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Nyheder2020august13

Hubble finds that Betelgeuse's mysterious dimming is due to a traumatic outburst
Recent observations of Betelgeuse have revealed that the star's unexpected and significant dimming periods in late 2019 and early 2020 were most likely caused by the ejection and cooling of dense hot gases, and that the star may be going through another dimming period more than a year early.
1h
Overraskende opdagelse: Coronavirus har tidligere lagt verden ned
En formodet influenza-pandemi i 1889 skyldtes i virkeligheden et coronavirus, viser dansk forskning.
15h
USC scientists identify the order of COVID-19's symptoms
COVID-19 has some symptoms in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tracts that may help doctors rule out flu or other illnesses and hasten treatment.
3h
Academia from home
As the uncertainty around reopening college and university campuses this fall continues, those who work, study, teach and conduct research are navigating the uncertain terrain of the 'new normal.' They are balancing physical distancing and other COVID-19 prevention practices with productivity, creating home workspaces and mastering communications and teamwork across time and space.
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Busting Up the Infection Cycle of Hepatitis B
Researchers at the University of Delaware have gained new understanding of the virus that causes hepatitis B and the "spiky ball" that encloses its genetic blueprint. They looked at how the capsid–a protein shell that protects the blueprint and also drives the delivery of it to infect a host cell–assembles itself. The capsid is an important target in developing drugs to treat hepatitis B, a life
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The Wikipedia War Over Kamala Harris's Race
At 4:14 p.m. Delaware time Tuesday, Joe Biden's campaign sent out a mass text message announcing the presumptive Democratic nominee's choice for vice president: Senator Kamala Harris of California. Four minutes later, a user named Zvikorn updated Harris's Wikipedia page to reflect the news, with the edit note: "(its official now!!!)" Zvikorn, whose bio on the site describes an Israeli teen into s
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Reconstructing global climate through Earth's history
Accurate temperature estimates of ancient oceans are vital because they are the best tool for reconstructing global climate conditions in the past. While climate models provide scenarios of what the world could look like in the future, paleoclimate studies (study of past climates) provide insight into what the world did look like in the past.
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A watershed moment for US water quality
A new federal rule that determines how the Clean Water Act is implemented leaves millions of miles of streams and acres of wetlands unprotected based on selective interpretation of case law and a distortion of scientific evidence, researchers say.
18min
Restoration helps forests recover faster
Actively restored forests recover above ground biomass faster than areas left to regenerate naturally after being logged, according to a long-term study on Borneo lowland rainforest.
18min
Researchers assemble first comprehensive list of Panama's trees with geographic ranges
Central America is one of the most diverse floristic regions in the world, but a lack of comprehensive plant records and knowledge of its endangered, endemic tree species impedes conservation work.
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Researchers assemble first comprehensive list of Panama's trees with geographic ranges
Central America is one of the most diverse floristic regions in the world, but a lack of comprehensive plant records and knowledge of its endangered, endemic tree species impedes conservation work.
25min
New catalyst efficiently turns carbon dioxide into useful fuels and chemicals
By efficiently converting CO2 into complex hydrocarbon products, a new catalyst developed by a team of Brown researchers could potentially aid in large-scale efforts to recycle excess carbon dioxide.
26min
Reconstructing global climate through Earth's history
Accurate temperature estimates of ancient oceans are vital because they are the best tool for reconstructing global climate conditions in the past. While climate models provide scenarios of what the world could look like in the future, paleoclimate studies (study of past climates) provide insight into what the world did look like in the past.
26min
Researchers develop cell injection technique that could help reverse vision loss
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have developed a new method of injecting healthy cells into damaged eyes. The technique could point the way toward new treatments with the potential to reverse forms of vision loss that are currently incurable.
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Researchers design efficient low-cost system for producing power at night
Researchers have designed an off-grid, low-cost modular energy source that can efficiently produce power at night. The system uses commercially available technology and could eventually help meet the need for nighttime lighting in urban areas or provide lighting in developing countries.
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Hepatitis B: Natural controllers shed light on immunity mechanisms
To improve our understanding of the antibody response conferring protection against HBV infection, scientists from the Institut Pasteur and Inserm, in collaboration with the Roche Innovation Center in Switzerland, produced and characterized human monoclonal antibodies specific to viral envelope antigens, referred as HBsAg, from blood memory B cells isolated from HBV vaccinees and natural controlle
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COVID-19 symptom tracker ensures privacy during isolation
An online COVID-19 symptom tracking tool developed by researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center ensures a person's confidentiality while being able to actively monitor their symptoms. The tool is not proprietary and can be used by entities that are not able to develop their own tracking systems.
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Go Beyond The Science Headlines With The Fundamentals Of Physics Course
Over the last twenty years, there have been some amazing breakthroughs in physics. We've found new particles , listened to black holes slamming into each other , and just keep proving how right Einstein was . Yet it can be hard to be truly excited when you've got no idea just why this is so cool. The Fundamentals of Physics , available for just $10, will change that for you. The five-hour course,
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NASA-NOAA satellite nighttime imagery reveals development of Tropical Storm Josephine
The tenth named tropical cyclone of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season was named today, Aug. 13, after NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a nighttime image of the storm.
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Researchers discover new tool to construct novel metal-based magnetic materials
A Canadian-Finnish collaboration has led to the discovery of a novel magnetic compound in which two magnetic dysprosium metal ions are bridged by two aromatic organic radicals forming a pancake bond. The results of this study can be utilized to improve the magnetic properties of similar compounds. The theoretical investigation of the study was carried out by the Academy Research Fellow Jani O. Moi
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New tools catch and release molecules at the flip of a light switch
A Princeton team has developed a class of light-switchable, highly adaptable molecular tools with new capabilities to control cellular activities. The antibody-like proteins, called OptoBinders, allow researchers to rapidly control processes inside and outside of cells by directing their localization, with potential applications including protein purification, the improved production of biofuels,
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Pancake bonding as a new tool to construct novel metal based magnetic materials
New research has led to the discovery of a novel magnetic compound in which two magnetic dysprosium metal ions are bridged by two aromatic organic radicals forming a pancake bond. The results of this study can be utilized to improve the magnetic properties of similar compounds.
31min
New tools catch and release molecules at the flip of a light switch
A Princeton team has developed a class of light-switchable, highly adaptable molecular tools with new capabilities to control cellular activities. The antibody-like proteins, called OptoBinders, allow researchers to rapidly control processes inside and outside of cells by directing their localization, with potential applications including protein purification, the improved production of biofuels,
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Contaminants from Mount Polley tailings spill continue to affect Quesnel Lake
Natural mixing of lake waters may resuspend contaminants deposited in a catastrophic mine spill six years ago, according to a new paper led by a University of Alberta scientist.
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Learn to trade stocks like a pro for under $30
Becoming a successful trader involves learning the psychology tricks of the trade. Risk management and a winning mindset can help you maximize profits in the market. Simple technical and fundamental analysis strategies can help you consistently profit. Though it's a time of great uncertainty, the stock market is continuing to soar. Rather than keeping it an enigma, the market can be learned with
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Why the UAE Made Peace With Israel
This morning, Donald Trump announced the normalization of relations between Israel and the United Arab Emirates. Israel is also committing to not annexing the West Bank. The agreement will shock those who thought the portion of the Jared Kushner portfolio devoted to peace in the Middle East consisted of a single briefing folder filled with printouts of Wikipedia articles. But there were signs tha
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Forecasters Predict A Heavy Hurricane Season
The hurricane season is just getting started and the storms are predicted to have a big impact this year. Forecasters Predict A Heavy Hurricane Season Video of Forecasters Predict A Heavy Hurricane Season Earth Thursday, August 13, 2020 – 14:00 Emilie Lorditch, Contributor (Inside Science) — Forecasters at NOAA's Climate Prediction Center predicted in May that 2020 would likely be an above-aver
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Pancake bonding as a new tool to construct novel metal based magnetic materials
New research has led to the discovery of a novel magnetic compound in which two magnetic dysprosium metal ions are bridged by two aromatic organic radicals forming a pancake bond. The results of this study can be utilized to improve the magnetic properties of similar compounds.
47min
Pollution linked to antibiotic resistance
Antibiotic resistance is an increasing health problem, but new research suggests it is not only caused by the overuse of antibiotics. It's also caused by pollution.
47min
New tools catch and release molecules at the flip of a light switch
A team has developed a class of light-switchable, highly adaptable molecular tools with new capabilities to control cellular activities. The antibody-like proteins, called OptoBinders, have potential applications including protein purification, the improved production of biofuels, and new types of targeted cancer therapies.
47min
New type of taste cell discovered in taste buds
Our mouths may be home to a newly discovered set of multi-tasking taste cells that — unlike most known taste cells, which detect individual tastes — are capable of detecting sour, sweet, bitter and umami stimuli.
47min
'Critical' questions over disease risks from ocean plastics
Key knowledge gaps exist in our understanding of how ocean microplastics transport bacteria and viruses — and whether this affects the health of humans and animals, researchers say.
47min
Research gets to the heart of organ shape in nature
Researchers have shed fresh light on the evolution and function of the shapes we see in nature – using as a model the heart shaped fruits of the Capsella genus.
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Filming the Legendary Hornet Breach | Shark Week
Stream Shark Week Episodes on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/Discovery https://www.instagram.com/
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Researchers assemble first comprehensive list of Panama's trees with geographic ranges
In a new research paper published in Forest Ecosystems, The Morton Arboretum Center for Tree Science Research Fellow Richard Condit, PhD, provided the first comprehensive checklist of Panama's trees to include geographic ranges by using an innovative, repeatable method for assessing extinction risk of trees in poorly studied areas.
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NASA-NOAA satellite nighttime imagery reveals development of Tropical Storm Josephine
The tenth named tropical cyclone of the Atlantic Ocean hurricane season was named today, Aug. 13, 2020, after NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a nighttime image of the storm.
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UCalgary researchers discover the microbiome's role in attacking cancerous tumours
University of Calgary researchers have discovered which gut bacteria help our immune system battle cancerous tumours and how they do it. The discovery may provide a new understanding of why immunotherapy, a treatment for cancer that helps amplify immune response, works in some cases, but not others. The findings, published in Science, show combining immunotherapy with specific microbial therapy he
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New tools catch and release molecules at the flip of a light switch
A team has developed a class of light-switchable, highly adaptable molecular tools with new capabilities to control cellular activities. The antibody-like proteins, called OptoBinders, have potential applications including protein purification, the improved production of biofuels, and new types of targeted cancer therapies.
53min
Everyone Needs A Buddy. Even Sharks
Contrary to the image of sharks as lone predators, new research has found evidence that some species are social creatures, who return repeatedly to the same fellow sharks, often for years. (Image credit: Bernard Radvaner/Corbis/Getty Images)
54min
Pancake bonding as a new tool to construct novel metal based magnetic materials
A Canadian-Finnish collaboration has led to the discovery of a novel magnetic compound in which two magnetic dysprosium metal ions are bridged by two aromatic organic radicals forming a pancake bond. The results of this study can be utilized to improve the magnetic properties of similar compounds. The research results were published in the well-recognized chemistry journal – Inorganic Chemistry Fr
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This physician has battled epidemics, quakes, and poverty in Haiti. Now, she's taking on COVID-19
Marie Marcelle Deschamps has become an inspiration to many in her home country
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Mouse Study Reveals Previously Unknown Taste Cell That Detects Nearly All Flavours
Mirroring the brain cells for taste we already knew.
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Hubble finds that Betelgeuse's mysterious dimming is due to a traumatic outburst
Observations are showing that the unexpected dimming of the supergiant star Betelgeuse was most likely caused by an immense amount of hot material ejected into space, forming a dust cloud that blocked starlight coming from Betelgeuse's surface.
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Potential new approach against fatal childhood brain cancer
In mouse models of DIPG, a fatal childhood brain cancer, simultaneously attacking two metabolic pathways led to significant improvements in survival.
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Researchers Built a "Gravity Suit" to Keep Astronauts Healthy
The "Gravity Suit" With funding from NASA, a team of researchers have created a negative pressure "gravity suit" to help astronauts counteract some of the dangers of spending time in microgravity. Previous research has shown that weightlessness can lead to muscle atrophy and even lead to blood fluid pooling around and squishing their brains. To counteract these dangers, a team of researchers buil
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Pushing an electric Corvette to 212 mph isn't easy without causing a meltdown
There's been a lot of talk about my vetting process lately. Here's an inside look: pic.twitter.com/tFRKJOE3hi — Joe Biden (@JoeBiden) August 5, 2020
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Covid-19 news: England's death toll revised down by more than 5000
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Climate change most likely cause of woolly rhino extinction – study
Analysis of ancient DNA from Siberia finds human hunting probably not to blame The woolly rhino may have been wiped out by climate change rather than human hunting, researchers have revealed. Enormous, hairy and with a huge hump, the woolly rhino roamed northern Eurasia until about 14,000 years ago. The cause of its demise has been much debated, with remains found near prehistoric human sites rai
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World's oldest camp bedding found in South African cave
Remains suggest people 200,000 years ago used ash to repel insects in grass bedding
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Bioengineers Are Using Levitation on Dead Cells to Preserve the Living
In the delicate work of bioengineering, dead cells get everywhere — and become a major nuisance. Now, Stanford scientists have figured out how to separate the dead cells from the living, using magnetic levitation, gently pulling them away from the still-useful survivors without ripping everything apart, according to New Scientist . Magnetic levitation itself isn't new, but learning that it can su
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How Data Mining Visualizes Story Lines in the Twittersphere
A vast new dataset reveals the popularity of words and phrases on Twitter and how they change over time.
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New tools catch and release molecules at the flip of a light switch
A Princeton team has developed a class of light-switchable, highly adaptable molecular tools with new capabilities to control cellular activities. The antibody-like proteins, called OptoBinders, have potential applications including protein purification, the improved production of biofuels, and new types of targeted cancer therapies.
1h
Characteristics of COVID-19 patients during initial peak and resurgence in Houston
A major Houston health care system saw a significant increase in younger and Hispanic COVID-19 patients from the first surge to the second surge after Texas phased in reopening.
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Restoration helps forests recover faster
Actively restored forests recover above ground biomass faster than areas left to regenerate naturally after being logged, according to a long-term study on Borneo lowland rainforest led by the University of Dundee, Aberdeen and ETH Zurich.
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How a protein stops cells from attacking their own DNA
Scientists at EPFL have demonstrated the mechanism that allows cells to fight off viral DNA without triggering an immune response against their own genetic material.
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Seasonal flu vaccinations don't 'stick' long-term in bone marrow
Seasonal flu vaccination does increase the number of antibody-producing cells specific for flu in the bone marrow. However, most of the newly generated cells are lost within one year, Emory researchers found.
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Systemic racism has consequences for all life in cities
Social inequalities, specifically racism and classism, are impacting the biodiversity, evolutionary shifts and ecological health of plants and animals in our cities. That's the main finding of a review paper published Aug. 13 in Science led by the University of Washington, with co-authors at the University of California, Berkeley, and University of Michigan.
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The behavior of therapeutic antibodies in immunotherapy
Since the late 1990s, immunotherapy has been the frontline treatment against lymphomas where synthetic antibodies are used to stop the proliferation of cancerous white blood cells. However, in the more than 20 years since their use began, the molecular mechanisms that underlie this therapy are still little understood. For the first time, scientists from the CNRS, Institut Pasteur and Université de
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Becoming a nerve cell: Timing is of the essence
A Belgian team of researchers led by Pierre Vanderhaeghen (VIB-KU Leuven) finds that mitochondria regulate a key event during brain development: how neural stem cells become nerve cells. Mitochondria influence this cell fate switch during a precise period that is twice as long in humans compared to mice. This highlights an unexpected function for mitochondria that may help explain how humans devel
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A watershed moment for US water quality
A new federal rule that determines how the Clean Water Act is implemented leaves millions of miles of streams and acres of wetlands unprotected based on selective interpretation of case law and a distortion of scientific evidence, researchers say in a new publication.
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MS drug may be used to inhibit hiv infection and reduce latent reservoir
A multiple sclerosis drug may be used to block HIV infection and reduce the latent reservoir, according to research published in PLOS Pathogens by a team at the RGeorge Washington University.
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Large-scale COVID-19 vaccine production will require knowledge transfer on manufacturing
Massive, rapid production of vaccines to fight COVID-19 will require firms to share know-how not just about what to make, but how to make it, write Nicholson Price and colleagues in this Policy Forum.
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Review: Consequences of systemic racism in urban environments
Even as studies have shown that the uneven distribution of urban heat islands, urban tree canopy cover, and urban environmental hazards, for example, are strongly dictated by structural racism and classism in cities, relatively few studies have addressed the varied contributions of social factors like race to ecological heterogeneity in cities.
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Flu vaccine induces short-lived bone marrow plasma cells, limiting vaccination longevity
Influenza-specific bone marrow plasma cells – responsible for maintaining the level of protective antibodies following a flu shot – are short-lived, and decline to their pre-vaccination levels within a year, researchers report.
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Positive contact between muslims and christians in soccer league built cohesion, with limitations
According to a study that evaluated how prejudice can be reduced when rival groups come together, having Muslim teammates caused Christian players in Iraq to change their behavior for the better toward their Muslim counterparts.
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In Iraq, mixed-religion soccer teams helped build social cohesion, healed wounds after war
A new study in Science used sports to promote reconciliation between Christians, who were displaced and persecuted under ISIS in Iraq, and their Muslim neighbors. Players who'd been randomly assigned to have Muslim players on their teams changed attitudes, which persisted even after the season ended. However, the changes only related to Muslim league players, and did not extend off the field.
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Restoring degraded tropical forests generates big carbon gains
An international team of scientists from 13 institutions has provided the first long-term comparison of aboveground carbon recovery rates between naturally regenerating and actively restored forests in Malaysian Borneo. The researchers found that restoration practices improved carbon storage recovery by more than 50% compared to natural regeneration.
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New type of taste cell discovered in taste buds
Our mouths may be home to a newly discovered set of multi-tasking taste cells that — unlike most known taste cells, which detect individual tastes — are capable of detecting sour, sweet, bitter and umami stimuli. A research team led by Kathryn Medler at the University at Buffalo reports this discovery in a study published 13th August in PLOS Genetics.
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Multiple sclerosis drug blocks HIV infection and transmission in human immune cells
An immunomodulatory drug called fingolimod, which is approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, blocks human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and transmission in human immune cells, according to a study published August 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Postdoctoral Fellow Rachel Resop and Assistant Professor Alberto Bosque of The George Washington University, and collea
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Pollution linked to antibiotic resistance
Antibiotic resistance is an increasing health problem, but new research suggests it is not only caused by the overuse of antibiotics. It's also caused by pollution.
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World's oldest captive alligator marks 83 years in Belgrade zoo
Muja has lived through multiple bombing campaigns and several countries—all while never leaving a tiny pool in Belgrade's zoo for 83 years, making him the world's oldest captive alligator.
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Pollution linked to antibiotic resistance
Antibiotic resistance is an increasing health problem, but new research suggests it is not only caused by the overuse of antibiotics. It's also caused by pollution.
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World's oldest captive alligator marks 83 years in Belgrade zoo
Muja has lived through multiple bombing campaigns and several countries—all while never leaving a tiny pool in Belgrade's zoo for 83 years, making him the world's oldest captive alligator.
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Four tips to ward off impostor syndrome
Nature, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02408-z There are ways to shut up that insidious inner critic, says Paris Grey.
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Coronavirus Found on Food Packaging, but Likely of Little Concern
China and New Zealand recently reported the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus on the outside of frozen food items imported from other countries, but experts stress the risk of transmission is extremely low.
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Strength in numbers
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Immunity from reinfection
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An elusive pocket
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Inflexible webs
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Autoimmunity promotor
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Authors retract highly cited 2014 Science paper
The authors of a 2014 paper in Science have retracted it, after becoming aware that impurities in the chemicals they used for their experiments may have generated the apparent findings. The paper, "Ammonia synthesis by N2 and steam electrolysis in molten hydroxide suspensions of nanoscale Fe2O3," has been cited 323 times, according to Clarivate Analytics' … Continue reading
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In Iraq, mixed-religion soccer teams helped build social cohesion, healed wounds after war
A new study, released today in Science, points to a way to repair social ties and promote coexistence after war. The study found that in post-ISIS Iraq, mixing Christians and Muslims on soccer teams made Christian players more tolerant toward Muslims in their league, though the sentiments did not extend to Muslims in the broader community. The findings suggest that meaningful social contact can bu
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Scientists decry federal rule that removes protection from 'unconnected' streams and wetlands
A new federal rule that determines how the Clean Water Act is implemented leaves millions of miles of streams and acres of wetlands unprotected based on selective interpretation of case law and a distortion of scientific evidence, researchers say in a new publication.
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Systemic racism has consequences for all life in cities
Social inequalities, specifically racism and classism, are impacting the biodiversity, evolutionary shifts and ecological health of plants and animals in our cities.
1h
Restoring degraded tropical forests generates big carbon gains
More than half of the world's aboveground carbon is stored in tropical forests, the degradation of which poses a direct threat to global climate regulation. Deforestation removes aboveground carbon in the form of trees, reducing the size of global carbon stocks in the process. Once forests are degraded, they are often perceived to have little ecological value, despite evidence of their ability to
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Becoming a nerve cell: Timing is of the essence
Mitochondria are small organelles that provide the energy critical for each cell in our body, in particular, in the energy-demanding brain. In this week's edition of Science, a Belgian team of researchers led by Pierre Vanderhaeghen (VIB-KU Leuven, ULB) reports that mitochondria also regulate a key event during brain development: how neural stem cells become nerve cells. Mitochondria influence thi
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Why flu vaccines don't protect people for long
A rare peek into the bone marrow after vaccination shows key antibodymaking cells have a short life span
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An unusual meteorite, more valuable than gold, may hold the building blocks of life
Aguas Zarcas, a space rock that crashed last year in a Costa Rican rainforest, has captivated researchers and collectors
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News at a glance
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Lucky strike
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The importins of pain
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Michael Soule (1936-2020)
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How it all ends
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Science meets politics
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Retraction
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Strength in numbers
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Immunity from reinfection
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An elusive pocket
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Inflexible webs
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Autoimmunity promotor
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Fermenting coevolution
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The thymus X factor
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Early vision matures
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An uncuttable foam
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Huntingtons disease alters human neurodevelopment
Although Huntington's disease is a late-manifesting neurodegenerative disorder, both mouse studies and neuroimaging studies of presymptomatic mutation carriers suggest that Huntington's disease might affect neurodevelopment. To determine whether this is actually the case, we examined tissue from human fetuses (13 weeks gestation) that carried the Huntington's disease mutation. These tissues showe
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Binding mechanisms of therapeutic antibodies to human CD20
Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting human antigen CD20 (cluster of differentiation 20) constitute important immunotherapies for the treatment of B cell malignancies and autoimmune diseases. Type I and II therapeutic mAbs differ in B cell binding properties and cytotoxic effects, reflecting differential interaction mechanisms with CD20. Here we present 3.7- to 4.7-angstrom cryo–electron microsc
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Divergent synthesis of complex diterpenes through a hybrid oxidative approach
Polycyclic diterpenes exhibit many important biological activities, but de novo synthetic access to these molecules is highly challenging because of their structural complexity. Semisynthetic access has also been limited by the lack of chemical tools for scaffold modifications. We report a chemoenzymatic platform to access highly oxidized diterpenes by a hybrid oxidative approach that strategical
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DNA vaccine protection against SARS-CoV-2 in rhesus macaques
The global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has made the development of a vaccine a top biomedical priority. In this study, we developed a series of DNA vaccine candidates expressing different forms of the SARS-CoV-2 spike (S) protein and evaluated them in 35 rhesus macaques. Vaccinated animals developed humoral an
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SARS-CoV-2 infection protects against rechallenge in rhesus macaques
An understanding of protective immunity to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is critical for vaccine and public health strategies aimed at ending the global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A key unanswered question is whether infection with SARS-CoV-2 results in protective immunity against reexposure. We developed a rhesus macaque model of SARS-CoV-2 infec
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Primary exposure to SARS-CoV-2 protects against reinfection in rhesus macaques
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global pandemic. It is unclear whether convalescing patients have a risk of reinfection. We generated a rhesus macaque model of SARS-CoV-2 infection that was characterized by interstitial pneumonia and systemic viral dissemination mainly in the resp
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BAF restricts cGAS on nuclear DNA to prevent innate immune activation
The appearance of DNA in the cytosol is perceived as a danger signal that stimulates potent immune responses through cyclic guanosine monophosphate–adenosine monophosphate synthase (cGAS). How cells regulate the activity of cGAS toward self-DNA and guard against potentially damaging autoinflammatory responses is a fundamental biological question. Here, we identify barrier-to-autointegration facto
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Trophic pyramids reorganize when food web architecture fails to adjust to ocean change
As human activities intensify, the structures of ecosystems and their food webs often reorganize. Through the study of mesocosms harboring a diverse benthic coastal community, we reveal that food web architecture can be inflexible under ocean warming and acidification and unable to compensate for the decline or proliferation of taxa. Key stabilizing processes, including functional redundancy, tro
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Observation of small Fermi pockets protected by clean CuO2 sheets of a high-Tc superconductor
In cuprate superconductors with high critical transition temperature ( T c ), light hole-doping to the parent compound, which is an antiferromagnetic Mott insulator, has been predicted to lead to the formation of small Fermi pockets. These pockets, however, have not been observed. Here, we investigate the electronic structure of the five-layered Ba 2 Ca 4 Cu 5 O 10 (F,O) 2 , which has inner coppe
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Active restoration accelerates the carbon recovery of human-modified tropical forests
More than half of all tropical forests are degraded by human impacts, leaving them threatened with conversion to agricultural plantations and risking substantial biodiversity and carbon losses. Restoration could accelerate recovery of aboveground carbon density (ACD), but adoption of restoration is constrained by cost and uncertainties over effectiveness. We report a long-term comparison of ACD r
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Importin {alpha}3 regulates chronic pain pathways in peripheral sensory neurons
How is neuropathic pain regulated in peripheral sensory neurons? Importins are key regulators of nucleocytoplasmic transport. In this study, we found that importin α3 (also known as karyopherin subunit alpha 4) can control pain responsiveness in peripheral sensory neurons in mice. Importin α3 knockout or sensory neuron–specific knockdown in mice reduced responsiveness to diverse noxious stimuli a
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A mathematical model reveals the influence of population heterogeneity on herd immunity to SARS-CoV-2
Despite various levels of preventive measures, in 2020, many countries have suffered severely from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus. Using a model, we show that population heterogeneity can affect disease-induced immunity considerably because the proportion of infected individuals in groups with the h
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A molecular mediator for reductive concerted proton-electron transfers via electrocatalysis
Electrocatalytic approaches to the activation of unsaturated substrates via reductive concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) must overcome competing, often kinetically dominant hydrogen evolution. We introduce the design of a molecular mediator for electrochemically triggered reductive CPET through the synthetic integration of a Brønsted acid and a redox mediator. Cathodic reduction at the cob
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Iron-based superelastic alloys with near-constant critical stress temperature dependence
Shape memory alloys recover their original shape after deformation, making them useful for a variety of specialized applications. Superelastic behavior begins at the critical stress, which tends to increase with increasing temperature for metal shape memory alloys. Temperature dependence is a common feature that often restricts the use of metal shape memory alloys in applications. We discovered a
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Mitochondrial dynamics in postmitotic cells regulate neurogenesis
The conversion of neural stem cells into neurons is associated with the remodeling of organelles, but whether and how this is causally linked to fate change is poorly understood. We examined and manipulated mitochondrial dynamics during mouse and human cortical neurogenesis. We reveal that shortly after cortical stem cells have divided, daughter cells destined to self-renew undergo mitochondrial
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Fire and grass-bedding construction 200 thousand years ago at Border Cave, South Africa
Early plant use is seldom described in the archaeological record because of poor preservation. We report the discovery of grass bedding used to create comfortable areas for sleeping and working by people who lived in Border Cave at least 200,000 years ago. Sheaves of grass belonging to the broad-leafed Panicoideae subfamily were placed near the back of the cave on ash layers that were often remna
1h
Building social cohesion between Christians and Muslims through soccer in post-ISIS Iraq
Can intergroup contact build social cohesion after war? I randomly assigned Iraqi Christians displaced by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) to an all-Christian soccer team or to a team mixed with Muslims. The intervention improved behaviors toward Muslim peers: Christians with Muslim teammates were more likely to vote for a Muslim (not on their team) to receive a sportsmanship award, reg
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New Products
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Interrupted–again
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1h
Using natures blueprint to expand catalysis with Earth-abundant metals
Numerous redox transformations that are essential to life are catalyzed by metalloenzymes that feature Earth-abundant metals. In contrast, platinum-group metals have been the cornerstone of many industrial catalytic reactions for decades, providing high activity, thermal stability, and tolerance to chemical poisons. We assert that nature's blueprint provides the fundamental principles for vastly
1h
Becoming a nerve cell: Timing is of the essence
Mitochondria are small organelles that provide the energy critical for each cell in our body, in particular, in the energy-demanding brain. In this week's edition of Science, a Belgian team of researchers led by Pierre Vanderhaeghen (VIB-KU Leuven, ULB) reports that mitochondria also regulate a key event during brain development: how neural stem cells become nerve cells. Mitochondria influence thi
1h
Contaminants from Mount Polley tailings spill continue to affect Quesnel lake
Natural mixing of lake waters may re-suspend contaminants deposited in a catastrophic mine spill six years ago, according to a new article.
1h
Recalling memories from a third-person perspective changes how our brain processes them
Adopting a third-person, observer point of view when recalling your past activates different parts of your brain than recalling a memory seen through your own eyes, according to a new article.
1h
Snowshoe hare carcasses feed more then the usual suspects
What do lynx, flying squirrels, ravens, and wolverines have in common? They will all scavenge from snowshoe hare carcasses under the right conditions, according to ecologists. And they're not alone. In fact, researchers documented 24 different species feeding from snowshoe hare carcasses in Canada's northern boreal forest.
1h
Sustainable nylon production made possible by bacteria discovery
Scientists have developed a sustainable method of making one of the most valuable industrial chemicals in the world – known as adipic acid — which is a key component of the material.
1h
Flavonoids' presence in sorghum roots may lead to frost-resistant crop
Flavonoid compounds — produced by the roots of some sorghum plants — positively affect soil microorganisms, according to researchers, who suggest the discovery is an early step in developing a frost-resistant line of the valuable crop for North American farmers.
1h
Strict diet explains metabolic effect of gastric bypass surgery
In many studies, bariatric surgery has been highlighted as an almost magical method for weight loss and reversing type 2 diabetes. One question that has remained largely unanswered is how the effect of surgery differs from the effects of a strict low-calorie diet.
1h
How do we prioritize what we see?
It is known that different regions of the brain help us prioritize information so we can efficiently process visual scenes. Neuroscientists have discovered that one specific region, the occipital cortex, plays a causal role in piloting our attention to manage the intake of images.
1h
Pollution linked to antibiotic resistance
Antibiotic resistance is an increasing health problem, but new research suggests it is not only caused by the overuse of antibiotics. It's also caused by pollution.
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How to shake off the 'impostor' fears that plague your PhD studies
Nature, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02401-6 Three strategies for fighting those insidious feelings that you don't deserve to be where you are.
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Daily briefing: Mysterious mismatch between coronavirus infections and serious disease in Africa
Nature, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02412-3 Antibody surveys from countries across Africa have shown that a large proportion of people has been infected with COVID-19 — but the continent has so far been spared the worst ravages of the disease. Plus: Ceres has an ocean and clean energy would pay for itself in good health.
1h
Eyes painted on cow butts thwart lion attacks
Lions help maintain balance in their ecosystems, but they also kill cattle. The big cats are ambush predators who depend on the element of surprise. In an experiment, eyes painted on cow backsides appear to deter lions from attacking. For cattle-owning subsistence farmers in Botswana, lions pose a threat to the livestock on which they depend. Attempts to keep cattle safe often result in the shoot
1h
Sustainable nylon production made possible by bacteria discovery
Scientists have developed a sustainable method of making one of the most valuable industrial chemicals in the world – known as adipic acid — which is a key component of the material.
1h
Ingenuity Mars helicopter recharges its batteries in flight
NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter received a checkout and recharge of its power system on Friday, Aug. 7, one week into its near seven-month journey to Mars with the Perseverance rover. This marks the first time the helicopter has been powered up and its batteries have been charged in the space environment.
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Fundamentally new approach to ultrasound imaging
Researchers have demonstrated a new technique for creating ultrasound images. The new approach is substantially simpler than existing techniques and could significantly drive down technology costs.
1h
Artificial intelligence recognizes deteriorating photoreceptors
A software based on artificial intelligence (AI) enables the precise assessment of the progression of geographic atrophy (GA), a disease of the light sensitive retina caused by age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
1h
Researchers analyze the factors that enable fish to reproduce in the Gulf of Cadiz
Researchers from the Marine Biology Laboratory of the University of Seville, led by Professor José Carlos García Gómez, have studied the factors involved in fish reproduction and breeding in the Gulf of Cadiz. Their analysis focused on estuaries which, due to their specific conditions, created by the mixing of river and sea water, are especially favorable for the reproductive function of the speci
2h
Sex, flies and videotape
On a hot summer day, in a darkened chamber, a video camera follows a couple as it engages in nature's oldest game—courtship. The male sings and chases after the female when suddenly a long tubular organ emerges from her rear end. The male recoils at first, but then returns to investigate. Is this a sign that the female is interested in moving on to the next phase, or should he try his luck elsewhe
2h
Warming Greenland ice sheet passes point of no return
Nearly 40 years of satellite data from Greenland shows that glaciers on the island have shrunk so much that even if global warming were to stop today, the ice sheet would continue shrinking.
2h
Sustainable nylon production made possible by bacteria discovery
Nylon manufacture could be revolutionized by the discovery that bacteria can make a key chemical involved in the process, without emitting harmful greenhouse gases.
2h
Researchers analyze the factors that enable fish to reproduce in the Gulf of Cadiz
Researchers from the Marine Biology Laboratory of the University of Seville, led by Professor José Carlos García Gómez, have studied the factors involved in fish reproduction and breeding in the Gulf of Cadiz. Their analysis focused on estuaries which, due to their specific conditions, created by the mixing of river and sea water, are especially favorable for the reproductive function of the speci
2h
Sex, flies and videotape
On a hot summer day, in a darkened chamber, a video camera follows a couple as it engages in nature's oldest game—courtship. The male sings and chases after the female when suddenly a long tubular organ emerges from her rear end. The male recoils at first, but then returns to investigate. Is this a sign that the female is interested in moving on to the next phase, or should he try his luck elsewhe
2h
Studying how skin cancer starts
New research by Ortiz-Rodríguez and mentor Carlos Crespo, a professor and lead researcher in the The Crespo Group lab, reveals for perhaps the first time how quickly certain pre-cancerous lesions can form on the DNA of our skin when exposed to sunlight.
2h
Child disability can reduce educational outcomes for older siblings
A recent paper published in The Economic Journal indicates that, in families with disabled children, the second born child is more adversely affected cognitively than the first-born child.
2h
Snowshoe hare carcasses feed more then the usual suspects, study shows
What do lynx, flying squirrels, ravens, and wolverines have in common? They will all scavenge from snowshoe hare carcasses under the right conditions, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists. And they're not alone. In fact, researchers documented 24 different species feeding from snowshoe hare carcasses in Canada's northern boreal forest.
2h
Recalling memories from a third-person perspective changes how our brain processes them
Adopting a third-person, observer point of view when recalling your past activates different parts of your brain than recalling a memory seen through your own eyes, according to a new paper.
2h
Contaminants from Mount Polley tailings spill continue to affect Quesnel lake
Natural mixing of lake waters may resuspend contaminants deposited in a catastrophic mine spill six years ago, according to a new paper led by a University of Alberta scientist.
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Study suggests new potential approach against fatal childhood brain cancer
In mouse models of DIPG, a fatal childhood brain cancer, simultaneously attacking two metabolic pathways led to significant improvements in survival.
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Diffusion MRI: Mapping the structural highways of the brain
Some of my favorite scientific images to look at come from scanning the human brain with a tool called diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (or diffusion MRI). These images depict the long fibers that connect one part of the brain to another in a color-coded fashion, with a beautiful result: a colorful map of the brain's […]
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Spread of monsoon circulation changes explains uncertainty in global land monsoon precipitation projection
Researchers from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that the projected uncertainty of the precipitation increase over global land monsoon regions by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6) models was mainly due to the spread of circulation changes across models.
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Data-vagthund er efter TikTok: For nemt for børn at komme ind
Datatilsynet undersøger, om TikTok ulovligt indsamler personlige oplysninger om børn uden forældrenes tilladelse.
2h
Employers reject transgender people
Employers in Sweden more often reject job applications from transgender people—especially in male-dominated occupations. Moreover, transgender people face discrimination from two different grounds for discrimination. This is according to a study from Linköping University that was recently published in the journal Labour Economics.
2h
NASA-NOAA satellite nighttime imagery helps confirm Elida now post-tropical
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a night-time image of Elida in the Eastern Pacific Ocean that helped confirm the storm had weakened to a post-tropical cyclone.
2h
California's Fast-Moving Lake Fire
Just north of Los Angeles, a wildfire near Lake Hughes grew to 10,000 acres within merely a few hours yesterday. The rapidly growing blaze prompted the evacuation of hundreds of nearby homes as firefighters rushed to contain it. High winds, hot and dry conditions, and steep terrain have driven the fire's growth in the Angeles National Forest .
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AI Developers Want to Perform a Bizarre Study on Released Prisoners
Watchful Eye A team of computer scientists has a well-intentioned but thorny plan to reduce recidivism, the rate at which prisoners return to prison once released, and it involves constantly monitoring them as they go about their lives. The idea? Giving parolees (who would volunteer for this program) smartphones and biometric wearables to monitor their biological data, pictures they take, and loc
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England has started testing a contact tracing app—again
The news: England's revamped covid-19 contact tracing app has finally been launched for testing by the public, after its previous version was scrapped for technical problems. The new program went live for residents of the Isle of Wight on Thursday, August 13, and will shortly become available for people living in the London borough of Newham, according to the UK's health department. Second time a
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Hubble finds that Betelgeuse's mysterious dimming is due to a traumatic outburst
Observations by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope are showing that the unexpected dimming of the supergiant star Betelgeuse was most likely caused by an immense amount of hot material ejected into space, forming a dust cloud that blocked starlight coming from Betelgeuse's surface.
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When you're smiling, the whole world really does smile with you
From Sinatra to Katy Perry, celebrities have long sung about the power of a smile — how it picks you up, changes your outlook, and generally makes you feel better. But is it all smoke and mirrors, or is there a scientific backing to the claim? Groundbreaking research confirms that the act of smiling can trick your mind into being more positive, simply by moving your facial muscles.
2h
Warming Greenland ice sheet passes point of no return
Nearly 40 years of satellite data from Greenland shows that glaciers on the island have shrunk so much that even if global warming were to stop today, the ice sheet would continue shrinking.
2h
Infectious Disease Researcher Steve Meshnick Dies
A leading scientist on the mechanisms of action of antimalarial medications, the University of North Carolina professor made contributions to research and mentoring all around the world.
2h
Astronomers Puzzled By Ancient Milky Way-Like Galaxy 12 Billion Light-Years Away
Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) of telescopes in Chile, astronomers have discovered a Milky Way-like galaxy called SPT0418-47 more than 12 billion light-years away from our own, as detailed in a new paper published in the journal Nature on Wednesday. That's a big deal considering the entire universe is considered to be only 13.4 billion years old , meaning that the n
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40 Years Ago: Lessons From the Eruption of Mount St. Helens
In this excerpt from Discover's debut 1980 issue, Mount St. Helens' spectacular show enabled scientists to learn how to predict volcanic eruptions. In our update, we share the lessons they've learned since.
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Kamala Harris's Nomination Reopens the Wounds of 2016
T he morning before Kamala Harris became the Democratic nominee for vice president, I met Amanda Litman at the Javits Center in New York City, a mammoth building near the Hudson River made almost entirely of glass. Four years ago, Litman spent Election Night here, waiting excitedly in a holding area with other staffers on Hillary Clinton's campaign. The intended metaphor was not subtle: Clinton w
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Single-cell analysis provides new insights into mitochondrial diseases
Investigators led by a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have made discoveries at the single cell level to uncover new details concerning mitochondrial diseases– inherited disorders that interfere with energy production in the body and currently have no cure.
2h
NASA-NOAA satellite nighttime imagery helps confirm Elida now post-tropical
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a night-time image of Elida in the Eastern Pacific Ocean that helped confirm the storm had weakened to a post-tropical cyclone.
2h
FEFU scientists propose to restore neural tissue with hydrogels based on modified pectins
Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) scientists have developed implantable hydrogels based on plant polysaccharides (pectins). They can play the role of an artificial extracellular matrix, a special network of molecules that fills the space between body cells. The development to be used as a medium for growing tissues and organs, as well as for drug delivery and brain recovery after removal of ma
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Researchers demonstrate fundamentally new approach to ultrasound imaging
Researchers have demonstrated a new technique for creating ultrasound images. The new approach is substantially simpler than existing techniques and could significantly drive down technology costs.
2h
Task force examines role of mobile health technology in COVID-19 pandemic
An international task force, including two University of Massachusetts Amherst computer scientists, concludes in new research that mobile health (mHealth) technologies are a viable option to monitor COVID-19 patients at home and predict which ones will need medical intervention.
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New study shows increase in domestic violence injuries during COVID-19
There was a higher incidence and severity of physical intimate partner violence (IPV) among patients seen at a large, academic medical center in the US during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with the prior three years, according to a new study.
2h
Sustainable nylon production made possible by bacteria discovery
Scientists have developed a sustainable method of making one of the most valuable industrial chemicals in the world – known as adipic acid — which is a key component of the material.
3h
Radiology reveals alarming rise in intimate partner violence during COVID-19 pandemic
Investigators assessed the incidence, pattern and severity of injuries related to Intimate Partner Violence in patients at the Brigham during the COVID-19 pandemic. When they compared IPV injuries from the spring of 2020 to injuries over the previous three years, they found an alarming increase in physical injuries associated with IPV.
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Climate Change, Not Hunting, May Have Doomed the Woolly Rhinoceros
Populations of the Ice Age icon were healthy right up until their extinction, suggesting they crashed precipitously as the planet warmed
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Vasectomies: men recall final cuts and close shaves | Letters
Rob Delaney's frank and funny account of his vasectomy revives memories for readers including Mike Cashman and the Rev Trevor Smith Rob Delaney's article about having a vasectomy ( 'Could I feel what they were doing? Yes' , 12 August) brought back memories from when I had one because my wife and I did not want more children. The surgeon gave me a local anaesthetic and I was cut above my penis. Al
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Georgia Tech scientist gets lighter sentence in grant violation case because of her work on coronavirus
Federal judge delays, shortens home confinement so Eva Lee can help combat pandemic
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What does "statistically significant" mean?
Lately, social media has been flooded with people sharing studies about various aspects of COVID. This is potentially great. I'm all for people being more engaged with science. Unfortunately, many people lack a good foundation for understanding science, and a common point of confusion is the meaning of "statistically significant." I've written about this at […]
3h
The larynx has evolved more rapidly in primates
The larynx is larger, more variable in size, and has undergone faster rates of evolution in primates than in carnivores, according to a study published August 11, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Daniel Bowling of Stanford University, W. Tecumseh Fitch of the University of Vienna, and colleagues.
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Flavonoids' presence in sorghum roots may lead to frost-resistant crop
Flavonoid compounds — produced by the roots of some sorghum plants — positively affect soil microorganisms, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest the discovery is an early step in developing a frost-resistant line of the valuable crop for North American farmers.
3h
UMD researchers identify structure of blue whirls
'Blue whirls' — small, spinning blue flames that produce almost no soot when they burn — have attracted great interest since their discovery in 2016, in part because they represent a potential new avenue for low-emission combustion. Now, a team of researchers has identified how these intriguing whirls are structured.
3h
Sufficiently distant parks and public services facilitate older adults' physical activity
Outdoor mobility facilitating parks, walking trails, and public services at greater distances increased physical activity, according to a study conducted at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences of the University of Jyväskylä.
3h
Warming Greenland ice sheet passes point of no return
Nearly 40 years of satellite data from Greenland shows that glaciers on the island have shrunk so much that even if global warming were to stop today, the ice sheet would continue shrinking.
3h
Artificial intelligence recognizes deteriorating photoreceptors
A software based on artificial intelligence (AI), which was developed by researchers at the Eye Clinic of the University Hospital Bonn, Stanford University and University of Utah, enables the precise assessment of the progression of geographic atrophy (GA), a disease of the light sensitive retina caused by age-related macular degeneration (AMD).
3h
Study: Medical marijuana associated with fewer hospitalizations for individuals with SCD
Individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) who receive medical marijuana to treat pain may require fewer visits to the hospital, according to a new study in Blood Advances. Adults with SCD who requested and obtained medical marijuana were admitted to the hospital less frequently than those who did not obtain it.
3h
Trilobites living 429 million years ago had eyes like modern insects
A compound eye almost identical to those of modern bees and dragonflies has been found in a fossil trilobite that lived on the seabed 429 million years ago
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You'll never want to leave bed with these breathable sheets
Sleep more comfortably. (Jilbert Ebrahimi via Unsplash/) The best part of sleeping? Snuggling into soft, silky, cozy sheets. The worst part? Waking up in the middle of night hot and uncomfortable due to lack of breathability. There's no shame in being a warm sleeper—and it can be especially frustrating if it's happening with any regularity. That's where cooling sheets come in: you may be in need
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Ancient genomes suggest woolly rhinos went extinct due to climate change, not overhunting
Although overhunting led to the demise of some prehistoric megafauna after the last ice age, a new study found that the extinction of the woolly rhinoceros may have been caused by climate change. By sequencing ancient DNA from 14 woolly rhinos, researchers found that their population remained stable and diverse until only a few thousand years before it disappeared from Siberia, when temperatures l
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In N.Y.C.'s Coronavirus Surge, a Frightening Echo of the 1918 Flu
This spring, death rates rivaled those seen during the country's deadliest pandemic, a new study finds. "What 1918 looked like is basically this."
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Kramper, dårlig mave og hovedpine: Sådan dealer du med menstruationssmerter
Hvis dine smerter rækker udover det normale, skal du søge læge.
3h
Comfortable and durable workout shorts—with pockets!
Comfort and utility. (Matthew LeJune via Unsplash/) The most frustrating thing about most workout shorts—for men and women—is the glaring lack of pockets. Maybe some people live in a world where car keys, wallets, and cellphones are optional, but most of us have real life obligations that require us to carry a little more baggage to the gym or park. Luckily, there are others who understand the st
3h
Best projectors for a better viewing experience
Upgrade your viewing experience. (Dylan Calluy via Unsplash/) If you're serious about movies and TV, you know the ideal viewing experience requires two things: quality and comfort. With the right projector, you can simulate a trip to the pictures in the coziness of your own home. Imagine hitting the theater in your underwear with your favorite snacks and a bottle of wine. While we don't recommend
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This triceratops cousin suffered from osteosarcoma, just like many humans do
A bone found 30 years ago holds the secrets of dinosaur cancer. (Danielle Dufault, Royal Ontario Museum/) Cancer follows a fairly standard protocol: Cells multiply out of control until they take over key organs necessary for survival. Creatures across the animal kingdom from humans to birds to reptiles can all get cancer, and, as researchers report this week, so can dinosaurs that roamed the Eart
3h
Advances in Nucleic Acid Sequencing
Download this eBook to learn how new sequencing methods revolutionize genetics research!
3h
Deepfakes: The Dark Origins of Fake Videos and Their Potential to Wreak Havoc Online
The presence of videos and images altered with artificial intelligence are nearly doubling every six months. But the problem might be more than meets the eye.
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Scientists sound the alarm: Lockdowns may escalate the obesity epidemic
Emotional stress, economic anxiety, physical inactivity and social distance – locking down society to combat COVID-19 creates psychosocial insecurity that leads to obesity, warn three Danish researchers. Counter measures are needed if we are to keep the public both metabolically healthy and safe from the coronavirus
3h
When you're smiling, the whole world really does smile with you
From Sinatra to Katy Perry, celebrities have long sung about the power of a smile — how it picks you up, changes your outlook, and generally makes you feel better. But is it all smoke and mirrors, or is there a scientific backing to the claim? Groundbreaking research from the University of South Australia confirms that the act of smiling can trick your mind into being more positive, simply by mov
3h
3h
How do we prioritize what we see?
It is known that different regions of the brain help us prioritize information so we can efficiently process visual scenes. A new study by a team of neuroscientists has discovered that one specific region, the occipital cortex, plays a causal role in piloting our attention to manage the intake of images.
4h
Analyzing the factors that enable fish to reproduce in the Gulf of Cadiz
The Guadalquivir estuary showed the highest density of early stages fish and also of macro-zooplankton (fish prey). A higher concentration of organic matter (preferential food of the macrozooplanton in the Guadalquivir), provided by a greater flow of fresh water and correlated with total suspended solids, inorganic matter and turbidity, were the most typical characteristics of the Guadalquivir.
4h
Strict diet explains metabolic effect of gastric bypass surgery
In many studies, bariatric surgery has been highlighted as an almost magical method for weight loss and reversing type 2 diabetes. One question that has remained largely unanswered is how the effect of surgery differs from the effects of a strict low-calorie diet. This question has now been examined by researchers at Lund University in Sweden in a study published in the journal Diabetes.
4h
Global deaths due to smokeless tobacco are up by a third, according to new study
The number of deaths globally due to smokeless tobacco has gone up by a third in 7 years to an estimated 350,000 people, a new study suggests.
4h
Strianassa lerayi anker, new shrimp species from Panama's Coiba national park
Last year's expedition, part of the project to compare microbiomes of animals in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, resulted in the discovery of several new animal genera including a new species of mud shrimp.
4h
Global Wave Discovery Ends 220-Year Search
The atmosphere is such a roiling mess that it defies analysis even by today's most sophisticated meteorological algorithms. But its complexity didn't stop the French scientist Pierre-Simon Laplace from cracking one simple aspect of atmospheric behavior in the late 1700s. Despite never seeing a global weather map, Laplace developed a theory predicting that continent-size pressure waves would perio
4h
Disaster Program Allocates Unprecedented Funds for Climate Resilience
Communities will be able to tap into $500 million to mitigate against disasters by, for example, strengthening building codes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EULAR: Amputations of body parts: The combination of diabetes and gout significantly increases
Compared to the average population, people suffering from both gout and diabetes have a 25 times higher risk of requiring an amputation of peripheral limbs such as feet, toes or lower legs. This is the result of a study presented by experts from the US at the virtual annual congress of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) 2020.
4h
Spread of monsoon circulation changes explains uncertainty in global land monsoon precipitation projection
A new study emphasizes the importance of reliable prediction of circulation changes, to ensure that future projections of global land monsoon are suitable for use by policy makers.
4h
Independent search engines respect your privacy but give more visibility to misinformation
Anti-vaccine websites, which could play a key role in promoting public hesitancy about a potential COVID vaccine, are far more likely to be found via independent search engines than through an internet giant like Google.
4h
Employers reject transgender people
Employers in Sweden more often reject job applications from transgender people — especially in male-dominated occupations. Moreover, transgender people face discrimination from two different grounds for discrimination. This is according to a study from Linköping University that was recently published in the journal Labour Economics.
4h
A new, 20-minute assay for COVID-19 diagnosis
Researchers have developed a new test that can diagnose COVID-19 in just 20 minutes. The findings, published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology, show the rapid molecular test called N1-STOP-LAMP, is 100% accurate in diagnosing samples containing SARS-CoV-2 at high loads.
4h
Research gets to the heart of organ shape in nature
Researchers have shed fresh light on the evolution and function of the shapes we see in nature – using as a model the heart shaped fruits of the Capsella genus.
4h
Delaying prostate cancer radiation therapy offers room for flexibility in pandemic peak
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital found that for men with unfavorable intermediate-risk or high-risk localized prostate cancer, who are receiving radiation and hormone therapy, delaying radiation while remaining on hormone therapy is unlikely to impact survival.
4h
Syphilis may have spread through Europe before Columbus
Columbus brought syphilis to Europe — or did he? A recent study conducted at the University of Zurich now indicates that Europeans could already have been infected with this sexually transmitted disease before the 15th century. In addition, researchers have discovered a hitherto unknown pathogen causing a related disease. The predecessor of syphilis and its related diseases could be over 2,500 ye
4h
A new neurofeedback strategy to treat pain
Researchers in Japan and Cambridge have developed a new neurofeedback strategy that might help to treat patients who suffer from chronic pain in the future. They have shown that they can use neurofeedback to boost the brain's natural ability to control pain, in a simple procedure in which people lie in a brain scanner and have their brain activity decoded using AI techniques.
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Diabetes, weight change and pancreatic cancer risk
Researchers investigated an association between the duration of diabetes and recent weight loss with subsequent risk of pancreatic cancer in this observational study.
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Outcomes associated with kinin B2 receptor antagonist for treatment of COVID-19
The association between receipt of the bradykinin 2 (B2) receptor antagonist icatibant and improved oxygenation in patients with COVID-19 is investigated in this study.
4h
Disparities in cancer outcomes due to COVID-19
This Viewpoint calls for greater attention to racial and socioeconomic health disparities affecting patients with cancer in the setting of COVID-19.
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Radiotherapy, androgen deprivation timing and implications for prostate cancer treatment during COVID-19
National Cancer Database data from 2004 to 2014 were used to examine the association between overall survival and timing of radiotherapy relative to androgen deprivation therapy in patients with prostate cancer.
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Evidence of direct viral damage to olfactory complex in patients testing positive for SARS-CoV-2
Researchers report the clinicopathologic and autopsy findings observed in the olfactory system of two patients with SARS-CoV-2-positive nasal swabs.
4h
COVID-19 outcomes in french nursing homes with staff confinement
COVID-19-related outcomes in French nursing homes that implemented voluntary staff confinement with residents are investigated in this study.
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Comparing excess deaths in New York during COVID-19 with 1918 influenza pandemic
Excess deaths in New York during the peak of the 1918 influenza pandemic were compared with those during the initial period of the COVID-19 outbreak in this study.
4h
'Critical' questions over disease risks from ocean plastics
Key knowledge gaps exist in our understanding of how ocean microplastics transport bacteria and viruses — and whether this affects the health of humans and animals, researchers say.
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Adding a meter between meals boosts vegetarian appeal — study
Researchers have identified the optimal dish positions to help "nudge" diners into picking more planet-friendly meals in cafeterias. Findings are the latest from Cambridge research on encouraging dietary decision-making that supports sustainable living.
4h
Palaeontology: 429-million-year-old eye provides a view of trilobite life
The internal structure of a 429-million-year-old fossilized trilobite eye is almost identical to that of modern bees, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. The findings suggest that the principles of vision in many insects and crustaceans today are at least half a billion years old.
4h
Sex, flies and videotape
Researchers discover key behaviour that triggers the transition from courtship to mating in fruit flies.
4h
Ancient genomes suggest woolly rhinos went extinct due to climate change, not overhunting
Although overhunting led to the demise of some prehistoric megafauna after the last ice age, a study appearing August 13 in the journal Current Biology found that the extinction of the woolly rhinoceros may have been caused by climate change. By sequencing ancient DNA from 14 woolly rhinos, researchers found that their population remained stable and diverse until only a few thousand years before i
4h
Landmark paper calls for need to develop the world's microbiome biobanking infrastructure
A team of scientists, led by CABI's Dr Matthew Ryan, have outlined a series of challenges and opportunities presented in a necessary review of how microbiomes – biological communities including bacteria, archaea, fungi, algae, protists and viruses – can be 'banked' and preserved for generations to come.
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Nanobodies Against the Coronavirus: Something New
So let's talk about nanobodies – there's a coronavirus connection to this, but it's a good topic in general for several reasons. We begin at the beginning: what the heck is a "nanobody"? Antibody Structure The name is derived, rather loosely, from "antibody". So let's spend a minute on what antibodies actually look like. What you see at right is the three-dimensional structure of a typical one –
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Paleontologists Reveal Animal Fossils From Ancient Supercontinent
Fossils dating more than about 540 million years old are extremely rare. That's why a newly discovered ancient deposit is so valuable. Aspidella-fossil.jpg A fossil from the Ediacaran of an Aspidella from Australia. The story discusses similar fossils found in Brazil. Image credits: Phoebe Cohen via Flickr Rights information: CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 Earth Thursday, August 13, 2020 – 11:00 Christian Foge
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Ullhåriga noshörningen kartlagd – dna hittades i permafrosten i Sibirien
Ny forskning visar att den ullhåriga noshörningen, som försvann efter den sista istiden, troligtvis dog ut på grund av klimatförändringar – inte för att människan jagade den. – Vi befinner ju oss nu i det sjätte massutdöendet av olika djurarter. Då är det viktigt att försöka förstå vad det är som orsakat tidigare utdöenden, säger Love Dalén, professor i evolutionär genetik.
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Medieval DNA suggests Columbus didn't trigger syphilis epidemic in Europe
Skeletons provide first DNA evidence that diverse strains of syphilis circulated in Europe before 1492
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A 429-Million-Year-Old Trilobite Had Eyes like Those of Modern Bees
Rare, cracked fossil shows the world through ancient eyes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Leukemia breakthrough: CircASXL1-1 regulates BAP1 deubiquitinase activity in leukemia
Researchers have identified covalently closed circular RNAs (circRNAs) from key genes involved in leukemia development and provided greater understanding of their roles in haematological malignancies.
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Cancer mapping may solve puzzle of regional disease links
New statistical analysis finds cancer mapping may help question regional disease links.
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Sea-level rise could make rivers more likely to jump course
River avulsions — catastrophic floods triggered when a river charts a new path to the sea — could occur more frequently on rivers as sea levels rises.
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Who's your daddy? Male seahorses transport nutrients to embryos
New research has found male seahorses transport nutrients to their developing babies during pregnancy. This discovery provides an opportunity for further comparative evolutionary research.
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AI system for high precision recognition of hand gestures
Scientists have developed an Artificial Intelligence (AI) system that recognises hand gestures by combining skin-like electronics with computer vision.
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Landmark paper calls for need to develop the world's microbiome biobanking infrastructure
A team of scientists led by CABI's Dr. Matthew Ryan has outlined a series of challenges and opportunities presented in a necessary review of how microbiomes—biological communities including bacteria, archaea, fungi, algae, protists and viruses—can be 'banked' and preserved for generations to come.
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Landmark paper calls for need to develop the world's microbiome biobanking infrastructure
A team of scientists led by CABI's Dr. Matthew Ryan has outlined a series of challenges and opportunities presented in a necessary review of how microbiomes—biological communities including bacteria, archaea, fungi, algae, protists and viruses—can be 'banked' and preserved for generations to come.
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A 429-Million-Year-Old Trilobite Had Eyes like Those of Modern Bees
Rare, cracked fossil shows the world through ancient eyes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Bedre viden om coronatendensen
PLUS. Hvordan udvikler antallet af hospitalsindlæggelser for covid-19 sig? Det kan et nyt danskudviklet Trend Direction Index give et statistisk bud på.
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Strianassa lerayi anker, new shrimp species from Panama's Coiba national park
Last year's expedition, part of the project to compare microbiomes of animals in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, resulted in the discovery of several new animal genera and a species of mud shrimp named for STRI and post-doctoral fellow, Matt Leray
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Research captures how human sperm swim in 3D
Using state-of-the-art 3D microscopy and mathematics, Dr Hermes Gadêlha from the University of Bristol, Dr Gabriel Corkidi and Dr Alberto Darszon from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, have reconstructed the movement of the sperm tail in 3D with high-precision.
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Adding a meter between meals boosts vegetarian appeal: study
Meat-heavy diets not only risk our health but that of the planet, as livestock farming on a massive scale destroys habitats and generates greenhouse gases.
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Research gets to the heart of organ shape in nature
Researchers have shed fresh light on the evolution and function of the shapes we see in nature—using as a model the heart shaped fruits of the Capsella genus.
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Quantum mechanics is immune to the butterfly effect
That could help with the design of quantum computers
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What killed the woolly rhino?
Not humans, for a change
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Why locusts swarm
A new discovery could offer novel ways of controlling the insects
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An arms race is brewing in orbit
Experts want to clarify how the laws of war on Earth apply beyond it
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429-million-year-old eye provides a view of trilobite life
The internal structure of a 429-million-year-old fossilized trilobite eye is almost identical to that of modern bees, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. The findings suggest that the principles of vision in many insects and crustaceans today are at least half a billion years old.
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Ancient genomes suggest woolly rhinos went extinct due to climate change, not overhunting
The extinction of prehistoric megafauna like the woolly mammoth, cave lion, and woolly rhinoceros at the end of the last ice age has often been attributed to the spread of early humans across the globe. Although overhunting led to the demise of some species, a study appearing August 13 in the journal Current Biology found that the extinction of the woolly rhinoceros may have had a different cause:
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Adding a meter between meals boosts vegetarian appeal: study
Meat-heavy diets not only risk our health but that of the planet, as livestock farming on a massive scale destroys habitats and generates greenhouse gases.
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'Critical' questions over disease risks from ocean plastics
Key knowledge gaps exist in our understanding of how ocean microplastics transport bacteria and viruses—and whether this affects the health of humans and animals, researchers say.
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Research gets to the heart of organ shape in nature
Researchers have shed fresh light on the evolution and function of the shapes we see in nature—using as a model the heart shaped fruits of the Capsella genus.
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Business this week
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KAL's cartoon
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Politics this week
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AI system for high precision recognition of hand gestures
Scientists have developed an Artificial Intelligence (AI) system that recognises hand gestures by combining skin-like electronics with computer vision.
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Researchers make green chemistry advance with new catalyst for reduction of carbon dioxide
Researchers have made a key advance in the green chemistry pursuit of converting the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into reusable forms of carbon via electrochemical reduction.
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A 429-Million-Year-Old Trilobite Had Eyes like Those of Modern Bees
Rare, cracked fossil shows the world through ancient eyes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Tre ingeniører blandt 24 nye medlemmer af Danmarks Frie Forskningsfond
De nye medlemmer i fondens faglige forskningsråd, der tiltræder til nytår, skal bruge deres viden til at repræsentere den frie forskning i Danmark
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The brews and bakes that forged career paths outside academia
Nature, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02404-3 Yeast is a staple of scientific experimentation. Some researchers have used the fungus — mixed with some entrepreneurial flair — to launch brewing and fermentation businesses.
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Rumors, trust and vaccines | Heidi Larson
Why do people distrust vaccines? Anthropologist Heidi Larson explores how medical rumors originate, spread and fuel resistance to vaccines worldwide. While vaccines cannot escape the "political and social turbulence" that surrounds them, she says, the first step to stopping the spread of disease is to talk to people, listen and build trust.
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New precision search for dark matter from ATLAS Experiment
The nature of dark matter remains one of the great unsolved puzzles of fundamental physics. Unexplained by the Standard Model, dark matter has led scientists to probe new physics models to understand its existence. Many such theoretical scenarios postulate that dark matter particles could be produced in the intense high-energy proton–proton collisions of the LHC. While the dark matter would escape
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COVID-19 survivors share their harrowing tales
The public Facebook group, Survivor Corps, is a place where long haulers and survivors congregate. Months after recovering from COVID-19, some are suffering from joint pain, hair loss, and cognitive issues. These cautionary tales are important in a county where many remain skeptical over the dangers of this virus. A concerted effort to stop famines in Africa spread across America in the '80s. Eve
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Researchers make green chemistry advance with new catalyst for reduction of carbon dioxide
Researchers have made a key advance in the green chemistry pursuit of converting the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into reusable forms of carbon via electrochemical reduction.
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Insect diversity boosted by combination of crop diversity and semi-natural habitats
To enhance the number of beneficial insect species in agricultural land, preserving semi-natural habitats and promoting crop diversity are both needed, according to new research.
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Virus uses decoy strategy to evade immune system
Researchers have learnt more about how viruses operate and can evade the immune system and are now using their discovery to help learn more about COVID-19.
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​NTU Singapore scientists develop artificial intelligence system for high precision recognition of hand gestures
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed an Artificial Intelligence (AI) system that recognises hand gestures by combining skin-like electronics with computer vision.
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Perovskite and organic solar cells prove successful on a rocket flight in space
Almost all satellites are powered by solar cells – but solar cells are heavy. While conventional high-performance cells reach up to three watts of electricity per gram, perovskite and organic hybrid cells could provide up to ten times that amount. A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has now tested this type of cell in space for the fi
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Study finds cancer mapping may solve puzzle of regional disease links
New statistical analysis finds cancer mapping may help question regional disease links.
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Food-based approach to lowering cholesterol provides significant healthcare cost savings
A new study is the first to show a food-based approach using clinically-proven diet interventions to lower cholesterol levels, such as Step One Foods®, provides significant healthcare cost savings.
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Vanliga linser bromsar närsynthet hos barn
Allt fler barn på jorden blir närsynta och om inte utvecklingen stoppas ökar risken för ögonsjukdomar senare i livet. Amerikanska forskare har nu visat att inte bara speciallinser kan bromsa närsynthet hos barn, också vanliga multifokala progressiva linser för medelålders personer fungerar bra och de finns hos varenda optiker.
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Reduce Your Laboratory's Carbon Footprint
Download this article to learn how to make a positive environmental impact through thoughtful behavioral and laboratory equipment choices!
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Why dark matter should be called something else
There are many things that we don't understand about dark matter, but whether it is actually dark isn't one of them, writes Chanda Prescod-Weinstein
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The Good Son
Jared Kushner , the second-most-powerful man in the White House, is quite a bit smarter than the most powerful man, his father-in-law, the president. Donald Trump possesses a genius for the jugular, but he evinces few other signs of intelligence. He certainly displays no capacity, or predisposition, to learn. His son-in-law, by contrast, appears to have sufficient analytic acumen to comprehend th
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Dignity and respect go a long way in county jail, new research shows
A University of Wisconsin Oshkosh study indicates a little respect and decency can go a long way in improving some aspects of America's criminal justice system.
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NUS research breakthrough: CircASXL1-1 regulates BAP1 deubiquitinase activity in leukemia
Researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) have identified covalently closed circular RNAs (circRNAs) from key genes involved in leukemia development and provided greater understanding of their roles in haematological malignancies.
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Who's your daddy? Male seahorses transport nutrients to embryos
New research by Dr Camilla Whittington and her team at the University of Sydney has found male seahorses transport nutrients to their developing babies during pregnancy. This discovery provides an opportunity for further comparative evolutionary research.
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Sea-level rise could make rivers more likely to jump course
A new study shows that sea level rise will cause rivers to change course more frequently.
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Singapore researchers discover genetic link to predict positive response to immunotherapy in patient
Findings offer cost and clinical benefits for patients with natural-killer T-cell lymphoma undergoing novel anti PD-1 therapy. Findings published in high impact factor journal, Leukemia. Discovery licensed to Singapore biotech company, Lucence Diagnostics which has developed diagnostic tests for clinical application.
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Researchers make green chemistry advance with new catalyst for reduction of carbon dioxide
Researchers at Oregon State University have made a key advance in the green chemistry pursuit of converting the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into reusable forms of carbon via electrochemical reduction.
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Broader view of sexuality in prisons needed to help inmates reintegrate into society: study
A narrow, outdated understanding of sexuality in prisons is causing serious psychological harm to male inmates, according to psychology research from the University of Alberta.
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Coronavirus: have we already missed the opportunity to build a better world?
Many people like to say that the coronavirus is teaching us a lesson, as if the pandemic were a kind of morality play that should lead to a change in our behaviour. It shows us that we can make big shifts quickly if we want to. That we can build back better. That social inequality is starkly revealed at times of crisis. That there is a "magic money tree". The idea that crisis leads to change was a
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Revealing the structure of the mysterious blue whirling flame
A team of researchers working at the University of Maryland has uncovered the structure of the mysterious blue whirling flame. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes using computer simulations to determine the structure of the unique type of flame.
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Baby Shark & Naughty Ocean Friends
Baby Shark has some interesting friends with very special abilities. Meet eel, octopus, and football fish! Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/Discovery https://w
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These Sleek Houses Are 3D Printed, and They Fit in Your Backyard
If you'd told me ten years ago that I could go live in a house built by a giant concrete-spitting 3D printer, I not only would've thought you were crazy, I wouldn't have known what you were talking about. Five years ago I still would have been very, very skeptical. But today, 3D printed homes seem to be coming out of the woodwork—so much so that we may soon need to adjust that saying to "coming o
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Virus uses decoy strategy to evade immune system, Otago research reveals
University of Otago researchers have learnt more about how viruses operate and can evade the immune system and are now using their discovery to help learn more about COVID-19.
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Can blood sugar control protect against COVID's worst effects?
A new algorithm for monitoring glucose may help combat serious complications from COVID-19 in patients with diabetes or high blood sugar, researchers say. After preliminary observations of 200 COVID-19 patients with severe hyperglycemia, a new Diabetes paper sheds light on why high blood sugar may trigger worse outcomes in people infected with the virus. "This might help shorten ICU stays and les
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Instantly Up Your WFH Game With These Laptop Add-Ons
Working from home has been an adjustment for a lot of us — in no small part due to our home office set-ups. And by set-ups, we mean kitchen tables, living room couches, or wherever else we can hunch over our laptops with a cup of coffee. Here's the thing though. That sweet office monitor set-up we had back in our office wasn't just for fun or even convenience; it actually helped us work better. A
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Researchers make green chemistry advance with new catalyst for reduction of carbon dioxide
Researchers have made a key advance in the green chemistry pursuit of converting the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into reusable forms of carbon via electrochemical reduction.
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Dignity and respect go a long way in county jail, new research shows
A University of Wisconsin Oshkosh study indicates a little respect and decency can go a long way in improving some aspects of America's criminal justice system. Matt Richie, an assistant criminal justice professor, recently published 'Managing the Rabble with Dignity and Respect,' in the Journal of Crime and Justice, a publication of the Midwestern Criminal Justice Association. His findings reveal
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Physicists calculate when the last supernova ever will happen
The end of the universe as we know it will not come with a bang. Most stars will slowly fizzle as their temperatures fade to zero.
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Crystallization of colloids secured to oil-water interface responding to laser illumination
A team of researchers at the University of Cambridge has developed a method for the crystallization of colloids secured to an oil-water interface in response to laser illumination. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their method and possible uses for it.
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'Pill' could sample bacteria while in your gut
A new swallowable tool acts like a colonoscopy, except that instead of looking at the colon with a camera, it takes samples of gut bacteria. Your gut bacteria could say a lot about you, such as why you're diabetic or how you respond to certain drugs, but scientists can see only so much of the gastrointestinal tract. What comes out of you is just a small sample of these bacteria, without indicatin
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Artificial intelligence examines best ways to keep parolees from recommitting crimes
Starting a new life is difficult for criminals transitioning from prison back to regular society. To help those individuals, Purdue University Polytechnic Institute researchers are using artificial intelligence to uncover risky behaviors which could then help identify when early intervention opportunities could be beneficial.
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Satellite record gives unprecedented view of Antarctic ice shelf melt pattern over 25 years
A science team led by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego has created a detailed history of mass loss from Antarctica's floating ice shelves.
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Air Force's Notorious Project Maven Goes Live Next Month
Welcome Back Remember Project Maven , the controversial military artificial intelligence program Google backed away from? Well, it's about to get its moment in the sun: In September, it's getting lumped together with other existing Air Force AI tech that will bring it into active deployment, FedScoop reports . The secretive project, which is meant to make military drone strikes more lethal , is a
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Video: ESA's meteor camera captures the Perseid showers
The Perseids meteor shower is one of the most spectacular annual meteor showers. Made of debris from comet Swift-Tuttle they have been observed by sky-watchers for thousands of years and this year the LIC1 camera of the Canary Long-Baseline Observatory (CILBO) at Tenerife captured the peak of the 2020 Perseid meteor shower detecting dozens of meteors in a single night.
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Silkeborg lancerer nyt tilbud om om udredning af funktionelle lidelser
TrygFonden støtter forskning i udredning af funktionelle lidelser med knap fire mio. kr.
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Universities scrub names of racist leaders — students say it's a first step
Nature, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02393-3 Activists praise the actions, but now seek deeper cultural change.
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Fats in the blood linked to autism
Nature, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02349-7 Precision medicine offers insight into a particular form of the disorder.
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Waistline matters in kidney disease
Does fat matter in kidney disease? The investigators found that all measures of higher abdominal fat content (including visceral fat, liver fat, or subcutaneous fat) and slower walk times were associated with increased levels of cardiometabolic risk factors in adults with non-dialysis dependent kidney disease. These data highlight that abdominal fat measures and lower physical fitness levels are a
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Maternal obesity and the risk of early-onset hypertensive disorders of pregnancy
Pregnant obese women were more at risk of experiencing early and late-onset hypertensive disorders, and that risk progressively increased in women with higher body mass indexes (BMI), according to a study led by researchers at UTHealth.
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Demonstrating entanglement through a fiber cable with high fidelity
A team of researchers from Heriot-Watt University, the Indian Institute of Technology and the University of Glasgow has demonstrated a way to transport entangled particles through a commercial fiber cable with 84.4% fidelity. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the group describes using a unique attribute of entanglement to achieve such high fidelity. Andrew Forbes and Isaac Na
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Masculinity keeps some Black men from mental health care
Norms surrounding masculinity can become barriers to young Black men reluctant to receiving the mental health care they need, according to a new study. Self-reliance—feeling that you can handle problems, issues, or concerns on your own—may be detrimental to young Black men's mental health and is linked to depression, the findings show. "It is likely that men may not know where to go for help. But
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Boxgrove: How we found Europe's oldest bone tools, and what we learned about their makers
Boxgrove in Sussex, England, is an iconic, old stone age site. This is where the oldest human remains in Britain have been discovered—fossils of Homo heidelbergensis. Part of an exceptionally preserved 26km-wide ancient landscape of stone, it provides a virtually untouched record of early humans almost half a million years ago.
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New deep-sea isopod is shockingly large
Researchers have discovered a new species of deep-sea giant isopod, Bathynomus raksasa . This is the first time that the genus Bathynomus has been collected in Indonesian waters. It's also one of the largest known to science. Marine isopods are a diverse group of animals with various feeding strategies, such as scavenging, filter feeding, and parasitism. They live in environments from the shallow
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Youth, waiting and action during COVID-19
In his book The Sense of an Ending, literary critic Frank Kermode considers the ticking of a clock. In the case of most clocks, each tick is an identical sound. But our brains impose an order on the sounds. We hear the first noise as "tick" and the second as "tock."
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Styrelse sætter maksimal varighed for fastholdelser i psykiatrien
Fastholdelser af psykiatriske patienter bør maksimalt vare 30 minutter, skriver Sundhedsstyrelsen i ny vejledning.
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The Logic Around Contact Tracing Apps Is All Wrong
Rather than tracking individual exposures, we should be using them for real-time info on what activities and locations may be responsible for the spread.
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Biscayne Bay fish kill is a warning sign, researcher says
A fish kill this week is a clear sign the health of Biscayne Bay is at risk, FIU Institute of Environment researchers said.
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Cheesemaking in Nepal under threat unless pastoralist traditions are revived
Nepal's Langtang Valley is known for many things, from its remarkable Himalayan landscapes, to its status as the origin of the country's beloved yak cheese. Cheesemaking, which has a unique history in the region, relies on milk supplied by yak herders. However, the traditional practice of herding is slowly disappearing. As Langtang, a popular travel destination, deals with a volatile tourism indus
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Biscayne Bay fish kill is a warning sign, researcher says
A fish kill this week is a clear sign the health of Biscayne Bay is at risk, FIU Institute of Environment researchers said.
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Donor incentives don't always equate to more charitable giving, study finds
People are accustomed to getting cash in the mail from an aunt or grandparent. But what about from complete strangers?
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How to get abandoned, lost and discarded 'ghost' fishing gear out of the ocean
Fishing gear and plastic marine debris is a growing global issue. Abandoned, lost or discarded fishing gear—often called ghost gear—can contribute up to 76 percent of all marine debris found during beach cleanups.
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How to get abandoned, lost and discarded 'ghost' fishing gear out of the ocean
Fishing gear and plastic marine debris is a growing global issue. Abandoned, lost or discarded fishing gear—often called ghost gear—can contribute up to 76 percent of all marine debris found during beach cleanups.
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Is Sweden's coronavirus strategy a cautionary tale or a success story?
Despite claims that soft lockdown was a good idea, so far Sweden has had more covid-19 related deaths than its Scandinavian neighbours with little difference in economic slowdown
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Got your bag? The critical place of mobile containers in human evolution
Today, bags are everywhere—from cheap canvas ones at the supermarket to designer handbags costing up to US$2,000,000.
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Early and mid-career scientists face a bleak future in the wake of the pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has taken a heavy toll on research in Australia. We surveyed 333 early and mid-career researchers in science, technical, engineering and medical (STEM) fields and found the impact on their productivity and mental health has been dire, with many considering leaving research altogether.
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From cave art to climate chaos: How a new carbon dating timeline is changing our view of history
Geological and archeological records offer important insights into what seems to be an increasingly uncertain future.
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These historic grasslands are becoming a weed-choked waste. It could be one of the world's great parks
Volcanic plains stretching from Melbourne's west to the South Australian border were once home to native grasslands strewn with wildflowers and a vast diversity of animals. Today, this grassland ecosystem is critically endangered.
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Coronavirus leaves international students in dire straits
Many international students in private rental housing in Sydney and Melbourne were struggling before COVID-19 hit. Our surveys of these students before and during the pandemic show it has made their already precarious situations much worse.
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Magnetic levitation can be used to separate the living from the dead
A form of magnetic levitation can separate living and dead cells, which could help in everything from drug discovery to tissue engineering
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These historic grasslands are becoming a weed-choked waste. It could be one of the world's great parks
Volcanic plains stretching from Melbourne's west to the South Australian border were once home to native grasslands strewn with wildflowers and a vast diversity of animals. Today, this grassland ecosystem is critically endangered.
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The hidden math of bacterial behavior
As modern medical science has become increasingly aware of the positive role that bacteria and other microorganisms can play in our health, a mystery has emerged: How is it that beneficial microbial communities can sometimes "flip" into a harmful state that is stubbornly resistant to treatment?
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The hidden math of bacterial behavior
As modern medical science has become increasingly aware of the positive role that bacteria and other microorganisms can play in our health, a mystery has emerged: How is it that beneficial microbial communities can sometimes "flip" into a harmful state that is stubbornly resistant to treatment?
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Research shows delaying school has little effect on children's maths and reading skills
Whether to hold a child back from starting school when they are first eligible is a question faced by many parents in Australia each year.
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Gem elektriciteten i mursten
Ved at tilføre en ledende polymer til mursten kan disse omdannes til superkapacitorer til lagring af energi.
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Carbon dioxide levels over Australia rose even after COVID-19 forced global emissions down. Here's why
COVID-19 has curtailed the activities of millions of people across the world and with it, greenhouse gas emissions. As climate scientists at the Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station, we are routinely asked: does this mean carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere have fallen?
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This Is What Happens When Society 'Has to Function'
(Peter Marlow / Magnum) W hen the stay-at-home orders were issued in the first weeks of the pandemic, a new term quickly spread across the United States: Suddenly, some of the most precarious people in the country were called "essential workers." This didn't just mean the doctors and nurses who braced for a deluge of patients. It also meant farmworkers , supermarket employees, and the people sort
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Fireflies shed light on the function of mitochondria
By making mice bioluminescent, scientists have found a way to monitor the activity of mitochondria in living organisms.
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People power and satellites help scientists study climate impacts on Antarctic seals
A New Zealand-led international study of the crabeater seal population in Antarctica aims to understand environmental impacts on one of the southern-most mammals in the world.
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Why more heatwaves endanger our health and ability to work
As the Earth warms, heatwaves are expected to occur more often, with sharper intensity and for longer periods. Rising temperatures adversely affect worker productivity and human health, but for policymakers to take substantive action for heat adaptation, and meet what researchers see as a life-saving Paris climate agreement, making an economic case is key.
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Soft Tiny Robots
We are already living in the age of robots, but they are mostly hidden from our daily lives. Unless you have a job that entails interacting with a robot, the ones you see are mostly novelties, like Roombas, or the googly-eyed robots now wandering around some supermarkets. Robots, however, are an iconic fixture of "the future", and have been for the better part of a century. The robots envisioned
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People power and satellites help scientists study climate impacts on Antarctic seals
A New Zealand-led international study of the crabeater seal population in Antarctica aims to understand environmental impacts on one of the southern-most mammals in the world.
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Forskning skal give ny indsigt årsager til udvikling af leddegigt
Klinisk assistent Bolette Gylden Soussi har fået en mio. kr. fra Gigtforeningen til forskning i sammenhæng mellem udvikling af leddegigt og fysisk aktivitet samt indtag af omega-3 og omega-6 fedtsyrer.
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A Plan to Turn Military Bases Into 'Sandboxes' for 5G
A top Trump adviser outlines a blueprint for experimenting with wireless tech on bases and using software to counter China's lead in hardware.
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Samsung's Galaxy Buds Live Review: Weird But Good
They won't grow a magic beanstalk, but the Galaxy Buds Live offer a unique fit, good sound with decent noise-canceling, and a price that's easy to stomach.
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The Science of Sourdough: How Microbes Enabled a Pandemic Pastime
Scientists peer into those jars on the kitchen counter to find out how what's really happening — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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COVID-19 kan hjælpe danske unge af med europarekord i druk
Når intet er, som det plejer, føles restriktioner mindre indgribende end ellers. COVID-19 kan have skabt gunstige forhold for Sundhedsstyrelsens satsning på at få unge til at drikke mindre alkohol, skriver professor Jakob Kjellberg.
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The Science of Sourdough: How Microbes Enabled a Pandemic Pastime
Scientists peer into those jars on the kitchen counter to find out how what's really happening — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Miljoner att spara om artros behandlas via app
– Artrosbehandlingen i studien är densamma som vid klinik, och följer Socialstyrelsens riktlinjer. Det enda som är nytt är att den levereras digitalt istället, vilket underlättar att kontinuerligt följa patienterna, något som är viktigt vid kronisk sjukdom, säger Håkan Nero, fysioterapeut och en av forskarna bakom studien. – Kan behandlingen via app dessutom levereras billigare och med större eff
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Nyupptäckt mikroorganism kastar ljus över arkéernas utveckling
En tidigare okänd grupp av arkéer, en slags primitiva encelliga livsformer, har nyligen upptäckts. De finns i nästan alla miljöer, tycks vara beroende av andra organismer för sin överlevnad och kan troligen lagra energi genom jäsning. Upptäckten, som gjorts vid bland annat Uppsala universitet, ger nya insikter i arkéernas mångfald och evolutionära historia. Arkéer utgör en av de tre så kallade do
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Making the case for conserving Tajikistan's fruit-and-nut forests
It was spring 2017. I was in the middle of my master's program and was rapidly running out of time to find the perfect thesis research project. My ideas had ranged from the unrealistic—a canopy camera-trapping project in Ecuador, to the extreme—abseiling down Saint Lucia's Petit Piton mountain to investigate a threatened juniper tree. I was profoundly relieved when I found a suitable project. The
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Engineers manipulate color on the nanoscale, making it disappear
Most of the time, a material's color stems from its chemical properties. Different atoms and molecules absorb different wavelengths of light; the remaining wavelengths are the "intrinsic colors" that we perceive when they are reflected back to our eyes.
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Making the case for conserving Tajikistan's fruit-and-nut forests
It was spring 2017. I was in the middle of my master's program and was rapidly running out of time to find the perfect thesis research project. My ideas had ranged from the unrealistic—a canopy camera-trapping project in Ecuador, to the extreme—abseiling down Saint Lucia's Petit Piton mountain to investigate a threatened juniper tree. I was profoundly relieved when I found a suitable project. The
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Researchers use supercomputer to gain insights into hepatitis B
Researchers at the University of Delaware, using supercomputing resources and collaborating with scientists at Indiana University, have gained new understanding of the virus that causes hepatitis B and the "spiky ball" that encloses the virus's genetic blueprint.
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Plant health management by flexible electronics
The emergence of biotic and abiotic stresses poses potential impairment on plant growth and yield. Accurate monitoring and assessment of plant health status is therefore highly important; however, conventional bulky and heavy sensors are usually restricted to centralized climate conditions or perform measurements in gas exchange chambers.
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'Terror Crocodile' the Size of a Bus Fed on Dinosaurs, Study Says
The monster animal, more closely related to American alligators than modern crocodiles, had teeth the size of bananas and a strange enlarged snout.
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Researchers use supercomputer to gain insights into hepatitis B
Researchers at the University of Delaware, using supercomputing resources and collaborating with scientists at Indiana University, have gained new understanding of the virus that causes hepatitis B and the "spiky ball" that encloses the virus's genetic blueprint.
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Every country wants a covid-19 vaccine. Who will get it first?
The Chinese company Sinovac Biotech developed an experimental vaccine for SARS back in 2004. That disease went away after killing just 800 people, and the project was shelved. But it meant that when the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, exploded in China last January, the company had a road map for what to do next. Four months later, it published evidence that it could protect monkeys against the dise
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NASA: TESS Space Telescope Completes Primary Planet-Hunting Mission
The TESS spacecraft. NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has completed its primary mission, having spent the last two years scanning the sky for evidence of exoplanets. The satellite wrapped up its mission last month with 66 confirmed exoplanets and another 2,100 candidates. That's already a giant pile of data for scientists to pore over, and TESS isn't done yet. The satellite has
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Photoshop Will Help ID Images That Have Been … Photoshopped
Adobe is adding technology to tag images with metadata, part of an effort to identify deepfakes and other efforts at manipulation.
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She Helped Wreck the News Business. Here's Her Plan to Fix It
Nandini Jammi's advertiser boycotts scared brands away from journalism and into shady ad tech. Now she wants to teach marketers to think for themselves again.
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Should We Conserve Parasites? Apparently, Yes
A group of ecologists and biologists say the world's ticks, leeches, and tapeworms need love and conservation, too. Now they've got a 12-point plan.
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Facebook risikerer bøde på 500 milliarder dollars
Instagram har ifølge et nyt sagsanlæg indsamlet biometriske data fra uvidende brugere. Selskabet risikerer nu en bøde på om mod en halv billion dollars.
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Darwin, Expression and the Lasting Legacy of Eugenics
If evolution is seen as the study of unseen development, the camera provided the illusion of quantifiable benchmarks—an irresistible proposition for the advocates of eugenics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Selvransagelse hos norsk forsvar: Fregat forliste efter stribevis af fejl
53 ud af 88 sikkerhedsbarrierer blev brudt op til og under forliset af den norske fregat KNM Helge Ingstad, der sank efter en kollission med et tankskib i 2018. Nu erkender det norske forsvar at sikkerheden haltede og investerer i nye sikkerhedstiltag.
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City centres need government support to recover
No amount of reassurance will return footfall to pre-pandemic levels by itself
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The 1918 Flu Faded in Our Collective Memory: We Might 'Forget' the Coronavirus, Too
The legacy of the 20th century's deadliest pandemic shows how large groups remember—and forget—their shared past — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Treats are better than electric shocks for training badly behaved dogs
When it comes to training badly behaved dogs, treats and rewards produce better and quicker results than electric shock collars
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The 1918 Flu Faded in Our Collective Memory: We Might 'Forget' the Coronavirus, Too
The legacy of the 20th century's deadliest pandemic shows how large groups remember—and forget—their shared past — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Machines can spot mental health issues—if you hand over your personal data
When Neguine Rezaii first moved to the United States a decade ago, she hesitated to tell people she was Iranian. Instead, she would use Persian. "I figured that people probably wouldn't know what that was," she says. The linguistic ambiguity was useful: she could conceal her embarrassment at the regime of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad while still being true to herself. "They just used to smile and go away,
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Breast cancer 'ecosystem' reveals possible new targets for treatment
Garvan researchers have used cellular genomics to uncover promising therapy targets for triple negative breast cancer.
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England's big northern lockdown leaves residents bewildered
'I can come to the pub and meet someone but I can't have them in my garden'
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Can a Protest Movement Topple Netanyahu?
C all it the Jerusalem pilgrimage of summer 2020. Every Saturday night, thousands of young people from around Israel gather outside the prime minister's residence, on Balfour Street, beating drums, blowing whistles, and holding signs quoting biblical injunctions against bribery and demanding the resignation of Benjamin Netanyahu, who faces trial on three counts of corruption. Netanyahu, having pr
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How to Navigate a Midlife Change of Faith
" How to Build a Life " is a biweekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. In the Bible, there is a curious story about a man named Nicodemus. He is a Pharisee and one of the religious elders with whom Jesus is in constant conflict. Nicodemus approaches Jesus alone at night, saying, " Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher who has come from God ," and proceeds to a
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The Artists of Lemmon, South Dakota
In March of this year, as the coronavirus and its effects were unfolding, Dakota Resources , a 24-year-old community development financial institution (CDFI) in Renner, South Dakota, launched a series of Zoom coffee breaks for people from across the state. Every morning, at 10:30, a few dozen people logged in to talk for an hour or so about what was on their minds, and to share their stories. (Mo
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The End of the Secular Republic
In Turkey, President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has acted on his yearlong quest to restore the historic Hagia Sophia, once a Byzantine-era cathedral and museum, as a functioning mosque. Three thousand miles away, in India's northeastern city of Ayodhya, Prime Minister Narendra Modi has fulfilled a similar promise, last week laying the foundation for a new Hindu temple on the ruins of a 16th-century mos
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Social distancing saves lives. Here's the proof.
During past pandemics, government-issued social distancing measures have cut down on disease transmission. Cities that reacted swiftly to the 1918 influenza pandemic by banning mass gatherings, closing schools, or taking other actions endured less severe outbreaks than those that waited or lifted restrictions too quickly. (Pixabay/) Statewide social distancing measures played a major role in slow
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Up to 6% of England's population may have had Covid, study shows
Imperial College home testing programme suggests 13% of Londoners have antibodies Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage About 3.4 million people in England – 6% of the population – have had Covid-19, with infections more common among members of black, Asian and minority ethnic communities, according to the results of a large home antibody testing study . The results from t
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One IT Guy's Spreadsheet-Fueled Race to Restore Voting Rights
This fall, thousands will show up to vote only to find out they've been purged. Lots of activists—and one Ohio man with lots of cats—are on a quest to fix that.
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An Alexa Bug Could Have Exposed Your Voice History to Hackers
Amazon has patched the flaw, but its discovery underscores the importance of locking down your voice assistant interactions.
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Sträng diet förklarar fetmakirurgins magi
För första gången har effekterna av den strikta lågkaloridieten och operationen studerats var för sig i samband med fetmakirurgi. Resultatet visar att dieten ensam stod för den största positiva effekten. Överviktskirurgi har i många studier lyfts fram som en näst intill magisk metod för viktnedgång och tillbakagång av typ 2-diabetes. En fråga som i stort sätt har lämnats obesvarad är huruvida eff
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Snapped cable slashes a devastating hole in Arecibo radio telescope
As Tropical Storm Isaias hit Puerto Rico, a thick cable snapped at Arecibo Observatory – one of the biggest radio telescopes in the world – and crashed through the dish
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Coronavirus Live Updates: New Zealand Races to Trace Source of New Outbreak
Fewer new jobless claims and a rising deficit could further hamper stimulus talks. New Zealand revives its "go hard, go early" approach as officials investigate a mysterious new outbreak.
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Altered serum protein levels in frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis indicate calcium and immunity dysregulation
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70687-7
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Active and social life is associated with lower non-social fearfulness in pet dogs
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70722-7
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Zoledronate and SPIO dual-targeting nanoparticles loaded with ICG for photothermal therapy of breast cancer tibial metastasis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70659-x
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Broadband slow-wave modulation in posterior and anterior cortex tracks distinct states of propofol-induced unconsciousness
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68756-y
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Aberrant pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A expression in breast cancers prognosticates clinical outcomes
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70774-9
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The human cost of a WeChat ban: severing a hundred million ties
In January, 1989, my 26-year-old father uprooted his life to move to the other side of the world. He had never been on a plane, let alone outside of China. But an American professor had offered him a postdoc, an opportunity he couldn't refuse. When he landed, he made only one call at an airport payphone to announce his arrival: not to home, but to his university. He had $100 to his name, and inte
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Fancy, fun tank decor to keep your fish happy
Your own little Atlantis. (Kev Costello via Unsplash/) One of the great things about having fish is the opportunity to personalize their tanks. No matter how small or large your fishbowl is, there are so many fun ways to decorate. From neon castles to a full recreation of Bikini Bottom, you have endless options. We have selected some of our favorite pieces to help get you started on your fish fri
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Graphitic phosphorus coordinated single Fe atoms for hydrogenative transformations
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17903-0 Phosphorus ligands have been extensively used in metal complexes for homogeneous catalysis. Here, the authors broaden this scope to heterogeneous catalysis by preparing a P-coordinated Fe single atom catalyst with excellent catalytic performance in hydrogenative transformations.
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Dscam1 establishes the columnar units through lineage-dependent repulsion between sister neurons in the fly brain
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17931-w Columns are the functional and morphological unit of the brain, but how neurons assemble into this structure was unclear. Here, the authors show that Dscam gene rewires neurons that derive from the same stem cell to establish columns through the process of lineage-dependent repulsion.
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Development of light-responsive protein binding in the monobody non-immunoglobulin scaffold
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17837-7 The ability to reversibly control monobody binding affinity would find use in biotechnology and research applications. Here the authors fuse the light-sensitive AsLOV2 domain to a monobody against the Abl SH2 domain to obtain a light dependent monobody and apply it in vitro and in mammalian cells.
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Genome-wide specificity of dCpf1 cytidine base editors
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17889-9 Cas12a-linked base editors can broaden the targeting scope of programmable cytidine deaminases. Here the authors assess their target specificity in an in vitro genome-wide assay.
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Author Correction: Ex vivo editing of human hematopoietic stem cells for erythroid expression of therapeutic proteins
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18036-0
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Autophagy regulates fatty acid availability for oxidative phosphorylation through mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum contact sites
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17882-2 How autophagy supports tumor cell metabolism is not fully clear. Here, the authors show that autophagy regulates lipid availability to support mitochondrial oxidative metabolism through mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum contact sites, necessary for cell proliferation in AML.
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Turn-on chemiluminescence probes and dual-amplification of signal for detection of amyloid beta species in vivo
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17783-4 Detection of amyloid beta deposits is often performed with fluorescent compounds that bind plaques. Here the authors develop turn-on chemiluminescent probes that bind amyloid beta plaques in vivo, and amplify the signal via chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer to the plaque-binding fluorescent molecule
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Face mask use in the general population and optimal resource allocation during the COVID-19 pandemic
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17922-x Recommendations regarding the use of face masks as a preventive measure for COVID-19 are inconsistent. Here, the authors show that optimal distribution of surgical-standard face masks in the population, or universal coverage of homemade face coverings, could reduce total infections and deaths.
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In Bolivia, a Model for Indigenous Groups Grappling With Covid-19
Since March, a team of anthropologists, physicians, and members of Bolivia's Indigenous Tsimane community have been crafting a plan to help the Tsimane weather the Covid-19 pandemic. The takeaway lesson: To be successful, efforts to aid Indigenous communities must respect local autonomy and tradition.
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I was Obama's Ebola tsar. US healthcare workers are dying at a shameful rate | Ronald A Klain
More than 900 healthcare workers have died in this pandemic. Many of those deaths could have been prevented Healthcare workers usually bear the brunt of an epidemic. Doctors, nurses and other medical personnel are in constant contact with people who may be infected. The cruel math of such potential exposures, multiplied over and over, inevitably takes a toll. Covid-19 is no exception. Lost on the
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Mauritius dodges second oil spill as fuel pumped from stricken ship
Mauritius avoided a second catastrophic oil spill Wednesday after salvage crews pumped the remaining fuel from the tanks of a cargo ship that ran aground off its coast, imperilling world-famous wildlife sanctuaries.
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Thai scientists catch bats to trace virus origins
Researchers in Thailand have been trekking though the countryside to catch bats in their caves in an effort to trace the murky origins of the coronavirus.
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Thai scientists catch bats to trace virus origins
Researchers in Thailand have been trekking though the countryside to catch bats in their caves in an effort to trace the murky origins of the coronavirus.
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Philippines to begin Russian Covid-19 vaccine trials in October
President Rodrigo Duterte says he will be one of the first to take contentious jab
11h
Gåtfull stjärnbildning i universums minsta galaxer kartlagd
Frågan hur stjärnor bildas i universums dvärggalaxer har länge gäckat världens astronomer. Nu visar det sig att de slumrande smågalaxerna under många miljarder år samlar på sig gas. När denna gas plötsligt kollapsar under sin egen vikt och antänds uppstår nya stjärnor. I universum finns cirka två tusen miljarder galaxer. Vår egen, Vintergatan, innehåller mellan 200 och 400 miljarder stjärnor. Det
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Efter tørlægning af hovedstaden: Nye UV-anlæg på hemmelig bakketop skal hindre en gentagelse
PLUS. Søndag aften stod mange københavnere med meget lidt eller intet vand i hanerne pga. et usædvanlig højt forbrug – og et svagt punkt i vandforsyningen. Læs, hvordan Hofor håber på at løse problemet inden næste sommer.
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Covid vaccine tracker: when will we have a coronavirus vaccine?
More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progress Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…
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Insect diversity boosted by combination of crop diversity and semi-natural habitats
To enhance the number of beneficial insect species in agricultural land, preserving semi-natural habitats and promoting crop diversity are both needed, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied of Ecology.
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Insect diversity boosted by combination of crop diversity and semi-natural habitats
To enhance the number of beneficial insect species in agricultural land, preserving semi-natural habitats and promoting crop diversity are both needed, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied of Ecology.
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'Madsen' wheat as source of disease resistance
A plant breeder's goal is to release cultivars that are commercially economical and environmentally sustainable. Breeders never know how well new cultivars will perform under commercial production until they are released and grown across different environments.
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'Madsen' wheat as source of disease resistance
A plant breeder's goal is to release cultivars that are commercially economical and environmentally sustainable. Breeders never know how well new cultivars will perform under commercial production until they are released and grown across different environments.
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Study revives debate over breast cancer screening age
Update to long-running study finds screening from age of 40 rather than 50 could save lives Screening women from the age of 40 for breast cancer has the potential to save lives, according to a study that will reopen the debate over the timing as well as the risks and benefits of routine mammograms . A group at Queen Mary University of London looked at data on 160,000 women between the ages of 39
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Bird and reptile tears aren't so different from human tears
Bird and reptile tears aren't so unlike our own, shows a new study in Frontiers in Veterinary Science. But the differences could provide insights into better ophthalmic treatments for humans and animals, as well as a clues into the evolution of tears across different species.
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Bird and reptile tears aren't so different from human tears
Bird and reptile tears aren't so unlike our own, shows a new study in Frontiers in Veterinary Science. But the differences could provide insights into better ophthalmic treatments for humans and animals, as well as a clues into the evolution of tears across different species.
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E-skin recreates sense of touch
BBC Click's LJ Rich looks at some of the best technology news stories of the week.
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What kind of face mask best protects against coronavirus?
Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly, in limited supply
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Scientists haven't found any major differences between women's and men's brains
People have searched for sex differences in human brains since at least the 19th century, when scientist Samuel George Morton poured seeds and lead shot into human skulls to measure their volumes. Gustave Le Bon found men's brains are usually larger than women's, which prompted Alexander Bains and George Romanes to argue this size difference makes men smarter. But John Stuart Mill pointed out , b
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Why the Mauritius oil spill is so serious
The location of the Mauritian oil spill means the environmental consequences could be long-lasting.
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What Europe's cities are doing to handle heatwaves
As London swelters, we look at how urban areas can adapt to deal with higher temperatures.
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I'm disabled but was told I won't receive critical care if I get Covid. It's terrifying
I use a ventilation machine at night and by early March, I could see that if I were to catch coronavirus, I'd be in serious trouble Towards the end of last year, I'd just got my life back on track after a long stay in hospital. I was discharged with round-the-clock care that transformed my life. I am disabled and the care package I was on before I was admitted to hospital didn't provide enough su
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Radiation to treat pediatric cancers may have lasting impact on heart and metabolic health
Adult survivors of childhood abdominal and pelvic cancers who had been treated with radiation therapy experienced abnormalities in body composition and had worse cardiometabolic health compared with the general population.
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On Native American Land, Contact Tracing Is Saving Lives
As the coronavirus spread on the Fort Apache reservation in Arizona, medical teams sought out residents who might have been exposed. The effort paid off in unexpected ways.
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Skadet kobling til låserigel stækker Aggersundbroen
Som følge af en skade har Aggersundbroen svært ved at lukke korrekt. Indtil reservedel er skaffet, kører broen med nedsat åbningsfrekvens.
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Ingen smäll vid big bang
Det är helt riktigt att en enorm mängd energi frigörs i samband med exempelvis supernovor. Men energin frigörs inte i form av ljudenergi. Det är en vanlig missuppfattning att supernovor "smäller" och därmed skapar höga ljud, liksom att "den stora smällen" big bang var ljudlig. Så är det inte.
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Oklar gräns mellan kejsare och kung
Östasiatiska härskare har av tradition burit egna inhemska titlar, som sällan haft en exakt motsvarighet i Väst. Våra översättningar vilar därför på konventioner som någon gång uppstått i Europa. Stora eller folkrika nationer har "tilldelats" kejsare och mindre har fått nöja sig med kung. Ett bra exempel är Japans tennō, som 1800-talets européer – och snart också japaner – återgav med beteckningen
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Panel bakom tittarsiffror
För att beräkna antal tittare används ofta något som kallas för People Meters – elektroniska mätare på tv-apparater i ett urval svenska hushåll. Sammansättningen av denna panel ska vara så lik den svenska befolkningen som möjligt. Hushåll som ingår får en mätare per tv-apparat med tillhörande fjärrkontroll, där varje person i hushållet loggar in sig när de tittar på tv. På så sätt är det möjligt a
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Rymdutforskning – till nytta på jorden
När Cecilia Hertz studerade industridesign fick hon chans att delta i ett projekt med NASA. Det inledde hennes långa kärleksaffär med rymdteknik och rymddesign, som hon arbetar med för att göra nyttig även på jorden. I boken berättar hon bland annat om hur innovationer från rymdbranschen kan hjälpa oss att leva hållbart på jorden. Boken är mycket personligt hållen och utgår från Cecilia Hertz egna
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När prylarna blir för smarta
Att en pryl blir "smart" brukar betyda att den förses med sensorer och trådlös kommunikation så att den kan samla in och skicka data. I bästa fall gör det att livet blir lite enklare, genom att kylen håller reda på vad som behöver handlas, och tandborsten talar om när tänderna är rena. I värsta fall – och om detta handlar boken Too Smart – leder all smarthet till ett dystopiskt övervakningssamhäll
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Listan: Så bor vi i EU
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Myrkotten ska skyddas
Samtliga åtta arter av myrkottar (Pholidota) är hotade. Den illegala handeln är omfattande eftersom deras kött anses vara delikat och fjällen används inom traditionell asiatisk läkekonst. I början av året pekade genetiska analyser ut myrkottarna som troliga mellanvärdar för viruset sars-cov-2 som orsakar den pågående pandemin. Men nya analyser frikänner myrkottarna. Det verkar troligare att kinesi
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Vi och våra stora hjärnor
I laboratorier och datorer över hela världen pågår forskningen som ska förstå viruset, hitta botemedlet och ta fram vaccinet. Tacksamt läser vi dagligen om att man kartlagt virusets arvsmassa, kan följa dess mutationer och förstå dess molekylära strukturer. Vi får mer och mer data om dem som insjuknat, tillfrisknat eller avlidit. Med mänsklig kreativitet och mycket datorkraft kommer vi att hitta m
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Därför vill vi göra gott i kriser
Grannar erbjuder sig att handla, musiker spelar för fullsatta balkonger, en 84-årig sjuksköterska som borde sitta i karantän hoppar in och jobbar på äldreboendet när det fattas personal. Varför väcks vår medkänsla så här i coronatider – och hur länge hänger den kvar?
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Alzheimer saknar samband med diabetes
Diabetes har inget samband med Alzheimers sjukdom, visar ny forskning. Ingen av de påstådda riskfaktorer som högt blodtryck och diabetes har samband med Alzheimer.
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Trängsel i naturen – friluftslivet ska kartläggas
Under pandemin har många tillbringar hemestern och lediga stunder på populära utflyktsplatser i naturen. Trycket har ökat bland annat på västkustens naturreservat och vandringsleder, enligt Anders Skriver Hansen, forskare i kulturgeografi, som leder en ny studie vid Göteborgs universitet.
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Covid-19 vaccine hopefuls scramble for stock market funds
CureVac of Germany to price shares in New York after strong Shanghai debut for CanSino
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Could Owl and Crocodilian Tears Lead to a Cure for Your Dry Eyes?
By studying the numerous ways animals keep their eyes wet and healthy, scientists hope to help address human vision problems.
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Consumer groups urge feds to act against Mercola and his false COVID-19 claims
Consumer rights organizations urge the FDA and FTC to take action against Joseph Mercola and his businesses over their false, misleading, and dangerous claims that their products will prevent, treat or cure COVID-19.
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The WHO Wants to Review The Results of Russia's COVID-19 Vaccine Trials
The agency urges "rapid, fair, and equitable access".
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'Madsen' wheat as source of disease resistance
Researchers show that 'Madsen,' a commonly used wheat variety, is resistant to more pests and diseases than recently thought, making it a good source of genes for breeding better wheat.
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Insect diversity boosted by combination of crop diversity and semi-natural habitats
To enhance the number of beneficial insect species in agricultural land, preserving semi-natural habitats and promoting crop diversity are both needed, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied of Ecology.
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Bird and reptile tears aren't so different from human tears
Vision is essential for the survival of most animal species and tears provide potentially life-saving protection for the eyes. A new first-of-its-kind study looks at the composition of bird and reptile tears and compares these findings to human tears. These results provide clues about tear evolution, as well as potential starting points for better eye treatments.
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From the archives: the chemistry of crime fiction
The Science Weekly team are taking a summer break – well, some of them – and so we're bringing you an episode from the archive. And not just any episode, one of Nicola Davis's favourites. Back in 2017, Nicola sat down with with Dr Kathryn Harkup to discuss a shared love of crime fiction and the chemistry contained within their poisonous plots. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian
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From the archives: the chemistry of crime fiction – podcast
The Science Weekly team are taking a summer break – well, some of them – and so we're bringing you an episode from the archive. And not just any episode, one of Nicola Davis's favourites. Back in 2017, Nicola sat down with with Dr Kathryn Harkup to discuss a shared love of crime fiction and the chemistry contained within their poisonous plots Continue reading…
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11 udviklere og et nyt ATP-system skal sikre danskerne feriepenge til oktober
En relativt lille udviklingsopgave for ATP bliver afgørende for udbetalingen af danskernes indefrosne feriepenge.
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Rewilding by Paul Jepson and Cain Blythe — radical rewards
From grazing in the Arctic to creating an 'ecospace', the wild ideas behind this new book are worth considering
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Why Lava Worlds Shine Brightly (It's Not the Lava)
Scientists determined that "lava world" exoplanets do not derive their brightness from molten rock but possibly get it from reflective metallic clouds. Christopher Intagliata reports.
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Why Lava Worlds Shine Brightly (It's Not the Lava)
Scientists determined that "lava world" exoplanets do not derive their brightness from molten rock but possibly get it from reflective metallic clouds. Christopher Intagliata… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Programmed bacteria have something extra
Chemists expand the genetic code of Escherichia coli bacteria to produce a synthetic building block, a 'noncanonical amino acid' that makes it a living indicator for oxidative stress. The research is a step toward designed cells that detect disease and produce their own drugs.
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New super-resolution method reveals fine details without constantly needing to zoom in
Since the early 1930s, electron microscopy has provided unprecedented access to the alien world of the extraordinarily small, revealing intricate details that are otherwise impossible to discern with conventional light microscopy. But to achieve high resolution over a large specimen area, the energy of the electron beams needs to be cranked up, which is costly and detrimental to the specimen under
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New study suggests ADHD- like behavior helps spur entrepreneurial activity
Many people have experienced a few nights of bad sleep that resulted in shifting attention spans, impulsive tendencies and hyperactivity the next day — all behaviors resembling ADHD. A new study found that this dynamic may also be linked to increased entrepreneurial behavior.
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Programmed bacteria have something extra
Chemists expand the genetic code of Escherichia coli bacteria to produce a synthetic building block, a 'noncanonical amino acid' that makes it a living indicator for oxidative stress. The research is a step toward designed cells that detect disease and produce their own drugs.
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'Reelin' in a new treatment for multiple sclerosis
In an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), decreasing the amount of a protein made in the liver significantly protected against development of the disease's characteristic symptoms and promoted recovery in symptomatic animals, scientists report.
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Time-shifted inhibition helps electric fish ignore their own signals
African fish called mormyrids communicate using pulses of electricity. New research shows that a time-shifted signal in the brain helps the fish to ignore their own pulse. This skill has co-evolved with large and rapid changes in these signals across species.
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Lack of females in drug dose trials leads to overmedicated women
Women are more likely than men to suffer adverse side effects of medications because drug dosages have historically been based on clinical trials conducted on men, suggests new research.
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New generation of drugs show early efficacy against drug-resistant TB
New drug regimen for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis shows early effectiveness in 85 percent of patients in a cohort including many with serious comorbidities. The results suggest a global need for expanded access to two recently developed medicines, bedaquiline and delamanid. Study cohort included many people who would have been excluded from trials because of comorbidities, severity of disease
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Improving treatment of spinal cord injuries
Bioengineers have created an osmotic therapy device that gently removes fluid from the spinal cord to reduce swelling in injured rats with good results. The device can eventually be scaled up for testing in humans.
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Human milk based fortifiers improve health outcomes for the smallest premature babies
More than 380,000 babies are born prematurely in the United States each year, according to the March of Dimes. 'Preemies' can be severely underweight babies and struggle to get the nutrients they need from breast milk alone, so neonatal intensive care units provide an additional milk fortifier, either in the form of cow's milk or manufactured from donor breast milk, to keep them healthy.
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Study provides insights into how Zika virus suppresses the host immune system
A research team has outlined how the Zika virus, which constituted an epidemic threat in 2016, suppresses the immune system of its host. The work provides valuable structural and functional information on the interaction between ZIKV and its host and offers a framework for the development of vaccines and antivirals.
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A novel strategy for quickly identifying twitter trolls
Two algorithms that account for distinctive use of repeated words and word pairs require as few as 50 tweets to accurately distinguish deceptive 'troll' messages from those posted by public figures.
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Coffee stains inspire optimal printing technique for electronics
Using an alcohol mixture, researchers modified how ink droplets dry, enabling cheap industrial-scale printing of electronic devices at unprecedented scales.
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The oldest known cremation in the Near East dates to 7000 BC
Ancient people in the Near East had begun the practice of intentionally cremating their dead by the beginning of the 7th millennium BC, according to a new study.
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Yoga shown to improve anxiety, study shows
A new study finds yoga improves symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder, suggesting the popular practice may be helpful in treating anxiety in some people.
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Researchers unlock secrets of the past with new international carbon dating standard
Radiocarbon dating is set to become more accurate than ever after an international team of scientists improved the technique for assessing the age of historical objects.
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Oxygen therapy harms lung microbiome in mice
A new mouse study hints that oxygen therapy may have unintended consequences via an unexpected source — the microbiome.
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Trustful collaboration critical for outcome of therapy
A trusting therapeutic relationship and outcome-oriented collaboration between therapist and patient are critical for the successful treatment of mental illness. And it pays to start early in therapy, a series of meta-studies shows.
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How stars form in the smallest galaxies
The question of how small, dwarf galaxies have sustained the formation of new stars over the course of the Universe has long confounded the world's astronomers. An international research team has found that dormant small galaxies can slowly accumulate gas over many billions of years. When this gas suddenly collapses under its own weight, new stars are able to arise.
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Seafood study finds plastic in all samples
A study of five different seafoods has found traces of plastic in every sample tested.
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Warming threat to tropical forests risks release of carbon from soil
Billions of tons of carbon dioxide risk being lost into the atmosphere due to tropical forest soils being significantly more sensitive to climate change than previously thought.
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New way to check the quality of nanomaterials like graphene
A new way to check the quality of nanomaterials like graphene has emerged.
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Nutrition labelling is improving nation's diet
Households eat more healthily when retailers display clear nutritional information on own-brand food products, say researchers.
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Exercise induces secretion of biomarkers into sweat
The aim was to reveal the potential of microRNAs in sweat extracellular vesicles in monitoring exercise performance.
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Porous liquids allow for efficient gas separation
Scientists have developed 'porous liquids': Nanoparticles, that are able to separate gas molecules of different sizes from each other, float – finely distributed – in a solvent. The porous liquids may be processed into membranes that efficiently separate propene from gaseous mixtures. This could replace the energy-intensive distillation that has been the common procedure up to now.
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New microrobot with in situ, in vivo bioprinting offers promise for gastric wounds
Researchers have taken the first step towards a new way of treating gastric wounds by using a microrobot combined with the new concept of 'in situ in vivo bioprinting' to carry out tissue repair inside the body.
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Molecular additives enhance mechanical properties of organic solar cell material
Computational experiments on semiconducting polymers show that under harsh loading conditions — stretching and compression — the addition of small molecules enhances performance and stability. The research points to a promising new direction for solar cell research.
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New advance in superconductors with 'twist' in rhombohedral graphite
An international research team has revealed a nanomaterial that mirrors the 'magic angle' effect originally found in a complex human-made structure known as twisted bilayer graphene — a key area of study in physics in recent years.
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New microrobot with in situ, in vivo bioprinting offers promise for gastric wounds
Researchers have taken the first step towards a new way of treating gastric wounds by using a microrobot combined with the new concept of 'in situ in vivo bioprinting' to carry out tissue repair inside the body.
17h
Molecular additives enhance mechanical properties of organic solar cell material
Computational experiments on semiconducting polymers show that under harsh loading conditions — stretching and compression — the addition of small molecules enhances performance and stability. The research points to a promising new direction for solar cell research.
17h
What violin synchronization can teach us about better networking in complex times
A new study suggests by using a model of violin synchronization in a network of violin players, there are ways to drown out distractions and miscommunications that could be used as a model for human networks in society.
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TV-watching snackers beware: You won't notice you're full if your attention is elsewhere
Eating while doing something perceptually-demanding makes it more difficult to notice when you feel full, shows new research.
18h
New advance in superconductors with 'twist' in rhombohedral graphite
An international research team has revealed a nanomaterial that mirrors the 'magic angle' effect originally found in a complex human-made structure known as twisted bilayer graphene — a key area of study in physics in recent years.
18h
Nanotubes in the eye that help us see
A new mechanism of blood redistribution that is essential for the proper functioning of the adult retina has just been discovered in vivo.
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Mitochondrial [4Fe-4S] protein assembly involves reductive [2Fe-2S] cluster fusion on ISCA1-ISCA2 by electron flow from ferredoxin FDX2 [Biochemistry]
The essential process of iron-sulfur (Fe/S) cluster assembly (ISC) in mitochondria occurs in three major phases. First, [2Fe-2S] clusters are synthesized on the scaffold protein ISCU2; second, these clusters are transferred to the monothiol glutaredoxin GLRX5 by an Hsp70 system followed by insertion into [2Fe-2S] apoproteins; third, [4Fe-4S] clusters are…
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Evidence for complex iron oxides in the deep mantle from FeNi(Cu) inclusions in superdeep diamond [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The recent discovery in high-pressure experiments of compounds stable to 24–26 GPa with Fe4O5, Fe5O6, Fe7O9, and Fe9O11 stoichiometry has raised questions about their existence within the Earth's mantle. Incorporating both ferric and ferrous iron in their structures, these oxides if present within the Earth could also provide insight into…
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Structural elucidation of the cis-prenyltransferase NgBR/DHDDS complex reveals insights in regulation of protein glycosylation [Medical Sciences]
Cis-prenyltransferase (cis-PTase) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of glycosyl carrier lipids required for protein glycosylation in the lumen of endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human NgBR/DHDDS complex, which represents an atomic resolution structure for any heterodimeric cis-PTase. The crystal structure sheds light on…
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Hierarchical dynamics as a macroscopic organizing principle of the human brain [Neuroscience]
Multimodal evidence suggests that brain regions accumulate information over timescales that vary according to anatomical hierarchy. Thus, these experimentally defined "temporal receptive windows" are longest in cortical regions that are distant from sensory input. Interestingly, spontaneous activity in these regions also plays out over relatively slow timescales (i.e., exhibits slower…
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Origin of the "odd" behavior in the ultraviolet photochemistry of ozone [Chemistry]
The origin of the even–odd rotational state population alternation in the 16O2(a1Δg) fragments resulting from the ultraviolet (UV) photodissociation of 16O3, a phenomenon first observed over 30 years ago, has been elucidated using full quantum theory. The calculated 16O2(a1Δg) rotational state distribution following the 266-nm photolysis of 60 K ozone…
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Optimal control of aging in complex networks [Applied Physical Sciences]
Many complex systems experience damage accumulation, which leads to aging, manifest as an increasing probability of system collapse with time. This naturally raises the question of how to maximize health and longevity in an aging system at minimal cost of maintenance and intervention. Here, we pose this question in the…
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A panorama of transcription-coupled repair in yeast chromatin [Commentaries]
Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are predominant ultraviolet (UV) light-induced DNA lesions that can result in mutations and lead to skin cancers (1). CPD lesions are primarily repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER), a highly conserved repair pathway (2). NER consists of two subpathways: transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) and global genome NER…
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Ediacaran sponges, animal biomineralization, and skeletal reefs [Commentaries]
With an estimated 15,000 living species (1), the animal phylum Porifera (colloquially known as sponges) is not a biodiversity heavyweight as are arthropods, mollusks, and chordates. Unassuming in character, sponges barely move in their adult lifetime of up to several thousand years, and they passively strain food particles from water…
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Science and Culture: Universities move science labs to the kitchen [Social Sciences]
Coronavirus school closures left many science professors scrambling for new ways to teach concepts traditionally explored in the lab. Not so for Pia Sörensen, a senior preceptor in chemical engineering and applied materials at Harvard University in Cambridge, MA. She breathed easy, knowing that even without advanced scientific instruments, her…
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Abiotic redox reactions in hydrothermal mixing zones: Decreased energy availability for the subsurface biosphere [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Subseafloor mixing of high-temperature hot-spring fluids with cold seawater creates intermediate-temperature diffuse fluids that are replete with potential chemical energy. This energy can be harnessed by a chemosynthetic biosphere that permeates hydrothermal regions on Earth. Shifts in the abundance of redox-reactive species in diffuse fluids are often interpreted to reflect…
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Sarecycline interferes with tRNA accommodation and tethers mRNA to the 70S ribosome [Biochemistry]
Sarecycline is a new narrow-spectrum tetracycline-class antibiotic approved for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Tetracyclines share a common four-ring naphthacene core and inhibit protein synthesis by interacting with the 70S bacterial ribosome. Sarecycline is distinguished chemically from other tetracyclines because it has a 7-[[methoxy(methyl)amino]methyl] group attached at the C7 position…
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Estimating the genome-wide contribution of selection to temporal allele frequency change [Evolution]
Rapid phenotypic adaptation is often observed in natural populations and selection experiments. However, detecting the genome-wide impact of this selection is difficult since adaptation often proceeds from standing variation and selection on polygenic traits, both of which may leave faint genomic signals indistinguishable from a noisy background of genetic drift….
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From one cell to many: Morphogenetic field of lateral root founder cells in Arabidopsis thaliana is built by gradual recruitment [Plant Biology]
The reiterative process of lateral root (LR) formation is widespread and underlies root system formation. However, early LR primordium (LRP) morphogenesis is not fully understood. In this study, we conducted both a clonal analysis and time-lapse experiments to decipher the pattern and sequence of pericycle founder cell (FC) participation in…
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Anonymt tip om byggesjusk førte til politianmeldelse på højhusbyggeri
PLUS. Betonkvaliteten i bundpladen på 86 meter højt Amagertårn svarer ikke til kravet på C35, konstaterer Københavns Kommune, der har politianmeldt entreprenør for manglende dokumentation.
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Stress and anger may exacerbate heart failure
Mental stress and anger may have clinical implications for patients with heart failure, according to a new report.
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New nitrogen products are in the air
Researchers have found a way to combine atmospheric nitrogen with benzene to make a chemical compound called aniline, which is a precursor to materials used to make an assortment of synthetic products.
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Quantum researchers create an error-correcting cat
Physicists have developed an error-correcting cat — a new device that combines the Schrödinger's cat concept of superposition (a physical system existing in two states at once) with the ability to fix some of the trickiest errors in a quantum computation.
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Perovskite and organic solar cells rocketed into space
Researchers have sent perovskite and organic solar cells on a rocket into space. The solar cells withstood the extreme conditions in space, producing power from direct sunlight and reflective light from the Earth's surface. The work sets the foundation for future near-Earth application as well as potential deep space missions.
18h
Evidence in mice that electroacupuncture reduces inflammation via specific neural pathways
Stimulating the nervous system using small electric current by acupuncture could tamp down systemic inflammation in the body, suggests new research in mice.
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Flipping a metabolic switch to slow tumor growth
The enzyme serine palmitoyl-transferase can be used as a metabolically responsive 'switch' that decreases tumor growth, according to a new study.
18h
New nitrogen products are in the air
Researchers have found a way to combine atmospheric nitrogen with benzene to make a chemical compound called aniline, which is a precursor to materials used to make an assortment of synthetic products.
18h
Want a company that lasts? Start a bank or a brewery
A Japanese company has been building Buddhist temples for almost a millennium and a half. It's the oldest continuously operating company in the world, but quite atypical. If you want to build a business that lasts, banks, breweries, and postal services are a good bet – but there are intriguing exceptions. Longest surviving companies 'The oldest profession in the world': thanks to a popular short
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Adaptation in single neurons provides memory for language processing
To understand language, we have to remember the words that were uttered and combine them into an interpretation. How does the brain retain information long enough to accomplish this, despite the fact that neuronal firing events are very short-lived? Researchers propose a neurobiological explanation bridging this discrepancy. Neurons change their spike rate based on experience and this adaptation p
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The (neuro)science of getting and staying motivated
Neuroscientists at EPFL and the University of Edinburgh have discovered that the degree of motivation and the stamina to keep it up depends on the ratio between the neurotransmitters glutamine and glutamate in the nucleus accumbens of the brain.
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The Atlantic Daily: Lefties Hope Kamala Harris Will Come Around
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Arsh Raziuddin / The Atlantic The vice presidency sometimes gets a bad rap. But put aside the pop-culture trope of the office as toothless, and its occupants as mere figureheads: My colleague Chr
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Soldiers could teach future robots how to outperform humans
Researchers have designed an algorithm that allows an autonomous ground vehicle to improve its existing navigation systems by watching a human drive.
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Soldiers could teach future robots how to outperform humans
Researchers have designed an algorithm that allows an autonomous ground vehicle to improve its existing navigation systems by watching a human drive.
20h
Discovery transforms understanding of hydrogen depletion at the seafloor
Results of a new study contradict the assumption that hydrogen depletions at the seafloor are caused by microbiological communities. Researchers found that these shifts in chemistry are driven by non-biological processes that remove energy before microbial communities at the shallow seafloor gain access to it.
20h
Researchers identify a protein that may help SARS-CoV-2 spread rapidly through cells
New research identifies a protein encoded by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, that may be associated with the quick spread of the virus through cells in the human body.
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Face mask insert could help diagnose conditions
Researchers have demonstrated that a fiber inserted into an ordinary N95 face mask can collect compounds in exhaled breath aerosols for analysis. The new method could allow screening for disease biomarkers on a large scale.
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Engaging undergrads remotely with an escape room game
Researchers describe an alternative way to engage students: a virtual game, modeled on an escape room, in which teams solve chemistry problems to progress and 'escape.'
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Coronavirus live news: Covid-19 may have been in New Zealand city for 'weeks'; Russia vaccine due in fortnight
Ninth case confirmed in student at New Zealand school ; Russia vaccine not yet completed its final trials; global deaths climb towards 750,000. Follow the latest updates 'They've jumped the gun': scientists worry about Russia's Covid-19 vaccine New Zealand begins mass testing as Australia records deadliest day French and Dutch on alert over rise in cases UK economy plunges into deepest recession
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Golden eagles breeding success at Scottish Highlands estate
The raptors have bred on an estate in the Scottish Highlands for the first time in 40 years.
20h
2020 Came for One of Earth's Most Famous Telescopes
Arecibo Observatory / University of Central Florida If the name Arecibo sounds familiar, it is probably because you've seen Contact , the 1997 movie adaptation of Carl Sagan's sci-fi novel of the same name. Dr. Ellie Arroway works at the Arecibo Observatory, scanning the skies for mysterious radio signals from faraway stars. In one scene, she gazes at the cavernous 1,000-foot radio dish, nestled
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Face mask insert could help diagnose conditions
Researchers have demonstrated that a fiber inserted into an ordinary N95 face mask can collect compounds in exhaled breath aerosols for analysis. The new method could allow screening for disease biomarkers on a large scale.
20h
Engaging undergrads remotely with an escape room game
Researchers describe an alternative way to engage students: a virtual game, modeled on an escape room, in which teams solve chemistry problems to progress and 'escape.'
20h
Despite large numbers tested, kids in England made up just 1% of COVID-19+ cases during first wave
Children made up a very small proportion–just 1%–of all confirmed COVID-19 cases in England during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic, despite the large numbers of them tested, reveals a study based on national monitoring data, and published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.
21h
Breast screening women in their forties saves lives
Breast screening women aged 40-49 reduces breast cancer mortality, with minimal increased overdiagnosis, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London that looked at data from 160,000 women.
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San Francisco Fed chief says some jobs may never come back
Mary Daly sees gym and cinema workers at particular risk as coronavirus leaves scars
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Puerto Rico's Arecibo Radio Telescope Damaged By Falling Cable
The cable tore a gaping 100-foot hole in one of the largest radio telescope dishes in the world, taking the instrument offline until repairs can be made. (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
21h
Break down the secrets to a lucrative project management career
The Premium 2020 Project & Quality Management Certification Bundle explores the most popular project management methodologies. Coursework covers Agile, Agile Scrum, PMI-PMBOK and Six Sigma approaches. Valued at $2,699, the course package is on sale for just $45.99. For all its intricacies and varied approaches, project management is a relatively simple pursuit. Your employer gives you a complex t
21h
Russia just approved a COVID vaccine—but that's not necessarily good news
A highly-effective and widely available vaccine will likely be necessary to get the COVID-19 pandemic under control, save lives, and return to normal life. But performing proper due diligence when it comes to testing will save lives, too. (Pixabay /) The race to develop a safe and effective vaccine against the novel coronavirus has drawn the attention of virologists and other health researchers t
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Swallow a Small Device and It'll Scrape Your Gut Bacteria for Signs of Trouble
Colonoscopies are crucial for investigating colorectal health, but doctors can only travel so far before they have to turn back. To help them see the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, scientists from Purdue University built a small device that goes in the other end (to be clear: your mouth) and samples gut bacteria as it makes its way downtown. The device, as described in research published ear
21h
Learn to create any logo, icon, or graphic with this Illustrator guidebook
Digital designers are in high demand as companies must compete to stand out. Translating your artwork from canvas to screen is easy with the right tools. From logo designs for business cards to billboards, all the skills you need can be learned in Adobe Illustrator. Having a vision is the first step toward bringing it to life. Learning the skills and software necessary for translating that vision
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Learn how to take control of your finances for under $40
As we navigate the global pandemic, staying on top of your finances is essential. Financial freedom is possible by focusing on budgeting and investing wisely. Accumulating long-term wealth is a skill that can be learned, and this Personal Finance Master Class Bundle can help. The stock market may have rebounded, but roughly half of Americans don't own any stock . Thankfully, learning how to budge
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Should You Risk Covid-19 to Get Routine Health Screenings?
Many health facilities are beckoning patients back, telling them it's safe and prudent to schedule appointments for routine screening tests. But some critics are pushing back, suggesting that patients aren't getting the sort of nuanced information they need on screening tests — and not just amid Covid-19.
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What happens in Vegas… is captured on camera
The use of facial recognition by police has come under a lot of scrutiny. In part three of our four-part series on FaceID, host Jennifer Strong takes you to Sin City, which actually has one of America's most buttoned-up policies on when cops can capture your likeness. She also finds out why celebrities like Woody Harrelson are playing a starring role in conversations about this technology. We mee
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Land of a billion faces
Clearview AI has built one of the most comprehensive databases of people's faces in the world. Your picture is probably in there (our host Jennifer Strong's was). In part two of this four-part series on facial recognition, we meet the CEO of the controversial company who tells us our future is filled with FaceID— regardless of whether it's regulated or not. We meet: Hoan Ton-That, Clearview AI Al
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New super-resolution method reveals fine details without constantly needing to zoom in
Since the early 1930s, electron microscopy has provided unprecedented access to the alien world of the extraordinarily small, revealing intricate details that are otherwise impossible to discern with conventional light microscopy. But to achieve high resolution over a large specimen area, the energy of the electron beams needs to be cranked up, which is costly and detrimental to the specimen under
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Preliminary study of 300+ COVID-19 patients suggests convalescent plasma therapy effective
A preliminary analysis of an ongoing study of more than 300 COVID-19 patients treated with convalescent plasma therapy at Houston Methodist suggests the treatment is safe and effective. The results, published in The American Journal of Pathology, represent one of the first peer-reviewed publications in the country assessing efficacy of convalescent plasma and offer valuable scientific evidence tha
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Combination therapy improves survival outcomes for patients with acute myeloid leukemia
A combination regimen of venetoclax and azacitidine was safe and improved overall survival (OS) over azacitidine alone in certain patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to the Phase III VIALE-A trial led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
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After Stillbirth, New Genetic Analyses May Give Parents Answers
Columbia researchers have uncovered an array of new genes that cause stillbirth, significantly increasing the understanding of the genetic foundations of common, but little studied, condition.
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5 NASA Science Projects That Can Help Teach Kids Astronomy
Kids and adults can get involved these citizen science experiments from NASA researchers. Each one comes with educational materials that can help you learn about everything from alien planets to finding asteroids.
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Spider silk inspires new class of functional synthetic polymers
Synthetic polymers have changed the world around us. However, It is hard to finely tune some of their properties, such as the ability to transport ions. To overcome this problem, researchers decided to take inspiration from nature and created a new class of polymers based on protein-like materials that work as proton conductors and might be useful in future bio-electronic devices.
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Why walking to work may be better for you than a casual stroll
Walking with a purpose — especially walking to get to work — makes people walk faster and consider themselves to be healthier, a new study has found. The study found that walking for different reasons yielded different levels of self-rated health. People who walked primarily to places like work and the grocery store from their homes, for example, reported better health than people who walked mos
22h
Analysis pinpoints most important forests for biodiversity and conservation in Central Africa
A new study produced new analyses to pinpoint the most important forests for biodiversity conservation remaining in Central Africa.
22h
Spider silk inspires new class of functional synthetic polymers
Synthetic polymers have changed the world around us. However, It is hard to finely tune some of their properties, such as the ability to transport ions. To overcome this problem, researchers decided to take inspiration from nature and created a new class of polymers based on protein-like materials that work as proton conductors and might be useful in future bio-electronic devices.
22h
New study suggests ADHD- like behavior helps spur entrepreneurial activity
Many people have experienced a few nights of bad sleep that resulted in shifting attention spans, impulsive tendencies and hyperactivity the next day—all behaviors resembling ADHD. A new study found that this dynamic may also be linked to increased entrepreneurial behavior.
22h
Coastal flooding study finds trust-building, power-sharing key for environmental justice
It took two years and $11 million, but eventually ranchers, politicians and scientists came to a consensus about how to prevent flooding in Tillamook, a coastal Oregon town. A recent study by Portland State University researchers examining the social factors involved in this decision-making process showcases how environmental justice can be served when affected parties have a seat at the table. Th
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How Life Could Continue to Evolve – Issue 88: Love & Sex
Once upon a time there was a molecule. That molecule, when it reacted with other molecules, set in motion a story that would result in the universe making another molecule almost exactly like that first one. Then that new molecule, when it reacted with other molecules, set in motion a story that would result in another molecule almost exactly like it. And all across the galaxy there were molecule
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We Don't Have to Despair – Issue 88: Love & Sex
The Twitter feed of Eric Topol, with nearly 300,000 followers, has become one of the go-to places for reliable updates on the COVID-19 pandemic. Topol is the founder and director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute, professor of molecular medicine, and executive vice president of Scripps Research. I first interviewed Topol in the early 2000s when he was chair of cardiovascular medicin
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Sex Is Driven by the Impetus to Change – Issue 88: Love & Sex
Ask any biologist—sex seems like a waste. It's costly: Think of the enormous energy that goes into producing a peacock's spectacular fan-shaped tail, apparently meant to entice a female to mate with him. And it seems inefficient: Sex allows us to pass on only half of our genes, and fully half the species (males) can't bear children. Evolution is unsentimental, so those costs must bring benefits.
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The Anonymous Culture Cops of the Internet – Facts So Romantic
This sort of research can, piece by piece, help reshape the online landscape so it isn't quite so tribal and awash in misinformation and vitriol. Photograph by Prostock-studio / Shutterstock Giant tech companies and governments largely determine what content is and isn't allowed online, and their decisions impact billions of people: 55 percent of internet users worldwide open either social media
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Coastal flooding study finds trust-building, power-sharing key for environmental justice
It took two years and $11 million, but eventually ranchers, politicians and scientists came to a consensus about how to prevent flooding in Tillamook, a coastal Oregon town. A recent study by Portland State University researchers examined the social factors involved in this decision-making process. This study showcases how environmental justice can be served when affected parties have a seat at th
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New study suggests ADHD- like behavior helps spur entrepreneurial activity
Many people have experienced a few nights of bad sleep that resulted in shifting attention spans, impulsive tendencies and hyperactivity the next day — all behaviors resembling ADHD. A new study found that this dynamic may also be linked to increased entrepreneurial behavior.
22h
Time-shifted inhibition helps electric fish ignore their own signals
Electric fish generate electric pulses to communicate with other fish and sense their surroundings. Some species broadcast shorter electric pulses, while others send out long ones. But all that zip-zapping in the water can get confusing. The fish need to filter out their own pulses so they can identify external messages and only respond to those signals.
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Who owns your face?
Police have a history of using FaceID to arrest protestors—something not forgotten by activists since the death of George Floyd. In the last of a four-part series on facial recognition, host Jennifer Strong explores the way forward for the technology and examines what policy might look like. We meet : Artem Kuharenko, NTechLab Deborah Raji, AI Now Institute Toussaint Morrison, Musician, actor, an
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What happens when an algorithm gets it wrong
In the first of a four-part series on FaceID, host Jennifer Strong explores the false arrest of Robert Williams by police in Detroit. The odd thing about Willliams's ordeal wasn't that police used face recognition to ID him—it's that the cops told him about it. There's no law saying they have to. The episode starts to unpack the complexities of this technology and introduces some thorny questions
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With the Biden-Harris Ticket, Environmental Justice Is a Focus
Climate change leaders said the choice of Harris signaled that Democrats will try to ensure that communities burdened by pollution would benefit from a transition to clean energy.
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Time-shifted inhibition helps electric fish ignore their own signals
Electric fish generate electric pulses to communicate with other fish and sense their surroundings. Some species broadcast shorter electric pulses, while others send out long ones. But all that zip-zapping in the water can get confusing. The fish need to filter out their own pulses so they can identify external messages and only respond to those signals.
22h
Measuring Sharks With a Stereo Camera | Shark Week
Stream Shark Week Episodes on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/Discovery https://www.instagram.com/
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Flying Cars Are Actually, Finally Becoming a Reality in Japan
Big in Japan The Japanese government is pouring money into the development of flying cars with aims of commercializing the futuristic mode of transportation as soon as 2023, the Japan Times reports . A number of flying car concepts are being developed throughout the globe, with the likes of Airbus , Boeing and Uber leading the charge. Two-Seater eVTOL The dream of covering smaller distances in ve
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Swallowing this colonoscopy-like bacteria grabber could reveal secrets about your health
Your gut bacteria could say a lot about you, such as why you're diabetic or how you respond to certain drugs. But scientists can see only so much of the gastrointestinal tract to study the role of gut bacteria in your health. Researchers built a way to swallow a tool that acts like a colonoscopy, except that instead of looking at the colon with a camera, the technology takes samples of bacteria.
23h
Mutations may have saved brown howlers from yellow fever virus
From 2007 to 2009, a devastating yellow fever virus outbreak nearly decimated brown and black and gold howler monkey populations at El Parque El Piñalito in northeastern Argentina. An international research team tested if howlers who survived the outbreak had any genetic variations that may have kept them alive. In brown howlers, they found two mutations on immune genes that resulted in amino acid
23h
Young children would rather explore than get rewards
Young children will pass up rewards they know they can collect to explore other options, a new study suggests. Researchers found that when adults and 4- to 5-year-old children played a game where certain choices earned them rewards, both adults and children quickly learned what choices would give them the biggest returns. But while adults then used that knowledge to maximize their prizes, children
23h
Public health consequences of policing homelessness
In a new study examining homelessness, researchers find that policy such a lifestyle has massive public health implications, making sleeping on the street even MORE unhealthy.
23h
COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
Researchers found a striking association between BMI and risk for death among patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19. The association was independent of obesity-related comorbities and other potential confounders. Their findings also suggest that high BMI was more strongly associated with COVID-19 mortality in younger adults and male patients, but not in female patients and older adults. A retrospe
23h
Swallowing this colonoscopy-like bacteria grabber could reveal secrets about your health
Your gut bacteria could say a lot about you, such as why you're diabetic or how you respond to certain drugs. But scientists can see only so much of the gastrointestinal tract to study the role of gut bacteria in your health. Purdue University researchers built a way to swallow a tool that acts like a colonoscopy, except that instead of looking at the colon with a camera, the technology takes samp
23h
Improving treatment of spinal cord injuries
A group led by UC Riverside bioengineering professor Victor G. J. Rodgers and UC Riverside School of Medicine professor Devin Binder has created an osmotic therapy device that gently removes fluid from the spinal cord to reduce swelling in injured rats with good results. The device can eventually be scaled up for testing in humans.
23h
Researchers identify a protein that may help SARS-CoV-2 spread rapidly through cells
Eric Ross and Sean Cascarina, biochemistry and molecular biology researchers at Colorado State University, have released a research paper identifying a protein encoded by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, that may be associated with the quick spread of the virus through cells in the human body. Through powerful application of the foundational sciences and bioinformatic analysis their res
23h
Scientists Find A Species Of Sharks With Strong Social Ties
Scientists found that grey reef sharks in the central Pacific Ocean form social groups — and they say those connections can last for years.
23h
Why black rhinos may get sick in captivity
Inflammation and oxidative stress may be involved in the pathogenesis of iron overload disorder in captive black rhinoceroses, making this syndrome a potential common denominator to various diseases described in captivity in this species, according to a new study.
23h