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The Causes of Adult Acne and How to Get Rid of It
Persistent pimples in adulthood might be linked to hormones, genetics, diet or stress. Although acne treatments aren't one-size-fits-all, dermatologists recommend trying some time-tested methods.
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Mathematical tool helps calculate properties of quantum materials more quickly
Many quantum materials have been nearly impossible to simulate mathematically because the computing time required is too long. Now a joint research group at Freie Universität Berlin and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB, Germany) has demonstrated a way to considerably reduce the computing time. This could accelerate the development of materials for energy-efficient IT technologies of the future.
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Poor hygiene is significant risk for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria colonization
Scientists have found clear indicators for how the interaction of poor hygiene and antibiotic use contribute to the colonization of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) bacteria in humans, a problem that contributes to hundreds of thousands of deaths annually.
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Doctors Forge Ahead with Plasma for COVID-19, Benefits Uncertain
Researchers say the popularity of convalescent plasma makes it more difficult to gather high-quality data on its efficacy.
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What does the COVID-19 summer surge mean for your cats and dogs?
From the risk pets pose to people to the symptoms your pet might show, we break down the newest science
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Eight tips for boosting mental health at college in the age of COVID-19
No parties, no football games, but plenty of reading and other assignments to work through. Fall '20 is going to be one for the books (for the wrong reasons). (Alex Bierwagen/Unsplash/) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ideas for hosting a virtual party , and the argument against using valved masks . This fall, students might not recognize the
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Linking sight and movement
Researchers found that image-processing circuits in the primary visual cortex not only are more active when animals move freely, but that they receive signals from a movement-controlling region of the brain that is independent from the region that processes what the animal is looking at.
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Scotland and Wales overruled London on quarantine deadline
Travel restrictions on France and other countries brought forward by 24 hours after pressure from devolved nations
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Teens who vape face much higher risk of COVID-19
Teenagers and young adults who vape face a much higher risk of COVID-19 than their peers who do not vape, according to new research. The study is believed to be the first to examine connections between youth vaping and COVID-19 using US population-based data collected during the pandemic. "We need to tell everyone: If you are a vaper, you are putting yourself at risk for COVID-19 and other lung d
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UCLA computer scientists set benchmarks to optimize quantum computer performance
Two UCLA computer scientists have shown that existing compilers, which tell quantum computers how to use their circuits to execute quantum programs, inhibit the computers' ability to achieve optimal performance. Specifically, their research has revealed that improving quantum compilation design could help achieve computation speeds up to 45 times faster than currently demonstrated.
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Study shows frequently used serology test may not detect antibodies that could confirm protection against reinfection of COVID-19
Two different types of detectable antibody responses in SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) tell very different stories and may indicate ways to enhance public health efforts against the disease, according to researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor binding domain (S-RBD) are speculated to neutralize virus infection, while the SARS-CoV
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Linking sight and movement
Researchers found that image-processing circuits in the primary visual cortex not only are more active when animals move freely, but that they receive signals from a movement-controlling region of the brain that is independent from the region that processes what the animal is looking at.
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Remains of 17th century bishop support neolithic emergence of tuberculosis
Researchers present analysis of the highest quality ancient Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome to date, suggesting the pathogen is much younger than previously believed.
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200,000 years ago, humans preferred to kip cozy
Researchers in South Africa's Border Cave have found evidence that people have been using grass bedding to create comfortable areas for sleeping and working on at least 200,000 years ago.
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Scientists demonstrate how genetic variations cause eczema
New research delineates how two relatively common variations in a gene called KIF3A are responsible for an impaired skin barrier that allows increased water loss from the skin, promoting the development of atopic dermatitis, commonly known as eczema. This finding could lead to genetic tests that empower parents and physicians to take steps to potentially protect vulnerable infants from developing
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ICE Signs Contract With Controversial Facial Recognition Company
Clearview AI According to documents obtained by tech accountability nonprofit Tech Inquiry , the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) signed a contract with (the extremely controversial) facial recognition tech company Clearview AI, New York-based startup currently being sued by several companies and civil rights groups. The contract, only listing "mission support," included a purchase order
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Coronavirus Live Updates: Firm Overseeing Federal Database Refuses Senators' Questions
People who recover from the virus have a three-month window of safety, C.D.C. guidance shows. As tax revenues plummet, states face an estimated $555 billion budget gap over the next two years.
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Russia vaccine thrusts little-known state research unit into spotlight
Gamaleya Institute says it has been developing the science behind its breakthrough for decades
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How abolitionists paved way for the 19th Amendment
As the centennial of the 19th Amendment approaches, marking the milestone in women's suffrage shouldn't go without acknowledging the intersection of gender and racial justice in America, argues Estelle Freedman. The 19th Amendment guaranteed that women throughout the United States would have the right to vote on equal terms with men. The amendment marked a culmination of decades-long efforts by w
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Coronavirus News Roundup: August 8-August 14
Here are pandemic highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Targeting a conserved cell pathway may offer treatments for numerous viruses, including SARS-CoV-2
Scientists have identified a small molecule that inhibits multiple different viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, in tissue culture and in mice by targeting the same signaling pathway. By identifying a host cell pathway that a wide variety of viruses rely on for successful infection, the findings suggest a possible target for broad-spectrum antiviral drugs.
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Synthetic drug ebselen could be repurposed to treat SARS-CoV-2 by targeting main protease at distant
The synthetic drug ebselen can bind to both the catalytic region and a previously unknown distant site on the SARS-CoV-2 virus' main protease, according to a molecular simulation analysis of the drug's interactions with this enzyme.
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Diving with Mako Sharks | Shark Week
Stream Mako Nation on Discovery GO: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/full-episodes/mako-nation Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/SharkWeek Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/SharkWeek We're on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/Discovery https://w
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Watching changes in plant metabolism — live
Almost all life on Earth, e.g. our food and health, depend on metabolism in plants. To understand how these metabolic processes function, researchers at Münster University with the participation of the University of Bonn are studying key mechanisms in the regulation of energy metabolism. A new method of in vivo biosensor technology has enabled them to monitor in real time what effects environmenta
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Native trees thrive in teak plantations and may protect the Panama Canal
Teak often underperforms on poor soils. By planting valuable native trees in existing teak plantations, researchers will evaluate the potential increase in timber value, biodiversity value and ecosystem services provided.
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Serenity Not Now: Meditation and Mindfulness Can Make Depression Worse
If you've ever dealt with depression or anxiety, there's a decent chance that someone, professional or otherwise, has suggested you try meditation . For many, mindfulness exercises can help. But new research suggests that for a small subset of people, about eight percent, meditating on one's own thoughts can actually make their depression or anxiety much worse. "For most people, it works fine but
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The best hand towels for bathrooms, kitchens, and home gyms
Dry in style. (Vitor Pinto via Unsplash/) Hand towels exist in a rare space where you don't really expect much from them, yet you expect them to do everything. They are the towel you reach for after washing your hands, making a mess, or rat-tailing a fly off the wall. They are expected to be no frills, but tough, durable, and soft in equal measure. It's a lot to ask from something you barely thin
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Scientists Create Quantum System That Stays Operational 10,000 Longer
Quantum computers only are useful to us when we know how the states of electrons relate to each other. But getting to a state where this relationship is known — "quantum coherence" — is extremely difficult and costly. That may soon change thanks to a new discovery. A team of scientists at the University of Chicago have figured out a way to keep a quantum computer system "coherent" (or: operationa
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NASA bounces laser beams off of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter
Laser experiments can reveal precisely how far away an object is from Earth. For years scientists have been bouncing light off of reflectors on the lunar surface that were installed during the Apollo era, but these reflectors have become less efficient over time. The recent success could reveal the cause of the degradation, and also lead to new discoveries about the Moon's evolution. NASA's Lunar
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NASA finds wind shear making Tropical Depression 10E struggle
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of a struggling Tropical Depression 10E in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Wind shear is preventing the storm from intensifying into a tropical storm.
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Researchers one step closer to bomb-sniffing cyborg locusts
Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has determined that locusts can smell explosives and determine where the smells originated — an important step in engineering cyborg bomb-sniffing locusts.
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Traces of ancient life tell story of early diversity in marine ecosystems
If you could dive down to the ocean floor nearly 540 million years ago just past the point where waves begin to break, you would find an explosion of life–scores of worm-like animals and other sea creatures tunneling complex holes and structures in the mud and sand–where before the environment had been mostly barren.
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NASA finds wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Josephine
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Josephine east of the Lesser Antilles island chain. Suomi NPP revealed that Josephine was being affected by wind shear.
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Preexisting drug shows promise in fight against COVID-19
A team of researchers at the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering (PME) at the University of Chicago used state-of-the-art computer simulations to identify a preexisting drug that could fast-track a solution to the worldwide pandemic.
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Anschutz researchers overturn hypothesis underlying the sensitivity of the mammalian auditory system
A new study from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus challenges a decades-old hypothesis on adaptation, a key feature in how sensory cells of the inner ear (hair cells) detect sound.
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A light bright and tiny: NIST scientists build a better nanoscale LED
A new design for light-emitting diodes achieves a dramatic increase in brightness as well as the ability to create laser light — characteristics that could make it valuable in a range of applications. The device shows an increase in brightness of 100 to 1,000 times over conventional submicron-sized LED designs.
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Cardiovascular risk factors tied to COVID-19 complications and death
COVID-19 patients with cardiovascular comorbidities or risk factors are more likely to develop cardiovascular complications while hospitalized, and more likely to die from COVID-19 infection, according to a new study published August 14, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jolanda Sabatino of Universita degli Studi Magna Graecia di Catanzaro, Italy, and colleagues.
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Program achieves 85% reduction in malaria cases, but does not eliminate the disease
The intensive implementation of currently available tools to fight malaria can achieve a drastic reduction in disease burden, but is not enough to interrupt its transmission. This is the main conclusion reached by the Mozambican Alliance Towards Elimination of Malaria (MALTEM). The MALTEM research team has just published in Plos Medicine the results from the Magude Project, a three-year interventi
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Targeting the LANDO pathway holds a potential clue to treating Alzheimer's disease
Reducing neuroinflammation by disrupting a protein involved in recycling cellular components may provide a potential therapeutic approach for treating neurodegeneration and memory loss.
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Is There a New Baby Panda Due at the National Zoo?
An ultrasound today revealed that the National Zoo's resident giant panda, Mei Xiang, could be expecting
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Why Derechos Are So Devilishly Difficult to Predict
The destructive storms, with winds over 75 mph, are often compared to inland hurricanes. But unlike a hurricane, a derecho can come out of nowhere.
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Irregular heartbeat still shortens life even with drop in deaths
Deaths related to atrial fibrillation have declined over the last 45 years, researchers report. But the increasingly common condition still takes an average of two years off of a person's life, compared to three years back in the 1970s and early 1980s, a new study in the journal BMJ shows. "The prognosis of individuals with atrial fibrillation has improved over time, but atrial fibrillation is st
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Conformational dynamics of a G protein-coupled receptor helix 8 in lipid membranes
G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest and pharmaceutically most important class of membrane proteins encoded in the human genome, characterized by a seven-transmembrane helix architecture and a C-terminal amphipathic helix 8 (H8). In a minority of GPCR structures solved to date, H8 either is absent or adopts an unusual conformation. The controversial existence of H8 of the class A G
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What does Congress want from the National Science Foundation? A content analysis of remarks from 1995 to 2018
The U.S. Congress writes the legislation that funds the National Science Foundation (NSF). Researchers who seek NSF support may benefit by understanding how Congress views the agency. To this end, we use text analysis to examine every statement in the Congressional Record made by any member of Congress about the NSF over a 22-year period. While we find broad bipartisan support for the NSF, there
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Atomically dispersed Ni in cadmium-zinc sulfide quantum dots for high-performance visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen production
Catalysts with a single atom site allow highly tuning of the activity, stability, and reactivity of heterogeneous catalysts. Therefore, atomistic understanding of the pertinent mechanism is essential to simultaneously boost the intrinsic activity, site density, electron transport, and stability. Here, we report that atomically dispersed nickel (Ni) in zincblende cadmium–zinc sulfide quantum dots
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Altered 3D chromatin structure permits inversional recombination at the IgH locus
Immunoglobulin heavy chain ( IgH ) genes are assembled by two sequential DNA rearrangement events that are initiated by recombination activating gene products (RAG) 1 and 2. Diversity (D H ) gene segments rearrange first, followed by variable (V H ) gene rearrangements. Here, we provide evidence that each rearrangement step is guided by different rules of engagement between rearranging gene segme
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Bacteria-triggered tumor-specific thrombosis to enable potent photothermal immunotherapy of cancer
We discovered that attenuated Salmonella after intravenous injection would proliferate within various types of solid tumors but show rapid clearance in normal organs, without rendering notable toxicity. Bacteria-induced inflammation would trigger thrombosis in the infected tumors by destroying tumor blood vessels. Six types of tested tumors would all turn into darkened color with strong near-infr
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High-brightness lasing at submicrometer enabled by droop-free fin light-emitting diodes (LEDs)
"Efficiency droop," i.e., a decline in brightness of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at high electrical currents, limits the performance of all commercial LEDs and has limited the output power of submicrometer LEDs and lasers to nanowatts. We present a fin p-n junction LED pixel that eliminates efficiency droop, allowing LED brightness to increase linearly with current. With record current densities
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Large Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction induced by chemisorbed oxygen on a ferromagnet surface
The Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) is an antisymmetric exchange interaction that stabilizes chiral spin textures. It is induced by inversion symmetry breaking in noncentrosymmetric lattices or at interfaces. Recently, interfacial DMI has been found in magnetic layers adjacent to transition metals due to the spin-orbit coupling and at interfaces with graphene due to the Rashba effect. We
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Transiently chaotic simulated annealing based on intrinsic nonlinearity of memristors for efficient solution of optimization problems
Optimization problems are ubiquitous in scientific research, engineering, and daily lives. However, solving a complex optimization problem often requires excessive computing resource and time and faces challenges in easily getting trapped into local optima. Here, we propose a memristive optimizer hardware based on a Hopfield network, which introduces transient chaos to simulated annealing in aid
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Quantifying ecospace utilization and ecosystem engineering during the early Phanerozoic–The role of bioturbation and bioerosion
The Cambrian explosion (CE) and the great Ordovician biodiversification event (GOBE) are the two most important radiations in Paleozoic oceans. We quantify the role of bioturbation and bioerosion in ecospace utilization and ecosystem engineering using information from 1367 stratigraphic units. An increase in all diversity metrics is demonstrated for the Ediacaran-Cambrian transition, followed by
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Self-targeting, zwitterionic micellar dispersants enhance antibiotic killing of infectious biofilms–An intravital imaging study in mice
Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) hold infectious biofilms together and limit antimicrobial penetration and clinical infection control. Here, we present zwitterionic micelles as a previously unexplored, synthetic self-targeting dispersant. First, a pH-responsive poly(-caprolactone)- block -poly(quaternary-amino-ester) was synthesized and self-assembled with poly(ethylene glycol)- block -po
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Connecting a broad spectrum of transient slip on the San Andreas fault
Strain accumulated on the deep extension of some faults is episodically released during transient slow-slip events, which can subsequently load the shallow seismogenic region. At the San Andreas fault, the characteristics of slow-slip events are difficult to constrain geodetically due to their small deformation signal. Slow-slip events (SSEs) are often accompanied by coincident tremor bursts comp
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Decades-old model of slow adaptation in sensory hair cells is not supported in mammals
Hair cells detect sound and motion through a mechano-electric transduction (MET) process mediated by tip links connecting shorter stereocilia to adjacent taller stereocilia. Adaptation is a key feature of MET that regulates a cell's dynamic range and frequency selectivity. A decades-old hypothesis proposes that slow adaptation requires myosin motors to modulate the tip-link position on taller ste
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3D bioprinting spatiotemporally defined patterns of growth factors to tightly control tissue regeneration
Therapeutic growth factor delivery typically requires supraphysiological dosages, which can cause undesirable off-target effects. The aim of this study was to 3D bioprint implants containing spatiotemporally defined patterns of growth factors optimized for coupled angiogenesis and osteogenesis. Using nanoparticle functionalized bioinks, it was possible to print implants with distinct growth facto
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Near-atomic-scale observation of grain boundaries in a layer-stacked two-dimensional polymer
Two-dimensional (2D) polymers hold great promise in the rational materials design tailored for next-generation applications. However, little is known about the grain boundaries in 2D polymers, not to mention their formation mechanisms and potential influences on the material's functionalities. Using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we present a direct observa
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Evidence that the ProPerDP method is inadequate for protein persulfidation detection due to lack of specificity
Protein persulfidation (protein-SSH) is a previously unidentified type of modification found in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells in recent years. Although a few persulfidated proteins have been identified, analyzing protein persulfidation from a proteomic level is still a big challenge. ProPerDP is a persulfidation detection method recently reported in Science Advances . The authors claimed
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Epithelial cell-specific loss of function of Miz1 causes a spontaneous COPD-like phenotype and up-regulates Ace2 expression in mice
Cigarette smoking, the leading cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), has been implicated as a risk factor for severe disease in patients infected with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Here we show that mice with lung epithelial cell-specific loss of function of Miz1 , which we identified as a negative regulator of nuclear factor B (NF-B) signaling
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Easing the Monte Carlo sign problem
Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods are the gold standard for studying equilibrium properties of quantum many-body systems. However, in many interesting situations, QMC methods are faced with a sign problem, causing the severe limitation of an exponential increase in the runtime of the QMC algorithm. In this work, we develop a systematic, generally applicable, and practically feasible methodology f
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Noncanonical function of an autophagy protein prevents spontaneous Alzheimers disease
Noncanonical functions of autophagy proteins have been implicated in neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). The WD domain of the autophagy protein Atg16L is dispensable for canonical autophagy but required for its noncanonical functions. Two-year-old mice lacking this domain presented with robust β-amyloid (Aβ) pathology, tau hyperphosphorylation, reactive microgliosis,
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Estimation of incubation period distribution of COVID-19 using disease onset forward time: A novel cross-sectional and forward follow-up study
We have proposed a novel, accurate low-cost method to estimate the incubation-period distribution of COVID-19 by conducting a cross-sectional and forward follow-up study. We identified those presymptomatic individuals at their time of departure from Wuhan and followed them until the development of symptoms. The renewal process was adopted by considering the incubation period as a renewal and the
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A novel mouse model of chronic suppurative otitis media and its use in preclinical antibiotic evaluation
Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) is a neglected pediatric disease affecting 330 million worldwide for which no new drugs have been introduced for over a decade. We developed a mouse model with utility in preclinical drug evaluation and antimicrobial discovery. Our model used immune-competent mice, tympanic membrane perforation and inoculation with luminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa that en
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How Much Protein Do You Actually Need in Your Diet?
Protein requirements change throughout life. But experts say it's just as important to focus on the source of protein rather than the amount you're eating.
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Trump's EPA Says Oil Industry Can Relax About Methane Leaks
Under The Rug Trump has a message for any oil tycoons out there: You no longer have to worry about any methane leaks at your rigs. Not as in they won't happen , but more like we don't care if they do . That's per new Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines that mark the end of Obama-era regulations over leaked carbon emissions for the oil and gas industry, E&E News reports . Now, if meth
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A light bright and tiny: Scientists build a better nanoscale LED
A new design for light-emitting diodes (LEDs) developed by a team including scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) may hold the key to overcoming a long-standing limitation in the light sources' efficiency. The concept, demonstrated with microscopic LEDs in the lab, achieves a dramatic increase in brightness as well as the ability to create laser light—all characte
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Obesity Raises the Risk of Death From Covid-19 Among Men
Obesity is not an independent risk for women, according to a new study, perhaps because their fat is distributed differently.
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Jack Dorsey, Who Once Said He Drinks "Salt Juice," Called Elon Musk's Routine "Bullshit"
Billionaire Fight! Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey has a message for aspiring tech startup founders: Don't try to be like Elon Musk. Specifically, Dorsey told Business Insider that the obscenely-long hours Musk claims to work at Tesla are a great way to run one's self, and potentially one's business, right into the ground. Possibly even lower, if you catch his drift. "I think being too rigid about having
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Coronavirus survey shows no surge in England-wide infections
But scientists warn Covid-19 cases could rise rapidly as parts of economy prepare to ease restrictions further
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Book Excerpt from The State of Science
In Chapter 13, "Trusting Experts—and the Trump Administration," Marc Zimmer laments the communication breakdown between modern US policy makers and scientists
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When will scientists learn to use fewer acronyms?
Researchers have analyzed 24 million scientific article titles and 18 million abstracts between 1950 and 2019, looking for trends in acronym use. Despite repeated calls for scientists to reduce their use of acronyms and jargon in journal papers, the advice has been largely ignored, their findings show.
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Colorful bird feathers may explain evolution paradox
The evolution of colorful bird feathers in North America may explain a paradox within the theory of evolution, researchers say. This is the paradox: The life forms that exist today are here because they were able to change when past environments disappeared. Yet, organisms evolve to fit into specific environmental niches. "Ever-increasing specialization and precision should be an evolutionary dea
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The Guardian view on record-breaking weather: the heat is on | Editorial
What better time than the UK's hottest-ever week for ministers to commit to bold climate action? The hottest week in the UK since records began offers further proof that our weather is changing. Climate change and global heating are not predictions, but facts of life that we must deal with now. Ten of the UK's warmest-ever years have been since 2002, while the temperature of 36.4C recorded at Hea
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TGen review suggests postmenopausal women at risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
NAFLD is the most common cause of liver damage, and can lead to liver cirrhosis and death. It affects nearly 1 in 4 people across the globe. It often is associated with obesity, abnormally high amounts of lipids in the blood, and type 2 diabetes. In the US, the number of NAFLD cases is expected to grow to more than 100 million within the next decade, annually costing an estimated at $292 billion.
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Historical redlining linked to premature births, lower birth weight babies
Adverse birth outcomes — including premature births, low birth weight babies and babies who are small for their gestational age — are more likely to occur in neighborhoods that were once redlined, finds a new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers. The results indicate that past discriminatory housing practices may be partly to blame for the disparities in infant and maternal h
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Montana State researcher featured in Nature for work on rare reptile genome
Chris Organ worked with an international group of scientists to sequence the genome of the tuatara, a reptile found only in New Zealand with an evolutionary history stretching back 250 million years.
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Oregon study rewrites the recent history of productive Cascade Arc volcanoes
Volcanic eruptions in the Cascade Range of the Pacific Northwest over the last 2.6 million years are more numerous and closely connected to subsurface signatures of currently active magma than commonly thought, according to newly publish research.
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Climate stabilization: Lessons from the corona crisis
Highlighting the parallels between the global health and the climate emergency, a team of researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) has analyzed what policy makers and citizens can learn from the corona outbreak and how to apply it to the global effort of reducing CO2 emissions. Their proposal: A Climate Corona Contract that unites the younger and the older generatio
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Decline in US bird biodiversity related to neonicotinoids, study shows
Bird biodiversity is rapidly declining in the US. The overall bird population decreased by 29% since 1970, while grassland birds declined by an alarming 53%. A new study from University of Illinois points to increased use of neonicotinoid insecticides as a major factor in the decline.
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Aurora mysteries unlocked with NASA's THEMIS mission
A special type of aurora, draped east-west across the night sky like a glowing pearl necklace, is helping scientists better understand the science of auroras and their powerful drivers out in space.
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For pregnant patients, number of clinic visits not tied to risk of getting COVID-19
In an analysis of the data collected during that time, a team of investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital found no association between the number of in-person health care visits and risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2.
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Daily briefing: Mysterious dimming of Betelgeuse caused by dust
Nature, Published online: 14 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02426-x Astronomers have solved the puzzle of why one of the sky's brightest has been getting dimmer. Plus: New Zealand races to eliminate the coronavirus again, and an algorithm flags signs of 'citation hacking' in scientific papers.
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There is a crisis of face recognition and policing in the US
When news broke that a mistaken match from a face recognition system had led Detroit police to arrest Robert Williams for a crime he didn't commit, it was late June, and the country was already in upheaval over the death of George Floyd a month earlier. Soon after, it emerged that yet another Black man, Michael Oliver, was arrested under similar circumstances as Williams. While much of the US con
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