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Researchers show children are silent spreaders of virus that causes COVID-19
Researchers provide critical data showing that children play a larger role in the community spread of COVID-19 than previously thought.
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Ligner noget fra Stranger Things: Fotograf fanger billede af rød 'gople' på nattehimlen
Det sjældne vejrfænomen røde feer opstår under kraftigt tordenvejr.
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LATEST

Blood clots and lung injuries found in patients who have died of COVID-19
A new post-mortem study of patients who have died from COVID-19 found severe damage to the lungs and signs of blood clotting in major organs.
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Community health workers reduce maternal, foetal and new-born deaths, study finds
Large forces of trained community health workers and standardised healthcare systems could reduce the number of maternal, newborn and foetal deaths, a study has recommended.
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Democrats' Unprecedented Embrace of Gun Control
On a cold February evening, weeks before the full force of the coronavirus pandemic hit the United States, a few dozen Mike Bloomberg supporters milled around the airy living room of a home in the genteel Washington, D.C., suburb of McLean, Virginia. The voters, most of them white, described themselves as moderates or former Republicans. They explained to me that, more than anything, they want st
6min
Scientists slow and steer light with resonant nanoantennas
Researchers have fashioned ultrathin silicon nanoantennas that trap and redirect light, for applications in quantum computing, LIDAR and even the detection of viruses.
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First daily surveillance of emerging COVID-19 hotspots
Over the course of the coronavirus epidemic, COVID-19 outbreaks have hit communities across the United States. As clusters of infection shift over time, local officials are forced into a whack-a-mole approach to allocating resources and enacting public health policies. Geographers hope that timely, localized data will help inform future decisions, and one day predict where hotpots will emerge.
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Study finds signs of altruism in people's COVID-19 worries
A new study demonstrates that people are more concerned about whether their family members could contract COVID-19 or if they are unknowingly spreading the virus themselves than they are with contracting it. The study also shows how increased resilience is able to reduce rates of anxiety and depression during the pandemic.
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The Atlantic Is Awash With Far More Plastic Than Previously Thought, Study Finds
A new study suggests there is far more plastic in the Atlantic Ocean than scientists previously thought, especially very small pieces of plastic that can end up inside fish and other animals. (Image credit: Michael O'Neill/Science Source)
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Uber and Lyft Win a Reprieve, and Won't Quit California—for Now
An appeals court delayed a requirement that the companies treat drivers as employees. Voters will ultimately decide through a November ballot measure.
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Ann Syrdal, Who Helped Give Computers a Female Voice, Dies at 74
As a researcher at AT&T, she helped lay the groundwork for modern digital assistants like Siri and Alexa.
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Walking catfish may use their whole body to smell when on land
Fish were not thought to be able to smell while on land because their olfactory systems evolved to work underwater, but the walking catfish can
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Gut bacteria might flip the effects of a common cancer-causing mutation in an unexpected way
Microbes in the gut can change the effects of genetic mutations (LJNovaScotia/Pixabay/) Health blogs and diet websites often tout antioxidants as a cure-all for gut health. But the story of the gut microbiome and its role in disease is murkier than most news stories might lead you to believe. Originally in search of an explanation as to why cancer is so much less likely to develop in the small in
1h
Firefighters exposed to more potentially harmful chemicals than previously thought
On-duty firefighters experienced higher exposures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, which are a family of chemicals that are known to have the potential to cause cancer.
1h
Unleashing the immune system's 'STING' against cancer
Scientists have discovered a molecule that can activate a natural immune-boosting protein called STING. The findings mark a key advance in the field of oncology, as the STING protein is known for its strong antitumor properties.
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Dr. Fauci Just Released a World Map of Ongoing Disease Outbreaks
With the endless torrent of COVID-19 updates, it's easy to forget that there are other diseases spreading around the world. Well, fret no more! Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and top White House coronavirus adviser, is here to remind you just how many dangerous outbreaks are happening right now. Nipah Virus in southern India, meas
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Your in-laws' history of drinking problems could lead to alcohol issues of your own
A study of more than 300,000 couples in Sweden finds marriage to a spouse who grew up exposed to parental alcohol misuse increases a person's likelihood of developing a drinking problem.
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Identifying Neuroinflammatory Biomarkers of COVID-19
Functional proteomics detects elevated neuroinflammatory markers in patient plasma and cerebrospinal fluid!
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NASA Celebrates 15 Years of Mars Orbiter With Stunning Photos
The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) recently passed its 15th anniversary leaving Earth behind to observe the red planet, and NASA is celebrating by recapping some of the robot's best images . You've probably seen some of them pop up over the last few years but maybe never stopped to appreciate how much this mission has contributed to our understanding of Mars. Well, here's an opportunity to soa
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Stanford scientists slow and steer light with resonant nanoantennas
Researchers have fashioned ultrathin silicon nanoantennas that trap and redirect light, for applications in quantum computing, LIDAR and even the detection of viruses.
2h
A new lens on the world: Improving the metalens with liquid crystal
Case Western Reserve University physics professor Giuseppe Strangi and collaborators at Harvard and the Italian university UniCal have taken a step toward making "metalenses" even more useful–by making them reconfigurable. They did this by harnessing nanoscale forces to infiltrate liquid crystals between those microscopic pillars, allowing them to shape and diffract the light in completely new wa
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NASA Says There's a Small Leak on the International Space Station
Leaking Air NASA is investigating a small air leak on board the International Space Station. Luckily, the three current crew members aren't in immediate danger, according to NASA, and will spend the upcoming weekend inside the Russian segment of the station as they try to find the source of the leak. A small amount of air leaking out of the station is to be expected. "The station's atmosphere is
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A New Kind of Plastic Could Be Recycled Indefinitely
Plastic Reborn Scientists say they've developed a kind of plastic that can be recycled an unlimited number of times. Usually, the recycling process takes a serious toll on the quality of plastics. But New Scientist reports that the new material, PBTL, can be broken down and remolded into something new that's just as high-quality as the original — meaning, potentially, a whole lot less plastic fil
2h
How Four Brothers Allegedly Fleeced $19 Million From Amazon
The scheme involved 7,000 $94 toothbrushes, according to law enforcement.
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Live Covid-19 Updates
Overburdened health care specialists are finding themselves on the front lines as schools reopen. India's crisis is now spreading to the hinterlands along its southern coastline.
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Osiris-Rex mission on course for asteroid sample collection
Nasa spacecraft makes final preparations to gather material from Bennu's surface in October Nasa's Osiris-Rex (origins, spectral interpretation, resource identification, security, regolith explorer) asteroid mission has performed its final practice run for its forthcoming sample collection manoeuvre . The spacecraft is 288m km from Earth, in orbit around the asteroid Bennu. On 20 October it is sc
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First daily surveillance of emerging COVID-19 hotspots
Over the course of the coronavirus epidemic, COVID-19 outbreaks have hit communities across the United States. As clusters of infection shift over time, local officials are forced into a whack-a-mole approach to allocating resources and enacting public health policies. Geographers led by the Univeristy of Utah hope that timely, localized data will help inform future decisions, and one day predict
2h
Downstream effects: Sturgeon lifespan, fertility vary strikingly with river conditions
New research has found that pallid sturgeon stocked in a northerly segment of the Missouri River live an average of three times longer, produce roughly 10 times as many eggs and weigh up to seven times more than specimens stocked downriver. The findings represent a dramatic example of how environmental conditions — in this case, fast-flowing channels introduced via human intervention — can shape
2h
Firefighters exposed to more potentially harmful chemicals than previously thought
The on-duty firefighters in the Kansas City, Missouri, area experienced higher exposures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, which are a family of chemicals that are known to have the potential to cause cancer.
2h
New database shows more than 20% of nursing homes still report staff, PPE shortages
More than 20% of US nursing homes continue to report severe shortages of staff and PPE, according to one of the first studies based on a new federal database of responses from more than 15,000 facilities.
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How misinformed vaccine beliefs affect policy views
As many as 20% of Americans hold negative views about vaccination. Such misinformed vaccine beliefs are by far the strongest driver of opposition to pro-vaccination public policies – more than political partisanship, education, religiosity or other sociodemographic factors, new research shows.
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Handgun purchaser licensing laws are associated with lower firearm homicides, suicides
State handgun purchaser licensing laws–which go beyond federal background checks by requiring a prospective buyer to apply for a license or permit from state or local law enforcement–appear to be highly effective at reducing firearm homicide and suicide rates.
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Learn How To Build Your Own Video Game With This Comprehensive Game Development Bundle
In 1958, William Higinbotham got stuck with the job of impressing a tour group. Higinbotham, who worked for the Brookhaven National Laboratory's instrumentation group, was assigned to make the rather boring exhibits they had explaining their work a little more engaging. So, with a little help from a technician, he created Tennis For Two , a simple little game you played on an oscilloscope by turn
2h
Relatable: This Tiny Robot Is Powered by Alcohol
RoBeetle A team of researchers have built a tiny microbot that runs entirely on methanol, a type of alcohol. The robot, dubbed RoBeetle, weighs less than a tenth of a gram and doesn't even need any other external power sources such as cables or electromagnetic fields to crawl along. "The energy density of batteries is very low, so we needed new sources of power," Nestor Perez-Arancibia at the Uni
2h
Firefighters exposed to more potentially harmful chemicals than previously thought
A new Oregon State University study suggests that firefighters are more likely to be exposed to potentially harmful chemicals while on duty compared to off duty.
2h
Study: Black babies are less likely to die when cared for by a Black doctor
A new study examined nearly 2 million births in Florida from 1992 to 2015. The results showed that, when cared more by a white doctor, Black newborns are 3 times more likely to die than white newborns. The researchers said several "disturbing" factors are likely at play. The U.S. infant mortality rate has been dropping for decades, but there remain significant racial disparities. One of the stark
2h
Oleandrin, Covid-19 Treatment Pitched to Trump, Could Be Dangerous
The chief executive of My Pillow, a Trump donor, claims oleandrin is a miracle cure for Covid-19. But no studies have shown that it is safe or effective, and the shrub it's derived from is poisonous.
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Thousands of fish turned up dead in Biscayne Bay. Coral bleaching might be next
Fish may not be the only victims of the pollution and hot temperatures that drove oxygen to insufficient levels in Biscayne Bay and led to a mortality event that shocked Miami residents last week.
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Relationship between COVID-19 deaths and morbid obesity
The prevalence of morbid obesity in a population is associated with negative outcomes from COVID-19, according to a new analysis of morbid obesity data and reported COVID-19 deaths in the United States.
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Robotic surgery may improve outcomes in mouth and throat cancer
Robotic surgery for patients with early stage, oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer is associated with improved health outcomes, including better long-term survival, according to a new study. Oropharyngeal cancer occurs in the back of the throat and includes the base of the tongue and tonsils.
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Fighting cancer with rejection-resistant, 'off-the-shelf' therapeutic T cells
Researchers are developing ready-to-use, off-the-shelf therapeutic T cells. These are genetically engineered T cells that are manufactured from normal, healthy donors. The cells are expanded and well characterized, and have shown to be effective at killing cancer cells.
2h
A new tool to create chemical complexity from fatty acids
A new catalyst design enables unprecedented control over the modification of fatty acid derivatives that opens the door to creating useful substances in a green and efficient manner.
2h
Why Do Zebras Have Stripes?
The stripes on zebras have been found to repel flies. But now researchers have found a black-and-white checkered pattern will, too — making them question the optical effect behind the phenomenon.
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Earth's anthropogenic carbon dioxide increase is unprecedented
A new measurement technology developed at the University of Bern provides unique insights into the climate of the past. Previous CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere could be reconstructed more accurately than ever before, thanks to high-resolution measurements made on an Antarctic ice core. The study, which analyzed the Earth's atmospheric composition between 330,000 and 450,000 years ago, was ma
2h
NASA gets a wide-angle view of hurricane Genevieve
NASA provided a series of photos of Hurricane Genevieve as it affected Mexico's southern Baja California peninsula. An astronaut aboard the International Space Station provided wide-angle photos of Genevieve, showing the size of the storm. Warnings and watches are in effect on Aug. 20.
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Florida mosquitoes: 750 million genetically modified insects to be released
The aim is to reduce insect-borne diseases but environmental groups warn of unforeseen consequences.
3h
A new tool to create chemical complexity from fatty acids
A new catalyst design enables unprecedented control over the modification of fatty acid derivatives that opens the door to creating useful substances in a green and efficient manner.
3h
New approach uses wild genes to improve biological nitrogen fixation in soybeans
One of the top four crops grown worldwide, soybean has been an integral part of Chinese agriculture for a long time, having been domesticated more than 6000 years ago. During the domestication process, certain traits are selected that make plants easier to cultivate and cook and other traits can be lost. Wild ancestors of domesticated crops can be important reservoirs of agronomic traits that have
3h
New approach uses wild genes to improve biological nitrogen fixation in soybeans
One of the top four crops grown worldwide, soybean has been an integral part of Chinese agriculture for a long time, having been domesticated more than 6000 years ago. During the domestication process, certain traits are selected that make plants easier to cultivate and cook and other traits can be lost. Wild ancestors of domesticated crops can be important reservoirs of agronomic traits that have
3h
Man whose stomach brewed beer is cured—by a poop transplant​
Last year, it was reported that a Belgian man arrested for drunk driving brewed the alcohol in his own gut. The disorder, auto-brewery syndrome, occurred after he took a round of antibiotics. He was cured after a fecal donation from his daughter. Nearly a year ago, headlines across the web were dominated by a 46-year-old man that brewed his own beer. His artisanal approach was quite unique: his s
3h
Corban Swain's poetry
At the MIT community vigil held in June 2020 in the wake of George Floyd's death, Corban Swain, a PhD student in biological engineering, read two of his poems on racism. Listen here. Courtesy of Corban Swain
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Tour the Minecraft Institvte of Technology
Check out the virtual MIT campus on this guided tour by Amanda Shayna Ahteck '23. Courtesy of Amanda Shayna Ahteck '23
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Grad students challenge university-mandated COVID-19 agreements
"We don't … understand the extent of how this could impact us legally; we're just scared because we know it could," one student says
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Graphene sensors find subtleties in magnetic fields
Researchers used an ultrathin graphene 'sandwich' to create a tiny magnetic field sensor that can operate over a greater temperature range than previous sensors, while also detecting miniscule changes in magnetic fields that might otherwise get lost within a larger magnetic background.
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Study focuses on low-carb, high-fat diet effect on older populations
Medical researchers noted improvements in body composition, fat distribution and metabolic health in response to an eight-week very low-carbohydrate diet. Older adults with obesity are at particularly high risk of developing cardiometabolic disease such as Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Rather than total fat mass, deposition of fat in certain areas, such as the abdominal cavity and sk
3h
Anthropogenic CO2 increase is unprecedented
Even in earlier warm periods there were pulse-like releases of CO2 to the atmosphere. Today's anthropogenic CO2 rise, however, is more than six times larger and almost ten times faster than previous jumps in the CO2 concentration.
3h
Prevention strategy for substance use disorder
There are well documented risk factors associated with developing substance use disorder across all age groups. A recent study found those risk factors affect age groups differently and proposes a primary prevention strategy for substance use disorder that is individualized for people within defined age groups.
3h
Dilated blood vessels in the lung may explain low oxygen levels in severe cases of COVID-19
A new pilot study suggests that COVID-19 is causing significant dilation of the blood vessels of the lung, specifically the capillaries.
3h
Paying attention to the neurons behind our alertness
The neurons of layer 6 – the deepest layer of the cortex – were examined by researchers to uncover how they react to sensory stimulation in different behavioral states.
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Animal mummies unwrapped with hi-res 3D X-rays
Three mummified animals from ancient Egypt have been digitally unwrapped and dissected by researchers, using high-resolution 3D scans that give unprecedented detail about the animals' lives — and deaths — over 2000 years ago. The three animals – a snake, a bird and a cat – are from the collection held by the Egypt Centre at Swansea University. Previous investigations had identified which animals
3h
Unleashing the immune system's 'STING' against cancer
Scientists at Scripps Research have discovered a molecule that can activate a natural immune-boosting protein called STING. The findings mark a key advance in the field of oncology, as the STING protein is known for its strong antitumor properties.
3h
New approach uses wild genes to improve biological nitrogen fixation in soybeans
It's a clever genetic approach to identify genes present in the wild soybean ancestor that might improve or enhance interactions between the modern cultivated soybean and its symbiotic partner S. fredii. Soybean was domesticated so long ago that most cultivated lines lack these ancient traits. This approach will help them to access some of the genetic diversity of the soybean ancestor to improve b
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Most US voters value party over democracy
Only a small fraction of US voters are willing to sacrifice their party and policy interests to defend democratic principles, a new study shows. The findings show that only 3.5% of US voters would cast ballots against their preferred candidates as punishment for undemocratic behavior, such as supporting gerrymandering, disenfranchisement, or press restrictions. "Our findings show that US voters ,
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Steve Bannon, a $25M Border Wall Campaign, and a GoFundMe Gone Bad
We Build the Wall raised millions. Now the DOJ says its operators—including the former Trump aide—skimmed hundreds of thousands off the top.
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Did I just see a giant red jellyfish in the sky? Maybe.
Red sprites are high-altitude companions to thunderstorms. They exist for milliseconds, so the best way to "capture" one is on video. They can reach 60 miles up from the top of a thundercloud. The thought-provoking and ultimately mind-bendingly great movie " Arrival " is the story of a human linguistics expert seeking to communicate with massive alien heptapods suspended, tentacles hanging down,
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Microsoft's new Flight Simulator makes flying—and turbulence—a lot more realistic
The new game considers thousands of points on an aircraft's surface and how those points interact with the air. (Microsoft Flight Simulator/) After more than a decade, Microsoft has officially launched the next version of its famous flight simulator. The game dropped for PCs this week, and while no computer simulation of something as complex as flight can completely mimic what actually happens in
3h
Past rapid warming levels in the Arctic associated with widespread climate changes
Using Greenland ice cores, new research is the first to confirm the longstanding assumption that climate changes between the tropics and the Arctic were synchronized during the last glacial period.
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Greenland ice sheet shows losses in 2019
The Greenland Ice Sheet recorded a new record loss of mass in 2019. This was the finding of a team of international researchers after evaluating data from satellite observations and modelling data.
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Vaccine that harnesses antifungal immunity protects mice from staph infection
Immunization of mice with a new vaccine consisting of fungal particles loaded with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) proteins protects mice against S. aureus infection, according to a new study.
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Dinosaurs' unique bone structure key to carrying weight
A unique collaboration between paleontologists, mechanical engineers and biomedical engineers revealed that the trabecular bone structure of hadrosaurs and several other dinosaurs is uniquely capable of supporting large weights, and different than that of mammals and birds.
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Exoskeleton research marches forward with study on fit
Exoskeletons, many of which are powered by springs or motors, can cause pain or injury if their joints are not aligned with the user's. To help manufacturers and consumers mitigate these risks, researchers have developed a new measurement method to test whether an exoskeleton and the person wearing it are moving smoothly and in harmony.
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Upcoming space mission to test drag sail pulling rocket back to Earth
A rocket is going up into space with a drag sail. The goal? For the drag sail to bring the rocket back to Earth, preventing it from becoming like the thousands of pieces of space junk in Earth's lower orbit.
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Salvors begin sinking ship which ran aground off Mauritius
Salvage crews on Thursday began the process of sinking the broken stem of a Japanese-owned ship which ran aground off Mauritius, leading to a major oil spill and ecological disaster for the Indian Ocean island.
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U.S. Mail Delays Slow Delivery of Medicines
In addition to concerns over mail-in voting, the cost-cutting at the Postal Service affects the millions of people who get their prescriptions by mail.
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Heart failure, hypertensive deaths rise in black women and men
Deaths due to heart failure and hypertensive heart disease are increasing in the US — particularly in Black women and men — despite medical and surgical advances in heart disease management. This is the first comprehensive study to look across a spectrum of heart disease types and examine differences between sex and racial groups across age groups and geography.
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Anthropogenic CO2 increase is unprecedented
Even in earlier warm periods there were pulse-like releases of CO2 to the atmosphere. Today's anthropogenic CO2 rise, however, is more than six times larger and almost ten times faster than previous jumps in the CO2 concentration. This is the conclusion reached by a European research team led by the University of Bern.
4h
NASA gets a wide angle view of hurricane Genevieve
NASA provided a series of photos of Hurricane Genevieve as it affected Mexico's southern Baja California peninsula. An astronaut aboard the International Space Station provided wide-angle photos of Genevieve, showing the size of the storm. Warnings and watches are in effect on Aug. 20.
4h
Study focuses on low-carb, high-fat diet effect on older populations
Amy Goss, Ph.D., RDN, says egg consumption can be incorporated into the diet in a healthful way without adversely impacting blood cholesterol in older adults.
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Watching This Video Raises Your IQ Score 18 Points, Researchers Say
Answer Key According to new research, simply watching a short video that provides some tips on how to answer specific types of questions on an IQ test work can boost your results by as many as 18 points. Nothing about the video actually makes people smarter. But because it serves as a sort of CliffsNotes for the test, New Scientist reports , those who watched it are better prepared. For a test th
4h
Nvidia's Datacenter Revenue Has Surpassed Gaming for the First Time
Credit: Nvidia About 13 years ago, Nvidia made a pair of bets on its long-term future as a company. The company launched two major initiatives, branded as Tegra and Tesla at the time, in the hopes of creating new markets for itself. This was partly a response to the decline of its chipset business, which left it active in fewer markets and more dependent on companies like AMD and Intel for a path
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Larger variability in sea level expected as Earth warms
A team of researchers from the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) identified a global tendency for future sea levels to become more variable as oceans warm this century due to increasing greenhouse gas emissions. Sea level variability alters tidal cycles and enhances the risks of coastal flooding and erosion beyond changes associated with s
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Trapping and controlling light at the interface of atomically thin nanomaterials
Light can partake in peculiar phenomena at the nanoscale. Exploring these phenomena can unlock sophisticated applications and provide useful insights into the interactions between light waves and other materials.
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UA research finds relationship between COVID-19 deaths and morbid obesity
The prevalence of morbid obesity in a population is associated with negative outcomes from COVID-19, according to an analysis by researchers at The University of Alabama of morbid obesity data and reported COVID-19 deaths in the United States.
4h
Fighting cancer with rejection-resistant, 'off-the-shelf' therapeutic T cells
Baylor College of Medicine researchers develop improved cancer-fighting CAR T cells.
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Dilated blood vessels in the lung may explain low oxygen levels in severe cases of COVID-19
A new pilot study from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai suggests that COVID-19 is causing significant dilation of the blood vessels of the lung, specifically the capillaries.
4h
IUPUI study looks at prevention strategy for substance use disorder
There are well documented risk factors associated with developing substance use disorder across all age groups. A recent study from IUPUI found those risk factors affect age groups differently and proposes a primary prevention strategy for substance use disorder that is individualized for people within defined age groups.
4h
No more playing with fire: Study offers insight into 'safer' rechargeable batteries
Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are a common type of rechargeable batteries. Their versatile nature and numerous applications in all sorts of electronic devices—from mobile phones to cars—makes them seem too good to be true. And perhaps they are: recently, there has been an increase in the number of fire-related incidents associated with LIBs, especially during charging, causing serious concerns over
4h
Dinosaurs' unique bone structure key to carrying weight
Weighing up to 8,000 pounds, hadrosaurs, or duck-billed dinosaurs were among the largest dinosaurs to roam the Earth. How did the skeletons of these four-legged, plant-eating dinosaurs with very long necks support such a massive load?
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Researchers create nanoclusters that mimic biomolecules
Biological systems come in all shapes, sizes and structures. Some of these structures, such as those found in DNA, RNA and proteins, are formed through complex molecular interactions that are not easily duplicated by inorganic materials.
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Graphene sensors find subtleties in magnetic fields
As with actors and opera singers, when measuring magnetic fields it helps to have range.
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Affirmative action incentivizes high schoolers to perform better, new research shows
California voters will be asked to approve a return to affirmative action on Nov. 3 with Proposition 16, which would restore the right of the state's colleges and universities to consider race, ethnicity and gender in admission decisions.
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'Cyborg' locusts could sniff out bombs
Researchers are one step closer to bomb-sniffing cyborg locusts. In a new study, they found locusts can quickly discriminate between different explosives' smells. If you want to enhance a locust to be used as a bomb-sniffing bug, however, there are a few technical challenges that need solving before sending it into the field. Is there some way to direct the locust—to tell it where to go to do its
4h
Trapping and controlling light at the interface of atomically thin nanomaterials
Scientists propose a new method to confine light in an atomically thin graphene layer by leveraging topological phenomena that occur at the interface of specially designed nanomaterials.
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Researchers shed light on the building blocks for next-generation LED displays
Three teams of researchers at Clemson University have joined forces to unravel some of the mysteries surrounding perovskite nanocrystals, which are semiconductors with numerous applications, including LEDs, lasers, solar cells and photodetectors.
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'Slingshot spiders' accelerate 100X faster than cheetahs
A new kinematic study explains how the amazing "slingshot spider" stores enough energy to produce acceleration of 1,300 meters/second 2 (4265 feet/second 2 ), or 100 times the acceleration of a cheetah. Running into an unseen spider web in the woods is scary enough, but what if you had to worry about a spider web—and the spider—catapulting at you? "When it weaves a new web every night, the spider
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Surprising pulses of ancient warming found in Antarctic ice samples
Weakened Atlantic currents may have driven centurylong bursts of warming
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Anger and Protest Over a Presidential Election in Belarus
In the last week and a half, thousands of protesters have filled the streets of Minsk and other cities in Belarus, voicing their anger over the widely disputed results of a presidential election. President Alexander Lukashenko, the authoritarian ruler of Belarus for the past 26 years, was declared the winner with 80 percent of the vote, giving him a sixth term in office. The main opposition candi
4h
Past rapid warming levels in the Arctic associated with widespread climate changes
Using Greenland ice cores, new research is the first to confirm the longstanding assumption that climate changes between the tropics and the Arctic were synchronised during the last glacial period.
4h
Promising discovery for patients with diabetic retinopathy
A study published in the journal Science has shed light on a cellular process that occurs in the retinas of people with diabetic retinopathy. This discovery could lead to the development of a treatment for this serious complication of diabetes.
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New 'molecular computers' find the right cells
New nanoscale devices, made of synthetic proteins, have been designed to target a therapeutic agent only to cells with a specific, predetermined combinations of cell surface markers. They operate on their own and search out cells they were programmed to find. The hope is that they might guide CAR T cancer therapy, and other treatments where precision is critical, through a sort of molecular beacon
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New, pharmacologically available STING agonists promote antitumor immunity in mice
In a pair of studies, researchers report the discovery and molecular pharmacology of stable, synthetic STING (stimulator of interferon genes) agonists that induce anticancer immune responses in mice.
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Intestinal bacteriophage alters effects of cancer therapies in mice
Enterococcus, a genus that includes common commensal bacteria found in the gut, harbors a bacteriophage that influences the effects of various cancer immunotherapies in ways that may be clinically relevant, researchers working in mice report.
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Pulse-like jumps in atmospheric carbon dioxide occurred in glacial and early interglacial periods
Once only associated with colder climate conditions of the last glacial period, a new study finds that rapid, pulse-like increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) also occurred during earlier, warmer interglacial periods.
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Abrupt global climate change events occurred synchronously during last glacial period
The abrupt climate warming events that occurred in Greenland during the last glacial period occurred very close in time to other rapid climate change events seen in paleoclimate records from lower latitudes, according to a new study, which reveals a near-synchronous teleconnection of climate events spanning Earth's hemispheres.
4h
A new tool to create chemical complexity from fatty acids
A new catalyst design enables unprecedented control over the modification of fatty acid derivatives that opens the door to creating useful substances in a green and efficient manner.
4h
Vaccine that harnesses antifungal immunity protects mice from staph infection
Immunization of mice with a new vaccine consisting of fungal particles loaded with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) proteins protects mice against S. aureus infection, according to a study published August 20 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by David Underhill of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and colleague.
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February lockdown in China caused a drop in some types of air pollution, but not others
Atmospheric scientists have analyzed how the February near-total shutdown of mobility affected the air over China. Results show a striking drop in nitrogen oxides, a gas that comes mainly from tailpipes and is one component of smog.
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Bustling seascapes risk collapse as the climate changes
Nature, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02444-9 A marine food web recreated in the laboratory provides a sobering look at ocean life in a warming world.
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E-learning? There's a database for that. Real-time data? That, too
Companies of all sizes and maturity levels, from startups to multinational corporations, have at least this in common: they know that using data effectively is a key driver of innovation, competitive advantage, and growth. Now that expensive hardware and software are no longer prerequisites for innovation, thanks to the rise of cloud computing, startups can play on the same field as, and sometime
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The Big Story: Revisiting Hurricane Katrina, 15 Years Later
Join Atlantic executive editor Adrienne LaFrance and staff writers Vann R. Newkirk II and Clint Smith for a live conversation about the lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina, 15 years later.
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Red mud is piling up. Can scientists figure out what to do with it?
Researchers seek new uses for caustic byproduct of aluminum production
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A new tool to create chemical complexity from fatty acids
Hokkaido University WPI-ICReDD researchers developed a modular catalyst that can accurately modify fatty acid derivatives in a hitherto inaccessible position. This enables the efficient production of valuable compounds from a renewable bioresource, whereas before we had to either rely on petroleum-derived resources or use complicated and costly methods.
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Past rapid warming levels in the Arctic associated with widespread climate changes
Abrupt climate changes during the Last Glacial Period, some 115,000 to 11,700 years ago, happened at the same time across a region extending from the Arctic to the Southern Hemisphere subtropics, new research has revealed.
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Mounting Climate Impacts Threaten U.S. Nuclear Reactors
Higher temperatures, rising flood risks and increased water stress mean facilities need to take additional resiliency measures — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Sick politics at the heart of PHE closure
The independence of the body which is replacing Public Health England is in doubt, according to Justin McCracken . Dr Aamir Ahmed wonders why England's approach is so different to that of other advanced nations Your article on the abolition of Public Health England ( Abolition of Pubic Health England just 'passing the blame for coronavirus mistakes' , 19 August) raises some important questions, b
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Black scientists matter
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News at a glance
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Mud
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Mud on the move
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A muddy legacy
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The mud is electric
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A dam big problem
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Red alert
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Pulses of the past
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Controlling the curvature
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Making robots useful
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Modifying MXene surfaces
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All together then
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Delivering IL-2 to Tregs
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Robots fuel up
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Let the grass grow old
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High heat
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Cross-reactivity between tumor MHC class I-restricted antigens and an enterococcal bacteriophage
Intestinal microbiota have been proposed to induce commensal-specific memory T cells that cross-react with tumor-associated antigens. We identified major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I–binding epitopes in the tail length tape measure protein (TMP) of a prophage found in the genome of the bacteriophage Enterococcus hirae . Mice bearing E. hirae harboring this prophage mounted a TMP-speci
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BTN3A1 governs antitumor responses by coordinating {alpha}{beta} and {gamma}{delta} T cells
Gamma delta () T cells infiltrate most human tumors, but current immunotherapies fail to exploit their in situ major histocompatibility complex–independent tumoricidal potential. Activation of T cells can be elicited by butyrophilin and butyrophilin-like molecules that are structurally similar to the immunosuppressive B7 family members, yet how they regulate and coordinate αβ and T cell responses
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Shaping colloidal bananas to reveal biaxial, splay-bend nematic, and smectic phases
Understanding the impact of curvature on the self-assembly of elongated microscopic building blocks, such as molecules and proteins, is key to engineering functional materials with predesigned structure. We develop model "banana-shaped" colloidal particles with tunable dimensions and curvature, whose structure and dynamics are accessible at the particle level. By heating initially straight rods m
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Isolation of potent SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies and protection from disease in a small animal model
Countermeasures to prevent and treat coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are a global health priority. We enrolled a cohort of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)–recovered participants, developed neutralization assays to investigate antibody responses, adapted our high-throughput antibody generation pipeline to rapidly screen more than 1800 antibodies, and established an
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Synchronous timing of abrupt climate changes during the last glacial period
Abrupt climate changes during the last glacial period have been detected in a global array of palaeoclimate records, but our understanding of their absolute timing and regional synchrony is incomplete. Our compilation of 63 published, independently dated speleothem records shows that abrupt warmings in Greenland were associated with synchronous climate changes across the Asian Monsoon, South Amer
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Asymmetric remote C-H borylation of aliphatic amides and esters with a modular iridium catalyst
Site selectivity and stereocontrol remain major challenges in C–H bond functionalization chemistry, especially in linear aliphatic saturated hydrocarbon scaffolds. We report the highly enantioselective and site-selective catalytic borylation of remote C(sp 3 )–H bonds to the carbonyl group in aliphatic secondary and tertiary amides and esters. A chiral C–H activation catalyst was modularly assemb
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Attosecond spectroscopy of liquid water
Electronic dynamics in liquids are of fundamental importance, but time-resolved experiments have so far remained limited to the femtosecond time scale. We report the extension of attosecond spectroscopy to the liquid phase. We measured time delays of 50 to 70 attoseconds between the photoemission from liquid water and that from gaseous water at photon energies of 21.7 to 31.0 electron volts. Thes
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Covalent surface modifications and superconductivity of two-dimensional metal carbide MXenes
Versatile chemical transformations of surface functional groups in two-dimensional transition-metal carbides (MXenes) open up a previously unexplored design space for this broad class of functional materials. We introduce a general strategy to install and remove surface groups by performing substitution and elimination reactions in molten inorganic salts. Successful synthesis of MXenes with oxyge
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SOSTDC1-producing follicular helper T cells promote regulatory follicular T cell differentiation
Germinal center (GC) responses potentiate the generation of follicular regulatory T (T FR ) cells. However, the molecular cues driving T FR cell formation remain unknown. Here, we show that sclerostin domain-containing protein 1 (SOSTDC1), secreted by a subpopulation of follicular helper T (T FH ) cells and T–B cell border–enriched fibroblastic reticular cells, is developmentally required for T F
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Julich-Brain: A 3D probabilistic atlas of the human brains cytoarchitecture
Cytoarchitecture is a basic principle of microstructural brain parcellation. We introduce Julich-Brain, a three-dimensional atlas containing cytoarchitectonic maps of cortical areas and subcortical nuclei. The atlas is probabilistic, which enables it to account for variations between individual brains. Building such an atlas was highly data- and labor-intensive and required the development of nes
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Antitumor activity of a systemic STING-activating non-nucleotide cGAMP mimetic
Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) links innate immunity to biological processes ranging from antitumor immunity to microbiome homeostasis. Mechanistic understanding of the anticancer potential for STING receptor activation is currently limited by metabolic instability of the natural cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) ligands. From a pathway-targeted cell-based screen, we identified a non-nucleotide,
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Abrupt CO2 release to the atmosphere under glacial and early interglacial climate conditions
Pulse-like carbon dioxide release to the atmosphere on centennial time scales has only been identified for the most recent glacial and deglacial periods and is thought to be absent during warmer climate conditions. Here, we present a high-resolution carbon dioxide record from 330,000 to 450,000 years before present, revealing pronounced carbon dioxide jumps (CDJ) under cold and warm climate condi
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Architecture and function of human uromodulin filaments in urinary tract infections
Uromodulin is the most abundant protein in human urine, and it forms filaments that antagonize the adhesion of uropathogens; however, the filament structure and mechanism of protection remain poorly understood. We used cryo–electron tomography to show that the uromodulin filament consists of a zigzag-shaped backbone with laterally protruding arms. N-glycosylation mapping and biophysical assays re
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Studies in humanized mice and convalescent humans yield a SARS-CoV-2 antibody cocktail
Neutralizing antibodies have become an important tool in treating infectious diseases. Recently, two separate approaches yielded successful antibody treatments for Ebola—one from genetically humanized mice and the other from a human survivor. Here, we describe parallel efforts using both humanized mice and convalescent patients to generate antibodies against the severe acute respiratory syndrome
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Antibody cocktail to SARS-CoV-2 spike protein prevents rapid mutational escape seen with individual antibodies
Antibodies targeting the spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) present a promising approach to combat the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic; however, concerns remain that mutations can yield antibody resistance. We investigated the development of resistance against four antibodies to the spike protein that potently neutralize SARS-CoV-2, individu
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Light harvesting in oxygenic photosynthesis: Structural biology meets spectroscopy
Oxygenic photosynthesis is the main process that drives life on earth. It starts with the harvesting of solar photons that, after transformation into electronic excitations, lead to charge separation in the reaction centers of photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII). These photosystems are large, modular pigment-protein complexes that work in series to fuel the formation of carbohydrates, concomitan
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Neutrophil extracellular traps target senescent vasculature for tissue remodeling in retinopathy
In developed countries, the leading causes of blindness such as diabetic retinopathy are characterized by disorganized vasculature that can become fibrotic. Although many such pathological vessels often naturally regress and spare sight-threatening complications, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we used orthogonal approaches in human patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy
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An orally available non-nucleotide STING agonist with antitumor activity
Pharmacological activation of the STING (stimulator of interferon genes)–controlled innate immune pathway is a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer. Here we report the identification of MSA-2, an orally available non-nucleotide human STING agonist. In syngeneic mouse tumor models, subcutaneous and oral MSA-2 regimens were well tolerated and stimulated interferon-β secretion in tumors, induce
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Pulses of the past
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Controlling the curvature
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Making robots useful
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Modifying MXene surfaces
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All together then
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Delivering IL-2 to Tregs
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Robots fuel up
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Research shows air pollution could play role in development of cardiometabolic diseases
Air pollution is the world's leading environmental risk factor, and causes more than nine million deaths per year. New research shows air pollution may play a role in the development of cardiometabolic diseases, such as diabetes. Importantly, the effects were reversible with cessation of exposure.
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Affirmative action incentivizes high schoolers to perform better, new research shows
Affirmative action is a contentious issue across the globe, hotly debated in countries such as India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Nigeria and Brazil, as well as in the United States. While the direct effects of affirmative action on college admissions are well known, new evidence from India shows that affirmative action has indirect benefits on the behavior of underrepresented high school students, who t
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Exoskeleton research marches forward with NIST study on fit
Exoskeletons, many of which are powered by springs or motors, can cause pain or injury if their joints are not aligned with the user's. To help manufacturers and consumers mitigate these risks, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed a new measurement method to test whether an exoskeleton and the person wearing it are moving smoothly and in harmony.
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Graphene sensors find subtleties in magnetic fields
Cornell researchers used an ultrathin graphene "sandwich" to create a tiny magnetic field sensor that can operate over a greater temperature range than previous sensors, while also detecting miniscule changes in magnetic fields that might otherwise get lost within a larger magnetic background.
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Researchers create nanoclusters that mimic biomolecules
Biological systems come in all shapes, sizes and structures. Some of these structures, such as those found in DNA, RNA and proteins, are formed through complex molecular interactions that are not easily duplicated by inorganic materials.
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Greenland ice sheet shows losses in 2019
The Greenland Ice Sheet recorded a new record loss of mass in 2019. This was the finding of a team of international researchers after evaluating data from satellite observations and modelling data.
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Dinosaurs' unique bone structure key to carrying weight
A unique collaboration between paleontologists, mechanical engineers and biomedical engineers revealed that the trabecular bone structure of hadrosaurs and several other dinosaurs is uniquely capable of supporting large weights, and different than that of mammals and birds.
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Redirect military budgets to tackle climate change and pandemics
Nature, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02460-9 Governments should stop spending billions of dollars on weapons and protect citizens from the real threats they face.
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Covid-19 news: Risk of coronavirus resurgence in Europe, says WHO
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Sea turtles carrying thermometers could improve hurricane forecasts
Loggerhead turtles carrying thermometers through the waters near a hurricane can log how the storm affects water temperatures, helping make better forecasts
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According to New Research, Kids Spread COVID-19 Like Crazy
In an alarming twist, children likely play a much larger role in spreading the coronavirus than previously thought. That's according to new research out of Massachusetts General Hospital that looked at the viral load — how much of the virus an infected person's body produces — of children with COVID-19. "I was surprised by the high levels of virus we found in children of all ages, especially in t
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How kids soak up bias against certain ways of talking
When it comes to communicating, what we're saying may only be as important as how we say it, the author of a new book argues. "We don't always realize that when we talk, we're not just conveying the content of our speech, we're also conveying a lot about who we are when we open our mouth and speak," says Katherine Kinzler, professor at the University of Chicago and author of the new book How You
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The UK exam debacle reminds us that algorithms can't fix broken systems
When the UK first set out to find an alternative to college entrance exams, the premise seemed perfectly reasonable. Covid-19 had derailed any opportunity for students to take the exams in person, but the government still wanted a way to assess them for admission decisions. Chief among its concerns was an issue of fairness. Teachers had already made predictions of their students' exam scores, but
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Destination, Mars! Pictures celebrate the launch of three bold missions
Nature, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-01966-6 Nature's pick of science images this month chronicles missions from the United Arab Emirates, China and the United States.
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Kort før første spadestik: Sådan stoppede Einar og Henrik atomkraften i Danmark
En kæmpe folkebevægelse blokerede atomkraften med fest og fakta.
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First lab-made 'mini-hearts' mimic the real thing
Researchers have created, for the first time, a miniature human heart model in the laboratory. The mini-hearts are complete with all primary heart cell types and a functioning structure of chambers and vascular tissue. "The organoids are small models of the fetal heart with representative functional and structural features. They are, however, not as perfect as a human heart yet. That is something
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A healthy lifestyle for cardiovascular health also promotes good eye health
Investigators found that ideal cardiovascular health, which is indicative of a healthy lifestyle, was associated with lower odds for ocular diseases especially diabetic retinopathy. These findings suggest that interventions to prevent cardiovascular diseases may also hold promise in preventing ocular diseases.
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A smart eye mask that tracks muscle movements to tell what 'caught your eye'
Integrating first-of-its-kind washable hydrogel electrodes with a pulse sensor, researchers have developed smart eyewear to track eye movement and cardiac data for physiological and psychological studies. The eyewear provides accurate measurements in an everyday environment without compromising users' comfort.
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International team identifies a new regulatory pathway in bladder cancer
GULP1 regulates the NRF2-KEAP1 signaling axis in urothelial carcinoma.
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Sortilin may hold the key to combat pancreatic cancer more effectively
Pancreatic cancer has an extremely poor prognosis; it is the third most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States. In a novel study published in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier, scientists report the discovery of an increased level of the neuroprotein sortilin in pancreatic cancer cells that may open up the way to developing more effective treatment.
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Discovery lays blame on supernova for extinction event nearly 360 million years ago
Between a decline in biodiversity and a series of extinction events, the Late Devonian period was not the most hospitable time on Earth. And then came one or more supernovae explosions whose resulting ionizing radiation was the final push that spelled the end for armored fish, most trilobites and other life.
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Study finds signs of altruism in people's COVID-19 worries
A new study demonstrates that people are more concerned about whether their family members could contract COVID-19 or if they are unknowingly spreading the virus themselves than they are with contracting it. The study, conducted by researchers from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
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Ichthyosaur's last meal is evidence of Triassic megapredation
Some 240 million years ago, a dolphin-like ichthyosaur ripped to pieces and swallowed another marine reptile only a little smaller than itself. Then it almost immediately died and was fossilized, preserving the first evidence of megapredation, or a large animal preying on another large animal.
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A quantum thermometer to measure the coldest temperatures in the universe
Physicists have proposed a thermometer based on quantum entanglement that can accurately measure temperatures a billion times colder than those in outer space.
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Routing apps can deliver real-time insights into traffic emissions
Routing apps such as Google Maps or Nokia's Here platform could offer a cost-effective way of calculating emissions hotspots in real time, say researchers.
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Trump Wanted FDA To Fast-Track Blood Plasma Therapy. What Is It?
The president criticized the FDA this week for not giving emergency use approval to an experimental treatment for COVID-19. Scientists argue that the therapy still lacks sufficient evidence. (Image credit: Arnulfo Franco/AP)
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How the COVID-19 Pandemic Has Affected Field Research
Unable to travel to international or remote sites, some researchers are losing critical data.
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Blue Origin Engineers Deliver Full-Scale Prototype Moon Lander to NASA
The Blue Origin-led Human Landing System (HLS) National Team just delivered to NASA a full-scale prototype of a lander that could one day carry American astronauts to the surface of the Moon. The 40-foot, full-scale mockup is made out of two different components: the Ascent Element (AE) and Descent Element (DE). The mockup will primarily serve as a platform to test out crew operations, i.e. how t
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Extraordinary fossil shows ancient marine reptile swallowing huge prey
An astonishing fossil shows a 5-metre-long ichthyosaur swallowed a 4-metre-long prey animal, but was injured and died before it could digest its massive meal
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Greenland lost more ice in 2019 than any other year on record
Greenland lost 15 per cent more ice in 2019 than the previous record, set in 2012. The loss of its ice sheet may already be unstoppable
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Eye-tracking mask could monitor people's reactions to what they see
A mask with fabric electrodes can monitor eye movements and heartbeat, which could be useful for studying people's responses to things that they view
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Five Places Where You Can Collect Fossils Around D.C.
The National Museum of Natural History may still be closed, but you don't have to venture far to make awesome finds yourself
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Watching an explainer video can boost your IQ score by 18 points
People who were taught the "rules" of a type of IQ test in which you guess the next in a series of shapes got a significantly higher score – throwing into question the validity of these tests
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New research finds association between COVID-19 hospital use and mortality
Researchers have found a statistical relationship between the number of hospital beds (ICU and non-ICU) occupied by COVID-19 patients in a state and reported mortality.
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3D printing 'greener' buildings using local soil
Scientists report progress toward a sustainable building material made from local soil, using a 3D printer.
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Anorexia may stunt young women's growth
Girls with anorexia nervosa can have stunted growth and may not reach their full height potential, according to a new study.
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Fossil leaves show high atmospheric carbon spurred ancient 'global greening'
Scientists studying leaves from a 23-million-year-old forest have for the first time linked high levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide with increased plant growth, and the hot climate off the time.
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The Postal Service helps keep millions of Americans alive and well
With a dysfunctional postal service, much of the population would lose access to much needed medications. (Pexels/) After recent attempts by the federal government to defund the United States Postal Service and make cuts to things like mail sorting and delivery frequency, the country's medical associations and health researchers have spoken out to raise awareness of the public health importance o
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This Plane Flies Itself. We Went for a Ride
Xwing is testing a Cessna that's controlled from the ground, not the cockpit. Its goal is to automate as much as possible, while keeping a human in the loop.
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Study: Unattractive people far overestimate their looks
Recent studies asked participants to rate the attractiveness of themselves and other participants, who were strangers. The studies kept yielding the same finding: unattractive people overestimate their attractiveness, while attractive people underrate their looks. Why this happens is unclear, but it doesn't seem to be due to a general inability to judge attractiveness. There's no shortage of disp
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Astronomers Detect "Bullets" of Gas Shooting Out of Our Galactic Center
Two giant blobs made up of a swirling complex of gases and cosmic rays sit centered above and below the plane of the Milky Way. These two " Fermi bubbles ," first spotted a decade ago, are clustered relatively close to the supermassive black hole lurking at the center of our galaxy called Sagittarius A*, a highly turbulent and energetic area of our galaxy. Now, astronomers have observed that thes
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Trapping and controlling light at the interface of atomically thin nanomaterials
In a recent study, scientists at Cornell University propose a novel method by which nanoscale light can be manipulated and transported.
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Research shows air pollution could play role in development of cardiometabolic diseases
Air pollution is the world's leading environmental risk factor, and causes more than nine million deaths per year. New research published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation shows air pollution may play a role in the development of cardiometabolic diseases, such as diabetes. Importantly, the effects were reversible with cessation of exposure.
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Development of serological assays to detect SARS-CoV-2 antibodies
Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, the CNRS, Inserm and Université de Paris conducted a pilot study to evaluate the reliability of several laboratory tests with the aim of gaining a better understanding of the profile of antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 and how the virus is spreading among the population. Four tests for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were developed and evaluated, as wel
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A healthy lifestyle for cardiovascular health also promotes good eye health
In a new study, investigators found that ideal cardiovascular health, which is indicative of a healthy lifestyle, was associated with lower odds for ocular diseases especially diabetic retinopathy. These findings appearing in The American Journal of Medicine, published by Elsevier, suggest that interventions to prevent cardiovascular diseases may also hold promise in preventing ocular diseases.
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Watch: 3D imaging reveals the ancient lives of Egyptian animal mummies
Researchers used 3D x-ray technology to digitally unwrap the preserved creatures
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Worries about telehealth are down, but barriers remain
One in four older Americans had a virtual medical visit in the first three months of the COVID-19 pandemic, most of them by video, a new telehealth poll finds. That's much higher than the 4% of people over 50 who said they had ever had a virtual visit with a doctor in a similar poll taken in 2019. "This has been an extraordinary time for the telemedicine movement, and these poll results show just
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Explainer: Hvorfor har Danmark ikke atomkraft?
Kernekraften skulle have gjort os uafhængig af olie. Men så åbnede Barsebäck.
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Meet Marta Pratelli – A Researcher Exploring the Roadmap of the Brain
Let me first introduce myself and tell you why I started to write about fellow scientists at UC San Diego. Choosing a profession isn't an easy decision for most people. Some people, however, have an early calling. I knew when I was twelve that I was going to study Biology. I was fascinated by all […]
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February lockdown in China caused a drop in some types of air pollution, but not others
Nitrogen dioxide, which comes from transportation, was half of what would be expected over China in February 2020. Other emissions and cloud properties, however, showed no significant changes.
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Generic public health messages work best at shifting dietary behaviors
A new health economics study warns that health information which offers specific advice tailored to individuals can inadvertently often backfire.
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Contact tracing apps unlikely to contain COVID-19 spread: UK researchers
Contract tracing apps used to reduce the spread of COVID-19 are unlikely to be effective without proper uptake and support from concurrent control measures, finds a new study by researchers in the United Kingdom. The systematic review shows that large-scale manual contact tracing alongside other public health control measures — such as physical distancing and closure of indoor spaces such as pubs
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Aerogel: the micro structural material of the future
Aerogel is an excellent thermal insulator. So far, however, it has mainly been used on a large scale, for example in environmental technology, in physical experiments or in industrial catalysis. Researchers have now succeeded in making aerogels accessible to microelectronics and precision engineering: A new article shows how 3D-printed parts made of silica aerogels and silica composite materials c
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Studying viral outbreaks in single cells could reveal new ways to defeat them
Many viruses mutate so quickly that identifying effective vaccines or treatments is like trying to hit a moving target. A better understanding of viral propagation and evolution in single cells could help. Now, scientists report a new technique that can detect minor changes in RNA sequences in living cells that might give viruses an edge.
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A new iron based superelastic alloy capable of withstanding extreme temperatures
Researchers have discovered a novel iron-based superelastic alloy (SEA) capable of withstanding extreme temperatures–both high and low.
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Australia's wish list of exotic pets
Unsustainable trade of species is the major pathway for the introduction of invasive alien species at distant localities at higher frequencies. It is also a major driver of over-exploitation of wild populations. In a new study scientists estimate the desire of Australians to own non-native and/or illegal pets and the major trends in this practice. In addition, the team suggests ways to improve bio
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More Pfizer/BioNTech Data On Their Actual Vaccine Candidate
When we last heard from the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine program, they had picked a different candidate than the one that they had already published on (BNT162b1). Today they've released more data about the actual candidate, BNT162b2. And it seems pretty clear why they went with it. This preprint describes a head-to-head study (NCT04368728) between their two candidates, in a rather wide-ranging trial
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Big data, small farms and a tale of two tomatoes | Erin Baumgartner
The path to better food is paved with data, says entrepreneur Erin Baumgartner. Drawing from her experience running a farm-to-table business, she outlines her plan to help create a healthier, zero-waste food system that values the quality and taste of small, local farm harvests over factory-farmed produce.
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US Army Scientist Brags That He's Trying to Build the Bad Guy From "Terminator 2"
Sky Not An Army engineer working on soft robotics says that his work is directly inspired by the T-1000, the shape-shifting (and fictional) robot villain from the 1991 James Cameron blockbuster "Terminator 2." Frank Gardea, an aerospace engineer at the Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's (CCDC) Army Research Laboratory, is leading a project to develop robotics out of flexible, self-rep
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Loss of Greenland Ice Sheet Reached a Record Last Year
The ice loss in 2019 was more than twice the annual average since 2003, scientists said.
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Secret to tardigrades' toughness revealed by supercomputer simulation
Tardigrades can survive extreme temperatures and the vacuum of space – a supercomputer simulation of the behaviour of 750,000 atoms in and around its DNA help explain why
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Beetlebot carries heavy loads using alcohol-powered artificial muscles
One of the world's smallest microrobots is able to carry 2.6 times its own body weight thanks to a muscular system powered by methanol
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Millions of missing female births predicted in India in next decade
There could be 6.8 million fewer girls born in India between 2017 and 2030 than would be expected without practices such as sex-selective abortion
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Secret to dinosaurs' huge size may be in unusually lightweight bones
We have discovered a new factor that helped dinosaurs attain gigantic sizes: their bones were built differently from other animals to be less dense without sacrificing strength
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A new type of plastic may be the first that is infinitely recyclable
A plastic that can be easily broken down and remoulded into high-quality products should make recycling easier and reduce plastic waste entering the environment
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We should rewild the sky to restore the atmosphere to its former glory
Let's take inspiration from the way we intervene to help degraded ecosystems recover and attempt to restore the atmosphere back to full health, writes Graham Lawton
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Covid-19 news: UK to expand random testing to identify virus outbreaks
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Cancer cells can pick up fatty coatings to spread further in the body
Some cancer cells spread through the lymphatic system where they can pick up a jacket of fatty acids that protect them against damage and let them travel further in the body
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Strange fast-moving clouds of gas may be suffocating the Milky Way
There are clouds of cold hydrogen gas hurtling at extraordinary speeds away from the centre of our galaxy, and this may be stifling star formation
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Has herd immunity really been achieved in some places?
Despite the claims that some places including pockets of London and New York have reached herd immunity to the coronavirus, the picture is far more complex
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Record melt: Greenland lost 586 billion tons of ice in 2019
Greenland lost a record amount of ice during an extra warm 2019, with the melt massive enough to cover California in more than four feet (1.25 meters) of water, a new study said.
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The Mathematical Structure of Particle Collisions Comes Into View
When particle physicists try to model experiments, they confront an impossible calculation — an infinitely long equation that lies beyond the reach of modern mathematics. Fortunately, they can generate largely accurate predictions without seeing this arcane math all the way through. By cutting the calculation short, scientists at CERN's Large Hadron Collider in Europe make forecasts that match ev
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Using estimation of camera movement to achieve multi-target tracking
Estimating the motion of a moving camera is a ubiquitous problem in the field of computer vision. With technology such as self-driving cars and autonomous drones becoming more popular, fast and efficient algorithms enabling on-board video processing are needed to return timely and accurate information at a low computational cost. This estimation of camera movement, or 'pose estimation', is also a
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Clear will and capacity to help emergency care in crisis
Operators beyond the confines of conventional emergency healthcare are willing and able to assist in a crisis, a University of Gothenburg study shows. Hotels, schools, and veterinary clinics are among those ready for inclusion in a crisis preparedness system, to enable emergency healthcare to be scaled up with the utmost speed.
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Affirmative action incentivizes high schoolers to perform better, new research shows
Affirmative action is a contentious issue across the globe, hotly debated in countries such as India, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Nigeria and Brazil, as well as in the United States. While the direct effects of affirmative action on college admissions are well known, new evidence from India shows that affirmative action has indirect benefits on the behavior of underrepresented high school students, who t
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New research finds association between COVID-19 hospital use and mortality
Researchers at the University of Minnesota and University of Washington found a statistical relationship between the number of hospital beds (ICU and non-ICU) occupied by COVID-19 patients in a state and reported mortality. Published today in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, this research is believed to be the first to use actual, state-level data to examine this association.
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February lockdown in China caused a drop in some types of air pollution, but not others
Nitrogen dioxide, which comes from transportation, was half of what would be expected over China in February 2020. Other emissions and cloud properties, however, showed no significant changes.
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CU student helps bridge teams at Clemson
Three teams of researchers at Clemson University have joined forces to unravel some of the mysteries surrounding perovskite nanocrystals, which are semiconductors with numerous applications, including LEDs, lasers, solar cells and photodetectors.
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Fewer serious asthma events in Philadelphia area following COVID-19 stay-at-home orders
Philadelphia and its surrounding counties issued a series of "stay-at-home" orders on March 17, 2020 in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19. In the months that followed, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) saw a marked decrease in healthcare visits for both outpatient and hospitalized asthma patients. New research from CHOP and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania suggests th
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Inconsistencies in data presentation could harm efforts against COVID-19
Since COVID-19 emerged late last year, there's been an enormous amount of research produced on this novel coronavirus disease. But the content publicly available for this data and the format in which it's presented lack consistency across different countries' national public health institutes, greatly limiting its usefulness, Children's National Hospital scientists report in a new study.
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University of Louisville immunologist summarizes functions of protein family for scientific community
Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) serve as a type of chaperone, coordinating the transport of fatty acids and other molecules between cells. Bing Li, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Louisville and a leading researcher in understanding the role of FABPs, has created a 'SnapShot' of the functions of these proteins published in the jo
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UMass Amherst scientists invent new sensing eye mask
From the team that invented physiology-sensing pajamas at UMass Amherst, now comes a new, lightweight eye mask that can unobtrusively capture pulse, eye movement and sleep signals, for example, when worn in an everyday environment. Senior authors, materials chemist Trisha L. Andrew and computer scientist Deepak Ganesan, say that "being able to track pulse and eye movement in a single wearable devi
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Larger variability in sea level expected as Earth warms
A team of researchers from the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) identified a global tendency for future sea levels to become more variable as oceans warm this century due to increasing greenhouse gas emissions.
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Robotic surgery may improve outcomes in mouth and throat cancer
Robotic surgery for patients with early stage, oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer is associated with improved health outcomes, including better long-term survival, according to a Cedars-Sinai study published Thursday in JAMA Oncology. Oropharyngeal cancer occurs in the back of the throat and includes the base of the tongue and tonsils.
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Projected estimates of African American graduates of closed historically black medical schools
An estimate of the number of African American students who would have graduated from historically Black medical schools that were closed during the period surrounding the 1910 Flexner report was the main outcome of this study.
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Animal mummies unwrapped with hi-res 3D X-rays
Three mummified animals from ancient Egypt have been digitally unwrapped and dissected by researchers, using high-resolution 3D scans that give unprecedented detail about the animals' lives – and deaths – over 2000 years ago. The three animals – a snake, a bird and a cat – are from the collection held by the Egypt Centre at Swansea University. Previous investigations had identified which animals t
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Black/white disparity in lung cancer incidence reversed or eliminated among young adults
A trend of higher lung cancer incidence rates in young Black people versus young white people in the United States has flipped, with the Black/white gap disappearing in men and reversing in women.
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Archaeology: X-ray imaging provides unique snapshot of ancient animal mummification
Analysis of three mummified animals – a cat, a bird and a snake – from Ancient Egypt using advanced 3D X-ray imaging is described in a paper published in Scientific Reports. The technique provides insights into the conditions in which the animals were kept, their complex mummification process and their possible causes of death, without causing damage to the specimens.
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Paying attention to the neurons behind our alertness
The neurons of layer 6 – the deepest layer of the cortex – were examined by researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University to uncover how they react to sensory stimulation in different behavioral states.
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Ichthyosaur's last meal is evidence of triassic megapredation
Some 240 million years ago, a dolphin-like ichthyosaur ripped to pieces and swallowed another marine reptile only a little smaller than itself. Then it almost immediately died and was fossilized, preserving the first evidence of megapredation, or a large animal preying on another large animal.
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Massive, well-preserved reptile found in the belly of a prehistoric marine carnivore
Paleontologists have found a giant ichthyosaur skeleton containing one of the longest fossils ever found in the stomach of a prehistoric marine reptile–the skeleton of a four-meter-long aquatic reptile called a thalattosaur. While the researchers can't say for sure whether it was scavenged or preyed upon, it could be the oldest direct evidence that Triassic marine reptiles like ichthyosaurs–prev
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A smart eye mask that tracks muscle movements to tell what 'caught your eye'
Integrating first-of-its-kind washable hydrogel electrodes with a pulse sensor, researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst have developed smart eyewear to track eye movement and cardiac data for physiological and psychological studies. The eyewear — known as Chesma and presented August 20 in the journal Matter–provides accurate measurements in an everyday environment without compro
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No more playing with fire: Study offers insight into 'safer' rechargeable batteries
Lithium-ion batteries are used in various electronic devices. But, they also come with potential hazards, particularly if the battery is damaged or overcharged. This usually occurs because, in its overcharged state, spiky structures called 'lithium dendrites' get deposited in the battery. Now, scientists at Okayama University use a technique called 'operando nuclear magnetic resonance' to track th
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Fossil leaves show high atmospheric carbon spurred ancient 'global greening'
Scientists studying leaves from a 23-million-year-old forest have for the first time linked high levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide with increased plant growth, and the hot climate off the time. The finding adds to the understanding of how rising CO2 heats the earth, and how the dynamics of plant life could shift within decades, when CO2 levels may closely mirror those of the distant past.
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Scientists reveal shifting spring phenology of Arctic tundra with satellite and ground observation
Phenology represents the seasonal dynamics of vegetation, and is an important indicator of local and regional climate change. With stronger warming trends at higher latitudes, the seasonality of vulnerable Arctic tundra is more sensitive. Many studies have reported advances in the start of growing season (SOS) in Northern Hemisphere, however, a delayed trend in SOS was reported in some recent stud
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Routing apps can deliver real-time insights into traffic emissions
Routing apps such as Google Maps or Nokia's Here platform could offer a cost-effective way of calculating emissions hotspots in real time, say researchers at the University of Birmingham.
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Catastrophic failures raise alarm about dams containing muddy mine wastes
Poor design and construction lead to deadly disasters
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Microscopic deformation of a neutron star inferred from a distance of 4500 light-years
Imagine that the size of a bacterium is measured from a distance of about 4500 light-years. This would be an incredible measurement, considering that a bacterium is so small that a microscope is required to see it, and what an enormous distance light can travel in 4500 years, given that it can round the Earth more than seven times in just one second.
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Researchers take a fresh look at the Michaelis-Menten equation
Researchers from Aarhus University challenge one of the cornerstones of biochemistry, the Michaelis-Menten equation. They show that many enzymes in signaling pathways are independent of substrate concentration, because the substrate is physically connected to the enzyme. With these results, it may one day be possible to develop drugs that not only target the enzyme, but also affect how it is conne
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Humans overshoot 2020 planetary 'budget' on August 22: report
Humanity will have burned through all the natural resources that the planet can replenish for 2020 by Saturday, according to researchers who said the grim milestone is slightly later than last year after the pandemic slowed runaway overconsumption.
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Climate change: 'Unprecedented' ice loss as Greenland breaks record
In a record breaking 2019, Greenland lost enough ice to cover the UK with over 2m of melt water.
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Scientists Uncover Massive Prey in the Belly of an Ancient Sea Monster
Finding suggests "megapredators" may have been more common in Mesozoic Era than previously thought. icthyosaur-stomach-cropped.jpg The stomach area of an icthyosaur fossil, where researchers found a bundle of bones belonging to a massive thalattosaur. Image credits: Da-Yong Jiang et al. Creature Thursday, August 20, 2020 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Inside the giant d
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Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 spreads more indoors at low humidity
The airborne transmission of the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 via aerosol particles in indoor environment seems to be strongly influenced by relative humidity, concludes the analysis of 10 most relevant international studies on the subject. Therefore, they recommend controlling the indoor air in addition to the usual measures such as social distancing and masks. A relative humidity of 40 to 60 percent c
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Researchers show children are silent spreaders of virus that causes COVID-19
Researchers provide critical data showing that children play a larger role in the community spread of COVID-19 than previously thought.
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Broccoli and Brussels sprouts a cut above for blood vessel health
New research has shown some of our least favorite vegetables could be the most beneficial when it comes to preventing advanced blood vessel disease.
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COVID-19: How South Korea prevailed while the United States failed
In a commentary, researchers demonstrate the stark differences in public health strategies from two democratic republics: South Korea and the United States, which have led to alarming differences in cases and deaths from COVID-19. After adjusting for the 6.5 fold differences in populations, the U.S. has suffered 47 times more cases and 79 times more deaths than South Korea.
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Study adds to evidence that cells in the nose are key entry point for SARS CoV-2
Scientists experimenting with a small number of human cell samples report that the 'hook' of cells used by SARS-CoV-2 to latch onto and infect cells is up to 700 times more prevalent in the olfactory supporting cells lining the inside of the upper part of the nose than in the lining cells of the rest of the nose and windpipe that leads to the lungs.
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Unique protein structures could hold the key to treatment for Parkinson's disease
Scientists have discovered a series of protein structures that are thought to be highly relevant to the onset of Parkinson's disease. It is hoped that further analysis of these structures will open up a new avenue for potential treatment for a disease that is the fastest growing neurological condition in the world, with no cure currently available.
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'Biorubber' glue created for faster surgical recovery and pain relief
Materials scientists have invented a new type of surgical glue that can help join blood vessels and close wounds faster and may also serve as a platform to deliver pain relief drugs.
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An active lifestyle reduces fearfulness in dogs – differences between breeds are great
The more dogs are engaged in activities and the more diverse experiences and canine friends they have, the less fearful they are in new situations and environments. Genes also play an important part.
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Defiance and low trust in medical doctors related to vaccine scepticism
A new study shows that individuals who react negatively to rules and recommendations and have lower trust in doctors more often use complementary and alternative medicine, that is, treatments or substances that are not included in the care offered or recommended by doctors.
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Air pollution linked to higher risk of young children developing asthma
Children exposed to higher levels of fine particles in the air (known as PM2.5) are more likely to develop asthma and persistent wheezing than children who are not exposed, finds a new study.
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Premature delivery linked to heightened risk of early death for mothers
Preterm and early term delivery are independent risk factors for premature death in women up to 40 years later, finds a new study.
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Lungfish fins reveal how limbs evolved
New research on the fin development of the Australian lungfis elucidates how fins evolved into limbs with hands with digits. The main finding is that in lungfish a primitive hand is already present, but that functional fingers and toes only evolved in land animals due to changes in embryonic development.
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A touch of gold sends crystals electric with excitement
A touch of gold – or another noble metal – can change the structure of a crystal and its intrinsic properties, physicists have demonstrated in a display of modern-day alchemy.
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Researchers take a fresh look at the Michaelis-Menten equation
Researchers from Aarhus University challenge one of the cornerstones of biochemistry, the Michaelis-Menten equation. They show that many enzymes in signaling pathways are independent of substrate concentration, because the substrate is physically connected to the enzyme. With these results, it may one day be possible to develop drugs that not only target the enzyme, but also affect how it is conne
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Prehistoric last meal: marine reptile fossil has beast in stomach
Discovery from Middle Triassic sheds new light on ocean predators millions of years ago Fresh evidence of the dog-eat-dog world of prehistoric oceans has been revealed by fossil hunters who have unearthed the remains of a giant marine reptile with another huge beast in its stomach. Dug up in south-western China in 2010, the animals are thought to have lived in the Middle Triassic. Continue readin
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Scans peek beneath wrappings of ancient mummified animals
Researchers say X-ray images of cat, bird and cobra shed light on their lives and deaths An ancient Egyptian "how-dunnit" has been solved, according to researchers who have used imaging techniques to peek beneath the wrappings of mummified animals. From birds to crocodiles, lions and beetles , the ancient Egyptians had a penchant for mummifying animals. While some were pets buried with their owne
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Greenland ice sheet lost a record 1m tonnes of ice per minute in 2019
Climate-driven loss is likely to be the worst for centuries, and is pushing up sea levels Greenland's melting ice sheet – in pictures The Greenland ice sheet lost a record amount of ice in 2019, equivalent to a million tonnes per minute across the year, satellite data shows. The climate crisis is heating the Arctic at double the rate in lower latitudes, and the ice cap is the biggest single contr
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Scientists invent new sensing eye mask
From the team that invented physiology-sensing pajamas at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, now comes a new, lightweight eye mask that can unobtrusively capture pulse, eye movement and sleep signals, for example, when worn in an everyday environment.
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Massive, well-preserved reptile found in the belly of a prehistoric marine carnivore
When paleontologists digging in a quarry in southwestern China uncovered the nearly complete skeleton of a giant, dolphin-like marine reptile known as an ichthyosaur, they didn't expect to find another fossil in its stomach. This second skeleton belonged to a four-meter-long, lizard-like aquatic reptile known as a thalattosaur and is one of the longest fossils ever found in the stomach of a prehis
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Animal mummies unwrapped with hi-res 3-D X-rays
Three mummified animals from ancient Egypt have been digitally unwrapped and dissected by researchers, using high-resolution 3-D scans that give unprecedented detail about the animals' lives—and deaths—over 2000 years ago.
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Immunologists summarize functions of protein family for scientific community
Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) serve as a type of chaperone, coordinating the transport of fatty acids and other molecules between cells. Bing Li, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Louisville and a leading researcher in understanding the role of FABPs, has created a "SnapShot" of the functions of these proteins published in the jo
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Immunologists summarize functions of protein family for scientific community
Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) serve as a type of chaperone, coordinating the transport of fatty acids and other molecules between cells. Bing Li, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Louisville and a leading researcher in understanding the role of FABPs, has created a "SnapShot" of the functions of these proteins published in the jo
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California Looks to Battle Mega Wildfires with Fire
As flames once again rage across the state, officials embrace a counterintuitive firefighting approach — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ever Seen Inside a Mummified Cat? Well Now You Have
Here's how scientists used a fancy microCT scanner to peer inside the remains of a cat, bird, and snake from ancient Egypt.
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Generic public health messages work best at shifting dietary behaviours
A new health economics study warns that health information which offers specific advice tailored to individuals can inadvertently often backfire.
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Contact tracing apps unlikely to contain COVID-19 spread
Contract tracing apps used to reduce the spread of COVID-19 are unlikely to be effective without proper uptake and support from concurrent control measures, finds a new study by UCL researchers. The systematic review*, published in Lancet Digital Health, shows that large-scale manual contact tracing alongside other public health control measures – such as physical distancing and closure of indoor
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California Looks to Battle Mega Wildfires with Fire
As flames once again rage across the state, officials embrace a counterintuitive firefighting approach — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Cloth Masks Do Protect the Wearer — Breathing in Less Coronavirus Means You Get Less Sick
When people wear masks, they can still get infected, but they're more likely to have milder symptoms.
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When covid-19 becomes a chronic illness
Scientists are investigating why some people suffer with the virus for many months
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California's Wildfire and Covid-19 Disasters Just Collided
Rare thunderstorms have peppered the California landscape with conflagrations, pouring smoke into the Bay Area—all as the state struggles with the pandemic.
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The Hunt for the Modern-Day Pirates Who Steal Millions of Tons of Fish From the Seas
These criminal actors threaten fragile species, forcing an international coalition to track them down
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Yes, climate change is almost certainly fueling California's massive fires
Thousands of lightning strikes have sparked hundreds of fires across California in recent days, producing several major clusters burning around the San Francisco Bay Area. The blazes quickly ripped through hundreds of thousands of acres, forcing thousands to evacuate, filling the skies with smoke, and raining down ash across much of the region. The fires follow a bone-dry winter in Northern Calif
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Studies of gut microbiota and contractility help deal with chronic constipation
Chronic constipation (CC) remains a serious medical and social problem because the complexity of diagnosis, the lack of a single approach to treatment, and unsatisfactory treatment results. The causes of constipation are varied – from the abnormal anatomical structure of the large intestine and its location in the abdominal cavity to impaired neurohumoral regulation of its motility, endocrine path
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A quantum thermometer to measure the coldest temperatures in the universe
The physicists' proposed thermometer is based on quantum entanglement and can accurately measure temperatures a billion times colder than those in outer space. It would be used to answer fundamental research questions and to study how matter behaves in extreme quantum states.
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Routing apps can deliver real-time insights into traffic emissions
Routing apps such as Google Maps or Nokia's Here platform could offer a cost-effective way of calculating emissions hotspots in real time, say researchers at the University of Birmingham.
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A metabolic enzyme as a potential new target for cancer immune therapies
The metabolic enzyme IL4I1 (Interleukin-4-Induced-1) promotes the spread of tumor cells and suppresses the immune system. This was discovered by scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH). The enzyme that activates the dioxin receptor is produced in large quantities by tumor cells. In the future, substances that inhibit IL4I1 could open up new o
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Yale-led surgical innovation promises better dialysis outcomes
A new technique developed by a Yale-led research team improves blood flow in surgically made blood vessels used in dialysis, enables them to last longer, and results in fewer complications than the standard technique.
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Mount Sinai researchers identify master regulator genes of asthma
The identified master regulators causally regulate the expression of downstream genes that modulate ciliary function and inflammatory response to influence asthma.
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Democrats Nail the Coronavirus Convention
Richard Nixon pulled the American political convention into the television era. COVID-19 has pulled the convention into the social-media era. Before 1968, political conventions were events . Things happened . Which meant that things could go wrong—very badly wrong, and wrong in front of a national television audience. Republicans suffered a disastrous convention in 1964: walkouts, booing, crazy s
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Shifting public health messaging about face coverings could improve uptake
Encouraging the public to see face masks as a social practice, which they can use to express their cultural background or their personality, could encourage more people to use them regularly, say researchers.
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Creating meaningful change in cities takes decades, not years, and starts from the bottom
New mathematical models reveal the links between the structure of cities and the dynamical nature of growth and inequality in human societies.
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Mystery gas discovered near center of Milky Way
Researchers have discovered a dense, cold gas that's been shot out from the center of the Milky Way 'like bullets'.
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Florida Is Releasing Almost a Billion Gene-Hacked Mosquitoes
Local authorities in the Florida Keys just approved a plan for biotech company Oxitec to release more than 750 million genetically modified mosquitoes over the next two years, CNN reports . The Environment Protection Agency approved the pilot project back in May after a years long approval process . The goal is to use mosquitoes that have had their genes altered so that female offspring die in th
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An 'Unprecedented' Effort to Stop the Coronavirus in Nursing Homes
Researchers are testing an experimental drug to halt sudden outbreaks. The trial may bring a new type of treatment for the virus.
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The Anointment of Kamala Harris
O ne by one , Democratic leaders who tried and failed to put a woman in the White House appeared on-screen at the Democratic National Convention last night to crown Kamala Harris as their successor. "I know a thing or two about the slings and arrows coming her way," said former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. "Kamala can handle them all." Despite the intense disappointment of 2016, many Democ
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Aerogel – the micro structural material of the future
Aerogel is an excellent thermal insulator. So far, however, it has mainly been used on a large scale, for example in environmental technology, in physical experiments or in industrial catalysis. Empa researchers have now succeeded in making aerogels accessible to microelectronics and precision engineering: An article in the latest issue of the scientific journal "Nature" shows how 3D-printed parts
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Superfast o-phthalaldehyde/N-nucleophile cross-linking strategy for biomedical hydrogels
Recently, Prof. Xuesi Chen and colleagues at the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, proposed a new crosslinking strategy based on the condensation reaction between o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) and N-nucleophiles for hydrogel formation.
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Scientists revealed shifting spring phenology of Arctic tundra with satellite and ground observation
Phenology, the seasonal and interannual dynamics of vegetation, is recognized as an important indicator of ecosystem response to climate change. With stronger warming trend at higher latitudes, the seasonality of vulnerable Arctic tundra is more sensitive. Now researchers in China have investigated the temporal and spatial variations of the spring phenology using multiple remote sensing indices an
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Defiance and low trust in medical doctors related to vaccine scepticism
A new study shows that individuals who react negatively to rules and recommendations and have lower trust in doctors more often use complementary and alternative medicine, that is, treatments or substances that are not included in the care offered or recommended by doctors. The study included altogether 770 parents of young children.
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New research showcases Italian town as blueprint for 'anchor entrepreneurship' framework
Study by The Business School (formerly Cass) uncovers how effective entrepreneurship can ignite economic growth of an entire community
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Dynamic kirigami shoe grip designed to reduce risks of slips and falls
The new kirigami-based shoe sole is intended to reduce the risks of slips and falls by adjusting as a person steps, increasing friction with pop-up spikes as necessary.
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Microscopic deformation of a neutron star inferred from a distance of 4500 light-years
Gravitational waves, which are ripples in spacetime, have recently provided a new window to the universe. But continuous gravitational waves, for example from a slightly deformed and spinning neutron star, a star which is incredibly dense, have so far not been detected. A recent research work by Prof. Sudip Bhattacharyya has inferred continuous gravitational waves from a neutron star and has estim
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COVID-19 Spit Tests Used by NBA Are Now Authorized by FDA
A new saliva-based diagnostic does not require a "brain-tickling" swab, and it can be used with a range of chemical reagents — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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'A journey around the world': Kew Gardens offers visitors an escape
Travel the World at Kew series will showcases plants from 10 countries across six continents Those unable to satisfy their wanderlust in these uncertain days of lockdown and travel quarantine are invited to immerse themselves in the sights, smells and spirit of faraway places – in a botanical sense at least – here in the UK. From colossal Californian redwoods, those imposing ancient giants of the
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The coronavirus responders
Countries that responded wisely to the pandemic run the gamut in terms of wealth, size, population, and style of government. What they shared was a swift, coordinated government response. Where that has been lacking, no amount of scientific expertise, technical knowhow, or wealth can prevent disaster, as the United States all too grimly shows. Krithika Varagur spoke to public health officials fro
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COVID-19 Spit Tests Used by NBA Are Now Authorized by FDA
A new saliva-based diagnostic does not require a "brain-tickling" swab, and it can be used with a range of chemical reagents — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Forskningsprojekt skal afkorte svartid på kræftmedicin fra timer til minutter
PLUS. Institut for Sundhedsteknologi går i spidsen for et nyt forskningsprojekt, der skal gøre det hurtigere og nemmere at monitorere, om kræftpatienter får den rette dosis medicin.
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GrillGrates Review: A Good Upgrade for Gas Grills
These replacement grates can upgrade a gas grill by improving its heat distribution. But not everyone will see the same results.
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Hydroxychloroquine Is Toast. Now Say Hi to Its 'Dirty' Cousin
Amodiaquine, a related treatment for malaria, can beat back Covid-19 in hamsters. But if this drug, too, gets overhyped, there will be awful consequences.
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When learning on your own is not enough
We make decisions based on not only our own learning experience, but also learning from others. Is social learning processed differently from direct learning? In a new study, published in "Science Advances", neuroscientist Lei Zhang of the University of Vienna provides empirical evidence that there are parallel computations for direct and social learning and they are carried out in distinct but in
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Researchers measure the global magnetic field in solar corona for the first time
An international team led by TIAN Hui, a professor from both Peking University and National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), has measured the global magnetic field of the solar corona for the first time.
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Vaccine developed for human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B)
A research group led by Professor MORI Yasuko (of the Division of Clinical Virology, Center for Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine) has revealed that the HHV-6B glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gQ1/gQ2 is an effective vaccine candidate for human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B). There are still no methods to treat nor prevent HHV-6B infection, and this study represents the first att
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An active lifestyle reduces fearfulness in dogs – differences between breeds are great
The more dogs are engaged in activities and the more diverse experiences and canine friends they have, the less fearful they are in new situations and environments. Genes also play an important part.
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Lipid-Oligonucleotides (LONs) — Promising materials for bioapplications
Lipid-oligonucleotides (LONs) are promising biological materials with special amphiphilic structures and unique functionalities of two moieties, contributing to different bioapplications (from biosensors to biomedicines). LONs have been employed in cellular microenvironment monitoring and mechanical forces measurements, and have shown potential in developing targeted theranostics as well as contro
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Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 spreads more indoors at low humidity
The airborne transmission of the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 via aerosol particles in indoor environment seems to be strongly influenced by relative humidity, concludes the analysis of 10 most relevant international studies on the subject. Therefore, they recommend controlling the indoor air in addition to the usual measures such as social distancing and masks. A relative humidity of 40 to 60 percent c
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Research reveals cilia's role in cardiovascular functions and genetic diseases
Research from Chapman University discover ciliary extracellular-like vesicles (cELVs). Released by fluid-shear, cELVs act as nano-compartments within a cilium. Proteomic identification reveals the role of cELVs in human genetic diseases and cardiovascular functions.
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We're Using Microbes to Clean Up Toxic Electronic Waste. Here's How
If you were to stack up all the electronic waste produced annually around the world it would weigh as much as all the commercial aircraft ever produced, or 5,000 Eiffel towers. This is a growing "tsunami" according to the UN , and it's fed by all the phones, tablets and other electronic devices that are thrown away each day. Of the 44.7 million metric tons of electronic waste (often shortened to
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Survey: Only 33% of Americans think return to school is safe
Nearly two-thirds of Americans do not believe it is safe for K-12 students to return to school, according to a new nationwide survey. Only 31% of people responding to the survey think returning to school is very safe or somewhat safe. The survey indicates that women, people with lower incomes, non-whites, and Democrats are less likely to consider sending their children back to school this fall. "
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Dounreay site available for reuse in the year 2333
The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority says the Dounreay facility will be ready for redevelopment by 2333.
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Flint water crisis: Michigan 'agrees to pay $600m'
The crisis left at least 12 dead and exposed tens of thousands of children to lead poisoning.
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Dementia education
School-based dementia education could deliver much needed empathy and understanding for older generations as new research from the University of South Australia shows it can significantly improve dementia knowledge and awareness among younger generations.
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Save the data: A new approach to database management in solid-state drives
The ever-increasing workload of data centers calls for new ways to store and access data. Researchers from the Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, have developed a new approach to manage databases in solid state drives, providing marked performance improvements in read/write delays and offloading database computation tasks from CPUs to increase efficiency and reduce power c
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Unique protein structures could hold the key to treatment for Parkinson's disease
Scientists at the University Bath have discovered a series of protein structures that are thought to be highly relevant to the onset of Parkinson's disease. It is hoped that further analysis of these structures will open up a new avenue for potential treatment for a disease that is the fastest growing neurological condition in the world, with no cure currently available.
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Move over Michaelis-Menten!
Researchers from Aarhus University challenge one of the cornerstones of biochemistry, the Michaelis-Menten equation. They show that many enzymes in signalling pathways are independent of substrate concentration, because the substrate is physically connected to the enzyme. With these results, it may one day be possible to develop drugs that not only target the enzyme, but also affect how it is conn
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Cyclohexyl phenyl sulfide cleavage studied for degradation of sulfur-containing heavy oil
So far, the KFU team has proven copper compounds are the most effective in producing catalysts for heavy oil extraction.
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Rapport: Sådan hjælper vi de truede insektarter
Insekterne i den danske natur er presset, men insekter er forskellige. Derfor bliver de påvirket forskelligt af menneskelig indgriben i naturen.
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Image: California on fire
Captured on 19 August 2020, this Copernicus Sentinel-3 image shows the extent of the smoke from fires currently ablaze in California, US.
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A new kind of plastic that is able to maintain its original qualities when recycled
A team of researchers from the U.S., China, and Saudi Arabia has developed a new kind of plastic that is able to maintain its original qualities when recycled. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes how the new plastic is made and how well it did when tested for recyclability.
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Mobiltelefonen kan stille diagnose med diabetes
Forskere har udviklet en algoritme, som ved hjælp af kameraet i en mobiltelefon med 80 pct. nøjagtighed kan identificere, om en person har diabetes.
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An active and social lifestyle reduces fearfulness in dogs, but differences between breeds are great
Noise sensitivity, fear of novel situations, and, for example, fear of slippery surfaces and heights are common behavioral problems among dogs. According to a behavioral survey of nearly 14,000 dogs conducted at the University of Helsinki, these non-social fears are associated with factors related to the dogs' living environment, lifestyle and breed.
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Scientists create water filtration membranes that can clean themselves
Scientists at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have developed a light-activated coating for filtration membranes—the kind used in water treatment facilities, at semiconductor manufacturing sites and within the food and beverage industry—to make them self-cleaning, eliminating the need to shut systems down in order to repair them.
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Study uncovers how effective entrepreneurship can ignite economic growth of an entire community
New research from The Business School (formerly Cass) has shed light on how Mirandola, a small town in the North East of Italy, became a major hub for the production of medical devices and sets a roadmap for the origins of industrialisation in small, quiet communities.
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Earliest art in British Isles discovered in Jersey
Prehistoric people in the British Isles were creating artistic designs on rock as early as 15,000 years ago, a study has discovered.
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DARPA Is Testing F-16s Flown by AI in Virtual Combat
Flight Simulator DARPA, the U.S. military's research division, is about to host a virtual dogfight where simulated F-16 fighter jets duke it out in a virtual environment to find out which is the, uh, top gun. It's all part of an initiative to develop AI algorithms that could replace — or at the very least assist — fighter pilots during combat, Popular Science reports . And this all-AI deathmatch
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Lugn och ro en bristvara i skolan
Det behövs mer ordning och reda i skolan. Det är både regeringen, elever och lärare överens om. Men hur ska det gå till? Forskarna menar att strängare regler och hårdare disciplin inte hjälper. Istället handlar det om att skapa goda relationer mellan lärare och elever, och att byta straff mot uppmuntran. Tre av tio elever i femman upplever att andra elever stör dem på lektionerna och i nian är de
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Vikten av musik vid begravning
Begravningsmusiken kan underlätta kommunikationen mellan familjen och den döende, och samtidigt ge en tröstande närvaro. Det visar en rapport från Kungl. Musikhögskolan där man undersökt vikten av musik vid begravningar. Har du upplevt att musik fått dig att släppa ut känslor som du länge tryckt undan eller brustit ut i tårar av ett musikstycke fast du inte riktigt förstår varför? Forskare vid Ku
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An active and social lifestyle reduces fearfulness in dogs, but differences between breeds are great
Noise sensitivity, fear of novel situations, and, for example, fear of slippery surfaces and heights are common behavioral problems among dogs. According to a behavioral survey of nearly 14,000 dogs conducted at the University of Helsinki, these non-social fears are associated with factors related to the dogs' living environment, lifestyle and breed.
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Heatwaves are an invisible killer, and the UK is woefully unprepared
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to cause suffering around the world, but another killer has silently struck in summer 2020. With relatively little by way of official warning or advice on how people can stay safe, recent heatwaves may have cost thousands of lives across the UK and western Europe. And these extreme weather events are arriving more often and in longer, deadlier bouts.
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A quantum thermometer to measure the coldest temperatures in the universe
Physicists from Trinity College Dublin have proposed a thermometer based on quantum entanglement that can accurately measure temperatures a billion times colder than those in outer space.
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Aerogel: The micro structural material of the future
Aerogel is an excellent thermal insulator. So far, however, it has mainly been used on a large scale, for example in environmental technology, in physical experiments or in industrial catalysis. Empa researchers have now succeeded in making aerogels accessible to microelectronics and precision engineering: An article in the latest issue of the scientific journal Nature shows how 3-D-printed parts
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Breakthrough in blue quantum dot technology
There are many things quantum dots could do, but the most obvious place they could change our lives is to make the colors on our TVs and screens more pristine. Research using the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan is helping to bring this technology closer to our living rooms.
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Dexamethasone and Hydroxychloroquine: Why Randomized Controlled Trials Matter
What does the best evidence tell us about hydroxychloroquine and dexamethasone?
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Study adds to evidence that cells in the nose are key entry point for SARS CoV-2
Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine, experimenting with a small number of human cell samples, report that the 'hook' of cells used by SARS-CoV-2 to latch onto and infect cells is up to 700 times more prevalent in the olfactory supporting cells lining the inside of the upper part of the nose than in the lining cells of the rest of the nose and windpipe that leads to the lungs.
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NTU scientists develop "biorubber" glue for faster surgical recovery and pain relief
Materials scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have invented a new type of surgical glue that can help join blood vessels and close wounds faster and may also serve as a platform to deliver pain relief drugs.
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COVID-19: How South Korea prevailed while the US failed
In a commentary, researchers demonstrate the stark differences in public health strategies from two democratic republics: South Korea and the United States, which have led to alarming differences in cases and deaths from COVID-19. After adjusting for the 6.5 fold differences in populations, the U.S. has suffered 47 times more cases and 79 times more deaths than South Korea.
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Fossil leaves show high atmospheric carbon spurred ancient 'global greening'
Scientists studying leaves from a 23-million-year-old forest have for the first time linked high levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide with increased plant growth, and the hot climate off the time.
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Anorexia may stunt young women's growth
Girls with anorexia nervosa can have stunted growth and may not reach their full height potential, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
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Argonne scientists create water filtration membranes that can clean themselves
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have designed a new, low-cost means to address membrane fouling through the application of a light-activated coating that can make the membrane self-cleaning.
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How Did Amelia Earhart Raise the Money for Her Flights?
You've got questions. We've got experts
9h
The History of the Asthma Inhaler
How a brilliant quip led to a treatment that helps millions every minute
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Topforskere vil forlade seruminstituttet
10 læger og topforskere fra Statens Serum Institut har anmodet Københavns Universitet om at overtage deres forskningsområder.
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Danmark får sit ­første professorat i immunopsykiatri
Forskningsverdenen er for alvor ved at få øjnene op for koblingen mellem immunforsvaret og psykiatriske sygdomme. Som konsekvens har Københavns Universitet udnævnt speciallæge i psykiatri Michael Eriksen Benros til Danmarks første professor i immunopsykiatri.
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Google Expands Its Fire-Tracking Tools in Maps and Search
A feature that maps wildfires in near-real time is getting a much bigger rollout as the western US continues to blaze.
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Office Life at the Pentagon Is Disconcertingly Retrograde
With no connectivity and little diversity, the military's hub may soon be a threat to national security.
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Trying to use your phone less? Get a smartwatch.
Look at that: This guy's not distracted by social media. (Björn Antonissen/Unsplash/) It's traditional to start an article like this by proclaiming that everyone spends too much time staring at screens. And, while some studies suggest there are negative consequences to doing so , I'm not here to debate the pros and cons of screen time. Instead, I'm here to show you how to stop looking at your dev
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'Mummified' plants give glimpse of Earth's future
Fossilised leaves suggest some plants may adapt to grow more quickly as CO2 levels rise.
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A new iron based superelastic alloy capable of withstanding extreme temperatures
Researchers from Tohoku University's Graduate School of Engineering have discovered a novel iron-based superelastic alloy (SEA) capable of withstanding extreme temperatures–both high and low.
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New Views of Our Mesmerizing, Maddening Minds
— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Expanding Paved Areas Has an Outsize Effect on Urban Flooding
Researchers have finally been able to determine just how much impervious surfaces exacerbate flood levels — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Views of Our Mesmerizing, Maddening Minds
— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Vi skal have tårnhøje ambitioner for psykiatrien
Vi havde aldrig tilladt, at sygehusene f.eks. afslutter en kræftpatients strålebehandling før tid, fordi den næste patient skal ind ad døren. Det er desværre virkeligheden for mange psykiatriske patienter i dag, og det kan vi ikke være bekendt.
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Some Indian jumping ant workers can transition to a queen-like state
A team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania has found that some Indian jumping ant workers can transition to a queen-like state if their queen dies. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of Harpegnathos saltator ants, and what they learned about them.
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Some Indian jumping ant workers can transition to a queen-like state
A team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania has found that some Indian jumping ant workers can transition to a queen-like state if their queen dies. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of Harpegnathos saltator ants, and what they learned about them.
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Some bacteria sacrifice themselves to protect their brethren from antibiotics
Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered how some cells within a bacterial swarm will sacrifice themselves so that other cells in the swarm have a better chance of surviving onslaught by antibiotics, in a discovery important for efforts to address antibiotic resistance.
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Study of ancient Mayan facial expressions suggests some are universal
A pair of researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, has found evidence that suggests some human facial expressions are universal across cultures. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Alan Cowen and Dacher Keltner describe their online study in which workers labeled faces they were shown with a given emotion.
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Classic short-scale electric guitars you can buy right now
Start with a strum. (Thomas Millot via Unsplash/) In the world of electric guitar, short scale guitars have carved out a reputation for offering players a leaner, snappier, and overall easier playing experience. While it's true that the smaller form and shorter neck can make these instruments ideal for taking on the road or for players with smaller hands, their unique benefits don't end there. Sh
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The best children's utensils sets for neat eating
Utensils made for them. (Providence Doucet via Unsplash/) It's no secret that toddlers are notoriously messy diners who'd rather squish, squeeze, and slam their food than actually eat it. But with the right set of children's utensils, your kid's meal time can go from sticky and slimy to scrumptious and tidy. Here are our favorites fork, spoon, and knife sets for little independent eaters. Made wi
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Some bacteria sacrifice themselves to protect their brethren from antibiotics
Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have discovered how some cells within a bacterial swarm will sacrifice themselves so that other cells in the swarm have a better chance of surviving onslaught by antibiotics, in a discovery important for efforts to address antibiotic resistance.
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What's behind China's record floods?
China has touted its massive dam network as a remedy for its devastating annual floods, but record deluges have once again killed hundreds of people and submerged thousands of homes this year.
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Silly and strategic card games for family game night
For the best family game nights. (Hugues de Buyer-Mimeure Via Unsplash /) It's Friday night and the house is…quiet. Instead of separately and silently scrolling on your devices, why not break out some card games for a rousing family game night? Not only do interactive games help kids develop motor and problem solving skills, they also create invaluable bonding moments and encourage healthy comp
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Soil data reveals secrets in ancient Israel
Fresh insight gleaned from rocks and soil mapped across Israel will help reveal more information about ancient humans, animals and evolution in the Middle East region.
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'Supergene' variation makes these songbirds more aggro
Differentiation of a single gene changes behavior in a wild songbird, determining whether the white-throated sparrow displays more, or less, aggression, according to a new study. The researchers singled out an estrogen receptor from a complex of more than 1,000 genes known as a "supergene," or genetic material inherited together as a block. The work provides a rare look at how genomic divergence
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How a simple nudge can motivate workers to save for retirement
Motivating people to save for retirement isn't easy. Fraught decisions around when to start a nest egg, how much to set aside, and where to invest can be so overwhelming that inertia often sets in.
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People trust decisions made by groups, but information markets are more accurate
Organizations that use ad hoc groups or committees to make decisions might do better to crowdsource their decisions, says forthcoming UC Riverside-led research.
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Plants take in less carbon in a warming world
As world temperatures rise, the rate at which plants in certain regions can absorb carbon dioxide is declining, according to University of Queensland research.
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How consumer expectations are evolving throughout the COVID-19 crisis
From savings and job security to staying safe in the age of social distancing, there's a lot for consumers to worry about during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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How a Plan to Save the Power System Disappeared
This article is a collaboration between The Atlantic and InvestigateWest . O n August 14, 2018, Joshua Novacheck, a 30-year-old research engineer for the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, was presenting the most important study of his nascent career. He couldn't have known it yet, but things were about to go very wrong. At a gathering of experts and policy makers in Lawrence, Kansas, Nov
11h
What Happens If Uber and Lyft Flee California? Look at Austin
The ride-hail services are threatening to stop service in the Golden State to protest a judge's ruling. They did something similar in Texas in 2016.
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Higher prices hint at the impact of coronavirus
Sharp rise in UK inflation may be a sign of trouble to come
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Advice for reading group for undergraduates
submitted by /u/malwaare [link] [comments]
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Open Access Conference by Stanford: "Triangulating Intelligence"
submitted by /u/MostlyAffable [link] [comments]
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Haim Sompolinsky on Neural Representation of Categories
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Online Neuropsychological Tests – Interview with Jaap Murre
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[Pre-Print] Neural Mechanism of Dreaming
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John Vervaeke: The Cognitive Science of Capitalist Realism
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The Science of Dreams
submitted by /u/InsightfulThinkers [link] [comments]
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What are you reading? | Cogsci Community Thread | Aug 17, 2020
Reading anything interesting? Books, articles, journal papers – all welcome! Share your all time favorite cog sci reading list! submitted by /u/MostlyAffable [link] [comments]
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Do Psychedelic Worlds Really Exist?
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Psychology and education discord server!
submitted by /u/iwishiknew__ [link] [comments]
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The grasshopper that was lost, then found, is now endangered
The Key's Matchstick Grasshopper, or the Keyacris scurra, was once widespread and abundant in New South Wales, the Australian Capital Territory and north-central Victoria, but over the past century its numbers have seriously declined.
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The grasshopper that was lost, then found, is now endangered
The Key's Matchstick Grasshopper, or the Keyacris scurra, was once widespread and abundant in New South Wales, the Australian Capital Territory and north-central Victoria, but over the past century its numbers have seriously declined.
11h
The Sun May Have Had Its Twin Ripped Away Billions of Years Ago
For the entirety of human history, we've looked up and seen just a single sun, but a new study claims we almost had a second . This scenario, put forward by astronomers at the Center for Astrophysics at Harvard & Smithsonian, features our solar system forming as a binary with another star that eventually drifted away. This might explain some of the more perplexing things about the solar system li
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Are the doors closing on the open office?
As workers return to their offices after the initial phase of lockdowns implemented to stop the spread of coronavirus, there is a new reckoning in the workplace: Will the open office survive?
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The story in the bones of lizards and frogs
It is no surprise that Australia is sometimes called "The Land of the Lizards."
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Size may not matter when estimating community energy use
Ecologists often want to understand how a community functions. For example, how much food does a community of animals consume every day? Or how much oxygen do plants produce every day? These functions are often assessed by measuring the energy use (or metabolism) of a community, and it is typically thought that energy use is closely related to the size of the organism.
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The story in the bones of lizards and frogs
It is no surprise that Australia is sometimes called "The Land of the Lizards."
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Size may not matter when estimating community energy use
Ecologists often want to understand how a community functions. For example, how much food does a community of animals consume every day? Or how much oxygen do plants produce every day? These functions are often assessed by measuring the energy use (or metabolism) of a community, and it is typically thought that energy use is closely related to the size of the organism.
11h
Opening Schools During a Pandemic
This is the big question facing many countries, but especially the US – how do we reopen schools while still in the middle of a pandemic? This is a serious dilemma. The American Academy of Pediatrics urges that , especially younger children, have the opportunity for in-person learning. This is important not only for their education but their socialization and development. The other important vari
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Kvinnor i ekonomiskt överläge har ökad risk att drabbas av partnervåld
Kvinnor som befinner sig i ett ekonomiskt överläge gentemot sin manliga partner, löper större risk för våld i hemmet, enligt en ny avhandling i nationalekonomi. Risken för våld mot kvinnor ökar då kvinnors relativa ekonomiska position förbättras, jämfört med deras partner. Det visar nationalekonomen Sanna Ericsson i sin avhandling "Reaching for Equality". – Min studie visar att en bakslagseffekt
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Forskare: "Havsmat ska föda jordens befolkning"
Ett tjugotal ekonomi- och miljöforskare har tittat på hur 10 miljarder människor ska kunna få tillräckligt med proteiner år 2050. Deras modeller visar att mat från havet är en stor del av svaret. Främst hållbar odling av musslor och fisk med hjälp av teknikutveckling och bättre miljöregler.
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Lægestafetten: Corona har medført ­mange ting, der ikke står i jobbeskrivelsen
Klinisk biokemiker Mads Nybo har under coronakrisen brugt en stor del af sin arbejdstid på at etablere et af de store covid-19-testcentre. Trods alt er han kommet godt igennem krisen. Han er spændt på fremtiden, når nye generationer af læger ikke ønsker at arbejde 50 timer om ugen, som han gør, men kun de aftalte 37 timer.
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Schools Have No Good Options for Reopening during COVID-19
Bringing students back into classrooms or keeping them home can both have negative consequences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Schools Have No Good Options for Reopening during COVID-19
Bringing students back into classrooms or keeping them home can both have negative consequences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Regulation of the MLH1-MLH3 endonuclease in meiosis
Reconstitution of the activation of the MLH1–MLH3 endonuclease shows how crossovers are formed during meiosis.
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How racism and classism affect natural ecosystems
Structural racism and classism could profoundly affect the existence of flora and fauna in our cities, according to a recent landmark publication in the academic journal Science.
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To preserve tropical forests, empower local communities
The world's tropical forests offer immense value to humanity, and the evidence of this is now overwhelming. Drugs derived from plants in tropical forests are used to treat cancer, diabetes and more. Trees sequester carbon, and the forests help to regulate regional and even global climate systems. One estimate of the ecosystem services these forests provide—the direct and indirect contributions the
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Regulation of the MLH1-MLH3 endonuclease in meiosis
Reconstitution of the activation of the MLH1–MLH3 endonuclease shows how crossovers are formed during meiosis.
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Challenges in the development of electrocatalysts
Regenerative energy harvesting often generates more electricity than is directly needed. Electrochemical processes could be used to store the excess energy or make it usable. Although intensive research on the catalysts required for this has been going on for 20 years, progress is only being made in small steps. What would have to change in research to develop efficient, stable and selective catal
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Scientists develop 'biorubber' glue for faster surgical recovery and pain relief
Materials scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have invented a new type of surgical glue that can help join blood vessels and close wounds faster and may also serve as a platform to deliver pain relief drugs.
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How racism and classism affect natural ecosystems
Structural racism and classism could profoundly affect the existence of flora and fauna in our cities, according to a recent landmark publication in the academic journal Science.
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The Worst Animal in the World
F or about a week this past September, I adopted a wellness routine that—at the time—felt like neurotic overkill. I didn't bother with masks or hand sanitizer; back then, the virus we now know as SARS-CoV-2 was still presumably nestled in the warm body of an unknown animal. Instead, each morning, I spritzed my arms and legs with picaridin, a chemical repellent meant to ward off parasitic bugs. Th
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Rybelsus er kommet til Danmark
Novo Nordisk har lanceret tabletversionen af semaglutid i Danmark.
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Machine-learning model finds SARS-COV-2 growing more infectious
A novel machine learning model developed by researchers at Michigan State University suggests that mutations to the SARS-CoV-2 genome have made the virus more infectious.
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Australia's farmers want more climate action, and they're starting in their own (huge) backyards
The National Farmer's Federation says Australia needs a tougher policy on climate, today calling on the Morrison government to commit to an economy wide target of net-zero greenhouse gas emission by 2050.
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Self-excited dancing droplets
Controlling the movement of liquid droplets is important in many applications that generate heat, from power plant condensers to personal computers. Techniques to control droplets on surfaces today include using good old-fashioned gravity, hydrophobic chemical coatings, and temperature gradients.
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Coal elimination treaty needed urgently
A new proposed Coal Elimination Treaty could make a major contribution to preventing dangerous climate change and save millions of lives, according to two UNSW Canberra academics.
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Machine-learning model finds SARS-COV-2 growing more infectious
A novel machine learning model developed by researchers at Michigan State University suggests that mutations to the SARS-CoV-2 genome have made the virus more infectious.
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Stone tools reveal how island-hopping humans made a living
Prehistoric axes and beads found in caves on a remote Indonesian island suggest this was a crucial staging post for seafaring people who lived in this region as the last ice age was coming to an end.
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Miljoner att spara om artros behandlas via app
87 miljoner kronor per år skulle den traditionella vården kunna spara ifall hälften av den nuvarande grundbehandlingen för patienter med artros genomfördes digitalt via en app istället för traditionellt på klinik. Det visar en ny studie av forskare vid Lunds universitet.
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Water contaminant could have neurotoxic effects on children
Manganese isn't considered a major water contaminant in America, but a new study is taking a closer look at whether it should be.
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How to Stop Butt Dialing Everyone with Your Smartphone
The age of touchscreens hasn't stopped pocket dialing. Here's how you can put an end to it once and for all.
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While Big Tech Prospers, an Eviction Crisis Looms Next Door
Over 40,000 families in Silicon Valley are at risk of losing their homes. Could tech offices, vacated during the pandemic, offer some emergency relief?
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The Race to Collect the Pandemic's History—as It Unfolds
From protest signs to bottles of Purell, archivists and curators are hurrying to preserve the artifacts of 2020 before they're lost.
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Bail Out Parents
Getty / The ATlantic If parenting were an industry, America's moms and dads would all be filing for bankruptcy. First came the closures of schools and child-care programs in the spring, followed by many summer camps and pools never opening, and now a fall during which huge swaths of the country will have all-virtual schooling. Many parents are completely depleted—mentally and financially. Typical
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Mobilise traditional African medicine against Covid-19
Practitioners' expertise is real and can bolster the deficit in other medical personnel
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How to Ensure the U.S.'s Quantum Future
It hinges on the country remaining a global beacon for international STEM talent — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Anti-racist Arguments Are Tearing People Apart
T he viral YouTube video was cued to begin at 42:23, the moment most likely to elicit incredulity. A webcam was tight on the face of Robin Broshi, a middle-aged white woman. She was upset. The edge in her voice sought to explain, to emphasize, to insist , that a wrong had been done. "It hurts people," she said, "when they see a white man bouncing a brown baby on their lap and they don't know the
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Why Some People Get Terribly Sick from COVID-19
Beyond factors such as age and sex, underlying aspects of biology and society influence disease severity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Arbejdspladser fortalte ikke medarbejdere om GPS- og TV-overvågning
Fem virksomheder og offentlige myndigheder får kritik af Datatilsynet, der har undersøgt, om arbejdspladserne gør nok for at fortælle deres medarbejdere om overvågning og kontrolindsandser.
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DSB sætter hangardronninger til salg: 11 "meget velfungerende" IC4-tog søger ny ejer
PLUS. Alt er relativt, også i togverdenen, lyder det fra DSB's chef for togmateriel, som dog ikke vil tage ansvar for mæglerens glade salgstekst om det italienske skandaletog.
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Eget nät ger trygghet i kristider
Strömavbrott på grund av stormar. Brist på kemikalier som renar dricksvatten på grund av pandemier. Kristider innebär påfrestningar på de stora samhällssystemen. Småskaliga lösningar för energi och avlopp kan bli räddare i nöden. För Robert von Bahr blev beslutet att bygga ett plusenergihus.
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Spider researcher uses legal threats, public records requests to prevent retractions
The case of Jonathan Pruitt, a spider researcher suspected of fabricating data in potentially dozens of studies, keeps getting weirder. Pruitt, according to our count, now has six retractions. Currently associate professor and Canada 150 Research Chair at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, he made a name for himself by providing other scientists with field … Continue reading
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When the Misdiagnosis Is Child Abuse
This article is a collaboration between The Atlantic and The Marshall Project . "M y baby is not breathing," Josue Santiago told the Racine, Wisconsin, 911 operator. "Oh my God, man, please send somebody. Please. Elihu. Elihu," he said, repeating his son's name. Until moments before the call, April 11, 2017, had been unremarkable in Santiago's household. He got home from his night shift at a foun
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Covid-19 News: Live Updates
Overburdened health care specialists are finding themselves on the front lines as schools reopen. India's crisis is now spreading to the hinterlands along its southern coastline.
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Pediatric Doctors Group Apologizes for Racist Past Toward Black Physicians
The American Academy of Pediatrics recently joined other prominent medical organizations in confronting its history of discrimination.
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Studying viral outbreaks in single cells could reveal new ways to defeat them
Many viruses, including HIV and influenza A, mutate so quickly that identifying effective vaccines or treatments is like trying to hit a moving target. A better understanding of viral propagation and evolution in single cells could help. Today, scientists report a new technique that can not only identify and quantify viral RNA in living cells, but also detect minor changes in RNA sequences that mi
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Studying viral outbreaks in single cells could reveal new ways to defeat them
Many viruses, including HIV and influenza A, mutate so quickly that identifying effective vaccines or treatments is like trying to hit a moving target. A better understanding of viral propagation and evolution in single cells could help. Today, scientists report a new technique that can not only identify and quantify viral RNA in living cells, but also detect minor changes in RNA sequences that mi
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America's Homes Need to Go on an Energy Diet
America's leaky, inefficient homes produce one-fifth of the country's energy-related greenhouse gas emissions and use almost twice as much energy per home as those in Europe. A new study shows how to reduce that carbon footprint — and the answer isn't just solar panels and renewable energy.
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Symbiotic microalgal diversity within lichenicolous lichens and crustose hosts on Iberian Peninsula gypsum biocrusts
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71046-2
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Monitoring membrane viscosity in differentiating stem cells using BODIPY-based molecular rotors and FLIM
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70972-5
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Generation of interconnected vesicles in a liposomal cell model
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70562-5
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A prediction model of outcome of SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia based on laboratory findings
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71114-7
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C57BL/6J substrain differences in response to high-fat diet intervention
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70765-w
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Twigs-derived activated carbons via H3PO4/ZnCl2 composite activation for methylene blue and congo red dyes removal
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71034-6 Twigs-derived activated carbons via H 3 PO 4 /ZnCl 2 composite activation for methylene blue and congo red dyes removal
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Non-linear changes in modelled terrestrial ecosystems subjected to perturbations
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70960-9
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Så går det att förutspå ödesdigra solstormar
Den magnetiska energin som frigörs vid solstormar har potential att slå ut elnät, internet och flygtrafik. Men nu har forskare utvecklat en metod som kan hjälpa till att förutspå rymdväder. Upptäckten kan på sikt göra oss bättre förberedda på att skydda sårbara samhällsfunktioner. Solen är en förutsättning för allt liv på jorden. Men vår 4,6 miljarder år gamla följeslagare kan också orsaka proble
13h
Genetic background influences disease risk from single-gene variants
Life can change dramatically when someone learns they are genetically predisposed to a disease. But these kinds of predictions are complicated: not everyone carrying such high-risk single-gene variants develops the condition. Researchers have now identified how a person's genetic background, in addition to any high-risk variants they carry, influences the risk of disease for three different condit
13h
3D printing 'greener' buildings using local soil
The construction industry is currently facing two major challenges: the demand for sustainable infrastructure and the need to repair deteriorating buildings, bridges and roads. Concrete has a large carbon footprint, resulting in high waste and energy expenditure. Today, scientists report progress toward a sustainable building material made from local soil, using a 3D printer. The researchers will
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Studying viral outbreaks in single cells could reveal new ways to defeat them (video)
Many viruses mutate so quickly that identifying effective vaccines or treatments is like trying to hit a moving target. A better understanding of viral propagation and evolution in single cells could help. Now, scientists report a new technique that can detect minor changes in RNA sequences in living cells that might give viruses an edge. The researchers will present their results today at the Ame
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3-D printing 'greener' buildings using local soil
The construction industry is currently facing two major challenges: the demand for sustainable infrastructure and the need to repair deteriorating buildings, bridges and roads. While concrete is the material of choice for many construction projects, it has a large carbon footprint, resulting in high waste and energy expenditure. Today, researchers report progress toward a sustainable building mate
14h
Nanorör levererar molekyler till stamcellernas inre
Med en ny nanoteknikbaserad metod har forskare vid Lunds universitet lyckats leverera biomolekyler till mänskliga blodstamceller. Metoden bibehåller cellernas funktion utan någon negativ påverkan, vilket har stor potential både inom grundforskning och kliniskt. Utvecklingen av nya terapeutiska biomolekyler – som gensaxen CRISPR – har gått otroligt snabbt de senaste åren men begränsas av svårighet
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Evidence that the TRPV1 S1-S4 membrane domain contributes to thermosensing
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18026-2 The TRPV1 ion channel is a heat-sensing receptor that is also activated by vanilloid compounds, but the molecular underpinnings of thermosensing have remained elusive. Here authors use in solution NMR on the isolated human TRPV1 S1-S4 domain and show that this domain undergoes a non-denaturing temperature-depe
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Genes with spiralian-specific protein motifs are expressed in spiralian ciliary bands
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17780-7 Spiralians have ciliary bands, used for locomotion and feeding, but defining molecular features of these structures are unknown. Here, the authors report a gene, Lophotrochin, that contains a protein domain only found in spiralians, and specifically expressed in diverse ciliary bands across the group, which pr
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Large cation ethylammonium incorporated perovskite for efficient and spectra stable blue light-emitting diodes
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17943-6 Blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are critical for displays. Employing a large organic cation into a quasi-two dimensional perovskite with green emission, Chu et al. achieve LEDs exhibiting a high external quantum efficiency of 12.1% and stable spectra in the sky-blue region.
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Inhibition of inflammatory CCR2 signaling promotes aged muscle regeneration and strength recovery after injury
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17620-8 Chronic inflammation is a feature of age-related regenerative decline in skeletal muscles, but how it directly affects resident muscle stem cell fate and function is unclear. Here, the authors show that Ccr2 signaling in muscle stem cell derived progenitors represses terminal myogenic differentiation, and that
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Photo-acoustic dual-frequency comb spectroscopy
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17908-9 Here, the authors show that the resolution and speed limitations in broadband photo-acoustic spectroscopy can be overcome by combining dual-comb spectroscopy with photo-acoustic detection. This enables broadband detection and allows for rapid and sensitive multi-species molecular analysis across all wavelength
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Unsymmetrical polysulfidation via designed bilateral disulfurating reagents
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18029-z The functionalization of a sulfur-sulfur motif is synthetically challenging but highly desired for the production of bioactive compounds. Here, the authors report a disulfurating reagent for sequential and modular assembly of polysulfides where the S-S motif is functionalized with different C-, N- and S-nucleo
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A pan-cancer analysis of PBAF complex mutations and their association with immunotherapy response
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17965-0 The clinical benefit from immunotherapy response in patients with mutations of genes forming the chromatin remodelling complex PBAF remains controversial. Here the authors show that PBAF complex mutations are not associated with favourable response in pan-cancer cohorts of patients treated with immune-checkpoi
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Iron phthalocyanine with coordination induced electronic localization to boost oxygen reduction reaction
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18062-y Iron phthalocyanine with a 2D structure and symmetric electron distribution around Fe-N4 active sites is not optimal for O2 adsorption and activation. Here, the authors report an axial Fe–O coordination induced electronic localization strategy to enhance oxygen reduction reaction performance.
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Optimering af algoritme kan spare det nordiske elnet for millioner årligt
PLUS. Det nordiske elnet kan udnyttes mere optimalt ved at tilføre lidt ny matematik i Nordpools markedsalgoritme, så den også medregner nettab.
14h
Khan Academy founder's tips for educating kids in pandemic
Sal Khan's first inkling that COVID-19 was going to disrupt education around the world came in February, when the popular online learning platform he created saw a surge in traffic from South Korea.
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99mTc-labeled nanocolloid drugs: development methods
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70991-2 99m Tc-labeled nanocolloid drugs: development methods
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Using sediment grain size characteristics to assess effectiveness of mechanical sand barriers in reducing erosion
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71053-3
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Feasibility of a new free mobility procedure to evaluate the function of the autonomic nervous system in patients with syncope
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70701-y
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High genetic burden of type 2 diabetes can promote the high prevalence of disease: a longitudinal cohort study in Iran
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70725-4
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Mild maternal sleep-disordered breathing during pregnancy and offspring growth and adiposity in the first 3 years of life
Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70911-4
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California slammed by wildfires, heat, unhealthy smoky air
Northern Californians were confronted with multiple threats as wildfires, unhealthy smoky air, extreme heat, the looming possibility of power outages and an ongoing pandemic forced many to weigh the risks of staying indoors or going outside.
14h
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: The animals at risk from Alaska oil drilling
As Donald Trump pushes forward with plans for drilling in the Alaskan wilderness, what is at stake?
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Hurricane Genevieve lashing Mexico's Baja with wind and rain
Hurricane Genevieve lost punch as it closed in on the southern end of Mexico's Baja California Peninsula, though it is still lashed the tourist region with heavy rains and strong winds in what was likely to be a close pass keeping the storm just offshore.
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Science Says: People stoking brew that makes California burn
If you want to build a fire, you need three things: Ignition, fuel and oxygen. But wildfire in California is a much more complex people-stoked witch's brew.
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Sustained planetwide storms may have filled lakes, rivers on ancient Mars
A new study from The University of Texas at Austin is helping scientists piece together the ancient climate of Mars by revealing how much rainfall and snowmelt filled its lake beds and river valleys 3.5 billion to 4 billion years ago.
14h
This cuttlefish is flamboyant on special occasions only
The flashy Flamboyant Cuttlefish is among the most famous of the cephalopods (octopus, squid, and cuttlefish)—but it is widely misunderstood by its legions of fans.
15h
Quick fixes won't stop sexual harassment in academia, experts say
While many academic institutions are searching for ways to prevent sexual assault and sexual coercion among their faculty members, staff and students, they are failing to address the most common forms of gender-based harassment, say experts who study harassment and discrimination at work and in academic and health care settings.
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This cuttlefish is flamboyant on special occasions only
The flashy Flamboyant Cuttlefish is among the most famous of the cephalopods (octopus, squid, and cuttlefish)—but it is widely misunderstood by its legions of fans.
15h
Galaxerna som vaknade igen
Stjärnor bildas genom att förtätningar i rymdens glesa gas drar till sig mer material, ända tills det finns tillräckligt för att gasen ska kollapsa till ett klot och tända en fusionsprocess. Men om gasen är för varm – om partiklarna i gasen rör sig för fort – kan den inte samlas i tillräckligt täta moln.
15h
Cruise ship operator Genting Hong Kong halts payments on debts
Latest blow for industry reeling from coronavirus pandemic as Malaysian-controlled company seeks debt restructuring
15h
Breakthrough for law enforcement to rapidly distinguish hemp vs. controlled marijuana
As hemp-based products experience heightened popularity among consumers, leading forensic scientists collaborate to solve a growing problem for law enforcement, hemp farmers, private citizens and overburdened national labs.
15h
Australia's wish list of exotic pets
Unsustainable trade of species is a major pathway for the introduction of invasive alien species at distant localities and at higher frequencies. It is also a major driver of over-exploitation of wild native populations. In a new study, published in the peer-reviewed open-access scholarly journal Neobiota, scientists estimated the desire of Australians to own non-native and/or illegal alien pets a
15h
Increasing graduation rates of students of color with more faculty of color
A new analysis published in Public Administration found that student graduation rates improve as more faculty employed by a college or university share sex and race/ethnic identities with students.
15h
Small enzyme-mimicking polymers may have helped start life
Most effort in origins of life research is focused on understanding the prebiotic formation of biological building blocks. However, it is possible early biological evolution relied on different chemical structures and processes, and these were replaced gradually over time by aeons of evolution. Recently, chemists Irena Mamajanov, Melina Caudan and Tony Jia at the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI
15h
Australia's wish list of exotic pets
Unsustainable trade of species is a major pathway for the introduction of invasive alien species at distant localities and at higher frequencies. It is also a major driver of over-exploitation of wild native populations. In a new study, published in the peer-reviewed open-access scholarly journal Neobiota, scientists estimated the desire of Australians to own non-native and/or illegal alien pets a
15h
UK coronavirus: students get GCSE results as BTecs are delayed – live news
Nearly 550,000 pupils in England will receive GCSE results awarded entirely by assessment for first time, but BTec students face further disruption Ofqual ignored exams warning a month ago amid ministers' pressure Disadvantaged pupils will be biggest winners from GCSE results Follow global coronavirus developments See all our coronavirus coverage 8.51am BST The threat to Gavin Willamson's positio
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Remember the '90s, Don't Long for a Return
"If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus," Edward Gibbon writes in The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire . "The vast extent of the Roman empire was governed by absolute power, under t
18h
Barack Obama Is Scared
Barack Obama didn't try to inspire Americans tonight: He wanted to scare them. The former president offered no thousand-watt smiles or soaring rhetoric as he exhorted voters to elect Joe Biden and warned them about the perils of giving Donald Trump another four years in the White House. In a stark, sober address from Philadelphia during the virtual Democratic National Convention, a man elected a
18h
Ancient gene family protects algae from salt and cold in an Antarctic lake
Glycerol, used in the past as antifreeze for cars, is produced by a range of organisms from yeasts to vertebrates, some of which use it as an osmoprotectant—a molecule that prevents dangerous water loss in salty environments—while others use it as an antifreeze. Here, scientists from the University of Nevada and Miami University in Ohio show that two species of the single-celled green algae Chlamy
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Ancient gene family protects algae from salt and cold in an Antarctic lake
Glycerol, used in the past as antifreeze for cars, is produced by a range of organisms from yeasts to vertebrates, some of which use it as an osmoprotectant—a molecule that prevents dangerous water loss in salty environments—while others use it as an antifreeze. Here, scientists from the University of Nevada and Miami University in Ohio show that two species of the single-celled green algae Chlamy
18h
Australia's wish list of exotic pets
Unsustainable trade of species is the major pathway for the introduction of invasive alien species at distant localities at higher frequencies. It is also a major driver of over-exploitation of wild populations. In a new study, published in the open-access journal Neobiota, scientists estimate the desire of Australians to own non-native and/or illegal pets and the major trends in this practice. In
18h
Broccoli and Brussels sprouts a cut above for blood vessel health
New research from Edith Cowan University has shown some of our least favourite vegetables could be the most beneficial when it comes to preventing advanced blood vessel disease.
18h
Declining US plant breeding programs impacts food security
Decreasing access to funding, technology, and knowledge in U.S. plant breeding programs could negatively impact our future food security.
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Small enzyme-mimicking polymers may have helped start life
Most origins of life research is focused on understanding the prebiotic formation of biological building blocks. However, it is possible that early biological evolution relied on chemical compounds that are no longer used by modern biology. Recent research at ELSI has found that small highly branched polymers, which can be formed under the types of conditions thought common on primitive Earth, are
18h
Ancient gene family protects algae from salt and cold in an Antarctic lake
Two species of Chlamydomonas algae from the ice-covered, hypersaline Lake Bonney in Antarctica use variants of an ancient gene family to synthetize the protective molecule glycerol, one of several adaptations that allow them to thrive in this extreme environment. The surprising ability of many microorganisms, such as these lake algae, to survive under extreme conditions has led many scientists to
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Ericsson: »Det svarer til at lukke veje for offentligheden, hvis vi giver industrien 5G-frekvenser.«
PLUS. Både teleselskaber og industrien venter spændt på, om Energistyrelsen vil åbne for private 5G-frekvenser.
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Covid-19 ethics: digital contact tracing (part 2) – podcast
The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted many of the economic, health, and social disparities faced by minorities and those living in more deprived areas. Although track-and-trace apps have the potential to reduce the spread of Covid-19, there remain questions about what role digital contact-tracing systems might have in reducing – or increasing – inequality, and who an app will really work for.
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The Battle That Changed Kamala Harris
C alls from the White House come in with the number blocked. People who are used to getting them know to pick up. And invitations to sit in the first lady's box for the State of the Union address don't come around very often. People who get them know to say yes. Kamala Harris received one of those invitations at the end of January 2012. She was in Washington, D.C., for meetings at the Justice Dep
18h
Covid-19 ethics: digital contact tracing (part 2)
The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted many of the economic, health, and social disparities faced by minorities and those living in more deprived areas. Although track-and-trace apps have the potential to reduce the spread of Covid-19, there remain questions about what role digital contact-tracing systems might have in reducing – or increasing – inequality, and who an app will really work for. I
19h
Why is the 'anti-vaxxer' movement growing during a pandemic?
US concerns that Trump will rush to approve a vaccine before election is playing into wider safety fears
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Extend eviction ban or risk coronavirus increase, health bodies warn
Medical groups and housing charities say no one who has lost income because of Covid should be made homeless
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Visualizing 175 Years of Words in Scientific American
A graphical tour of popular words paired with key moments in the history of the magazine — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Conflict Between Kamala Harris and Joe Biden Is Inevitable
Updated on August 19, 2020 at 11:18 p.m. ET When Kamala Harris spoke at the Democratic National Convention tonight, she projected an image of absolute harmony with presidential nominee Joe Biden, the man who has lifted her to newfound fame and potential great power. Tomorrow night, Biden will glory in his history-making decision. The two candidates will bask in their mutual regard. But if they're
21h
Circadian regulation of c-MYC in mice [Medical Sciences]
The circadian clock is a global regulatory mechanism that controls the expression of 50 to 80% of transcripts in mammals. Some of the genes controlled by the circadian clock are oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Among these Myc has been the focus of several studies which have investigated the effect of…
21h
Contrast trees and distribution boosting [Statistics]
A method for decision tree induction is presented. Given a set of predictor variables x=(x1,x2,⋅⋅⋅,xp) and two outcome variables y and z associated with each x, the goal is to identify those values of x for which the respective distributions of y | x and z | x, or selected…
21h
Bicontinuous phase separation of lithium-ion battery electrodes for ultrahigh areal loading [Engineering]
Ultrathick battery electrodes are appealing as they reduce the fraction of inactive battery parts such as current collectors and separators. However, thick electrodes are difficult to dry and tend to crack or flake during production. Moreover, the electrochemical performance of thick electrodes is constrained by ion and electron transport as…
21h
Phosphorylated CtIP bridges DNA to promote annealing of broken ends [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The early steps of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in human cells involve the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex and its cofactor, phosphorylated CtIP. The roles of these proteins in nucleolytic DSB resection are well characterized, but their role in bridging the DNA ends for efficient and correct repair is much less…
21h
Synthetic conversion of leaf chloroplasts into carotenoid-rich plastids reveals mechanistic basis of natural chromoplast development [Plant Biology]
Plastids, the defining organelles of plant cells, undergo physiological and morphological changes to fulfill distinct biological functions. In particular, the differentiation of chloroplasts into chromoplasts results in an enhanced storage capacity for carotenoids with industrial and nutritional value such as beta-carotene (provitamin A). Here, we show that synthetically inducing a…
21h
One gene, multiple ecological strategies: A biofilm regulator is a capacitor for sustainable diversity [Microbiology]
Many bacteria cycle between sessile and motile forms in which they must sense and respond to internal and external signals to coordinate appropriate physiology. Maintaining fitness requires genetic networks that have been honed in variable environments to integrate these signals. The identity of the major regulators and how their control…
21h
Molecular causes of an evolutionary shift along the parasitism-mutualism continuum in a bacterial symbiont [Microbiology]
Symbiosis with microbes is a ubiquitous phenomenon with a massive impact on all living organisms, shaping the world around us today. Theoretical and experimental studies show that vertical transmission of symbionts leads to the evolution of mutualistic traits, whereas horizontal transmission facilitates the emergence of parasitic features. However, these studies…
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Opportunities and limitations of genetically modified nonhuman primate models for neuroscience research [Perspectives]
The recently developed new genome-editing technologies, such as the CRISPR/Cas system, have opened the door for generating genetically modified nonhuman primate (NHP) models for basic neuroscience and brain disorders research. The complex circuit formation and experience-dependent refinement of the human brain are very difficult to model in vitro, and thus…
21h
Bacteria- and temperature-regulated peptides modulate {beta}-catenin signaling in Hydra [Developmental Biology]
Animal development has traditionally been viewed as an autonomous process directed by the host genome. But, in many animals, biotic and abiotic cues, like temperature and bacterial colonizers, provide signals for multiple developmental steps. Hydra offers unique features to encode these complex interactions of developmental processes with biotic and abiotic…
21h
Multiomic blood correlates of genetic risk identify presymptomatic disease alterations [Systems Biology]
Transitions from health to disease are characterized by dysregulation of biological networks under the influence of genetic and environmental factors, often over the course of years to decades before clinical symptoms appear. Understanding these dynamics has important implications for preventive medicine. However, progress has been hindered both by the difficulty…
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IL-12 p40 monomer is different from other IL-12 family members to selectively inhibit IL-12R{beta}1 internalization and suppress EAE [Immunology and Inflammation]
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common human demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The IL-12 family of cytokines has four members, which are IL-12 (p40:p35), IL-23 (p40:p19), the p40 monomer (p40), and the p40 homodimer (p402). Since all four members contain p40 in different forms, it is important…
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Enhancer dependence of cell-type-specific gene expression increases with developmental age [Developmental Biology]
How overall principles of cell-type–specific gene regulation (the "logic") may change during ontogeny is largely unexplored. We compared transcriptomic, epigenomic, and three-dimensional (3D) genomic profiles in embryonic (EryP) and adult (EryD) erythroblasts. Despite reduced chromatin accessibility compared to EryP, distal chromatin of EryD is enriched in H3K27ac, Gata1, and Myb…
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News Feature: Foreseeing fires [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
To predict future wildfires, researchers are building models that better account for the vegetation that fans the flames. Wildfire ripped through the black spruce forests of Eagle Plains, Yukon Territory, Canada in 1990. Fire came again in 2005. By the time plant ecologist Carissa Brown arrived in the summer of…
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A {beta}-barrel for oil transport through lipid membranes: Dynamic NMR structures of AlkL [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The protein AlkL is known to increase permeability of the outer membrane of bacteria for hydrophobic molecules, yet the mechanism of transport has not been determined. Differing crystal and NMR structures of homologous proteins resulted in a controversy regarding the degree of structure and the role of long extracellular loops….
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Opinion: Use science to stop sexual harassment in higher education [Social Sciences]
Sexual harassment abounds in academia. We know this from a 2018 report published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (1). As members of the committee who authored that report,* we have presented its findings to colleges and universities around the country. It has been deeply gratifying to…
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Illuminating the allosteric modulation of the calcium-sensing receptor [Pharmacology]
Many membrane receptors are regulated by nutrients. However, how these nutrients control a single receptor remains unknown, even in the case of the well-studied calcium-sensing receptor CaSR, which is regulated by multiple factors, including ions and amino acids. Here, we developed an innovative cell-free Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based conformational…
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