT

5h

Can ageing really be 'treated' or 'cured'? An evolutionary biologist explains

As time passes, our fertility declines and our bodies start to fail. These natural changes are what we call aging.

5h

The best kites to seize windy days

Fun flying in the sky. (Anna Kolosyuk via Unsplash/) Has there ever been a kite flying at the beach that wasn't, to some degree, entertaining? You can take a kite along to a camping site or a picnic at the park, or on your winter holiday to a warmer destination. With the right design, material, and sturdiness to withstand high winds, quality kites will last for countless uses — and bring you the

5h

Can ageing really be 'treated' or 'cured'? An evolutionary biologist explains

As time passes, our fertility declines and our bodies start to fail. These natural changes are what we call aging.

5h

Tensions rise on coronavirus handling as the media take control of the accountability narrative

Media coverage of disasters follows a broadly similar trajectory, even though the disasters themselves might take very different forms.

5h

Classifying galaxies with artificial intelligence

Astronomers have applied artificial intelligence (AI) to ultra-wide field-of-view images of the distant Universe captured by the Subaru Telescope, and have achieved a very high accuracy for finding and classifying spiral galaxies in those images. This technique, in combination with citizen science, is expected to yield further discoveries in the future.

5h

Most close relatives of birds neared the potential for powered flight but few crossed its thresholds

Uncertainties in the evolutionary tree of birds and their closest relatives have impeded deeper understanding of early flight in theropods, the group of dinosaurs that includes birds. To help address this, an international study led by HKU Research Assistant Professor Dr. Michael Pittman (Vertebrate Paleontology Laboratory, Division of Earth and Planetary Science & Department of Earth Sciences) an

5h

Blood test flags youth at risk for later diabetes

A simple blood test that doesn't require overnight fasting can be an accurate screening tool for identifying young people at risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease risk later in life, researchers report. The results suggest that health officials should use the simple blood test, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), more frequently to screen young people for diabetes and related health risks. The HbA1c tes

5h

Researchers identify a protein that may help SARS-CoV-2 spread rapidly through cells

Eric Ross and Sean Cascarina, biochemistry and molecular biology researchers at Colorado State University, have released a research paper identifying a protein encoded by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, that may be associated with the quick spread of the virus through cells in the human body.

5h

For bacteria, a small genome means some serious decluttering—even in the ribosome

Researchers from Skoltech, Lomonosov Moscow State University and the Kharkevich Institute for Information Transmission Problems have studied the genomes of some 200 strains of bacteria to determine which proteins in the ribosome, part of the key cell machinery, can be safely lost and why. The paper was published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution.

5h

Researchers reveal hierarchical transcriptional regulatory network for plant somatic embryogenesis

Owing to their sessile nature, plants maintain cell pluripotency or totipotency throughout their life cycles. Somatic plant cells are able to regenerate themselves in response to mechanical stimuli, or to go through somatic embryogenesis to regenerate whole plants. Since first documented in 1950s, somatic embryogenesis has become a powerful tool in plant biotechnology for propagation of endangered

5h

Researchers develop novel autonomous dynamic regulation system in streptomyces

Microbes have been engineered as renewable cell factories for producing a vast array of products, such as pharmaceuticals, biofuels and bio-chemicals. However, static engineering strategies often result in metabolic imbalance, pathway intermediate accumulation and growth retardation, limiting product titers and yields.

5h

New method captures neural and vascular dynamics at high spatiotemporal resolution deep in brain

A joint research team led by Dr. Wang Kai and Dr. Du Jiulin from the Institute of Neuroscience, Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported a novel volumetric imaging method—confocal light field microscopy (Confocal LFM)—to image fast neural and vascular dynamics at high speed, deep in the brain.

5h

Menopausal woman gives birth after blood plasma injection in ovaries

Five out of 60 women who were menopausal or transiting into the menopause became pregnant after having their own blood plasma injected into their ovaries, according to results of a pilot study

5h

Main Belt asteroid Psyche might be the remnant of a planet that never fully formed

New 2-D and 3-D computer modeling of impacts on the asteroid Psyche, the largest Main Belt asteroid, indicate it is probably metallic and porous in composition, something like a flying cosmic rubble pile. Knowing this will be critical to NASA's forthcoming asteroid mission, Psyche: Journey to a Metal World, that launches in 2022.

5h

A team of international physicists join forces in hunt for sterile neutrinos

An international group of more than 260 scientists have produced one of the most stringent tests for the existence of sterile neutrinos to date. The scientists from two major international experimental groups, MINOS+ at the Department of Energy's Fermilab and Daya Bay in China, are reporting results in Physical Review Letters ruling out oscillations into one sterile neutrino as the primary explana

5h

Researchers identify a protein that may help SARS-CoV-2 spread rapidly through cells

Eric Ross and Sean Cascarina, biochemistry and molecular biology researchers at Colorado State University, have released a research paper identifying a protein encoded by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, that may be associated with the quick spread of the virus through cells in the human body.

5h

For bacteria, a small genome means some serious decluttering—even in the ribosome

Researchers from Skoltech, Lomonosov Moscow State University and the Kharkevich Institute for Information Transmission Problems have studied the genomes of some 200 strains of bacteria to determine which proteins in the ribosome, part of the key cell machinery, can be safely lost and why. The paper was published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution.

5h

Researchers reveal hierarchical transcriptional regulatory network for plant somatic embryogenesis

Owing to their sessile nature, plants maintain cell pluripotency or totipotency throughout their life cycles. Somatic plant cells are able to regenerate themselves in response to mechanical stimuli, or to go through somatic embryogenesis to regenerate whole plants. Since first documented in 1950s, somatic embryogenesis has become a powerful tool in plant biotechnology for propagation of endangered

5h

Researchers develop novel autonomous dynamic regulation system in streptomyces

Microbes have been engineered as renewable cell factories for producing a vast array of products, such as pharmaceuticals, biofuels and bio-chemicals. However, static engineering strategies often result in metabolic imbalance, pathway intermediate accumulation and growth retardation, limiting product titers and yields.

5h

New method captures neural and vascular dynamics at high spatiotemporal resolution deep in brain

A joint research team led by Dr. Wang Kai and Dr. Du Jiulin from the Institute of Neuroscience, Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported a novel volumetric imaging method—confocal light field microscopy (Confocal LFM)—to image fast neural and vascular dynamics at high speed, deep in the brain.

5h

Calculating the best fabrication strategy for organic electronic components

Semiconductors made of organic materials, e.g. for light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and solar cells, could replace or supplement silicon-based electronics in the future. The efficiency of such devices depends crucially on the quality of thin layers of such organic semiconductors. These layers are created by coating or printing "inks" that contain the material. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute

5h

A highly light-absorbent and tunable material

By layering different two-dimensional materials, physicists at the University of Basel have created a novel structure with the ability to absorb almost all light of a selected wavelength. The achievement relies on a double layer of molybdenum disulfide. The new structure's particular properties make it a candidate for applications in optical components or as a source of individual photons, which p

5h

New shrimp species discovered in Panama's Coiba National Park

John Steinbeck wrote Log From the Sea of Cortez in 1951, his chronicle of an expedition with marine biologist Ed Ricketts along the coast of California and Mexico. Ricketts named several of the many new marine animals they found after Steinbeck, his friend and patron of the expedition. On a similar expedition in February 2019 to Panama's Coiba National Park in the Pacific Ocean, marine biologists

5h

NASA's InSight Mars Lander Reveals What's Inside the Red Planet

Scientists believe Mars was much more similar to Earth in the distant past, not the dried-up ball of dust it is today. Understanding Mars could help us better understand how planets form, and the NASA InSight mission has the tools to get us there. Using the seismometer on the lander, researchers from Rice University have peeled back the layers below the surface of the red planet like a giant, dus

5h

New shrimp species discovered in Panama's Coiba National Park

John Steinbeck wrote Log From the Sea of Cortez in 1951, his chronicle of an expedition with marine biologist Ed Ricketts along the coast of California and Mexico. Ricketts named several of the many new marine animals they found after Steinbeck, his friend and patron of the expedition. On a similar expedition in February 2019 to Panama's Coiba National Park in the Pacific Ocean, marine biologists

5h

Peatland carbon and nitrogen stocks vulnerable to permafrost thaw

Northern peatlands hold large stocks of carbon and nitrogen and thus play a key role in global climate dynamics. However, their vulnerability to climate warming is uncertain, due in part to a lack of spatially explicit, observation-based peatland maps. This is shown in a study published in PNAS of, among others, researchers at Umeå University.

5h

Laser beams reflected between Earth and moon boost science

Dozens of times over the last decade NASA scientists have launched laser beams at a reflector the size of a paperback novel about 240,000 miles (385,000 kilometers) away from Earth. They announced today, in collaboration with their French colleagues, that they received signal back for the first time, an encouraging result that could enhance laser experiments used to study the physics of the univer

5h

More COVID-19 knowledge may cut your pandemic stress

The more people know about COVID-19, the less pandemic-related stress they have, according to a new study. Further, the researchers found that making plans to reduce stress was also effective for older adults—but not for adults in their 40s or younger. "COVID-19 is a new disease—it's not something that people worried about before," says coauthor Shevaun Neupert, a professor of psychology at North

5h

Staten skal forsikre os mod skader fra kunstig intelligens

Tech-giganterne kæmper for at være først med de smarteste kunstige intelligenser, mens…

5h

Track COVID-19 sickness, not just positive tests and deaths

Nature, Published online: 11 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02335-z Define 'recovery': that the virus leaves many ill for weeks or months must shape pandemic policy.

5h

Foodies and Factory Farmers Have Formed an Unholy Alliance

Their swipes at fake-meat products—Impossible Burgers, Beyond Meat, and all the rest—are pretty much the same.

5h

The safest way to travel during the pandemic

Think about how many people you'll bump into, and how long you'll be in transit, before booking those tickets. (Pexels/) Summer is in full swing, and nobody would blame you if a trip to the beach or your favorite city is tempting you. But even if you are itching for a vacation outside of your living room, there's a few things to consider—namely where you're going and how exactly you're going to g

6h

Russia Approves Coronavirus Vaccine Before Completing Tests

The country's regulators became the first in the world to approve a possible vaccine against the virus, despite warnings from the global authorities against cutting corners.

6h

Ceres an Ocean World

It seems we can add the dwarf planet, Ceres , to the list of ocean worlds in the solar system. These are planets or moons that have vast oceans beneath their surface – Earth is the only world with stable liquid water on its surface. These worlds are of particular interest because liquid water means the potential for life. Ceres is the largest object in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

6h

Dofterna som styr malariamyggans fortplantning

Nytt genombrott i forskningen kring malariamyggans fortplantningsprocess visar att hanmyggor i stora svärmar attraherar honor genom att avge speciella dofter. Resultaten kan ge nya möjligheter att bekämpa spridningen av en rad olika sjukdomar. Världens dödligaste djur, myggsläktet anopheles, mer känd som malariamyggan, sprider en lång rad sjukdomar, bland annat malaria, denguefeber, gula febern,

6h

Lebanon's Tragedy Is All Too Familiar

"That the Lebanese have suffered so much both for reasons beyond their control and because of the fickleness of their political machine is a tragedy," the American Enterprise Institute scholar Michael Rubin wrote in the Washington Examiner after last week's horrific explosion in a Beirut port. Only "when the Lebanese people shirk off corrupt and incompetent elites and a political culture where to

6h

Milne Ice Shelf: Satellites capture Arctic ice split

The Planet Earth-observation company releases new imagery of Canada's broken Milne Ice Shelf.

6h

Solve the Covid-19 Testing Crunch, Win $5 Million

For decades, governments and private organizations like Xprize have put up prizes to spur scientific innovation. But how much can contests help in a crisis?

6h

Coronavirus Live Updates: Worldwide Cases Reach 20 Million

Russia is the first country to approve a vaccine, and its announcement raises fears that the country is rushing for political purposes. The number of virus cases worldwide has now passed 20 million.

7h

Trash-Collecting Researchers Find Dietary Patterns in Discarded Hair Clippings

People in low-income neighborhoods eat more proteins from animals and less of them from vegetables, a study suggests — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Efter nye miljøundersøgelser skal kemisk genanvendte plastprodukter på markedet

PLUS. Den tyske kemigigant BASF har fået lavet tre livscyklusanalyser af deres pyrolyseproces, der blandt andet viser, at processen udleder halvt så meget CO2, som hvis den blandede plast blev sendt til forbrænding.

7h

Deworming Pill For Kids Linked To Better Wages When They Grow Up

An inexpensive way to help kids in poor countries: hand out deworming pills so they're healthy enough to stay in school. A study by a Nobel Prize winner finds 20 years on, they earn higher wages too.

7h

Trash-Collecting Researchers Find Dietary Patterns in Discarded Hair Clippings

People in low-income neighborhoods eat more proteins from animals and less of them from vegetables, a study suggests — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Leave a Reply