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Nyheder2020august12

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New species of dinosaur discovered on Isle of Wight

A new study by Palaeontologists at the University of Southampton suggests four bones recently found on the Isle of Wight belong to new species of theropod dinosaur, the group that includes Tyrannosaurus rex and modern-day birds.

20h

Ford advarer: Stop opladning af populær plug-in hybrid

Knap 3.000 danske bilejere må indtil videre ikke oplade deres nye Kuga Plug-in Hybrid. Det skyldes mistanke om overophedning og brandfare ved opladning.

9h

Næsten hver tredje ansat på akutafdeling har antistoffer mod coronavirus

Blodprøver fra hospitalsansatte i Region Midtjylland viser, at 12 pct. af de ansatte på Hospitalsenheden Vest har antistoffer mod coronavirus. På hospitalets akutafdeling er det 30 pct.

7

Searching the ancient depths of a reptilian genome yields insight into all vertebrates

An Iowa State University scientists contributed to a global effort to assemble the genome of the tuatara, a rare reptile species native to New Zealand. The tuatara genome sheds light on the genomic structure of a huge range of species, including humans.

5min

Mutations may have saved brown howlers from yellow fever virus

From 2007 to 2009, a devastating yellow fever virus outbreak nearly decimated brown and black and gold howler monkey populations at El Parque El Piñalito in northeastern Argentina. An international research team tested if howlers who survived the outbreak had any genetic variations that may have kept them alive. In brown howlers, they found two mutations on immune genes that resulted in amino acid

5min

'Reelin' in a new treatment for multiple sclerosis

In an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), decreasing the amount of a protein made in the liver significantly protected against development of the disease's characteristic symptoms and promoted recovery in symptomatic animals, UTSW scientists report.

5min

Human milk based fortifiers improve health outcomes for the smallest premature babies

More than 380,000 babies are born prematurely in the United States each year, according to the March of Dimes. 'Preemies' can be severely underweight babies and struggle to get the nutrients they need from breast milk alone, so neonatal intensive care units provide an additional milk fortifier, either in the form of cow's milk or manufactured from donor breast milk, to keep them healthy.

5min

No increased skin cancer risk with topical immunosuppressant ointments

Two topical immunosuppressant medications commonly prescribed to treat skin conditions do not appear to increase the risk for the most common forms of skin cancer, despite package label warnings to the contrary.

5min

Study provides insights into how Zika virus suppresses the host immune system

A research team led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has outlined how the Zika virus, which constituted an epidemic threat in 2016, suppresses the immune system of its host. The work provides valuable structural and functional information on the interaction between ZIKV and its host and offers a framework for the development of vaccines and antivirals.

5min

Scientists see an earthquake boomerang back and forth in the Atlantic

An earthquake ran quickly east before turning west beneath the Atlantic Ocean near the equator in 2016. Such earthquakes are likely to pack significantly more destructive power. Land-based boomerang earthquakes may have been witnessed, but have never been recorded seismographically. It was definitely an odd story Rosario García González told in the summer of 2010. González is an elder of the indi

10min

Write in style for life with this 100% inkless wooden stylus

Styluses date back to ancient Mesopotamia and are considered the original writing instruments. With no lead, graphite, or ink cartridges, this stylus will last a lifetime without replacement parts. Two top Italian design companies worked together to create this unique stylus. Ancient Mesopotamians used styluses to write in cuneiform. Egyptians used reed styluses in order to write hieroglyphs. Wes

10min

Arecibo radio telescope goes dark after snapped cable shreds dish

Iconic instrument could be offline for months

13min

'We're losing an entire generation of scientists.' COVID-19's economic toll hits Latin America hard

The pandemic has given science a chance to shine—but budget cuts in many countries threaten its future

13min

Disturbed Microbes Contribute to Lung Damage from Oxygen Treatment

In humans, higher oxygen levels during ventilation is tied to an altered bacterial composition in the lungs, and mouse experiments show a causative link.

19min

What are your research interests? | Community Feedback Thread | Aug 10 – Aug 17, 2020

What area of cognitive science are you most excited about? What sort of research do you work on, what fields do you keep up with? Is there a domain in cognitive science you'd want to see more of on this sub? We want to hear from you! You should also feel free to use this thread to make any suggestions / give feedback for what you'd like to see from the sub. The mod team is always happy to hear yo

21min

The speed of human social interaction perception (Isik, et al., 2020)

submitted by /u/MostlyAffable [link] [comments]

21min

21min

Bizarre Apple Patent Describes Self-Aware AirPods

Self-Correcting Apple just filed a patent that would make AirPods a whole lot more self-aware. Not in a "this is how the AI revolution starts" way, mind you. At least, we don't think so. Rather, as Business Insider reports , the tech would give AirPods — technically the patent mentions a "wearable audio device" but, come on, let's be real, it's AirPods — the ability to automatically adjust volume

24min

Programmed bacteria have something extra

Rice University chemists expand the genetic code of Escherichia coli bacteria to produce a synthetic building block, a "noncanonical amino acid" that makes it a living indicator for oxidative stress. The research is a step toward designed cells that detect disease and produce their own drugs.

27min

Short-term use of HIV-prevention medication protects at-risk men on vacation

Men at particular risk for HIV are very likely to consistently take prevention medication during vacations when their odds of contracting the virus are higher, according to a new study. The findings indicate that short-term use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) medication could be a highly successful way to prevent the spread of HIV in men who have sex with men and have difficulty with long-term

27min

'We're losing an entire generation of scientists.' COVID-19's economic toll hits Latin America hard

The pandemic has given science a chance to shine—but budget cuts in many countries threaten its future

27min

August 2020 Interactive Crossword Puzzle

Try your hand at a sciency brainteaser.

40min

New prediction model can forecast personalized risk for COVID-19-related hospitalization

Researchers have developed and validated a risk prediction model (called a nomogram) that can help physicians predict which patients who have recently tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, are at greatest risk for hospitalization.

41min

Male Brazilian frog stays loyal to two females in 'harem'

A species of frog from the Brazilian rainforest has become the first amphibian shown to live in a harem, where one male mates with two females who remain loyal to him.

54min

Take your career to the next level by raising your EQ

Daniel Goleman's 1995 book Emotional Intelligence catapulted the term into widespread use in the business world. One study found that EQ (emotional intelligence) is the top predictor of performance and accounts for 58% of success across all job types. EQ has been found to increase annual pay by around $29,000 and be present in 90% of top performers. Emotional intelligence helps us to recognize ho

55min

NASA finds hurricane Elida's eye covered

NASA's Aqua satellite obtained visible imagery of Hurricane Elida in the Eastern Pacific as it continued to weaken. Imagery revealed that Elida's eye had become covered as the storm embarks on a weakening trend over cooler waters.

57min

Male Brazilian frog stays loyal to two females in 'harem'

A species of frog from the Brazilian rainforest has become the first amphibian shown to live in a harem, where one male mates with two females who remain loyal to him.

57min

Young children would rather explore than get rewards

Young children will pass up rewards they know they can collect to explore other options, a new study suggests. Researchers found that when adults and 4- to 5-year-old children played a game where certain choices earned them rewards, both adults and children quickly learned what choices would give them the biggest returns. But while adults then used that knowledge to maximize their prizes, children

1h

Impact of family income on learning in children shaped by hippocampus in brain

A new study by a team of researchers at the University of Toronto identifies the region of the brain's hippocampus that links low income with decreased memory and language ability in children. The research shows it is the anterior hippocampus that is associated with differences in cognition related to income.

1h

Stay-at-home orders significantly associated with reduced spread of COVID-19, study finds

As COVID-19 swept across the nation, most states went into lockdown — new research and state-by-state data suggests that stay-at-home orders helped slow the pandemic significantly.

1h

Some dinosaurs could fly before they were birds

New research using the most comprehensive study of feathered dinosaurs and early birds has revised the evolutionary relationships of dinosaurs at the origin of birds. An international team of researchers, including McGill University Professor Hans Larsson published their findings in the journal Current Biology. The team pored over fossils, developed a novel analytical pipeline to search for evolut

1h

Some physicians are ordering thyroid tests for unsupported reasons

Up to one-third of physicians reported sending patients for a thyroid ultrasound for reasons not supported by clinical care guidelines, a new study led by University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center researchers finds. Routine use of ultrasounds to detect cancerous thyroid nodules have led to a significant increase in thyroid cancer cases in recent years, although many are low-risk and unlikely to c

1h

Unlocking how cellular proteins control cancer spread

A new insight into cell signals that control cancer growth and migration could help in the search for effective anti-cancer drugs. A McGill-led study reveals key biochemical processes that advance our understanding of colorectal cancer, the third most common cancer among Canadians.

1h

NASA finds hurricane Elida's eye covered

NASA's Aqua satellite obtained visible imagery of Hurricane Elida in the Eastern Pacific as it continued to weaken. Imagery revealed that Elida's eye had become covered as the storm embarks on a weakening trend over cooler waters.

1h

Face mask insert could help diagnose disease conditions, study shows

Given current events, many people are wearing face masks to protect themselves and others. But that same face mask could someday also collect useful health information. Researchers reporting in ACS' Analytical Chemistry have demonstrated that a fiber inserted into an ordinary N95 face mask can collect compounds in exhaled breath aerosols for analysis. The new method could allow screening for disea

1h

Suomi NPP satellite finds stubborn tropical depression 06W

Tropical Depression 06W has been around for days, and continues to hold together as it moves in a westerly direction toward Taiwan in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of the storm.

1h

Demographics data helps predict NY flood insurance claims

In flood-prone areas of the Hudson River valley in New York state, census areas with more white and affluent home owners tend to file a higher percentage of flood insurance claims than lower-income, minority residents, raising the issue of developing more nuanced, need-based federal flood insurance subsidies in these floodplains, according to a new study.

1h

Engaging undergrads remotely with an escape room game

To prevent the spread of COVID-19, many universities canceled classes or held them online this spring—a change likely to continue for many this fall. As a result, hands-on chemistry labs are no longer accessible to undergraduate students. In a new study in the Journal of Chemical Education, researchers describe an alternative way to engage students: a virtual game, modeled on an escape room, in wh

1h

COVID-19 clinical trials lack diversity

Despite disproportionately higher rates of COVID-19 infection, hospitalization and death among people of color, minority groups are significantly underrepresented in COVID-19 clinical trials.

1h

Facial recognition in schools risks making racism worse

Officials should ban the use of facial recognition technology in schools, according to new research that cites the heightened risk of racism and potential for privacy erosion. The study comes at a time when debates over returning to in-person school in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic are consuming administrators and teachers, who need to decide which technologies will best serve public health a

1h

Everything you need to know about Russia's coronavirus vaccine claims

Russia has given regulatory approval to a covid-19 vaccine, amid concerns about the level of testing it has undergone. Here's what you need to know about the Sputnik V vaccine

1h

Nations buying up covid-19 vaccine doses endanger pandemic efforts

A vaccine against the coronavirus needs to reach vulnerable people in all countries if we want to stop the virus, but some countries are buying up future stocks to protect their nationals

1h

Trials Seek to Answer if Vitamin D Could Help in COVID-19

In clinical studies worldwide, researchers are testing the possibility that supplements of the vitamin could prevent or decrease the severity of SARS-CoV-2 infections.

1h

He Doesn't Mind Being Shared, Unless His Mates Try to Eat Each Other's Eggs

A Brazilian frog species engages in reproductive behavior never seen in amphibians before.

1h

Tesla Designer Reinvents the Chocolate Chip

Breaking News! If it ain't broke, spend millions of dollars fixing it anyway . It's a common rallying cry of the Silicon Valley entrepreneurial spirit , and Tesla senior industrial designer Remy Labesque is heeding the call with his new, weirdly high-tech chocolate chips. That's right. In his spare time, Labesque works for the chocolate startup Dandelion Chocolate, which Business Insider reports

1h

UK Covid death toll revised down by 5,377 after data review

New methodology of counting daily figures brings England in line with rest of nation

1h

Emerging infectious disease and challenges of social distancing in human and non-human animals

Humans are not the only social animal struggling with new infectious diseases. This review examines the behavioral responses to emerging diseases across the animal kingdom from frogs and wolves to lobsters, bats, and humans. The paper also addresses whether or not technology helps when it comes to dealing with humans and social distancing.

1h

Demographics data helps predict NY flood insurance claims

In flood-prone areas of the Hudson River valley in New York state, census areas with more white and affluent home owners tend to file a higher percentage of flood insurance claims than lower-income, minority residents, according to a new study.

1h

First in Human Study with Novel Antisense Oligonucleotide

A single intravenous dose of MRG-110, an anti-microRNA drug, significantly reduced miR-92a levels in the blood of healthy humans.

1h

Research Finds Women Often Overprescribed Opioids After Childbirth

Excessive opioid prescriptions following childbirth may lead to higher rates of addiction within communities, according to a new report in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

1h

Early spread of COVID-19 appears far greater than initially reported

Patients with undiagnosed flu symptoms who actually had COVID-19 last winter were among thousands of undetected early cases of the disease at the beginning of this year. In a new paper in The Lancet's open-access journal EClinicalMedicine, epidemiological researchers from The University of Texas at Austin estimated COVID-19 to be far more widespread in Wuhan, China, and Seattle, Washington, weeks

1h

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite finds a stubborn tropical depression 06W

Tropical Depression 06W has been around for days, and continues to hold together as it moves in a westerly direction toward Taiwan in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of the storm.

1h

Oxygen therapy harms lung microbiome in mice

A new mouse study hints that oxygen therapy may have unintended consequences via an unexpected source–the microbiome.

1h

New research reveals mysterious blue whirl flame structure

A recently discovered soot-free flame called a blue whirl – which consumes all fuel it encounters — actually consists of three different flame structures that swirl together into one otherworldly blue ring, according to the first study to identify how these unique flames form. By revealing the blue whirl's structure, the findings may inform potential applications of the flame for.

1h

Cremation in the Middle-East dates as far back as 7,000 B.C.

The gender of the human remains found inside a cremation pyre pit in Beisamoun, Israel remains unknown. What is known is that the individual was a young adult injured by a flint projectile several months prior to their death in spring some 9,000 years ago. Preserved due to it being buried, the pit represents the oldest proof of direct cremation in the Middle-East, according to an international tea

1h

Coffee stains inspire optimal printing technique for electronics

Using an alcohol mixture, researchers modified how ink droplets dry, enabling cheap industrial-scale printing of electronic devices at unprecedented scales.

1h

The oldest known cremation in the near east dates to 7000 BC

Ancient people in the Near East had begun the practice of intentionally cremating their dead by the beginning of the 7th millennium BC, according to a study published August 12, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Fanny Bocquentin of the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and colleagues.

1h

Why black rhinos may get sick in captivity

Inflammation and oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of iron overload disorder in captive black rhinoceroses, making this syndrome a potential common denominator to various diseases described in captivity in this species, according to a study published August 12 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hanae Pouillevet of Oniris Nantes-Atlantic National College of Veterinary Medicin

1h

A novel strategy for quickly identifying twitter trolls

Two algorithms that account for distinctive use of repeated words and word pairs require as few as 50 tweets to accurately distinguish deceptive "troll" messages from those posted by public figures. Sergei Monakhov of Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany, presents these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on August 12, 2020.

1h

PLOS special collection launch

On August 12 2020, a Special Collection of articles addressing how to improve access to safe, quality medicines in East Africa by simplifying the regulatory processes in the region was published in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine. The five articles in the collection all look at how the East African Community (EAC)'s Medicines Regulatory Harmonization (MRH) initiative has aimed to solve this

1h

Bouncing, sticking, exploding viruses: Understanding the surface chemistry of SARS-CoV-2

Researchers highlight the need to understand the different environmental conditions that affect the surface chemistry of viruses like SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease COVID-19.

1h

Global report: Germany reports highest cases since May as Brussels mandates face masks

German outbreaks sparked by holidaymakers returning home; Paris cancels marathon Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Covid-19 infections hit a three-month high in Germany and face masks were made compulsory in public throughout the Brussels region as the accelerating spread of the virus continued to ring alarm bells across Europe. As schools in the country's most populou

1h

Unexpected reproductive fidelity in a polygynous frog

Polygynous mating systems with group fidelity are a common animal organization, typically consisting of multiple females in a mated group with a single male for an extended period (sometimes referred to as harem polygyny). Single-male polygyny with reproductive fidelity occurs in invertebrates, bony fishes, and some tetrapods, such as lizards, mammals, and birds. In amphibians, reproductive fidel

1h

Extracellular vesicle-encapsulated IL-10 as novel nanotherapeutics against ischemic AKI

Recently, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been attracting strong research interest for use as natural drug delivery systems. We report an approach to manufacturing interleukin-10 (IL-10)–loaded EVs (IL-10 + EVs) by engineering macrophages for treating ischemic acute kidney injury (AKI). Delivery of IL-10 via EVs enhanced not only the stability of IL-10, but also its targeting to the kidney due

1h

Fluoroalkylation promotes cytosolic peptide delivery

Cytosolic delivery of peptides remains a challenging task owing to their susceptibility to enzymatic degradation and the existence of multiple intracellular barriers. Here, we report a new strategy to address these issues by decoration of a fluorous tag on the terminal of cargo peptides. The fluorous-tagged peptides were assembled into nanostructures, efficiently internalized by cells via several

1h

EED-mediated histone methylation is critical for CNS myelination and remyelination by inhibiting WNT, BMP, and senescence pathways

Mutations in the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) can cause Weaver-like syndrome, wherein a patient cohort exhibits abnormal white matter; however, PRC2 functions in CNS myelination and regeneration remain elusive. We show here that H3K27me3, the PRC2 catalytic product, increases during oligodendrocyte maturation. Depletion of embryonic ectoderm development (EED), a core PRC2 subunit, reduces

1h

Termination switching of antiferromagnetic proximity effect in topological insulator

This work reports the ferromagnetism of topological insulator, (Bi,Sb) 2 Te 3 (BST), with a Curie temperature of approximately 120 K induced by magnetic proximity effect (MPE) of an antiferromagnetic CrSe. The MPE was shown to be highly dependent on the stacking order of the heterostructure, as well as the interface symmetry: Growing CrSe on top of BST results in induced ferromagnetism, while gro

1h

Metabolic multistability and hysteresis in a model aerobe-anaerobe microbiome community

Major changes in the microbiome are associated with health and disease. Some microbiome states persist despite seemingly unfavorable conditions, such as the proliferation of aerobe-anaerobe communities in oxygen-exposed environments in wound infections or small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Mechanisms underlying transitions into and persistence of these states remain unclear. Using two microbi

1h

The structure of the blue whirl revealed

The blue whirl is a small, stable, spinning blue flame that evolved spontaneously in recent laboratory experiments while studying turbulent, sooty fire whirls. It burns a range of different liquid hydrocarbon fuels cleanly with no soot production, presenting a previously unknown potential way for low-emission combustion. Here, we use numerical simulations to present the flame and flow structure o

1h

Cellular diversity of the regenerating caudal fin

Zebrafish faithfully regenerate their caudal fin after amputation. During this process, both differentiated cells and resident progenitors migrate to the wound site and undergo lineage-restricted, programmed cellular state transitions to populate the new regenerate. Until now, systematic characterizations of cells comprising the new regenerate and molecular definitions of their state transitions

1h

A general ink formulation of 2D crystals for wafer-scale inkjet printing

Recent advances in inkjet printing of two-dimensional (2D) crystals show great promise for next-generation printed electronics development. Printing nonuniformity, however, results in poor reproducibility in device performance and remains a major impediment to their large-scale manufacturing. At the heart of this challenge lies the coffee-ring effect (CRE), ring-shaped nonuniform deposits formed

1h

Gliotoxin, identified from a screen of fungal metabolites, disrupts 7SK snRNP, releases P-TEFb, and reverses HIV-1 latency

A leading pharmacological strategy toward HIV cure requires "shock" or activation of HIV gene expression in latently infected cells with latency reversal agents (LRAs) followed by their subsequent clearance. In a screen for novel LRAs, we used fungal secondary metabolites as a source of bioactive molecules. Using orthogonal mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to latency reversal bioassays, we identifi

1h

Cryo-EM structures of SERCA2b reveal the mechanism of regulation by the luminal extension tail

Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ ATPase (SERCA) pumps Ca 2+ from the cytosol into the ER and maintains the cellular calcium homeostasis. Herein, we present cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of human SERCA2b in E1•2Ca 2+ –adenylyl methylenediphosphonate (AMPPCP) and E2-BeF 3 – states at 2.9- and 2.8-Å resolutions, respectively. The structures revealed that the luminal extension tail (

1h

Internal friction controls active ciliary oscillations near the instability threshold

Ciliary oscillations driven by molecular motors cause fluid motion at micron scale. Stable oscillations require a substantial source of dissipation to balance the energy input of motors. Conventionally, it stems from external fluid. We show, in contrast, that external fluid friction is negligible compared to internal elastic stress through a simultaneous measurement of motion and flow field of an

1h

Dissociation of broadband high-frequency activity and neuronal firing in the neocortex

Broadband high-frequency activity (BHA; 70 to 150 Hz), also known as "high gamma," a key analytic signal in human intracranial (electrocorticographic) recordings, is often assumed to reflect local neural firing [multiunit activity (MUA)]. As the precise physiological substrates of BHA are unknown, this assumption remains controversial. Our analysis of laminar multielectrode data from V1 and A1 in

1h

Forward genetics identifies a novel sleep mutant with sleep state inertia and REM sleep deficits

Switches between global sleep and wakefulness states are believed to be dictated by top-down influences arising from subcortical nuclei. Using forward genetics and in vivo electrophysiology, we identified a recessive mouse mutant line characterized by a substantially reduced propensity to transition between wake and sleep states with an especially pronounced deficit in initiating rapid eye moveme

1h

Polymer blend directed anisotropic self-assembly toward mesoporous inorganic bowls and nanosheets

Anisotropic mesoporous inorganic materials have attracted great interest due to their unique and intriguing properties, yet their controllable synthesis still remains a great challenge. Here, we develop a simple synthesis approach toward mesoporous inorganic bowls and two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets by combining block copolymer (BCP)–directed self-assembly with asymmetric phase migration in terna

1h

Molecular insights into the human CLC-7/Ostm1 transporter

CLC family proteins translocate chloride ions across cell membranes to maintain the membrane potential, regulate the transepithelial Cl – transport, and control the intravesicular pH among different organelles. CLC-7/Ostm1 is an electrogenic Cl – /H + antiporter that mainly resides in lysosomes and osteoclast ruffled membranes. Mutations in human CLC-7/Ostm1 lead to lysosomal storage disorders an

1h

A durable nanomesh on-skin strain gauge for natural skin motion monitoring with minimum mechanical constraints

Ultraconformable strain gauge can be applied directly to human skin for continuous motion activity monitoring, which has seen widespread application in interactive robotics, human motion detection, personal health monitoring, and therapeutics. However, the development of an on-skin strain gauge that can detect human body motions over a long period of time without disturbing the natural skin movem

1h

TRIBE editing reveals specific mRNA targets of eIF4E-BP in Drosophila and in mammals

4E-BP (eIF4E-BP) represses translation initiation by binding to the 5' cap–binding protein eIF4E and inhibiting its activity. Although 4E-BP has been shown to be important in growth control, stress response, cancer, neuronal activity, and mammalian circadian rhythms, it is not understood how it preferentially represses a subset of mRNAs. We successfully used HyperTRIBE (targets of RNA binding pro

1h

The biophysical, molecular, and anatomical landscape of pigeon CRY4: A candidate light-based quantal magnetosensor

The biophysical and molecular mechanisms that enable animals to detect magnetic fields are unknown. It has been proposed that birds have a light-dependent magnetic compass that relies on the formation of radical pairs within cryptochrome molecules. Using spectroscopic methods, we show that pigeon cryptochrome clCRY4 is photoreduced efficiently and forms long-lived spin-correlated radical pairs vi

1h

Ozone affects plant, insect, and soil microbial communities: A threat to terrestrial ecosystems and biodiversity

Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations induce adverse effects in plants. We reviewed how ozone affects (i) the composition and diversity of plant communities by affecting key physiological traits; (ii) foliar chemistry and the emission of volatiles, thereby affecting plant-plant competition, plant-insect interactions, and the composition of insect communities; and (iii) plant-soil-microbe int

1h

A quick, cost-effective method to track the spread of COVID-19 through untreated wastewater

Researchers have demonstrated that, from seven methods commonly used to test for viruses in untreated wastewater, an adsorption-extraction technique can most efficiently detect SARS-CoV-2.

1h

Quantum materials quest could benefit from graphene that buckles

Graphene buckles when cooled while attached to a flat surface, resulting in pucker patterns that could benefit the search for novel quantum materials and superconductors, according to new research.

1h

Scientists identify hundreds of drug candidates to treat COVID-19

Scientists have used machine learning to identify hundreds of new potential drugs that could help treat COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, or SARS-CoV-2. To identify several candidates, they developed a drug discovery pipeline — a type of computational strategy linked to artificial intelligence.

1h

Experimental COVID-19 vaccine prevents severe disease in mice

Researchers have created a COVID-19 vaccine candidate from a replicating virus. This experimental vaccine has proven effective at preventing pneumonia in mice.

1h

Teens' social media use does not raise risk for depression, study finds

New findings refute popular wisdom and may provide relief to parents and educators concerned with adolescents' heavy use of social media — particularly during the COVID-19 crisis.

1h

Bouncing, sticking, exploding viruses: Understanding the surface chemistry of SARS-CoV-2

Researchers highlight the need to understand the different environmental conditions that affect the surface chemistry of viruses like SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease COVID-19.

1h

World Elephant Day 2020

August 12 has been set aside as World Elephant Day since 2011. Supported by numerous conservation agencies, the day is a time to "spread awareness, share knowledge, and provide solutions for better care and management of both captive and wild elephants," according to the organizer's website . Elephants continue to face numerous challenges, including poaching, habitat loss, exploitation, abuse, an

1h

Covid-19 news: Germany joins Spain in worrying surge of infections

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic

1h

Why black rhinos may get sick in captivity

Inflammation and oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of iron overload disorder in captive black rhinoceroses, making this syndrome a potential common denominator to various diseases described in captivity in this species, according to a study published August 12 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hanae Pouillevet of Oniris Nantes-Atlantic National College of Veterinary Medicin

1h

Toxic waste sites aren't prepared for hurricane season

Flooding during Hurricane Harvey (andrewtheshrew/Pixabay/) Hurricanes can be made exponentially worse by whatever lies in their path. Unfortunately, that's often the toxic waste of some of the most extractive, pollutive industries. Take Hurricane Florence, for instance. The storm's intense downpour triggered the spill of coal ash, the arsenic-laced substance that remains after burning coal, from

1h

The oldest known cremation in the near east dates to 7000 BC

Ancient people in the Near East had begun the practice of intentionally cremating their dead by the beginning of the 7th millennium BC, according to a study published August 12, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Fanny Bocquentin of the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and colleagues.

1h

Why black rhinos may get sick in captivity

Inflammation and oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of iron overload disorder in captive black rhinoceroses, making this syndrome a potential common denominator to various diseases described in captivity in this species, according to a study published August 12 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hanae Pouillevet of Oniris Nantes-Atlantic National College of Veterinary Medicin

1h

Group produces materials via self-organization in chemical systems

Applications range from sensors and batteries to fuel cells, among other technological possibilities. Achieving a deeper understanding and control of the processes involved is the goal of the Campinas Electrochemistry Group.

1h

Soldiers could teach future robots how to outperform humans

In the future, a Soldier and a game controller may be all that's needed to teach robots how to outdrive humans.

1h

New Zealand suspects 'some failure at the border' after COVID-19 returns

Scientists say it's unlikely that the virus spread silently for 3 months

2h

Paging Dr. Hamblin: Everyone Wants to Check My Temperature

Editor's Note: Every Wednesday, James Hamblin takes questions from readers about health-related curiosities, concerns, and obsessions. Have one? Email him at paging.dr.hamblin@theatlantic.com . Dear Dr. Hamblin, I'm an attorney and I've been working from home. Yesterday I had to visit several courthouses to pick up files. At the security checks at the entrance, they had some kind of infrared came

2h

Bushfire scientists call for Australia to set up national fire monitoring agency

Inconsistencies in how fires are measured across the states leads to confusion over how much of the country actually burned, experts say A group of bushfire scientists have used an article in one of the world's leading scientific journals to call for Australia to establish a national agency to monitor the scale, severity and impacts of fires. The eight scientists from Australia and Spain say inco

2h

Engaging undergrads remotely with an escape room game

To prevent the spread of COVID-19, many universities canceled classes or held them online this spring — a change likely to continue for many this fall. As a result, hands-on chemistry labs are no longer accessible to undergraduate students. In a new study in the Journal of Chemical Education, researchers describe an alternative way to engage students: a virtual game, modeled on an escape room, in

2h

Face mask insert could help diagnose conditions

Given current events, many people are wearing face masks to protect themselves and others. But that same face mask could someday also collect useful health information. Researchers reporting in ACS' Analytical Chemistry have demonstrated that a fiber inserted into an ordinary N95 face mask can collect compounds in exhaled breath aerosols for analysis. The new method could allow screening for disea

2h

New Analysis Reveals Worsening Shortage of Emergency Physicians in Rural Areas

Despite the nation's growing reliance on emergency departments, large areas of rural America are experiencing shortages emergency physicians, according to a new emergency medicine workforce analysis in Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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A Rare Flapnose Hound Shark! | Shark Week

Stream Extinct or Alive: Land of the Lost Sharks on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/extinct-or-alive-land-of-the-lost-sharks Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're

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Øget sexlyst, PMS og masser af overskud: Sådan fungerer din cyklus

Dine æggestokke er en hormon-fabrik, der kan påvirke dig både fysisk og psykisk

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Significantly improved COVID-19 outcomes in countries with higher TB vaccination coverage

The researchers discovered that BCG regimes are associated with better COVID-19 outcomes, both in reducing infection rates and death rates per million, especially for ages 24 or younger who had received the vaccination in the last 15 years. There was no effect among older adults who had received the BCG vaccine. Many countries have stopped inoculating their entire population, but some still use BC

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Analysis: Health sector, big pharma spent big on lobbying for COVID-19 funding

To date, Congress has authorized roughly $3 trillion in COVID-19 relief assistance — the largest relief package in history. With more COVID relief money on the way, a new analysis in the Journal of General Internal Medicine finds these newly available funds led to a significant surge in health sector lobbying activity, especially within the pharmaceutical industry.

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You can try the new Apple Watch features—including sleep tracking—right now

Dancing finally gets the recognition it deserves as a full-fledged workout. (Stan Horaczek/) Apple is about to give its watchOS operating system the major update that we first learned about back at WWDC. If you're eager to try out all the new features (some of which are outlined below), the company is offering a public beta that you can install right now. This is the first public beta Apple is of

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Internal differences: A new method for seeing into cells

The new technology may help answer outstanding questions about the immune system, cancer, Alzheimer's, and more.

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Upcycling plastic waste toward sustainable energy storage

Engineering professors and their students have been working for years on creating improved energy storage materials from sustainable sources, such as glass bottles, beach sand, Silly Putty, and portabella mushrooms. Now they have turned plastic soda bottles into a nanomaterial for use in batteries. Though they don't store as much energy as lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors made with the mater

2h

Collaboration is key to rebuilding coral reefs

The most successful and cost-effective ways to restore coral reefs have been identified by an international group of scientists, after analyzing restoration projects in Latin America.

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Australian Indigenous banana cultivation found to go back over 2,000 years

Archaeologists have found the earliest evidence of Indigenous communities cultivating bananas in Australia. The evidence of cultivation and plant management dates back 2,145 years and was found at Wagadagam on the tiny island of Mabuyag in the western Torres Strait.

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Extremely young galaxy is Milky Way look-alike

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have revealed an extremely distant and therefore very young galaxy that looks surprisingly like our Milky Way. The galaxy is so far away its light has taken more than 12 billion years to reach us: we see it as it was when the Universe was just 1.4 billion years old. It is also surprisingly unchaotic, contradicting theories t

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Countries transitioning to zero carbon should look at more than technology cost

A 'one-size-fits-all' approach to producing cleaner energy based on cost alone could create social inequalities, finds a new study.

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New way to make bacteria more sensitive to antibiotics discovered

Researchers have discovered a new way to reverse antibiotic resistance in some bacteria using hydrogen sulphide (H2S). By adding H2S releasing compounds to Acinetobacter baumannii – a pathogenic bacteria that does not produce H2S on its own – they found that exogenous H2S sensitised the A. baumannii to multiple antibiotic classes. It was even able to reverse acquired resistance in A. baumannii to

2h

Security gap allows eavesdropping on mobile phone calls

Calls via the LTE mobile network, also known as 4G, are encrypted and should therefore be tap-proof. However, researchers have shown that this is not always the case. They were able to decrypt the contents of telephone calls if they were in the same radio cell as their target, whose mobile phone they then called immediately following the call they wanted to intercept. They exploit a flaw that some

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How anxiety — and hope — can drive new product adoption

When considering new products, anxiety creates approach response (i.e., interest, purchase) rather than avoidance response (i.e., disinterest, failure to purchase) when consumers hope for the goal-congruent outcomes.

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The UK's future prosperity depends on a robust recovery

Size of the drop in second quarter is less important than the strength of the rebound

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Paper: Industry concentration contributes to job quality erosion, wage stagnation

Dominant firms in concentrated industries can play a role in job quality erosion and wage stagnation for U.S. workers, says new research co-written by U. of I. labor and employment relations professor Richard Benton and U. of I. graduate student Ki-Jung Kim.

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Yale quantum researchers create an error-correcting cat

Yale physicists have developed an error-correcting cat — a new device that combines the Schrödinger's cat concept of superposition (a physical system existing in two states at once) with the ability to fix some of the trickiest errors in a quantum computation.

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New nitrogen products are in the air

A nifty move with nitrogen has brought the world one step closer to creating a range of useful products — from dyes to pharmaceuticals — out of thin air.

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Stress and anger may exacerbate heart failure

Mental stress and anger may have clinical implications for patients with heart failure according to a new report published in the Journal of Cardiac Failure.

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Selective conversion of reactive lithium compounds made possible

Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed a new catalyst that can catalyse reactions to produce pharmaceuticals or chemicals used in agriculture. It creates carbon-carbon bonds between what are known as organolithium compounds without creating any unwanted by-products.

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20 Things You Didn't Know About Learning

Lab rats can be taught to identify patterns and babies learn to recognize their mothers' faces, but IBM's Watson achieved that most impressive of feats: becoming a Jeopardy! champ.

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Internal differences: A new method for seeing into cells

The new technology may help answer outstanding questions about the immune system, cancer, Alzheimer's, and more.

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The Big Reason Lefties Aren't Upset About Kamala Harris

The far left of the Democratic Party spent much of the primary attacking Kamala Harris, decrying her as an untrustworthy "cop" whose overtures to the left were half-hearted and opportunistic. But with Joe Biden naming the senator from California as his running mate, some progressive leaders and activists, including Harris skeptics, sound reluctantly optimistic about what the pair could achieve. T

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How to prep anxious kids to go back to school

Knowing signs of emotional distress and preparing children to bond with peers and teachers before school begins is important to a successful transition back to school, psychologist Kelly Moore argues. Students preparing to return to school—in-person, remotely , or both—are facing stresses unique to the type of learning they will engage in this fall. Moore , a licensed clinical psychologist and pr

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New advance in superconductors with 'twist' in rhombohedral graphite

An international research team led by The University of Manchester has revealed a nanomaterial that mirrors the "magic angle" effect originally found in a complex man-made structure known as twisted bilayer graphene—a key area of study in physics in recent years.

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Researchers unlock secrets of the past with new international carbon dating standard

Radiocarbon dating is set to become more accurate than ever after an international team of scientists improved the technique for assessing the age of historical objects.

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Adaptation in single neurons provides memory for language processing

To understand language, we have to remember the words that were uttered and combine them into an interpretation. How does the brain retain information long enough to accomplish this, despite the fact that neuronal firing events are very short-lived? Hartmut Fitz from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and his colleagues propose a neurobiological explanation bridging this discrepancy. N

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Porous liquids allow for efficient gas separation

Jointly with partners, a researcher of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology has developed 'porous liquids': Nanoparticles, that are able to separate gas molecules of different sizes from each other, float – finely distributed – in a solvent. The porous liquids may be processed into membranes that efficiently separate propene from gaseous mixtures. This could replace the energy-intensive distillation

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Spider silk inspires new class of functional synthetic polymers

Synthetic polymers have changed the world around us. However, It is hard to finely tune some of their properties, such as the ability to transport ions. To overcome this problem, assistant professor Giuseppe Portale decided to take inspiration from nature and created a new class of polymers based on protein-like materials that work as proton conductors and might be useful in future bio-electronic

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Stabilization and operation of a Kerr-cat qubit

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2587-z A qubit generated and stabilized in a superconducting microwave resonator by encoding it into Schrödinger cat states produced by Kerr nonlinearity and single-mode squeezing shows intrinsic robustness to phase-flip errors.

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Heat detection by the TRPM2 ion channel

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2510-7

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Soil carbon loss by experimental warming in a tropical forest

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2566-4 When tropical forest soils are warmed in situ, they release more CO2 than predicted by theory, creating a potentially substantial positive feedback to climate change.

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The chemical that turns locusts from Jekyll into Hyde

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02394-2 Triggering swarming behaviour in locusts, and new insights into how humans synchronize.

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Heat and carbon coupling reveals ocean warming due to circulation changes

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2573-5 A linear relationship between the storage of heat and carbon in global oceans in response to anthropogenic emissions is used to reconstruct the effect of circulation changes on past and future ocean warming patterns.

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Structure of the essential inner membrane lipopolysaccharide–PbgA complex

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2597-x Structural and physiological studies show that the inner membrane protein PbgA is a crucial sensor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and regulates the activity of the LPS biosynthesis enzyme LpxC.

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4-Vinylanisole is an aggregation pheromone in locusts

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2610-4 4-Vinylanisole, which is emitted by gregarious locusts or as a result of aggregation of solitary locusts, is identified as an aggregation pheromone that strongly attracts both solitary and gregarious locusts, acting via the olfactory receptor OR35.

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Reply to: Heat detection by the TRPM2 ion channel

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2511-6

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Evidence of flat bands and correlated states in buckled graphene superlattices

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2567-3 Buckled monolayer graphene superlattices are found to provide an alternative to twisted bilayer graphene for the study of flat bands and correlated states in a carbon-based material.

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Funders must mandate and reward open research records

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02395-1

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Structure of a lipopolysaccharide regulator reveals a road to new antibiotics

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02256-x Bacteria with two membranes must regulate the production of a surface molecule known as lipopolysaccharide. The structure of an essential signal-transduction protein now reveals how lipopolysaccharide controls its own synthesis.

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Evidence that tunnelling nanotube-like structures connect cells in mice

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02315-3 Structures similar to closed-ended tunnelling nanotubes have now been seen connecting pericyte cells in the mouse retina. The structures enable pericytes to coordinate their responses to neural activity, thereby modulating blood flow.

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Coupling dinitrogen and hydrocarbons through aryl migration

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2565-5 An iron complex sequentially activates N2 and C–H bonds in benzene to form aniline, with coupling achieved through partial silylation of a reduced iron–nitrogen complex and phenyl migration.

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Wildfires: Australia needs national monitoring agency

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02306-4 Comprehensive fire surveillance will strengthen resilience and adaptation to climate change.

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Interpericyte tunnelling nanotubes regulate neurovascular coupling

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2589-x Retinal pericytes connect via interpericyte tunnelling nanotubes into functional syncytia that regulate microcirculatory blood flow to help to match local blood flow with neuronal activity.

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A dynamically cold disk galaxy in the early Universe

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2572-6 A strongly lensed galaxy at redshift 4.2 appears to be a dynamically cold disk galaxy, similar to spiral galaxies in the local neighbourhood and weakly affected by extreme physical processes.

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A dendritic cell multitasks to tackle cancer

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02339-9 Learning how immune cells target tumours is crucial for cancer immunotherapy. The finding that a type of dendritic cell activates two sorts of T cell and coordinates their crosstalk sheds light on immune responses to tumours.

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Serine restriction alters sphingolipid diversity to constrain tumour growth

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2609-x In xenograft tumour models in mice, modulation of dietary serine, serine palmitoyltransferase or phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase activity enables control of the endogenous synthesis of deoxysphingolipids, sensitizing the tumours to metabolic stress and slowing their progression.

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cDC1 prime and are licensed by CD4+ T cells to induce anti-tumour immunity

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2611-3 Conventional type 1 dendritic cells perform antigen processing and priming of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells against tumour antigens, orchestrating their cross-talk to effect anti-tumour immunity.

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Electronic phase separation in multilayer rhombohedral graphite

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2568-2 High-quality rhombohedral graphite films are found to offer an alternative to twisted bilayer graphene as a platform for studying correlated physics in carbon materials.

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Structural basis of salicylic acid perception by Arabidopsis NPR proteins

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2596-y Structural determination of the salicylic-acid-binding core of Arabidopsis NPR4 sheds light on the mechanisms through which this plant hormone interacts with its receptors, providing insights that are of potential use in engineering enhanced immunity.

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Carbon dioxide loss from tropical soils increases on warming

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02266-9 Plots of tropical forest soils were warmed by 4 °C for two years to observe the effects on soil carbon emissions. The increase in efflux of carbon dioxide was larger than expected — a result with worrying implications for climate change.

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Catching plague locusts with their own scent

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02264-x A pheromone molecule that makes crop-damaging locusts swarm has been identified. Could this pheromone, which is sensed by odorant receptors, be used to trap these insects and prevent the agricultural devastation that they cause?

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Antarctica's Ice Shelves Have Lost Millions of Metric Tons of Ice

As these platforms are winnowed away, they imperil the continent's glaciers and set the stage for further sea level rise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Efficient valves for electron spins

Researchers at the University of Basel in collaboration with colleagues from Pisa have developed a new concept that uses electron spin to switch an electrical current. In addition to fundamental research, such spin valves are also the key elements in spintronics—a type of electronics that exploits the spin instead of the charge of electrons. The results were published in the scientific journal Com

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OECD countries' politicians follow each other

The more democratic a country is, the greater the probability that its politicians decide in the same way as in neighboring countries, without further analysis. This is according a research group that has studied political decision-making during the beginning of the Corona crisis.

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Glass blowing inspires new class of quantum sensors

When Adelaide glass blower Karen Cunningham made art using diamond and glass she had no idea it would inspire a new kind of hybrid material. Now a consortium of scientists, including from RMIT University and University of Adelaide, is using the technology to make a new class of quantum sensors.

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Japanese biologists discover new species of sea worm in the southern ocean

Earlier this year, a team from Japan's National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR), National Museum of Nature and Science (NMNS), and Kochi University (KU) set out to collect specimens of sea worm near the South Orkney Islands, a remote region of the Southern Ocean about 400 miles northeast of the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula.

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Global warming makes tropical soils leak carbon dioxide

Tropical forest soil warmed in experiments to levels consistent with end-of-century temperature projections released 55 percent more CO2 than control plots, exposing a previously underestimated source of greenhouse gas emissions, researchers reported Wednesday.

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Efficient valves for electron spins

Researchers have developed a new concept that uses the electron spin to switch an electrical current. In addition to fundamental research, such spin valves are also the key elements in spintronics — a type of electronics that exploits the spin instead of the charge of electrons.

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Lipoic acid supplements help some obese but otherwise healthy people lose weight

A compound given as a dietary supplement to overweight but otherwise healthy people in a clinical trial caused many of the patients to slim down.

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Secretion of sugar polymers modulates multicellularity in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus

Research has revealed that multicellular physiology in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus–a bacterium that can actively reorganize its community according to the environment in which it is found — is modulated by the secretion of two natural sugar polymers in separate zones of a swarm.

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Scientists propose method for eliminating damaging heat bursts in fusion device

Researchers discover a technique for widening the windows of plasma current to enhance suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs) that can damage tokamak facilities.

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Climate change projected to increase seasonal East African rainfall

According to new research, seasonal rainfall is expected to rise significantly in East Africa over the next few decades in response to increased greenhouse gases. The study used high-resolution simulations to find that the amount of precipitation during the rainy season known as the 'short rains' could double by the end of the century, continuing a trend that has been observed in recent years.

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New species of dinosaur discovered on Isle of Wight

A new study by palaeontologists suggests four bones recently found on the Isle of Wight belong to new species of theropod dinosaur, the group that includes Tyrannosaurus rex and modern-day birds.

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A chemical that encourages locusts to swarm could also help stop them

A pheromone released by migratory locusts seems to encourage them to swarm, so placing it on sticky traps that attract the insects could stop them from devastating crops

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Ancient serene galaxy suggests the early universe was eerily calm

A strange "coffee stain" galaxy in the early universe is much calmer than it ought to be, which may mean our ideas about a chaotic young universe could be wrong

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Japanese biologists discover new species of sea worm in the southern ocean

Earlier this year, a team from Japan's National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR), National Museum of Nature and Science (NMNS), and Kochi University (KU) set out to collect specimens of sea worm near the South Orkney Islands, a remote region of the Southern Ocean about 400 miles northeast of the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula.

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An irresistible scent makes locusts swarm, study finds

The coronavirus isn't the only plague making headlines this year—locusts are devastating crops in several parts of the world, and now scientists are discovering why the pest forms destructive swarms.

3h

This Beast of a Hydrogen-Powered Hypercar Has a 1,000 Mile Range

California-based tech company Hyperion has unveiled the Hyperion XP-1, a hydrogen fuel cell-powered hypercar with an advertised 1,000 mile range and a top speed of 221 mph. It can launch from 0 to 60 mph in just 2.2 seconds. Those are without a doubt some impressive specs — but its main purpose isn't to take on Tesla in a head-to-head. It's to generate interest for hydrogen power, according to th

3h

Business booming for Brazil farmers but deforestation looms large

Brazilian farmer Rodrigo Pozzobon drives his pick-up truck toward his giant corn and soybean fields at the edge of the Amazon rainforest where, pandemic or not, business is booming thanks to surging demand from China.

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An irresistible scent makes locusts swarm, study finds

The coronavirus isn't the only plague making headlines this year—locusts are devastating crops in several parts of the world, and now scientists are discovering why the pest forms destructive swarms.

3h

Simple Tool Evaluates Mask Performance at Blocking Droplets

A proof-of-concept study finds some commonly used facial coverings may perform worse than no mask at all.

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Mood-Altering Non-Alcoholic Drinks Could Mean the End of Hangovers

Almost everyone likes to drink alcohol, now and again. And one of the main appeals of alcoholic beverages is the "social lubrication" they provide. But that social lubrication has always come with a cost: blackouts, hangovers, and myriad other negative side-effects too numerous to mention. Luckily, now there's an alternative that provides that same social lubrication without the downside. It's a

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How to get the perfect fit when buying clothes online

Skip the trying on and go straight to rocking that outfit. (Godisable Jacob / Pexels/) As a lazy homebody, I shop for almost everything online—except clothes. Call me old-fashioned, but I prefer to go to the mall, try on multiple sizes, and visit a few stores to find the perfect fit. But things are not so simple in the midst of a pandemic. Some states, like California and Florida, are suffering f

3h

Exercise induces secretion of biomarkers into sweat

The aim was to reveal the potential of microRNAs in sweat extracellular vesicles in monitoring exercise performance.

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Nutrition labelling is improving nation's diet – new study

Households eat more healthily when retailers display clear nutritional information on own-brand food products, say researchers.

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New advance in superconductors with 'twist' in rhombohedral graphite

An international research team led by The University of Manchester has revealed a nanomaterial that mirrors the 'magic angle' effect originally found in a complex man-made structure known as twisted bilayer graphene — a key area of study in physics in recent years.

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New way to check the quality of nanomaterials like graphene

A new way to check the quality of nanomaterials like graphene has emerged from a team at the University of Sussex.

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TV-watching snackers beware: you won't notice you're full if your attention is elsewhere

Eating while doing something perceptually-demanding makes it more difficult to notice when you feel full, shows new research from the University of Sussex.

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Warming threat to tropical forests risks release of carbon from soil

Billions of tonnes of carbon dioxide risk being lost into the atmosphere due to tropical forest soils being significantly more sensitive to climate change than previously thought.

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A phylogenetic analysis reveals the evolution of the mitochondrial calcium transporter

The system that regulates cellular calcium levels duplicated, generating two non-equivalent systems, some one billion years ago before fungi and animals diverged evolutionarily.The fungal models currently used for the study of mitochondrial calcium regulation are not adequate, as the system they possess is not equivalent to that of animals. Chytrids, a divergent group of fungi, would be the only f

3h

Researchers unlock secrets of the past with new international carbon dating standard

Radiocarbon dating is set to become more accurate than ever after an international team of scientists improved the technique for assessing the age of historical objects.

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'Black dwarf supernova': Physicist calculates when the last supernova ever will happen

New theoretical research finds that many white dwarfs may explode in supernova in the distant far future, long after everything else in the universe has died and gone quiet.

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Your hair can crack steel when it hits the right spot

Imperfections on the surface of razor blades cause them to fail

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Mystery solved: Odd, giraffe-necked reptile lived in water

Paleontologists have finally solved the mystery of Tanystropheus , a bizarre giraffe-necked reptile that lived 242 million years ago. It lived in water and was surprisingly adaptable, according to a new study. For over 150 years, paleontologists have puzzled over the reptile that had a neck three times as long as its torso, but only had thirteen extremely elongated vertebrae, and whether it lived

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Scientists Built an Inhaler They Claim Stops Coronavirus

Imagine: An antiviral inhaler that could protect you from the coronavirus. One puff a day that keeps COVID away? If it sounds like a distant dream, wake up: A team of scientists from the University of California, San Francisco claim to have created it. The scientists developed a tiny molecule that they say can latch onto SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, and make it impossible for

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Seafood study finds plastic in all samples

A study of five different seafoods has found traces of plastic in every sample tested.

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How stars form in the smallest galaxies

The question of how small, dwarf galaxies have sustained the formation of new stars over the course of the Universe has long confounded the world's astronomers. An international research team led by Lund University in Sweden has found that dormant small galaxies can slowly accumulate gas over many billions of years. When this gas suddenly collapses under its own weight, new stars are able to arise

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Trustful collaboration critical for outcome of therapy

A trusting therapeutic relationship and outcome-oriented collaboration between therapist and patient are critical for the successful treatment of mental illness. And it pays to start early in therapy, a series of meta-studies by a task force of the American Psychological Association (APA) led by UZH psychology professor Christoph Flueckiger shows.

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'Spree' Is Nasty, Clever Satire for the Influencer Era

I never want to watch this movie again. 5/5 stars.

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Vanlig genvariant fördubblar risken för herpesorsakad Alzheimers

Att vanligt herpesvirus kan öka risken för Alzheimers sjukdom har forskare kommit fram till i flera studier under senare år. Nu visar forskning vid Umeå universitet att en tidigare outforskad gen som kallas GM17, kan vara förklaringen till att herpes hos vissa personer leder till Alzheimers sjukdom. Infektion med vanligt herpesvirus kan öka risken för Alzheimers sjukdom. Viruset tros hos äldre pe

4h

The Iconic Arecibo Telescope Goes Quiet After Major Damage

A cable cut a large gash into the radio telescope this week and it's uncertain when it will be back in working order.

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A quick, cost-effective method to track the spread of COVID-19

A group of researchers have demonstrated that, from seven methods commonly used to test for viruses in untreated wastewater, an adsorption-extraction technique can most efficiently detect SARS-CoV-2. This gives us another tool to detect the presence and spread of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Robot technology for everyone or only for the average person?

Robot technology is being used more and more in health rehabilitation and in working life. Exoskeletons are one technology with great potential. But this technology is often developed for the average person. So what about people who are small and thin, or tall and overweight?

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If we ever make a covid-19 vaccine who should be first to get it?

It will take at least a year to make the billions of vaccine doses needed to protect everyone, so tough decisions will have to be made about who is top priority

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What Scientists Know About Airborne Transmission of the New Coronavirus

Aerosol experts, from engineers to doctors, weigh in on the ability of tiny droplets to transmit the virus that causes COVID-19

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Internal differences: A new method for seeing into cells

The new technology may help answer outstanding questions about the immune system, cancer, Alzheimer's, and more.

4h

Children think robots can help the elderly — but not their own grandparents

A study that asked children to assess three different robots showed that they responded most positively to simple robots shaped like flower pots, and were most sceptical of Pepper the robot, which looks more human.

4h

OECD countries' politicians follow each other

The more democratic a country is, the greater the probability that its politicians decide in the same way as in neighbouring countries, without further analysis. This is according a research group that has studied political decision-making during the beginning of the Corona crisis. The results have now been published in the respected journal PNAS.

4h

Efficient valves for electron spins

Researchers at the University of Basel in collaboration with colleagues from Pisa have developed a new concept that uses the electron spin to switch an electrical current. In addition to fundamental research, such spin valves are also the key elements in spintronics — a type of electronics that exploits the spin instead of the charge of electrons. The results were published in the scientific jour

4h

Simpler and faster microscopy system enabling broader biomedical applications

Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has demonstrated great values in biomedical research. However, most OR-PAM systems suffer from limited imaging speed due to their inherent design limitation. A novel, two-dimensional multifocal OR-PAM system using a single-element ultrasonic transducer has been proposed. This system, termed as MFOR-PAMER, enables 400 times shorter scanning time

4h

Flipping a metabolic switch to slow tumor growth

The enzyme serine palmitoyl-transferase can be used as a metabolically responsive "switch" that decreases tumor growth, according to a new study by a team of San Diego scientists, who published their findings Aug. 12 in the journal Nature.By restricting the dietary amino acids serine and glycine, or pharmacologically targeting the serine synthesis enzyme phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase, the team in

4h

Countries transitioning to zero carbon should look at more than technology cost

A 'one-size-fits-all' approach to producing cleaner energy based on cost alone could create social inequalities, finds a new study.

4h

Comparing yoga, other treatments for anxiety

Researchers in this randomized clinical trial assessed whether Kundalini yoga and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for generalized anxiety disorder are each more effective than stress education and whether yoga is noninferior to CBT for the treatment of the disorder.

4h

Survival on heart transplant waiting list

Survival of patients on the heart transplant waiting list was examined in this observational study.

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Having COVID-19

This essay describes the author's experience of having COVID-19.

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Assessment of lupus anticoagulant positivity in patients with COVID-19

How common lupus anticoagulant (LA) positivity is in patients with COVID-19 was assessed in this observational study, which also examined the association of LA positivity with patient outcomes.

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Scientists unveil nature of active site in nitrogen-doped carbon for electrocatalytic CO2 reduction

A research group led by Prof. DENG Dehui from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) unveiled the nature of the active site in N-doped carbon materials for the electrocatalytic CO 2 reduction to CO.

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Yoga shown to improve anxiety, study shows

A new study led by NYU Grossman School of Medicine finds yoga improves symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder, suggesting the popular practice may be helpful in treating anxiety in some people.

4h

ALMA sees most distant Milky Way look-alike

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have revealed an extremely distant and therefore very young galaxy that looks surprisingly like our Milky Way. The galaxy is so far away its light has taken more than 12 billion years to reach us: we see it as it was when the Universe was just 1.4 billion years old. It is also surprisingly unchaotic, contradicting theories t

4h

Researchers identify human influence as key agent of ocean warming patterns in the future

Scientists from the Department of Physics at Oxford University have discovered that the influence of circulation changes on shaping ocean warming will diminish in the future. This is despite having been identified and modelled as a key factor over the past 60 years.

4h

Nanotubes in the eye that help us see

A new mechanism of blood redistribution that is essential for the proper functioning of the adult retina has just been discovered in vivo by researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM).

4h

Quieting the storm

Experiments show acupuncture modulates inflammation in mice. Findings reveal site, intensity and timing of acupuncture affect disease course. Results can inform efforts to use acupuncture for treatment of human diseases marked by aberrant inflammation.

4h

Quantum materials quest could benefit from graphene that buckles

Graphene, an extremely thin two-dimensional layer of the graphite used in pencils, buckles when cooled while attached to a flat surface, resulting in beautiful pucker patterns that could benefit the search for novel quantum materials and superconductors, according to Rutgers-led research in the journal Nature. Quantum materials host strongly interacting electrons with special properties, such as e

4h

Evidence in mice that electroacupuncture reduces inflammation via specific neural pathways

Stimulating the nervous system using small electric current by acupuncture could tamp down systemic inflammation in the body, suggests new research in mice from a team of neuroscientists in the US and China. The research, publishing August 12 in the journal Neuron, helps to map the neuroanatomical underpinnings of this ancient medical practice.

4h

Perovskite and organic solar cells rocketed into space

For the first time, researchers in Germany sent perovskite and organic solar cells on a rocket into space. The solar cells withstood the extreme conditions in space, producing power from direct sunlight and reflective light from the Earth's surface. The work, published August 12 in the journal Joule, sets the foundation for future near-Earth application as well as potential deep space missions.

4h

Few Black educators win prestigious White House teaching award

Three recent winners say minority students and teachers need role models, resources

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Russia says suggestion its coronavirus vaccine may be unsafe is 'groundless' – video

Russia said on Wednesday the first batch of its Sputnik V Covid-19 vaccine would be ready within two weeks and rejected safety concerns over its rapid approval as 'groundless'. The health minister, Mikhail Murashko, said the vaccine, developed by the Gamaleya Institute, would be administered on a voluntary basis. The vaccine has not yet completed its final trials. Only about 10% of clinical trial

4h

Astronomers spy a Milky Way–like galaxy in very early universe

This "ring of fire" is actually a remarkably calm and well-ordered galaxy

4h

'Zombie' Microbes Redefine Life's Energy Limits

Energy drives the planet; it's the currency that all living things use to grow, develop and function. But just how little energy do cells need to get by? Sediment-dwelling microbes below the seafloor — which may outnumber the microbial cells found in the oceans themselves — are providing some surprising answers. The organisms not only challenge what scientists thought they knew about life's energ

4h

They Turned a Brick Into a Battery

Powerhouse From the Department of They Did Surgery on a Grape : A team of researchers at Washington University in St Louis have figured out a way to turn regular ol' bricks into batteries . They did it by filling the pores of the brick with tiny conducting nanofibers of plastic that can store a charge. In early tests, the bricks were capable of powering a small LED light. While the energy density

4h

A cancer mystery of more than 40 years ago is solved thanks to epigenetics

In an article that was just published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) by the group of Dr. Manel Esteller, Director of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute, ICREA Research Professor and Professor of Genetics at the University of Barcelona is solved this mystery by describing that in cancer cells the protein that generates the nucleotide "Y" is epigenetically ina

4h

Glass blowing inspires new class of quantum sensors

A glass artist's work with diamonds has opened the door to a new class of quantum sensors able to monitor changes in magnetic fields, with implications for mining and underwater monitoring.

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Security gap allows eavesdropping on mobile phone calls

Calls via the LTE mobile network, also known as 4G, are encrypted and should therefore be tap-proof. However, researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum have shown that this is not always the case. They were able to decrypt the contents of telephone calls if they were in the same radio cell as their target, whose mobile phone they then called immediately following the call they wanted to intercept.

4h

SMART researchers find new way to make bacteria more sensitive to antibiotics

Researchers from SMART have discovered a new way to reverse antibiotic resistance in some bacteria using hydrogen sulphide (H2S). By adding H2S releasing compounds to Acinetobacter baumannii – a pathogenic bacteria that does not produce H2S on its own – they found that exogenous H2S sensitised the A. baumannii to multiple antibiotic classes. It was even able to reverse acquired resistance in A. ba

4h

What silence can teach you about sound | Dallas Taylor

What can you hear in silence? In this exploration of sound, host of the podcast "Twenty Thousand Hertz" Dallas Taylor tells the story of arguably the most debated musical composition in recent history — composer John Cage's iconic piece 4'33" — and invites you to take notice of the soundscape around you. Watch to the end to experience a performance of 4'33".

4h

Quantum materials quest could benefit from graphene that buckles

Graphene, an extremely thin two-dimensional layer of the graphite used in pencils, buckles when cooled while attached to a flat surface, resulting in beautiful pucker patterns that could benefit the search for novel quantum materials and superconductors, according to Rutgers-led research in the journal Nature.

4h

ALMA sees most distant Milky Way look-alike

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), in which the European Southern Observatory (ESO) is a partner, have revealed an extremely distant and therefore very young galaxy that looks surprisingly like our Milky Way. The galaxy is so far away its light has taken more than 12 billion years to reach us: we see it as it was when the Universe was just 1.4 billion years

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Researchers identify human influence as key agent of ocean warming patterns in the future

The oceans play an important role in regulating our climate and its change by absorbing heat and carbon.

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That time we borked causality

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02384-4 It's a bit of a gamble.

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Australian Indigenous banana cultivation found to go back over 2,000 years

Archaeologists at The Australian National University (ANU) have found the earliest evidence of Indigenous communities cultivating bananas in Australia.

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Research suggests bias against natural hair limits job opportunities for black women

New research suggests Black women with natural hairstyles, such as curly afros, braids or twists, are often perceived as less professional than Black women with straightened hair, particularly in industries where norms dictate a more conservative appearance.

4h

Eggshell-based surgical material for skull injuries

A bioactive polymer-ceramic composite for fixing implants and restoring bone defects in the skull was developed by an international group of materials scientists from the NUST MISIS Center for Composite Materials. An innovative composition of the material based on eggshell-derived bioceramic provides increased strength and biointegration of implants. The results of the work were published in the i

4h

'Invisible words' reveal a blueprint for all stories

Small, "invisible" words appear in a similar pattern across most stories, no matter the length or format, according to new research. When telling a story, these common words—a, the, it—are used in certain ways and at certain moments. In a new study in Science Advances , researchers recorded the use of these kinds of words across thousands of fictional and nonfictional stories, mapping a universal

5h

Japanese biologists discover new species of sea worm in the southern ocean

A Japanese research team observed a new species of polychaetes amid the seafloor materials collected near the South Orkney Islands, a remote region of the Southern Ocean about 400 miles northeast of the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula. They named it 'Flabelligena Gillet', 2001.

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Scientists identify hundreds of drug candidates to treat COVID-19

Scientists at the University of California, Riverside, have used machine learning to identify hundreds of new potential drugs that could help treat COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, or SARS-CoV-2. To identify several candidates, they developed a drug discovery pipeline — a type of computational strategy linked to artificial intelligence.

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Australian Indigenous banana cultivation found to go back over 2,000 years

Archaeologists at The Australian National University have found the earliest evidence of Indigenous communities cultivating bananas in Australia. The evidence of cultivation and plant management dates back 2,145 years and was found at Wagadagam on the tiny island of Mabuyag in the western Torres Strait. The research is led by a First Australian author. His work makes a statement that goes beyond a

5h

Making Sense of 'One of the Most Baffling Animals That Ever Lived'

Important mysteries have been solved about a reptile with a giraffe-like neck that hunted prey 242 million years ago.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Kan jeg få legionærsyge af min bruser i kolonihaven?

En læser med kolonihave er bekymret for, om det minimalistiske brusebad står og udvikler farlige bakterier i Solen. Det svarer professor fra Rigshospitalet på.

5h

Kamala Harris's Nomination Is a Turning Point for Democrats

In the final rally Joe Biden held before COVID-19 shut down the country in March, he clasped hands on a stage in Detroit with a group of emerging Democratic stars. "I view myself as a bridge, not as anything else," he declared a few minutes later. "There is an entire generation of leaders that you saw standing behind me. They are the future of this country." Yesterday, Biden took a major step tow

5h

Detecting SARS-CoV-2 with qPCR

This virtual symposium, brought to you by The Scientist, will explore the limitations and challenges of current SARS-CoV-2 qPCR-based testing approaches, their root causes, and what can be learned for the future.

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Scientists propose method for eliminating damaging heat bursts in fusion device

Picture an airplane that can only climb to one or two altitudes after taking off. That limitation would be similar to the plight facing scientists who seek to avoid instabilities that restrict the path to clean, safe and abundant fusion energy in doughnut-shaped tokamak facilities. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and General Atomics (

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Novateur Ventures explores new strategy to reduce hyperinflammatory response caused by COVID-19

Novateur's research proposes simple treatment paradigm using two generic drugs, directed to blocking inflammation in airways of patients with asthma, to target hyper-inflammatory response insevere COVID-19. This will be accomplished by combination of leukotriene biosynthesis blocker zileuton (Zyflo® controlled release formulation) and inhibitor of cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptor montelukast (Sing

5h

Collaboration is key to rebuilding coral reefs

The most successful and cost-effective ways to restore coral reefs have been identified by an international group of scientists, after analyzing restoration projects in Latin America. The University of Queensland's Dr Elisa Bayraktarov led the team that investigated 12 coral reef restoration case studies in five countries.

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Britons hope to keep sustainable habits beyond COVID-19 lockdown, research suggests

Britons are keen to continue with low-carbon lifestyle choices adopted during lockdown, according to research by The University of Manchester and Cardiff University.

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Drug abuse researcher faked data in grant applications, says Federal watchdog

A researcher at Texas Tech University plagiarized or faked data in four different federal U.S. grant applications, according to a new finding by the agency responsible for oversight of research integrity at the National Institutes of Health. Rahul Dev Jayant, according to the Office of Research Integrity, "engaged in research misconduct by intentionally plagiarizing, falsifying, … Continue reading

5h

Fire and melting ice: The Arctic is having a terrifyingly bad year

As records tumble, 2020 has been an extraordinary year for the Arctic – and there is more to come unless we take action on climate change

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Møllereparationer i område med høj-intensive lyn koster Vestas 1,3 mia. kroner

PLUS. Vindmøllekoncernen ønsker ikke at fortælle, hvor møllerne er placeret eller hvilke tekniske løsninger, der er nødvendige for at tilpasse vingerne til vejrforholdene.

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Why nanomaterial quality matters, and the smart new way to check it

A new way to check the quality of nanomaterials like graphene has emerged from a team at the University of Sussex.

5h

Baby Shark & Sea Turtle

Not all sea animals swim around with fins- meet Baby Shark's new friend, Sea Turtle, who swims with flippers! Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/Discovery https:

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An Indian Company Is Gearing Up to Make Millions of Doses of a $3 Covid-19 Vaccine

As the Covid-19 pandemic drags on, there's one thing we're all counting on to rescue us from the drudgery of socially-distanced life: a vaccine. How many times have you heard "X won't happen again until there's a vaccine"? Concerts, conferences, festivals, sporting events, weddings, and anything else that entails a lot of people being in one place has been put on hold indefinitely—and we miss it.

5h

How plastics could help build a sustainable future

The disposal of plastics is a global problem. They are nearly indestructible in natural conditions but are discarded worldwide on a large scale. The world produces around 359 million metric tons of plastics each year. Nature cannot address the amount of their disposal at a speed fast enough to prevent harm to living beings.

5h

Enhanced liquid repellence through flexible microstructures

Artificial surfaces that can repel liquids have attracted significant attention across scientific and industrial platforms to create functional topological features. But the role of the underlying structures that are in contact with liquid droplets is not well understood. Recent developments in micro-nanofabrication can allow researchers to construct a skin-muscle-like system that combines liquid

5h

NASA's TESS Planet-Hunting Space Telescope Completes Its Primary Mission

The observatory has found 66 confirmed worlds, plus 2,100 additional candidates—and the search goes on — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Trying to Forecast Earthquakes Near the Salton Sea

A swarm of earthquakes near California's Salton Sea has led the U.S. Geological Survey to issue a forecast on the potential for a large quake.

5h

Upcycling plastic waste toward sustainable energy storage

UC Riverside engineering professors Mihri and Cengiz Ozkan and their students have been working for years on creating improved energy storage materials from sustainable sources, such as glass bottles, beach sand, Silly Putty, and portabella mushrooms. Now they have turned plastic soda bottles into a nanomaterial for use in batteries. Though they don't store as much energy as lithium-ion batteries,

5h

Predicting A-level grades accurately 'near-impossible task'

Predicting A-level grades is a "near-impossible task," and the system needs to be overhauled to reduce inaccuracies that can lead to unfair disadvantages for some students, says new research from the UCL Institute of Education.

5h

The best rugged cameras for adventurous photographers

Snap shots anywhere. (Thom Holmes via Unsplash/) Whether you're tackling a hike through the mountains or a surf on the ocean, rugged cameras are built to capture it all. They're perfect for the toughest of environments, with waterproof, shockproof, and freeze-proof designs that make them the ultimate adventure companion. We found some of the most durable cameras on the market, which promise to sh

6h

Grey reef sharks found to exhibit social behavior

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.S. and the U.K. has found that gray reef sharks exhibit a form of social behavior. Their paper is published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B

6h

Scientists propose method for eliminating damaging heat bursts in fusion device

Researchers discover a technique for widening the windows of plasma current to enhance suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs) that can damage tokamak facilities.

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Portable UV chambers could disinfect PPE anywhere

Portable disinfection chambers that use ultraviolet light to inactivate virus particles could quickly disinfect personal protective equipment, researchers report. The chambers could benefit those who need PPE in the fight against COVID-19, including emergency medical technicians, police officers, health care workers, pharmacy technicians, and others. Researchers built two prototype chambers to ev

6h

Grey reef sharks found to exhibit social behavior

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.S. and the U.K. has found that gray reef sharks exhibit a form of social behavior. Their paper is published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B

6h

Scientists reveal long-term cumulative effects of frequent green tides in coastal oceans

The world's largest green tide caused by Ulva prolifera has been occurring continually in the Yellow Sea, China, for more than 10 years. It has become a serious marine ecological disaster.

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Economists conclude opioid crisis responsible for millions of children living apart from parents

Nearly 500,000 people in the U.S. during the past 20 years have died from an opioid overdose. Millions of others—many of them parents—are using, incarcerated or in drug rehabilitation programs. While the drug crisis has had profound impacts on adults, there has been relatively little research into its effects on the children of drug users. A recent study by University of Notre Dame economists Kase

6h

Collaboration is key to rebuilding coral reefs

The most successful and cost-effective ways to restore coral reefs have been identified by an international group of scientists, after analyzing restoration projects in Latin America.

6h

Ny professor vil forbedre udredningen af psykiske lidelser hos børn og unge

Marlene Briciet Lauritsen er udnævnt til professer på Aalborg Universitet.

6h

Q&A: Treading on shrinking ice

Geophysicist Marco Tedesco has an affinity for ice in all its forms–snow, glaciers, ice sheets, sea ice–and has spent his career exploring its qualities and fates. He has worked in Antarctica and the United States, but most of his research has centered on Greenland, where he studies the climate-driven forces attacking the fast-wasting ice sheet.

6h

Research suggests bias against natural hair limits job opportunities for black women

New research suggests Black women with natural hairstyles, such as curly afros, braids or twists, are often perceived as less professional than Black women with straightened hair.

6h

Experimental COVID-19 vaccine prevents severe disease in mice

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have created a COVID-19 vaccine candidate from a replicating virus. This experimental vaccine has proven effective at preventing pneumonia in mice.

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Teens' social media use does not raise risk for depression: study

Contrary to popular wisdom, daily social media use is not a strong or consistent risk factor for depressive symptoms among adolescents, according to a new study by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health researchers. The results are published in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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SDSU professor finds after-hours cannabis use has no impact on workplace performance

Dr. Jeremy Bernerth, management professor at San Diego State University and H. Jack Walker, management professor at Auburn University set out to determine the effects of different types of cannabis use (before, during and after hours) on work performance, especially as it relates to core job requirements, helping colleagues or their organizations, and counterproductive behavior in the workplace.

6h

Our Temporary Moratorium against Handshakes Should Become Permanent

The COVID-19 pandemic has ushered in an overdue development — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Phylogenetic analysis reveals the evolution of the mitochondrial calcium transporter

Calcium levels regulate multiple processes in cells, ranging from metabolism to division. And these levels are regulated, in turn, by calcium transport into and out of mitochondria, the energy hub of the cell. The regulation of calcium levels is, therefore, a recurring topic of study, with important implications in biomedicine. In this context, fungi are often the model organisms of choice to stud

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'They've jumped the gun': scientists worry about Russia's Covid-19 vaccine

Rising chorus of concern over Sputnik V vaccine stems from opaque development and lack of mass testing Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage In 1977, Scott Halstead, a virologist at the University of Hawaii, was studying dengue fever when he noticed a now well-known but then unexpected feature of the disease. Animals that had already been exposed to one of the four closely

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Phylogenetic analysis reveals the evolution of the mitochondrial calcium transporter

Calcium levels regulate multiple processes in cells, ranging from metabolism to division. And these levels are regulated, in turn, by calcium transport into and out of mitochondria, the energy hub of the cell. The regulation of calcium levels is, therefore, a recurring topic of study, with important implications in biomedicine. In this context, fungi are often the model organisms of choice to stud

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Trillions in coronavirus spending is putting AOC's favorite economic theory to the test

French philosopher Voltaire famously quipped: "If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him." Something similar can be said of modern monetary theory, also known as MMT, because it may be the economy's only hope to get through the pandemic.

6h

Astronomers investigate an ultraluminous X-ray source in NGC 5055

Using the Chandra and XMM-Newton spacecraft, astronomers from the Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center in Warsaw, Poland, have investigated an ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) in the galaxy NGC 5055. The study, detailed in a paper published August 5 on the arXiv preprint server, provides more insight into the properties of this source.

6h

COVID-19 is hitting tipped workers hard

Even prior to COVID-19, tipped workers suffered from the inadequacies of the United States' social safety net and minimum wage standards.

6h

New insights into star formation in the smallest galaxies

The question of how small, dwarf galaxies have sustained the formation of new stars over the course of the Universe has long confounded the world's astronomers. Now, an international research team has found that dormant small galaxies can slowly accumulate gas over many billions of years. When this gas suddenly collapses under its own weight, new stars are able to arise. The new work is published

6h

Selfish genes take sides in the battle of the sexes

Men may have a surprising genetic advantage over women, according to new research carried out at the University of St Andrews.

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Selfish genes take sides in the battle of the sexes

Men may have a surprising genetic advantage over women, according to new research carried out at the University of St Andrews.

6h

Ancient crested penguin fossil found in New Zealand

A team of researchers from New Zealand and the U.S. is reporting on the discovery of unearthed 3.36-million-year-old crested penguin fossils found on New Zealand's North Island. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes the find and why they believe it could provide a link with modern penguins.

6h

How to Turn Your Camera into a Webcam: Canon, Fujifilm, GoPro, and More

Months into the pandemic, webcams are still hard to find. But if you're a shutterbug, you already have a better option.

6h

Microsoft Duo: Price, Details, Release Date

Microsoft has had to shift its sales pitch from a "work" product to "staying home indefinitely" device.

6h

Space-themed board games that are out of this world

All of time and space; everywhere and anywhere; every star that ever was. Where do you want to start? (Shot by Cerqueira via Unsplash/) Like a great film or television show, the best games are often a form of escapism from everyday life. And there's no better way to escape than into the actual stars—the unexplored frontier of outer space. There are games for all types of players, from intergalact

6h

Researchers discover honeybees have more than one way to feed on nectar

A team of researchers from Sun Yat-Sen University, Kiel University, and the University of Washington has found that honeybees have more than one way to feed on nectar. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of honeybees and the way they eat.

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Scientists devised a cheap, ingenious trick to save this bird from a blood-sucking maggot, and it works brilliantly

Saving endangered species from extinction is a challenging job that requires creative, affordable and effective interventions. In a rare good news story for conservation, we came up with one such method.

6h

How Climate Change Strategies That Use Biomass Can Be More Realistic

Current plans for drawing down carbon dioxide call for more trees, grasses and crop residues than Earth can spare — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Our Temporary Moratorium against Handshakes Should Become Permanent

The COVID-19 pandemic has ushered in an overdue development — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Researchers discover honeybees have more than one way to feed on nectar

A team of researchers from Sun Yat-Sen University, Kiel University, and the University of Washington has found that honeybees have more than one way to feed on nectar. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of honeybees and the way they eat.

6h

Ancient North American reptiles lived on an island archipelago in South Wales

A recent study led by the University of Bristol has uncovered fossils of dwarf reptiles that lived in South Wales 205 million years ago and were closely related to North American animals that lived 15 million years earlier.

6h

Parallel coupled cell-centered finite volume thermal lattice boltzmann method on unstructured grids

The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which originated from lattice gas automata (LGA), has become an effective and attractive numerical scheme in computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

6h

Researchers develop a tool for characterizing frequency-entangled photon pairs

Frequency-entangled photon pairs, an easily accessible type of entanglement, have been widely applied in fields like quantum-enhanced positioning and clock synchronization, and quantum spectroscopy.

6h

Scientists devised a cheap, ingenious trick to save this bird from a blood-sucking maggot, and it works brilliantly

Saving endangered species from extinction is a challenging job that requires creative, affordable and effective interventions. In a rare good news story for conservation, we came up with one such method.

6h

New device delivers single cells in just one click

EPFL spin-off SEED Biosciences has developed a pipetting robot that can dispense individual cells one by one. Their innovation allows for enhanced reliability and traceability, and can save life-science researchers time and money.

6h

Q&A: Keeping cool efficiently during heat waves

Heat waves are becoming a more regular occurrence across the country. Iain Walker, Leader of the Residential Building Systems Group at Berkeley Lab, has suggestions for how to weather them. Walker has more than 20 years' experience as a building scientist and consultant on energy use and ventilation in residential buildings.

6h

New device delivers single cells in just one click

EPFL spin-off SEED Biosciences has developed a pipetting robot that can dispense individual cells one by one. Their innovation allows for enhanced reliability and traceability, and can save life-science researchers time and money.

6h

Library pandemic restrictions showcase the importance of digital collections and the advantages of open access

While registering more than 4.6 million downloads of its Open Access publications in 2019, the Australian National University (ANU) Press has experienced an average 44% increase in its monthly download numbers from March 2020, as COVID-19 lockdowns have become enforced around the world. Similarly, in May 2020, the Natural History Museum (NHM) in the United Kingdom (UK) has registered a staggering

6h

Insider trading has become more subtle

Insider trading comes in two main forms: arguably legal and clearly illegal.

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Worse memory with age? It may just be 'different'

Aging memories may not be "worse," just different, a new study suggests. While it may not always be the first sign of aging, some faculties, including memory, do get worse as people age. But the process may not be as straightforward as it seems. Zachariah Reagh, assistant professor of psychological and brain sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, looked at the brain activity of older peo

7h

Best backyard umbrellas for shade and style

Relax in the shade. (Claudia Altamimi via Unsplash/) Hot, sweaty weather are only made better with a cool drink and plenty of shade. Investing in a backyard umbrella means so many more comfy days spent outside—minus all the stickiness and heat exhaustion. They'll add a splash of color to your outdoor area and some of them even include LED lights. We found a few of the sturdiest, most weather-resi

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Researchers propose climate-smart desert food production model for land and human health

As the National Weather Service warns that a heat wave spreading across the southwestern United States is of a "magnitude rare, dangerous and deadly," a team of scientists, led by the University of Arizona, has generated a new vision aimed at reducing climate disruptions to food security, human health and rural economies.

7h

New study outlines how work from home could adapt to continue effectively

The first international empirical study of work from home shows there are benefits that could be maintained after the pandemic.

7h

The best pro drones for stunning aerial shots

Achieve shots from great heights. (Arnold Dogelis via Unsplash/) If you're in the market for cinematic, aerial footage that will capture your activities – whether it's a casual day at the beach or an adventurous hike in the mountains – pro drones have you covered. These high-quality cameras fly overhead, taking sweeping pictures and video as they go. Get ready to snag some enviable shots that'll

7h

NASA: Dwarf Planet Ceres Is an Ocean World

Scientists considered Pluto to be a planet when it was discovered, but it later became the first dwarf planet. It's not the closest one to Earth, though. Ceres is a dwarf planet and the largest object in the Great Asteroid Belt, and it has a new distinction today: ocean world . The latest data from NASA's Dawn mission proves the almost-planet has a vast repository of salty water hiding below its

7h

Researchers help endangered birds beat deadly parasite

Researchers have found a way to help one of Australia's rarest birds "self-fumigate" or safeguard their nests, to protect their young from deadly parasites.

7h

Researchers explore pollen fertilization mechanisms

A group of researchers from four countries has worked out exactly how a pollen tube, the plant cell that emerges from a grain of pollen, grows up to a thousand-fold to reach an ovule deep inside the flower. The key to this growth is an inflow and outflow of protons that creates electrical activity at the cell membrane and makes the cell grow. The results of the study will help scientists understan

7h

Researchers help endangered birds beat deadly parasite

Researchers have found a way to help one of Australia's rarest birds "self-fumigate" or safeguard their nests, to protect their young from deadly parasites.

7h

Pressure-induced 2D-3D conversion in hybrid lead iodide layered perovskite

Hydrostatic pressurization can lead to new and improved material properties. However, most novel material properties are only retainable at high-pressure states, and therefore have no practical applicability at ambient conditions. Recently, a team of international scientists led by Dr. Lingping Kong and Dr. Gang Liu from HPSTAR reported permanent and irreversible transition of 2-D hybrid Dion-Jaco

7h

Researchers explore pollen fertilization mechanisms

A group of researchers from four countries has worked out exactly how a pollen tube, the plant cell that emerges from a grain of pollen, grows up to a thousand-fold to reach an ovule deep inside the flower. The key to this growth is an inflow and outflow of protons that creates electrical activity at the cell membrane and makes the cell grow. The results of the study will help scientists understan

7h

Researchers find new way to make bacteria more sensitive to antibiotics

Researchers from Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, have discovered a new way to reverse antibiotic resistance in some bacteria using hydrogen sulfide (H2S).

7h

Researchers find new way to make bacteria more sensitive to antibiotics

Researchers from Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, have discovered a new way to reverse antibiotic resistance in some bacteria using hydrogen sulfide (H2S).

7h

Unexpected role of two lipid-binding mitochondrial proteins associated with heart disease and diabetes

Mitochondria are the powerhouse of cells, continuously converting energy from food into the chemical energy currency called ATP. This essential process depends on large protein complexes within the inner membrane of mitochondria acting similar to batteries. A new study led by Dr. Ruchika Anand and Prof. Andreas Reichert, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, has found that two lipid-binding prote

7h

Secretion of sugar polymers modulates multicellularity in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus

Research by INRS (Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique) Professor Salim Timo Islam and his Ph.D. student Fares Saïdi has recently revealed that multicellular physiology in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus—a bacterium that can actively reorganize its community according to the environment in which it is found—is modulated by the secretion of two natural sugar polymers in separate z

7h

Last Chance to Enter Our Annual Top 10 Innovations Contest

There's only a week and half left to submit your new product and have a chance at being selected for a coveted spot in The Scientist's 2020 competition.

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Dwarf planet Ceres may have salty water inside

The dwarf planet Ceres could currently have liquid water in its interior, researchers report. Ceres, the largest object in our solar system's main asteroid belt, once harbored a global subsurface ocean that likely froze solid long ago. Today, if any liquid water—a key requisite for habitability—still exists on Ceres, a good place to look for it is beneath the youngest of its large impact craters.

7h

Unexpected role of two lipid-binding mitochondrial proteins associated with heart disease and diabetes

Mitochondria are the powerhouse of cells, continuously converting energy from food into the chemical energy currency called ATP. This essential process depends on large protein complexes within the inner membrane of mitochondria acting similar to batteries. A new study led by Dr. Ruchika Anand and Prof. Andreas Reichert, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, has found that two lipid-binding prote

7h

Secretion of sugar polymers modulates multicellularity in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus

Research by INRS (Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique) Professor Salim Timo Islam and his Ph.D. student Fares Saïdi has recently revealed that multicellular physiology in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus—a bacterium that can actively reorganize its community according to the environment in which it is found—is modulated by the secretion of two natural sugar polymers in separate z

7h

A new way to fabricate MXene films that block electromagnetic interference

Chemical and biomolecular engineers have demonstrated a novel approach to MXene fabrication that could lead to methods for at-scale production of MXene freestanding films: drop-casting onto prepatterned hydrophobic substrates. Their method led to a 38% enhancement of EMI shielding efficiency over conventional methods.

7h

X-rays indicate that water can behave like a liquid crystal

Scientists have discovered that water can exhibit a similar behavior like a liquid crystal when illuminated with laser light. This effect originates by the alignment of water molecules, which exhibit a mixture of low- and high-density domains that are more or less prone to alignment. The results are based on a combination of experimental studies using X-ray lasers and molecular simulations.

7h

Recipe for success — interaction proteomics become a household item

A research team introduces a new optimized and integrated interaction proteomics protocol that combines two state-of-the art methods to allow rapid identification of protein-protein interactions and more.

7h

Why walking to work may be better for you than a casual stroll

Walking with a purpose — especially walking to get to work — makes people walk faster and consider themselves to be healthier, a new study has found. The study, published online earlier this month in the Journal of Transport and Health, found that walking for different reasons yielded different levels of self-rated health. People who walked primarily to places like work and the grocery store fro

7h

I Run a Tutoring Company. I Get Dozens of Calls a Day About Learning Pods.

"I can't imagine not sending my kids to school, but ​how can I possibly send them?"​ I've spoken with well over 100 parents in the past week, and every single one has expressed some version of this dilemma. They come to me because my business partner and I run New York City's only tutoring company where all of the tutors are classroom teachers . People used to call me with a specific question. "M

7h

Citizens of Mauritius are cleaning up a major oil spill themselves

Mauritius' clear waters are currently muddied by oil (bg62/Pixabay/) When a huge freighter aground on the coast of Mauritius cracked open last Thursday, August 6, David Sauvage took immediate action. He called up his friends and team members from Rezistans ek Alternativ, a local group of environmental and political activists, and got to work. The born and bred Mauritian, who is a software enginee

7h

Google Is Launching a Global Earthquake-Detection Network

A new feature will allow Android devices to collect readings from smartphone sensors and warn users when a tectonic shake-up is imminent.

7h

Cannondale Quick Neo SL Review (2020): A Fast, Fun E-Ride

This is a powerful electric bike for fun, mostly on-road romps around town.

7h

AI Magic Makes Century-Old Films Look New

Denis Shiryaev uses algorithms to colorize and sharpen old movies, bumping them up to a smooth 60 frames per second. The result is a stunning glimpse at the past.

7h

Russian and Other COVID Vaccines

Russia's approval of a COVID-19 vaccine is premature and counterproductive.

7h

Arbetsgivare ratar transpersoner

Diskrimineringslagen räcker inte för att skydda transpersoner på arbetsmarknaden, enligt en experimentell studie från Linköpings universitet. Samtidigt kan arbetsgivare diskriminerar utifrån olika grunder. En transman kan till exempel diskrimineras för att vara trans i mansdominerade yrken, men för att vara man i kvinnodominerade yrken. Sedan 2017 är könsidentitet och könsuttryck en av de sju dis

7h

Russia's Fast-Track Coronavirus Vaccine Draws Outrage over Safety

The immunization could be dangerous because it hasn't been tested in large trials, researchers say — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Claims of 'Ocean' inside Ceres May Not Hold Water

Final results from NASA's Dawn spacecraft suggest a brine reservoir exists within the dwarf planet, but some experts remain unconvinced — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Claims of 'Ocean' inside Ceres May Not Hold Water

Final results from NASA's Dawn spacecraft suggest a brine reservoir exists within the dwarf planet, but some experts remain unconvinced — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Japan cracks down on research interference and Lebanon's devastating blast

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02336-y The latest science news, in brief.

8h

How to stop COVID-19 fuelling a resurgence of AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02334-0 A focus on the coronavirus has disrupted detection and treatment of other infectious diseases. Governments and funders can do four things to avert a catastrophe.

8h

Self-interest powers decision to go solar

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02377-3 Cool calculation trumps the common good when it comes to adopting solar energy.

8h

Phase 1/2 study of COVID-19 RNA vaccine BNT162b1 in adults

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2639-4

8h

Sputnik review – smart Soviet-era sci-fi chiller

The alien is the least of the horrors in Egor Abramenko's mostly gripping suspense, set in a dour 80s army facility with an unwanted visitor 'We sent two into space. Three came back." At first, no one notices the extraterrestrial stowaway when a Soviet rocket lands back on Earth; the creature is tucked out of sight, getting comfy in the oesophagus of one of the two astronauts on board. But it mak

8h

Climate change researcher dies in Greenland accident

A prominent Swiss-American glaciologist specialising in climate change has died in an accident in Greenland, his research institute said Wednesday.

8h

Solens lägereldar syns i närbild

Rymdsonden Solar Orbiter som sändes upp i februari har nu levererat de första närbilderna på solen från sin närmaste punkt i det första varvet, på halva avståndet jämfört med jorden. – Kvaliteten är faktiskt helt fantastisk, säger solforskaren Jorrit Leenaarts på Stockholms universitet.

8h

Teachers Respond: Should Schools Reopen?

I'm a Nurse in New York. Teachers Should Do Their Jobs, Just Like I Did. Last week, Kristen McConnell argued that schools are essential to the functioning of society, which makes teachers essential workers. "I can understand that teachers are nervous about returning to school," she wrote. "But they should take a cue from their fellow essential workers and do their job. Even people who think there

8h

How to Make Remote Learning Work for Your Children

If you're preparing for yet another round of homeschooling, we've identified a few ways to make this school year suck just a little bit less.

8h

How Facebook and Other Sites Manipulate Your Privacy Choices

Social media platforms repeatedly use so-called dark patterns to nudge you toward giving away more of your data.

8h

Scientists Put Masks to the Test—With an iPhone and a Laser

When it comes to blocking germs, not all cloth masks are created equal. A new, low-cost testing device literally illuminates which ones won't get the job done.

8h

Lægedage hænger i en tynd tråd

Årets største begivenhed for landets praktiserende læger er i fare for at blive aflyst. Beslutningen tages, når myndighedernes forsamlingsforbud udløber 31. august, lyder det fra PLO, der skal balancere både økonomiske og etiske hensyn.

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Covid-19 lockdown means 115 million Indian children risk malnutrition

India operates the world's largest free school lunch programme in an effort to combat childhood malnutrition, but the lockdown to halt the spread of the coronavirus has left many without a meal

8h

Tiktok brød Google-regler: Indsamlede brugerdata via MAC-adresser

The Wall Street Journal kunne i går afsløre, at Tiktok har indsamlet data fra Android-telefoner, selvom Google havde gjort netop den type indsamling ulovlig.

8h

America Is Preparing for the Wrong Arctic Crisis

The first U.S. Coordinator for the Arctic is mostly veteran of Afghan war diplomacy—but the issues in the far North aren't primarily military — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Kurser i udlandet har lange udsigter for praksislæger

De populære efteruddannelseskurser i udlandet er indtil videre droppet hos PLO, fortæller organisationen. I stedet vinder gruppebaserede kurser på 6-12 læger frem i kursuskataloget, der er fyldt til randen i efteråret.

8h

Vinterregnen har forsinket byggerier mere end corona

PLUS. Dansk Byggeri vurderer, at vinterens voldsomme nedbør og deraf følgende oversvømmelser har større skyld i forsinkelser af bygge- og anlægsopgaver end coronakrisen.

9h

Women in Science May Suffer Lasting Career Damage from COVID-19

They bear a greater proportion of childcare and household responsibilities, making it much harder for them to publish their work and get ahead — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

The Other Way Trump Could Destroy the Next Presidency

A brazen refusal by the president to leave office is surely a nightmare scenario. But even if President Donald Trump were to lose and accept the results on November 3 or soon thereafter, he could nevertheless wreak significant damage during the period between the election and the inauguration of Joe Biden—endangering the incoming administration, at best, and actively sabotaging it, at worst. Pres

9h

Rigsrevision: DSB's indsats med at færdigbygge IC4 er tilfredsstillende

DSB har stort set færdiggjort IC4-togene og overholdt den oprindelige bevilling, og dermed afslutter Rigsrevisionen sagen. Togene kommer dog aldrig til at erstatte IC3.

9h

Women in Science May Suffer Lasting Career Damage from COVID-19

They bear a greater proportion of childcare and household responsibilities, making it much harder for them to publish their work and get ahead — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Sparvugglan missgynnas av varma vintrar

Sparvugglan Glaucidium passerinum är inte större än en stare. Den jagar småfåglar och sorkar som den lagrar inför vintern i sina bohål och i holkar. Forskare i Finland har samlat data om sparvugglors vinterförråd i västra Finland under perioden 2003–2018. Vanligtvis börjar ugglorna lägga upp förråd när temperaturen sjunker under noll, vilket brukar inträffa i slutet av oktober i forskarnas studieo

9h

Mauritius oil spill: Almost all fuel oil pumped out of MV Wakashio

There has been a race against time to remove the fuel oil, amid fears that the ship will break up.

9h

Coronavirus Live Updates

New Zealand has returned to a partial lockdown. New Jersey's governor is giving school districts the option to offer all-virtual classes, relaxing his original policy.

9h

Pop Culture Failed to Imagine Kamala Harris

"T here will be a resistance to your ambition. There will be people who say to you, 'You are out of your lane,' because they are burdened by only having the capacity to see what has always been instead of what can be." That was Kamala Harris, earlier this month, speaking at the Black Girls Lead conference . She was talking about the American status quo. But she was also acknowledging a more parti

9h

Trump Is Hobbling the Mail the Old-Fashioned Way

On the eve of a highly consequential presidential election, when millions of citizens are eager to protect their health by voting by mail, the United States Postal Service bears the burden of expediting a secure election free of partisan tampering. But the officials with power over the agency appear bent on doing exactly the opposite—that is, returning to an old tradition of politicizing the post

9h

'Teeth The Size Of Bananas'; New Study Paints Picture Of 'Terror Crocodiles'

A new study reveals there were multiple species of Deinosuchus , the giant crocodylians that lived 75 million years ago. They were among the largest predators in the ecosystem and ate dinosaurs. (Image credit: Adam Cossette)

9h

The Furious Hunt for the MAGA Bomber

Scarred by trauma and devoted to Trump, a man began mailing explosives to the president's critics on the eve of an election. Inside the race to catch him.

9h

Snabbtest för covid-19-antikroppar prövas på sjukvårdspersonal

Ett nytt antikroppstest vid covid-19 som utvecklats av forskare vid Lunds universitet har visat hög prestanda i kliniska tester och tillämpning. Antikropparna som mäts är kopplade till det så kallade spikeproteinet (S-protein) hos SARS-CoV-2-viruset, som orsakar covid-19. Testet visar på 15 minuter om en person haft sjukdomen, oavsett om man haft symptom eller inte. Till skillnad från andra serol

9h

Absent Federal Rules, Farmworkers Face Covid-19 Risks

Farms have already reported outbreaks among hundreds of workers in California, Washington, Florida, and Michigan. But the federal government has not established any enforceable rules to protect farmworkers from the pandemic. So far, safeguards and guidelines for what to do when workers get sick are voluntary.

10h

Tiger sightings increase in Thai forest

This year 79 tigers were captured on hidden cameras in Thailand's Thungyai-Huai Kha Khaeng forest.

10h

A micro-bioimpedance meter for monitoring insulin bioavailability in personalized diabetes therapy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70376-5

10h

Metabolites profiling and pharmacokinetics of troxipide and its pharmacodynamics in rats with gastric ulcer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70312-7

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ApcMin/+ tumours and normal mouse small intestines show linear metabolite concentration and DNA cytosine hydroxymethylation gradients from pylorus to colon

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70579-w Apc Min/+ tumours and normal mouse small intestines show linear metabolite concentration and DNA cytosine hydroxymethylation gradients from pylorus to colon

10h

Extracting user influence from ratings and trust for rating prediction in recommendations

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70350-1

10h

Pneumocephalus and air travel: an experimental investigation on the effects of aircraft cabin pressure on intracranial pressure

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70614-w

10h

Evaluation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated anticancer response against tumor interstitium-simulating physical barriers

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70694-8

10h

RNA N6-methyladenosine modification is required for miR-98/MYCN axis-mediated inhibition of neuroblastoma progression

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-64682-1 RNA N 6 -methyladenosine modification is required for miR-98/MYCN axis-mediated inhibition of neuroblastoma progression

10h

How Ebola prepared one doctor for Covid-19

How Ebola prepared one doctor in the Democratic Republic of Congo to treat coronavirus.

10h

Revealing electronic state-switching at conical intersections in alkyl iodides by ultrafast XUV transient absorption spectroscopy

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17745-w The reaction trajectories of photoexcited molecules may involve transitions through conical intersections, which are ubiquitous in nature but challenging to characterize. Here the authors provide a complete mapping of molecular dissociation of two model alkyl halides by ultrafast XUV transient absorption.

10h

Stretchable hydrogels with low hysteresis and anti-fatigue fracture based on polyprotein cross-linkers

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17877-z High stretchability, low hysteresis and anti-fatigue fracture are essential for hydrogel-based devices but it is rare to achieve. Here the authors demonstrate a hydrogel design using tandem-repeat proteins as the cross-linkers and random coiled polymers as the percolating network which results in high stretcha

10h

Discovery of EMRE in fungi resolves the true evolutionary history of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17705-4 The mitochondrial calcium uptake system, crucial for cellular processes, evolved in ancient eukaryotes. Here, authors perform a phylogenomic analysis across 1,156 eukaryotes, and show that previously identified animal and fungal genes in this system originated from an ancestral duplication.

10h

Pyropia yezoensis genome reveals diverse mechanisms of carbon acquisition in the intertidal environment

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17689-1 The nori producing seaweed Pyropia yezoensis has heteromorphic generations that occupy distinct habitats. Here, via genome assembly, transcriptome analysis, and 13 C isotope labeling, the authors show the interplay between inorganic carbon availability and life cycle evolution in the intertidal environment.

10h

Self healable neuromorphic memtransistor elements for decentralized sensory signal processing in robotics

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17870-6 Sensory information processing in robots relies on a centralized approach with issues of wiring, fault-tolerance and latency. Here, the authors report a decentralized neuromorphic approach with self-healable memristive elements enabling intelligent sensations in a prototypical robotic nervous system.

10h

Labile carbon limits late winter microbial activity near Arctic treeline

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17790-5 Soil microbial communities remain active throughout much of the Arctic winter, and Arctic winters are warming dramatically. Here, the authors show that persistently warm winter soils can lead to labile carbon starvation and reduced microbial respiration, despite the high carbon content of most Arctic soils.

10h

Inhibition of autophagy curtails visual loss in a model of autosomal dominant optic atrophy

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17821-1 Autosomal dominant optic atrophy is caused by mutations in the mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1. Here, the authors show that AMPK-induced autophagy depletes mitochondria in axons of retinal ganglion cells and that autophagic inhibition reverses vision loss in a mouse model.

10h

Children's family income is associated with cognitive function and volume of anterior not posterior hippocampus

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17854-6 The hippocampus is thought to underlie income gaps in children's cognition. Here, the authors find that the stress-sensitive anterior (but not posterior) hippocampus mediates income-gaps in memory and vocabulary, especially in children whose families earn ≤$75k annually.

10h

Covid-19 "long haulers" are organizing online to study themselves

Gina Assaf was running in Washington, DC, on March 19 when she suddenly couldn't take another step. "I was so out of breath I had to stop," she says. Five days earlier, she'd hung out with a friend; within days, that friend and their partner had started showing three classic signs of covid-19: fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Assaf had those symptoms too, and then some. By the second week,

10h

PAD patients with depression had worse recovery, women twice as likely to be depressed

Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and symptoms of depression had worse recovery, according to an analysis of PAD patients receiving vascular care at a specialty clinic. Researchers detected about twice the rate of depressive symptoms among women than men. This research is the first to document the link between depressive symptoms and PAD recovery among patients newly diagnosed with PAD

10h

Refleksioner i lyset af corona: Telefonkonsultationen længe leve

Af uransagelige grunde har overenskomsten for praktiserende læger altid krævet, at patienten møder fysisk op for at lægen har ret til at tage et honorar på 145 kr. Det bør høre fortiden til, skriver praktiserende læge Jannik Falhof.

10h

Can VR help us understand layers of oppression?

Often thought of first as gaming tech, virtual reality has been increasingly used in research as a tool for mimicking real-life scenarios and experiences in a safe and controlled environment. Focusing on issues of oppression and the ripple affect it has throughout America's political, educational, and social systems, Dr. Courtney D. Cogburn of Columbia University School of Social Work and her tea

10h

Quantum particles timed as they tunnel through a solid

Quantum particles can tunnel through seemingly impassable barriers, popping up on the other side. Quantum tunneling is not a new discovery, but there's a lot that scientists don't know. By super-cooling rubidium particles, researchers use their spinning as a magnetic timer. When it comes to weird behavior, there's nothing quite like the quantum world. On top of that world-class head scratcher ent

10h

U.S. Puts Kodak Deal On Hold Amid Scrutiny Of Its Finances

The decision to entrust $765 million of taxpayer money to the former maker of photographic equipment raises several questions about the Trump administration's due diligence of Kodak. (Image credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)

10h

AI-forskaren Max Tegmark utnämns till "Årets svensk i världen"

Fysikprofessorn Max Tegmark utnämns till "Årets svensk i världen", som delas ut av organisationen Svenskar i världen. De motiverar sitt val med att Tegmark är en av "de mest framstående forskarna inom artificiell intelligens" och att han "hjälper oss att förstå och närma oss AI", enligt ett pressmeddelande.

11h

Gulf of Mexico 'Dead Zone' smaller-than-average this summer due to storms

The bottom area of low oxygen in Louisiana coastal waters west of the Mississippi River, commonly known as the "Dead Zone," was mapped at a much smaller-than-average size this summer. The area was 2,117 square miles, which is larger than Rhode Island but smaller than Delaware, and well below the projected estimate of 7,769 square miles.

11h

New microrobot with in situ, in vivo bioprinting offers promise for gastric wounds

Researchers in China have taken the first step towards a new way of treating gastric wounds by using a microrobot combined with the new concept of "in situ in vivo bioprinting" to carry out tissue repair inside the body.

11h

"We are extremely guilty and distressed"

"Now no-one wants ForBetterScience to become an all-Papermill channel. And we cannot really expect to shame or inspire scriveners in the academic-ghostwriter industry to seek out more constructive applications for their talents, so the point of exposing them is not immediately obvious." -Smut Clyde

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Virus gives Sri Lanka's threatened elephants a reprieve

Sri Lanka's coronavirus lockdown has helped reduce the death toll from clashes between elephants and humans, conservationists have said.

11h

Virus gives Sri Lanka's threatened elephants a reprieve

Sri Lanka's coronavirus lockdown has helped reduce the death toll from clashes between elephants and humans, conservationists have said.

12h

Venice nurtures its lagoon back to health

Venice may be famed for Saint Mark's Square or the Bridge of Sighs, but the Italian city has another jewel that is often overlooked: its lagoon.

12h

New dinosaur related to T. rex discovered on Isle of Wight

Four bones found at Shanklin belonged to a new species of theropod dinosaur, a study finds.

12h

Android phones to track quakes; California gets alert system

Android phones will be used to sense earthquakes around the world and may one day be able to provide global warnings, with the first mass alert system unveiled Tuesday in California, Google announced.

12h

Covid vaccine tracker: when will we have a coronavirus vaccine?

More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progress Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…

12h

How anxiety—and hope—can drive new product adoption

Researchers from University of New South Wales, University of Southern California, and Imperial College London published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that analyzes how varying levels of hope and anxiety about outcomes from new products affect consequential adoption intentions and actual product adoption.

12h

New research identifies business travel as driver of economic growth

New research from Harvard's Growth Lab finds a direct link between a country's incoming business travel and the growth of new and existing industries. The findings, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, support a Growth Lab hypothesis that moving knowhow, the tacit knowledge accumulated and transferred from brain to brain through a long process of imitation, repetition, and feedback, is

12h

Nanocrystals from recycled wood waste make carbon-fiber composites tougher

Polymers reinforced with ultra-fine strands of carbon fibers epitomize composite materials that are "light as a feather and strong as steel," earning them versatile applications across several industries. Adding materials called carbon nanotubes can further enhance the composites' functionality. But the chemical processes used for incorporating carbon nanotube end up spreading them unevenly on the

12h

New species of dinosaur discovered on Isle of Wight

A new study by Palaeontologists at the University of Southampton suggests four bones recently found on the Isle of Wight belong to new species of theropod dinosaur, the group that includes Tyrannosaurus rex and modern-day birds.

12h

Eating out was a very social matter for early humans

A half-a-million-year-old internationally significant archeological site in Sussex, England, offers unprecedented insights into the life of a poorly understood extinct human species, according to new UCL research.

12h

First generation university students need more guidance navigating education system

Young people who are the first in their family to go to university are less likely to attend an elite institution and are more likely to drop out than those with graduate parents, according to new research led by the UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies.

12h

Molecular additives enhance mechanical properties of organic solar cell material

Organic solar cells are ideal for use in flexible electronics because of the inherently malleable nature of semiconducting polymers. Recent research on the interplay between processing, thermodynamics and mechanical stability of typical photoactive layers in organic cells is providing a deeper understanding of these high-potential materials.

12h

Examining Congress members' popularity on Instagram

With a "virtual campaign season" underway due to the COVID-19 pandemic, social media platforms will be a particularly important way for candidates to build a following and connect with voters. New research on the popularity of Congress members' Instagram posts reveals some surprising factors at play that could elevate their influence on the platform and make for more effective campaigns.

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Kursk forliste for 20 år siden i dag – sådan blev den hævet

Efter at de første 20 meter af den atomdrevne ubåd var skåret af, kunne resten hæves af bugseringsprammens 26 kraner, hvis wirer blev fastgjort i hver sit hul i ubådens skrog.

12h

New Zealand probes freight as mystery source of virus outbreak

First locally acquired Covid-19 cases in 102 days threaten to hit economy ahead of election

13h

How to spot "alternative scientists".

Recently, a so-called "white coat summit" gave me a sense of dejavu. It was held by a group that calls itself ' America's Frontline Doctors ' (AFD) that consisted of about a dozen people wearing white coats to the effect of achieving an appearance of being experts on medical matters. The AFD apparently wanted to address a "massive disinformation campaign" (what irony) and counter the medical advi

14h

We have no idea if the Russian Covid vaccine is safe or effective | Gideon Meyerowitz-Katz

The only discernible difference between Russia's vaccine and others is that this one has skipped most of the testing phases • Russia's coronavirus vaccine: will it work, and is it safe? Throughout the Covid-19 pandemic, there's been one hope that we've all relied on. We're all waiting, with bated breath, for the day that scientists announce a successful coronavirus vaccine, because then we can ge

14h

Europe's earliest bone tools found in Britain

Archaeologists say they've discovered the earliest known bone tools in Europe.

14h

'AeroNabs' promise powerful, inhalable protection against COVID-19

Scientists have devised a novel approach to halting the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The researchers engineered a completely synthetic, production-ready molecule that straitjackets the crucial SARS-CoV-2 machinery that allows the virus to infect our cells. In an aerosol formulation they tested, these molecules could be self-administered with a nasal spray or inhaler.

14h

How the Pandemic Revealed Britain's National Illness

F aced with the coronavirus pandemic, Britain's leaders asked their people to do three things, captured in one pithy slogan: "Stay home. Protect the NHS. Save lives." On the first of those edicts, Britons largely followed through. Main streets, town centers, and public spaces were mostly abandoned, and the government pulled together a far-reaching job-protection program, ensuring that those who f

14h

'Could I feel what they were doing? Yes': Rob Delaney on the pain and pleasure of his vasectomy

The actor and comedian decided it was time to have the procedure after he and his wife had had four children. Here he writes candidly about the experience, and why it was the kindest cut I got a vasectomy a few months ago. A vasectomy is when they cut and tie off the vas deferens , which are these little tubes in your ball sack (scrotum) so that there's no sperm (sperm) in your jizz (semen) when

14h

Global report: New Zealand begins mass testing as Australia records deadliest day

New Zealand to conduct 'tens of thousands' of tests; 21 deaths recorded in Australian state of Victoria; US health secretary sceptical of Russia vaccine Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Australia suffered its deadliest day of the pandemic so far, with 21 deaths in the state of Victoria, as authorities in New Zealand 's largest city prepared to conduct "tens of thousan

15h

Secretion of sugar polymers modulates multicellularity in the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus

Research by INRS (Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique) Professor Salim Timo Islam has revealed that multicellular physiology in the social bacterium Myxococcus xanthus–a bacterium that can actively reorganize its community according to the environment in which it is found–is modulated by the secretion of two natural sugar polymers in separate zones of a swarm. Results from their resea

15h

Examining Congress members' popularity on Instagram

New research on the popularity of Congress members' Instagram posts reveals some surprising factors at play that could elevate their influence on the platform and make for more effective campaigns.

15h

Molecular additives enhance mechanical properties of organic solar cell material

Ganesh Balasubramanian, P.C. Rossin assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering & Mechanics at Lehigh University, and his graduate student Joydeep Munshi demonstrated that adding small molecules to a semiconducting polymer blend enhances the performance and stability of material used in organic solar cells. The study is described in an article, 'Elasto-morphology of P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction

15h

KERI creates a super-high-resolution nano display based on the 3D printing close to virtual reality

Companies across the world are competing fiercely to provide high-resolution displays to electronic devices such as TVs and smartphones. In particular, the virtual reality, a keyword of the 4th industrial revolution, requires a much higher resolution to improve the picture quality. A Korean research team developed a technology to produce a 'nano display' with a phenomenal resolution based on the 3

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Pressure-induced 2D-3D conversion in hybrid lead iodide layered perovskite

Here, we demonstrate that 2D D-J perovskites experiencevarious transitions under pressure, such as crystalline-amorphous and 2D-three-dimensional structural transformation, and theprobable metallization are strongly suggested. Moreover, thefundamental changes in the material properties are observed at ambient conditions after pressure treatment, which is crucial for achieving the desired character

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Lipoic acid supplements help some obese but otherwise healthy people lose weight

A compound given as a dietary supplement to overweight but otherwise healthy people in a clinical trial caused many of the patients to slim down.

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Technology can help speed soil recovery after oil spills

Researchers use spectroscopy to quickly and cheaply analyze soils samples.

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KIST finds a strong correlation between ultrasonic stroke rehabilitation treatment and brain waves

The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a research team led, by Dr. Hyungmin Kim at the Center for Bionics, Biomedical Research Institute of the KIST, found a strong correlation between a ultrasonic stroke rehabilitation method for treating damaged brain and a change in delta waves, which is a type of brain waves.

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How anxiety–and hope–can drive new product adoption

When considering new products, anxiety creates approach response (i.e., interest, purchase) rather than avoidance response (i.e., disinterest, failure to purchase) when consumers hope for the goal-congruent outcomes.

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Age, education, and surgical history affect hormone use after oophorectomy

CLEVELAND, Ohio (August 12, 2020)–Removal of the ovaries before natural menopause (surgical menopause) often exacerbates menopause symptoms and places women at increased risk for heart disease, osteoporosis, and cognitive decline. A new study identified the frequency of hormone therapy (HT) use and factors that determine who is more likely to use hormones after oophorectomy to manage symptoms. St

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Meditation-relaxation therapy may offer escape from the terror of sleep paralysis

Sleep paralysis – a condition thought to explain a number of mysterious experiences including alleged cases of alien abduction and demonic night-time visits – could be treated using a technique of meditation-relaxation, suggests a pilot study published today.

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Survey finds most parents nervous to take their kids for vaccinations due to COVID-19

Vaccination rates in the U.S. have plummeted amid COVID-19. A new national survey by Orlando Health finds while the vast majority of parents (84%) believe vaccines are the best way to protect their children from infectious diseases, two-thirds are still nervous to take their kids to their pediatrician's office due to COVID-19.

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Netherlands and Belgium split over tackling virus hotspots

Authorities in The Hague and Brussels take sharply different approaches to surge in Covid-19 cases

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Aardvarks Are Ailing amid Heat and Drought

Climate change is expected to bring more frequent droughts and heat waves to Africa's Kalahari Desert. And aardvarks might not be able to cope. Jason G. Goldman reports.

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Aardvarks Are Ailing amid Heat and Drought

Climate change is expected to bring more frequent droughts and heat waves to Africa's Kalahari Desert. And aardvarks might not be able to cope. Jason G. Goldman reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Digital content on track to equal half 'Earth's mass' by 2245

As we use resources to power massive computer farms and process digital information, our technological progress is redistributing Earth's matter from physical atoms to digital information. Eventually, we will reach a point of full saturation, a period in our evolution in which digital bits will outnumber atoms on Earth, a world 'mostly computer simulated and dominated by digital bits and computer

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Nanocrystals from recycled wood waste make carbon-fiber composites tougher

Researchers have used a natural plant product, called cellulose nanocrystals, to pin and coat carbon nanotubes uniformly onto the carbon-fiber composites. The researchers said their prescribed method is quicker than conventional methods and also allows the designing of carbon-fiber composites from the nanoscale.

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Coronarestriktioner i Nepal har lett till kraftigt ökad barnadödlighet

Åtgärderna som tagits för att stoppa smittspridningen av covid-19 i Nepal har lett till att andelen spädbarn som dör under sin första levnadsvecka är tre gången högre än före pandemin. Det har forskare från Uppsala universitet kunnat visa efter att ha jämfört data från nio sjukhus före och efter att restriktionerna infördes 21 mars i år. Globalt dör 2 miljoner barn varje år under sin första levna

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Torvmarker förvandlas till uppvärmare när permafrosten tinar

Nordliga torvmarker lagrar stora mängder kol och kväve. Och fungerar för närvarande som en källa till global avkylning. Men när permafrosten tinar på grund av den globala klimatuppvärmningen kan torvmarkerna förvandlas till en källa för uppvärmning. De nordliga torvmarkernas sårbarhet för klimatuppvärmning är osäker, delvis på grund av bristen på rumsligt tydliga observationsbaserade torvkartor.

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With VP Pick Kamala Harris, Joe Biden Gets a Digital Juggernaut

The senator and her team have earned a reputation for savvy online organizing. That could come in handy for a socially distanced presidential campaign.

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Danmark halter efter naboerne i 5G udrulning

PLUS. Med stor forsinkelse mødes politikerne om rammerne de kommende 5G-frekvenser. Teleselskaberne frygter, at en forhastet proces vil koste forbrugerne dyrt.

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Health disparities among former NFL players

Among former NFL players, Black, Hawaiian, and athletes from other racial backgrounds report worse physical, mental health outcomes than white players. The widest health gaps emerged between Black and white former NFL players. Black former players reported worse health outcomes in all five health categories, compared with their white peers. Presence of health disparities among former NLF players r

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Nanocrystals from recycled wood waste make carbon-fiber composites tougher

Researchers have used a natural plant product, called cellulose nanocrystals, to pin and coat carbon nanotubes uniformly onto the carbon-fiber composites. The researchers said their prescribed method is quicker than conventional methods and also allows the designing of carbon-fiber composites from the nanoscale.

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Business travel identified as driver of economic growth

New research finds a direct link between a country's incoming business travel and the growth of new and existing industries. The findings support a Growth Lab hypothesis that moving 'knowhow' is critical to economic growth, and business travel plays a key part in that process. The research also raises new concerns about the economic implications of the international travel restrictions imposed to

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Grey reef sharks hang out with the same friends year after year

A four-year study at a Pacific atoll revealed that grey reef sharks keep company with the same individuals, but how they recognise other group members is a mystery

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US to buy 100m doses of potential Covid-19 vaccine for $1.5bn

Moderna snares deal while undertaking phase 3 clinical trials of its experimental drug

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Russia claims world's first COVID-19 vaccine but skepticism abounds

Vladimir Putin announced on Tuesday that a COVID-19 vaccine has been approved in Russia. Scientists around the world are worried that the vaccine is unsafe and that Russia fast-tracked the vaccine without performing the necessary phase 3 trials. To date, Russia has had nearly 900,000 registered cases of coronavirus. Russia's President Vladimir Putin announced on Tuesday, August 11th that his coun

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Could We Force the Universe to Crash?

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

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Is anyone else scared about the far future?

I do not know why it bothers me but I have great anxiety when I think how the world will end because it is guaranteed to happen. I know I will be dead already but thinking about the future just makes me uneasy. Also it is human nature to keep advancing in technology and that is scary if there are no limits. Will there be some point in advancement where we could not advance any further and if this

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Indigenous tribes are using drones to protect the Amazon and endangered jaguars

submitted by /u/Danny-California- [link] [comments]

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FedEx introduces robots to 'most difficult' job in sorting facility

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Disease-bearing ticks thrive as climate change heats up US | US news

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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Scientists make major quantum computing breakthrough

submitted by /u/mystique0712 [link] [comments]

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Amplifying Light With Air

submitted by /u/Sorin61 [link] [comments]

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Action needed to stop the use of killer robots, report says

submitted by /u/KevinCaused911 [link] [comments]

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The Atlantic Daily: Should Colleges Reopen This Fall?

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . It's Kamala. Joe Biden's vice-presidential pick is one you might've guessed from the start . Read Edward-Isaac Dovere on what Harris's selection reveals about Biden —and the future of the Democra

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A Honeybee's Tongue Is More Swiss Army Knife Than Ladle

Once again, insects prove to be more complicated than scientists thought they were.

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Neural transcription factor Pou4f1 promotes renal fibrosis via macrophage-myofibroblast transition [Immunology and Inflammation]

Unresolved inflammation can lead to tissue fibrosis and impaired organ function. Macrophage–myofibroblast transition (MMT) is one newly identified mechanism by which ongoing chronic inflammation causes progressive fibrosis in different forms of kidney disease. However, the mechanisms underlying MMT are still largely unknown. Here, we discovered a brain-specific homeobox/POU domain protein…

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Mismatch sensing by nucleofilament deciphers mechanism of RecA-mediated homologous recombination [Biochemistry]

Recombinases polymerize along single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) at the end of a broken DNA to form a helical nucleofilament with a periodicity of ∼18 bases. The filament catalyzes the search and checking for homologous sequences and promotes strand exchange with a donor duplex during homologous recombination (HR), the mechanism of which…

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Noncovalent {pi}-stacked robust topological organic framework [Applied Physical Sciences]

Organic frameworks (OFs) offer a novel strategy for assembling organic semiconductors into robust networks that facilitate transport, especially the covalent organic frameworks (COFs). However, poor electrical conductivity through covalent bonds and insolubility of COFs limit their practical applications in organic electronics. It is known that the two-dimensional intralayer π∙∙∙π transfer…

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An exploratory data analysis of word form prediction during word-by-word reading [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

In 2005, we reported evidence indicating that upcoming phonological word forms—e.g., kite vs. airplane—were predicted during reading. We recorded brainwaves (electroencephalograms [EEGs]) as people read word-by-word and then correlated the predictability in context of indefinite articles that preceded nouns (a kite vs. an airplane) with the average event-related brain potentials…

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Multicolor 3D MINFLUX nanoscopy of mitochondrial MICOS proteins [Applied Physical Sciences]

The mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) is a multisubunit protein complex that is essential for the proper architecture of the mitochondrial inner membrane. MICOS plays a key role in establishing and maintaining crista junctions, tubular or slit-like structures that connect the cristae membrane with the inner boundary…

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Electronic structure and photophysics of a supermolecular iron complex having a long MLCT-state lifetime and panchromatic absorption [Chemistry]

Exploiting earth-abundant iron-based metal complexes as high-performance photosensitizers demands long-lived electronically excited metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) states, but these species suffer typically from femtosecond timescale charge-transfer (CT)-state quenching by low-lying nonreactive metal-centered (MC) states. Here, we engineer supermolecular Fe(II) chromophores based on the bis

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RNA abasic sites in yeast and human cells [Genetics]

RNA abasic sites and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are mostly unknown; in contrast, DNA abasic sites are well-studied. We found surprisingly that, in yeast and human cells, RNA abasic sites are prevalent. When a base is lost from RNA, the remaining ribose is found as a closed-ring or…

20h

MicroRNA-dependent inhibition of PFN2 orchestrates ERK activation and pluripotent state transitions by regulating endocytosis [Developmental Biology]

Profilin2 (PFN2) is a target of the embryonic stem cell (ESC)-enriched miR-290 family of microRNAs (miRNAs) and an actin/dynamin-binding protein implicated in endocytosis. Here we show that the miR-290-PFN2 pathway regulates many aspects of ESC biology. In the absence of miRNAs, PFN2 is up-regulated in ESCs, with a resulting decrease…

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Physical mechanisms of platelet formation [Commentaries]

Platelets are the second most abundant cell type in blood and play an essential role in the immune response by orchestrating blood coagulation during wound healing (1). Because of their short life span of under 10 d, it is critical for the body to be able to constantly replenish platelets…

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Revealing the mechanism of repressor inactivation during switching of a temperate bacteriophage [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Temperate bacteriophages can enter one of two life cycles following infection of a sensitive host: the lysogenic or the lytic life cycle. The choice between the two alternative life cycles is dependent upon a tight regulation of promoters and their cognate regulatory proteins within the phage genome. We investigated the…

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Assessing multidimensional sustainability: Lessons from Brazil's social protection programs [Sustainability Science]

Examining linkages among multiple sustainable development outcomes is key for understanding sustainability transitions. Yet rigorous evidence on social and environmental outcomes of sustainable development policies remains scarce. We conduct a national-level analysis of Brazil's flagship social protection program, Zero Hunger (ZH), which aims to reduce food insecurity and poverty. Using…

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Dimer interaction in the Hv1 proton channel [Physiology]

The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is a member of the voltage-gated ion channel superfamily, which stands out in design: It is a dimer of two voltage-sensing domains (VSDs), each containing a pore pathway, a voltage sensor (S4), and a gate (S1) and forming its own ion channel. Opening of the…

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Overweight, obesity, and risk of hospitalization for COVID-19: A community-based cohort study of adults in the United Kingdom [Immunology and Inflammation]

The role of obesity and overweight in occurrence of COVID-19 is unknown. We conducted a large-scale general population study using data from a community-dwelling sample in England (n = 334,329; 56.4 ±8.1 y; 54.5% women) with prospective linkage to national registry on hospitalization for COVID-19. Body mass index (BMI, from…

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Explaining the homogeneous diffusion of COVID-19 nonpharmaceutical interventions across heterogeneous countries [Political Sciences]

We analyze the adoption of nonpharmaceutical interventions in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries during the early phase of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Given the complexity associated with pandemic decisions, governments are faced with the dilemma of how to act quickly when their core decision-making…

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Role of Hippo signaling pathway in early placental development [Commentaries]

The placenta is an organ of fetal origin that develops at the interface with the maternal uterus (1). It performs numerous and diverse functions fundamental for the proper growth and development of the semiallogeneic fetus, including gas, nutrient, and waste exchange; production of hormones; and modulation of maternal immune response….

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Stochastic sampling provides a unifying account of visual working memory limits [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Research into human working memory limits has been shaped by the competition between different formal models, with a central point of contention being whether internal representations are continuous or discrete. Here we describe a sampling approach derived from principles of neural coding as a framework to understand working memory limits….

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In-cell destabilization of a homodimeric protein complex detected by DEER spectroscopy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The complexity of the cellular medium can affect proteins' properties, and, therefore, in-cell characterization of proteins is essential. We explored the stability and conformation of the first baculoviral IAP repeat (BIR) domain of X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP), BIR1, as a model for a homodimer protein in human HeLa…

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Negative MAPK-ERK regulation sustains CIC-DUX4 oncoprotein expression in undifferentiated sarcoma [Medical Sciences]

Transcription factor fusions (TFFs) are present in ∼30% of soft-tissue sarcomas. TFFs are not readily "druggable" in a direct pharmacologic manner and thus have proven difficult to target in the clinic. A prime example is the CIC-DUX4 oncoprotein, which fuses Capicua (CIC) to the double homeobox 4 gene, DUX4. CIC-DUX4…

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An ATP-dependent partner switch links flagellar C-ring assembly with gene expression [Microbiology]

Bacterial flagella differ in their number and spatial arrangement. In many species, the MinD-type ATPase FlhG (also YlxH/FleN) is central to the numerical control of bacterial flagella, and its deletion in polarly flagellated bacteria typically leads to hyperflagellation. The molecular mechanism underlying this numerical control, however, remains enigmatic. Using the…

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Dimple drainage before the coalescence of a droplet deposited on a smooth substrate [Applied Physical Sciences]

Thin liquid or gas films are everywhere in nature, from foams to submillimetric bubbles at a free surface, and their rupture leaves a collection of small drops and bubbles. However, the mechanisms at play responsible for the bursting of these films is still in debate. The present study thus aims…

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Evasion of MAIT cell recognition by the African Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 pathovar that causes invasive disease [Immunology and Inflammation]

Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are innate T lymphocytes activated by bacteria that produce vitamin B2 metabolites. Mouse models of infection have demonstrated a role for MAIT cells in antimicrobial defense. However, proposed protective roles of MAIT cells in human infections remain unproven and clinical conditions associated with selective absence…

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Mathematical model of colorectal cancer initiation [Applied Mathematics]

Quantifying evolutionary dynamics of cancer initiation and progression can provide insights into more effective strategies of early detection and treatment. Here we develop a mathematical model of colorectal cancer initiation through inactivation of two tumor suppressor genes and activation of one oncogene, accounting for the well-known path to colorectal cancer…

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Collective property rights reduce deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon [Social Sciences]

In this paper, we draw on common-pool resource theory to argue that indigenous territories, when granted full property rights, will be effective at curbing deforestation. Using satellite data, we test the effect of property rights on deforestation between 1982 and 2016. In order to identify causal effects, we combine a…

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Atomistic structure and dynamics of the human MHC-I peptide-loading complex [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The major histocompatibility complex class-I (MHC-I) peptide-loading complex (PLC) is a cornerstone of the human adaptive immune system, being responsible for processing antigens that allow killer T cells to distinguish between healthy and compromised cells. Based on a recent low-resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of this large membrane-bound protein complex,…

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Channelrhodopsin-mediated optogenetics highlights a central role of depolarization-dependent plant proton pumps [Plant Biology]

In plants, environmental stressors trigger plasma membrane depolarizations. Being electrically interconnected via plasmodesmata, proper functional dissection of electrical signaling by electrophysiology is basically impossible. The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii evolved blue light-excited channelrhodopsins (ChR1, 2) to navigate. When expressed in excitable nerve and muscle cells, ChRs can be

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Activator protein-1 transactivation of the major immediate early locus is a determinant of cytomegalovirus reactivation from latency [Microbiology]

Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that latently infects hematopoietic cells and has the ability to reactivate when triggered by immunological stress. This reactivation causes significant morbidity and mortality in immune-deficient patients, who are unable to control viral dissemination. While a competent immune system helps prevent clinically detectable viremia,…

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Magnon Bose-Einstein condensation and superconductivity in a frustrated Kondo lattice [Physics]

Motivated by recent experiments on magnetically frustrated heavy fermion metals, we theoretically study the phase diagram of the Kondo lattice model with a nonmagnetic valence bond solid ground state on a ladder. A similar physical setting may be naturally occurring in YbAl3C3, CeAgBi2, and TmB4 compounds. In the insulating limit,…

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Mechanism of PRL2 phosphatase-mediated PTEN degradation and tumorigenesis [Biochemistry]

Tumor suppressor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) levels are frequently found reduced in human cancers, but how PTEN is down-regulated is not fully understood. In addition, although a compelling connection exists between PRL (phosphatase of regenerating liver) 2 and cancer, how this phosphatase induces oncogenesis has…

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Neuronal spike-rate adaptation supports working memory in language processing [Neuroscience]

Language processing involves the ability to store and integrate pieces of information in working memory over short periods of time. According to the dominant view, information is maintained through sustained, elevated neural activity. Other work has argued that short-term synaptic facilitation can serve as a substrate of memory. Here we…

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Decreasing snow cover alters functional composition and diversity of Arctic tundra [Ecology]

The Arctic is one of the least human-impacted parts of the world, but, in turn, tundra biome is facing the most rapid climate change on Earth. These perturbations may cause major reshuffling of Arctic species compositions and functional trait profiles and diversity, thereby affecting ecosystem processes of the whole tundra…

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Correction to Supporting Information for Fushimi et al., Evolution-inspired design of multicolored photoswitches from a single cyanobacteriochrome scaffold [SI Correction]

BIOCHEMISTRY Correction to Supporting Information for "Evolution-inspired design of multicolored photoswitches from a single cyanobacteriochrome scaffold," by Keiji Fushimi, Masumi Hasegawa, Takeru Ito, Nathan C. Rockwell, Gen Enomoto, Ni-Ni -Win, J. Clark Lagarias, Masahiko Ikeuchi, and Rei Narikawa, which was first published June 22, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2004273117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci….

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Field experimental evidence shows that self-interest attracts more sunlight [Sustainability Science]

This study examines how messaging approaches in a prosocial intervention can influence not only the effectiveness of the intervention but also, contagion afterward. Our investigation focuses on leveraging two motivations for solar adoption: self-interest and prosocial. Using data from a natural field experiment in 29 municipalities containing 684,000 people, we…

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QnAs with Sharad Goel and Allison Koenecke [QnAs]

Sharad Goel works at the interface of computer science, statistics, and the social sciences. An assistant professor of management science and engineering at Stanford University, Goel has applied computational and statistical techniques to study a variety of socially relevant, policy-related topics, including voter fraud and political polarization. Goel and a…

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A 25-y longitudinal dolphin cohort supports that long-lived individuals in same environment exhibit variation in aging rates [Population Biology]

While it is believed that humans age at different rates, a lack of robust longitudinal human studies using consensus biomarkers meant to capture aging rates has hindered an understanding of the degree to which individuals vary in their rates of aging. Because bottlenose dolphins are long-lived mammals that develop comorbidities…

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Epigenetic loss of the transfer RNA-modifying enzyme TYW2 induces ribosome frameshifts in colon cancer [Medical Sciences]

Transfer RNA (tRNA) activity is tightly regulated to provide a physiological protein translation, and tRNA chemical modifications control its function in a complex with ribosomes and messenger RNAs (mRNAs). In this regard, the correct hypermodification of position G37 of phenylalanine-tRNA, adjacent to the anticodon, is critical to prevent ribosome frameshifting…

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Correction for MacDonald and Mordecai, Amazon deforestation drives malaria transmission, and malaria burden reduces forest clearing [Corrections]

ECOLOGY Correction for "Amazon deforestation drives malaria transmission, and malaria burden reduces forest clearing," by Andrew J. MacDonald and Erin A. Mordecai, which was first published October 14, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1905315116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 22212–22218). The authors note that the following statement should be added to the Acknowledgments:…

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Stomatal immunity against fungal invasion comprises not only chitin-induced stomatal closure but also chitosan-induced guard cell death [Plant Biology]

Many pathogenic fungi exploit stomata as invasion routes, causing destructive diseases of major cereal crops. Intensive interaction is expected to occur between guard cells and fungi. In the present study, we took advantage of well-conserved molecules derived from the fungal cell wall, chitin oligosaccharide (CTOS), and chitosan oligosaccharide (CSOS) to…

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Correction for Song et al., Flat latitudinal diversity gradient caused by the Permian-Triassic mass extinction [Corrections]

EARTH, ATMOSPHERIC, AND PLANETARY SCIENCES, EVOLUTION Correction for "Flat latitudinal diversity gradient caused by the Permian–Triassic mass extinction," by Haijun Song, Shan Huang, Enhao Jia, Xu Dai, Paul B. Wignall, and Alexander M. Dunhill, which was first published July 6, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1918953117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 17578–17583). The…

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A field-based quantitative analysis of sublethal effects of air pollution on pollinators [Ecology]

While the impact of air pollution on human health is well studied, mechanistic impacts of air pollution on wild systems, including those providing essential ecosystem services, are largely unknown, but directly impact our health and well-being. India is the world's largest fruit producer, second most populous country, and contains 9…

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Physical modeling of the heritability and maintenance of epigenetic modifications [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

We develop a predictive theoretical model of the physical mechanisms that govern the heritability and maintenance of epigenetic modifications. This model focuses on a particular modification, methylation of lysine-9 of histone H3 (H3K9), which is one of the most representative and critical epigenetic marks that affects chromatin organization and gene…

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Correction for Baresch and Garbin, Acoustic trapping of microbubbles in complex environments and controlled payload release [Corrections]

ENGINEERING Correction for "Acoustic trapping of microbubbles in complex environments and controlled payload release," by Diego Baresch and Valeria Garbin, which was first published June 22, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2003569117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 15490–15496). The authors note that, due to a printer's error, the article title for reference 39…

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Large stocks of peatland carbon and nitrogen are vulnerable to permafrost thaw [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Northern peatlands have accumulated large stocks of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), but their spatial distribution and vulnerability to climate warming remain uncertain. Here, we used machine-learning techniques with extensive peat core data (n > 7,000) to create observation-based maps of northern peatland C and N stocks, and to…

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Mucosal delivery of ESX-1-expressing BCG strains provides superior immunity against tuberculosis in murine type 2 diabetes [Microbiology]

Tuberculosis (TB) claims 1.5 million lives per year. This situation is largely due to the low efficacy of the only licensed TB vaccine, Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) against pulmonary TB. The metabolic disease type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a risk factor for TB and the mechanisms underlying increased TB susceptibility in…

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Correction for Schroeder et al., Seizure pathways change on circadian and slower timescales in individual patients with focal epilepsy [Corrections]

NEUROSCIENCE, BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for "Seizure pathways change on circadian and slower timescales in individual patients with focal epilepsy," by Gabrielle M. Schroeder, Beate Diehl, Fahmida A. Chowdhury, John S. Duncan, Jane de Tisi, Andrew J. Trevelyan, Rob Forsyth, Andrew Jackson, Peter N. Taylor, and Yujiang Wang, which…

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Syntaxin 3 is essential for photoreceptor outer segment protein trafficking and survival [Cell Biology]

Trafficking of photoreceptor membrane proteins from their site of synthesis in the inner segment (IS) to the outer segment (OS) is critical for photoreceptor function and vision. Here we evaluate the role of syntaxin 3 (STX3), in trafficking of OS membrane proteins such as peripherin 2 (PRPH2) and rhodopsin. Photoreceptor-specific…

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QnAs with Mark T. Nelson [QnAs]

Mark T. Nelson has long been interested in the mechanisms that control blood flow in the brain in response to neuronal activity. During his research career, he has examined ion channels in smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and how the channels are regulated. Nelson's work has improved researchers' understanding of…

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Correction for Wu et al., A negative reciprocal regulatory axis between cyclin D1 and HNF4{alpha} modulates cell cycle progression and metabolism in the liver [Corrections]

MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for "A negative reciprocal regulatory axis between cyclin D1 and HNF4α modulates cell cycle progression and metabolism in the liver," by Heng Wu, Tzachi Reizel, Yue J. Wang, Jessica L. Lapiro, Betsy T. Kren, Jonathan Schug, Shilpa Rao, Ashleigh Morgan, Adam Herman, Laurie L. Shekels, Matthew S….

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Virtuous violence from the war room to death row [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

How likely is it that someone would approve of using a nuclear weapon to kill millions of enemy civilians in the hope of ending a ground war that threatens thousands of American troops? Ask them how they feel about prosecuting immigrants, banning abortion, supporting the death penalty, and protecting gun…

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Enhancer evolutionary co-option through shared chromatin accessibility input [Developmental Biology]

The diversity of forms in multicellular organisms originates largely from the spatial redeployment of developmental genes [S. B. Carroll, Cell 134, 25–36 (2008)]. Several scenarios can explain the emergence of cis-regulatory elements that govern novel aspects of a gene expression pattern [M. Rebeiz, M. Tsiantis, Curr. Opin. Genet. Dev. 45,…

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Defect tolerant zero-bias topological photocurrent in a ferroelectric semiconductor [Applied Physical Sciences]

Lattice defect is a major cause of energy dissipation in conventional electric current due to the drift and diffusion motions of electrons. Different nature of current emerges when noncentrosymmetric materials are excited by light. This current, called the shift current, originates from the change in the Berry connection of electrons'…

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Necrotic upper tips1 mimics heat and drought stress and encodes a protoxylem-specific transcription factor in maize [Plant Biology]

Maintaining sufficient water transport during flowering is essential for proper organ growth, fertilization, and yield. Water deficits that coincide with flowering result in leaf wilting, necrosis, tassel browning, and sterility, a stress condition known as "tassel blasting." We identified a mutant, necrotic upper tips1 (nut1), that mimics tassel blasting and…

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Optical properties of metasurfaces infiltrated with liquid crystals [Applied Physical Sciences]

Optical metasurfaces allow the ability to precisely manipulate the wavefront of light, creating many interesting and exotic optical phenomena. However, they generally lack dynamic control over their optical properties and are limited to passive optical elements. In this work, we report the nontrivial infiltration of nanostructured metalenses with three respective…

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Nucleosome allostery in pioneer transcription factor binding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

While recent experiments revealed that some pioneer transcription factors (TFs) can bind to their target DNA sequences inside a nucleosome, the binding dynamics of their target recognitions are poorly understood. Here we used the latest coarse-grained models and molecular dynamics simulations to study the nucleosome-binding procedure of the two pioneer…

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Correction for Johansson et al., An open challenge to advance probabilistic forecasting for dengue epidemics [Corrections]

MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for "An open challenge to advance probabilistic forecasting for dengue epidemics," by Michael A. Johansson, Karyn M. Apfeldorf, Scott Dobson, Jason Devita, Anna L. Buczak, Benjamin Baugher, Linda J. Moniz, Thomas Bagley, Steven M. Babin, Erhan Guven, Teresa K. Yamana, Jeffrey Shaman, Terry Moschou, Nick Lothian, Aaron…

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Profile of James R. Ehleringer [Profiles]

For the past 40 years, ecologist James R. Ehleringer has led students and colleagues to California's Death Valley to collect leaves from Encelia farinosa, a common desert shrub known as brittlebrush. The little shrub launched Ehleringer's career, sending it in multiple directions and leading to major discoveries and unforeseen applications….

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COVID-19: Herd immunity in Sweden fails to materialize

Sweden's policy of allowing the controlled spread of Covid-19 viral infection among the population has so far failed to deliver the country's previously stated goal of herd immunity. Commenting on recent antibody testing clinical and research findings, authors of a paper published by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, write that Sweden's higher rates of viral infection, hospitalisation

20h

First generation university students need more guidance navigating education system

Young people who are the first in their family to go to university are less likely to attend an elite institution and are more likely to drop out than those with graduate parents, according to new research led by the UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies.

20h

Coronavirus live news: Lebanon sees record cases after blast; New Zealand's biggest city heads into lockdown

WHO warns displacement of people in Beirut risks accelerating Covid-19 spread ; four new cases in Auckland, New Zealand ; Australia suffers deadliest day . Follow the latest updates Russia approves vaccine despite testing concerns French and Dutch on alert over rise in cases Lost on the frontline: the 900 US health workers who have died See all our coronavirus coverage 1.02am BST In case you miss

20h

Therapy app Talkspace mined user data for marketing insights, former employees allege

In the report, several former employees said that "individual users' anonymized conversations were routinely reviewed and mined for insights." Talkspace denied using user data for marketing purposes, though it acknowledged that it looks at client transcripts to improve its services. It's still unclear whether teletherapy is as effective as traditional therapy. A recent report raises questions ove

20h

Author Correction: Aerosol and surface contamination of SARS-CoV-2 observed in quarantine and isolation care

Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70939-6

21h

Viewing abstract art causes notable cognitive changes

A new study finds that viewing modern art causes real cognitive changes in the viewer. Abstract art causes the viewer to place more psychological distance between themselves and the art than with more typical works. Exactly how this works is not yet known. In what will be taken as a win both for people who think modern art doesn't look like anything and those who say that is the point, a new stud

21h

1 in 6 maternity workers have had COVID-19, of whom 1 in 3 were completely asymptomatic

New research from two London hospital maternity units published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that 1 in 6 maternity workers tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies, showing they have had a previous infection. Of those testing positive, 1 in 3 were completely asymptomatic.

21h

Why Joe Biden Picked Kamala Harris

I f Joe Biden is elected in November, his presidency will likely be defined by history-shaping decisions made after long, deliberative, some might say operatic processes. Biden's selection of Senator Kamala Harris of California as his running mate—the first woman of color to appear on a major-party ticket—was precisely that sort of careful, drawn-out decision. Neera Tanden, the president of the C

21h

Author Correction: Structure and flexibility in cortical representations of odour space

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2615-z

21h

Author Correction: Iron-based binary ferromagnets for transverse thermoelectric conversion

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2584-2

21h

Author Correction: Variable water input controls evolution of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc

Nature, Published online: 12 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2582-4

21h

Russia claims world's first Covid-19 vaccine but scepticism abounds

Russia's President Putin announced on Tuesday, August 11th, that his country was the first to approve a coronavirus vaccine, provoking skepticism from Russian and international scientists. Putin said the vaccine has met the Health Industry's standards and was even tested on his own daughter. Others aren't so sure, pointing to the lack of evidence from Russia and the seeming fact that the vaccine

21h

This is the way the universe ends: not with a whimper, but a bang

In the far, far future, cosmologists find a final supernova light show

22h

In reversal, ornithologists yank Confederate general's name from bird

Decision comes in the wake of renewed attention to racism in science

22h

Bouncing, sticking, exploding viruses: Understanding the surface chemistry of SARS-CoV-2

Better understanding of the surface chemistry of the SARS-CoV-2 virus is needed to reduce transmission and accelerate vaccine design.

22h

Scientists found genes that help cancer cells to penetrate the brain

An international team of scientists, including a researcher from Sechenov University, reviewed scientific articles on proteins (and genes encoding them) that help cancer cells enter the brain. An understanding of the processes that facilitate the formation of metastases in the brain will allow scientists to create new methods for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Details of the study can be found in

22h

Russia's approval of a COVID-19 vaccine is less than meets the press release

Despite Putin's reported endorsement, little-tested vaccine is not approved for widespread use until 2021

22h

Evolutionary theory of economic decisions

When survival over generations is the end game, researchers say it makes sense to undervalue long shots that could be profitable and overestimate the likelihood of rare bad outcomes.

22h

Does high blood sugar worsen COVID-19 outcomes?

Preliminary observations of COVID-19 patients with diabetes inspired an algorithm for glucose monitoring that's suspected to help combat the virus' serious complications.

22h

Multifocal contact lenses slow myopia progression in children

Children wearing multifocal contact lenses had slower progression of their myopia, according to new results. The findings support an option for controlling the condition, also called nearsightedness, which increases the risk of cataracts, glaucoma and retinal detachment later in life.

22h

Indigenous property rights protect the Amazon rainforest

One way to cut back on deforestation in the Amazon rainforest – and help in the global fight against climate change – is to grant more of Brazil's indigenous communities full property rights to tribal lands.

22h

Algal blue light switch control of electrical excitation in plants

What is the role and molecular basis of electrical signaling in higher plants? This can now be investigated non-invasively for the first time.

22h

Manmade pollutants could be harming marine mammals more than we think

Researchers identified multiple bottlenose dolphins with high levels of mercury in their livers. Marine scientists are only beginning to understand the relationship between ocean pollutants and sea animals' health. (NOAA/Amy Van Cise /) Marine biologists have been sounding the alarm about ocean pollution since the 1950s. Up until then, many scientists believed that the ocean was large enough to d

22h

Harvard research identifies business travel as driver of economic growth

Research from Harvard Kennedy School's Growth Lab finds a direct link between a country's incoming business travel and the growth of new and existing industries. The findings, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, support a Growth Lab hypothesis that moving 'knowhow' is critical to economic growth, and business travel plays a key part in that process. The research also raises new concer

22h

What violin synchronization can teach us about better networking in complex times

A new study published in Nature Communications suggests by using a model of violin synchronization in a network of violin players, there are ways to drown out distractions and miscommunications that could be used as a model for human networks in society.

22h

UCF researchers utilize Human-on-a-Chip® approach to model ALS pathology

A new study published today demonstrates that a technology developed at the University of Central Florida could serve as a more reliable clinically-based model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and a better screening tool for novel therapies than currently use preclinical models.

22h

Nanocrystals from recycled wood waste make carbon-fiber composites tougher

In a new study, Texas A&M University researchers have used a natural plant product, called cellulose nanocrystals, to pin and coat carbon nanotubes uniformly onto the carbon-fiber composites. The researchers said their prescribed method is quicker than conventional methods and also allows the designing of carbon-fiber composites from the nanoscale.

22h

Study points to health disparities among former NFL players

Among former NFL players, Black, Hawaiian, and athletes from other racial backgrounds report worse physical, mental health outcomes than white players. The widest health gaps emerged between Black and white former NFL players. Black former players reported worse health outcomes in all five health categories, compared with their white peers. Presence of health disparities among former NLF players r

22h

Scientists Think They Found the Coronavirus' Weak Spot

Scientists think they've identified a weak point in SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. And just like shooting torpedoes down the Death Star's exhaust shaft, they think they can exploit this critical weakness to make new treatments. It all comes down to a tiny region right next to the virus's spike proteins, which latch onto new host cells, according to research published last week

22h

Fed-up archaeologists aim to fix 'frat party' atmosphere at field schools

Drinking and sexual harassment spur experiments to reform core training course

22h

AI-enhanced precision medicine identifies novel autism subtype

A novel precision medicine approach enhanced by artificial intelligence has laid the groundwork for what could be the first biomedical screening and intervention tool for a subtype of autism, reports a new study.

23h

Rare 'boomerang' earthquake observed along Atlantic Ocean fault line

Scientists have tracked a 'boomerang' earthquake in the ocean for the first time, providing clues about how they could cause devastation on land.

23h

Aging memories may not be 'worse', just 'different'

A study adds nuance to the idea that an aging memory is a poor one and finds a potential correlation between the way people process the boundaries of events and episodic memory.

23h

Study predicts millions of unsellable homes could upend market

Millions of American homes could become unsellable – or could be sold at significant losses to their senior-citizen owners – between now and 2040, according to new research.

23h

Stack and twist: Physicists accelerate the hunt for revolutionary new materials

Scientists have taken an important step towards understanding the interaction between layers of atomically thin materials arranged in stacks. They hope their research will speed up the discovery of new, artificial materials, leading to the design of electronic components that are far tinier and more efficient than anything known today.

23h

Machine learning can predict market behavior

Machine learning can assess the effectiveness of mathematical tools used to predict the movements of financial markets, according to new research based on the largest dataset ever used in this area.

23h

Primate voice boxes are evolving at rapid pace

Scientists have discovered that the larynx, or voice box, of primates is significantly larger relative to body size, has greater variation, and is under faster rates of evolution than in other mammals.

23h

Brain-NET, a deep learning methodology, accurately predicts surgeon certification scores based on neuroimaging data

Researchers demonstrated how a deep learning framework they call 'Brain-NET' can accurately predict a person's level of expertise in terms of their surgical motor skills, based solely on neuroimaging data.

23h

For bacteria, a small genome means some serious decluttering — even in the ribosome

Researchers have studied the genomes of some 200 strains of bacteria to determine which proteins in the ribosome, part of the key cell machinery, can be safely lost and why. Research showed that frequently lost ribosomal proteins tend to be placed on the ribosome surface, where they usually have fewer contacts to other ribosome components. Yet since ribosomal proteins are in the cell's essential t

23h

Researchers explore pollen fertilization mechanisms

A study showing how pollen tubes grow into flowers to reach the ovule paves the way for the improvement of food crop varieties as well as a deeper understanding of the growth of fungi and neurons.

23h

Building the batteries of cells

A new study, led by Dr. Ruchika Anand and Prof. Andreas Reichert, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, Germany, now found that two lipid-binding proteins located inside of mitochondria control the overall stability of these batteries. This study provides the first link between mitochondrial structure, lipids and assembly of large respiratory pro

23h

Broken cable damages giant radio telescope in Puerto Rico

A broken cable caused severe damage at Puerto Rico's Arecibo Observatory, causing a suspension of operations for one of the world's largest single-dish radio telescopes, officials said Tuesday.

23h

Optics research demonstrates waveguides that guarantee stable propagation of azimuthons

The optical vortex plays an increasingly important role in optical information processing. As an information carrier, it improves the capacity of channels and offers an independent aspect for analysis—different from polarization, intensity, phase, and path. A new degree of freedom for encoding and encrypting optical information may be provided via nonlinear optics, using vortex beams known as azim

23h

Climate change projected to increase seasonal East African rainfall

According to research led by The University of Texas at Austin, seasonal rainfall is expected to rise significantly in East Africa over the next few decades in response to increased greenhouse gases.

23h

Physicists accelerate the hunt for revolutionary artificial atomic materials

Scientists at the University of Bath have taken an important step towards understanding the interaction between layers of atomically thin materials arranged in stacks. They hope their research will speed up the discovery of new, artificial materials, leading to the design of electronic components that are far tinier and more efficient than anything known today.

23h

Study predicts millions of unsellable homes could upend market

Millions of American homes could become unsellable—or could be sold at significant losses to their senior-citizen owners—between now and 2040, according to new research from the University of Arizona.

23h

NASA finds Mekkhala coming apart after landfall in Southeastern China

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of former Typhoon Mekkhala shortly after it made landfall in southeastern China. Wind shear had torn the storm apart.

23h

Analysis pinpoints most important forests for biodiversity and conservation in Central Africa

A study by WCS and partners produced new analyses to pinpoint the most important forests for biodiversity conservation remaining in Central Africa. The results highlight the importance of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), northern Republic of Congo, and much of Gabon as the most important countries in Central Africa for safeguarding biodiversity and intact forests.

23h

Does high blood sugar worsen COVID-19 outcomes?

Preliminary observations of COVID-19 patients with diabetes inspired an algorithm for glucose monitoring that's suspected to help combat the virus' serious complications.

23h

Evolutionary theory of economic decisions

When survival over generations is the end game, researchers say it makes sense to undervalue long shots that could be profitable and overestimate the likelihood of rare bad outcomes.

23h

Getting medieval: Society says it is retracting 14 book reviews for plagiarism

More than a dozen book reviews by a history PhD student are under scrutiny for plagiarism concerns. The reviews are published in the Al-Masāq Journal of the Medieval Mediterranean, a Society for the Medieval Mediterranean journal published by Taylor & Francis. The majority of the papers appear to be stolen whole works from other authors … Continue reading

23h

Obesity in pregnancy may hinder brain development

Obesity in pregnant women may hinder the development of fetal brains as early as the second trimester, researchers report. Their new study links high body mass index (BMI), an indicator of obesity, to changes in two brain areas, the prefrontal cortex and anterior insula. These regions play a key role in decision-making and behavior. Previous studies have linked disruptions in these regions to att

23h

Gilead Urged to Explore Remdesivir Relative as COVID-19 Drug

Citizen advocates push the pharmaceutical company to examine a compound that has been used to treat certain coronavirus infections in cats.

23h

How can you actively boost your low libido?

Low libido, or sudden changes in your sex drive, can be overwhelming and cause embarrassment or shame, but this is a common problem that could have many different solutions. According to research, managing your anxiety/stress levels, maintaining a healthy diet and proper sleeping habits, and cutting down on things such as alcohol or smoking can all boost your libido. Low libido can have many caus

23h

Inexpensive, accessible device provides visual proof that masks block droplets

In a proof-of-concept study, researchers report that a simple, low-cost technique provided visual proof that face masks are effective in reducing droplet emissions during normal wear. They found that the best face coverings were N95 masks without valves — the hospital-grade coverings that are used by front-line health care workers. Surgical or polypropylene masks also performed well. Hand-made co

23h

A new way to fabricate MXene films that block electromagnetic interference

Chemical and biomolecular engineers have demonstrated a novel approach to MXene fabrication that could lead to methods for at-scale production of MXene freestanding films: drop-casting onto prepatterned hydrophobic substrates. Their method led to a 38% enhancement of EMI shielding efficiency over conventional methods.

23h

Storing energy in red bricks

Red bricks — some of the world's cheapest and most familiar building materials — can be converted into energy storage units that can be charged to hold electricity, like a battery, according to new research. Chemists have developed a method to make or modify 'smart bricks' that can store energy until required for powering devices. A proof-of-concept study shows a brick directly powering a green

23h

Excess weight among pregnant women may interfere with child's developing brain

Obesity in expectant mothers may hinder the development of the babies' brains as early as the second trimester, a new study finds.

23h

Mathematical patterns developed by Alan Turing help researchers understand bird behavior

Scientists have used mathematical modelling to understand why flocks of long-tailed tits segregate themselves into different parts of the landscape.

23h

Researchers create mask filtration effectiveness hierarchy

Infection prevention experts set out to gather evidence on the fitted filtration efficiency of dozens of different types of masks and mask modifications, including masks sterilized for reuse, expired masks, novel masks sourced from domestic and overseas sources, and homemade masks.

23h

Oscillatory optics: Nonlinear, multi-mode waveguide for flip-flopping (yet stable) azimuthons

The team determined specific requirements for a weak nonlinearity: (1) both the linear and nonlinear induced index changes are small compared to the ambient refractive index, and (2) the induced nonlinear index change is much smaller than the linear one.

23h

Climate change projected to increase seasonal East African rainfall

According to research led by The University of Texas at Austin, seasonal rainfall is expected to rise significantly in East Africa over the next few decades in response to increased greenhouse gases. The study, published in Climate Dynamics, used high-resolution simulations to find that the amount of precipitation during the rainy season known as the 'short rains' could double by the end of the ce

23h

Inexpensive, accessible device provides visual proof that masks block droplets

In a proof-of-concept study, researchers report that a simple, low-cost technique provided visual proof that face masks are effective in reducing droplet emissions during normal wear. They found that the best face coverings were N95 masks without valves — the hospital-grade coverings that are used by front-line health care workers. Surgical or polypropylene masks also performed well. Hand-made co

23h