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Nyheder2020august14

Black silicon photodetector breaks the 100% efficiency limit
Aalto University researchers have developed a black silicon photodetector that has reached above 130% efficiency. Thus, for the first time, a photovoltaic device has exceeded the 100% limit, which has earlier been considered as the theoretical maximum for external quantum efficiency.
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Mindfulness and meditation can worsen depression and anxiety
The first systematic review of the evidence on meditation suggests that 8 per cent of people experience a negative effect such as depression, anxiety, psychosis or thoughts of suicide
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The Constitution Is Perfectly Clear About Citizenship
It took all of about 39 seconds for the vicious "birther" chatter to reemerge once former Vice President Joe Biden announced that Senator Kamala Harris would be his running mate for the November election. No wonder, since a certain variety of American citizen just can't seem to wrap his mind around the U.S. Constitution's provisions guaranteeing equal citizenship to all Americans. Not long after
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The most reliable and versatile kitchen shears for the busy kitchen
Multi-use shears for your kitchen. (Micheile Henderson via Unsplash/) If you don't appreciate how important a good, reliable pair of kitchen shears is to your food prep station, we can only assume you order a lot of takeout. Most people know that nothing can grind kitchen work to a halt faster than needing a good pair of heavy duty scissors and not having them handy. To ensure you never find your
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Simulations show lander exhaust could cloud studies of lunar ices
A new study led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, shows that exhaust from a mid-sized lunar lander can quickly spread around the Moon and potentially contaminate scientifically vital ices at the lunar poles.
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40 Years Ago: Detroit's Brainy New Autos, Now With Microprocessors
In this except from Discover's debut issue in 1980, U.S. car makers were loading their new models with those "clever microprocessors."
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Study identifies social connection as the strongest protective factor for depression
Study says social connection as the strongest protective factor for depression.
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Research helps explain source of pathogen that causes bitter rot disease
Fungal spores responsible for bitter rot disease, a common and devastating infection in fruit, do not encounter their host plants by chance. Turns out, they have a symbiotic association with the plant, often living inside its leaves. The new way of looking at the fungal pathogen, Colletotrichum fioriniae, as a leaf endophyte — bacterial or fungal microorganisms that colonize healthy plant tissue
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Researchers capture footage of fluid behaving like a solid
Researchers using a high-speed camera have captured the moments a fluid reacts like a solid, through a new method of fluid observation under pressurized conditions. They examined fluids that have a solid-like response to stress, a phenomenon called Discontinuous Shear Thickening (DST). This is when liquid abruptly thickens and becomes solid when disturbed. DST is being researched for engineering a
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Study explores the association of malaria, HIV with anemia during pregnancy
Pregnant women from sub-Saharan Africa with malaria and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have a higher prevalence of anemia than pregnant women without infections, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The findings may have implications for reducing the risk of death in pregnant women and preventing low birth weights and neurocognitive impairment in their children as a result
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An AI algorithm to help identify homeless youth at risk of substance abuse
While many programs and initiatives have been implemented to address the prevalence of substance abuse among homeless youth in the United States, they don't always include data-driven insights about environmental and psychological factors that could contribute to an individual's likelihood of developing a substance use disorder. Now, an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm developed by researche
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Changes in climate and land cover affecting European migratory bird populations
A new study led by the Department of Biosciences at Durham University, UK, is the first large-scale assessment of how recent changes in both climate and land cover have impacted populations of migrating birds.
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Changes in climate and land cover affecting European migratory bird populations
A new study led by the Department of Biosciences at Durham University, UK, is the first large-scale assessment of how recent changes in both climate and land cover have impacted populations of migrating birds.
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Does a VP pick matter? Probably not
Joe Biden on Tuesday announced Kamala Harris as his running mate for the 2020 presidential election. But how much does a pick for vice president really matter? Barbara Norrander , a professor in the School of Government and Public Policy in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Arizona studies elections, public opinion and political parties. Here, she talks about how
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Gene variants help explain connection between skin disorder and food allergy risk
Two common variants in the KIF3A gene increase the risk of young children having a dysfunctional skin barrier and developing the skin condition atopic dermatitis, according to study led by scientists at Cincinnati Children's.
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Linking sight and movement
Harvard researchers found that image-processing circuits in the primary visual cortex not only are more active when animals move freely, but that they receive signals from a movement-controlling region of the brain that is independent from the region that processes what the animal is looking at.
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Dynamic membranes set to solve problems of liquid waste treatment
The co-authors, Associate Professor Dinar Fazullin and Associate Professor Gennady Mavrin, have been engaged in the topic of membrane elements for water purification for ten years. This research area is very pertinent because of the large volumes of liquid waste and a lack of specialized types of membranes.
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NIH-supported scientists demonstrate how genetic variations cause eczema
New research supported by the National Institutes of Health delineates how two relatively common variations in a gene called KIF3A are responsible for an impaired skin barrier that allows increased water loss from the skin, promoting the development of atopic dermatitis, commonly known as eczema. This finding could lead to genetic tests that empower parents and physicians to take steps to potentia
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How people and ecosystems fit together on the Great Barrier Reef
A world-first study examining the scales of management of the Great Barrier Reef has the potential to help sustain other ecosystems across the world.
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Beautiful jigsaw puzzles for an evening at home
Beautiful fun. (Ben Stern via Unsplash/) Jigsaw puzzles are one of those universally beloved items that can inspire people of any age or walk of life to bond and work together. You've probably seen many in-progress or finished puzzles on your social feeds, too, since lots of people love to show off their work. Given the range of options out there, jigsaw puzzles with the right piece count, size,
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The best reusable produce bags for your grocery trips
Reuse time and time again. (Markus Spiske via Unsplash/) Reusable tote bags have become a grocery store essential in recent years, as cities have banned plastic bags. But what about those thin produce bags, those ones that we tear off from rolls? Luckily, there are tons of reusable produce bag options for environmentally conscious people looking to cut down on waste. We've picked some of our favo
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16 synced violinists show how human networks function
Synchronization in a network of violin players may shed light on how human networks function in society, researchers report. Human networking involves every field and includes small groups of people to large, coordinated systems working together toward a goal, be it traffic management in an urban area, economic systems, or epidemic control . The research team devised an experiment involving 16 vi
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Travel industry hit hard by new restrictions
New infections and fear of second wave weigh heavily on sector
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Space bricks for lunar habitation
In what could be a significant step forward in space exploration, a team of researchers from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) and the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has developed a sustainable process for making brick-like structures on the moon. It exploits lunar soil, and uses bacteria and guar beans to consolidate the soil into possible load-bearing structures. These 'space bri
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Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide lens for high resolution imaging
An ultrathin optical lens made from a monolayer of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) could pave the way for next-generation imaging devices. An international team of researchers, led by Prof. Baohua Jia from Swinburne University of Technology in Australia, used femtosecond laser writing to pattern nanoparticles on TMDC crystals. The lens has a sub-wavelength resolution and a
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Former Maryland researcher banned from Federal funding for misconduct
At least seven years after questions were first raised about work by a researcher at the University of Maryland Baltimore, School of Medicine, he has agreed to a three-year ban on Federal funding. Anil Jaiswal, whose first retraction appeared in 2013, faked data in eight NIH grant applications and six papers supported by Federal grants, … Continue reading
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Scientists Furious That Scientists Keep Using Indecipherable Acronyms
MAYONNAISE Scientists have an awful tendency to overuse complex, confusing, or otherwise indecipherable acronyms in their work. Thankfully, a plucky group of, uh, scientists, is here to try and keep them in line. It's something of an inside joke among scientists to come up with fun acronyms like MAYONNAISE (a morphological components analysis pipeline for circumstellar disks and exoplanets imagin
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This Vision Experiment Resolved a Centuries-Old Philosophical Debate – Facts So Romantic
"We conclude," the researchers wrote, "that objects have a remarkably persistent dual character: their objective shape 'out there,' and their perspectival shape 'from here.'" Photograph by Ryan DeBerardinis / Shutterstock Imagine you are looking at a manhole cover a few paces away on the street. It looks circular, but this is because of some impressive perceptual machinery in your mind. The patte
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Signs of 'citation hacking' flagged in scientific papers
Nature, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02378-2 An algorithm developed to spot abnormal patterns of citations aims to find scientists who have manipulated reference lists.
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Elon Musk: SpaceX Competitor "A Complete Waste of Taxpayer Money"
Despite SpaceX just having won a massive US Air Force launch contract, the company's CEO Elon Musk is super pissed. That's because SpaceX was only assigned 40 percent of the military's national security missions between 2022 and 2026. The other 60 percent went to competitor United Launch Alliance (ULA). That's not good enough for Musk. "Efficiently reusable rockets are all that matter for making
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Why a fight over Fortnite could decide the future of big tech
Apple and Google have long held firm control over which apps can be sold on their devices, but lawsuits from the developer of the mega popular game Fortnite could change that
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How people and ecosystems fit together on the Great Barrier Reef
A world-first study examines the scales of management of the Great Barrier Reef. The findings have the potential to help sustain other ecosystems across the world. The study provides a new approach for diagnosing social-ecological scale mismatches and responding to them.
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Newly identified gut cells nurture lymph capillaries
IBS research team has identified new subsets of gut connective cells, which are crucial for lymphatic growth.The findings imply a crucial link between the physiology of intestinal environment and biological interactions between cell types.
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Many medical 'rainy day' accounts aren't getting opened or filled
One-third of the people who could benefit from a special type of savings account to cushion the blow of their health plan deductible aren't doing so, a new study finds. And even among people who do open a health savings account, half haven't put any money into it in the past year. This means they may be missing a chance to avoid taxes on money they can use to pay for their health insurance deducti
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Researchers discover the microbiome's role in attacking cancerous tumors
Researchers have discovered which gut bacteria help our immune system battle cancerous tumors and how they do it. The discovery may provide a new understanding of why immunotherapy, a treatment for cancer that helps amplify immune response, works in some cases, but not others. The findings show combining immunotherapy with specific microbial therapy helps the immune system to recognize and attack
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Seasonal flu vaccinations don't 'stick' long-term in bone marrow
Seasonal flu vaccination does increase the number of antibody-producing cells specific for flu in the bone marrow. However, most of the newly generated cells are lost within one year, researchers found.
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Becoming a nerve cell: Timing is of the essence
Researchers find that mitochondria regulate a key event during brain development: how neural stem cells become nerve cells. Mitochondria influence this cell fate switch during a precise period that is twice as long in humans compared to mice. This highlights an unexpected function for mitochondria that may help explain how humans developed a bigger brain during evolution, and how mitochondrial def
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Syphilis may have spread through Europe before Columbus
Columbus brought syphilis to Europe — or did he? A recent study now indicates that Europeans could already have been infected with this sexually transmitted disease before the 15th century. In addition, researchers have discovered a hitherto unknown pathogen causing a related disease. The predecessor of syphilis and its related diseases could be over 2,500 years old.
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A guide to sun protection for people with darker skin
Darker skins have a head start when it comes to sun protection, but it's not nearly as much as you'd think. (Dellon Thomas / Pexels/) Overall recommendations on when and if to use sunscreen seem to be clear: always protect yourself from the sun, especially if you have a lighter skin tone. But for people with abundant melanin who often hear phrases like "Black don't crack" or "Black don't burn," g
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This High Tech Wireless Meat Thermometer Lets You Grill Like It's the Future (Because It Is)
Grilling is a timeless art that goes back deep into the heart of human history. It was probably developed shortly after man discovered fire. But that's no reason to be a grilling Luddite and ignore advances in technology that can take your grilling game to the next level. Technology like the MEATER+ wireless meat thermometer, for example, takes one of the trickiest parts of any grilling session —
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Changes in climate and land cover affecting European migratory bird populations
Changes in climate and habitat on the breeding and non-breeding grounds of migratory birds are both playing an important part in driving their long-term population changes.
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The flax wilt agent has been sequenced
Fusarium wilt is a nasty but common disease affecting economically important crops such as banana, cotton, flax, canola, melons, onions, potato and tomato. The release of the complete genome sequence is a milestone in comparative genomics studies of fungal parasites; it contributes to the global efforts aimed at elimination of plant disease outbreaks by aiding in engineering of new resistant crops
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200 000 years ago, humans preferred to kip cozy
Researchers in South Africa's Border Cave have found evidence that people have been using grass bedding to create comfortable areas for sleeping and working on at least 200 000 years ago.
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German-Argentinean doctoral program bears first fruits
The Faculty of Biology at TU Dresden and the Faculty of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences at the Universidad Nacional del Litoral (UNL) in Santa Fe, Argentina have had a very special partnership for more than five years. A bi-national doctoral program not only enables doctoral students from both research institutions to spend a longer period of time abroad, but also offers a double degree in Bi
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Organic chemistry — a brilliant tool
An international team led by the chemist Heinz Langhals of LMU Munich succeeded in molecular deflection of light radiation by means of Diamantane. Novel applications such as efficient light collectors or broadband light absorbers are promising.
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If Only Any of the 'Hobbit' Movies Were the Right Length
Peter Jackson's trilogy is too long, the Rankin/Bass cartoon from the 1970s is too short. The proper length is somewhere in between.
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TikTok made him famous. Now he's imagining a world without it
Ryan Beard was sitting in front of his keyboard, taking song requests on a live stream on the last Friday of July, when he saw a message from a viewer pop up in the chat: "tik tok is officially getting banned " Beard, 22, has more than 1.8 million followers on TikTok. He spent a year growing that following, throwing everything he had into a career as an online creator with the app as his anchor.
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Will 2020 Be the Hottest Year on Record?
It will certainly place in the top five—a marker of how much the world has warmed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Will 2020 Be the Hottest Year on Record?
It will certainly place in the top five—a marker of how much the world has warmed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Remains of 17th century bishop support neolithic emergence of tuberculosis
In a recent study published in Genome Biology, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Lund University and the Swedish Natural Historical Museum present analysis of the highest quality ancient Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome to date, suggesting the pathogen is much younger than previously believed.
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The flax wilt agent has been sequenced
Researchers teamed up to sequence and assemble genome of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lini, a highly destructive fungal parasite infecting flax. The results of the study were published in the Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions.
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Rare plant may prevent the first lithium quarry in the US from opening
Tiehm's buckwheat is an extremely rare plant that thrives in soil containing lithium and boron. Both elements are vital for renewable energy technologies, but mining for them will destroy most of the plant's habitat
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The Books Briefing: What the Storms Left Behind
Editor's note: This week's newsletter is a rerun. We'll be back with a fresh newsletter next week. Know other book lovers who might like this guide? Forward them this email. Late summer often proves turbulent on the Caribbean islands and along the Gulf Coast. Locals exist under the daunting threat of severe storms that have the power to destroy lives and infrastructure. Some have tried to prevent
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This Star Looked Like It Would Explode. Maybe It Just Sneezed
The mysterious dimming of the red supergiant Betelgeuse is the result of a stellar exhalation, astronomers say.
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Achieving highly efficient ammonia synthesis by altering the rate-determining step
The electrochemical conversion of nitrogen to ammonia is the most promising alternative of the traditional Haber-Bosch process to achieve nitrogen fixation under ambient conditions. In this strategy, activation of high-energy triple-bonds of nitrogen is the most significant bottleneck and is commonly considered as the rate-determining step of ammonia synthesis. Scientists based in China successful
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How people and ecosystems fit together on the Great Barrier Reef
A world-first study examines the scales of management of the Great Barrier Reef. The findings have the potential to help sustain other ecosystems across the world. The study provides a new approach for diagnosing social-ecological scale mismatches and responding to them.
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Weight between young adulthood and midlife linked to mortality: BU study
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that changes in weight between young adulthood and midlife may have important consequences for a person's risk of early death.
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Patients' access to opioid treatment cumbersome
The 'secret shopper' study used trained actors attempting to get into treatment with an addiction provider in 10 US states. The results, with more than 10,000 unique patients, revealed numerous challenges in scheduling a first-time appointment to receive medications for opioid use disorder, including finding a provider who takes insurance rather than cash.
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Comparing ICD-10 Codes With Electronic Medical Records Among Patients With COVID-19 Symptoms
The goal of this study was to compare International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes with manual electronic medical records review in capturing symptoms of fever, cough and shortness of breath (dyspnea) among patients being tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection.
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Trump Administration Completes Climate Dismantling with Methane Rollback
New rules provide laxer requirements for finding and repairing leaks of the potent greenhouse gas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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This Star Is Moving So Fast it Visibly Warps Spacetime
NYOOM Scientists just identified the fastest-moving star in our galaxy, and it's booking it . The star S62 whips around Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, at an extremely tight orbit. At its closest approach, it can travel faster than eight percent the speed of light, according to research published in The Astrophysical Journal . That's fast enough to make
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Scientists: Probe Center of Uranus, You'll Hit Some Weird Water
By modeling planets' interior using computer simulations, an international team of scientists are having a closer look at the unusual watery cores of Uranus and Neptune. Their simulation allowed them to analyze the thermal and electric processes at the core of the two ice giants since, according to a statement , these processes are often physically impossible to reproduce in an experiment back on
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Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide lens for high resolution imaging
An ultrathin optical lens made from monolayer of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) could pave the way for next-generation imaging devices. An international team of researchers, led by Prof. Baohua Jia from Swinburne University of Technology in Australia, used femtosecond laser writing to pattern nanoparticles on TMDC crystals. The lens has a sub-wavelength resolution and a t
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You will surprise yourself (and other pearls of wisdom) | Daniel Alexander Jones
"Some call me a soul sonic superstar," says Jomama Jones, the alter ego of TED Fellow and theater artist Daniel Alexander Jones. In this stunning talk and performance, Jomama Jones invites us to consider how coming undone can be the first step toward transformation. It's a powerful story of community, growth and renewal — and how breaking apart can mean breaking open.
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This online calculator can predict your stroke risk
Doctors can predict patients' stroke risk by using an online tool that measures the severity of their metabolic syndrome, a conglomeration of conditions that includes high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol levels and excess body fat.
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Catalyst recycles carbon dioxide into useful fuels
A new catalyst can efficiently turn carbon dioxide into useful fuels and chemicals, researchers report. By efficiently converting CO2 into complex hydrocarbon products, the new catalyst could potentially aid in large-scale efforts to recycle excess carbon dioxide. As levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide continue to climb, scientists are looking for new ways of breaking down CO2 molecules to make
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What you need to know about Microsoft's new $1,400, dual-screen smartphone
It's like a multi-monitor setup in your pocket. (Microsoft/) In the spring of 2019, folding smartphones felt imminent. Samsung was about to launch the flashy, expensive Galaxy Z Fold and numerous other manufacturers were showing off flexible prototypes and concepts designed to free us from the monolithic smartphone design. Then the Galaxy Fold stumbled when the screen and hinge proved too fragile
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Russia's Rushed Covid-19 Vaccine Worries Health Experts
On Tuesday, Russian president Vladimir Putin announced that his country had become the first to approve a Covid-19 vaccine. There's one major catch: The vaccine has not gone through the full, three-phase complement of trials that researchers conduct to ensure that a vaccine candidate is safe and effective.
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Jeremy Farrar: 'Viruses know no borders. Until every country is protected, we are all at risk'
There is no future in narrow nationalism. The only way out of this crisis is by working together • Time to reset: more brilliant ideas to remake the world Make no mistake, we are still only at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic. My hope is that the world is now finally waking up, and will do all that is needed to bring the crisis to an end, and be better prepared for inevitable future outbreaks.
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The Plan That Could Give Us Our Lives Back
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . M ichael Mina is a professor of epidemiology at Harvard, where he studies the diagnostic testing of infectious diseases. He has watched, with disgust and disbelief, as the United States has struggled for months to obtain enough tests to fight the coronavirus. In January, he
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Build A Coding Career With The 2020 Ultimate Web Developer and Design Bootcamp Bundle
From the beginning of the century, web design and development has been one of the most in-demand coding jobs on the planet. The Bureau of Labor Statistics anticipates that web developer jobs will grow by 13% over the next decade , nearly three times the average for most jobs. It's also becoming part of the skill set of jobs across any number of industries, with marketing professionals, IT staff,
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Nanoparticles to immunize plants against heat stress
Civil and Environmental Engineering's Greg Lowry and his team are creating nanoparticles (NP) and NP coatings that will revolutionize the agricultural industry. Already, his research has demonstrated that NPs that are coated with the right polymers can be applied to plant leaves with 99 percent uptake—orders of magnitude more efficient than current agrochemical delivery methods. Their NP's are als
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WTF, when will scientists learn to use fewer acronyms?
Have you heard of DNA? It stands for Do Not Abbreviate apparently. Jokes aside, it's the most widely used acronym in scientific literature in the past 70 years, appearing more than 2.4 million times.
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New Algorithm Paves the Way Towards Error-Free Quantum Computing
No one likes noise when they're working through a difficult problem. Q uantum computers are no different, and now researchers have devised a new way to estimate how noise can throw their calculations off, a big step towards making the technology practical. The quantum states at the heart of today's quantum computers are fragile things. They are highly susceptible to disturbances from everything f
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Nanoparticles to immunize plants against heat stress
Civil and Environmental Engineering's Greg Lowry and his team are creating nanoparticles (NP) and NP coatings that will revolutionize the agricultural industry. Already, his research has demonstrated that NPs that are coated with the right polymers can be applied to plant leaves with 99 percent uptake—orders of magnitude more efficient than current agrochemical delivery methods. Their NP's are als
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Unmade in America
In early March, as the coronavirus pandemic forced America to contemplate a nationwide shutdown, Dan St. Louis started to get nervous. St. Louis runs a facility in Conover, North Carolina, called the Manufacturing Solutions Center, which prototypes and tests new fabrics and other materials; most of its funding comes from contracts with what remains of the American textile industry. With stay-at-h
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It's Always the Summer of the Shark
Even during a pandemic, we cannot get the white shark out of our minds. Despite the rare attack, experts say humans have little to fear.
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Galleri: Sommerens fotokonkurrence
Hvad stiller man op med en ingeniør, der ikke har andet praktisk at foretage sig end at tøffe rundt i ferielandskabet og pege på andres elendige tekniske løsninger, klamp, fejl og mangler? Man beder ham tage et billede af miseren, knytte et par ord til og sende det til Ingeniøren. Det opfordrede vi læserne til på ing.dk, før sommeren satte ind med sol og varme (i korte glimt), og lokkemaden var fi
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Stabilizing monolayer nitrides with silicon
In a new report published in Science, Yi-Lun Hong and a group of research scientists in materials science, engineering, and advanced technology in China and the U.K. investigated two-dimensional (2-D) materials to discover new phenomena and unusual properties. The team introduced elemental silicon during chemical vapor deposition-based growth of molybdenum nitride to passivate its surface and deve
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UK holidaymakers scramble to leave France before quarantine deadline
Travel operators report most services are already fully booked as people seek to return by 4am on Saturday
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Ship leaks more oil off Mauritius as calls for answers grow
A fresh streak of oil spilled Friday from a bulk carrier stranded on a reef in pristine waters off Mauritius which is already reeling from the ecological disaster, as demands mounted for answers as to why the vessel had come so close to shore.
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Investigation of five-layered cuprate reveals Fermi pockets
A team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions in Japan and one in the U.K has observed Fermi pockets during experiments with a five-layered cuprate, confirming theories. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their study of the cuprate Ba2Ca4Cu5O10(F,O)2 and what they learned about superconductivity. Inna Vishik with the University of California Davis,
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Searching for Heavy Higgs bosons decaying into two tau leptons with the ATLAS detector
In particle physics, three out of the four known fundamental forces in the universe, namely electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions, are described by a theory known as the standard model (SM). One extension of this model is supersymmetry (SUSY), a theoretical construct that points to a possible relationship between two classes of particles: bosons and fermions.
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The search for molecular glue in targeted disease control
In cells, there are proteins that do the work and proteins that regulate them. The latter inhibit or enhance activity, depending on the need. However, in many diseases—for example cancer—there is so much overactivity in the cell that the regulator proteins can no longer keep up with it. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology therefore developed a kind of molecular "glue" in 2019 that he
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The search for molecular glue in targeted disease control
In cells, there are proteins that do the work and proteins that regulate them. The latter inhibit or enhance activity, depending on the need. However, in many diseases—for example cancer—there is so much overactivity in the cell that the regulator proteins can no longer keep up with it. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology therefore developed a kind of molecular "glue" in 2019 that he
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Chinese Scientists Figured Out How to Beam Quantum Messages From Satellites
Beaming Down A team of Chinese scientists just vastly improved the length over which they can send a quantum-encrypted message, managing to beam one all the way down from a satellite. The transmission — which uses a quantum computer-proof form of encryption called quantum key distribution — traveled 756 miles from orbit to a facility on the ground, Space.com reports . That's over 12 times farther
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This online calculator can predict your stroke risk, study finds
Doctors can predict patients' stroke risk by using an online tool that measures the severity of their metabolic syndrome, a conglomeration of conditions that includes high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol levels and excess body fat.
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People power and satellites help scientists study climate impacts on Antarctic seals
A New Zealand-led international study of the crabeater seal population in Antarctica aims to understand environmental impacts on one of the southern-most mammals in the world.
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Q&A: Global methane emissions soaring, but how much was due to wetlands?
Last month, an international team of scientists, including Berkeley Lab's William Riley and Qing Zhu, published an update on the global methane budget as part of the Global Carbon Project. They estimated annual global methane emissions at nearly 570 million tons for the 2008 to 2017 decade, which is 5% higher than emissions recorded for the early 2000s and the equivalent of 189 million more cars o
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Bagsiden: Teknik-ups fra ingeniørernes feriealbums
Konkurrence: Læserne fotograferer spøjse tekniske løsninger
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Just How Far Will Trump Go?
President Donald Trump's open admission yesterday that he's sabotaging the Postal Service to improve his election prospects crystallizes a much larger dynamic: He's waging an unprecedented campaign to weaponize virtually every component of the federal government to partisan advantage. Trump is systematically enlisting agencies, including the Postal Service, Census Bureau, Department of Justice, a
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Mass Die-Offs of Marine Mammals Are on the Rise
Viral and bacteria outbreaks are increasingly causing fatalities in a variety of species, including seals and dolphins
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How to teach teachers amidst the pandemic
In a new study published this week in The Learning Professional, a University of Colorado Denver researcher looked at best practices for educating teachers in an online environment. Known as professional learning, this type of learning is different from professional development in the sense that it is typically interactive, sustained, and customized to teachers' needs—not a one-size-fits-all works
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Deep learning deciphers images made with sound
Nature, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02348-8 A composite material helps scientists to see the details in 'acoustic images' depicting numbers.
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'We felt we had beaten it': New Zealand's race to eliminate the coronavirus again
Nature, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02402-5 Genomics could reveal details about the source of the country's first outbreak in more than 100 days, says epidemiologist Amanda Kvalsvig.
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Da vores data forsvandt op i skyen
PLUS. Det lyder forjættende med et nærmest uendeligt datalager, men da vi droppede den personlige harddisk, var det også et farvel til det personlige ejerskab, advarer ny udstilling.
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Research helps explain source of pathogen that causes bitter rot disease
Fungal spores responsible for bitter rot disease, a common and devastating infection in fruit, do not encounter their host plants by chance. Turns out, they have a symbiotic association with the plant, often living inside its leaves.
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Practical solution for preventing corrosive buildup in nuclear systems
When clogs and corrosion threaten residential water and heating systems, homeowners can simply call a plumber to snake a drain or replace a pipe. Operators of nuclear power plants aren't nearly so lucky. Metallic oxide particles, collectively known as CRUD in the nuclear energy world, build up directly on reactor fuel rods, impeding the plant's ability to generate heat. These foulants cost the nuc
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Move like Sea Animals with Baby Shark
Meet and dance with Baby Shark and move like sea animals! Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/Discovery https://www.instagram.com/SharkWeek From: Discovery
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Research helps explain source of pathogen that causes bitter rot disease
Fungal spores responsible for bitter rot disease, a common and devastating infection in fruit, do not encounter their host plants by chance. Turns out, they have a symbiotic association with the plant, often living inside its leaves.
4h
From Ellen DeGeneres to Tom Hanks, QAnon Has Infiltrated the Hollywood Rumor Mill
Plus: Kamala Harris' stance on Section 230, a doctor's duty to misinformed patients, and an iconic new Airbnb.
4h
The Very 2020 Ascent of Sarah Cooper
The comedian, whose impersonations of Trump garnered a huge following on social media, is now hosting late-night and getting her own Netflix special.
4h
Study quantifies potential COVID-19 spread from hurricane evacuation
With the peak of the hurricane season coming up and COVID-19 abundant in many hurricane-prone areas, the United States is poised to experience the collision of two major disasters. According to a study by scientists at Columbia University and the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), a large-scale hurricane evacuation would increase COVID-19 cases in both evacuees' origin and destination counties.
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A superelastic alloy with a nearly limitless temperature window
A team of researchers at Tohoku University has developed a new kind of superelastic alloy with a nearly limitless superelastic window. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes the new alloy's properties and possible uses for it. Paulo La Roca and Marcos Sade with Universidad Nacional de Cuyo–CNEA have published a Perspective piece in the same journal issue outlining the
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Tænkeboks: Hvor hurtigt kom peberbøssen op af suppen?
Nu kan du dykke ned i ugens tænkeboks.
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Plant protein responds to radio waves by making seedlings grow faster
A type of protein found in plants and animals called a cryptochrome seems to respond to radio waves, changing how genes in thale cress seedlings are expressed. The find could have applications in farming and medicine
4h
One way to teach students more safely this fall? Move lessons outdoors | Jaime Cunningham
It's easier to do social distancing outside – and there's considerable evidence that students learn better in fresh air We need to send our children back to school this fall – safely. School districts across the United States are currently being led by indecisive administrators who are grappling with budget cuts while scrambling to figure out how to coordinate complicated schedules for socially d
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Stay-at-home orders worked to slow COVID's spread
Stay-at-home orders helped slow the pandemic significantly, new research suggests. Across the globe, COVID-19 has infected more than 18 million people to date and has killed hundreds of thousands—and the United States has taken an especially hard hit. Although the US comprises just 4.2% of the global population, it accounted for approximately 33% of all reported infections by the end of April. Ho
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In COVID's shadow, global terrorism goes quiet. But we have seen this before, and should be wary
Have we flattened the curve of global terrorism? In our COVID-19-obsessed news cycle stories about terrorism and terrorist attacks have largely disappeared. We now, though, understand a little more about how pandemics work.
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Almost half of US teens who date experience stalking and harassment
Falling in love for the first time can be a thrill, and teen dating is important to adolescent development. But according to the results of a study that my research team recently conducted, these early forays into romance often veer into unhealthy territory.
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The molecular deflection of light radiation by means of diamantane
An international team led by the chemist Heinz Langhals of Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet (LMU) in Munich has succeeded in the molecular deflection of light radiation by means of diamantane. Novel applications such as efficient light collectors or broadband light absorbers are promising.
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Forensic research proves that textile fibres can be transferred between clothing in the absence of contact
Breakthrough forensic research at Northumbria University, Newcastle, has revealed for the first time that textile fibers can, under certain circumstances, be transferred between clothing in the absence of contact.
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Exponential scaling of frictional forces in cells
AMOLF researchers have presented a theory that describes the friction between biological filaments that are crosslinked by proteins. Surprisingly, their theory predicts that the friction force scales highly nonlinearly with the number of crosslinkers. The authors believe that cells use this scaling not only to stabilize cellular structures, but also to control their size. The new findings are impo
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Digital transformation will be key to ensuring survival of theatre industry during coronavirus, research shows
Digital transformation will be key to ensuring the survival of the theater industry during coronavirus because people are willing to pay to see shows online, new research shows.
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A three-decade 'moving picture' of young Australians' study, work, and life
The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) unpack the lives of young Australians as they leave school, enter further study or the workforce and make the transition into adulthood.
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Americans actively engaging in collectivism as financial buoy, experts say
The economic effects of the coronavius in the U.S. have brought Americans' preexisting financial precarity into stark focus. Karen Richman, University of Notre Dame director of undergraduate studies at the Institute for Latino Studies, and her colleague Joelle Saad-Lessler, associate teaching professor and associate dean of undergraduates at Stevens Institute of Technology, found that many people
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Uranium reveals its true nature
Most people are familiar with uranium as a fuel for nuclear power plants. And while that's the most common application, this element is also used in many other fields, such as dyes, medical devices, and weapons. Scientists at EPFL's Environmental Microbiology Laboratory (EML) have recently made an important discovery about uranium that could have major implications for soil and groundwater remedia
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Gathering data to save a rare turtle
We are never more conscious of the summer sun than while struggling to unpack a trap full of turtles, watching with resignation as the wind slowly drags us and our kayak across the marsh. We are in Goose Lake Prairie State Natural Area, about 50 miles southwest of Chicago. We visit these wetlands two weeks per month during the field season, which runs from May to October.
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Cheese: New insights into an age-old food
The most detailed study to date of the microbes in cheese was published today in Nature Food by a team of researchers at Teagasc and APC Microbiome Ireland SFI Research Center, led by Professor Paul Cotter. For this study, the team employed the most advanced DNA technologies to characterize in great depth the microbiology of 184 samples of cheeses from across the world, including newly studied sam
4h
Gathering data to save a rare turtle
We are never more conscious of the summer sun than while struggling to unpack a trap full of turtles, watching with resignation as the wind slowly drags us and our kayak across the marsh. We are in Goose Lake Prairie State Natural Area, about 50 miles southwest of Chicago. We visit these wetlands two weeks per month during the field season, which runs from May to October.
4h
Cheese: New insights into an age-old food
The most detailed study to date of the microbes in cheese was published today in Nature Food by a team of researchers at Teagasc and APC Microbiome Ireland SFI Research Center, led by Professor Paul Cotter. For this study, the team employed the most advanced DNA technologies to characterize in great depth the microbiology of 184 samples of cheeses from across the world, including newly studied sam
4h
Australia's smallest fish among 22 at risk of extinction within two decades
The tragic fish kills in the lower Darling River drew attention to the plight of Australia's freshwater fish, but they've been in trouble for a long time.
4h
Mark Konishi, Pioneer of Studying Behavior's Neural Basis, Dies
The Caltech scientist was revered for his work on the neurobiology of birdsong and owls' ability to home in on their prey.
4h
Australia's smallest fish among 22 at risk of extinction within two decades
The tragic fish kills in the lower Darling River drew attention to the plight of Australia's freshwater fish, but they've been in trouble for a long time.
4h
Tree ferns are older than dinosaurs. And that's not even the most interesting thing about them
With massive fronds creating a luxuriously green canopy in the understory of Australian forests, tree ferns are a familiar sight on many long drives or bushwalks. But how much do you really know about them?
4h
Fastest star ever seen is moving at 8% the speed of light
In the center of our galaxy, hundreds of stars closely orbit a supermassive black hole. Most of these stars have large enough orbits that their motion is described by Newtonian gravity and Kepler's laws of motion. But a few orbit so closely that their orbits can only be accurately described by Einstein's theory of general relativity. The star with the smallest orbit is known as S62. Its closest ap
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Impact of COVID-19 in Africa: A severe setback for development
COVID was late to arrive in Africa, with initial infection and death rates lower than elsewhere in the world. Community transmission is however now accelerating in most countries, with lack of safe water as a major contributing factor. The pandemic also threatens to set back Africa's development and attainment of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with extreme poverty on the rise, according to
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Tree ferns are older than dinosaurs. And that's not even the most interesting thing about them
With massive fronds creating a luxuriously green canopy in the understory of Australian forests, tree ferns are a familiar sight on many long drives or bushwalks. But how much do you really know about them?
5h
22 Australian freshwater fish on path to extinction
Twenty-two native freshwater fish have been identified as likely to become extinct within the next twenty years, unless there is new conservation action, according to new research.
5h
22 Australian freshwater fish on path to extinction
Twenty-two native freshwater fish have been identified as likely to become extinct within the next twenty years, unless there is new conservation action, according to new research.
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Dolphin viewing more profitable than swimming in research
Wild dolphin-swim tourism has grown in specific locations where Hawaiian spinner dolphins have known resting habitat. Under normal operations, Hawaiʻi's dolphin-swim tourism industry is estimated to generate hundreds of millions annually according to a study by the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Duke University and York University published in Frontiers of Marine Science. The study offers the fir
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How 14 Elephant Seals Assisted an Antarctic Ice Study
Mapping currents in the Southern Ocean is vital to monitoring climate change, but hard to conduct. So scientists turned to seals for help.
5h
What Lovecraft Country Gets Wrong About Racial Horror
Eli Joshua Ade / HBO Like many young people, the protagonist of the 2016 novel Lovecraft Country devours entertainment that his father finds foolish and reprehensible. Atticus loves reading science fiction, fantasy, and horror—genres that, as his dad points out, are dominated by white authors and full of racist stereotypes. The tension inherent in Atticus's fondness for such writers drives much o
5h
Why Kanye Is Running for President
To teach someone is to influence them, and nothing interests Kanye West more than influence. (Shutterstock / Getty / Arsh Raziuddin / The Atlantic) U nderlying Kanye West's confusing run for president may be the simple impulse that has driven much of his career: the impulse to teach. His first album, 2004's The College Dropout , kicked off with a skit in which West was asked to give a school's co
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Yaa Gyasi on the Mysteries of Faith and Reason
Editor's Note: Read Yaa Gyasi's new fiction, "When My Mother Came to Stay." "When My Mother Came to Stay" is taken from Yaa Gyasi's forthcoming novel, Transcendent Kingdom (available on September 1). To mark the excerpt's publication in The Atlantic , Gyasi and Oliver Munday, a senior art director of the magazine, discussed it over email. Their conversation has been lightly edited for clarity. Ol
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When My Mother Came to Stay
Editor's Note: Read an interview with Yaa Gyasi about her writing process. Whenever I think of my mother, I picture a queen-size bed with her lying in it, a practiced stillness filling the room. For months on end, she colonized that bed like a virus, the first time when I was a child and then again when I was a graduate student. The first time, I was sent to Ghana to wait her out. While there, I
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Dolphin viewing more profitable than swimming in research
Wild dolphin-swim tourism has grown in specific locations where Hawaiian spinner dolphins have known resting habitat. Under normal operations, Hawaiʻi's dolphin-swim tourism industry is estimated to generate hundreds of millions annually according to a study by the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Duke University and York University published in Frontiers of Marine Science. The study offers the fir
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WTF, when will scientists learn to use fewer acronyms?
Have you heard of DNA? It stands for Do Not Abbreviate apparently. Jokes aside, it's the most widely used acronym in scientific literature in the past 70 years, appearing more than 2.4 million times.
5h
Watching changes in plant metabolism—live
Researchers at Münster University with the participation of the University of Bonn are studying key mechanisms in the regulation of energy metabolism in plants and, using a new method of in vivo biosensor technology, they have opened the door to monitoring, in real time, what effects environmental changes have on the central redox metabolism. The study has been published in the journal The Plant C
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200,000 years ago, humans preferred to sleep in beds
Researchers in South Africa's Border Cave, a well-known archeological site perched on a cliff between eSwatini (Swaziland) and KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa, have found evidence that people have been using grass bedding to create comfortable areas for sleeping and working on at least 200,000 years ago.
5h
Drones driving community conservation of the sea cow
Dr. Christophe Cleguer is on a mission to save the dugong. In doing so, he's saving a critical habitat for a host of other marine species.
5h
From lobsters to honey bees, social distancing is common in the animal kingdom
Like humans, wildlife employs the tactic to avoid spreading disease
5h
Watching changes in plant metabolism—live
Researchers at Münster University with the participation of the University of Bonn are studying key mechanisms in the regulation of energy metabolism in plants and, using a new method of in vivo biosensor technology, they have opened the door to monitoring, in real time, what effects environmental changes have on the central redox metabolism. The study has been published in the journal The Plant C
5h
Drones driving community conservation of the sea cow
Dr. Christophe Cleguer is on a mission to save the dugong. In doing so, he's saving a critical habitat for a host of other marine species.
5h
Who Needs a Folding Phone, Anyway?
This week, we look at the Microsoft Surface Duo and wonder if an expensive, dual-screen device like this one feels relevant, or just needlessly extravagant.
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Decipher mysterious sounds with this matching game
Sounds can play tricks on you—can you decipher the truth? (Pixabay/) We know you are bored at home right now—we are too. Here are some puzzles and brainteasers to challenge your family and friends with, either in person or over video chat. Clamor comes in many packages, from abstract waveforms, to countless spoken words in thousands of languages, to mathematically complex values like the decibel.
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Invisible Qualities such as 'Hardness' Can Pinpoint Objects
Objects' hidden physical traits can help people locate them faster — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Invisible Qualities such as 'Hardness' Can Pinpoint Objects
Objects' hidden physical traits can help people locate them faster — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
The fastest star in our galaxy moves at 8 per cent the speed of light
Astronomers have spotted the fastest star ever, whizzing at 8 per cent the speed of light around our galaxy's supermassive black hole closer than any star we've seen before
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Mysteriet med Ceres vita fläckar är löst
Ceres är den största himlakroppen i asteroidbältet mellan Mars och Jupiter, en dvärgplanet ärrad av kratrar. I en av kratrarna lyser vita fläckar, som har förvånat forskarna. De reflekterar ljus lika bra som en vit glaciär, men om det vore is skulle den avdunsta snabbt i den atmosfärsfria miljön. Närmare undersökningar visade attde här fläckarna består av flera sorters salt. Ett av salterna innehå
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Analyse: Kovending i maskespørgsmålet er uundgåelig og forsinket
PLUS. Evidensen for maskers virkning har ikke ændret sig. Men vores viden om covid-19 er større, og jorden er gødet hos befolkning og politikere.
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Furry engineers: sea otters in California's estuaries surprise scientists
It is not just at sea that North America's smallest marine mammals with a huge appetite are benefitting the ecosystem Photographs by Isabelle Groc When Brent Hughes started studying the seagrass beds of Elkhorn Slough, an estuary in Monterey Bay on California's central coast, he was surprised by what he found. In this highly polluted estuary, excessive nutrients from agricultural runoff spur the
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How to Study Racial Disparities
To understand the causes of unequal treatment, researchers need to be sensitive to the statistical, conceptual and historical complexities associated with race — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Makeup Classes Have Gone Virtual—and We Tried One Out
Many small companies and beauticians have updated in-store lessons for the new stay-at-home world. Think beauty YouTube, but better.
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Making a Covid-19 Vaccine Is Hard. Making One for Kids Is Harder
As researchers deepen their understanding of children's role in the pandemic, some argue they are being overlooked in the race to a vaccine.
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How to Study Racial Disparities
To understand the causes of unequal treatment, researchers need to be sensitive to the statistical, conceptual and historical complexities associated with race — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Marine food webs under increasing stress
Scientists at the University of Adelaide have found growing evidence that marine ecosystems will not cope well with rising sea temperatures caused by climate change.
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Marine food webs under increasing stress
Scientists at the University of Adelaide have found growing evidence that marine ecosystems will not cope well with rising sea temperatures caused by climate change.
6h
New method for late-stage functionalization of carbon-hydrogen bonds
National University of Singapore chemists have developed a photo-induced method for late-stage functionalization of carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds in organic molecules.
6h
Fracture toughness of the material for aircraft construction is increased by 1.5 times
Scientists from NUST MISIS have found a way to increase the fracture toughness of silicon carbide, a promising structural material for the production of refractory parts, by 1.5 times. These results were achieved due to the formation of reinforcing nanofibers in the structure. In the future, the technology will expand the scope of silicon carbide application as a structural and refractory material
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Liquid crystals that can replace color-shifting ink and prevent money counterfeiting
A research team in Korea has developed a material that may potentially replace color-shifting ink in prevention of forgery of bank notes, ID cards and so on. A team headed by Dr. Sang-seok Lee from the Functional Composite Material Research Center of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) announced that it has successfully developed a technology to fabricate liquid crystals comprising
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Light Pollution from Coastal Cities Reaches Seafloor
The artificial night sky brightness could harm creatures that dwell in the ocean depths — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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PODCAST: Farlig pseudovidenskab fra Netflix. Vi tester cloudgaming
Fagfolk bør mane Netflix' pseudovidenskab i Jorden. Cloudgaming er på vej til at blive spilverdenens svar på Netflix. Selvom der stadig mangler evidens for deres virkning, har SSI pludselig sadlet om mht. ansigsmasker.
6h
Light Pollution from Coastal Cities Reaches Seafloor
The artificial night sky brightness could harm creatures that dwell in the ocean depths — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
American Passports Are Useless Now
Becoming a United States citizen was meaningful to me for a great number of reasons. German by birth, I had come to feel at home in America, and to love it. For all the deep injustices that shape this country, I remained convinced that the United States was more likely than just about any other place in the world to build a thriving, diverse democracy. And when I wrote about the danger that right
6h
Coronavirus Live Updates
With tax revenues plummeting, states could face a cumulative budget gap of $555 billion through the 2022 fiscal year, according to one estimate.
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Adaptation in U.S. Corn Belt increases resistance to soil carbon loss with climate change
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70819-z
7h
Elastic modulus evolution of rocks under heating–cooling cycles
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70920-3
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Contribution of endogenous antibodies to learning deficits and astrocytosis in human P301S mutant tau transgenic mice
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70845-x
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The origin of early Acheulean expansion in Europe 700 ka ago: new findings at Notarchirico (Italy)
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68617-8 The origin of early Acheulean expansion in Europe 700 ka ago: new findings at Notarchirico (Italy)
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A fine-tuned β-catenin regulation during proliferation of corneal endothelial cells revealed using proteomics analysis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70800-w
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Mineral nitrogen captured in field-aged biochar is plant-available
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70586-x
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We Flattened the Curve. Our Kids Belong in School.
Because the coronavirus is still spreading rapidly in much of the country, not every school district can bring children and teachers back safely and equitably this fall. But among those that can is Somerville, Massachusetts—the city of about 80,000 just northwest of Boston where my family and I live. After a biotech conference in late February spread the coronavirus in the Boston area, public off
7h
The 'Iran Connection': A ring of four research groups has published hundreds of dodgy papers, says whistleblower
A scheme of far-reaching research misconduct among several groups of Iranian researchers may have created hundreds of low-quality and fraudulent publications, according to a new detailed report by an anonymous whistleblower who has already forced the retraction of dozens of papers by one author in the ring. The whistleblower, who goes by the pseudonym Artemisia … Continue reading
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Team discovers a new role for a well-known molecule as a plant hormone
Researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD) have discovered an entirely new role for a well-known plant molecule called ACC, providing the first clear example of ACC acting on its own as a likely plant hormone. Just like in humans and animals, hormones in plants carry messages to signal and trigger essential processes for plant health and functionality, from reproduction to defense. Without th
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Team discovers a new role for a well-known molecule as a plant hormone
Researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD) have discovered an entirely new role for a well-known plant molecule called ACC, providing the first clear example of ACC acting on its own as a likely plant hormone. Just like in humans and animals, hormones in plants carry messages to signal and trigger essential processes for plant health and functionality, from reproduction to defense. Without th
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Book Review: A Pair of Guides to Fossils, Past and Future
In "Footprints" and "Some Assembly Required," two authors explore different kinds of fossils. While Neil Shubin challenges misperceptions that many people have about mysteries of evolution, David Farrier ponders everyday objects that will be fossils in the future — and what else humans are leaving behind.
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Omdiskuteret klimaløsning skuffer fælt
PLUS. Blot 23 såkaldte biocoveranlæg er blevet etableret på danske lossepladser mod de forudsatte 100. Nu er tilskudsordningen udløbet.
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A college kid's fake, AI-generated blog fooled tens of thousands. This is how he made it.
At the start of the week, Liam Porr had only heard of GPT-3. By the end, the college student had used the AI model to produce an entirely fake blog under a fake name. It was meant as a fun experiment. But then one of his posts found its way to the number-one spot on Hacker News. Few people noticed that his blog was completely AI-generated. Some even hit "Subscribe." While many have speculated abo
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UMD discovers a new role for a well-known molecule as a plant hormone
Researchers at the University of Maryland have discovered a new role for a well-known plant molecule, providing the first clear example of ACC acting as a likely plant hormone. In Nature Communications, researchers show that ACC has a critical role in pollination and seed production by activating proteins similar to those in human and animal nervous systems. Findings could change textbooks and ope
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Newly identified gut cells nurture lymph capillaries
IBS research team has identified new subsets of gut connective cells, which are crucial for lymphatic growth.The findings imply a crucial link between the physiology of intestinal environment and biological interactions between cell types.
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Coronavirus: When Will Long-Term Care Facilities Reopen to Visitors?
Struck hard by the pandemic, long-term and assisted living facilities shut their doors to outsiders. Many still have not reopened.
8h
UK agrees deals for 90m doses of two potential coronavirus vaccines
Government secures early access to those being developed by Novavax and Janssen Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK has added a further 90m doses of coronavirus vaccine to its stockpile. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has announced that it has ordered 60m doses of a vaccine from the US biotech company Novavax, and 30m doses of another
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Experience: I helped a snail find love
It is difficult for lefty snails to mate with normal snails because they have genitals on the opposite side of their head It began when a retired scientist at the Natural History Museum in London told me that he had found a rare garden snail with a left-coiling shell. In 20 years of researching the genetics of snails at universities around the world, I had never found a "lefty" garden snail. My f
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Mechanism of ribosome rescue by alternative ribosome-rescue factor B
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17853-7 Rescue of ribosomes stalled on non-stop mRNA is essential for cell viability, and several rescue systems to resolve stalling exist in bacteria. Here, the authors use rapid kinetics and cryo-EM to reveal the pathway and selectivity mechanism of ArfB-mediated ribosome rescue.
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CryoEM structure of the low-complexity domain of hnRNPA2 and its conversion to pathogenic amyloid
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17905-y hnRNPA2 is involved in RNA metabolism and can form both functional amyloid-like fibrils in membraneless organelles, and pathogenic fibrils in neurodegenerative conditions. Here, the authors present the cryo-EM fibril structure of the wild-type hnRNPA2 low-complexity domain (LCD) and the crystal structure of a
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Artificial intelligence for the detection of COVID-19 pneumonia on chest CT using multinational datasets
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17971-2 Chest CT is emerging as a valuable diagnostic tool for clinical management of COVID-19 associated lung disease. Here, the authors present a multinational study on the application of deep learning algorithms for COVID-19 diagnosis against multiple lung conditions as controls.
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Reassessment of the distinctive geometry of Staphylococcus aureus cell division
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17940-9 Staphylococcus aureus is thought to divide in three alternating orthogonal planes over three consecutive divisions. Here the authors dispel this idea, showing that one out of the multiple planes perpendicular to the septum can be used in daughter cells irrespective of its orientation in relation to the penulti
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Genomic characterization of malignant progression in neoplastic pancreatic cysts
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17917-8 Neoplastic pancreatic cysts are associated with invasive pancreatic cancer, but their origins and evolutionary relationships are unclear. Here, the authors present the evolutionary analysis of neoplastic cysts and report them as precursors of invasive pancreatic cancer, and that SMAD4/TGFBR2 alterations are li
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A scalable CRISPR/Cas9-based fluorescent reporter assay to study DNA double-strand break repair choice
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17962-3 Cells employ different repair pathways to repair DNA double strand breaks. Here, the authors develop a CRISPR/Cas9-dependent method to study choices in DNA repair called the Color Assay Tracing-Repair (CAT-R) which simultaneously measure outcomes of DSB repair via end-protection and end-resection pathways.
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Scavenging of reactive dicarbonyls with 2-hydroxybenzylamine reduces atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic Ldlr−/− mice
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17915-w Hypercholesterolemia is associated with lipid peroxidation induced reactive dicarbonyl adducts. Here the authors show that the dicarbonyl scavenger, 2-hydroxybenzylamine(2-HOBA), decreases reactive dicarbonyl modifications of LDL and HDL, improves HDL function, reduces atherosclerosis and promotes features of
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Reductive cyanation of organic chlorides using CO2 and NH3 via Triphos–Ni(I) species
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17939-2 Nitriles are key intermediates in production of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. Here, the authors report a nickel-catalyzed reductive cyanation of organic chlorides with CO2/NH3 and urea as cyanation reagents to afford a broad range of organic nitriles.
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What Really Scares Voting Experts About the Postal Service
President Donald Trump and his allies might well succeed in undermining the United States Postal Service's ability to handle an expected surge in mail-in ballots this fall. But the biggest immediate threat to voting by mail isn't blocked funding. Trump acknowledged yesterday that he opposes a major stimulus deal with Democrats in part because he wants to stop an infusion of $25 billion to the Pos
8h
Danskere vest for Storebælt har lettere adgang til eksperimentel behandling
Læger vest for Storebælt søger langt oftere vejledning om eksperimentel behandling hos Sundhedsstyrelsen end læger øst for bæltet. Ledende overlæge fra Roskilde afviser, at der er et problem og retter i stedet kritik mod rådgivningstilbud, som »har overlevet sig selv«.
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Dansk firma måtte give op: Spillet om cloud gaming er ikke for de små
Cloud gaming kræver enorme mængder computerkraft i skyen fra datacentre spredt over hele verden. Det er der kun ganske få selskaber, der kan levere.
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The entrepreneur's guide to success: Follow these tips
Anyone can start a business and be an entrepreneur, but the reality is that most businesses will fail. Building something successful from the ground up takes hard work, passion, intelligence, and a network of people who are equally as smart and passionate as you are. It also requires the ability to accept and learn from your failures. In this video, entrepreneurs in various industries including 3
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Elbiler uden afgift er den dyreste af regeringens mulige klimatiltag
PLUS. Selvom det er dyrt at satse på elbilers klimaeffekt, kan det ifølge klimarådet stadig give mening på lang sigt.
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Danske Patienter: Forskel i eksperimentel behandling er »Helt uacceptabelt«
Det er en geografisk ulighed, som vi ikke kan være tilfredse med i det danske sundhedsvæsen, siger Morten Freil, direktør i Danske Patienter, om de markante forskelle på, hvor ofte regionerne søger rådgivning om eksperimentel behandling hos Sundhedsstyrelsen.
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UK secures another 90m doses of potential Covid-19 vaccines
Deals with J&J and Novavax bring country's total advance orders to 340m doses
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Covid vaccine tracker: when will we have a coronavirus vaccine?
More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progress Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…
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Nytt och säkert snabbtest för antikroppar mot covid-19
Ett nytt antikroppstest vid covid-19 har visat hög prestanda i kliniska tester och tillämpning. Antikropparna som mäts är kopplade till det så kallade spikeproteinet (S-protein) hos SARS-CoV-2-viruset som orsakar covid-19. Testet visar på 15 minuter om en person haft sjukdomen, oavsett om man haft symptom eller inte.
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China targets frozen goods after Brazilian chicken tests positive
Brasília rejects claim as Beijing conducts coronavirus tests on refrigerated imports
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Mauritius oil spill: Are major incidents less frequent?
Oil slicks can lead to major environmental disasters but industry experts say regulations are now much better.
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Robots go their own way deep in the ocean
Firms are building robots that can survey the seabed and underwater structures without human help.
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What kind of face mask best protects against coronavirus?
Your questions answered on what type of mask to wear to cut the risk of getting or giving someone Covid-19 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yes. Different types of mask offer different levels of protection. Surgical grade N95 respirators offer the highest level of protection against Covid-19 infection, followed by surgical grade masks. However, these masks are costly,
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Coronavirus: Wales may ease rules to allow extended families to meet
Up to four households will be able to gather from 22 August if conditions remain stable Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage People will be able to see more of their families and friends under plans to further ease the coronavirus restrictions in Wales. Mark Drakeford, the first minister, said that should conditions remain stable over the next week then from 22 August, up
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Klimatförändringar trolig orsak till ullhåriga noshörningens utdöende
Utdöendet av förhistoriska djurarter som grottlejonet, den ullhåriga mammuten och den ullhåriga noshörningen vid slutet av den senaste istiden har ofta tillskrivits människans expansion över världen. Ny genforskning visar att åtminstone den ullhåriga noshörningens utdöende kan ha haft andra orsaker. – Den ullhåriga noshörningen hade gener som var anpassade till ett kallt klimat, och vi ser ingen
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1.750 specialundersøgelser flyttes for at sikre lungespeciale i Viborg
Udvidelse af Regionshospitalet Viborg har givet den fornødne plads til, at 1.750 årlige specialundersøgelser og behandlinger kan flyttes. Dermed kan hospitalet leve op til robusthedskrav fra Sundhedsstyrelsen.
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US West faces reckoning over water but avoids cuts for now
The white rings that wrap around two massive lakes in the U.S. West are a stark reminder of how water levels are dropping and a warning that the 40 million people who rely on the Colorado River face a much drier future.
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Research recommends integrated approaches to managing reniform nematodes in cotton
While there are many pests affecting cotton, the reniform nematode is one the most damaging, with the ability to cause annual losses of approximately $33 million within the Mid-Southern United States. Farmers struggle to manage this pest as commercially available resistance is not widespread and a limited number of products are commercially available for use in suppressing the reniform nematode.
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Research recommends integrated approaches to managing reniform nematodes in cotton
While there are many pests affecting cotton, the reniform nematode is one the most damaging, with the ability to cause annual losses of approximately $33 million within the Mid-Southern United States. Farmers struggle to manage this pest as commercially available resistance is not widespread and a limited number of products are commercially available for use in suppressing the reniform nematode.
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Reconstructing global climate through Earth's history
A key component when forecasting what the Earth's climate might look like in the future is the ability to draw on accurate temperature records of the past. By reconstructing past latitudinal temperature gradients (the difference in average temperature between the equator and the poles) researchers can predict where, for example, the jet stream, which controls storms and temperatures in the mid-lat
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Britain's coronavirus death rate is down, but the unanswered question is why | Charlotte Summers
Some have suggested we're now successfully treating Covid-19, or that 'herd immunity' has finally arrived. Neither is true Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Why has the mortality rate for coronavirus decreased in the UK? The Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre has analysed data from more than 10,000 patients admitted to intensive care units in England, Wa
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Dansk Hjerteregister har fået hul igennem til Sundhedsplatformen
At der nu er data fra alle regioner, er vigtigt nyt for Dansk Hjerteregisters årsrapport, siger formand Jens Flensted Lassen. Rapporten viser en tendens til, at iskæmisk hjertesygdom er på tilbagegang, og at patienter, der har den, lever længere med den.
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Gigtafdelinger har svært ved at leve op til kvalitetetskrav
Få afdelinger kan leve op til krav om tæt opfølgning af patienter, der har fået konstaterer ledde- og rygsøjlegigt. Manglende går det svært at sikre registrering af kvalitetsdata i hverdagen, fremgår det af den seneste årsrapport fra DANBIO-databasen.
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Corona skapar kaos kring barnvaccinationer
Flera av ett barns viktigaste vaccinationer ska ges under det första levnadsåret, enligt Världshälsoorganisationen, WHO. Bland dessa ingår vaccin mot bland annat difteri, kikhosta, polio och mässling, varav det sistnämnda beräknats ha räddat livet på 23,2 miljoner barn sedan 2000.
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Science is saving the forty-spotted pardalote – nature's ridiculous tiny idiot | First Dog on the Moon
Blood-sucking maggots are bent on the deaths of these innocent creatures Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are published Get all your needs met at the First Dog shop if what you need is First Dog merchandise and prints Continue reading…
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Debat: Miljøstyrelsen lyttede ikke til advarsler mod biocover
Siden 2014 har Ole Elmose advaret om, at der ikke er methan nok i de gamle deponier til, at biocovers ville være rentable. Nu er ordningen stoppet, og han konstaterer, at han havde ret.
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Fast food consumption is on the rise among US children and adolescents
Children in the US gain an average of 14 per cent of their daily calories from fast food – up from about 11 per cent a decade ago – according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Victoria reports 14 more coronavirus deaths, including man in his 20s
Premier Daniel Andrews announces 372 new cases as chief health officer Brett Sutton says he is 'confident' Covid-19 outbreak has peaked Follow today's Australian coronavirus live blog Australian stats interactive ; Vic cases map ; NSW cases map ; NSW hotspots list State by state Covid restrictions ; Melbourne stage 4 restrictions ; Vic stage 3 rules Sign up for Guardian Australia's coronavirus em
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Can Imported Frozen Foods Really Spread COVID-19? Here's What Experts Say
That's what may have occurred in New Zealand.
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UK holidaymakers in race to return from France before quarantine deadline
Channel Tunnel warns it doesn't have capacity for extra travellers trying to get home before 4am on Saturday Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK's airports and ports were braced for travel chaos on Friday as some of the hundreds of thousands of British holidaymakers in France race to return home before new quarantine rules kick in. Summer plans have been thrown in
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Fra mikrobe til menneske: Ny opdagelse gør os klogere på, hvordan liv på Jorden opstod
Den lille mikrobe har givet en vigtig evne videre til os.
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A star is reborn: dust cloud blamed for dimming of Betelgeuse
Mystery had enthralled skywatchers since the star began to lose luminosity last October – with some suggesting it could explode The sudden dimming of one of the Milky Way's brightest stars, Betelgeuse, could be due to a dust cloud spewing up from its surface, astronomers have said. The mystery has enthralled skywatchers since the star – part of the Orion constellation – began to lose luminosity l
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Photos of the Week: Antarctic Sunrise, Suspended Cabin, Shanghai Lightning
Heavy fog in India, the announcement of a vice-presidential candidate in Delaware, protests and anger in Beirut, coronavirus precautions in a Thai kindergarten, a Latvian folk and pagan metal band in concert, a funicular in Austria, a volcanic eruption in Indonesia, derecho damage in Iowa, guests at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, the return of the Mayflower II, and much more
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Sounds of action: Using ears, not just eyes, improves robot perception
People rarely use just one sense to understand the world, but robots usually only rely on vision and, increasingly, touch. Carnegie Mellon University researchers find that robot perception could improve markedly by adding another sense: hearing.
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Liquid crystals that can replace color shifting ink in preventing counterfeiting
A research team in Korea has developed a material that may potentially replace color shifting ink in prevention of forgery of bank notes, ID cards, and so on. A team headed by Dr. Sang-seok Lee from the Functional Composite Material Research Center of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology successfully developed a technology to fabricate liquid crystals Liquid crystal comprised of several l
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Genetic privacy: We must learn from the story of Henrietta Lacks
Henrietta Lacks's cells are used in experiments in laboratories around the world but were cultivated without her consent. The lessons from her story are more important than ever, says Maninder Ahluwalia
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Exploring Connections Between Cosmos & Mind Through Six Interactive Art Installations in "As Above As Below"
Are there parallels between the furthest reaches of our universe, and the foundations of thought, awareness, perception, and emotion? What are the connections between the webs and structures that define both? What are the differences? "As Above As Below" was an exhibition that examined these questions. It consisted of six artworks, each of them the product of a collaboration that included at least
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Skyen har ædt musik- og filmbranchen: Nu vil den have computerspillene
Igen lader det til, at amerikanske techgiganter skal levere digital kultur til Vesten. Denne gang via cloud-baserede spilplatforme.
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Heterogeneous origins and functions of mouse skeletal muscle-resident macrophages [Immunology and Inflammation]
Tissue-resident macrophages can originate from embryonic or adult hematopoiesis. They play important roles in a wide range of biological processes including tissue remodeling during organogenesis, organ homeostasis, repair following injury, and immune response to pathogens. Although the origins and tissue-specific functions of resident macrophages have been extensively studied in many…
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Decreasing snow cover alters functional composition and diversity of Arctic tundra [Ecology]
The Arctic is one of the least human-impacted parts of the world, but, in turn, tundra biome is facing the most rapid climate change on Earth. These perturbations may cause major reshuffling of Arctic species compositions and functional trait profiles and diversity, thereby affecting ecosystem processes of the whole tundra…
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The roles of long-range proton-coupled electron transfer in the directionality and efficiency of [FeFe]-hydrogenases [Chemistry]
As paradigms for proton-coupled electron transfer in enzymes and benchmarks for a fully renewable H2 technology, [FeFe]-hydrogenases behave as highly reversible electrocatalysts when immobilized on an electrode, operating in both catalytic directions with minimal overpotential requirement. Using the [FeFe]-hydrogenases from Clostridium pasteurianum (CpI) and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrHydA1) we
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The {alpha}{beta}TCR mechanosensor exploits dynamic ectodomain allostery to optimize its ligand recognition site [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Each αβT cell receptor (TCR) functions as a mechanosensor. The TCR is comprised of a clonotypic TCRαβ ligand-binding heterodimer and the noncovalently associated CD3 signaling subunits. When bound by ligand, an antigenic peptide arrayed by a major histocompatibility complex molecule (pMHC), the TCRαβ has a longer bond lifetime under piconewton-level…
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Opinion: Science policy for scientists: A simple task for great effect [Political Sciences]
Many scientists have become increasingly concerned with the course and status of science-related policies in recent years, and these concerns have only grown in the past months as governments have had to face a global pandemic. As experts in our respective fields, scientists have an obligation and an opportunity to…
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Overriding a moral default for honesty or dishonesty [Commentaries]
There is a long-standing paradox concerning the cognitive nature of honesty: Is it a matter of "will" or "grace" (1)? The will hypothesis assumes that honesty requires cognitive control to suppress temptation to cheat, while dishonest behavior to serve self-interest is people's automatic response. In contrast, the grace hypothesis assumes…
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The macroevolutionary dynamics of symbiotic and phenotypic diversification in lichens [Evolution]
Symbioses are evolutionarily pervasive and play fundamental roles in structuring ecosystems, yet our understanding of their macroevolutionary origins, persistence, and consequences is incomplete. We traced the macroevolutionary history of symbiotic and phenotypic diversification in an iconic symbiosis, lichens. By inferring the most comprehensive time-scaled phylogeny of lichen-forming fungi (LFF)
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'Project Power' Is a Secret Lesson About Science's Dark Side
Netflix's new film updates a played-out superhero trope with a hidden message about the evils of human experimentation.
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Alligators May Be Able to Survive Venomous Snake Bites
Alligator blood inhibits a key toxin in the venom of vipers such as rattlesnakes and copperheads.
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College Football's Great Unraveling
This week, the bottom fell out of college football. The future of the fall season had been wavering for more than a month as the coronavirus continued to burn through much of the United States, and on Tuesday, the Big 10, the conference that comprises the Midwest's major football programs, was the first to topple. It canceled its fall season, and a few hours later, the Pac-12, which represents ma
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The behavior of therapeutic antibodies in immunotherapy
Since the late 1990s, immunotherapy has been the frontline treatment against lymphomas where synthetic antibodies are used to stop the proliferation of cancerous white blood cells. However, in the more than 20 years since their use began, the molecular mechanisms that underlie this therapy are still little understood. For the first time, scientists have observed the interaction between therapeutic
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MS drug may be used to inhibit HIV infection and reduce latent reservoir
A multiple sclerosis drug may be used to block HIV infection and reduce the latent reservoir, according to new research.
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The Atlantic Daily: The President's Most Dangerous Enabler
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Christopher Lee / VII / Redux Jared Kushner is the second-most-powerful man in the White House. He's also the president's most dangerous enabler, Franklin Foer writes. For this new profile , Fran
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Coronavirus live news: France says UK quarantine will lead to reciprocal measures as global deaths pass 750,000
France and Spain report highest post-lockdown Covid-19 cases; Trans-Tasman travel bubble 'on pause' ; Iraq reports record daily infections. Follow the latest updates UK adds France to Covid-19 14-day quarantine list France says UK quarantine will lead to reciprocal measures Greece: UK passengers barred from flights over confusing form Mobile crematorium in Bolivia as deaths surge See all our coro
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The Coming or Possibly Nearly Here Storm
Former Scientific American editor Mark Alpert talks about his latest sci-fi thriller The Coming Storm, which warns about the consequences of unethical scientific research and of ignoring the… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Heavy class A drug use linked to heightened risk of sight loss in US military
Heavy use of class A drugs, such as heroin, methamphetamine, or cocaine is linked to a heightened risk of partial or total blindness among US military personnel, finds research published online in the journal BMJ Military Health.
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Smoking strongly linked to women's lower take up of cancer screening services
Smoking is strongly linked to lower use of cancer screening services by women, and more advanced disease once cancer is diagnosed, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open.
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Consumer researcher leaves Pitt after retractions for data anomalies
A brand researcher has parted ways with the Katz Graduate School of Business at the University of Pittsburgh, Retraction Watch has learned. The researcher, Nicole Verrochi Coleman, was an associate professor of business administration. Her staff profile disappeared a few weeks after several recent retractions came to light. A Pitt spokesperson confirmed that Coleman was … Continue reading
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This Hammerhead Is MASSIVE | Shark Week
Stream Monster Under the Bridge on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/monster-under-the-bridge Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're on Instagram! https://www.instagr
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Konrad Steffen, Who Sounded Alarm on Greenland Ice, Dies at 68
A renowned researcher on rising sea levels, he died after falling into the kind of crevasse that warming has created. "It looks like climate change actually claimed him as a victim," a colleague said.
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Anxiety and Depression Rises Among Young Adults, Blacks and Latinos in Pandemic
A new C.D.C. survey indicates that young people, as well as Blacks and Latinos of all ages, are showing signs of deteriorating mental health and some are resorting to substance abuse.
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Apple fjerner Fortnite fra App Store
Fortnite er ikke længere at finde i Apples App Store, efter udvikleren introducerede sit eget betalingssystem.
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Epic Games' Lawsuits Fire a Shot at Apple and Google's App Store 'Monopolies'
The Fortnite developer filed suits today in California that suggest it may even want to launch its own app stores on iOS and Android.
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You Can Now Waste $6,000 on an Elon Musk-Themed iPhone
Forbidden Idolatry Hey, you! Yes, you, discerning consumer! Do you have $5,830 to burn and disposable income where your soul should be? If so, it's a great day to be you: A Russian company called Caviar is selling an Elon Musk-themed iPhone 12 for that exact amount! Caviar has a long history of selling outlandish and expensive iPhone designs, Fox Business reports . Now, the company is claiming th
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The pandemic stilled human activity. What did this 'anthropause' mean for wildlife?
New studies aim to understand how animals reacted to less noise, traffic, and tourism
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New AI Might Finally Decipher Human Gestures
Waving Hello A team of scientists think they've finally figured out how to get artificial intelligence to recognize the gestures we use in everyday life. There are speech recognition bots out there, but until they can decipher what the hell it is we're doing with our hands , even the most sophisticated AI will be missing a crucial aspect of human communication. The problem, it turns out, was the
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Why your hair dulls the sharpest razor blades
Steel is fifty times harder than hair, yet shaving razors dull in a hurry. A new study finds much of this is caused by hair cracking razors at points of imperfection. The findings may lead to new ways of making razors that last longer. Everybody who shaves regularly knows that most razors only last a few shaves. Given that hair is not nearly as hard as steel, this tendency seems odd. Why should s
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CDC: Over 25% of Young Americans Considered Suicide Due to the Pandemic
The US is going through a mental health crisis of immense proportions, according to a new CDC study . It's a damning study, and a terrible predicament: according to the agency's numbers, 25.5 percent of young American adults between 18 and 24 considered suicide between May and June due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. 10.7 percent of respondents overall considered suicide. The mental health l
20h
Research recommends integrated approaches to managing reniform nematodes in cotton
While there are many pests affecting cotton, the reniform nematode is one the most damaging, with the ability to cause annual losses of approximately $33 million within the Mid-Southern United States. Farmers struggle to manage this pest as commercially available resistance is not widespread and a limited number of products are commercially available for use in suppressing the reniform nematode.
20h
How Floating Microbes Could Live in the Acid Clouds of Venus
A team of planetary scientists has proposed a hypothetical life cycle that could allow microbes to survive on Venus by migrating between different atmospheric layers.
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Social distancing can make living with eating disorders harder
The study found that people living with eating disorders, like many others, also report an increase in anxiety related to the pandemic. (Pixabay/) New research suggests that pandemic stress is exacerbating the symptoms of people who live with eating disorders. The study, published late last month in the International Journal of Eating Disorders , involved more than 1000 participants in the US and
20h
Big dogs face more joint problems if neutered early
Heavier mixed-breed dogs have higher health risks if neutered or spayed early, according to a new study.
20h
You Probably Won't Catch the Coronavirus From Frozen Food
Reports that the virus was detected in a trans-continental shipment of frozen chicken wings sparked concerns online. But experts aren't worried.
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Trump Eliminates Major Methane Rule, Even as Leaks Are Worsening
The weakening of Obama-era efforts to fight climate change amounts to a gift to many oil companies. Researchers warn that the decision ignores science.
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Big dogs face more joint problems if neutered early
Heavier mixed-breed dogs have higher health risks if neutered or spayed early, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis. The study found mixed-breed dogs weighing more than 44 pounds as adults are at higher risk for one or more joint disorders if neutered before 1 year of age. Dogs weighing up to 43 pounds had no increased risk for joint problems. The study
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200,000 Years Ago, Humans Created Beds of Grass and Ash to Sleep
Ancient site suggests early humans controlled fire and used plants to ward off insects. Border_Cave00_Cropped.jpg View from the mouth of Border Cave in South Africa, the site where researchers discovered fossilized bedding used by ancient humans. Image credits: Androstachys via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: Public domain Human Thursday, August 13, 2020 – 16:00 Katharine Gammon, Contribut
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Trump administration backs off plans to open land near Utah national parks to drilling
The Trump administration has canceled plans to open tens of thousands of acres for oil and gas drilling near three national parks in Utah next month, a victory for environmentalists and residents angered by its proposal.
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Big dogs face more joint problems if neutered early
Heavier mixed-breed dogs have higher health risks if neutered or spayed early, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis. The study found mixed-breed dogs weighing more than 44 pounds as adults are at higher risk for one or more joint disorders if neutered before 1 year of age. Dogs weighing up to 43 pounds had no increased risk for joint problems. The study
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Many medical 'rainy day' accounts aren't getting opened or filled, study finds
One-third of the people who could benefit from a special type of savings account to cushion the blow of their health plan deductible aren't doing so, a new study finds. And even among people who do open a health savings account, half haven't put any money into it in the past year. This means they may be missing a chance to avoid taxes on money they can use to pay for their health insurance deducti
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Hubble helps uncover the mystery of the dimming of Betelgeuse
New observations by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope suggest that the unexpected dimming of the supergiant star Betelgeuse was most likely caused by an immense amount of hot material ejected into space, forming a dust cloud that blocked starlight coming from Betelgeuse's surface.
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Unread second-opinion radiology reports waste health care resources
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), 537 of 4,696 second-opinion reports–11.4%, likely underestimated, too–were not read by a clinician. The imaging modality with the highest rate of not being read was sonography (62.5%), the requesting specialty with the highest rate was pediatrics (33.8%), and the radiologic subspecialty with the highest rate was interventional radiology
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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
Household contact the greatest risk for transmission of COVID-19.
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Big dogs face more joint problems if neutered early
Heavier mixed-breed dogs have higher health risks if neutered or spayed early, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis.
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To understand the machinery of life, this scientist breaks it on purpose
"I'm fascinated with life, and that's why I want to break it."
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To understand the machinery of life, this scientist breaks it on purpose
"I'm fascinated with life, and that's why I want to break it."
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New catalyst efficiently turns carbon dioxide into useful fuels and chemicals
As levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide continue to climb, scientists are looking for new ways of breaking down CO2 molecules to make useful carbon-based fuels, chemicals and other products. Now, a team of Brown University researchers has found a way to fine-tune a copper catalyst to produce complex hydrocarbons—known as C2-plus products—from CO2 with remarkable efficiency.
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Cover crop roots are an essential key to understanding ecosystem services
To judge the overall effectiveness of cover crops and choose those offering the most ecosystem services, agricultural scientists must consider the plants' roots as well as above-ground biomass, according to Penn State researchers who tested the characteristics of cover crop roots in three monocultures and one mixture.
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Bacterial enzymes 'hijacked' to create complex molecules normally made by plants
Chemists at Scripps Research have efficiently created three families of complex, oxygen-containing molecules that are normally obtainable only from plants.
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Embracing remote research can benefit postdocs and their research teams
As the uncertainty around reopening college and university campuses this fall continues, those who work, study, teach and conduct research are navigating the uncertain terrain of the "new normal." They are balancing physical distancing and other COVID-19 prevention practices with productivity, creating home workspaces and mastering communications and teamwork across time and space.
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Scientists discover way to make quantum states last 10,000 times longer
If we can harness it, quantum technology promises fantastic new possibilities. But first, scientists need to coax quantum systems to stay yoked for longer than a few millionths of a second.
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To understand the machinery of life, this scientist breaks it on purpose
By tinkering with some of life's oldest components, astrobiologists hope to find clues about how life emerged. In a recent article researchers report an unexpected discovery, hinting at an effect that prevents organisms from ever reaching evolutionary 'perfection.'
20h
Busting Up the Infection Cycle of Hepatitis B
Researchers have gained new understanding of the virus that causes hepatitis B and the 'spiky ball' that encloses its genetic blueprint. They looked at how the capsid — a protein shell that protects the blueprint and also drives the delivery of it to infect a host cell — assembles itself. The capsid is an important target in developing drugs to treat hepatitis B, a life-threatening and incurable
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Loss of a specific enzyme boosts fat metabolism and exercise endurance in mice
Blocking the activity of a fat-regulating enzyme in the muscles of mice leads to an increased capacity for endurance exercise, according to the results of a new study.
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Bacterial enzymes hijacked to create complex molecules normally made by plants
Chemists have efficiently created three families of complex, oxygen-containing molecules that are normally obtainable only from plants. These molecules, called terpenes, are potential starting points for new drugs and other high-value products — marking an important development for multiple industries. In addition, the new approach could allow chemists to build many other classes of compounds.
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Cover crop roots are an essential key to understanding ecosystem services
To judge the overall effectiveness of cover crops and choose those offering the most ecosystem services, agricultural scientists must consider the plants' roots as well as above-ground biomass, according to researchers who tested the characteristics of cover crop roots in three monocultures and one mixture.
20h
Simple mod makes quantum states last 10,000 times longer
A team of scientists has announced the discovery of a simple modification that allows quantum systems to stay operational — or 'coherent' — 10,000 times longer than before.
20h
Single-cell analysis provides new insights into mitochondrial diseases
Investigators have made discoveries at the single cell level to uncover new details concerning mitochondrial diseases — inherited disorders that interfere with energy production in the body and currently have no cure.
20h
Adding a meter between meals boosts vegetarian appeal
Researchers have identified the optimal dish positions to help "nudge" diners into picking more planet-friendly meals in cafeterias.
20h
How a protein stops cells from attacking their own DNA
Viruses multiply by injecting their DNA into a host cell. Once it enters the intracellular fluid, this foreign material triggers a defense mechanism known as the cGAS-STING pathway. The protein cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase (cGAS), which is also found inside the fluid, binds to the invading DNA to create a new molecule. This, in turn, binds to another protein called Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING
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Bacterial enzymes 'hijacked' to create complex molecules normally made by plants
Chemists at Scripps Research have efficiently created three families of complex, oxygen-containing molecules that are normally obtainable only from plants.
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Researchers design efficient low-cost system for producing power at night
Researchers have designed an off-grid, low-cost modular energy source that can efficiently produce power at night. The system uses commercially available technology and could eventually help meet the need for nighttime lighting in urban areas or provide lighting in developing countries.
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Researchers demonstrate fundamentally new approach to ultrasound imaging
North Carolina State University researchers have demonstrated a new technique for creating ultrasound images. The new approach is substantially simpler than existing techniques and could significantly drive down technology costs.
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Researchers discover new phase of nanoconfined water
Researchers at MIPT Laboratory of Terahertz Spectroscopy together with their Russian and international colleagues discovered a new phase of nanoconfined water; separate water molecules that are confined within nanocavities formed by ions of cordierite crystal lattice. The first reliable experimental observation of a phase transition in a network of dipole-dipole coupled water molecules is, in and
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How a protein stops cells from attacking their own DNA
Viruses multiply by injecting their DNA into a host cell. Once it enters the intracellular fluid, this foreign material triggers a defense mechanism known as the cGAS-STING pathway. The protein cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase (cGAS), which is also found inside the fluid, binds to the invading DNA to create a new molecule. This, in turn, binds to another protein called Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING
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4 breathing techniques to get you through high-stress moments
Anxiety is triggered environmentally and emotionally, but a physiological response quickly follows. Calming breathing techniques help to tamp down the physiological response of anxiety. The following four exercises are known to help calm anxiety and develop focus. Stressed? Use This Breathing Technique to Improve Your Attention and Memory, with Emma Seppälä Alternate Nostril Breathing Emma Seppäl
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Effective new tool created for discerning fake news
Research from the University of Texas at Austin shows platforms can reduce the extent to which their users fall for and spread fake news articles by deploying a better designed fake news flag.
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To understand the machinery of life, this scientist breaks it on purpose
By tinkering with some of life's oldest components, astrobiologists hope to find clues about how life emerged. In a recent paper, a group led by Betül Kaçar at the University of Arizona report an unexpected discovery, hinting at an effect that prevents organisms from ever reaching evolutionary perfection.
20h
Study focuses on a different kind of liquid biopsy to detect cancer
In a study published August 13, 2020, in Cell by a team of collaborators from Memorial Sloan Kettering and Weill Cornell Medicine, researchers report that tiny packages of materials released by tumors, called EVPs (extracellular vesicles and particles), may serve as biomarkers for detecting a number of different types of cancer in the early stages.
20h
Simple mod makes quantum states last 10,000 times longer
A team of scientists has announced the discovery of a simple modification that allows quantum systems to stay operational — or 'coherent' — 10,000 times longer than before.
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Tiniest premature babies fare worse with cow milk fortifiers
Human-based milk fortifiers offer better health outcomes for severely underweight, premature babies when compared to traditional, cow-based milk fortifiers, a new study suggests. More than 380,000 babies are born prematurely in the United States each year, according to the March of Dimes. These babies are often severely underweight babies and struggle to get the nutrients they need from breast mi
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ISIS Allegedly Ran a Covid-19 PPE Scam Site
The Justice Department says that an agent of the terrorist organization operated FaceMaskCenter.com, in part of a series of cryptocurrency-related complaints.
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Yale Researchers Seek FDA Approval For Coronavirus Saliva Test
Researchers at Yale University are seeking emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration for a coronavirus saliva test. This streamlined test can offer results faster and easier.
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Cover crop roots are an essential key to understanding ecosystem services
To judge the overall effectiveness of cover crops and choose those offering the most ecosystem services, agricultural scientists must consider the plants' roots as well as above-ground biomass, according to Penn State researchers who tested the characteristics of cover crop roots in three monocultures and one mixture.
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Engineered capsids for efficient gene delivery to the eye
A rational design approach created novel variants of adeno-associated viral (AAV) capsids. These have improved transduction properties in the mouse retina and cornea.
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Bacterial enzymes hijacked to create complex molecules normally made by plants
Chemists at Scripps Research have efficiently created three families of complex, oxygen-containing molecules that are normally obtainable only from plants. These molecules, called terpenes, are potential starting points for new drugs and other high-value products — marking an important development for multiple industries. In addition, the new approach could allow chemists to build many other clas
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Exercise Enhancement
Blocking the activity of a fat-regulating enzyme in the muscles of mice leads to an increased capacity for endurance exercise, according to the results of a new study.
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UChicago scientists discover way to make quantum states last 10,000 times longer
A team of scientists at the University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering announced the discovery of a simple modification that allows quantum systems to stay operational–or 'coherent'–10,000 times longer than before.
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The US Seized Millions in Crypto From Terrorist Groups
The Big Score U.S. federal law enforcement recently seized millions of dollars' worth of cryptocurrency from a trio of terrorist organizations . The seizure, which is the world's largest, funneled funding away from al-Qaeda, ISIS, and the al-Qassam Brigades, which is a militant wing of Hamas, NBC News reports . On its own, it's a major counterterrorist achievement, but it also serves as a reminde
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Hepatitis B: Natural controllers shed light on immunity mechanisms
To improve our understanding of the antibody response conferring protection against HBV infection, scientists have produced and characterized human monoclonal antibodies specific to viral envelope antigens, referred as HBsAg, from blood memory B cells isolated from HBV vaccinees and natural controllers.
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Efficient low-cost system for producing power at night
Researchers have designed an off-grid, low-cost modular energy source that can efficiently produce power at night. The system uses commercially available technology and could eventually help meet the need for nighttime lighting in urban areas or provide lighting in developing countries.
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New catalyst efficiently turns carbon dioxide into useful fuels and chemicals
By efficiently converting CO2 into complex hydrocarbon products, a new catalyst could potentially aid in large-scale efforts to recycle excess carbon dioxide.
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The (neuro)science of getting and staying motivated
Neuroscientists have discovered that the degree of motivation and the stamina to keep it up depends on the ratio between the neurotransmitters glutamine and glutamate in the nucleus accumbens of the brain.
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First opioids for teens may not up drug abuse risk by much
Young adults who receive an opioid prescription for the first time may have a slightly greater risk of a substance-related problem later, but that risk might not be as high as previously thought, according to a new study. The findings show that, compared with people not prescribed an opioid, 1 to 2% more of those prescribed an opioid for the first time developed a substance use disorder or other
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Coronavirus Live Updates: California Becomes First State to Report 600,000 Cases
Five communities in South Texas have become leading hot spots in the United States. Fewer new jobless claims and a rising deficit could further hamper stimulus talks.
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Earliest known beds are 227,000-year-old piles of grass and ash
Grass bedding in South Africa's Border cave dates back 227,000 years, and was put on top of ash to help keep biting insects away
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