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Multiple myeloma cells are exceptionally sensitive to heat shock, which overwhelms their proteostasis network and induces apoptosis [Medical Sciences]
Proteasome inhibitors, such as bortezomib (BTZ), are highly effective and widely used treatments for multiple myeloma. One proposed reason for myeloma cells' exceptional sensitivity to proteasome inhibition is that they produce and continually degrade unusually large amounts of abnormal immunoglobulins. We, therefore, hypothesized that, heat shock may also be especially…
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Decoding three distinct states of the Syntaxin17 SNARE motif in mediating autophagosome-lysosome fusion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Syntaxin17, a key autophagosomal N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein, can associate with ATG8 family proteins SNAP29 and VAMP8 to facilitate the membrane fusion process between the double-membraned autophagosome and single-membraned lysosome in mammalian macroautophagy. However, the inherent properties of Syntaxin17 and the mechanistic basis underlying the
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The m6A RNA demethylase FTO is a HIF-independent synthetic lethal partner with the VHL tumor suppressor [Cell Biology]
Loss of the von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor is a hallmark feature of renal clear cell carcinoma. VHL inactivation results in the constitutive activation of the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) HIF-1 and HIF-2 and their downstream targets, including the proangiogenic factors VEGF and PDGF. However, antiangiogenic agents and HIF-2 inhibitors have…
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Maize ANT1 modulates vascular development, chloroplast development, photosynthesis, and plant growth [Plant Biology]
Arabidopsis AINTEGUMENTA (ANT), an AP2 transcription factor, is known to control plant growth and floral organogenesis. In this study, our transcriptome analysis and in situ hybridization assays of maize embryonic leaves suggested that maize ANT1 (ZmANT1) regulates vascular development. To better understand ANT1 functions, we determined the binding motif of…
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Calcium flares and compartmentalization in rod photoreceptors [Neuroscience]
Rod photoreceptors are composed of a soma and an inner segment (IS) connected to an outer segment (OS) by a thin cilium. OSs are composed of a stack of ∼800 lipid discs surrounded by the plasma membrane where phototransduction takes place. Intracellular calcium plays a major role in phototransduction and…
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Suppressing neutrophil-dependent angiogenesis abrogates resistance to anti-VEGF antibody in a genetic model of colorectal cancer [Medical Sciences]
We tested cis-ApcΔ716/Smad4+/− and cis-ApcΔ716/Smad4+/− KrasG12D mice, which recapitulate key genetic abnormalities accumulating during colorectal cancer (CRC) tumorigenesis in humans, for responsiveness to anti-VEGF therapy. We found that even tumors in cis-ApcΔ716/Smad4+/− KrasG12D mice, although highly aggressive, were suppressed by anti-VEGF treatment. We tested the hypothesis that inflammatio
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Ultraflexible organic light-emitting diodes for optogenetic nerve stimulation [Applied Biological Sciences]
Organic electronic devices implemented on flexible thin films are attracting increased attention for biomedical applications because they possess extraordinary conformity to curved surfaces. A neuronal device equipped with an organic light-emitting diode (OLED), used in combination with animals that are genetically engineered to include a light-gated ion channel, would enable…
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Sustained planetwide storms may have filled lakes, rivers on ancient Mars
A new study is helping scientists piece together the ancient climate of Mars by revealing how much rainfall and snowmelt filled its lake beds and river valleys 3.5 billion to 4 billion years ago.
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Exploring Connections Between Cosmos & Mind Through Six Interactive Art Installations in "As Above As Below"
Are there parallels between the furthest reaches of our universe, and the foundations of thought, awareness, perception, and emotion? What are the connections between the webs and structures that define both? What are the differences? "As Above As Below" was an exhibition that examined these questions. It consisted of six artworks, each of them the product of a collaboration that included at least
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The Atlantic Daily: A Q&A With Ed Yong on Long-Haulers
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Getty / Paul Spella / The Atlantic Today, Ed Yong, our staff writer whose coverage of this pandemic has been essential to understanding it , is back with a new piece about long-haulers. It's wort
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Liquid sulfur changes shape and goes critic under pressure
Scientists have found the proof for a liquid-to-liquid transition in sulfur and of a new kind of critical point ending this transition.
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High blood pressure during pregnancy may mean worse hot flashes during menopause
Women with a history of high blood pressure disorders during pregnancy are more likely to experience bothersome menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats, according to a new study.
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Shifting public health messaging about face coverings could improve uptake
Encouraging the public to see face masks as a social practice, which they can use to express their cultural background or their personality, could encourage more people to use them regularly, say researchers writing in The BMJ today.
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Just Because It's Natural Doesn't Mean It's Good – Issue 89: The Dark Side
What do anti-vaxxers and anti-GMO campaigners have in common? Underpinning both "antis" is a shared belief that because vaccines and GMOs are "unnatural," they're bad, which for many people—whatever their feelings about vaccines and GMOs—segues into its inverse: What's natural is good. Shades of Rousseau's exaltation of the noble savage, within us and without. It's an easy conclusion, often appro
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The Universe Has Made Almost All the Stars It Will Ever Make – Issue 89: The Dark Side
Our human world is soaked in light. For starters there are the 100,000 trillion photons arriving every second at every square centimeter of Earth's dayside surface, after racing here from the outer envelope of a natural giant thermonuclear reactor we call the sun. There are also the photons that zip every which way through any cubic centimeter of open space. Some of these are the microwave leftov
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The Bias in the Machine – Issue 89: The Dark Side
In January, Robert Williams, an African-American man, was wrongfully arrested due to an inaccurate facial recognition algorithm, a computerized approach that analyzes human faces and identifies them by comparison to database images of known people. He was handcuffed and arrested in front of his family by Detroit police without being told why, then jailed overnight after the police took mugshots,
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Premature delivery linked to heightened risk of early death for mothers
Preterm and early term delivery are independent risk factors for premature death in women up to 40 years later, finds a study from Sweden published by The BMJ today.
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Air pollution linked to higher risk of young children developing asthma
Children exposed to higher levels of fine particles in the air (known as PM2.5) are more likely to develop asthma and persistent wheezing than children who are not exposed, finds a study published by The BMJ today.
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Contact tracing apps are only one part of the pandemic fight
What's new: Dozens of countries have rolled out automated contact tracing apps, but a new study confirms what experts already knew: they can't beat the pandemic on their own. According to a new systematic review of 15 published studies, the technology still requires manual contact tracing, social distancing, and mass testing in order to be effective. The new research , from University College Lon
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Heating our climate damages our economies: Study reveals greater costs than expected
Rising temperatures due to our greenhouse gas emissions can cause greater damages to our economies than previous research suggested, a new study shows.
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Warning that contact-tracing apps will fail without high uptake
Study finds programs must be downloaded by more than three-quarters of population to be effective
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Time crystal discovery could change the future of quantum computing
submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]
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Watch a tiny robot powered by alcohol
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
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The Rise of Artificial General Intelligence – AGI
submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]
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Beyond batteries: Scientists build methanol-powered beetle bot
submitted by /u/Sorin61 [link] [comments]
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I'm Tom Standage, editor of The Economist's The World If and The World In. Ask me anything!
Hi everyone. I am The Economist's deputy editor, and editor of our annual future-gazing supplements, The World If and The World In. This year's World If supplement presented a series of imagined scenarios around the topic of climate change. We explored what might happen if technology tracked all carbon emissions , the Republican party got serious about climate change , or carbon removal became th
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The next pandemic could come from factory farms
submitted by /u/professionalfruit__ [link] [comments]
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A Norwegian Startup Is Turning Dry Deserts Into Fertile Cropland
submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]
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China's blockchain digital Yuan likely means death for WeChat Pay, Alipay
submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]
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Tinted Solar Panels Can Help Farms Generate Energy and Grow Food
submitted by /u/thinkB4WeSpeak [link] [comments]
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Our Average Life Expectancy Could Increase to 115 Years Very Soon
submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]
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Scientists successfully harvest eggs from last two northern white rhinos
submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]
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Physicists witness time crystals interacting for the first time ever
submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]
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Weekly Climate Change Mega Thread to w/e 23 Aug
From now on with the exception of – news of new technological developments or major unique news events relating to climate change – we're going to put all other climate change posts in their own weekly mega thread. ​ 17/08 – Coal's Days May Be Over in the U.S 19/08 – City Councilor Michelle Wu Pitches 'Green New Deal' for Boston submitted by /u/FuturologyModBot [link] [comments]
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This maze has three solutions. Can you solve them all?
There are three solutions to this maze. Can you solve them all? (Glenn Orzepowski/) We know you are bored at home right now—we are too. Here are some puzzles and brainteasers to challenge your family and friends with, either in person or over video chat. Humans have meandered through mazes for thousands of years, whether they be ancient Egyptian labyrinths, a Minotaur's lair, passageways carved i
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Author Correction: Leveraging excited-state coherence for synthetic control of ultrafast dynamics
Nature, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2658-1
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Publisher Correction: Cleavable comonomers enable degradable, recyclable thermoset plastics
Nature, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2660-7
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Author Correction: Microbiota modulate sympathetic neurons via a gut–brain circuit
Nature, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2657-2
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Older adults with existing depression show resilience during the pandemic
A multi-site study finds that seniors are more concerned with being infected with COVID-19 than the effects of social isolation.
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Biomorphic batteries could provide 72 times more energy for robots
Like biological fat reserves store energy in animals, a new rechargeable zinc battery integrates into the structure of a robot to provide much more energy, researchers have shown.
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Researchers predict deficits in female birth numbers in India over coming decades
Between 2017 and 2030, an estimated 6.8 million fewer female births will be recorded in India than would be by chance, due to sex-selective abortions, according to a new study.
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Words used to describe alcohol intoxication may give clues to drinking habits
Research suggests the language young adults use to describe the effects they feel from drinking may give insight into their drinking habits.
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Evidence lags behind excitement over blood plasma as a coronavirus treatment
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02324-2 Researchers call for more rigorous clinical trials as rumours abound that US regulators are considering widening access to the potential therapy.
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A how-to guide for teaching GIS courses online with hardware or software in the cloud
Geographers offer first-hand accounts of what is required for GIS instructors and IT administrators to set up virtual computing specifically for providing state-of-the-art geographic information systems (GIS) instruction.
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Is COVID-19 transmitted through breast milk? Study suggests not likely
A recent study suggests transmission of COVID-19 through breast milk is not likely. The infectious virus was not detected in 64 samples of breast milk tested.
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This cuttlefish is flamboyant on special occasions only!
The flashy Flamboyant Cuttlefish is among the most famous of the cephalopods (octopus, squid, and cuttlefish) – but it is widely misunderstood by its legions of fans. A new article sets the record straight.
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Genetic background may affect adaptions to aging
How we adapt to aging late in life may be genetically influenced, according to a study led by a psychologist. The research has implications for how epigenetic factors relate to aging.
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Retro Gaming's Misogyny Is Brought to Light After a Violent Tragedy
A retro game champion is suspected of killing an ex-girlfriend and then himself. Gamers now say they warned others about his threatening behavior for years.
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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Wields Brevity as a Superpower
Skilled in the conciseness of Instagram, TikTok, and Twitter, the congressperson said all she needed to say in the short time she was given at the DNC.
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Quick fixes won't stop sexual harassment in academia, experts say
Many academic institutions are failing to address the most common forms of gender-based harassment: behaviors that communicate derision, disgust or disrespect for members of one sex or gender group.
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Sustained planetwide storms may have filled lakes, rivers on ancient mars
A new study from The University of Texas at Austin is helping scientists piece together the ancient climate of Mars by revealing how much rainfall and snowmelt filled its lake beds and river valleys 3.5 billion to 4 billion years ago.
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Major weight loss — whether from surgery or diet — has same metabolic benefits
A longstanding theory has suggested that gastric bypass surgery may have unique, weight loss-independent effects in treating type 2 diabetes. But new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that weight loss after surgery, rather than the surgery itself, drives metabolic improvements, such as the remission of diabetes.
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Affordable Care Act key to keeping people insured amid COVID 19-related job losses
Widespread layoffs amid the COVID-19 pandemic threaten to cut off millions of people from their employer-sponsored health insurance plans. But the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will protect many of these people and their families from losing coverage, according to a new study.
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New study identifies better treatment option for common complication of dialysis
Use of drug-coated balloon angioplasty to treat blocked blood vessels used for hemodialysis offers hope for millions of patients globally
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These Robots Can Store Energy in "Fat Reserves," Like Humans
A team of scientists at the University of Michigan have created "biomorphic batteries" that allow robots to store energy like humans — in fat reserves spread across their bodies. The idea is to greatly increase the battery capacity of robots by mimicking the distributed energy sources of living beings, and as it turns out, the new batteries may also hold far more power than the conventional lithi
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Genetic background may affect adaptions to aging
How we adapt to aging late in life may be genetically influenced, according to a study led by a psychologist at the University of California, Riverside. The research has implications for how epigenetic factors relate to aging.
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This cuttlefish is flamboyant on special occasions only!
The flashy Flamboyant Cuttlefish is among the most famous of the cephalopods (octopus, squid, and cuttlefish) – but it is widely misunderstood by its legions of fans. A new paper from the Roger Hanlon laboratory at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, sets the record straight.
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Increasing graduation rates of students of color with more faculty of color
A new analysis published in Public Administration found that student graduation rates improve as more faculty employed by a college or university share sex and race/ethnic identities with students.
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Invasive shrubs in Northeast US forests grow leaves earlier and keep them longer
The rapid pace that invasive shrubs infiltrate forests in the northeastern United States makes scientists suspect they have a consistent advantage over native shrubs, and the first region-wide study of leaf timing supports those suspicions.
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New insights into how skin can regenerate after severe burns
New research has made an exciting leap forward in understanding how skin heals, which could lead to drug treatments to vastly improve wound healing.
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The secret of lymph: How lymph nodes help cancer cells spread
For decades, physicians have known that many kinds of cancer cells often spread first to lymph nodes before traveling to distant organs through the bloodstream. New research provides insight into why this occurs, opening up new targets for treatments that could inhibit the spread of cancer.
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Bacteria can defuse dangerous chemical in Rassaic River
Bacteria that can help defuse highly toxic dioxin in sediments in the Passaic River – a Superfund hazardous waste site – could eventually aid cleanup efforts at other dioxin-contaminated sites around the world, according to scientists.
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Disorders in movement
Medical researchers are tracking the onset of ataxias. The results provide valuable data for prevention studies. The data were collected by a research network, which includes scientific institutions from Austria, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland and Spain.
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Protein influences regeneration of vascular cells
Physicians have discovered how the communication between individual cells can be influenced with the help of a specific protein. These findings are an important approach to improving the treatment of diseases such as arteriosclerosis (calcified blood vessels), which causes heart attacks.
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Bacteria can defuse dangerous chemical in Rassaic River
Bacteria that can help defuse highly toxic dioxin in sediments in the Passaic River – a Superfund hazardous waste site – could eventually aid cleanup efforts at other dioxin-contaminated sites around the world, according to scientists.
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Seafood could account for 25% of animal protein needed to meet increases in demand
Policy reforms and technological improvements could drive seafood production upward by as much as 75% over the next three decades, research by Oregon State University and an international collaboration suggests.
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Older adults with existing depression show resilience during the pandemic
Older adults with existing depression are showing resilience during the pandemic, research shows.
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Unlocking the cell enhances student learning of the genetic code
An open-source educational biotechnology called the "Genetic Code Kit" has been developed by California Polytechnic State University researchers to allow students to interact with the molecular process inside cells in new ways. Researchers show that adapting state-of-the-art biotechnology for the classroom could transform how biology and biochemistry are taught to high school and undergraduate stu
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San Francisco blanketed in smoke as California fires rage
Crews were battling wildfires in the San Francisco Bay Area and thousands of people were under orders to evacuate as dozens of wildfires blazed across the state amid a blistering heat wave now in its second week.
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New approach takes quantum key distribution further
In an important step toward practical implementation of secure quantum-based communication, researchers have demonstrated secure measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) transmission over a record-breaking 170 kilometers.
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Unlocking the cell enhances student learning of the genetic code
An open-source educational biotechnology called the "Genetic Code Kit" has been developed by California Polytechnic State University researchers to allow students to interact with the molecular process inside cells in new ways. Researchers show that adapting state-of-the-art biotechnology for the classroom could transform how biology and biochemistry are taught to high school and undergraduate stu
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Kepler's supernova remnant: Debris from stellar explosion not slowed after 400 years
Astronomers have used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to record material blasting away from the site of an exploded star at speeds faster than 20 million miles per hour. This is about 25,000 times faster than the speed of sound on Earth.
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Invasive shrubs in Northeast forests grow leaves earlier and keep them longer
The rapid pace that invasive shrubs infiltrate forests in the northeastern United States makes scientists suspect they have a consistent advantage over native shrubs, and the first region-wide study of leaf timing, conducted by Penn State researchers, supports those suspicions.
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Invasive shrubs in Northeast forests grow leaves earlier and keep them longer
The rapid pace that invasive shrubs infiltrate forests in the northeastern United States makes scientists suspect they have a consistent advantage over native shrubs, and the first region-wide study of leaf timing, conducted by Penn State researchers, supports those suspicions.
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Real-Time PCR Tips and Tricks
Strategies to overcome common qPCR challenges!
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Low-cost, accurate COVID-19 antibody detection platform
A robust, low-cost imaging platform utilizing lab-on-a-chip technology may be available for rapid coronavirus diagnostic and antibody testing throughout the nation by the end of the year.
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Blocking copper uptake in tumor cells may be clue to boosting immune system
Researchers have discovered that removing copper from the blood can destroy some of the deadliest cancers that are resistant to immunotherapy using models of the disease.
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Microbes living on air a global phenomenon
Researchers have found their previous discovery of bacteria living on air in Antarctica is likely a process that occurs globally, further supporting the potential existence of microbial life on alien planets.
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Brain remapping dysfunction causes spatial memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease
A research group elucidated the brain circuit mechanism that cause of spatial memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease. In the future, improving brain remapping function may reverse spatial memory impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
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Partner selection ultimately happens in the woman's reproductive tract
The female reproductive tract has the final say in human mate choice, according to new research.
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Alaska's salmon are getting smaller, affecting people and ecosystems
The size of salmon returning to rivers in Alaska has declined dramatically over the past 60 years because they are spending fewer years at sea, scientists report. Salmon are critically important to both people and ecosystems in Alaska, supporting commercial and subsistence fisheries and transporting nutrients from the ocean to inland areas. Smaller salmon provide less food for people who depend on
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Cryo-EM study yields new clues to chicken pox infection
Scientists studying the varicella zoster virus found that an antibody that blocks infection doesn't work exactly as they'd thought.
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New COVID-19 Saliva Tests Are Cheaper and Faster Than Nose Swabs. Here's How They Work
Some universities are using spit tests to tests students for coronavirus. But a wider roll out could transform the diagnosis of COVID-19.
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We rely on science. Why is it letting us down when we need it most?
Science is suffering from a replication crisis. Too many landmark studies can't be repeated in independent labs, a process crucial to separating flukes and errors from solid results. The consequences are hard to overstate: Public policy, medical treatments and the way we see the world may have been built on the shakiest of foundations.
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A how-to guide for teaching GIS courses online with hardware or software in the cloud
In a new paper this week, geographer Forrest Bowlick at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and colleagues at Texas A&M offer first-hand accounts of what is required for GIS instructors and IT administrators to set up virtual computing specifically for providing state-of-the-art geographic information systems (GIS) instruction.
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Research team develops low-cost, accurate COVID-19 antibody detection platform
A robust, low-cost imaging platform utilizing lab-on-a-chip technology created by University of California, Irvine scientists may be available for rapid coronavirus diagnostic and antibody testing throughout the nation by the end of the year.
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Is COVID-19 transmitted through breast milk? Study suggests not likely
A recent study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine suggests transmission of COVID-19 through breast milk is not likely. The infectious virus was not detected in 64 samples of breast milk tested.
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Unlocking the cell enhances student learning of the genetic code
An open-source educational biotechnology called the 'Genetic Code Kit' allows students to interact with the molecular process inside cells in new ways. Researchers show that adapting state-of-the-art biotechnology for the classroom could transform how biology and biochemistry are taught to high school and undergraduate students.
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A how-to guide for teaching GIS courses online with hardware or software in the cloud
In a new paper this week, geographer Forrest Bowlick at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and colleagues at Texas A&M offer first-hand accounts of what is required for GIS instructors and IT administrators to set up virtual computing specifically for providing state-of-the-art geographic information systems (GIS) instruction.
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New mechanism for stroke treatment shows successful proof-of-concept
Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the US; new research from UConn Health suggests a promising treatment for patients by successfully inhibited an important receptor implicated in post-stroke damage and recovery.
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Can a healthy diet reduce risk of Parkinson's?
While movement problems are the main symptoms of Parkinson's disease, people with the disease often have non-motor symptoms such as constipation, daytime sleepiness and depression 10 or more years before the movement problems start. A new study suggests that eating a healthy diet in middle age may be linked to having fewer of these preceding symptoms. The study is published in the August 19, 2020,
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Is risk of Alzheimer's linked to specific sleep patterns?
Disturbed sleep patterns do not cause Alzheimer's disease but people who are at high genetic risk of developing Alzheimer's disease may be more likely to be a 'morning person,' have shorter sleep duration and other measures of sleep disturbance and are less likely to have insomnia, according to a study published in the August 19, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the America
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Fossil fuel companies don't have to clean up their methane emissions anymore
The EPA finalized the rule change this week after foreshadowing it for several months. (Environmental Protection Agency/) Jeremy Deaton writes for Nexus Media, a nonprofit climate change news service. You can follow him @deaton_jeremy . This story was published in partnership with Nexus Media . This year, levels of methane, a powerful heat-trapping gas, hit an all-time high , driven in large part
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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
The Remote Misses of COVID-19
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UCI develops low-cost, accurate COVID-19 antibody detection platform
A robust, low-cost imaging platform utilizing lab-on-a-chip technology created by University of California, Irvine scientists may be available for rapid coronavirus diagnostic and antibody testing throughout the nation by the end of the year.
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This Trawler's Haul: Evidence That Antibodies Block the Coronavirus
Three crew members aboard were spared when the virus spread through the boat. They were the only ones who had antibodies at the beginning of the trip.
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Telemedicine may well outlast the pandemic, say mental health care staff
The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about rapid innovation in mental health care, and the move to telemedicine is likely here to stay to at least some degree, but new research cautions that serious barriers still need to be overcome.
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Down syndrome mice open door to better understanding of the disorder
Researchers have created and characterized a new mouse replica of Down syndrome, long considered one of the most challenging disorders to simulate in laboratory animals.
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Ratio of two proteins may add kidneys to the transplant donor pool
Research has shown that two proteins found in deceased donor urine can be measured to define which donor organs — including those with AKI — are the best candidates for saving the lives of patients with kidney failure.
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Opioid use linked to pregnancy loss, lower chance of conception, study suggests
Opioid use among women trying to conceive may be associated with a lower chance of pregnancy, suggests a new study. Moreover, opioid use in early pregnancy may be associated with a greater chance of pregnancy loss.
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3D Space Images Could Reveal How Quasars Influence Galaxies
Incredible Immersion NASA wants to take a fresh look at some distant galaxies. When the James Webb Space Telescope launches, the space agency plans to use it to capture 3D images of three distant quasars and the host galaxies that swirl around them. The new images, NASA hopes, will help finally explain how, exactly, these bizarre supermassive black holes shape and reshape their galaxies. All For
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Mystery of Interstellar Visitor 'Oumuamua Gets Trickier
Aliens? Or a chunk of solid hydrogen? Which idea makes less sense? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Artificial materials for more efficient electronics
The discovery of an unprecedented physical effect in a new artificial material marks a significant milestone in the lengthy process of developing 'made-to-order' materials and more energy-efficient electronics.
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Scientists Find Bacteria That Devours Cancer-Causing Pollutants
Light Snack While they were trying to find ways to clean the Passaic River Superfund site, a team of scientists discovered a new bacterium that might be able too do some of the heavy lifting on similar sites. The bacteria was found thriving in toxic mud at the bottom of the river, where it was happily munching away on cancer-causing and otherwise dangerous toxins called dioxins, according to rese
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Machine learning, meet human emotions: How to help a computer monitor your mental state
An international team of scientists has tested state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms for the challenging tasks of determining the mental workload and affective states of a human brain. Their software can help design smarter brain-computer interfaces for applications in medicine and beyond. In the next steps, researchers plan to use more sophisticated artificial intelligence (AI) methods, es
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Tesla Competitor Claims Its Car Will Be the "Fastest Charging" EV Ever
The Fastest Charger Electric car company Lucid Motors claims that that its Lucid Air luxury sedan "will be the fastest charging electric vehicle ever offered with the capability to charge at rates of up to 20 miles per minute," according to a press release. That's about 300 miles of range in just 20 minutes of charging, according to the company, which is making a pretty big deal out of its upcomi
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This Underground Experiment Will Hunt for Supernova Shrapnel
Panning For Neutrinos When an ambitious new Fermilab experiment called DUNE (Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment) begins its work, physicists believe they'll be able to learn a whole lot more about supernova explosions than ever before. That's because DUNE, an underground facility in Illinois, is expected to be sensitive to an extremely elusive particle called a neutrino that's blasted far and w
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Can stem cell capsules fix heart attack damage faster?
Shielding stem cells with a new biomaterial improves their ability to heal heart attack damage, a new study with rodents shows. Researchers showed they could make capsules of wound-healing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and implant them next to wounded hearts using minimally invasive techniques. Within four weeks, they saw heart healing 2.5 times greater in animals treated with shielded stem cells
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Clinical and sociodemographic features of early COVID-19 patients in Massachusetts
Data from the first COVID-19 patients treated at three large Massachusetts hospitals reveal important trends, including disproportionate representation of vulnerable populations, high rates of disease-related complications, and the need for post-discharge, post-acute care and monitoring.
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New study calculates alarming lifetime risk of death from firearms and drug overdoses in the United States
A new study calculates the lifetime risk of death from firearms and drug overdoses in the United States. The lifetime risk of death from firearms is about one percent, and the lifetime risk of death from drug overdoses is 1.5 percent, according to the study.
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Out of sync: Ecologists report climate change affecting bee, plant life cycles
Reporting on the first community-wide assessment of 67 bee species of the Colorado Rockies, ecologists say 'phenological mismatch,' changing timing of life cycles between bees and flowers, caused by climate change, has the potential to disrupt a mutually beneficial relationship.
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Illegal trade with terrestrial vertebrates in markets and households of Laos
Scientists provide the first interdisciplinary assessment of human involvement into the terrestrial vertebrate trade in Laos and its impact on the survival of the local fauna populations. Sixty-six traded species found on wildlife trade markets were documented, and more than half of them were found to be the species protected either by national law or international convention.
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Researchers explore self-healing materials
Researchers developed a new material that can autonomously heal in air and underwater.
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Songbirds, like people, sing better after warming up
If you've ever been woken up before sunrise by the chirping of birds outside your window, you may have wondered: why do birds sing so loud, so early in the morning? The cacophony is mostly males, whose songs are meant to impress potential mates and rivals. Researchers say there may be a good reason why birds are most vocal at first light. By singing early and often, birds perform better during the
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Naming guides how 12-month-old infants encode and remember objects
Even for infants just beginning to speak their first words, the way an object is named guides infants' encoding, representation and memory for that object, according to new research. Encoding objects in memory and recalling them later is fundamental to human cognition and emerges in infancy. Evidence from a new recognition memory task reveals that as they encode objects, infants are sensitive to a
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Heart attack damage reduced by shielded stem cells
Bioengineers and surgeons have shown in rodents that a four-week shielded stem cell treatment can reduce damage caused by a heart attack.
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'Electric mud' teems with new, mysterious bacteria
Microbes that conduct electricity are transforming how we see sediments
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McKinsey earnt £560,000 for giving 'vision' to new English pandemic body
Health department sought report from consultancy on options for running coronavirus programme
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Cover crop mixtures must be 'farm-tuned' to provide maximum ecosystem services
Researchers, in a recent study, were surprised to learn that they could take the exact same number of seeds from the same plants, put them in agricultural fields across the Mid-Atlantic region and get profoundly different stands of cover crops a few months later.
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OCT-based technique captures subtle details of photoreceptor function
Researchers have developed a new instrument that has, for the first time, measured tiny light-evoked deformations in individual rods and cones in a living human eye. The new approach could one day improve detection of retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness in people over 55 worldwide.
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Climate change impact on green energy production
As the climate of the planet is changing, many researchers are looking to more renewable energy sources. Researchers investigate whether the power generated by solar and wind farms would differ between current and future climates. The researchers focused on sites in Australia where variable renewable generators are located or are likely to be located in the future based on the Australian Energy Ma
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Escape artists: How vibrio bacteria break out of cells
As soon as the foodborne pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus infects a human intestinal cell, the bacteria are already planning their escape. After all, once it is in and multiplies, the bacterium must find a way out to infect new cells.
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Some California cities think they're safe from sea level rise. They're not, new research shows
Just north of the Golden Gate Bridge, yet a world away from San Francisco, in an unincorporated and oft-overlooked area known as Marin City, sea level rise is rarely the first worry that comes to mind.
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Influenza Aboard Dust Particles Infects Guinea Pigs
A new study demonstrates that some viruses can be transmitted on airborne particles other than those produced by talking, coughing, or sneezing.
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Revealing the Complexities of Cancer with Single-cell RNA Analysis
Download this eBook to learn how single-cell analysis identifies subpopulations of tumor cells!
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Potential link for Alzheimer's disease and common brain disease that mimics its symptoms
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital uncovered a group of closely related genes that may capture molecular links between Alzheimer's disease and Limbic-predominant Age-related TDP-43 Encephalopathy, or LATE, a recently recognized common brain disorder that can mimic Alzheimer's symptoms.
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Invasive shrubs in Northeast forests grow leaves earlier and keep them longer
The rapid pace that invasive shrubs infiltrate forests in the northeastern United States makes scientists suspect they have a consistent advantage over native shrubs, and the first region-wide study of leaf timing, conducted by Penn State researchers, supports those suspicions.
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What Changed–and What Didn't–in Democrats' Climate Platform
The 2020 aims on climate are more ambitious than in 2016, but don't meet all of activists' demands — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Why more couples are choosing to live apart
For many couples, moving in together signifies a big step in the relationship. Traditionally, this meant marriage, although nowadays most cohabit before getting married, or splitting up. But there is a third choice: living apart together. Not only is it surprisingly common , but living apart together is increasingly seen as a new and better way for modern couples to live . Surveys have previously
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NASA-NOAA satellite provides overnight watch on hurricane Genevieve
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite kept an eye on Hurricane Genevieve overnight and provided infrared imagery to forecasters who were monitoring the storm's strength, structure and size. Because Genevieve is close to the coast of western Mexico, warnings and watches were still in effect.
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A key to cheaper renewable fuels: keeping iron from rusting
Researchers have made a key first step in economically converting plant materials to fuels: keeping iron from rusting.
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Study of one million Danish children: Childhood adversity increases the risk of early death
Social adversity in early childhood appears to be a significant risk factor for death in early adulthood. Children who have experienced repeated serious adversity such as losing a parent, mental illness in the family, poverty or being placed in foster care have a 4.5 times higher risk of dying in early adulthood than children who have not experienced adversity during childhood.
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Machine learning unearths signature of slow-slip quake origins in seismic data
Combing through historical seismic data, researchers using a machine learning model have unearthed distinct statistical features marking the formative stage of slow-slip ruptures in the earth's crust months before tremor or GPS data detected a slip in the tectonic plates.
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Biomedical scientists piece together how medication paralyzes parasitic worms
A new study upends the widely held belief that a medication used to treat lymphatic filariasis doesn't directly target the parasites that cause the disease. The research shows the medication, diethylcarbamazine, temporarily paralyzes the parasites.
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NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite snaps Tropical Storm Higos' landfall
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the landfall of Tropical Storm Higos on Aug. 18.
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Visits to fast food joints protect older adult cognitive health
Older adults' regular visits to eateries such as fast food restaurants and coffee shops may be as protective of cognitive health as marriage, according to new research. Researchers interviewed 125 older adults ages 55-92 in the Minneapolis metro area and accompanied them on visits to their neighborhood haunts. Through analysis of the interviews, they found that older adults valued these types of
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Immune Biomarkers Tied to Severe COVID-19: Study
Increases in the levels of three cytokines are among the features linked to poor outcomes.
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Dozens of Wildfires Burn Across California
Multiple major wildfires are currently burning out of control in the state of California, and the resources needed to contain the fires are being stretched thin. Many of the blazes, driven by high winds amid hot and dry conditions, are believed to have been started by lightning. Thousands of residents have been ordered to evacuate, as heavy smoke blankets the San Francisco Bay Area. Gathered here
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Abolition of Public Health England just 'passing of blame for coronavirus mistakes'
Wellcome Trust director says government should have waited for public inquiry Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The abolition of Public Health England is a kneejerk attempt to blame it for mistakes made over coronavirus, one of the government's key advisers on the crisis has alleged. Jeremy Farrar, a member of the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (Sage), critic
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Genevieve approaches Mexico's Baja as Category 3 hurricane
Powerful Hurricane Genevieve began flinging rain at Mexico's Baja California Peninsula on Wednesday and it threatened to bring hurricane-force winds to the tourist region even if its center wasn't likely to hit land.
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California staves off more power outages amid heat wave
California staved off another round of rolling blackouts as a searing heat wave strained its electrical grid, but authorities warned of a continuing threat Wednesday.
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Creating meaningful change in cities takes decades, not years, and starts from the bottom
New mathematical models reveal the links between the structure of cities and the dynamical nature of growth and inequality in human societies
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A Reverse Approach to Vessel Surgery May Boost Clinical Outcomes in Dialysis
A new approach to a surgical procedure required for dialysis offers better long-term viability and a lower chance of complications compared with conventional techniques, according to work involving rats and 274 patients.
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Lungfish fins reveal how limbs evolved
New research on the fin development of the Australian lungfish by an international team of researchers from the University of Konstanz (Germany), Macquarie University in Sydney (Australia) and the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn in Naples (Italy) elucidates how fins evolved into limbs with hands with digits. The main finding is that in lungfish a primitive hand is already present, but that function
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Prevention of heart disease can start before birth
Babies that experience low oxygen levels in the womb due to pregnancy complications often go on to develop heart disease in adulthood. A study using sheep has discovered that a specialised antioxidant called MitoQ can prevent heart disease at its very onset. The results are published today in the journal Science Advances.
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Analysis of ancient Mesoamerican sculptures supports universality of emotional expressions
An analysis of facial expressions in ancient Mesoamerican sculptures finds that some emotions expressed in these artworks match the emotions that modern US participants would anticipate for each discernible context, including elation, sadness, pain, anger, and determination or strain. For instance, elation was predicted in the context of social touch while anger was
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Biomorphic batteries could provide 72x more energy for robots
Like biological fat reserves store energy in animals, a new rechargeable zinc battery integrates into the structure of a robot to provide much more energy, a team led by the University of Michigan has shown.
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Biomedical research may miss key information by ignoring genetic ancestry
A new study of Black residents of four distinct US cities reveals variations in genetic ancestry and social status that underscore the inadequacy of using skin color as a proxy for race in research. Dede Teteh of City of Hope Medical Center in Duarte, California, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on August 19, 2020.
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Researchers predict deficits in female birth numbers in India over coming decades
Between 2017 and 2030, an estimated 6.8 million fewer female births will be recorded in India than would be by chance, due to sex-selective abortions, according to a new study published August 19, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Fengqing Chao of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Saudi Arabia, and colleagues.
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Cows with Eye Images Keep Predators in Arrears
Butterflies, fish and frogs sport rear-end eyespots that reduce predation. Painting eye markings on cows similarly seems to ward off predators.
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The most sensitive instrument in the search for life beyond Earth
Researchers have developed the highly sensitive ORIGIN instrument, which can provide proof of the smallest amounts of traces of life, for future space missions. The instrument may be used on missions to the ice moons of Europa (Jupiter) and Enceladus (Saturn), for example.
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Team creates better tool to aid COVID-19 diagnosis
A radiologist and an evolutionary anatomist have teamed up to show the same techniques used for research on reptile and bird lungs can be used to help confirm the diagnosis of COVID-19 in patients. Their paper demonstrates that 3D models are a strikingly clearer method for visually evaluating the distribution of COVID-19-related infection in the respiratory system.
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Toward a coronavirus breathalyzer test
Researchers have developed a prototype device that non-invasively detected COVID-19 in the exhaled breath of infected patients.
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Speeding up nerve regrowth for trauma patients
Researchers have found a treatment that increases the speed of nerve regeneration by three to five times, leading to much better outcomes for trauma surgery patients.
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If sustainably managed, wild fisheries and mariculture could help meet rising demand for food
Demand for food is set to rise substantially in the coming decades, which raises a question: How well can the ocean fill the gap between current supply and future need?
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Deep learning will help future Mars rovers go farther, faster, and do more science
NASA JPL are developing autonomous capabilities that could allow future Mars rovers to go farther, faster and do more science. Training machine learning models on the Maverick2, their team developed and optimized models for Drive-By Science and Energy-Optimal Autonomous Navigation.
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Termite-fishing chimpanzees provide clues to the evolution of technology
Unlike chimpanzees in East and West Africa, who use a single tool to extract termites, chimpanzees in Central Africa's Congo Basin use tool sets — puncturing sticks or perforating twigs plus fishing probes — to harvest the insects from underground nests or towering earthen mounds scattered across lowland forests.
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First immune-evading cells created to treat type 1 diabetes
Scientists have made a major advance in the pursuit of a safe and effective treatment for type 1 diabetes, an illness that impacts an estimated 1.6 million Americans with a cost of $14.4 billion annually. Using stem cell technology, researchers generated the first human insulin-producing pancreatic cell clusters able to evade the immune system. These 'immune shielded' cell clusters controlled bloo
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Toddlers who use touchscreens show attention differences
New research from the TABLET project recruited 12-month-old infants who had different levels of touchscreen usage.
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Digital contact tracing alone may not be miracle answer for COVID-19
In infectious disease outbreaks, digital contact tracing alone could reduce the number of cases, but not as much as manual contract tracing, new research reveals.
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A Little-Known Technology Change Will Make Video Streaming Cheaper and Pave the Way for Higher Quality
A new standard for how videos are sent through the internet and read by your computer could make the digital world more inclusive, says media scholar Jason Schmitt.
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Engraved stones found in Jersey 'an art form of 15,000 years ago'
Discovery of marked plaquettes at Les Varines points to earliest evidence of human art in British Isles They are small, flat and covered in what appear to be chaotic scratches, but 10 engraved stone fragments unearthed in Jersey, researchers say, could be the earliest evidence of human art in the British Isles. The stones were found at Les Varines, on the island, between 2014 and 2018, and are be
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Urban growth and the emergent statistics of cities
Urban theory models cities as spatial equilibria to derive their aggregate properties as functions of extensive variables, such as population size. However, this assumption seems at odds with cities' most interesting properties as engines of fast and variable processes of growth and change. Here, we build a general statistical dynamics of cities across scales, from single agents to entire urban s
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Interferon-{gamma} signaling in human iPSC-derived neurons recapitulates neurodevelopmental disorder phenotypes
Maternal immune activation increases the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders. Elevated cytokines, such as interferon- (IFN-), in offspring's brains play a central role. IFN- activates an antiviral cellular state, limiting viral entry and replication. Moreover, IFN- is implicated in brain development. We tested the hypothesis that IFN- signaling contributes to molecular and cellular phenotypes as
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Vortices as Brownian particles in turbulent flows
Brownian motion of particles in fluid is the most common form of collective behavior in physical and biological systems. Here, we demonstrate through both experiment and numerical simulation that the movement of vortices in a rotating turbulent convective flow resembles that of inertial Brownian particles, i.e., they initially move ballistically and then diffusively after certain critical time. M
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Universal facial expressions uncovered in art of the ancient Americas: A computational approach
Central to the study of emotion is evidence concerning its universality, particularly the degree to which emotional expressions are similar across cultures. Here, we present an approach to studying the universality of emotional expression that rules out cultural contact and circumvents potential biases in survey-based methods: A computational analysis of apparent facial expressions portrayed in a
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Translatable mitochondria-targeted protection against programmed cardiovascular dysfunction
The prenatal origins of heart disease in offspring have been established. However, research in species with developmental milestones comparable to humans is lacking, preventing translation of this knowledge to clinical contexts. Using sheep and chickens, two species with similar cardiovascular developmental milestones to humans, we combined in vivo experiments with in vitro studies at organ, cell
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Smart covalent organic networks (CONs) with "on-off-on" light-switchable pores for molecular separation
Development of the new-generation membranes for tunable molecular separation requires materials with abilities beyond strict separation. Stimuli response could remotely adjust the membrane selectivity. Azobenzene derivatives can be photo-switched between trans and cis isomers under ultraviolet or visible light. Here, the azobenzenes were implanted as light switches to bridge the flexible cyclen b
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A brain network supporting social influences in human decision-making
Humans learn from their own trial-and-error experience and observing others. However, it remains unknown how brain circuits compute expected values when direct learning and social learning coexist in uncertain environments. Using a multiplayer reward learning paradigm with 185 participants (39 being scanned) in real time, we observed that individuals succumbed to the group when confronted with di
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Multimodal soft tissue markers for bridging high-resolution diagnostic imaging with therapeutic intervention
Diagnostic imaging often outperforms the surgeon's ability to identify small structures during therapeutic procedures. Smart soft tissue markers that translate the sensitivity of diagnostic imaging into optimal therapeutic intervention are therefore highly warranted. This paper presents a unique adaptable liquid soft tissue marker system based on functionalized carbohydrates (Carbo-gel). The liqu
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Tough and tunable scaffold-hydrogel composite biomaterial for soft-to-hard musculoskeletal tissue interfaces
Tendon inserts into bone via a fibrocartilaginous interface (enthesis) that reduces mechanical strain and tissue failure. Despite this toughening mechanism, tears occur because of acute (overload) or degradative (aging) processes. Surgically fixating torn tendon into bone results in the formation of a scar tissue interface with inferior biomechanical properties. Progress toward enthesis regenerat
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Hierarchically patterned self-powered sensors for multifunctional tactile sensing
Flexible sensors are highly desirable for tactile sensing and wearable devices. Previous researches of smart elements have focused on flexible pressure or temperature sensors. However, realizing material identification remains a challenge. Here, we report a multifunctional sensor composed of hydrophobic films and graphene/polydimethylsiloxane sponges. By engineering and optimizing sponges, the fa
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High-performance pan-tactic polythioesters with intrinsic crystallinity and chemical recyclability
Three types of seemingly unyielding trade-offs have continued to challenge the rational design for circular polymers with both high chemical recyclability and high-performance properties: depolymerizability/performance, crystallinity/ductility, and stereo-disorder/crystallinity. Here, we introduce a monomer design strategy based on a bridged bicyclic thiolactone that produces stereo-disordered to
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Coexistence of a new type of bound state in the continuum and a lasing threshold mode induced by PT symmetry
Some photonic systems support bound states in the continuum (BICs) that have infinite lifetimes, although their frequencies and momenta are matched to vacuum modes. Using a prototypical system that can be treated analytically, we show that each of these BICs always splits into a pair of new type BIC and lasing threshold mode when a parity-time (PT)–symmetric perturbation is introduced. The radiat
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Sarcopterygian fin ontogeny elucidates the origin of hands with digits
How the hand and digits originated from fish fins during the Devonian fin-to-limb transition remains unsolved. Controversy in this conundrum stems from the scarcity of ontogenetic data from extant lobe-finned fishes. We report the patterning of an autopod-like domain by hoxa13 during fin development of the Australian lungfish, the most closely related extant fish relative of tetrapods. Difference
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Reengineering biocatalysts: Computational redesign of chondroitinase ABC improves efficacy and stability
Maintaining biocatalyst stability and activity is a critical challenge. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) has shown promise in central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, yet its therapeutic utility is severely limited by instability. We computationally reengineered ChABC by introducing 37, 55, and 92 amino acid changes using consensus design and forcefield-based optimization. All mutants were more stabl
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Interplay of m6A and H3K27 trimethylation restrains inflammation during bacterial infection
While N 6 -methyladenosine (m 6 A) is the most prevalent modification of eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA) involved in various cellular responses, its role in modulating bacteria-induced inflammatory response remains elusive. Here, we showed that loss of the m 6 A reader YTH-domain family 2 (YTHDF2) promoted demethylation of histone H3 lysine-27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), which led to enhanced prod
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Actomyosin contractility confers mechanoprotection against TNF{alpha}-induced disruption of the intervertebral disc
Inflammation triggers degradation of intervertebral disc extracellular matrix (ECM), a hallmark of disc degeneration that contributes to back pain. Mechanosensitive nucleus pulposus cells are responsible for ECM production, yet the impact of a proinflammatory microenvironment on cell mechanobiology is unknown. Using gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we show that tumor necrosis factor–α (TNFα
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Lifting a sessile oil drop from a superamphiphobic surface with an impacting one
Colliding drops are encountered in everyday technologies and natural processes, from combustion engines and commodity sprays to raindrops and cloud formation. The outcome of a collision depends on many factors, including the impact velocity and the degree of alignment, and intrinsic properties like surface tension. Yet, little is known on binary impact dynamics of low-surface-tension drops on a l
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Structure and assembly of ESCRT-III helical Vps24 filaments
ESCRT-III proteins mediate a range of cellular membrane remodeling activities such as multivesicular body biogenesis, cytokinesis, and viral release. Critical to these processes is the assembly of ESCRT-III subunits into polymeric structures. In this study, we determined the cryo-EM structure of a helical assembly of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Vps24 at 3.2-Å resolution and found that Vps24 adopts a
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A gene therapy for inherited blindness using dCas9-VPR-mediated transcriptional activation
Catalytically inactive dCas9 fused to transcriptional activators (dCas9-VPR) enables activation of silent genes. Many disease genes have counterparts, which serve similar functions but are expressed in distinct cell types. One attractive option to compensate for the missing function of a defective gene could be to transcriptionally activate its functionally equivalent counterpart via dCas9-VPR. K
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Surface slip on rotating graphene membrane enables the temporal selectivity that breaks the permeability-selectivity trade-off
Membrane separation technology is dictated by the permeability-selectivity trade-off rule, because selectivity relies on membrane pore size being smaller than that of hydrated ions. We discovered a previously unknown mechanism that breaks the permeability-selectivity trade-off in using a rotating nanoporous graphene membrane with pores of 2 to 4 nanometers in diameter. The results show that the r
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Social reprogramming in ants induces longevity-associated glia remodeling
In social insects, workers and queens arise from the same genome but display profound differences in behavior and longevity. In Harpegnathos saltator ants, adult workers can transition to a queen-like state called gamergate, which results in reprogramming of social behavior and life-span extension. Using single-cell RNA sequencing, we compared the distribution of neuronal and glial populations be
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Watch a tiny robot powered by alcohol
Beetle-size machine can climb, crawl, and carry heavy objects—all without batteries
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Massive 'Darth Vader' isopod found lurking in the Indian Ocean
A new species of isopod with a resemblance to a certain Sith lord was just discovered. It is the first known giant isopod from the Indian Ocean. The finding extends the list of giant isopods even further. Humanity knows surprisingly little about the ocean depths. An often-repeated bit of evidence for this is the fact that humanity has done a better job mapping the surface of Mars than the bottom
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Earliest art in the British Isles discovered on Jersey
Fragments of stone engraved with abstract designs are the earliest art in the British Isles.
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Lungfish fins reveal how limbs evolved
The evolution of limbs with functional digits from fish fins happened approximately 400 million years ago in the Devonian. This morphological transition allowed vertebrates to leave the water to conquer land and gave rise to all four-legged animals or tetrapods—the evolutionary lineage that includes all amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals (including humans). Since the nineteenth century severa
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Creating meaningful change in cities takes decades, not years, and starts from the bottom
Newly published research in Science Advances by University of Chicago researcher Luis Bettencourt proposes a new perspective and models on several known paradoxes of cities. Namely, if cities are engines of economic growth, why do poverty and inequality persist? If cities thrive on faster activity and more diversity, why are so many things so hard to change? And if growth and innovation are so imp
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Lungfish fins reveal how limbs evolved
The evolution of limbs with functional digits from fish fins happened approximately 400 million years ago in the Devonian. This morphological transition allowed vertebrates to leave the water to conquer land and gave rise to all four-legged animals or tetrapods—the evolutionary lineage that includes all amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals (including humans). Since the nineteenth century severa
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Young gay men's health care needs not being met
Young gay men who are uncomfortable discussing sexual issues with their primary care providers and experience health care discrimination are less likely to seek coordinated care, leading to missed opportunities for early diagnosis of chronic and mental health issues, according to Rutgers researchers.
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Electronic consultations between primary providers and radiologists improve patient care
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), the eConsult electronic consultation system allowed primary care providers to easily consult with radiologists, was perceived as high value by primary care providers, resulted in altered patient management, and avoided unnecessary imaging tests. "We identified follow-up imaging of cystic lesions and imaging workup of pain in patients as o
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Clinical and sociodemographic features of early COVID-19 patients
Data from the first COVID-19 patients treated at three large Massachusetts hospitals reveal important trends, including disproportionate representation of vulnerable populations, high rates of disease-related complications, and the need for post-discharge, post-acute care and monitoring.
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NASA-NOAA satellite provides overnight watch on hurricane Genevieve
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite kept an eye on Hurricane Genevieve overnight and provided infrared imagery to forecasters who were monitoring the storm's strength, structure and size. Because Genevieve is close to the coast of western Mexico, warnings and watches were still in effect.
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NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite snaps Tropical Storm Higos' landfall
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the landfall of Tropical Storm Higos on Aug. 18.
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Scientists Built a Tiny Treadmill for Microscopic Water Creatures
A team of Stanford researchers have created a tiny "hydrodynamic treadmill," essentially an endless loop of water, to closely observe the behavior of marine microorganisms. "This is a completely new way of studying life in the ocean," Deepak Krishnamurthy, Stanford mechanical engineering PhD student, and first author of the paper published in Nature Methods on Monday, said in a statement . "It op
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This WWII shipwreck hosts an underwater kingdom of bacteria
The Pappy Lane shipwreck, as seen from above. (John McCord/) Thousands of vessels are submerged in the waters off the coast of North Carolina. The Outer Banks, with its strong currents and storms that create treacherous conditions for ships, is nicknamed "The Graveyard of the Atlantic." However, many of these wrecks have taken on new duties by providing valuable habitat for fish and other marine
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Toward a coronavirus breathalyzer test
Researchers have developed a prototype device that non-invasively detected COVID-19 in the exhaled breath of infected patients.
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Podcast: Want consumer privacy? Try China
The narrative in the US that the Chinese don't care about data privacy is simply misguided. It's true that the Chinese government has built a sophisticated surveillance apparatus (with the help of Western companies), and continues to spy on its citizenry. But when it comes to what companies can do with people's information, China is rapidly moving toward a data privacy regime that, in aligning wi
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Latif Nasser, Harvard Ph.D., on the Rewards of Being Dumb
They include getting your own Netflix show. Nasser, a science journalist known for his work on "Radiolab," talked about going on-camera for "Connected" and the importance of staying curious.
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Clear solar cells hit an all-time efficiency record
In a step closer to skyscrapers that serve as power sources, researchers have set a new efficiency record for color-neutral, transparent solar cells. The team achieved 8.1% efficiency and 43.3% transparency with an organic, or carbon-based, design rather than conventional silicon. While the cells have a slight green tint, they are much more like the gray of sunglasses and automobile windows. " Wi
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Here's everything you need to know about the potential Oxford University Covid vaccine
The vaccine is designed to mimic the coronavirus and train the immune system to react if a person is later infected Sign up for Guardian Australia's coronavirus email Download the free Guardian app to get the most important news notifications The vaccine developed and tested by a team at Oxford University is one of the most promising of the many candidates being developed around the world to prot
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The Sun was half of a binary system, a new paper suggests
Most stars begin in binary systems, why not ours? Puzzles posed by the Oort cloud and the possibility of Planet 9 may be solved by a new theory of our sun's lost companion. The sun and its partner would have become separated long, long ago. If most stars form in binary pairs , what about our Sun? A new paper presents a model supporting the theory that the Sun may have started out as one member of
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Observational study identifies drug that improves survival in sickest COVID-19 patients
A drug normally used in rheumatoid arthritis and cancer treatments, tocilizumab, improves hospital survival in critically-ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). The findings were published in The Lancet Rheumatology on Aug. 14, and Hackensack Meridian Health researchers have updated the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other national leaders of the findings to potentially acc
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How Weather Detectives Scrutinize Would-Be World Records
When a weather station in Death Valley recorded a high of 130 degrees Sunday, it triggered an inquiry to verify the reading. Here's a look into the exacting process of vetting extreme weather claims. (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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Reprobing Immunoassay Samples
Download this application note to learn how to maximize protein expression data!
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Cows with Eye Images Keep Predators in Arrears
Butterflies, fish and frogs sport rear-end eyespots that reduce predation. Painting eye markings on cows similarly seems to ward off predators. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Democratic Convention Is a Reality Check for Trump
Democrats turned over their convention keynote speech last night to a split-screen array of 17 diverse young leaders one day after news leaked that Republicans had invited to speak at their convention the white suburban couple who brandished guns at a multiracial group of Black Lives Matter protesters outside their St. Louis home in June. Even with all else that has happened during Donald Trump's
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Computer Search Settles 90-Year-Old Math Problem
A team of mathematicians has finally finished off Keller's conjecture, but not by working it out themselves. Instead, they taught a fleet of computers to do it for them. Keller's conjecture, posed 90 years ago by Ott-Heinrich Keller, is a problem about covering spaces with identical tiles. It asserts that if you cover a two-dimensional space with two-dimensional square tiles, at least two of the
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Pandemic on campus: tell us how your institution is coping
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02452-9 We want to hear how researchers and students are managing the start of term.
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Bacteria can defuse dangerous chemical in Passaic River
Bacteria that can help defuse highly toxic dioxin in sediments in the Passaic River—a Superfund hazardous waste site—could eventually aid cleanup efforts at other dioxin-contaminated sites around the world, according to Rutgers scientists.
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Deep learning will help future Mars rovers go farther, faster, and do more science
NASA's Mars rovers have been one of the great scientific and space successes of the past two decades.
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Ultrafast electrons in magnetic oxides: A new direction for spintronics?
Special metal oxides could one day replace semiconductor materials that are commonly used today in processors. Now, for the first time, an international team of researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the University of Kaiserslautern and the University of Fribourg in Switzerland was able to observe how electronic charge excitation changes electron spin in metal oxides in
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Study sheds new light on certainty of opinions
Researchers for years have understood how attitudes held with certainty might predict behavior, but psychologists now suggest there may be a more general disposition at work that predicts the certainty of newly formed evaluations, just as they do for pre-existing opinions.
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Study maps the roots of global mangrove loss
Using high-resolution data, researchers have created the first map of the causes of change in global mangrove habitats between 2000 and 2016 – a valuable tool to aid conservation efforts for these vital coastline defenders.
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Species competition and cooperation influence vulnerability to climate change
Organisms need to work together to adapt to climate change, especially in the presence of competitors, suggests a new study.
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How a single gene drives aggression in wild songbird
A new study shows how differentiation of a single gene changes behavior in a wild songbird, determining whether the white-throated sparrow displays more, or less, aggression.
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Quest for quantum Internet gets a boost with new technique for making entanglement
Traditional ways of producing entanglements, necessary for the development of any 'quantum internet' linking quantum computers, are not very well suited for fiber optic telecoms networks used by today's non-quantum internet. However, researchers have come up with a new way to produce such particles that is much more compatible.
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The Secret Service is buying social media location data
Documents reveal that the Secret Service used Locate X as part of a social media tracking package. The service "allows investigators to draw a digital fence around an address or area, pinpoint mobile devices that were within that area, and see where else those devices have traveled, going back months." Other agencies that have used this service include the Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the
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Facebook Only Catches 16 Percent of Medical Misinformation Posts
Press F According to damning new research, only about 16 percent of the medical misinformation posted on Facebook gets caught by the social media giant's filters. The remaining 84 percent is never labeled as inaccurate, Business Insider reports . That means countless Facebook users are seeing potentially dangerous, misleading medical information without any sort of warning that it isn't accurate.
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Further details revealed about a highly-efficient anticancer drug delivery system
The majority of drug delivery systems use nano carriers to transport drugs due to their small size and ability to distribute drugs to otherwise inaccessible sites of the body. The downside to this small size, however, is that large quantities are needed to match the required dosage.
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Termite-fishing chimpanzees provide clues to the evolution of technology
Researchers, who remotely videotaped a generation of wild chimpanzees learning to use tools, gain insights into how technology came to define human culture.
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Safer technique reveals that corals take up seawater pollutants both directly and indirectly
Marine pollutants are taken up by corals directly from seawater as well as through accumulation in their food, shows research from KAUST that uses a state-of-the-art spectroscopy technique known as cavity ring-down spectroscopy. This is the first time the approach has been used to measure pollutant accumulation.
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Researchers discover new information on the regulation of cancer cell motility
PIM kinases are enzymes that promote metastatic growth and spread of cancer cells. Researchers from the University of Turku, Finland, have obtained new information on how PIM kinases enhance cancer cell motility by regulating the formation of actin fibers in the cytoskeleton. The published results support the development of PIM-targeted therapies to prevent metastasis formation in cancer patients.
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Termite-fishing chimpanzees provide clues to the evolution of technology
Researchers, who remotely videotaped a generation of wild chimpanzees learning to use tools, gain insights into how technology came to define human culture.
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Liquid sulfur changes shape and goes critical under pressure
Scientists from the ESRF, together with teams from CEA and CNRS/Sorbonne Université, have found the proof for a liquid-to-liquid transition in sulfur and of a new kind of critical point ending this transition. Their work is published in Nature.
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Tennessee agricultural sectors taking a hit from COVID-19
The latest research from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture indicates that the COVID-19 pandemic has affected all aspects of agricultural commodity production and distribution, leading to substantial price declines and reduced income for farmers.
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New study calculates alarming lifetime risk of death from firearms and drug overdoses in the US
A new study appearing in The American Journal of Medicine, published by Elsevier, calculates the lifetime risk of death from firearms and drug overdoses in the United States. The lifetime risk of death from firearms is about one percent, meaning that approximately one out of every 100 children will die from firearms if current death rates continue. The lifetime risk of death from drug overdoses is
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New clues to a 500-year old mystery about the human heart
Researchers used artificial intelligence and genetic analyses to examine the structure of the inner surface of the heart using 25 000 MRI scans. They found that the complex network of muscle fibres lining the inside of the heart, called trabeculae, allows blood to flow more efficiently and can influence the risk of heart failure. The study answers old questions in human physiology and leads to new
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Deep learning will help future Mars rovers go farther, faster, and do more science
NASA JPL are developing autonomous capabilities that could allow future Mars rovers to go farther, faster and do more science. Training machine learning models on the Maverick2 supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, their team developed and optimized models for Drive-By Science and Energy-Optimal Autonomous Navigation. The team presented results of their work at the IEEE Aerospace C
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Not Approved Until It's Approved
For some years now, Biomarin has been working on a gene therapy for hemophilia A. That's the form of the disease caused by a deficiency in Factor VIII, which is a necessary part of the blood-clotting cascade. Like many such conditions, it comes in a wide range of phenotypes. One group of patients (around 10%) makes a nonfunctional version of the protein, while the majority just make insufficient
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Safer technique reveals that corals take up seawater pollutants both directly and indirectly
Marine pollutants are taken up by corals directly from seawater as well as through accumulation in their food, shows research from KAUST that uses a state-of-the-art spectroscopy technique known as cavity ring-down spectroscopy. This is the first time the approach has been used to measure pollutant accumulation.
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Dyes from atmospheric carbon dioxide
Dry soils in Germany, heat records in the Arctic and thawing permafrost soils in Siberia. The consequences of climate change are visible across the globe. To reduce the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, numerous research groups are investigating how CO2 can be used as a raw material for the production of chemicals.
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Researchers discover new information on the regulation of cancer cell motility
PIM kinases are enzymes that promote metastatic growth and spread of cancer cells. Researchers from the University of Turku, Finland, have obtained new information on how PIM kinases enhance cancer cell motility by regulating the formation of actin fibers in the cytoskeleton. The published results support the development of PIM-targeted therapies to prevent metastasis formation in cancer patients.
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The most sensitive instrument in the search for life in space
Researchers at the University of Bern have developed the highly sensitive ORIGIN instrument, which can provide proof of the smallest amounts of traces of life, for future space missions. Space agencies such as NASA have already expressed interest in testing ORIGIN for future missions. The instrument may be used on missions to the ice moons of Europa (Jupiter) and Enceladus (Saturn), for example.
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Food from the sea: Sustainably managed fisheries and the future
Demand for food is set to rise substantially in the coming decades, which raises a question: How well can the ocean fill the gap between current supply and future need?
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Toward a coronavirus breathalyzer test
Few people who have undergone nasopharyngeal swabs for coronavirus testing would describe it as a pleasant experience. The procedure involves sticking a long swab up the nose to collect a sample from the back of the nose and throat, which is then analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by the reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a prot
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Space telescope to study quasars and their host galaxies in three dimensions
Supermassive black holes, which likely reside at the centers of virtually all galaxies, are unimaginably dense, compact regions of space from which nothing—not even light—can escape. As such a black hole, weighing in at millions or billions of times the mass of the Sun, devours material, it is surrounded by a swirling disk of gas. When gas from this disk falls towards the black hole, it releases a
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Humans could merge with AI through this specialized polymer
Companies are developing brain-machine interfaces that aim to connect humans to computers. One major challenge is finding materials that can accomplish this without damaging human tissue. At a recent event, a team of researchers presented a specialized version of a polymer that could someday make brain-machine interfaces safer and more effective. Elon Musk's Neuralink has a straightforward outloo
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Ultrafast electrons in magnetic oxides: A new direction for spintronics?
Special metal oxides could one day replace semiconductor materials that are commonly used today in processors. Now, for the first time, researchers were able to observe how electronic charge excitation changes electron spin in metal oxides in an ultrafast and inphase manner.
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Trace vapor generator for detecting explosives, narcotics
Trace vapor detection technologies are crucial for ensuring reliable and safe detection of explosives and illegal drugs. Researchers have developed a compact testing device called the Trace Vapor Generator for Explosives and Narcotics, which is portable and can be used for non-contact sampling of these vapors. The team reports the TV-Gen can accurately generate trace vapors of low vapor pressure c
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Native Hawaiian tiger cowries eat alien invasive species
Researchers have discovered the Hawaiian tiger cowrie is a voracious predator of sponges. Among preferred sponge prey is the invasive Orange Keyhole sponge (Mycale grandis).
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Further details revealed about a highly-efficient anticancer drug delivery system
The majority of drug delivery systems use nano carriers to transport drugs due to their small size and ability to distribute drugs to otherwise inaccessible sites of the body. The downside to this small size, however, is that large quantities are needed to match the required dosage.
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RNA as a future cure for hereditary diseases
Scientists have developed an RNA molecule that can be used in bone marrow cells to correct genetic errors that affect protein production. Patients suffering from a rare hereditary disease that causes a painful hypersensitivity to sunlight could benefit in future.
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Researchers discover novel molecular mechanism that enables conifers to adapt to winter
Unlike broadleaf trees, conifers are evergreen and retain their photosynthesis structure throughout the year. Especially in late winter, the combination of freezing temperatures and high light intensity exposes the needles to oxidative damage that could lead to the destruction of molecules and cell structures that contribute to photosynthesis. Researchers have discovered a previously unknown mecha
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A stepping stone for measuring quantum gravity
A group of theoretical physicists have proposed a 'table-top' device that could measure gravity waves. However, their actual aim is to answer one of the biggest questions in physics: is gravity a quantum phenomenon? The key element for the device is the quantum superposition of large objects.
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Bolsonaro's hostility has driven Brazil's Indigenous peoples to the brink
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02431-0
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Author declaration: have you considered equity, diversity and inclusion?
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02429-8
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Europe's first syphilis outbreak may predate Columbus' voyage
New evidence may debunk the idea that Columbus brought syphilis to Europe. Europeans could already have been infected with this sexually transmitted disease before the 15th century, according to a new study. In addition, the researchers have discovered a hitherto unknown pathogen causing a related disease. The predecessor of syphilis and its related diseases could be over 2,500 years old. "It see
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Link Horizon Europe funding to real steps to gender equality
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02430-1
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Promising COVID-19 studies show hope for long-lasting immunity
A handful of new studies suggest that people who had been infected with COVID-19 had "memory" T cells that were able to facilitate a unique immune response against subsequent exposure to the virus. "This calls for some optimism about herd immunity, and potentially a vaccine," Smita Iyer, an immunologist at the University of California, Davis told The New York Times. Still, many questions remain a
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Termite-fishing chimpanzees provide clues to the evolution of technology
Unlike chimpanzees in East and West Africa, who use a single tool to extract termites, chimpanzees in Central Africa's Congo Basin use tool sets–puncturing sticks or perforating twigs plus fishing probes–to harvest the insects from underground nests or towering earthen mounds scattered across lowland forests.
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One in 10 Tennessee families were food insufficient during early months of COVID-19
The latest research from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture indicates that during late April and early May 2020, approximately 525,000 Tennessee households were food insufficient, meaning they sometimes or often did not have enough to eat – that's one in 10 families. About 30% of these struggling households were food sufficient prior to the onset of the pandemic.
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UAlberta researchers find way to speed up nerve regrowth for trauma patients
A University of Alberta researcher has found a treatment that increases the speed of nerve regeneration by three to five times, leading to much better outcomes for trauma surgery patients.
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Food from the sea
Demand for food is set to rise substantially in the coming decades, which raises a question: How well can the ocean fill the gap between current supply and future need?
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Study sheds new light on certainty of opinions
Researchers for years have understood how attitudes held with certainty might predict behavior, but a series of new studies led by a University at Buffalo psychologist suggest there may be a more general disposition at work that predicts the certainty of newly formed evaluations, just as they do for pre-existing opinions.
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LSU Health New Orleans team creates better tool to aid COVID diagnosis
An LSU Health New Orleans radiologist and evolutionary anatomist have teamed up to show the same techniques used for research on reptile and bird lungs can be used to help confirm the diagnosis of COVID-19 in patients. Their paper published in BMJ Case Reports demonstrates that 3D models are a strikingly clearer method for visually evaluating the distribution of COVID-19-related infection in the r
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UCalgary research delivers new insights into how skin can regenerate after severe burns
New research led by Dr. Jeff Biernaskie, PhD, has made an exciting leap forward in understanding how skin heals, which could lead to drug treatments to vastly improve wound healing. The study, published in the scientific journal Cell Stem Cell, was co-led by Dr. Sepideh Abbasi, PhD, Sarthak Sinha, MD/PhD candidate and Dr. Elodie Labit, PhD, postdoctoral fellow.
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How to make your own disinfecting wipes
If you're making one of each kind of wipe, make sure you label them. You really don't want a 70% alcohol solution on your baby's skin. (Sandra Gutierrez G. /) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . Shortages have been a big side effect of the pandemic. They
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That Racist Kamala Harris Birther Conspiracy Is Nothing New
The falsehood that the senator isn't really a US citizen comes from an old playbook.
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David Dobrik's Vlog Squad Get Blasted on the Dodgeball Thunderdome Course
Stream Full Episodes of Dodgeball Thunderdome: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/dodgeball-thunderdome/ Watch Dodgeball Thunderdome hosted by David Dobrik, Erin Lim, and Andrew "Hawk" Hawkins Wednesdays at 9P on Discovery. Dodgeball Thunderdome host David Dobrik challenges the Vlog Squad's Jonah, Suzy, Zane, and Mariah to compete against each other for $1,000. Enter for a chance to win $5,000 Dis
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Combating COVID-19 with Cell-Free Expression
Scientists rely on synthetic biology and cell-free expression systems for developing novel approaches to combat the pandemic.
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Myanmar: palaeontologists must stop buying conflict amber
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02432-z
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Scientists: Exploding Star Likely Caused Mass Extinction on Earth
According to researchers at the University of Illinois, a supernova 65 light-years from Earth likely caused a mass extinction event during the Late Devonian period, 359 million years ago. The researchers found radioactive isotopes in rocks that may be able to confirm such an event, as detailed in a new paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . During the Lat
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Understanding the inner workings of the human heart
Researchers used artificial intelligence and genetic analyses to examine the structure of the inner surface of the heart using 25,000 MRI scans. They found that the complex network of muscle fibers lining the inside of the heart, called trabeculae, allows blood to flow more efficiently and can influence the risk of heart failure. The study answers very old questions in basic human physiology and l
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World record: Plasma accelerator operates right around the clock
Researchers have reached an important milestone on the road to the particle accelerator of the future. For the first time, a laser plasma accelerator has run for more than a day while continuously producing electron beams. The LUX beamline achieved a run time of 30 hours.
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Portrait of a virus
Researchers create a centralized electronic medical records tool to gather, monitor, analyze clinical trends in COVID-19 across multiple countries. Proof-of-concept platform overcomes key hurdles of decentralized EMR systems.
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Under pressure, nontoxic salt-based propellant performs well
In smaller spacecraft such as CubeSat satellites, a salt-based monopropellant is showing promise. It can be used both in high-thrust chemical propulsion for fast time-sensitive maneuvers, and electric mode for slow maneuvers, such as orbit maintenance. Now, researchers have more knowledge about how it performs under pressure to inform rocket design.
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3D printing some of the world's lightest materials
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02448-5 A new way to shape aerogels opens up their use, and understanding how sulfur can change state between two liquids.
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Toward a coronavirus breathalyzer test
Few people who have undergone nasopharyngeal swabs for coronavirus testing would describe it as a pleasant experience. The procedure involves sticking a long swab up the nose to collect a sample from the back of the nose and throat, which is then analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by the reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a prot
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Researchers discovered new information on the regulation of cancer cell motility
PIM kinases are enzymes that promote metastatic growth and spread of cancer cells. Researchers from the University of Turku, Finland, have obtained new information on how the PIM kinases enhance cancer cell motility by regulating the formation of actin fibres in the cytoskeleton. The published results support the development of PIM-targeted therapies to prevent metastasis formation in cancer patie
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Microscopy approach poised to offer new insights into liver disease
Researchers have developed a new way to visualize the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in mouse models of the disease.
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The most sensitive instrument in the search for life in space comes from Bern
Researchers at the University of Bern have developed the highly sensitive ORIGIN instrument, which can provide proof of the smallest amounts of traces of life, for future space missions. Space agencies such as NASA have already expressed interest in testing ORIGIN for future missions. The instrument may be used on missions to the ice moons of Europa (Jupiter) and Enceladus (Saturn), for example.
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COVID-19 cytokine storms may prevent a durable immune response
New stud shows high levels of some cytokines seen in COVID-19 patients, as part of a cytokine storm, may prevent the development of long-term immunity to SARS-CoV-2.
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Words used to describe alcohol intoxication may give clues to drinking habits
Penn State research suggests the language young adults use to describe the effects they feel from drinking may give insight into their drinking habits.
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Kids Are Bigger Coronavirus Spreaders Than Many Doctors Realized — Here's How Schools Can Lower the Risk
Checking for symptoms is just the beginning. Here are 10 ways schools can help keep children, families and faculty safe.
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Asteroid Makes the Closest Earth Flyby a Space Rock Has Ever Survived
The car-sized object zoomed by just 1,830 miles away — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Vagabonding female butterflies weigh in on reproductive strategies
A new study by researchers from the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bengaluru, published today in the Royal Society's journal Biology Letters, shows that dispersals, when undertaken by butterflies in search of unpredictable resources, selectively burden the egg-carrying females on their long flights.
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Castration-resistant prostate cancer at high risk of metastasis: enzalutamide has added benefit
. For the first time, new data from the PROSPER study show an advantage in overall survival that outweighs the disadvantages in some side effects.
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Targeting a chronic pain gateway could bring relief
A new approach to chronic pain treatment targets a molecule that moves pain messages into nerve cell nuclei.
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Making the DNA melt curve more accurate
NIST researchers find a new (mathematical) twist to improve DNA origami, which could lead to better drug delivery containers and biosensors.
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Bacteria can defuse dangerous chemical in Passaic River
Bacteria that can help defuse highly toxic dioxin in sediments in the Passaic River – a Superfund hazardous waste site – could eventually aid cleanup efforts at other dioxin-contaminated sites around the world, according to Rutgers scientists. Their research, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, needs further work to realize the full potential of the beneficial bottom-dwell
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Small set of genes may provide unique barcode for different types of brain cells in worms
When it comes to brain cells, one size does not fit all. Neurons come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and contain different types of brain chemicals. A new study in Nature suggests that the identities of all the neurons in a worm are linked to unique members of a single gene family that control the process of converting DNA instructions into proteins, known as gene expression.
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Liquid sulfur changes shape and goes critic under pressure
Scientists from the ESRF, together with teams from CEA and CNRS/Sorbonne Université, have found the proof for a liquid-to-liquid transition in sulfur and of a new kind of critical point ending this transition. Their work is published in Nature.
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Mystery gas discovered near center of Milky Way
An international team of researchers have discovered a dense, cold gas that's been shot out from the centre of the Milky Way "like bullets".
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Leading-edge technology unmasks protein linked to Parkinson's disease
UC San Diego scientists using leading-edge technologies have produced the first visualizations of LRRK2, the elusive protein that many consider the key of fully understanding the causes of genetic Parkinson's disease, inside its natural cellular environment and the first high-resolution blueprint of the protein. They leveraged these depictions to describe how LRRK2 binds to cellular tracks called
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A touch of gold sends crystals electric with excitement
A touch of gold – or another noble metal – can change the structure of a crystal and its intrinsic properties, physicists at the University of Warwick have demonstrated in a display of modern-day alchemy.
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Protein structural insights chart the way to improved treatments for heart disease
A team including Wei Liu, assistant professor in ASU's School of Molecular Sciences (SMS) and the Biodesign Institute's Center for Applied Structural Discovery, has published a paper today in Molecular Cell that offers promising details for improved therapeutic treatments for cardiac disease.
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Medicaid expansion and outpatient surgical care
This observational study examined the association between state participation in Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act and changes in the use of surgical care for common outpatient procedures.
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Understanding the inner workings of the human heart
Researchers used artificial intelligence and genetic analyses to examine the structure of the inner surface of the heart using 25,000 MRI scans. They found that the complex network of muscle fibers lining the inside of the heart, called trabeculae, allows blood to flow more efficiently and can influence the risk of heart failure. The study answers very old questions in basic human physiology and l
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First immune-evading cells created to treat type 1 diabetes
Salk Institute scientists have made a major advance in the pursuit of a safe and effective treatment for type 1 diabetes, an illness that impacts an estimated 1.6 million Americans with a cost of $14.4 billion annually. Using stem cell technology, Salk researchers generated the first human insulin-producing pancreatic cell clusters able to evade the immune system. These "immune shielded" cell clus
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The secret of lymph: How lymph nodes help cancer cells spread
For decades, physicians have known that many kinds of cancer cells often spread first to lymph nodes before traveling to distant organs through the bloodstream. New research from Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) provides insight into why this occurs, opening up new targets for treatments that could inhibit the spread of cancer.
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Potenshöjande läkemedel med cancerhämmande potential
Potenshöjande läkemedel av typen Viagra har potential att förbättra prognosen hos män med tjock- och ändtarmscancer. Dessa så kallade PDE5-hämmare tycks ha en cancerhämmande förmåga, enligt en studie från Lunds universitet och Region Skåne. En ny studie från Centrum för Primärvårdsforskning, ett samarbete mellan Lunds universitet och Region Skåne, visar att de potenshöjande läkemedlen fosfodieste
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DS9 Upscale Project Update: What I've Been Working On
It's been several months since I wrote an update on my ongoing efforts to restore Deep Space Nine. I took a break from the project through much of June due to a move and an associated injury but jumped back into it in July and have been at work steadily since then. The majority have my time has been focused on understanding how shifting the episode into various alternative frame rates would impac
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APP gene copy number changes reflect exogenous contamination
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2522-3
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Neurodegenerative gene's function is not all about those bases
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02382-6 A mutation in the C9orf72 gene is the most common genetic cause of two neurodegenerative diseases. A newly identified immunological function for the C9orf72 protein points to a potential therapeutic strategy for these diseases.
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Regulation of the MLH1–MLH3 endonuclease in meiosis
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2592-2 Reconstitution of the activation of the MLH1–MLH3 endonuclease shows how crossovers are formed during meiosis.
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Unique homeobox codes delineate all the neuron classes of C. elegans
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2618-9 Each one of the complete set of 118 neuron classes in Caenorhabditis elegans can be specified individually by the expression of unique combinations of homeodomain proteins.
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An intramembrane chaperone complex facilitates membrane protein biogenesis
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2624-y The PAT complex, an intermembrane chaperone complex comprising the ER-resident membrane proteins CCDC47 and Asterix, directly interacts with nascent transmembrane domains to facilitate the biogenesis of multi-spanning membrane proteins.
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Quantum error correction of a qubit encoded in grid states of an oscillator
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2603-3 Quantum error correction of Gottesman–Kitaev–Preskill code states is realized experimentally in a superconducting quantum device.
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Immune-evasive human islet-like organoids ameliorate diabetes
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2631-z Metabolically-mature human islet-like organoids generated from induced pluripotent stem cells are able to recapitulate insulin-responsive pancreatic islet function and avoid immunologic cell death in diabetic mouse transplantation models.
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Structure of hepcidin-bound ferroportin reveals iron homeostatic mechanisms
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2668-z
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Reply to: APP gene copy number changes reflect exogenous contamination
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2523-2
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One-way supercurrent achieved in an electrically polar film
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02380-8 Diodes are devices that conduct electric current mainly in one direction. An electrically polar film that acts as a diode for superconducting current could lead to electronic devices that have ultralow power consumption.
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Observation of superconducting diode effect
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2590-4 A superconducting diode that has zero resistance in only one direction is realized in an artificially engineered superlattice without inversion symmetry, enabling directional charge transport without energy loss.
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Cold gas in the Milky Way's nuclear wind
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2595-z Observations of a cold molecular gas associated with the atomic hydrogen outflow from the centre of our Galaxy indicate that this gas has a surprisingly high mass but unclear origin.
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Genetic and functional insights into the fractal structure of the heart
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2635-8 A genome-wide association study shows that myocardial trabeculae are an important determinant of cardiac performance in the adult heart, identifies conserved pathways that regulate structural complexity and reveals the influence of trabeculae on the susceptibility to cardiovascular disease.
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Cancer cells stock up in lymph vessels to survive
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02383-5 A cellular condition called oxidative stress can kill cancer cells. The finding that skin cancer cells evade such destruction using lipids acquired while passing through lymphatic vessels reveals a mechanism that boosts cancer spread.
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Structure of LRRK2 in Parkinson's disease and model for microtubule interaction
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2673-2
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Liquid–liquid transition and critical point in sulfur
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2593-1 Under high pressure, elemental sulfur shows a sharp density discontinuity that evolves with pressure and temperature and terminates at a critical point, indicating a first-order liquid–liquid phase transition.
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C9orf72 in myeloid cells suppresses STING-induced inflammation
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2625-x Studies of mice and humans suggest a role for loss of the C9orf72 protein in some neurodegenerative disorders: with reduced C9orf72 levels, there is more inflammation mediated by the STING protein in immune and brain cells.
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PCNA activates the MutLγ endonuclease to promote meiotic crossing over
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2645-6
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Molecules in the blood of older people promote cancer spread
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02381-7 A molecule produced by the metabolism of proteins and fats has been found to accumulate in the blood of older people, and to endow cancer cells with the ability to spread from one site in the body to others.
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The causes of sea-level rise since 1900
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2591-3 Observed global-mean sea-level rise since 1900 is reconciled with estimates based on the contributing processes, revealing budget closure within uncertainties and showing ice-mass loss from glaciers as a dominant contributor.
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A single-cell transcriptome atlas of marsupial embryogenesis and X inactivation
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2629-6 Single-cell RNA-sequencing analysis of embryogenesis and X chromosome inactivation in the opossum (Monodelphis domestica) resolves the developmental trajectory of a marsupial, and sheds light on the evolution of embryogenesis in mammals.
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Age-induced accumulation of methylmalonic acid promotes tumour progression
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2630-0 Ageing in humans is associated with an increase in circulating methylmalonic acid, which induces expression of SOX4 and promotes tumour progression.
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The future of food from the sea
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2616-y Modelled supply curves show that, with policy reform and technological innovation, the production of food from the sea may increase sustainably, perhaps supplying 25% of the increase in demand for meat products by 2050.
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Structural basis for dimerization quality control
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2636-7 Structural studies of the dimerization quality control E3 ubiquitin ligase SCF–FBXL17 indicate that its selectivity for aberrant complex formation is based on recognizing both shape and complementarity of interacting domains.
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Additive manufacturing of silica aerogels
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2594-0 A direct ink writing protocol for silica aerogels enables 3D printing of lightweight, miniaturized objects with complex shapes, with the possibility to easily add functionality by incorporating nanoparticles.
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Lymph protects metastasizing melanoma cells from ferroptosis
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2623-z Melanoma cells undergo less oxidative stress and less ferroptosis in lymph than in blood, owing to higher levels of oleic acid in lymph, and thus exposure to the lymphatic environment increases subsequent metastasis through blood.
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Piezoelectric and pyroelectric effects induced by interface polar symmetry
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2602-4 A built-in electric field at the interface of metals and centrosymmetric semiconductors is shown to induce polar structures in the semiconductors and generate substantial piezoelectric and pyroelectric effects.
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Mother bats use baby talk to communicate with their pups
When talking to babies, humans slow down their speech, raise their pitch and change the "color" of their voice. This 'baby talk,' as people know it, increases the infant's attention and facilitates language learning. Among animals, mothers often engage in pup-directed vocalizations too, but does this also imply voice changes? A team of scientists that included Smithsonian Tropical Research Institu
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New research highlights 'challenging nature' of vested interests in the energy transition
Pioneering new research has highlighted some of the political difficulties with the UK's energy transition, in particular around vested fossil fuel interests.
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Researchers develop tillandsia-inspired hygroscopic photothermal organogels for atmospheric water harvesting
As a typical representative of air plants, Tillandsia species can absorb moisture from the air with their leaves. Inspired by this hygroscopic foliage, Prof. Chen Tao's team at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), has developed a new type of hygroscopic photothermal organogel (POG).
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Pumice arrives delivering 'vitamin boost' to the reef
The giant pumice raft created by an underwater volcanic eruption last August in Tonga has begun arriving on the Australian eastern seaboard, delivering millions of reef-building organisms that researchers say could be a 'vitamin boost' for the Great Barrier Reef.
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Unconventional monetary policy and bank risk taking
Unconventional monetary policy does not lead to greater risk-taking by banks, according to new research. This will be welcome news for central banks and policymakers as they ramp up efforts to limit the economic fallout of the pandemic.
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Controlling the electron spin: Flip it quickly but carefully
Over the past two decades, a new area at the interface of semiconductor physics, electronics and quantum mechanics has been gaining popularity among theoretical physicists and experimenters. This new field is called spintronics, and one of its main tasks is to learn how to control the spin of charge carriers in well known semiconductor structures. Many theoretical efforts are always required befor
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World record: Plasma accelerator operates right around the clock
A team of researchers at DESY has reached an important milestone on the road to the particle accelerator of the future. For the first time, a so-called laser plasma accelerator has run for more than a day while continuously producing electron beams. The LUX beamline, jointly developed and operated by DESY and the University of Hamburg, achieved a run time of 30 hours. "This brings us a big step cl
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Mother bats use baby talk to communicate with their pups
When talking to babies, humans slow down their speech, raise their pitch and change the "color" of their voice. This 'baby talk,' as people know it, increases the infant's attention and facilitates language learning. Among animals, mothers often engage in pup-directed vocalizations too, but does this also imply voice changes? A team of scientists that included Smithsonian Tropical Research Institu
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Biden's Holiday From History
This year's Democratic convention is heavy on biography, light on history. Speaker after speaker has told the story of Joe Biden's personal life: his working-class roots, his family tragedies, his resilience. The message is that Biden cares about ordinary Americans because he sees their struggles as an echo of his own. What no speaker has done is put Biden's personal history in the context of Ame
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A Byproduct of Digestion Helps Explain Why Cancer Gets Worse as We Age
Cancer cells become super-charged when exposed to methylmalonic acid, a chemical that builds up in older people's bodies. cancer-cell-illustration_cropped.jpg Image credits: SciePro/ Shutterstock Human Wednesday, August 19, 2020 – 11:00 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) — Many forms of cancer become more common and deadlier as we get older. There are several reasons behind this, includi
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NIH imposes 'outrageous' conditions on resuming coronavirus grant targeted by Trump
Grantee calls move "cynical," conditions "impossible" to meet
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A key to cheaper renewable fuels: Keeping iron from rusting
Washington State University researchers have made a key first step in economically converting plant materials to fuels: keeping iron from rusting.
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A touch of gold sends crystals electric with excitement
A touch of gold—or another noble metal—can change the structure of a crystal and its intrinsic properties, physicists at the University of Warwick have demonstrated in a display of modern-day alchemy.
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Mystery gas discovered near center of Milky Way
An international team of researchers have discovered a dense, cold gas that's been shot out from the center of the Milky Way "like bullets".
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Farvel til forhadt notch: Nu bliver selfie-kameraet gemt under skærmen
Som de første i verden er kinesiske mobilproducent ZTE på vej med et kamera gemt under en OLED-skærm. Det betyder et farvel til den forhadte skærmudskæring.
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Climate change: Dams played key role in limiting sea level rise
Huge dam projects that came on stream in the 1970s substantially slowed the rate of sea level rise.
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Childhood maltreatment linked to higher risk of multiple health conditions in later life
People who suffer one or more forms of maltreatment in childhood have a higher chance of multimorbidity in later life.
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New database could help lead to personalized treatments for breast cancer patients
New database of cell lines helps expand the current way of doing research — enabling the development of better therapies through the evaluation of the entire genomic signature.
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Toddlers who use touchscreens show attention differences
New research from the TABLET project recruited 12-month-old infants who had different levels of touchscreen usage.
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Crust and upper mantle velocity structure in SE Tibet and its geodynamic implications
Southeastern Tibet is a major area for transport of the Tibetan Plateau materials. Recently, researchers from University of Science and Technology of China obtained the high-resolution crust and upper mantle velocity structure of this area from ambient noise and surface wave tomography. The results reveal three major dynamic modes in southeastern Tibet: rigid extrusion of upper crustal material, c
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Watch a Guy Selling a Fake COVID-19 Cure Get Absolutely Destroyed
In a scathing CNN interview Tuesday, Anderson Cooper absolutely eviscerated MyPillow creator Mike Lindell for pushing the compound oleandrin as a cure for COVID-19 — even though it's not backed by any sort of scientific evidence. Cooper begins the interview guns blazing, immediately questioning the credentials and motivations of Lindell, who is on President Trump's coronavirus task force and serv
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A new paper says the Sun was half of a binary system
Most stars begin in binary systems, why not ours? Puzzles posed by the Oort cloud and the possibility of Planet 9 may be solved by the new theory. The sun and its partner would have become separated long, long ago. If most stars form in binary pairs , what about our Sun? A new paper presents a model supporting the theory that the Sun may have started out as one member of a temporary binary system
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How doctors can help fix the broken US asylum system | Joseph Shin
Refugees fleeing persecution endure unimaginable hardships in search of a better life. Physician Joseph Shin explains the essential collaboration of doctors and lawyers working together to help asylum seekers in the United States, sharing promising pathways toward securing the human dignities they deserve.
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New research highlights 'challenging nature' of vested interests in the energy transition
Pioneering new research has highlighted some of the political difficulties with the UK's energy transition, in particular around vested fossil fuel interests.
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High blood pressure and salt, anti-aging factor Klotho key
The mechanism behind salt-intake and hypertension has been elucidated for the first time, through vascular non-canonical Wnt5a/RhoA under Klotho deficiency.
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Osteoarthritis: Conservative therapy delays need for knee and hip joint replacement surgery
With implementation of conservative treatment methods like physiotherapy and individually tailored, adjusted exercises, quality of osteoarthritis care can improve and patients can delay the need for an artificial hip or knee joint. This has been demonstrated by a clinical study from Norway that was recently presented at the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR 2020) Online Annual Congress.
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Pumice arrives delivering "vitamin boost" to the reef
The giant pumice raft created by an underwater volcanic eruption last August in Tonga has begun arriving on the Australian eastern seaboard, delivering millions of reef-building organisms that researchers say could be a "vitamin boost" for the Great Barrier Reef.
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Hypoxia in hospitalized COVID-19 patients may be treatable
Covid-19 patients with hypoxia respond positively to icatibant treatment, Radboud university medical center researchers wrote in JAMA Network Open. These findings have led to a follow-up study at ten Dutch hospitals into a drug that may be even more effective. The current study has been funded by ZonMw.
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The 70 Million-Year-Old History of the Mississippi River
Dive into the secret past and uncertain future of the body of water that has defined a nation
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What Super-Spreading Events Teach Us About Protecting Ourselves From COVID-19
Scientists are increasingly finding that a small number of people may be the source of many cases
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A mushroom-related brush with mortality: how John Cage fell for fungi
Despite one foraging trip landing him in hospital, the avant garde composer held a lifelong passion for mycology, using his expertise to supply New York restaurants – and surprise Italian quiz show audiences In February 1959, while on a visit to fellow composer Luciano Berio in Milan, John Cage appeared five times on a popular Italian television quiz show called Lascia o Raddoppia? (Double or Not
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Oops: Colleges Are Already Canceling In-Person Classes
It's almost as though US universities have been living under a rock for the last six months. Sure, they're limiting in-person classes and telling students to stay quarantined inside their dorms — but, at the same time, many are welcoming students back to campus. Unsurprisingly, countless clusters of new coronavirus cases are cropping up at institutes of higher learning across the entire country.
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Starving key cells boosts glioblastoma treatment in mice
New insight into a gene that controls energy production in cancer stem cells could help in the search for a more effective treatment for glioblastoma, researchers report. Suppressing the OSMR gene can improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy, according to their new study. "To improve patient response to glioblastoma treatment, we must find new vulnerabilities in cancer stem cells and overco
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Telemedicine may well outlast the pandemic, say mental health care staff
The Covid-19 pandemic has brought about rapid innovation in mental health care, and the move to telemedicine is likely here to stay to at least some degree, but new research led by UCL and King's College London cautions that serious barriers still need to be overcome.
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COVID-19 patients who experience cytokine storms may make few memory B cells
The release of massive amounts of proteins called cytokines can lead to some of the most severe symptoms of COVID-19. An August 19 study in the journal Cell now suggests that high levels of some cytokines may also prevent people who are infected from developing long-term immunity as affected patients were observed to make very few of the type of B cells needed to develop a durable immune response.
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Lactobacillus hilgardii LMG 7934 genome deciphered at Kazan Federal University
The team is led by Associate Professor Ayrat Kayumov (Department of Genetics, Kazan Federal University). In this research, the scientists not only performed genome sequencing, but also found a completely new type of PII-Like Protein PotN.
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Controlling the electron spin: Flip it quickly but carefully
Over the past two decades, a new area at the interface of semiconductor physics, electronics and quantum mechanics has been gaining popularity among theoretical physicists and experimenters. This new field is called spintronics, and one of its main tasks is to learn how to control the spin of charge carriers in well known semiconductor structures.
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A key to cheaper renewable fuels: keeping iron from rusting
Washington State University researchers have made a key first step in economically converting plant materials to fuels: keeping iron from rusting.
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World record: Plasma accelerator operates right around the clock
A team of researchers at DESY has reached an important milestone on the road to the particle accelerator of the future. For the first time, a laser plasma accelerator has run for more than a day while continuously producing electron beams. The LUX beamline, jointly developed and operated by DESY and the University of Hamburg, achieved a run time of 30 hours. The scientists are reporting on their r
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Research challenges popular belief that 'unbridled ambition' costs female candidates votes
New research looking at voters' perception of gender and aspiration suggests that voters do not penalize ambitious women candidates seeking political office, contrary to popular belief.
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Heating our climate damages our economies: Study reveals greater costs than expected
Rising temperatures due to our greenhouse gas emissions can cause greater damages to our economies than previous research suggested, a new study shows. Scientists from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) and the Mercator Research Institute for Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC) took a closer look at what climate change does to regions at the sub-national level, such as US
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Toward an ultrahigh energy density capacitor
Capacitors that rapidly store and release electric energy are key components in modern electronics and power systems. However, the most commonly used ones have low energy densities compared to other storage systems like batteries or fuel cells, which in turn cannot discharge and recharge rapidly without sustaining damage.
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Researchers work to ensure accurate decoding in fragile quantum states
When computers share information with one another, the information gets encoded into bits, then decoded back into its original form. In the process, pieces of the information sometimes get scrambled, or lost. As a simplified example, an improperly decoded email that says "I am now sending you the money" could arrive at its destination saying "I am not sending you the money."
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Første han-kæmpe-hveps fundet i USA
Kæmpe-hvepsen er farlig for mennesker og spiser de hjemlige bier.
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A method to perform canonical phase measurements using quantum feedback
Light is known to have a number of fundamental properties, including color, brightness, and direction, most of which are immediately apparent and can be observed with the naked eye. There are now several instruments to detect and measure these properties, such as photon counters, detectors often used in research that measure brightness by counting individual light quanta. Crucially, some existing
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A Norwegian Startup Is Turning Dry Deserts Into Fertile Cropland
The UN population forecast predicts that by 2050 there will be almost 10 billion people on the planet. They'll live mostly in cities and have an older median age than the current global population. One looming questions is, what will they eat? The Green Revolution of the 1960s used selective breeding to double crop yields of rice and wheat in some areas of the world, rescuing millions of people f
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Research challenges popular belief that 'unbridled ambition' costs female candidates votes
A new study into voter behaviour in the US and UK argues that electorates value aspiration and ambition among female candidates seeking office challenging common assumptions.
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Disorders in movement
A European research alliance headed by the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the University of Bonn tracks the onset of ataxias. The results published in "The Lancet Neurology" provide valuable data for prevention studies. The data were collected by a research network, which includes scientific institutions from Austria, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland and Spain.
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Heating our climate damages our economies – study reveals greater costs than expected
Rising temperatures due to our greenhouse gas emissions can cause greater damages to our economies than previous research suggested, a new study shows. Scientists from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) and the Mercator Research Institute for Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC) took a closer look at what climate change does to regions at the sub-national level, such as US
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Ultrafast electrons in magnetic oxides: A new direction for spintronics?
Special metal oxides could one day replace semiconductor materials that are commonly used today in processors. Now, for the first time, an international team of researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the University of Kaiserslautern and the University of Fribourg in Switzerland was able to observe how electronic charge excitation changes electron spin in metal oxides in
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Quest for quantum Internet gets a boost with new technique for making entanglement
Traditional ways of producing entanglements, necessary for the development of any 'quantum internet' linking quantum computers, are not very well suited for fiber optic telecoms networks used by today's non-quantum internet. However, researchers have come up with a new way to produce such particles that is much more compatible.
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Facebook's Portal Device Can Now Do Zoom Calls
BlueJeans, GoToMeeting, and Webex are also among the services now supported by the videochat gadget.
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Virtual fighter jets powered by AI are battling for the chance to duel a human
This F-16 in Florida is being flown by a real human. (US Air Force / Tech. Sgt. John Raven/) Fighter jets need humans to fly them, but someday, that could change. This week, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency—better known as DARPA—is hosting a virtual Top Gun -style competition in which various artificial intelligence algorithms fly simulated jets in digital dogfights. No actual planes
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Watch: Space rocks impacted this Costa Rican village in more ways than one
A rare and precious meteorite, strewn across a rainforest, turns Aguas Zarcas into a hotbed for deals and science
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Three Ways to Fix Toxic Policing
Accountability, demilitarization and the transfer of responsibilities to social workers are needed to remake our overly antagonistic law-enforcement agencies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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We're using microbes to clean up toxic electronic waste – here's how
If you were to stack up all the electronic waste produced annually around the world it would weigh as much as all the commercial aircrafts ever produced, or 5,000 Eiffel towers. This is a growing "tsunami" according to the UN, and it's fed by all the phones, tablets and other electronic devices that are thrown away each day.
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Oleandrin is a deadly plant poison, not a COVID-19 cure
With COVID-19 cases and deaths rising in the U.S. and globally, identifying new therapies to prevent and combat the virus is a top priority. Natural products from plants are an attractive option in the search for a cure. Approximately 374,000 plant species are on Earth; humans have used more than 28,000 of them as a form of medicine.
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Oleandrin is a deadly plant poison, not a COVID-19 cure
With COVID-19 cases and deaths rising in the U.S. and globally, identifying new therapies to prevent and combat the virus is a top priority. Natural products from plants are an attractive option in the search for a cure. Approximately 374,000 plant species are on Earth; humans have used more than 28,000 of them as a form of medicine.
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Aalborg Universitetshospital ramt af coronasmitte
Otte medarbejdere på Aalborg Universitetshospital er smittet med coronavirus.
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Facing High Costs at Home, Americans Seek Fertility Help Abroad
With fertility rates falling as first-time parents get older, and the costs of treatments out of reach, a steady stream of Americans with perfectly good health insurance are traveling to countries they otherwise might never have set foot in to pursue a fundamental part of life: starting a family.
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What can ants and termites teach us about fighting disease?
You live in a crowded underground city with everyone you know. A relative comes home, and you can tell that they've been exposed to something that could get you all sick. Unchecked, a disease could wipe out your whole civilization. So you do what needs to be done.
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An on-skin durable nanomesh sensor to monitor natural skin motion
Comfortable strain gages can be directly placed on human skin to monitor continuous motion activity with widespread applications in robotics, human motion detection, and personal health care. However, it is challenging to develop an on-skin strain gage to monitor long-term human body motions without disturbing the natural movement of skin. In a new report now on Science Advances, Yan Wang, and a t
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What can ants and termites teach us about fighting disease?
You live in a crowded underground city with everyone you know. A relative comes home, and you can tell that they've been exposed to something that could get you all sick. Unchecked, a disease could wipe out your whole civilization. So you do what needs to be done.
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Russiagate Was Not a Hoax
Rereading the Mueller report more than a year after its publication is an exercise in disappointment. One gets the feeling that Robert Mueller didn't press his inquiry to its end. Instead of settling the questions that haunt the 2016 campaign, he left them dangling, publishing a stilted document riddled with insinuation and lacunae. He rushed his work, closing up shop before finishing his assignm
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How tech can keep virtual music class pitch perfect
In K-12 music classes and performances may look different this fall, but creativity and music-making technology will mean classes won't be silenced, one expert says. "There are so many online tools out there that music educators can use to bring students together during the COVID-19 pandemic," says Christopher Cayari, assistant professor of music education in the Patti and Rusty Rueff School of D
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Partner selection ultimately happens in the woman's reproductive tract
The female reproductive tract has the final say in human mate choice, according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland.
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Brain remapping dysfunction causes spatial memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease
A research group elucidated the brain circuit mechanism that cause of spatial memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease.In the future, improving brain remapping function may reverse spatial memory impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
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Toward an ultrahigh energy density capacitor
Researchers at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have demonstrated that a common material can be processed into a top-performing energy storage material. Their discovery could improve the efficiency, reliability, and robustness of personal electronics, wearable technologies, and car audio systems.
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Protein influences regeneration of vascular cells
Through their basic research, physicians at the Heart Center of the University Hospital Bonn have discovered how the communication between individual cells can be influenced with the help of a specific protein. These findings are an important approach to improving the treatment of diseases such as arteriosclerosis (calcified blood vessels), which causes heart attacks. The study was published onlin
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Study of one million Danish children: Childhood adversity increases the risk of early death
Social adversity in early childhood appears to be a significant risk factor for death in early adulthood. Children who have experienced repeated serious adversity such as losing a parent, mental illness in the family, poverty or being placed in foster care have a 4.5 times higher risk of dying in early adulthood than children who have not experienced adversity during childhood. This is the conclus
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Trust is key to effectiveness in virtual communities, researchers find
With the global COVID-19 pandemic shifting more and more of our work and school online, virtual communities are more important than ever — but how do we know, without bias, that our online groups are actually successful in helping us with our goals? A team of researchers based in Italy think has proposed the first objective metric to assess the effectiveness of virtual groups.
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Researchers find link between gut microbiome and cancer treatment outcomes
City of Hope and TGen have found that greater gut microbial diversity in patients with metastatic kidney cancer is associated with better treatment outcomes on FDA-approved immunotherapy regimens. A potential takeaway: Oncologists might encourage patients to eat a high-fiber diet, including fruits and vegetables high in fructo-oligosaccharides such as bananas, dried fruit, onions, leeks, garlic, a
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Image: Sloshing in space
ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst during his 2018 stay on the International Space Station, with two floating SPHERES robots tethered to a container of liquid, serving to simulate the experience of pulling a derelict satellite out of orbit.
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Method to develop blue-emitting zero-dimensional all-inorganic metal halides
All-inorganic zero-dimensional (0D) metal halides are widely applied in the fields of display and solid-state lighting due to their excellent photoluminescence (PL) properties and high stability.
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Floods in Delhi as South Asia monsoon toll rises to nearly 1,300
Heavy monsoon rains lashed New Delhi Wednesday, inundating roads and piling on misery for commuters in the chaotic Indian capital, as the death toll from the annual deluge across South Asia rose to nearly 1,300.
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The First Subway in New York City Was a Cylindrical Car Pushed by Air
Scientific American editor Alfred Ely Beach revealed the secretly built wonder in 1870 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Will you get a refund if COVID-19 closes your campus?
Many colleges are welcoming students back for in-person learning and dormitory living this fall semester. Looming over everything: Campuses could shut back down at any time.
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Nu kan din smartphone fortælle, når du er for fuld
En lille sensor i smartphonen kan være din nye ven, hvis du har for vane at gå kold før 12. Det er dine bevægelser, der afslører dig
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Unconventional monetary policy and bank risk taking
Unconventional monetary policy does not lead to greater risk-taking by banks, according to new research. This will be welcome news for policymakers and central banks as they ramp up efforts to limit the economic fallout of the pandemic.
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Top coma experts develop plan to improve patient outcomes
Leading coma experts have created an ambitious plan to help doctors better care for comatose patients and answer that most awful question: 'Will my loved one wake up?'
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Mother bats use baby talk to communicate with their pups
When addressing infants, human adults tend to change the speed, pitch and "color" of their voice. This "baby talk" is known to facilitate language learning. According to new research at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, it may not be exclusive of humans. Some bats have their own version of "baby talk" to communicate with their pups.
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Blocking copper uptake in tumor cells may be clue to boosting immune system
Australian researchers have discovered that removing copper from the blood can destroy some of the deadliest cancers that are resistant to immunotherapy using models of the disease.
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Microbes living on air a global phenomenon
UNSW researchers have found their previous discovery of bacteria living on air in Antarctica is likely a process that occurs globally, further supporting the potential existence of microbial life on alien planets.
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Digital contact tracing alone may not be miracle answer for COVID-19
In infectious disease outbreaks, digital contact tracing alone could reduce the number of cases, but not as much as manual contract tracing, new University of Otago-led research published in the Cochrane Library reveals.
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Progress report on the coronavirus pandemic
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02414-1 In the first of a series of editorials, we look back at some of the key findings from scientists' race to demystify SARS-CoV-2.
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Guide released to support disaster recovery in Australia
Wellbeing and decision-making during recovery from disasters such as Australia's summer bushfires and the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic are supported by a new researched-backed resource.
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New cataclysmic variable star discovered
Using NASA's Kepler spacecraft, astronomers have detected a new bright transient event. After further analysis, the newly found transient source turned out to be a cataclysmic variable (CV) star. The finding is detailed in a paper published August 10 on the arXiv pre-print server.
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Coronavirus kan måske føre til diabetes
Forskere er nervøse for, at coronavirus kan øge risikoen for udvikling af diabetes hos raske mennesker.
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Public health orders up intimate partner violence risks
The prevalence of intimate partner violence has been the hidden and often unspoken impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers report. Many of the strategies critical to ensuring public health, such as lockdowns, stay-at-home orders, social isolation, and social distancing, have a profound impact on families experiencing intimate partner violence, also known as IPV, according to a new paper in P
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Blood Plasma Treatment for Covid-19 Now on Hold at F.D.A.
Government health leaders including Dr. Francis S. Collins and Dr. Anthony S. Fauci urged caution last week, citing weak data from the country's largest plasma study.
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In Missouri River, sturgeon don't look their age
In the lower Missouri River, a fish with prehistoric ties has learned to live hard—and, too often, die young.
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Microbes living on air a global phenomenon
UNSW researchers have found their previous discovery of bacteria living on air in Antarctica is likely a process that occurs globally, further supporting the potential existence of microbial life on alien planets.
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Employee fraud decreases when they see family photos
Displaying family photos in the workplace cuts down on employee fraud and other unethical behavior, new Washington University in St. Louis research finds.
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Reckoning with Our Mistakes
Some of the cringiest articles in Scientific American's history reveal bigger questions about scientific authority — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Pandemic Is Forcing Everyone to Face the Digital Divide
Editor in chief Nicholas Thompson sits down with WIRED reporters to talk about how another round of remote learning could deepen education inequality in the US.
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Why Forest-Dwelling Lionesses Seek Many Mates
For Asiatic lionesses, sex may be a way of protecting their cubs from murderous males. lions-top-image_cropped.jpg An Asiatic lioness and her cubs. Image credits: Milan Zygmunt/ Shutterstock Creature Wednesday, August 19, 2020 – 09:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — On a bright day in 2015, an Asiatic lioness hid her cubs in a thicket and went to meet two strangers. The strange mal
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In Missouri River, sturgeon don't look their age
In the lower Missouri River, a fish with prehistoric ties has learned to live hard—and, too often, die young.
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Best protein shakes for a quick macronutrient boost
Tasty treat for a healthy life. (Kelly Sikkema via Unsplash/) Protein shakes are not just used by serious athletes and bodybuilders. They are quick and easy additions to your diet and can replace meals packed with protein, vitamins, and probiotics—or they can act as a supplement for after your workout to help your muscles recover and strengthen. For meals on the go you can buy your shakes pre-mix
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Why it's not empowering to abandon the male pseudonyms used by female writers
In a letter to James AH Murray in 1879, the writer ME Lewes wrote "I wish always to be quoted as George Eliot." She perhaps would not have been pleased by a new campaign from The Women's Prize for Fiction and its sponsor, Baileys called Reclaim Her Name campaign.
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Scientists on Arctic mission make unplanned detour to pole
A German icebreaker carrying scientists on a year-long international expedition in the high Arctic has reached the North Pole, after making an unplanned detour because of lighter-than-usual sea ice conditions.
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The best WiFi extenders to stay connected
Work or play with minimal interruption. (ConvertKit via Unsplash/) Dependable WiFi access is crucial when working or unwinding at home. If your signal constantly drops when presenting in meetings or leaves you with unexpected cliffhangers watching shows, you can expand the coverage area of your WiFi network with an extender. Improve the strength and range of your connection with these affordable
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Must-have equipment for recording a podcast
Now you just need a podcast idea. ( Jonathan Farber via Unsplash/) It seems like someone starts a podcast every day. And that's because they do. Podcasts are fairly simple to start but challenging to maintain at a high quality. If you sound like you are recording in the closet on an iPhone 6 people probably won't hang around for your witty banter. Start on the right foot with a decent mixer/recor
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Plantwatch: how a miraculous moss keeps cool in the Mojave desert
Sheltering under translucent quartz stones shields the moss from heat, cold, drought and intense ultraviolet rays A small moss growing in the Mojave desert in California uses a remarkable protection from the desert sun – it shelters under translucent quartz stones. It is a miniature greenhouse that shields the moss from heat, cold, drought and intense ultraviolet rays. The desert gets extremely h
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Nature and nurture both contribute to gender inequality in leadership, but that doesn't mean patriarchy is forever
Kamala Harris' candidacy as vice president of the United States provoked familiar criticism, based in part on her identity as a woman. Critics find her too angry, too confident, too competitive. But when women do act less competitively, they are seen as less capable of leadership. This is the "double-bind" women face when aspiring to leadership positions.
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'All things will outlast us': How the Indigenous concept of deep time helps us understand environmental destruction
The bushfire royal commission is examining ways Indigenous land and fire management could improve Australia's resilience to national disasters. On the face of it, this offers an opportunity to embrace Indigenous ways of knowing.
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Making the DNA melt curve more accurate
DNA is not only the blueprint of life, it has become the backbone for making tiny structures that can be inserted into the human body to diagnose and treat disease. In particular, researchers are setting their sights on a technique known as DNA origami, in which they meticulously assemble hundreds of strands of DNA to build a Lilliputian collection of structures that could include drug delivery co
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Modeling avalanche protection in forests
Two EPFL students have compared the ability of a forest in Vaud Canton to protect against avalanches before and after it was ravaged by fire in 2018. Their method could be applied to other forested slopes, helping to enhance local reforestation strategies.
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Parents of online gamers need to think twice before labelling the hobby a 'waste of time'
Another day, another critic of online gaming. This time, it is one of the most well known faces, or voices, in popular culture today.
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We each get 7 square metres of cropland per day. Too much booze and pizza makes us exceed it
Croplands are a valuable, yet scarce natural resource. To guard against serious and potentially irreversible environmental harm, croplands should not extend beyond 15% of the earth's ice-free surface.
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Searching for supernova neutrinos with Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment
When a massive star reaches the end of its life, it can explode in a process known as a supernova. The massive star—much more massive than our sun—runs out of fuel in its core. Gravity forces the core to collapse on itself, causing a shockwave to form and spew stellar material into space. Metals, along with heavy elements such as carbon, are expelled into the universe.
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'Jumping sequences' may alter gene expression in melons
On the surface, the humble melon may just look like a tasty treat to most. But researchers from Japan have found that this fruit has hidden depths: retrotransposons (sometimes called "jumping sequences") may change how genes are expressed.
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Study finds clues to aging in 'junk' DNA
For decades, greater than 60% of the human genome was believed to be "junk DNA" that served little or no purpose in the course of human development. Recent research by Colorado State University is challenging this notion to show that junk DNA might be important after all.
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Tracking the tailbeats of a tiger shark
Although tiger sharks have a reputation as swift and fierce predators, new research by The University of Western Australia, Australian Institute of Marine Science and Murdoch University has revealed that they actually prefer life in the slow lane.
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Partner selection ultimately happens in the woman's reproductive tract
Achieving pregnancy has been shown to be more likely between partners who carry dissimilar human leucocyte antigen (HLA) immune genes. Accordingly, humans are expected to choose HLA dissimilar reproductive partners. Earlier studies have demonstrated that HLA dissimilarity preferences are mediated either by body odors or facial preferences. However, it has been unclear whether HLA-based mating pref
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Popular fish species disappear from Turkey's Marmara and Black Seas
Bluefin tuna, swordfish and Atlantic mackerel are among the fish species considered commercially extinct or extirpated on the Turkish side of the Marmara and Black Seas.
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Making the DNA melt curve more accurate
DNA is not only the blueprint of life, it has become the backbone for making tiny structures that can be inserted into the human body to diagnose and treat disease. In particular, researchers are setting their sights on a technique known as DNA origami, in which they meticulously assemble hundreds of strands of DNA to build a Lilliputian collection of structures that could include drug delivery co
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Rapid acceptance of foreign food tradition in Bronze Age Europe
Not just metals, hierarchical societies and fortified settlements: a new food also influenced economic transformations in the Bronze Age around 3,500 years ago. This is evidenced by frequent archeological discoveries of remains of broomcorn millet (Panicum miliaceum L.), a cereal with small, roundish grains. A major study by the Collaborative Research Center 1266 at Kiel University (CAU) was publi
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'Jumping sequences' may alter gene expression in melons
On the surface, the humble melon may just look like a tasty treat to most. But researchers from Japan have found that this fruit has hidden depths: retrotransposons (sometimes called "jumping sequences") may change how genes are expressed.
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Study finds clues to aging in 'junk' DNA
For decades, greater than 60% of the human genome was believed to be "junk DNA" that served little or no purpose in the course of human development. Recent research by Colorado State University is challenging this notion to show that junk DNA might be important after all.
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Natural hair bias cuts job opportunities for Black women
Black women with natural hairstyles, such as curly afros, braids, or twists, are often perceived as less professional than Black women with straightened hair, new research suggests. This is particularly true in industries where norms dictate a more conservative appearance, according to the study. The findings offer empirical evidence that societal bias against natural Black hairstyles infiltrates
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Controlling heat opens door for next-generation lighting and displays in perovskite LEDs
Light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, are nearly ubiquitous in modern life, providing the brightness in phone displays, televisions, and lights. A new form of LEDs, made of a class of materials called halide perovskites, promises higher color quality and ease of manufacture, but has been known to fail when subjected to the kind of electrical current typically needed for practical uses. Now, Barry Rand,
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Tracking the tailbeats of a tiger shark
Although tiger sharks have a reputation as swift and fierce predators, new research by The University of Western Australia, Australian Institute of Marine Science and Murdoch University has revealed that they actually prefer life in the slow lane.
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Partner selection ultimately happens in the woman's reproductive tract
Achieving pregnancy has been shown to be more likely between partners who carry dissimilar human leucocyte antigen (HLA) immune genes. Accordingly, humans are expected to choose HLA dissimilar reproductive partners. Earlier studies have demonstrated that HLA dissimilarity preferences are mediated either by body odors or facial preferences. However, it has been unclear whether HLA-based mating pref
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Robotic telescope finds closest known asteroid to fly by Earth
On August 16, the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), a robotic survey camera located at Palomar Observatory near San Diego, spotted an asteroid that had, just hours earlier, traveled only 1,830 miles (2,950 kilometers) above Earth's surface. Designated 2020 QG, it is the closest known asteroid to fly by Earth without impacting the planet. The previous known record-holder is asteroid 2011 CQ1, discov
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Hayabusa2 re-entry capsule approved to land in Australia
On August 10, 2020, JAXA was informed that the Authorization of Return of Overseas-Launched Space Object (AROLSO) for the re-entry capsule from Hayabusa2 was issued by the Australian Government. The date of the issuance is August 6, 2020.
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Popular fish species disappear from Turkey's Marmara and Black Seas
Bluefin tuna, swordfish and Atlantic mackerel are among the fish species considered commercially extinct or extirpated on the Turkish side of the Marmara and Black Seas.
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Hydrogen economy with mass production of high-purity hydrogen from ammonia
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) has made an announcement about the technology to extract high-purity hydrogen from ammonia and generate electric power in conjunction with a fuel cell developed by a team led by Young Suk Jo and Chang Won Yoon from the Center for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Research. This confirms the possibility of using ammonia as a hydrogen carrier to transport la
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The risks of three back-to-school plans, ranked
While some options eliminate COVID-19 concerns, they still may be worrisome for other reasons. (Julia M Cameron from Pexels/) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including breakdowns of the safest swimming options , safest dining options , and a tutorial on safest long-distance travel options . School is back in session for many students across the country, which means tough decision
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We must do a comprehensive study on Covid-19 'long-haulers.' A lot is at stake | Oved Amitay and Anthony L Komaroff
Covid patients are reporting persistent, long-term symptoms of chronic fatigue. Let's get to the bottom of this "Long-haulers" is no longer just a job description for truckers. This term now refers to the growing number of people who contracted Covid-19 and have continued to have symptoms for more than 100 days – even though tests reveal no virus left in the body. Covid-19 "long-haulers" continue
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Real Renaissance man
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02447-6 Life lessons.
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Brazilian lawmakers in showdown to double science budget
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02433-y President Jair Bolsonaro has threatened deep cuts to research budgets — now scientists hope legislation will give them protected funds.
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New Data on How Many Kids Got That Covid Mystery Illness
A few young patients also develop strange inflammatory symptoms. A CDC report sheds light on how widespread this syndrome is, and what it could mean for vaccines.
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Skewed Grading Algorithms Fuel Backlash Beyond the Classroom
Thousands protest in the UK after a formula replaced a test that influences college placement. It's led to broader scrutiny of automation and inequality.
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Paging Dr. Hamblin: My Daughter Needs Help Watching the Kids
Editor's Note: Every Wednesday, James Hamblin takes questions from readers about health-related curiosities, concerns, and obsessions. Have one? Email him at paging.dr.hamblin@theatlantic.com . Dear Dr. Hamblin, I'm a healthy 72-year-old living in Berkeley, California. My daughter, son-in-law, and grandkids recently moved here across the country, and now we have a bubble together. I offered to he
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The Movie That Will Change How You Look at Zoom Meetings
An old house. Sleepaway camp. The woods outside Burkittsville, Maryland . Every generation has its dark places, settings where horror filmmakers stage the zeitgeist's fears. During a pandemic, just about any spot where people congregate will do. But the new film Host takes an unexpected approach. The director Rob Savage sets his movie in a familiar virtual zone—a Zoom session—flipping the script
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En forvagt på 74 år?
Tiden er kommet til at tage kampen for den gode hverdag med krav om arbejdsforhold på de offentlige arbejdspladser, som gør det muligt at være med, til man fylder 75.
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How Rising Education for Women Is Shaping the Global Population – Facts So Romantic
We need a global debate on the best way to respond to these demographic changes. Photo illustration by Arthimedes / Shutterstock In their 1968 book The Population Bomb , biologists Paul Ehrlich and his wife Anne foretold a Malthusian future of famine and disease if humanity failed to control its growth. The Ehrlichs' warning made sense. At the time, the global population sat at about 3.5 billion,
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Oleandra – The New COVID Snake Oil
Oleandrin is being promoted as the new COVID-19 snake oil – but it is a deadly toxin.
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Skogsutbildningen efter #MeToo
Skogens eget metoo-upprop #slutavverkat och ett öppet brev från kvinnliga studenter i jägmästarprogrammet 2018 gjorde det tydligt att sexuella trakasserier är en del av kulturen vid skogsutbildningen. Forskare vid SLU har undersökt vad som hänt på utbildningen efter uppropet. En ny studie visar att både ledning, lärare och studenter alltför ofta avstått från att agera vid sexuella trakasserier so
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Health misinformation pages got half a billion views on Facebook in April
The news: Pages spreading health misinformation got an estimated 3.8 billion views on Facebook this year as of May, according to analysis by human rights group Avaaz . Views peaked at nearly half a billion in April 2020 alone, just as the pandemic was rapidly escalating globally, it found. Content from 10 websites spreading health misinformation received almost four times as many estimated views
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Sömnighet kan försämra ditt sociala liv
Att vara socialt aktiv ökar generellt chansen till god nattsömn. Men om du är aktiv sent på kvällen ger det kortad sömn – och kan därmed även påverka ditt sociala liv. Sömnighet påverkar kognitiv förmåga, motivation och beteende. Fler och fler lider av sömnstörningar, men effekterna av sömnighet på sociala interaktioner, som spelar en viktig roll för hälsa och välbefinnande, har varit rätt okända
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Klimaudsatte boliger mister værdi – problemet kalder på indsats
PLUS. I USA kræves der mere i udbetaling for et hus, hvis det ligger klimaudsat. I Danmark afgøres det fra sag til sag.
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Jill Fisher's Adverse Events: a book review
The new book Adverse Events by Jill Fisher shows the reality behind phase 1 clinical trials in USA and the "healthy volunteers" who participate in those. Clue: they are not White middle-class university students with a penchant for altruism.
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The man who built a spyware empire says it's time to come out of the shadows
Shalev Hulio wants to explain himself. Normally, silence and secrecy are inherent in the spy business. For nine full years, Hulio never talked publicly about his billion-dollar hacking company—even when his hacking tools were linked to scandal or he was accused of being complicit in human rights abuses around the world. Lately, though, he's speaking up. "People don't understand how intelligence w
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Vietnam's covid hospital
Until the beginning of August, Vietnam, population 97 million, was the world's largest country with zero coronavirus deaths. A small number of people have died since then. The one- party state implemented aggressive quarantines. It also funneled most of its coronavirus patients into one central hospital in Saigon. 25 Covid deaths as of August 19, 2020. Source: WHO Dashboard It was in December 201
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Stockholm Syndrome
Sweden's controversial, less-stringent lockdown has made an unlikely star of its state epidemiologist. He told us why he still believes in the national strategy and why he thinks a classic second wave is unlikely. Proportionately, Sweden has suffered many more deaths than its neighbors. Norway has had 48 coronavirus deaths per million people, Finland 60, Denmark 107, and Sweden 573. It's strange
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No more maté sharing
Uruguay has been a rare bright spot in coronavirus-­ravaged South America, thanks to a highly developed research infrastructure, a tradition of at-home medical care, and a strong public health system. Two key advisors to the government's pandemic response team explain how they scaled up their tests so fast and why they are now encouraging people to go outside more. The first cases in Uruguay were
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How Ebola helped Liberia prepare for covid
Covid-19 was the second pandemic of the decade for Liberia, which was devastated by Ebola just five years ago. A US-trained public health officer who served in both emergencies explains how some institutional knowledge was carried over, as well as how the virus entered the country despite considerable precautions. The moment we heard that there was this new disease in China, we knew there was no
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The inside story of Germany's coordinated covid response
The government-run Robert Koch Institute for public health research in Berlin has been at the forefront of the country's robust pandemic response, leading the search for a vaccine and racing to push out vast stocks of tests. A career epidemiologist at the institute explains the challenges of reopening, communicating risk, and contact tracing in the German context. 9,232 Covid deaths as of August
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Brazil is sliding into techno-authoritarianism
For many years, Latin America's largest democracy was a leader on data governance. In 1995, it created the Brazilian Internet Steering Committee , a multi-stakeholder body to help the country set principles for internet governance. In 2014, impelled by Edward Snowden's revelations about surveillance by the US National Security Agency of countries including Brazil, Dilma Rousseff's government pion
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Inside NSO, Israel's billion-dollar spyware giant
Maâti Monjib speaks slowly, like a man who knows he's being listened to. It's the day of his 58th birthday when we speak, but there's little celebration in his voice. "The surveillance is hellish," Monjib tells me. "It is really difficult. It controls everything I do in my life." A history professor at the University of Mohammed V in Rabat, Morocco, Monjib vividly remembers the day in 2017 when h
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How China surveils the world
China doesn't only collect enormous amounts of data on its own citizens: it also sucks up data from around the world that might one day be useful for its national security, using both domestic and foreign companies as conduits. Samantha Hoffman of the Australian Strategy Policy Institute, one of the leading experts on the Chinese surveillance state, shed light on this phenomenon last year with a
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Inside China's unexpected quest to protect data privacy
Late in the summer of 2016, Xu Yuyu received a call that promised to change her life. Her college entrance examination scores, she was told, had won her admission to the English department of the Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications. Xu lived in the city of Linyi in Shandong, a coastal province in China, southeast of Beijing. She came from a poor family, singularly reliant on her fa
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Amazon Fire Tablet Deals: Kids Edition $50 Off, and More
If you're looking to intro your children to tablets, Amazon's Fire tablets are a great deal right now.
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A New Study Suggests a Possible Disease Vector: Germy Dust
Since the pandemic's beginning, scientists have argued over how respiratory viruses can spread. Now an experiment with guinea pigs and influenza is adding a new wrinkle.
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How Financial Apps Get You to Spend More and Question Less
You should never invest without fully understanding the risks, but tax prep and stock trading services often obfuscate the things you really need to know.
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Parenting in the Age of the Pandemic Pod
We talked to parents about how they're juggling caring for their kids, schools "reopening," and trying desperately to do their jobs.
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Mauritius oil spill: Satellite images show removal operation
Satellite images capture tug boats trying to remove the broken vessel, which spilled tonnes of oil.
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Apparent duplication from anesthesiology journal puts heart paper into intensive care
A heart journal has issued an expression of concern about a 2017 paper which looks suspiciously like a 2016 article by some of the same researchers that appeared in an anesthesiology publication. The 2017 paper, "Efficacy of prophylactic dexmedetomidine in preventing postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia after pediatric cardiac surgery," was written by a group led … Continue reading
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Long-Haulers Are Redefining COVID-19
Editor's Note: Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . Lauren Nichols has been sick with COVID-19 since March 10, shortly before Tom Hanks announced his diagnosis and the NBA temporarily canceled its season. She has lived through one month of hand tremors, three of fever, and four of night sweats. When we spoke o
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Competing Toe to Toe without Sharing an Arena
The Regeneron Science Talent Search rethinks its youth STEM competition in the face of COVID-19 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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UK to set limits on harmful airborne particles
A new UK target will be set to protect people from the effects of breathing in tiny particles.
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Nyt studie advarer: Vi har undervurderet, hvor hurtigt Arktis smelter
Isen i Det Arktiske Ocean smelter hurtigere end hidtil antaget. Faktisk er der tale om en meget brat…
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Should I Feel Guilty About Judging Kamala Harris?
America is seeing only the beginning of the attacks that Kamala Harris will face. Voters will expect her to be supportive of Joe Biden, of course, but they will inevitably find her insufficiently loyal and deferential. They will dismiss her as angry , cold, and schoolmarmish. They will hear her voice as shrill and grating . They will call her inauthentic, a liar, and a phony. Many people will wan
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Time's Arrow Flies through 500 Years of Classical Music, Physicists Say
A statistical study of more than 8,000 compositions shows how the flow of time distinguishes music from noise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Time's Arrow Flies through 500 Years of Classical Music, Physicists Say
A statistical study of more than 8,000 compositions shows how the flow of time distinguishes music from noise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Why Pooled Testing for the Coronavirus Isn't Working
Combining samples for coronavirus testing, an approach once hailed by U.S. health officials, only works when the vast majority of tests are negative.
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The antibiotic paradox: why companies can't afford to create life-saving drugs
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02418-x Paratek Pharmaceuticals successfully brought a new antibiotic to the market. So why is the company's long-term survival in question?
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Alaska's salmon are getting smaller, affecting people and ecosystems
The size of salmon returning to rivers in Alaska has declined dramatically over the past 60 years because they are spending fewer years at sea, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the University of Alaska Fairbanks.
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Alaska's salmon are getting smaller, affecting people and ecosystems
The size of salmon returning to rivers in Alaska has declined dramatically over the past 60 years because they are spending fewer years at sea, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the University of Alaska Fairbanks.
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Enlige arbejdsløse får mest ud af kommunernes tilbud om genoptræning
Kommunerne kan forbedre deres tilbud om rehabilitering og genoptræning, hvis de blev enige om, hvordan de skal måle effekten af tilbuddene, mener sundhedsøkonom.
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Why the Democrats' Keynote Fell Flat
R obert Gibbs had just woken up when his boss called. It was about 6 a.m., and Barack Obama, who was not normally a morning person, had written yet another draft of his keynote speech for the 2004 Democratic National Convention. Obama wanted to know what Gibbs, who had recently joined his campaign for the U.S. Senate, thought. After sheepishly admitting that he had not read his boss's latest effo
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The Climate Crisis Is Still a Crisis
With former Vice President Joe Biden leading in the polls and Democratic control of the Senate possible, the United States may soon have the chance, for the first time in more than a decade, to enact urgently needed legislation to address global climate change—but only if Democrats don't repeat the mistakes they made at the start of the Obama administration. In June 2009, the House of Representat
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Bluetooth-gruppen vil gøre det muligt at smitteopspore gennem wearables
Den internationale Bluetooth-organisation arbejder på at gøre wearables til en del af den digitale smitteopsporing. Den første udgave forventes at lande i løbet af få måneder.
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Hands-free driving could be made legal on UK roads by spring
Government is consulting industry on technology which can take control of a vehicle at up to 70mph.
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Coronavirus smell loss 'different from cold and flu'
Covid-19 is not like other typical viral respiratory diseases and has some unique features, say experts.
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How developers are using mobile games to help save the planet
Developers behind huge mobile games are encouraging players to think about the environment.
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Fordom afblæst: Det er ikke dårlig opførsel, der sender kæledyrene til internatet
Det er typisk ikke dårlig opførsel hos Fido og Misser, der får hunde- og katteejere til…
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Pesticidkontrol finder tre fødevarer med sundhedsmæssig risiko
DTU's fødevareinstitut har fundet pesticidrester i kontrollen for årets 1. kvartal. Tre fødevarer udgør en decideret sundhedsmæssig risiko, mens prøverne for fire andre ikke kan udelukkes.
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Death Valley: What life is like in the 'hottest place on Earth'
The Death Valley just saw one of the highest temperatures ever recorded on Earth – 130F (54.4C)
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Högre metanutsläpp från sjöar på dagen
Flöden av metan från insjöar är lägre nattetid än dagtid. De nordliga sjöarnas bidrag till de globala metanutsläppen därmed är 15 procent lägre än man tidigare trott. Det visar mätningar gjorda av forskare i Linköping. Sötvattensjöar, åar och dammar är den näst största källan till utsläpp av metan, en av de växthusgaser som har störst påverkan på den globala uppvärmningen. Metan är också den växt
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Live Covid-19 Updates
South Africa's efforts to contain the virus are tainted by corruption. Top U.S. health officials intervened just as the F.D.A. was prepared to issue an emergency authorization for plasma as a virus treatment.
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With Virtual Reality, Caregivers Can Become Patients
Carrie Shaw's struggle with her mother's dementia led her to create a company that allows users to experience the struggles of growing older.
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Coronavirus infection survey to be expanded across UK
ONS to increase testing in England from 28,000 people a fortnight to 150,000 by October
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Portrait of a virus
Researchers create a centralized electronic medical records tool to gather, monitor, analyze clinical trends in COVID-19 across multiple countries. Proof-of-concept platform overcomes key hurdles of decentralized EMR systems.
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Alaska's salmon are getting smaller, affecting people and ecosystems
The size of salmon returning to rivers in Alaska has declined dramatically over the past 60 years because they are spending fewer years at sea, scientists report. Salmon are critically important to both people and ecosystems in Alaska, supporting commercial and subsistence fisheries and transporting nutrients from the ocean to inland areas. Smaller salmon provide less food for people who depend on
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Combo therapy may prevent blood vessel complications in children with Kawasaki disease
For children with Kawasaki disease with higher risk of developing blood vessel complications, adding corticosteroids to standard intravenous immunoglobulin treatment could boost initial treatment response and prevent complications.Researchers used real-world data from large, nationwide Japanese Kawasaki disease surveys to compare combination therapy with the standard treatment.
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Mumier skriver om tuberkulosens historia
En genetisk studie av små förkalkningar som hittades i lungorna på lundabiskopen Peder Winstrups mumie visar att sjukdomen tuberkulos inte är äldre än cirka 6000 år och inte 70 000 år som tidigare antagits. Den extremt välbevarade arvsmassan från tuberkulosbakterien berättar att människan inte drabbades av tuberkulos innan hon blev jordbrukare. Tuberkulos är den bakteriella sjukdom som skördat fl
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Recent declines in salmon body size impact ecosystems and fisheries
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17726-z The average body size of salmon has declined rapidly over recent decades. Here the authors quantify changes in body size distributions for Pacific salmon in Alaska and examine the causes and consequences of size declines for ecosystems, food security, and commercial fisheries.
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A molecular assembler that produces polymers
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17814-0 The feasibility of molecular assemblers as a device to control chemical reactions by positioning molecules with atomic precision is a matter of debate in the literature. Here the authors describe of a rudimentary synthetic molecular assembler, supramolecular aggregate of bifunctional surfactants produced by th
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Machine learning enables completely automatic tuning of a quantum device faster than human experts
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17835-9 To optimize operating conditions of large scale semiconductor quantum devices, a large parameter space has to be explored. Here, the authors report a machine learning algorithm to navigate the entire parameter space of gate-defined quantum dot devices, showing about 180 times faster than a pure random search.
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Dead cells release a 'necrosignal' that activates antibiotic survival pathways in bacterial swarms
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17709-0 Swarming bacterial populations can exhibit antibiotic resistance, despite sustaining considerable cell death. Here, Bhattacharyya et al. show that killed cells release periplasmic protein AcrA, which activates efflux pumps on the surface of live cells, thus enhancing antibiotic resistance in the surviving cell
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Histone methyltransferase DOT1L coordinates AR and MYC stability in prostate cancer
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18013-7 Histone methyltransferase, DOTL1 is implicated in the pathogenesis of MLL-rearranged leukemia, however, not much is known of its role in prostate cancer (PCa). Here, the authors report that DOTL1 inhibition suppresses both androgen receptor and MYC pathways in a negative feed forward manner to reduce growth of
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The Rad53CHK1/CHK2-Spt21NPAT and Tel1ATM axes couple glucose tolerance to histone dosage and subtelomeric silencing
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17961-4 The relationship between DNA damage response (DDR) and regulation of the tolerance to glucose restriction is currently unclear. Here the authors reveal that maintaining a physiological level of histones by Rad53-Spt21 is necessary for glucose tolerance via multiple parallel pathways, including derepression of
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Boundary-directed epitaxy of block copolymers
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17938-3 Directing the position, orientation, and long-range lateral order of block copolymer domains to produce technologically-useful, sublithographic patterns is a challenge. Here, the authors present a promising approach to overcome the challenge by directing assembly using spatial boundaries between planar, low-re
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Author Correction: The solute carrier SLC9C1 is a Na+/H+-exchanger gated by an S4-type voltage-sensor and cyclic-nucleotide binding
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18023-5 Author Correction: The solute carrier SLC9C1 is a Na + /H + -exchanger gated by an S4-type voltage-sensor and cyclic-nucleotide binding
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Nordjylland vil afbøde konsekvenser af lukkede lægevagter
Lukningen af lægevagtkonsultationer i Skagen, Brovst og Farsø har fået hård kritik. Region Nordjylland overvejer at lade andre faggrupper træde i stedet for de praktiserende læger.
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Mars colony: Humanity's greatest quest
We are closer than ever to actually putting human beings on Mars, but exactly how close is very much still up for debate. Getting there is one thing, and we eventually may not have a choice, but there are a number of problems that need to be solved before our species can call the Red Planet home. In this video, former NASA astronaut Leland Melvin, educator Bill Nye, science journalist Stephen Pet
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Digitalisering har hjälpt oss i krisen
Fem frågor till Amy Loutfi, vicerektor för AI och professor i datavetenskap vid Örebro universitet. Amy Loutfi är en av deltagarna i Omstartskommissionen där experter inom olika områden tar fram en handfast plan för hur Sverige kan starta om efter coronakrisen.
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Playing the virus blame game
Middle of a pandemic is not the time for a major UK health reorganisation
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Vaccine skal skåne grise for antibiotika
PLUS. Danske forskere går snart i forsøg med en vaccine, som skal forhindre fravænningsdiarré hos smågrise – uden zink og antibiotika.
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Is anyone safe from Covid-19? This is what we know so far about immunity | Zania Stamataki
The good news is that our natural defences can eliminate the virus and scientists are making progress with antiviral therapies Zania Stamataki is a senior lecturer in viral immunology Coronavirus – latest updates About nine months ago – as we now all know – a new coronavirus jumped to humans, causing a complex respiratory disease called Covid-19. The virus breezed through the planet with ease , h
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Kartläggning av Kiruna under jord
Hur ser malmkroppen i Kirunaområdet ut? En kartläggning av Kiruna under jord ska ge svar. – Vi sammanställer alla tillgängliga data i en enda modell för att få reda på hur berggrunden ser ut på djupet, säger Tobias Bauer, biträdande professor i malmgeologi vid Luleå tekniska universitet. I januari 2018 kom nyheten att malmkroppen i Kiruna inte fortsätter med samma volym som förväntat. Mineraliser
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Morrison walks back comments on potential Covid vaccine, saying 'it is not going to be compulsory'
Health experts say prime minister discussing coercive measures early risked driving hesitant Australians away The health minister Greg Hunt says the federal government will not "force vaccinations on any Australian" and Scott Morrison has clarified they would not be compulsory after experts expressed concern that earlier talk of "mandatory" vaccination might drive hesitant Australians away. The p
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California battling power drain, wildfires during heat wave
California staved off another round of rolling blackouts but faced a renewed threat Wednesday from a searing heat wave, raging wildfires and even a chance of thunderstorms and flooding in some southern areas.
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Efter syv positive svar på 14 dage: »Mundbind bør være et krav hos os«
Praktiserende læger bør kunne stille krav til patienter om at bære mundbind, mener praktiserende læge Lise Høyer, der har givet syv positive covid-19 svar på 14 dage.
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OCT-based technique captures subtle details of photoreceptor function
Researchers have developed a new instrument that has, for the first time, measured tiny light-evoked deformations in individual rods and cones in a living human eye. The new approach could one day improve detection of retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness in people over 55 worldwide.
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Amazon continues to burn in 2020 despite promises to save it
A year ago this month, the forest around the town of Novo Progresso erupted into flames—the first major blazes in the Brazilian Amazon's dry season that ultimately saw more than 100,000 fires and spurred global outrage against the government's inability or unwillingness to protect the rainforest.
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Shrinking Tasmanian tigers: Resizing an Australian icon
The thylacine, that famous extinct Australian icon colloquially known as the Tasmanian Tiger, is revealed to have been only about half as big as once thought—not a "big" bad wolf after all.
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2 strong earthquakes shake western Indonesia; no tsunami
Two powerful and shallow undersea earthquakes shook western Indonesia on Wednesday, causing panic but no immediate reports of casualties or damage.
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Shrinking Tasmanian tigers: Resizing an Australian icon
The thylacine, that famous extinct Australian icon colloquially known as the Tasmanian Tiger, is revealed to have been only about half as big as once thought—not a "big" bad wolf after all.
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Cryo-EM study yields new clues to chicken pox infection
Despite decades of study, exactly how herpesviruses invade our cells remains something of a mystery. Now researchers studying one herpesvirus, the varicella zoster virus (VZV) that causes chicken pox, may have found an important clue: A key protein the virus uses to initiate infection does not operate as previously thought, researchers at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC Nat
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COVID-19 immunity, scorching temperatures and telescope accident
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02417-y The latest science news, in brief.
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Cryo-EM study yields new clues to chicken pox infection
Despite decades of study, exactly how herpesviruses invade our cells remains something of a mystery. Now researchers studying one herpesvirus, the varicella zoster virus (VZV) that causes chicken pox, may have found an important clue: A key protein the virus uses to initiate infection does not operate as previously thought, researchers at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC Nat
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Improving protein digestibility in sorghum
Sorghum, a common food item in regions of Africa and Asia, has one missing puzzle piece. The missing piece? Protein digestibility, which researchers in the Department of Agronomy at Kansas State University are trying to find.
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Songbirds, like people, sing better after warming up
If you've ever been woken up before sunrise by the trilling and chirping of birds outside your window, you may have wondered: why do birds sing so loud, so early in the morning?
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Cover crop mixtures must be 'farm-tuned' to provide maximum ecosystem services
Penn State researchers, in a recent study, were surprised to learn that they could take the exact same number of seeds from the same plants, put them in agricultural fields across the Mid-Atlantic region and get profoundly different stands of cover crops a few months later.
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Plastic debris releases potentially harmful chemicals into seabird stomach fluid
Plastic waste in the ocean is an increasing problem for wildlife, including seabirds who frequently mistake it for food. However, ingested plastic does not just pose physical risks for such birds. A new study in open-access journal Frontiers in Environmental Science is the first to show that plastic waste can release chemicals into the stomach oil of seabirds over time, potentially posing a threat
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The Mythology of Karen
W hat does it mean to call a woman a "Karen"? The origins of any meme are hard to pin down, and this one has spread with the same intensity as the coronavirus, and often in parallel with it. Karens are " the policewomen of all human behavior ." Karens don't believe in vaccines. Karens have short hair. Karens are selfish. Confusingly, Karens are both the kind of petty enforcers who patrol other pe
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Microbial ecology yields new insights for future shipwreck conservation
Shipwrecks act as artificial reefs and provide a substrate and nutrients for a great diversity of microorganisms, which can contribute to either the deterioration or preservation of the ship. Precisely how diverse such communities are, and how they are organized, is still unknown. Here, researchers from East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina, identify the bacteria associated with a
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Out of sync: Ecologists report climate change affecting bee, plant life cycles
Bees and flowers seem inseparable harbingers of spring, but what happens when pollinators emerge later than their sources of nectar and pollen? Reporting on the first community-wide assessment of 67 bee species of the Colorado Rockies, ecologists Michael Stemkovski of Utah State University and Rebecca Irwin of North Carolina State University say "phenological mismatch," changing timing of life cyc
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Covid vaccine tracker: when will we have a coronavirus vaccine?
More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progress Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…
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Improving protein digestibility in sorghum
Sorghum, a common food item in regions of Africa and Asia, has one missing puzzle piece. The missing piece? Protein digestibility, which researchers in the Department of Agronomy at Kansas State University are trying to find.
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Songbirds, like people, sing better after warming up
If you've ever been woken up before sunrise by the trilling and chirping of birds outside your window, you may have wondered: why do birds sing so loud, so early in the morning?
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Plastic debris releases potentially harmful chemicals into seabird stomach fluid
Plastic waste in the ocean is an increasing problem for wildlife, including seabirds who frequently mistake it for food. However, ingested plastic does not just pose physical risks for such birds. A new study in open-access journal Frontiers in Environmental Science is the first to show that plastic waste can release chemicals into the stomach oil of seabirds over time, potentially posing a threat
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Out of sync: Ecologists report climate change affecting bee, plant life cycles
Bees and flowers seem inseparable harbingers of spring, but what happens when pollinators emerge later than their sources of nectar and pollen? Reporting on the first community-wide assessment of 67 bee species of the Colorado Rockies, ecologists Michael Stemkovski of Utah State University and Rebecca Irwin of North Carolina State University say "phenological mismatch," changing timing of life cyc
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Illegal trade with terrestrial vertebrates in markets and households of Laos
It's not a surprise to anyone that numerous vertebrate species are being sold at different wildlife markets, but at the moment there is still no comprehensive understanding of how much people are involved in those actions in Laos (Lao PDR), nor what the impact on local wildlife populations really is.
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Illegal trade with terrestrial vertebrates in markets and households of Laos
It's not a surprise to anyone that numerous vertebrate species are being sold at different wildlife markets, but at the moment there is still no comprehensive understanding of how much people are involved in those actions in Laos (Lao PDR), nor what the impact on local wildlife populations really is.
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Out of sync: Ecologists report climate change affecting bee, plant life cycles
Reporting on the first community-wide assessment of 67 bee species of the Colorado Rockies, ecologists Michael Stemkovski of Utah State University and Rebecca Irwin of North Carolina State University say "phenological mismatch," changing timing of life cycles between bees and flowers, caused by climate change, has the potential to disrupt a mutually beneficial relationship.
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Klimamål sætter politikere i dilemma: Kødskat og dieselafgifter sender CO2 ud over grænserne
PLUS. ANALYSE: Mens dansk klimapolitik nærmer sig efterårets sværdslag om CO2-afgift, nordsøolie og madvaner, truer såkaldt CO2-lækage med at punktere indsatsen.
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Researchers identify better classification system for adult idiopathic scoliosis
Researchers have designed a new X-ray classification system for adult idiopathic scoliosis that can more precisely define which parts of the spine need correction
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Illegal trade with terrestrial vertebrates in markets and households of Laos
Scientists provide the first interdisciplinary assessment of human involvement into the terrestrial vertebrate trade in Laos and its impact on the survival of the local fauna populations. Sixty-six traded species found on wildlife trade markets were documented in the paper, published in the open-access journal Nature Conservation, and more than half of them were found to be the species protected e
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Patients with recently discovered antibodies have more severe myasthenia gravis
A study of 181 patients at 16 sites across the country who test negative for two antibodies long known to cause muscle-weakening myasthenia gravis, found that about 15% test positive for one of two newly discovered antibodies that also attack the point of communication between nerves and muscle.
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Hydrogen economy with mass production of high-purity hydrogen from ammonia
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) has made an announcement about the technology to extract high-purity hydrogen from ammonia and generate electric power in conjunction with a fuel cell developed by a team led by Young Suk Jo and Chang Won Yoon from the Center for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Research. This confirms the possibility of using ammonia as a hydrogen carrier to transport la
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High blood pressure during pregnancy associated with more bothersome menopause symptoms
Women with high blood pressure during pregnancy are at an increased risk for chronic hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, stroke, and early cardiovascular death. A new study suggests that they may also be at risk for more bothersome menopause symptoms, including hot flashes. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS
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High blood pressure during pregnancy may mean worse hot flashes during menopause
Women with a history of high blood pressure disorders during pregnancy are more likely to experience bothersome menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats, according to a study published Wednesday, Aug. 19, in Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Society.
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Migration and dispersal of butterflies have contrasting effect on flight morphology
Migration and dispersal are vastly different activities with very different benefits and risks. NCBS Grad student Vaishali Bhaumik and her advisor Dr Krushnamegh Kunte decided to investigate the effects of such activities on the morphology (form and structure) and reproduction of butterflies.
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Microbial ecology yields new insights for future shipwreck conservation
Researchers find distinct differences in the composition of microbial communities on and around the 1960s Pappy Lane shipwreck in Pamlico Sound, North Carolina, suggesting niche partitioning based on biotic and abiotic conditions. The study also identified a new strain of iron-oxidizing bacteria that may contribute to biocorrosion. These results will be useful for the conservation of coastal shall
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