Search Posts

Nyheder2020august22

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS?
Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

Police can track cars nationwide with new license plate surveillance network
Some police departments use automatic license plate readers to track suspects. A company called Flock Safety is now allowing police departments to opt in to a national network, which shares data on car movements. Privacy advocates are concerned about the potential for errors and abuse. Earlier this month, a man shot a police officer in Pell City, Alabama, and fled the scene. Police didn't know wh
52min
The Dreaded Lanternbug, Scourge of Agriculture, Spreads in New Jersey
The insect poses a serious threat to American crops, particularly vineyards, and inspires creative backyard methods of eliminating them.
28min
30min
Sponsored

LATEST

Why Antibody Tests Won't Help You Much
Most antibody tests are useful only for large population surveys, diagnosis in certain children or when initial diagnostic testing fails, according to an expert panel.
22min
'It's absurd': Coronavirus researcher shut down by US funding agency vents frustrations
Nature, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02473-4 Peter Daszak, president of small research organization EcoHealth Alliance, says he has been caught in political crosshairs over his partnership with a virology lab in China.
37min
Publisher Correction: A dynamically cold disk galaxy in the early Universe
Nature, Published online: 22 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2693-y
58min
Publisher Correction: The effect of large-scale anti-contagion policies on the COVID-19 pandemic
Nature, Published online: 22 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2691-0
58min
Author Correction: Molecular heterogeneity drives reconfigurable nematic liquid crystal drops
Nature, Published online: 22 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2659-0
58min
Genomic analysis reveals many animal species may be vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 infection
Analysis of ACE2, the main receptor that SARS-CoV-2 uses to bind and enter cells, across 410 vertebrate species reveals that many are potentially susceptible to infection by the novel coronavirus. They include a number of endangered and threatened species, notably apes and old world primates. The study could also reveal potential intermediate hosts and animal models for the virus.
1h
Tiny engineered therapeutic delivery system safely solves genetic problems in mice
Inserting genetic material into the body to treat diseases caused by gene mutations can work, scientists say – but getting those materials to the right place safely is tricky. Scientists now report that the lipid-based nanoparticles they engineered, carrying two sets of protein-making instructions, showed in animal studies that they have the potential to function as therapies for two genetic disor
1h
Ozone across northern hemisphere increased over past 20 years
In a first-ever study using ozone data from commercial aircraft, researchers found that levels of the pollutant in the lowest part of Earth's atmosphere have increased across the Northern Hemisphere over the past 20 years. That's even as tighter controls on emissions of ozone precursors have lowered ground-level ozone in some places, including North America and Europe.
1h
What to Know About Stuttering
The speech disorder can play havoc with sociability, relationships, even identity, but there are ways to handle it.
1h
Facebook's 'Kill Switch' Solves the Wrong Problem
If the election is disputed, the company may shut down all political advertising. Meanwhile, more harmful vectors of misinformation continue to spread.
1h
Tiny engineered therapeutic delivery system safely solves genetic problems in mice
Inserting genetic material into the body to treat diseases caused by gene mutations can work, scientists say – but getting those materials to the right place safely is tricky. Scientists now report that the lipid-based nanoparticles they engineered, carrying two sets of protein-making instructions, showed in animal studies that they have the potential to function as therapies for two genetic disor
1h
Study: Names change how an infant's memory encodes objects
Humans begin to encode for categories and individuals at an early age. A new study shows that language, specifically naming conventions, plays a role in how infants' memories encode objects either within groups or as individuals. Even before we speak our first words, the way words are used around us begin to shape our representation of the world. The human mind brims with fascinating mental tools
2h
Argonne scientists use artificial intelligence to strengthen power grid resiliency
A new artificial neural network model, created by Argonne scientists, handles both static and dynamic features of a power system with a relatively high degree of accuracy.
2h
Jeffrey Epstein's Harvard Connections Show How Money Can Distort Research
Letting the rich pay for science that interests them is a bad idea—even if they aren't convicted sex offenders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
The Uncanny Escapism of 'Flight Simulator 2020'
Despite its pitch for realism, the most endearing parts of Microsoft's popular flying experience are the imperfections.
2h
Optimizing Lab Ultrafiltration Workflows: From Molecule Separation to Diagnostics
This webinar will provide the latest guidance on innovative methods, products, tools, and considerations needed to optimize lab ultrafiltration workflows, with a particular emphasis on cell culture molecules.
2h
Nutrients make coral bleaching worse
Nutrients can aggravate the already negative effects of climate change on corals to trigger mass coral bleaching. A study suggests ecosystem managers can reduce the impacts of coral bleaching by implementing strategies to reduce nutrient stress in areas subject to thermal stress.
2h
Nasal vaccine against COVID-19 prevents infection in mice
Scientists have developed a vaccine that targets the SARS-CoV-2 virus, can be given in one dose via the nose and is effective in preventing infection in mice susceptible to the novel coronavirus. The investigators next plan to test the vaccine in nonhuman primates and humans to see if it is safe and effective in preventing COVID-19 infection.
2h
Arctic ocean moorings shed light on winter sea ice loss
The eastern Arctic Ocean's winter ice grew less than half as much as normal during the past decade, due to the growing influence of heat from the ocean's interior, researchers have found.
2h
The age of Earth's inner core revised
By creating conditions akin to the center of Earth inside a laboratory chamber, researchers have improved the estimate of the age of our planet's solid inner core, putting it at 1 billion to 1.3 billion years old.
2h
Early NK cell-mediated immune response may contribute to severe COVID-19
Researchers may have come one step closer toward understanding how the immune system contributes to severe COVID-19. In a new study, researchers show that so-called natural killer (NK) cells were strongly activated early after SARS-CoV-2 infection but that the type of activation differed in patients with moderate and severe COVID-19. The discovery contributes to our understanding of development of
2h
Researchers generate attosecond light from industrial laser
Researchers are making the cutting-edge field of attosecond science more accessible to researchers from all disciplines.
2h
Gaps in early surveillance of coronavirus led to record-breaking US trajectory
New research provides insight into how limited testing and gaps in surveillance during the initial phase of the COVID-19 epidemic resulted in so many cases going undetected.
2h
Hubble snaps close-up of celebrity comet NEOWISE
The Hubble Space Telescope has snapped the closest images yet of the sky's latest visitor to make headlines, comet NEOWISE, after it passed by the Sun. This is the first time Hubble has photographed a comet of this brightness at such resolution after this close of a pass by the Sun.
2h
California fires spread, fouling air and spurring evacuations
Thick smoke blanketed large areas of central and northern California on Friday as more people fled some of the biggest fires in the state's history which have raged largely uncontrolled through the week.
2h
Researchers generate attosecond light from industrial laser
Researchers are making the cutting-edge field of attosecond science more accessible to researchers from all disciplines.
2h
An extinct reptile's last meal shows it was a grip-and-tear killer
Nature, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02436-9 Fossilized ichthyosaur offers a prehistoric 'Kinder Surprise' for researchers.
2h
Electricity is achieved drop by drop
Nature, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02413-2 Rain-fuelled nanogenerators could power small electrical devices.
2h
Researchers generate attosecond light from industrial laser
University of Central Florida researchers are making the cutting-edge field of attosecond science more accessible to researchers from all disciplines.
3h
Arctic ocean moorings shed light on winter sea ice loss
The eastern Arctic Ocean's winter ice grew less than half as much as normal during the past decade, due to the growing influence of heat from the ocean's interior, researchers have found.
3h
Placebos really can help your fitness
What do Bugs Bunny and athletic trainers have in common? (Muti/) Popular Science 's Play issue is now available to everyone. Read it now, no app or credit card required. In the 1996 film Space Jam , Bugs Bunny supplies his demoralized Looney Tunes teammates with Michael Jordan's "Secret Stuff," which delivers the boost they need to win the game. But unbeknownst to Daffy and the gang, it's just wa
3h
Genomic analysis reveals many animal species may be vulnerable to SARS-CoV-2 infection
Analysis of ACE2, the main receptor that SARS-CoV-2 uses to bind and enter cells, across 410 vertebrate species reveals that many are potentially susceptible to infection by the novel coronavirus. They include a number of endangered and threatened species, notably apes and old world primates. The study could also reveal potential intermediate hosts and animal models for the virus.
3h
COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
37.7 Million Adults Living With School-Age Children and 2.9 Million K-12 Teachers Have Medical Conditions That Raise Their Risk of Severe COVID-19; Review provides advice for managing the postpandemic mental health crisis among clinicians
3h
Gaps in early surveillance of coronavirus led to record-breaking US trajectory
Research from the University of Notre Dame provides insight into how limited testing and gaps in surveillance during the initial phase of the epidemic resulted in so many cases going undetected.
3h
UCF researchers generate attosecond light from industrial laser
University of Central Florida researchers are making the cutting-edge field of attosecond science more accessible to researchers from all disciplines. Their method to help open up the field is detailed in a new study published today in the journal Science Advances.
3h
NASA nighttime imagery finds Tropical Storm Laura developing
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a nighttime view of Tropical Depression 13 early on Aug. 21. By 11 a.m. EDT, it had strengthened into Tropical Storm Laura.
3h
Why Coronavirus Superspreading Events Happen
The coronavirus appears to transmit unevenly: A few people can infect many, while others don't pass the virus on at all. Researchers are working to understand the factors that drive superspreading.
3h
750 Million GM Mosquitoes Will Be Released in the Florida Keys
There have been no reports of health or environmental harm in other locations where genetically modified mosquitoes have been introduced over the last decade.
3h
COVID-19 pooling test method from Ben-Gurion U. IDs asymptomatic carriers
P-BEST can be configured on the basis of the carrier rate. The lower the carrier rate, the higher efficiency. The pooling method has been tested using an advanced liquid-handling robotic system that can perform the task in an hour and can be performed in a typical clinical diagnostic laboratory anywhere in the world.
3h
Early NK cell-mediated immune response may contribute to severe COVID-19
Researchers may have come one step closer toward understanding how the immune system contributes to severe COVID-19. In a study published in Science Immunology, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden show that so-called natural killer (NK) cells were strongly activated early after SARS-CoV-2 infection but that the type of activation differed in patients with moderate and severe COVID-19. T
3h
The age of the Earth's inner core revised
By creating conditions akin to the center of the Earth inside a laboratory chamber, researchers have improved the estimate of the age of our planet's solid inner core, putting it at 1 billion to 1.3 billion years old.
3h
SETI Telescope Down for Months After Mysterious Damage
Out Of Commission The Arecibo Observatory, which has been for decades a crucial tool for SETI researchers hunting for extraterrestrial life, will be out of commission for months after unexplained structural damage. Earlier this month, a thick support cable came crashing down and tore through the antenna that the observatory uses to send and receive transmissions, The New York Times reports . The
3h
COVID-19 symptoms appear in a specific order, study finds
USC researchers identify a distinct order in which COVID-19 symptoms present themselves. SARS-CoV-2 affects the digestive tract in a way that distinguishes it from other similar infections. If you experience these symptoms in this order, call your doctor. One of the scary things about COVID-19 is that the early symptoms it presents are also common indicators of a flu or infection: fever, cough, a
3h
The Question at the Heart of the Postal Service Crisis
Y es, the mail really has slowed down recently. No, the delays are not part of a dastardly plot to steal the election on behalf of President Donald Trump. That was the two-pronged message that Louis DeJoy, the new postmaster general, delivered this morning to the Senate—and, by extension, American voters—as he confronted a national uproar over whether the Postal Service can, and will, handle a su
3h
Answering the Many Questions About 'The One and Only Ivan'
The new Disney+ film about a talented gorilla might leave you wondering about the real great ape that inspired the story. We have answers.
3h
Economists Predict "Tsunami" of Unemployment
Mass Unemployment The US economy may be in for a rough ride in the coming months. According to a press release by the US Department of Labor, the number of unemployed people in the country making claims for the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) program is growing exponentially. The program, which falls under the CARES Act, supports unemployed Americans who already used up 26 wee
4h
Outbreaks at U.S. Colleges Force Sudden Changes and Send Students Scrambling: Covid-19 Live Updates
Outbreaks at U.S. colleges are forcing sudden changes and sending students scrambling. With cases surging, Europe braces for a new phase in the pandemic.
4h
California Wildfires Can Create Their Own Terrifying Weather
Sparked by freak thunderstorms, the blazes changed wind patterns and could potentially lead to fire tornadoes and pyrocumulonimbus clouds.
4h
Arctic ocean moorings shed light on winter sea ice loss
The eastern Arctic Ocean's winter ice grew less than half as much as normal during the past decade, due to the growing influence of heat from the ocean's interior, researchers have found.
4h
NASA nighttime imagery finds Tropical Storm Laura developing
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a nighttime view of Tropical Depression 13 early on Aug. 21. By 11 a.m. EDT, it had strengthened into Tropical Storm Laura.
4h
Urine sediment test results, diagnoses vary significantly across nephrologists
A new study shows that nephrologists do not always agree on their interpretation of images from urine sediment tests, which are frequently ordered to evaluate a variety of kidney diseases. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center and published in JAMA Network Open, the findings indicate the need to standardize education and training around evaluating urine sediment tests to improve the test's r
4h
Coronavirus News Roundup, August 15-August 21
Pandemic highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
40,000 Russians Are About to Get That Untested COVID-19 Vaccine
Beginning next week, 40,000 volunteers will take the coronavirus vaccine that was recently approved and lauded by the Russian government. The vaccine, which Russia has dubbed Sputnik V, is going to be distributed in a randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled clinical study, Ars Technica reports . Such large-scale experiments are a crucial part of making sure that a vaccine or any other
4h
Algorithm Detects Heart Disease by Analyzing Selfies
Researchers have developed a new deep learning algorithm that can detect heart disease just by analyzing four photographs of a patient's face. "To our knowledge, this is the first work demonstrating that artificial intelligence can be used to analyse faces to detect heart disease," Zhe Zheng, vice director of the National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases in Beijing, China, and lead author of a
4h
Nasal vaccine against COVID-19 prevents infection in mice
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a vaccine that targets the SARS-CoV-2 virus, can be given in one dose via the nose and is effective in preventing infection in mice susceptible to the novel coronavirus. The investigators next plan to test the vaccine in nonhuman primates and humans to see if it is safe and effective in preventing COVID-19 infection
4h
Trauma may increase cognitive decline with age
People who experience trauma in child- and adulthood may experience a greater amount of cognitive decline as they age than individuals who haven't experienced trauma, a new study found. The research also showed that recent trauma in adulthood has a larger impact on some aspects of cognitive functioning than trauma in childhood. "We found that the more adverse events experienced, such as your pare
4h
Women experience adverse drug reactions nearly twice as frequently as men. Here's why.
A new study investigates adverse drug reactions in women and men. Women are on average lighter in weight and have smaller organs and more body fat, which affects the absorption and distribution of drugs. The authors suggest more individualized dosage recommendations moving forward. The double-blind study has been under fire for years due to the replication crisis : numerous clinical studies canno
4h
California Wildfires Threaten UC Campus, Telescopes
Thousands of acres have burned across the northern part of the state, forcing the evacuation of the University of California, Santa Cruz, and posing a serious threat to Lick Observatory.
4h
Detailed map of natural killer cells in COVID-19 patients expands understanding of innate immune response to SARS-CoV-2
A new study of 27 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 has provided a detailed map of natural killer (NK) cell responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection, revealing that specific characteristics of NK cell activation associate with different levels of disease severity.
4h
Nutrients make coral bleaching worse
Nutrients can aggravate the already negative effects of climate change on corals to trigger mass coral bleaching. A study suggests ecosystem managers can reduce the impacts of coral bleaching by implementing strategies to reduce nutrient stress in areas subject to thermal stress.
4h
Tiny engineered therapeutic delivery system safely solves genetic problems in mice
Inserting genetic material into the body to treat diseases caused by gene mutations can work, scientists say – but getting those materials to the right place safely is tricky. Scientists report in the journal Science Advances that the lipid-based nanoparticles they engineered, carrying two sets of protein-making instructions, showed in animal studies that they have the potential to function as the
4h
Ozone across northern hemisphere increased over past 20 years
In a first-ever study using ozone data from commercial aircraft, CIRES researchers found that levels of the pollutant in the lowest part of Earth's atmosphere have increased across the Northern Hemisphere over the past 20 years. That's even as tighter controls on emissions of ozone precursors have lowered ground-level ozone in some places, including North America and Europe.
4h
Covid-19 news: UK cases level off as R number rises slightly
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
4h
Hubble snaps close-up of comet NEOWISE
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the closest images yet of the sky's latest visitor to make the headlines, comet C/2020 F3 NEOWISE, after it passed by the Sun. The new images of the comet were taken on 8 August and feature the visitor's coma, the fine shell that surrounds its nucleus, and its dusty output.
5h
Researchers create bioluminescent tag to detect DNA break repair
A new bioluminescent reporter that tracks DNA double stranded break (DSB) repair in cells has been developed by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Academia Sinica in Taiwan. The international team's novel bioluminescent repair reporter (BLRR)-based system can be used to monitor DNA repair pathways directly in animals as well as cell lines. No such system previously exist
5h
Researchers create bioluminescent tag to detect DNA break repair
A new bioluminescent reporter that tracks DNA double stranded break (DSB) repair in cells has been developed by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Academia Sinica in Taiwan. The international team's novel bioluminescent repair reporter (BLRR)-based system can be used to monitor DNA repair pathways directly in animals as well as cell lines. No such system previously exist
5h
For Quick Coronavirus Testing, Israel Turns to a Clever Algorithm
Inspired by a mother's question, the new method will be introduced across Israel this fall, just in time for flu season, and could be coming soon to the U.S.
5h
Bias-preserving gates with stabilized cat qubits
The code capacity threshold for error correction using biased-noise qubits is known to be higher than with qubits without such structured noise. However, realistic circuit-level noise severely restricts these improvements. This is because gate operations, such as a controlled-NOT (CX) gate, which do not commute with the dominant error, unbias the noise channel. Here, we overcome the challenge of
5h
Laser writing of nitrogen-doped silicon carbide for biological modulation
Conducting or semiconducting materials embedded in insulating polymeric substrates can be useful in biointerface applications; however, attainment of this composite configuration by direct chemical processes is challenging. Laser-assisted synthesis has evolved as a fast and inexpensive technique to prepare various materials, but its utility in the construction of biophysical tools or biomedical d
5h
Single-cell transcriptome analysis reveals cell lineage specification in temporal-spatial patterns in human cortical development
Neurogenesis processes differ in different areas of the cortex in many species, including humans. Here, we performed single-cell transcriptome profiling of the four cortical lobes and pons during human embryonic and fetal development. We identified distinct subtypes of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and their molecular signatures, including a group of previously unidentified transient NPCs. We sp
5h
Negative resistance state in superconducting NbSe2 induced by surface acoustic waves
We report a negative resistance, namely, a voltage drop along the opposite direction of a current flow, in the superconducting gap of NbSe 2 thin films under the irradiation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs). The amplitude of the negative resistance becomes larger by increasing the SAW power and decreasing temperature. As one possible scenario, we propose that soliton-antisoliton pairs in the char
5h
The universal pathway to innovative urban economies
Is there a universal economic pathway individual cities recapitulate over and over? This evolutionary structure—if any—would inform a reference model for fairer assessment, better maintenance, and improved forecasting of urban development. Using employment data including more than 100 million U.S. workers in all industries between 1998 and 2013, we empirically show that individual cities indeed r
5h
Selective methylation of toluene using CO2 and H2 to para-xylene
Toluene methylation with methanol to produce xylene has been widely investigated. A simultaneous side reaction of methanol-to-olefin over zeolites is hard to avoid, resulting in an unsatisfactory methylation efficiency. Here, CO 2 and H 2 replace methanol in toluene methylation over a class of ZnZrO x –ZSM-5 (ZZO-Z5) dual-functional catalysts. Results demonstrate that the reactive methylation spe
5h
Phase transition enhanced superior elasticity in freestanding single-crystalline multiferroic BiFeO3 membranes
The integration of ferroic oxide thin films into advanced flexible electronics will bring multifunctionality beyond organic and metallic materials. However, it is challenging to achieve high flexibility in single-crystalline ferroic oxides that is considerable to organic or metallic materials. Here, we demonstrate the superior flexibility of freestanding single-crystalline BiFeO 3 membranes, whic
5h
Aircraft observations since the 1990s reveal increases of tropospheric ozone at multiple locations across the Northern Hemisphere
Tropospheric ozone is an important greenhouse gas, is detrimental to human health and crop and ecosystem productivity, and controls the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. Because of its high spatial and temporal variability and limited observations, quantifying net tropospheric ozone changes across the Northern Hemisphere on time scales of two decades had not been possible. Here, we show, usi
5h
Synthetic lethal combination targeting BET uncovered intrinsic susceptibility of TNBC to ferroptosis
Identification of targeted therapies for TNBC is an urgent medical need. Using a drug combination screen reliant on synthetic lethal interactions, we identified clinically relevant combination therapies for different TNBC subtypes. Two drug combinations targeting the BET family were further explored. The first, targeting BET and CXCR2, is specific for mesenchymal TNBC and induces apoptosis, where
5h
Efficient ultrafast all-optical modulation in a nonlinear crystalline gallium phosphide nanodisk at the anapole excitation
High–refractive index nanostructured dielectrics have the ability to locally enhance electromagnetic fields with low losses while presenting high third-order nonlinearities. In this work, we exploit these characteristics to achieve efficient ultrafast all-optical modulation in a crystalline gallium phosphide (GaP) nanoantenna through the optical Kerr effect (OKE) and two-photon absorption (TPA) i
5h
Multioctave supercontinuum generation and frequency conversion based on rotational nonlinearity
The field of attosecond science was first enabled by nonlinear compression of intense laser pulses to a duration below two optical cycles. Twenty years later, creating such short pulses still requires state-of-the-art few-cycle laser amplifiers to most efficiently exploit "instantaneous" optical nonlinearities in noble gases for spectral broadening and parametric frequency conversion. Here, we sh
5h
Extracellular matrix compression temporally regulates microvascular angiogenesis
Mechanical cues influence tissue regeneration, and although vasculature is known to be mechanically sensitive, little is known about the effects of bulk extracellular matrix deformation on the nascent vessel networks found in healing tissues. Previously, we found that dynamic matrix compression in vivo potently regulated revascularization during bone tissue regeneration; however, whether matrix d
5h
Massively parallel single-molecule telomere length measurement with digital real-time PCR
Telomere length is a promising biomarker for age-associated diseases and cancer, but there are still substantial challenges to routine telomere analysis in clinics because of the lack of a simple and rapid yet scalable method for measurement. We developed the single telomere absolute-length rapid (STAR) assay, a novel high-throughput digital real-time PCR approach for rapidly measuring the absolu
5h
Competition between social cheater viruses is driven by mechanistically different cheating strategies
Cheater viruses, also known as defective interfering viruses, cannot replicate on their own yet replicate faster than the wild type upon coinfection. While there is growing interest in using cheaters as antiviral therapeutics, the mechanisms underlying cheating have been rarely explored. During experimental evolution of MS2 phage, we observed the parallel emergence of two independent cheater muta
5h
The motor cortex uses active suppression to sculpt movement
Even the simplest movements are generated by a remarkably complex pattern of muscle activity. Fast, accurate movements at a single joint are produced by a stereotyped pattern that includes a decrease in any preexisting activity in antagonist muscles. This premovement suppression is necessary to prevent the antagonist muscle from opposing movement generated by the agonist muscle. Here, we provide
5h
Anti-{alpha}4{beta}7 monoclonal antibody-conjugated nanoparticles block integrin {alpha}4{beta}7 on intravaginal T cells in rhesus macaques
Intravenous administration of anti-α 4 β 7 monoclonal antibody in macaques decreases simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) vaginal infection and reduces gut SIV loads. Because of potential side effects of systemic administration, a prophylactic strategy based on mucosal administration of anti-α 4 β 7 antibody may be safer and more effective. With this in mind, we developed a novel intravaginal form
5h
DELTEX2 C-terminal domain recognizes and recruits ADP-ribosylated proteins for ubiquitination
Cross-talk between ubiquitination and ADP-ribosylation regulates spatiotemporal recruitment of key players in many signaling pathways. The DELTEX family ubiquitin ligases (DTX1 to DTX4 and DTX3L) are characterized by a RING domain followed by a C-terminal domain (DTC) of hitherto unknown function. Here, we use two label-free mass spectrometry techniques to investigate the interactome and ubiquiti
5h
Functionalized lipid-like nanoparticles for in vivo mRNA delivery and base editing
Messenger RNA (mRNA) therapeutics have been explored to treat various genetic disorders. Lipid-derived nanomaterials are currently one of the most promising biomaterials that mediate effective mRNA delivery. However, efficiency and safety of this nanomaterial-based mRNA delivery remains a challenge for clinical applications. Here, we constructed a series of lipid-like nanomaterials (LLNs), named
5h
Nutrient-supplying ocean currents modulate coral bleaching susceptibility
With predictions that mass coral bleaching will occur annually within this century, conservation efforts must focus their limited resources based on an accurate understanding of the drivers of bleaching. Here, we provide spatial and temporal evidence that excess nutrients exacerbate the detrimental effects of heat stress to spark mass coral bleaching in the Red Sea. Exploiting this region's uniqu
5h
California shut off power grids this week, but not because of clean energy
RIGHT NOW: Thousands across #BayArea & #California without power. Here's the latest @PGE4Me outage map. #PGE #poweroutages pic.twitter.com/fgfoaNsC5Z — Brooks Jarosz (@BrooksKTVU) August 15, 2020
5h
NASA's Suomi NPP satellite highlights California wildfires at night
Striking images of the California wildfires are seen in these nighttime satellite images taken by the NOAA-NASA Suomi NPP satellite on Aug. 20, 2020. At approximately 3:01 am PDT, NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP was almost directly overhead and imaged the regionusing different bands on its VIIRS (Visible infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) instrument. Large fires are easily visible in this image. Suomi NPP's
5h
Nutrients make coral bleaching worse
A new study shows nutrients can aggravate the already negative effects of climate change on corals to trigger mass coral bleaching.
5h
Tiny engineered therapeutic delivery system safely solves genetic problems in mice
Inserting genetic material into the body to treat diseases caused by gene mutations can work, scientists say—but getting those materials to the right place safely is tricky.
5h
Ozone across northern hemisphere increased over past 20 years
In a first-ever study using ozone data collected by commercial aircraft, researchers from the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at the University of Colorado Boulder found that levels of the pollutant in the lowest part of Earth's atmosphere have increased across the Northern Hemisphere over the past 20 years. That's even as tighter controls on emissions of ozone
5h
Mass General researchers create bioluminescent tag to detect DNA break repair
A new bioluminescent reporter that tracks DNA double stranded break (DSB) repair in cells has been developed by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Academia Sinica in Taiwan.
5h
Were Covid hospital admissions figures in England overreported? It's not that simple
A Sage member and NHS England have pushed back against criticism of hospital admissions data Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Claims that hospital admissions for Covid-19 in England were overreported at the peak of the outbreak may not be telling the whole story. According to government figures , the daily hospital admissions for Covid-19 patients in hospital rose fro
5h
NASA's Terra satellite analyzes Caribbean's Tropical Depression 14
NASA's Terra satellite gathered infrared data on Tropical Depression 14 as it moves through the Caribbean Sea. Infrared data was used to find the location of the strongest storms.
5h
Understanding how birds respond to extreme weather can inform conservation efforts
When it comes to climate change, University of Wisconsin-Madison forest and wildlife ecology Professor Ben Zuckerberg says birds are the proverbial canary in the coal mine. They are both responsive and sensitive to changes in the environment, including the extreme weather events associated with a warming planet.
5h
Understanding how birds respond to extreme weather can inform conservation efforts
When it comes to climate change, University of Wisconsin-Madison forest and wildlife ecology Professor Ben Zuckerberg says birds are the proverbial canary in the coal mine. They are both responsive and sensitive to changes in the environment, including the extreme weather events associated with a warming planet.
5h
Mining Lunar Ice Could Irrevocably Damage the Moon's Environment
No Touching As NASA and other space agencies move toward their goal of setting up shop on the Moon, questions remain about how scientists and settlers will actually survive once they get there. Experts have floated the idea that ice on the Moon's poles could be harvested for drinking water . But now, NASA argues that the scientific potential of the polar ice is potentially too great to jeopardize
5h
The age of the Earth's inner core revised
By creating conditions akin to the center of the Earth inside a laboratory chamber, researchers have improved the estimate of the age of our planet's solid inner core, putting it at 1 billion to 1.3 billion years old.
5h
A 70 degree shift on Jupiter's icy moon Europa was the last event to fracture its surface
Europa's outer icy shell has completely reoriented itself in one of the last geologic events recorded on its young surface. Europa's poles are not where they used to be. Cracks in the surface of Jupiter's icy moon indicate its shell of ice rotated by 70 degrees sometime in the last several million years. In addition to supporting prior evidence for the existence of a subsurface ocean, it also mean
5h
Apertif images yield first scientific results
Using Apertif (APERture Tile In Focus), searching at a radio frequency of 1.4 GHz, researchers have found an intra-hour variable (IHV) source, described in the paper "Extreme intra-hour variability of the radio source J1402+5347 discovered with Apertif." IHVs are very compact radio sources that twinkle on timescales of minutes and are among the rarest objects in the sky. For the past 30 to 40 year
5h
I Danmark snakker vi ikke om atomkraft: Sådan kan debatten få et comeback
Drop katastrofesnak og afliv myterne, vurderer eksperter.
5h
Bacterial cells sacrifice themselves to protect the swarm
Some cells within a bacterial swarm will sacrifice themselves so that other cells in the swarm have a better chance of surviving an antibiotic onslaught, according to a new study. The discovery could be important for efforts to address antibiotic resistance. As bacterial cells within a cluster or swarm die, they release chemical death cries, which scientists call necrosignaling. These signals act
5h
Hubble snaps close-up of comet NEOWISE
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the closest images yet of the sky's latest visitor to make the headlines, comet C/2020 F3 NEOWISE, after it passed by the Sun. The new images of the comet were taken on 8 August and feature the visitor's coma, the fine shell that surrounds its nucleus, and its dusty output.
5h
Group of international scientists align on a definition for 'synbiotic'
To address the scientific ambiguity around synbiotics, a group of 11 leading international scientists formed a panel to create a consensus definition and to clarify the evidence required to show synbiotics are safe and effective.
5h
Long-acting, injectable drug could strengthen efforts to prevent, treat HIV
Scientists have developed an injectable drug that blocks HIV from entering cells. They say the new drug potentially offers long-lasting protection from the infection with fewer side effects. The drug, which was tested in non-human primates, could eventually replace or supplement components of combination drug "cocktail" therapies currently used to prevent or treat the virus.
5h
The Budding Plant Parent's Guide to Fixing Common Houseplant Problems
What new plant moms and dads need to know to help indoor plants thrive — or at least, stay alive.
5h
Bias leads to young gay men missing key health care
Young gay men who are uncomfortable discussing sexual issues with their primary care providers and experience health care discrimination are less likely to seek coordinated care, according to a new study. That can lead to missed opportunities for early diagnosis of chronic and mental health issues, researchers say. "Oftentimes, once gay patients disclose their sexual orientation, providers do not
5h
Man sees half of every face like it's melting due to rare brain lesion
A man with a rare brain lesion sees the right half of every face as if it is melting. This could suggest that each brain hemisphere typically processes one half of the face
5h
Ibrahim Cissé's Tools Provide a Lens to Watch RNA Production
The MIT physicist has demonstrated the importance of clusters of RNA polymerase and other transcription mediators in regulating RNA production.
5h
Hubble snaps close-up of celebrity comet NEOWISE
The Hubble Space Telescope has snapped the closest images yet of the sky's latest visitor to make headlines, comet NEOWISE, after it passed by the Sun. This is the first time Hubble has photographed a comet of this brightness at such resolution after this close of a pass by the Sun.
5h
Reversible 'stitches' give self-healing polymers new powers
A new family of polymers can self-heal, can retain a shape, and are recyclable, researchers report. The new synthetic materials range in texture from ultra-soft to extremely rigid. The researchers say their materials are 3D printable, self-healing, recyclable, and naturally adhere to each other in air or underwater. Nature's blueprint for the human limb is a carefully layered structure with stiff
5h
'Selfies' could be used to detect heart disease
Sending a 'selfie' to the doctor could be a cheap and simple way of detecting heart disease, according to researchers. Their study is the first to show that it's possible to use a deep learning computer algorithm to detect coronary artery disease (CAD) by analyzing four photographs of a person's face.
6h
A new lens on the world: Improving the metalens with liquid crystal
Physicists have taken a step toward making 'metalenses' even more useful — by making them reconfigurable. They did this by harnessing nanoscale forces to infiltrate liquid crystals between those microscopic pillars, allowing them to shape and diffract the light in completely new ways — 'tuning' the focusing power, one of the researchers said.
6h
New 'molecular computers' find the right cells
New nanoscale devices, made of synthetic proteins, have been designed to target a therapeutic agent only to cells with a specific, predetermined combinations of cell surface markers. They operate on their own and search out cells they were programmed to find. The hope is that they might guide CAR T cancer therapy, and other treatments where precision is critical, through a sort of molecular beacon
6h
NASA Facility Will Beam Messages to Space Through Lasers
Beaming Up For all of its technological prowess, NASA can still have a hard time sending data from distant space missions back down to Earth and vice versa. It's part of the reason that images and footage from space are often so grainy. But with new laser facilities coming online next year, NASA plans to beam messages up and down from Earth using infrared lasers, vastly improving the space agency
6h
Two Disasters Are Exponentially Worse Than One
Eleven thousand lightning strikes, 370 wildfires, a pandemic, a heat wave, and rolling blackouts—California has endured a lot this week. Hundreds of thousands of acres have burned, and tens of thousands of people have had to evacuate. The largest of the blazes—the LNU Lightning Complex fires, which alone span Napa, Sonoma, Solano, and Lake Counties—is only 7 percent contained. One disaster is bad
6h
Listen: The Comedy and Tragedy of Virtual Live Events
On this episode of Social Distance , the comedian Maeve Higgins is back home in New York after weathering the pandemic's first peak in her native Ireland. She joins James Hamblin to talk about her strange journey back to the United States, and the strange moment the country finds itself in. James Fallows returns to reflect on the Democratic National Convention and why politics (unlike comedy) mig
6h
Welcome to Lithuania, land of smoked mackerel ice cream
Lithuanians fell in love with ice cream in the 18th century, and have been crazy about the frozen treat ever since. They go for variety rather than volume – and they make a sport of developing weird flavors. This map guides you to places where you can get ice cream based on nettles, bacon, beer… and more. "World's biggest ice cream fans" Why Lithuania? If you haven't yet added the Baltic nation t
6h
Parts of north-west England face tougher coronavirus restrictions
New data show little sign of a nationwide surge in infections
6h
Researchers validate rapid tests to detect dengue, Zika, yellow fever and other viruses
The method identifies and distinguishes between flaviviruses that cause many diseases in humans and animals in Brazil.
6h
DNA nanoswitches rapidly detect Sars-Cov-2 and other emerging viruses
Programmable DNA nanoswitches that bind to viral RNA in human body fluids may provide an inexpensive platform to rapidly detect a wide variety of emerging viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, according to a new study.
6h
Finding clues to a successful immune response in the T cells of COVID-19 patients
Now, Roan and her team have catalogued the T cells of people who have recovered from mild cases of COVID-19. Their analysis, published in Cell Reports Medicine, sheds light on what a successful immune response to SARS-CoV-2 might entail, and has implications for vaccine development.
6h
NASA's Suomi NPP satellite highlights California wildfires at night
Striking images of the California wildfires are seen in these nighttime satellite images taken by the NOAA-NASA Suomi NPP satellite on Aug. 20, 2020. At approximately 3:01 am PDT, NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP was almost directly overhead and imaged the regionusing different bands on its VIIRS (Visible infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) instrument.
6h
New 'molecular computers' find the right cells
New nanoscale devices, made of synthetic proteins, have been designed to target a therapeutic agent only to cells with a specific, predetermined combinations of cell surface markers. They operate on their own and search out cells they were programmed to find. The hope is that they might guide CAR T cancer therapy, and other treatments where precision is critical, through a sort of molecular beacon
6h
NASA's Terra satellite analyzes Caribbean's Tropical Depression 14
NASA's Terra satellite gathered infrared data on Tropical Depression 14 as it moves through the Caribbean Sea. Infrared data was used to find the location of the strongest storms.
6h
Entreprenør undersøger datterselskab for svindel på højhusbyggeri
Bach Gruppen mistænker et datterselskab for at have leveret beton af lavere kvalitet til fundamentet på byggeriet af et næsten 90 meter højt tårn på Amager.
6h
Cliff collapse reveals 313-million-year-old fossil footprints in Grand Canyon National Park
Paleontological research has confirmed a series of recently discovered fossils tracks are the oldest recorded tracks of their kind to date within Grand Canyon National Park. In 2016, a geology professor was hiking with his students when he made a surprising discovery. Lying next to the trail, in plain view of the many hikers, was a boulder containing conspicuous fossil footprints.
6h
Understanding how birds respond to extreme weather can inform conservation efforts
How do different bird species respond to extreme weather events that occur for different amounts of time, ranging from weekly events like heat waves to seasonal events like drought? And how do traits unique to different species — for example, how far they migrate or how commonly they occur — predict their vulnerability to extreme weather?
6h
Skat and poker: More luck than skill?
Chess requires playing ability and strategic thinking; in roulette, chance determines victory or defeat, gain or loss. But what about skat and poker? Are they games of chance or games of skill in game theory? This classification also determines whether play may involve money. Economists have studied this question and developed a rating system similar to the Elo system used for chess.
6h
How do Planets Form? NASA Wants Your Help Finding Out
A NASA citizen science project called Disk Detective enlists volunteers to study images of solar systems as they're forming.
6h
Tesla Asks USA For Permission to Automatically Detect Kids Left in Hot Car
No Child Left Behind Tesla is seeking approval from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to market a sensor that could tell if a child has been left in a hot car, Reuters reports . According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 52 children died of heatstroke in cars alone in 2019. To stop that from happening, the Elon Musk-led company wants to use millimeter wave sensors
6h
This Fully Functional, 9000 Pound Mech Suit Looks Absolutely Amazing
Exo-Bionics Engineering firm Furrion has built a massive, four-legged mech suit called Prosthesis, a 9,000 pound monstrosity straight out of "Pacific Rim" — and it wants you to pilot it. The company recently put out a call on Kickstarter , asking enthusiasts if they'd like to help them build a "global racing league that would pit multiple world-class athletes in head-to-head competitions, through
6h
Five charts that will change everything you know about mud
Humans are changing how it moves, and where it piles up
6h
Horror Movies Seem to Really Hate the Suburbs
The doom of a cul-de-sac has long been a Hollywood staple.
6h
Biochemistry: Move over Michaelis-Menten!
Researchers challenge one of the cornerstones of biochemistry, the Michaelis-Menten equation. They show that many enzymes in signalling pathways are independent of substrate concentration, because the substrate is physically connected to the enzyme. With these results, it may one day be possible to develop drugs that not only target the enzyme, but also affect how it is connected to its substrate.
6h
Facebook is training robot assistants to hear as well as see
In June 2019, Facebook's AI lab, FAIR, released AI Habitat, a new simulation platform for training AI agents. It allowed agents to explore various realistic virtual environments, like a furnished apartment or cubicle-filled office. The AI could then be ported into a robot, which would gain the smarts to navigate through the real world without crashing. In the year since, FAIR has rapidly pushed t
6h
COVID-19 symptoms appear in a distinct, specific order
USC researchers identify a distinct order in which COVID-19 symptoms present themselves. SARS-CoV-2 affects the digestive tract in a way that distinguishes it from other similar infections. If you experience these symptoms in this order, call your doctor. One of the scary things about COVID-19 is that the early symptoms it presents are also common indicators of a flu or infection: fever, cough, a
6h
Recipe for a Busy Hurricane Season: Warmer Water, Cleaner Air
The peak of the season just started, but already there have been as many storms as in an entire average season — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
'You can't imagine the disaster we're living in': Lebanon's researchers struggle to cope with explosion aftermath
Nature, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02437-8 Analytical chemist Najat Saliba describes the part scientists could play as investigations into the cause of Beirut's devastating ammonium-nitrate blast get under way.
7h
The Books Briefing: The Legacy of a Political Speech
Political speeches make up a strange genre of writing. This year's Democratic National Convention has showcased their breadth, featuring Barack Obama's fearful warning , New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's self-aggrandizing remarks , a disjointed keynote from 17 "rising stars," and Michelle Obama's forceful call to action . Speeches such as these can influence a figure's legacy. Martin Luther King J
7h
Unveiling rogue planets with NASA's Roman Space Telescope
New simulations show that NASA's Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will be able to reveal myriad rogue planets — freely floating bodies that drift through our galaxy untethered to a star.
7h
More than politics or age, psychological disease avoidance linked to preventative behavior, study finds
More than other factors, strong feelings of germ aversion and pathogen disgust are significantly associated with concern about COVID-19 and preventative behavior, according to a new study. The findings are part of a year-long examination of how behavior and social attitudes change, and what factors influence those changes, when people in the United States are faced with the threat of widespread di
7h
Why babies don't always remember what they have learned
If and how babies recall what they have learned depends on their mood: what they've learned when feeling calm is inaccessible when they're acitive and vice versa. This was shown in a study with 96 children aged nine months.
7h
Self-collected saliva and deep nasal swabs are equally effective for diagnosing COVID-19, study finds
Self-collected saliva and deep nasal swabs collected by healthcare providers are equally effective for detecting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, according to a new study.
7h
Meet hedge fund managers of avian world
New research finds that brood parasites living in more variable and unpredictable habitats tend to parasitize — or squat and drop their eggs in — the nests of a greater variety and number of hosts.
7h
Larger variability in sea level expected as Earth warms
Researchers have identified a global tendency for future sea levels to become more variable as oceans warm this century due to increasing greenhouse gas emissions.
7h
No more playing with fire: Study offers insight into 'safer' rechargeable batteries
Lithium-ion batteries are used in various electronic devices. But, they also come with potential hazards, particularly if the battery is damaged or overcharged. This usually occurs because, in its overcharged state, spiky structures called 'lithium dendrites' get deposited in the battery. Now, scientists use a technique called 'operando nuclear magnetic resonance' to track the precise mechanism of
7h
Inconsistencies in data presentation could harm efforts against COVID-19
Since COVID-19 emerged late last year, there's been an enormous amount of research produced on this novel coronavirus disease. But the content publicly available for this data and the format in which it's presented lack consistency across different countries' national public health institutes, greatly limiting its usefulness, Children's National Hospital scientists report in a new study.
7h
Researchers launch video game exploring the effects of confinement
An interactive video game created by researchers and students in the EPFL College of Humanities (CDH) and UNIL Gamelab, in collaboration with the Initiative for Media Innovation (IMI) and Le Temps, allows users to explore a series of digital narratives that bear witness to the period of pandemic-induced isolation.
7h
Spinning black hole powers jet by magnetic flux
Black holes are at the center of almost all galaxies that have been studied so far. They have an unimaginably large mass and therefore attract matter, gas and even light. But they can also emit matter in the form of plasma jets—a kind of plasma beam that is ejected from the center of the galaxy with tremendous energy. A plasma jet can extend several hundred thousand light years far into space.
7h
Four tips to make sure your dishwasher does its job
We thought we'd show you things from the dishes' point of view. (Wendelin Jacober/Pexels/) Loading the dishwasher is a remarkably controversial activity. After five years of marriage, my wife and I still debate the proper method for getting dishes clean with minimal hassle. So I spoke to an expert to settle our battle once and for all. "It's a contentious issue in most households," says Richard T
7h
Quantum computers do the (instantaneous) twist
Regardless of what makes up the innards of a quantum computer, its speedy calculations all boil down to sequences of simple instructions applied to qubits—the basic units of information inside a quantum computer.
7h
Turkey announces historic gas discovery in Black Sea
President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Friday said Turkey had made a historic discovery of gas in the Black Sea, but would still speed up contentious exploration in the Mediterranean that has pitted it against Greece and the EU.
7h
Understanding how birds respond to extreme weather can inform conservation efforts
How do different bird species respond to extreme weather events that occur for different amounts of time, ranging from weekly events like heat waves to seasonal events like drought? And how do traits unique to different species — for example, how far they migrate or how commonly they occur — predict their vulnerability to extreme weather?
7h
NASA nighttime image shows a weaker Genevieve moving away from Mexico
Nighttime imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found the center of now Tropical Storm Genevieve moving along the coast of the Baja California, Mexico peninsula and further away from land. The storm is weakening rapidly from several factors. It is expected to be a remnant low-pressure area by Saturday, Aug. 21.
7h
A new method for in vivo plant cell imaging with SNAP-tag proteins
A team of scientists at the Nagoya University Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM) have developed a method for visualizing microtubule dynamics and cell membrane protein endocytosis in living plant cells, an important step forward in plant cell biology.
7h
Microfluidic chip technology enables rapid multiplex diagnosis of plant viral diseases
A research group composed of Professor Takayuki Shibata and his colleagues at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology has applied a microfluidic chip technology to develop a multiplex genetic diagnostic device for the early detection and prevention of crop diseases. The group conducted a gene amplification experiment using four kinds of cucumber viruses on the
7h
NASA nighttime image shows a weaker Genevieve moving away from mexico
Nighttime imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found the center of now Tropical Storm Genevieve moving along the coast of the Baja California, Mexico peninsula and further away from land. The storm is weakening rapidly from several factors. It is expected to be a remnant low-pressure area by Saturday, Aug. 21.
7h
A new method for in vivo plant cell imaging with SNAP-tag proteins
A team of scientists at the Nagoya University Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM) have developed a method for visualizing microtubule dynamics and cell membrane protein endocytosis in living plant cells, an important step forward in plant cell biology.
7h
California Wildfires Explained: Why Does The State Have So Many?
There are four key ingredients to the disastrous wildfire seasons in the West, and climate change figures prominently.
7h
A Rip in the Fabric of Interstellar Dreams
The iconic Arecibo radio telescope is temporarily crippled by an accident.
7h
A Former Uber Exec's Indictment Is a Warning Shot
Prosecutors allege that former Uber security chief Joseph Sullivan covered up a major breach, in the first high-profile case of its kind.
7h
Microfluidic chip technology enables rapid multiplex diagnosis of plant viral diseases
A research group composed of Professor Takayuki Shibata and his colleagues at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology has applied a microfluidic chip technology to develop a multiplex genetic diagnostic device for the early detection and prevention of crop diseases. The group conducted a gene amplification experiment using four kinds of cucumber viruses on the
7h
Skat and poker: More luck than skill?
Chess requires playing ability and strategic thinking; in roulette, chance determines victory or defeat, gain or loss. But what about skat and poker? Are they games of chance or games of skill in game theory? This classification also determines whether play may involve money. Prof. Dr. Jörg Oechssler and his team of economists at Heidelberg University studied this question, developing a rating sys
7h
Sea-level rise linked to higher water tables along California coast
In the first comprehensive study of the link between rising sea levels and inland water tables along the California coast, researchers found an increased threat to populated areas already at risk from rising water tables, and the possibility of flooding in unexpected inland areas.
7h
'All-in-one' strategy for metalla[3]catenanes, Borromean rings and ring-in-ring complex
Interlocked molecular species have received considerable attention recently, not only because of their intriguing structures and topological importance, but also because of their important applications as molecular machines and nanoscale devices. Benefiting from the reversible coordination bond, some complicated interlocked structure could be realized by high-yield, one-step processes, for example
7h
New insights into lung tissue in COVID-19 disease
Researchers have developed a new three-dimensional imaging technique to visualize tissue damage in severe COVID-19.
7h
Sea-level rise linked to higher water tables along California coast
Researchers modeled the effects of rising sea levels along the California coast. While results varied with local topography, the study indicates an increased threat to populated areas already at risk from rising water tables, and the possibility of flooding in unexpected inland areas.
7h
Spinning black hole powers jet by magnetic flux
A new letter has been found in the mysterious alphabet of black holes.
7h
Large tin monosulfide crystal opens pathway for next generation solar cells
A team has succeeded in growing large single crystals of tin monosulfide, a material used in next generation solar cells.
7h
First physics-based method for predicting large solar flares
A research team recently succeeded in developing the first physics-based model that can accurately predict imminent large solar flares, which can cause severe space weather disturbances affecting Earth.
7h
End of Green Sahara linked to SE Asia megadrought
In a new study links the end of the Green Sahara with a previously unknown megadrought which caused mass population shifts in Southeast Asia during the mid-Holocene period.
7h
Reproducing the pathophysiology of polycystic kidney disease from human iPS cells
A research project has successfully reproduced the pathogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) from human iPS cells in vitro. Although cysts derived from renal tubules have been previously documented, this is the first derivation of cysts from collecting ducts, which is more closely related to the pathogenesis of the disease. This research is expected to lead to a better u
7h
From ACTH to DNA: the rise of acronyms in research
Nature, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02466-3 More than one million abbreviations have been used in biomedical papers since 1950 — but just a fraction appear regularly.
7h
Family photos at work curb fraud and unethical activity
Displaying family photos in the workplace cuts down on employee fraud and other unethical behavior, new research finds. For instance, in one study the researchers conducted, participants who looked at pictures of family or friends filed expense reports claiming about $8 less on average than workers without pictures. While $8 may not seem like much, it can add up quickly. "If numerous employees su
7h
Ofqual's A-level algorithm: why did it fail to make the grade?
There is a lot we can learn from the algebraic symbols used to determine results in England A university vice-chancellor's diary of A-level chaos P kj = (1-r j )C kj + r j (C kj + q kj – p kj ) For such a short string of algebraic symbols, there is a lot we can learn from Ofqual's grading algorithm (though really it is an equation) – and a lot we can learn about what went wrong. Continue reading.
7h
Video Shows NASA's Bizarre Guide to Near-Light-Speed Travel
Instruction Manual Last week, NASA put out an adorably bizarre cartoon that explains some of the trials and tribulations of near-light-speed travel. The video, which looks like the sort of safety presentation that teaches you how to use the seatbelt on a ride at Disney World, is surprisingly informative. It's basically a brief, digestible primer on advanced concepts like special relativity and th
7h
Unveiling rogue planets with NASA's Roman Space Telescope
New simulations show that NASA's Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will be able to reveal myriad rogue planets – freely floating bodies that drift through our galaxy untethered to a star.
7h
Effect of remdesivir vs standard care on clinical status of patients with moderate COVID-19
This open-label randomized trial compares the effect of remdesivir (5 or 10 days) compared with standard care on clinical status 11 days after treatment initiation among patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection hospitalized with moderate pneumonia.
7h
Rogue planets could outnumber the stars
An upcoming NASA mission could find that there are more rogue planets – planets that float in space without orbiting a sun – than there are stars in the Milky Way, a new study theorizes.
7h
Epidemiology of COVID-19 among incarcerated individuals, staff in Massachusetts jails, prisons
COVID-19 among incarcerated individuals and staff in Massachusetts jails and prisons is described in this observational study, which assesses the association of COVID-19 case rates with decarceration and testing rates.
7h
Modeling contact tracing strategies for COVID-19
The potential for contract tracing to reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in the context of reduced physical distancing under different assumptions for case detection, tracing and quarantine efficacy is examined in this mathematical modeling study.
7h
Energy transition away from coal in China will yield benefits
China is the world's largest producer and consumer of coal. A team of international scientists led by Stony Brook University's Gang He, PhD, contend that China needs to transition away from coal to help the world achieve global decarbonization and improve the nation's environmental and human health.
7h
Discovering the mechanism of brain vascular pathfinding during development
A research team led by Dr. DU Jiulin of the Institute of Neuroscience, Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology (CEBSIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, has revealed that Ca 2+ activities mediated by mechanosensitive Piezo1 channels regulate the pathfinding of growing brain vessels in larval zebrafish.
7h
Revealed: How billions in EU farming subsidies are being misspent
A unique study has analyzed in detail how EU agricultural subsidies flow down to the local level. The new data show that most income support payments go to intensively farmed regions already above median EU income, while climate-friendly and biodiverse farming regions, as well as poorer regions, are insufficiently funded. Consequently, the majority of payments are going to the regions causing the
7h
Mauritians Launch Rescue to Save Wildlife from Oil Spill
In addition to trapping oil with booms, residents of Mauritius have evacuated endangered plants and animals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Mauritians Launch Rescue to Save Wildlife from Oil Spill
In addition to trapping oil with booms, residents of Mauritius have evacuated endangered plants and animals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Amid Covid-19 Spikes, Universities and Students Spar Over Blame
Universities have struggled for months to find a balance between the interests of faculty, students, parents, and the surrounding communities in developing plans for reopening. As campuses shut down in response to Covid-19 spikes, some schools are putting the blame squarely on students.
8h
From biopaste to bioplastic
Forest scientists develop innovative wood-based materials for 3D printing.
8h
What kind of animal transports the seeds of the world's smallest fruit-bearing plants?
Balanophora have some of the smallest fruits among angiosperms, leading researchers to question how the seeds of these plants are dispersed. Very little is currently known about their seed dispersal system. Researchers have now documented an unrecognized seed dispersal mutualism between the peculiar, mushroom-like non-photosynthetic plant Balanophora yakushimensis and its avian visitors. The birds
8h
A gatekeeper against insulin resistance in the brain
The brain plays a major role in controlling our blood glucose levels. In type 2 diabetes this glucose metabolism brain control is often dysfunctional. A group of scientists has now shown that in men a genetic variant of the gene DUSP8 can increase the risk for T2D by impairing our brain response to the hormone insulin.
8h
Stop dancing to the sound of your oppression | Madame Gandhi
Popular music is often riddled with misogynistic lyrics that objectify and demean women … so why are we listening and dancing to it? Performing a sample of her original song "Top Knot Turn Up" and sharing clips from her female-directed music video of "See Me Thru," activist and musician Madame Gandhi explains why she's making sex-positive music that doesn't contribute to anyone's oppression — a
8h
The Missing Piece in Biden's Convention Speech
Last night, Joe Biden capped a Democratic convention like no other by underscoring the themes that dominated the gathering from the beginning: empathy, national unity, racial justice, and President Donald Trump's failures in managing the coronavirus. Now the question is whether those messages, which largely eclipsed a direct economic appeal to struggling families, can protect Biden's consistent l
8h
Rogue planets could outnumber the stars
An upcoming NASA mission could find that there are more rogue planets—planets that float in space without orbiting a sun—than there are stars in the Milky Way, a new study theorizes.
8h
Energy transition away from coal in China will yield benefits
China is the world's largest producer and consumer of coal. A team of international scientists led by Stony Brook University's Gang He, Ph.D., contend that China needs to transition away from coal to help the world achieve global decarbonization and improve the nation's environmental and human health. They outline steps that can be taken for an albeit difficult, yet just and quicker transition awa
8h
Revealed: How billions in EU farming subsidies are being misspent
A unique study has analyzed in detail how EU agricultural subsidies flow down to the local level. The new data show that most income support payments go to intensively farmed regions already above median EU income, while climate-friendly and biodiverse farming regions, as well as poorer regions, are insufficiently funded. Consequently, the majority of payments are going to the regions causing the
8h
Mount Sinai study finds COVID patients were most commonly readmitted to hospital for respiratory complications
Study describes characteristics of patients with COVID-19 who returned to the ER or required readmission to the hospital within 14 days of being discharged
8h
Rare fossil depicting battle sheds light on ancient ant
A fossil of a prehistoric ant hunting has recently been discovered. Fossilization is rare, so depictions of activities like hunting are hard to come by. Other fossils show us how dinosaurs hunted, fought, and died. Any animal with the name "hell ant" is going to be freaky. Now, thanks to a one-in-a-million chance find, we know how exactly how strange the hell ant was. The infernally named insect
8h
'Instant Coffee' COVID-19 Tests Could Be the Answer to Reopening the U.S.
Cheap and quick, they could move us toward normalcy before a vaccine is widely available — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
AI Fighter Jet Obliterates Human Air Force Pilot in Simulated Dogfight
AlphaDogfight An AI-controlled virtual fighter jet just beat a human pilot in a dogfight. The win came about during the finale of the US military's AlphaDogfight challenge , put on by the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), in which big-name military contractors including Lockheed Martin competed for the crown. The winning company, Heron Systems, emerged as a victor with its fighter
8h
Molecule secreted by cancer-associated fibroblasts promotes anticancer drug resistance
Joint research at Kumamoto University in Japan discovered a new mechanism for anticancer drug resistance in gastric cancer. Experiments clarified that the Annexin A6 molecule contained in extracellular vesicles (EVs) is secreted by cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and taken up by gastric cancer cells, resulting in resistance to anticancer drug treatment. New drug development that targets Annex
8h
New research on Post-fracture Care Coordination Programs highlighted at WCO-IOF-ESCEO
After the first fragility fracture, there is a high risk of subsequent fractures, with the risk highest in the following two years. This is why secondary fracture prevention, and specifically topics related to Post-fracture Care Coordination Program (such as Fracture Liaison Service – FLS) development, are a focus of several live and pre-recorded presentations at the virtual World Congress on Oste
8h
Children with cognitive delays are more likely to have CT scan to diagnose appendicitis
Computed tomography (CT) is used at a higher rate than ultrasound in children with developmental and cognitive impairments to diagnose appendicitis, even though CT scans increase radiation risk in smaller bodies.
8h
Scientists discover a social cue of safety
Are you in danger? Looking at how others behave is one of the ways social animals, such as humans, find the answer. Even though the existence of social cues of danger is well known, no social cues of safety have been identified until just now.
8h
Sea-level rise linked to higher water tables along California coast
Researchers modeled the effects of rising sea levels along the California coast. While results varied with local topography, the study indicates an increased threat to populated areas already at risk from rising water tables, and the possibility of flooding in unexpected inland areas.
8h
New insights into lung tissue in COVID-19 disease
Physicists at the University of Göttingen, together with pathologists and lung specialists at the Medical University of Hannover, have developed a three-dimensional imaging technique that enables high resolution and three-dimensional representation of damaged lung tissue following severe Covid-19. Using a special X-ray microscopy technique, they were able to image changes caused by the coronavirus
8h
Loop, resonate, and accelerate!
Neuroscientists demonstrate how to improve communication between different regions of the brain
8h
Your in-laws' history of drinking problems could lead to alcohol issues of your own
A study of more than 300,000 couples in Sweden finds marriage to a spouse who grew up exposed to parental alcohol misuse increases a person's likelihood of developing a drinking problem.
8h
A new molecular guardian of intestinal stem cells
Intestinal stem cells hold a fine balance between two potential forms: remaining as stem cells, or developing into intestinal epithelial cells. In a new study, researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) discovered a novel molecular mechanism that regulates this balance and preserves the stemness of intestinal stem cells—that is, their ability to develop into any intestinal epithel
8h
A new molecular guardian of intestinal stem cells
Intestinal stem cells hold a fine balance between two potential forms: remaining as stem cells, or developing into intestinal epithelial cells. In a new study, researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) discovered a novel molecular mechanism that regulates this balance and preserves the stemness of intestinal stem cells—that is, their ability to develop into any intestinal epithel
8h
The Party of Bill Kristol and Angela Davis
Anyone seeking a metaphor for the current Democratic Party could find one in the final night of this year's Democratic National Convention. It was an often-dizzying mix of the solemn and the silly, veering between themes and ideas without a clear direction, and unified only by Joe Biden, who delivered a strong acceptance speech to close the night and the convention. If he's going to succeed in No
8h
Skat and poker: More luck than skill?
Chess requires playing ability and strategic thinking; in roulette, chance determines victory or defeat, gain or loss. But what about skat and poker? Are they games of chance or games of skill in game theory? This classification also determines whether play may involve money. Prof. Dr Jörg Oechssler and his team of economists at Heidelberg University studied this question, developing a rating syst
8h
Psychological disease avoidance linked to preventative behavior, study finds
More than other factors, strong feelings of germ aversion and pathogen disgust are significantly associated with concern about COVID-19 and preventative behavior, according to findings from UConn School of Nursing researchers published in the journal PLOS ONE.The findings are part of a year-long examination of how behavior and social attitudes change, and what factors influence those changes, when
8h
'Selfies' could be used to detect heart disease
Sending a "selfie" to the doctor could be a cheap and simple way of detecting heart disease, according to the authors of a new study published in the European Heart Journal. The study is the first to show that it's possible to use a deep learning computer algorithm to detect coronary artery disease (CAD) by analysing four photographs of a person's face.
8h
A powder method for the high-efficacy measurement of electro-optic coefficients
A high-efficacy powder method, combining calculations and measurements on powder second harmonic generation (SHG) effect, infrared reflectance spectrum (IRRS), and Raman spectrum, is put forward for the evaluation and exploration of novel electro-optic crystals.
8h
Why obeying orders can make us do terrible things
War atrocities are sometimes committed by 'normal' people obeying orders. Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience measured brain activity while participants inflicted pain and found that obeying orders reduced empathy and guilt related brain activity for the inflicted pain. This may explain why people are able to commit immoral acts under coercion.
8h
Simple test could improve public attitudes to autism
Psychologists from Bath and Essex suggest existing ways of testing public attitudes towards autism are not fit for purpose.
8h
"All-in-one" strategy for metalla[3]catenanes, borromean rings and ring-in-ring complex
Recently, Ye Lu, Dong Liu, Yue-Jian Lin, Zhen-Hua Li and Guo-Xin Jin from Fudan University (Shanghai, China) made exciting progress and developed self-assembly of metalla[3]catenanes, Borromean rings and ring-in-ring complex using a simple π-donor unit.
8h
A four-state magnetic tunnel junction for novel spintronics applications
A tunnel junction is a device consisting of two conducting layers separated by an insulating layer. Classically, the resistance for driving current across an insulating layer is infinite; however, when the insulating layer is thin (~ 1-2 nanometers), charge carriers may tunnel through the insulating layer, due to their quantum nature. When the conducting layers are magnetic, a magnetic tunnel junc
8h
How the Pandemic Reshaped Election Campaigns—Maybe Forever
The digital infrastructures have been under construction for years. But the pandemic has forced candidates to embrace them and to get creative with how they use them.
8h
Electron movements in liquid measured in super-slow motion
Electrons are able to move within molecules, for example when they are excited from outside or in the course of a chemical reaction. For the first time, scientists have now succeeded in studying the first few dozen attoseconds of this electron movement in a liquid.
8h
Six ways the 2020 census will change your life
For the past 118 years, census takers have traveled on foot, horse, snowmobile, and more to capture basic demographic data from Americans. This is the first year that the survey can be filled out online. (US Census Bureau/) A national census only comes around once every decade, but this year's has truly been special. When the 2020 US census launched back in March, it was the first survey of its k
9h
Electron movements in liquid measured in super-slow motion
Electrons are able to move within molecules, for example when they are excited from outside or in the course of a chemical reaction. For the first time, scientists have now succeeded in studying the first few dozen attoseconds of this electron movement in a liquid.
9h
When Your Best Friend Gives Birth to Your Babies—All 4 of Them
Each installment of The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with Stacey Beehler, the mother of quadruplets, and her best friend, Debbie Vibber, who gave birth to them in 2001. Debbie offered to serve as Stacey's surrogate after seeing her friend strugg
9h
Metal organic framework (MOF) microcrystals for multicolor broadband lasing
Multicolor single-mode polarized microlasers containing an output range from visible light to the near-infrared have significant applications in photonic integration and multimodal chemical sensing or imaging applications. However, such devices are very difficult to realize in practice. In a new report, Huajun He and a research team in physics, materials science and chemistry in Singapore, China a
9h
Blodplättar kan hindra att cancer sprids
I blodkärlen patrullerar blodplättar, trombocyter, för att kunna täppa till de skador som uppkommer, en viktig roll för att minska risken för allvarlig blödning.
9h
6G Will Be 100 Times Faster Than 5G—and Now There's a Chip for It
Though 5G—a next-generation speed upgrade to wireless networks—is scarcely up and running (and still nonexistent in many places) researchers are already working on what comes next. It lacks an official name, but they're calling it 6G for the sake of simplicity (and hey, it's tradition). 6G promises to be up to 100 times faster than 5G— fast enough to download 142 hours of Netflix in a second—but
9h
Reports of domestic violence on the rise during pandemic, study finds
The conditions created by COVID-19—unexpected time at home, unemployment and financial insecurity, anxiety and stress—are the same conditions known to aggravate domestic violence.
9h
The VentiFresh ECO Uses NASA-Inspired Tech To Eliminate Odor And Airborne Germs
Nobody likes bad smells, but when you're in space, there's no escape from them. The smells are so intense astronaut Scott Kelly likened them to the smell of a jail . Nor would traditional air fresheners work; they release chemicals into the environment, and you can't throw open a window to get some fresh air in. The answer turned out to be photocatalysis, which destroys stench by blasting it with
9h
Spinning black hole powers jet by magnetic flux
A new letter has been found in the mysterious alphabet of black holes. Two astrophysicists share this discovery in the journal Nature Communications.
9h
A four-state magnetic tunnel junction for novel spintronics applications
Researchers have introduced a new type of MTJ with four resistance states, and successfully demonstrated switching between the states with spin currents. The increased number of states is achieved by replacing one of the magnetic layers with a structure in the form of two crossing ellipses. Such MTJs may enable novel spintronics devices, e.g., multi-level MRAM which stores data much more densely,
9h
One more hit from rare Earth: Efficient coherent spin manipulation by the electric field
Researchers used rare earth ions to efficiently couple the electric and magnetic behaviors of material. They realized convenient coherent controlling of electron spins with the electric field, aiming at fabricating applicable quantum computation devices.
9h
A new molecular guardian of intestinal stem cells
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) investigated how intestinal stem cells are controlled at the molecular level to remain stem cells or to develop into one of various intestinal cells. By studying mice lacking the protein IRF2, the researchers found a blunted regenerative response and an increased development of immature Paneth cells upon intestinal inflammation and infect
9h
Electron movements in liquid measured in super-slow motion
Electrons are able to move within molecules, for example when they are excited from outside or in the course of a chemical reaction. For the first time, scientists have now succeeded in studying the first few dozen attoseconds of this electron movement in a liquid.
9h
Smart responsive lasing signals for high-security optical encryption
Very recently, Professor Yong Sheng Zhao's group in the Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences propose a strategy to achieve multiple responsive lasing emission states for high-security optical encryption by modulating the competition between radiative rate of donor and the rate of energy transfer in FRET microlasers, which is published in National Science Review.
9h
Concussions can cause long-term sleep problems
A new study shows that people who have had concussions sometimes develop long-term after effects, including sleep disturbances. The findings could also be of use to other patient groups.
9h
Glacier town at risk in next great New Zealand earthquake
Running through the heart of New Zealand's glacier country is the infamous Alpine Fault. The 600 kilometer-long (370 mile) faultline on the boundary of the Eurasian and Pacific tectonic plates beneath the country's South Island produces infrequent but significant earthquakes. In the line of fire is the small town of Franz Josef, just 5 kilometers (3 miles) from the often-visited Franz Josef glacie
9h
Cancer tumour microbiome may predict a person's chances of survival
The microbes embedded in a tumour seem to influence how a person's cancer will develop and how well they will respond to treatment
9h
Scientists solve Leonardo da Vinci's 500-year-old human heart mystery
Scientists discover the function of the trabeculae, muscle fibers lining human hearts. The structures were first described by Leonard da Vinci over 500 years ago. The trabeculae have an effect on the heart's performance and failure. Scientists found out the purpose of mysterious structures in the human heart, first described by Leonardo da Vinci 500 years ago. The mesh of muscle fibers called tra
9h
Heidi Larson: Why Is Trust In Vaccines As Important As The Vaccines Themselves?
In 2003, polio reemerged in twenty countries that had long been declared polio-free. Anthropologist Heidi Larson says to stop the spread of disease, we need to first build trust in vaccines. (Image credit: TED)
9h
Why babies not always remember what they have learned
If and how babies recall what they have learned depends on their mood: what they've learned when feeling calm is inaccessible when they're acitive and vice versa. This was shown in a study conducted by developmental psychologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) with 96 children aged nine months. They published their report in the journal "Child Development" from 19. August 2020.
9h
Microfluidic chip technology enables rapid multiplex diagnosis of plant viral diseases
Toyohashi University of Technology has applied a microfluidic chip technology to develop a multiplex genetic diagnostic device for the early detection and prevention of crop diseases. The group conducted a gene amplification experiment using cucumber viruses on the diagnostic device, and demonstrated that the rapid multiplex diagnosis can be performed within 1 hour. This diagnostic device is a hig
9h
Reproducing the pathophysiology of polycystic kidney disease from human iPS cells
A joint research project has successfully reproduced the pathogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) from human iPS cells in vitro. Although cysts derived from renal tubules have been previously documented, this is the first derivation of cysts from collecting ducts, which is more closely related to the pathogenesis of the disease. This research is expected to lead to a be
9h
Scientists sink teeth into identifying several new bacteria that cause dental caries
The microbial ecosystem of our body plays a vital role in its upkeep. Any imbalance in this ecosystem can cause several health problems; in our mouth, this can mean tooth cavities. Motivated by the need to find out why an increasing number of young Japanese people are reporting tooth decay, scientists from Japan examined saliva samples from university students. They discovered insightful differenc
9h
From biopaste to bioplastic
Forest scientists develop innovative wood-based materials for 3D printing.
9h
What kind of animal transports the seeds of the world's smallest fruit-bearing plants?
Plants in the Balanophora genus have very small fruits and very little is known about their seed dispersal strategy. Associate Professor Suetsugu Kenji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science) illuminates a previously unrecognized seed dispersal mutualism between Balanophora yakushimensis and birds, which are attracted by and obtain nutrients from its fleshy bracts.
9h
Key molecule responsible for poor prognosis of breast cancer identified
Hokkaido University scientists have shown that Interleukin-34 is a prognostic marker and drug target for Triple Negative Breast Cancer.
9h
A gatekeeper against insulin resistance in the brain
The brain plays a major role in controlling our blood glucose levels. In type 2 diabetes this glucose metabolism brain control is often dysfunctional. A group of scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD) have now shown in the 'Journal of Clinical Investigations' that in men a genetic variant of the gene DUSP8 can increase the risk for T2D by impairin
9h
Unbalanced microtubule networks launch establishment of neuronal polarity
Prof. MENG Wenxiang's group from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently reported a new mechanism by which microtubule networks instruct neuronal polarity.
9h
Very high energy gamma-ray emission from a radio galaxy
Giant elliptical galaxies, the oldest known large galactic structures in the universe, have no spiral arms and little or no current star formation activity, but their central supermassive black holes are often active galactic nuclei (AGN). While nearly all galaxies host a supermassive black hole in their nuclei, most nuclei are not AGN. Astronomers think that giant ellipticals formed in the early
9h
The risk of preterm birth rises near gas flaring, reflecting deep-rooted environmental injustices in rural America
Through the southern reaches of Texas, communities are scattered across a flat landscape of dry brush lands, ranches and agricultural fields. This large rural region near the U.S.-Mexico border is known for its persistent poverty. Over 25% of the families here live in poverty, and many lack access to basic services like water, sewer and primary health care.
9h
What's in that wildfire smoke, and why is it so bad for your lungs?
If I dare to give the coronavirus credit for anything, I would say it has made people more conscious of the air they breathe.
9h
Super-resolution imaging breakthrough in living cells
Edinburgh scientists have developed a new imaging technique that reveals the inner workings of living cells in stunning detail and could pave the way to a better understanding of many diseases.
9h
Humans aren't inherently selfish: We're actually hardwired to work together
There has long been a general assumption that human beings are essentially selfish. We're apparently ruthless, with strong impulses to compete against each other for resources and to accumulate power and possessions.
9h
Super-resolution imaging breakthrough in living cells
Edinburgh scientists have developed a new imaging technique that reveals the inner workings of living cells in stunning detail and could pave the way to a better understanding of many diseases.
9h
Image: Hubble captures supernova host galaxy
This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope features the spectacular galaxy NGC 2442, nicknamed the Meathook galaxy owing to its extremely asymmetrical and irregular shape.
9h
In Pandemic, More Are Paying for Direct Access to Their Doctors
Concierge care has grown fast as patients no longer want to sit in a waiting room with strangers. But it comes at a high price.
9h
How an Article about the H-Bomb Landed Scientific American in the Middle of the Red Scare
At one time this magazine tangled with the FBI, the Atomic Energy Commission and Joseph McCarthy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
When Scientific American Made M. C. Escher Famous
In the 1960s Martin Gardner helped to turn the artist M. C. Escher into a sensation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Scientific American vs. the Supernatural
This magazine launched a contest to prove, or disprove, the existence of ghosts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Birds sing better with some early morning practice
There may be a good reason why birds are most vocal at first light, according to new research. By singing early and often, birds perform better during the day, a new study suggests. "It's like they're warming up backstage, before the sun comes up and the curtain rises." The morning cacophony is mostly males, whose songs are meant to impress potential mates and rivals. "It's like they're warming u
9h
The partisan pandemic: Do we now live in alternative realities?
Politics can divide even friends and families. When this happens, we like to tell ourselves that the explanation lies in honest differences in values and preferences. From this standpoint, friends from different political parties won't really disagree, for example, about the number of workers displaced in the pandemic, but they might differ on who should bear the costs. It's another matter, howeve
9h
Women surgeons earn their cut of NIH funding — and then some
Women are underrepresented in academic surgery, but women surgeons are earning a disproportionate share of research grants from the National Institutes of Health, a new study has found.
9h
Developing precise medicines for triple negative breast cancer
Taking advantage of a cancer cell's altered metabolism that drives its runaway growth, Princess Margaret researchers are zeroing in on these molecular changes to help them develop more precise drug targets for one of the most deadly breast cancers.
9h
A new method for in vivo plant cell imaging with SNAP-tag proteins
A new method for visualizing in vivo protein dynamics in plant cells has been developed by Nagoya University scientists, offering an important step forward in plant cell fluorescent imaging.
9h
The impacts of gentrification on transportation and social support
The historically Black district of Albina in Portland, Oregon, due to racist real estate practices, faced multiple displacement events between 1960 and 1990 with the construction of Interstate 5 through the heart of the neighborhood as well as wholesale destruction of hundreds of homes. Steven Howland of Portland State University focused his doctoral research on examining the impacts of gentrifica
9h
Foiling illicit cryptocurrency mining with artificial intelligence
Los Alamos National Laboratory computer scientists have developed a new artificial intelligence (AI) system that may be able to identify malicious codes that hijack supercomputers to mine for cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin and Monero.
9h
Self-collected saliva and deep nasal swabs are equally effective for diagnosing COVID-19
Self-collected saliva and deep nasal swabs collected by healthcare providers are equally effective for detecting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, according to a new study conducted by ARUP Laboratories and University of Utah (U of U) Health.
9h
Elevated "hunger" hormone leaves trauma-exposed teens at higher risk for PTSD
Research suggests that acyl-ghrelin is an especially predictive biomarker of PTSD.
9h
Ah shucks, how bushfires can harm and even kill our delicious oysters
Oysters are filter feeders, extracting nutrients from the water, so that makes them very susceptible to water pollution such as that from bushfires.
9h
Efter ballade om lort i Øresund: Hofor bygger nyt rør til spildevand
PLUS. Der er sat prop for planerne om at udlede 290 mio. liter urenset spildevand til Øresund. En ny ledning og sløjfning af parkeringspladser skal løse problemet.
10h
Examining the potential of home food growing during lockdown
Can growing food at home help households to be more resilient to future lockdowns by ensuring access to healthy foods? How much can we grow at home and does this have benefits for our health and wellbeing?
10h
How our food choices cut into forests and put us closer to viruses
As the global population has doubled to 7.8 billion in about 50 years, industrial agriculture has increased the output from fields and farms to feed humanity. One of the negative outcomes of this transformation has been the extreme simplification of ecological systems, with complex multi-functional landscapes converted to vast swaths of monocultures.
10h
A way to intentionally change the curvature of bent molecules using a polymer and ultraviolet light
A team of researchers from the University of Oxford and Utrecht University has developed a way to change the curvature of bent molecules using a polymer and ultraviolet light. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their process and possible uses for it. Maria Helena Godinho, with University NOVA of Lisbon, has published a Perspective piece in the same journal issue o
10h
Ah shucks, how bushfires can harm and even kill our delicious oysters
Oysters are filter feeders, extracting nutrients from the water, so that makes them very susceptible to water pollution such as that from bushfires.
10h
Scientists demonstrate tunable, atomically thin semiconductors
To tune the band gap, a key parameter in controlling the electrical conductivity and optical properties of semiconductors, researchers typically engineer alloys, a process in which two or more materials are combined to achieve properties that otherwise could not be achieved by a pristine material.
10h
Apple's $2 Trillion Valuation Weakens Its Fight Over Fortnite
Plus: Steve Jobs on apps, Bill Gates on the TikTok sale, and bad weather getting worse.
10h
The DNC Is the Best Zoom Meeting of 2020—So Far
Coast-to-coast roll calls, Billie Eilish, and Meg Whitman's quick bite—this year's all-digital Democratic National Convention was a lesson in the new voyeurism.
10h
This Isn't How Joe Biden Wanted to Win
WILMINGTON, Del.—In a diner not far from here, in April 2016, Joe Biden was on one knee, looking into the eyes of a girl with Down syndrome, talking with her so quietly that only she could hear. He was locked in, like he couldn't see or hear anything else, for a few seconds at the end of a campaign stop that could not possibly have produced enough votes to justify the amount of time he spent ther
10h
Destroyed ancient temple now open for virtual exploration
Five years after its destruction, the ancient Temple of Bel in Palmyra, Syria has been digitally reconstructed by the UC San Diego Library's Digital Media Lab using cutting-edge 3-D methods and artificial intelligence applications.
10h
Child mindfulness study promotes calmer, more caring classrooms
As many young children—and their families—prepare to return to school following COVID-19 shutdowns, stress levels for students, teachers and parents will undoubtedly reach an all-time high.
10h
Physics team applies quantitative methods to model how far virus-laden aerosols travel through the air
As scientific voids go, it would be hard just now to find a more pressing question: How do the aerosols that carry the invisible coronavirus travel on the air after they leave an infected person?
10h
Plasma guides maintain focus of lasers
In science fiction, firing powerful lasers looks easy—the Death Star can just send destructive power hurtling through space as a tight beam. But in reality, once a powerful laser has been fired, care must be taken to ensure it doesn't get spread too thin.
10h
Brud på principaftale: Lynetteholmen bliver alligevel ikke selvfinansierende
Selv i det mest optimistiske scenarie vil anlægsprojektet Lynetteholmen være 13,1 mia. kroner fra at være selvfinancieret.
10h
Miljøstyrelsen trodser rådgiver i ny pesticid-dispensation
En advokatrapport konkluderer, at Miljøstyrelsen nu har styr på pesticidgodkendelser, som for et halvt år siden blev kritiseret af Rigsrevisionen. Alligevel giver styrelsen på ny dispensation fra et EU-forbud, denne gang i strid med sin egen rådgiver.
10h
Why Hurricane Names Are Retired
Deaths or excessive damage put Katrina, Maria, Harvey and other monikers out of circulation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Synthesis of organophilic carbon nanodots with multi-band emission from tomato leaves
In a paper published in NANO, researchers from Shanghai Normal University, China prepared organophilic carbon nanodots (CNDs) using natural organic molecules in plant leaves by a one-pot green synthesis. The multi-emissive carbon dots were used as an efficient fluorescent sensor in ethanol, which have potential applications in sensing fields or energy devices.
10h
What kind of animal transports the seeds of the world's smallest fruit-bearing plants?
Balanophora have some of the smallest fruits among angiosperms, leading researchers to question how the seeds of these plants are dispersed. However, very little is currently known about their seed dispersal system. Associate Professor Suetsugu Kenji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science) documents an unrecognized seed dispersal mutualism between the peculiar, mushroom-like non-photosyntheti
10h
Young New Zealanders are turning off reading in record numbers – we need a new approach to teaching literacy
Meet Otis. He's eight years old and until recently he didn't want to read or write. Then his teacher changed the way she taught and things began to improve.
10h
Researchers discover first 'open-charm' tetraquark
The LHCb experiment at CERN has developed a penchant for finding exotic combinations of quarks, the elementary particles that come together to give us composite particles such as the more familiar proton and neutron. In particular, LHCb has observed several tetraquarks, which, as the name suggests, are made of four quarks (or rather two quarks and two antiquarks). Observing these unusual particles
10h
Forest scientists develop innovative wood-based materials for 3-D printing
A viscous biopaste that is easy to process, solidifies quickly and is suitable for producing even complex structures using the 3-D printing process has been developed by a research team headed by Prof. Dr. Marie-Pierre Laborie from the Chair of Forest Biomaterials at the University of Freiburg. The wood-based biodegradable synthetic could potentially be used in lightweight construction, amongst ot
10h
What kind of animal transports the seeds of the world's smallest fruit-bearing plants?
Balanophora have some of the smallest fruits among angiosperms, leading researchers to question how the seeds of these plants are dispersed. However, very little is currently known about their seed dispersal system. Associate Professor Suetsugu Kenji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science) documents an unrecognized seed dispersal mutualism between the peculiar, mushroom-like non-photosyntheti
10h
Awkward glances show your brain can 'read minds'
The universal and embarrassing tendency to avert our gaze when we're caught looking at someone else could shed light on how our brains derive meaning from a look into another's eyes, researchers say. In almost all cases, people instinctually follow the gaze of another. But in their new study, the researchers found an exception in the socially awkward situation in which a person caught staring ave
10h
Novel hormone discovery provides new insight into the evolution of plant structure
An international study co-led by the Monash University School of Biological Sciences has discovered a stem-cell promoting hormone in the liverwort Marchantia polymopha.
10h
Flying-foxes' extraordinary mobility creates key challenges for management and conservation
New research led by scientists at Western Sydney University and published in BMC Biology shows that flying-foxes are always on the move among a vast network of roosts, creating key challenges for their management and conservation in Australia.
10h
Younger generation fail to notice environmental decline due to generational amnesia
Young people are not as aware of environmental changes compared to the older generation, according to a new report by Royal Holloway, University of London and international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society London) due to a phenomenon known as shifting baseline syndrome (SBS).
10h
Video: NASA's guide to near-light-speed travel
So, you've just put the finishing touches on upgrades to your spaceship, and now it can fly at almost the speed of light. We're not quite sure how you pulled it off, but congratulations!
10h
Novel hormone discovery provides new insight into the evolution of plant structure
An international study co-led by the Monash University School of Biological Sciences has discovered a stem-cell promoting hormone in the liverwort Marchantia polymopha.
10h
Flying-foxes' extraordinary mobility creates key challenges for management and conservation
New research led by scientists at Western Sydney University and published in BMC Biology shows that flying-foxes are always on the move among a vast network of roosts, creating key challenges for their management and conservation in Australia.
10h
Researchers see crack formation in 3-D-printed tungsten in real time
Boasting the highest melting and boiling points of all known elements, tungsten has become a popular choice for applications involving extreme temperatures, including lightbulb filaments, arc welding, radiation shielding and, more recently, as plasma-facing material in fusion reactors such as the ITER Tokamak.
10h
Younger generation fail to notice environmental decline due to generational amnesia
Young people are not as aware of environmental changes compared to the older generation, according to a new report by Royal Holloway, University of London and international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society London) due to a phenomenon known as shifting baseline syndrome (SBS).
10h
Make Covid-19 tests compulsory for students, say scientists
Independent Sage also advises socialising be restricted to students' residential bubbles Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Covid-19 tests should be compulsory for all university students and staff to prevent outbreaks on campuses and protect communities, according to an independent group of scientists. Testing should be carried out either before or as soon as people ar
10h
Scientists discover a social cue of safety
For schools of fish, herds of antelope, and even human societies, inherent safety is one of many advantages of cooperative groups. Surrounded by their peers, individuals can lower their vigilance and calmly engage in other activities, such as foraging or watching YouTube videos.
10h
New ground station brings laser communications closer to reality
Optical communications, transmitting data using infrared lasers, has the potential to help NASA return more data to Earth than ever. The benefits of this technology to exploration and Earth science missions are huge. In support of a mission to demonstrate this technology, NASA recently completed installing its newest optical ground station in Haleakala, Hawaii.
10h
Light-responsive top layer of plastic film induces movement
Azobenzene-containing plastic film is a peculiar material: Its surface can change shape when exposed to light, making it a valuable component in modern technologies/devices like TV screens and solar cells. Scientists now show that only a thin, topmost layer of the light-dependent azobenzene-containing plastic film needs to be light-sensitive, rather than the entire film, opening up new ways to pot
10h
Researchers discover superconductor with unexpected lattice configuration
An international team has discovered that compressing monocrystalline (TaSe4)2I can create a system where the constituent TaSe4Q1-D atomic chains are in amorphous state without breaking the orientational and periodic translation symmetries of the chain lattice. Moreover, they found that along with the amorphization of the atomic chains, the insulating (TaSe4)2I becomes a superconductor.
10h
Electron movements in liquid measured in super-slow motion
Electrons are able to move within molecules when they are excited from outside or in the course of a chemical reaction. For the first time, scientists have now succeeded in studying the first few dozen attoseconds of this electron movement in a liquid.
10h
Large tin monosulfide crystal opens pathway for next generation solar cells
Tin monosulfide (SnS) is a promising material used for next-generation solar cells because of its nontoxic characteristics and abundance, in addition to its excellent photovoltaic properties. Sakiko Kawanishi and Issei Suzuki led a team that has succeeded in growing large single crystals of SnS, which can provide a pathway for the fabrication of SnS solar cells with a high conversion efficiency.
10h
Scientists discover a social cue of safety
For schools of fish, herds of antelope, and even human societies, inherent safety is one of many advantages of cooperative groups. Surrounded by their peers, individuals can lower their vigilance and calmly engage in other activities, such as foraging or watching YouTube videos.
10h
Smartphone, blockchain technologies to open new frontier in fight against food fraud
Food fraudsters have found myriad ways to trick shoppers—from cheap horsemeat sold as beef to conventional apples labelled as organic. But new rapid testing and tracing technologies may help turn the tables on food crime.
10h
'Beggers' can't be choosers as another meta-analysis is retracted
A group of researchers in China may be asking for a refund after, they claim, they got bad advice from a course in writing meta-analyses that led to a retraction for plagiarism and other problems. They may not be alone. We're aware of at least nine articles with similar issues that have been retracted so … Continue reading
10h
'SMILES' are the brightest fluorescent materials ever
Materials called small-molecule, ionic isolation lattices, or SMILES, are the brightest-known fluorescent materials, researchers report. The patent-pending materials could address key setbacks to using fluorescent dyes as solid-state materials in academic and commercial applications. "There are several commercial applications for SMILES, including medical diagnostics, solar concentrators, lasers,
10h
SmartSEC™ EV Isolation System
The next generation of size exclusion chromatography (SEC) for the isolation of extracellular vesicles (EV)
10h
How Secure Are Your Texts, Really?
This week, we discuss the ins and outs of encrypted messaging apps and videochat services—and why you should probably be using them.
11h
Watch This Obscure Animated Classic. Never Recover
In the freaky-fantastic Hungarian film 'Son of the White Mare,' the hero breastfeeds for 14 years. Years. And that's only the beginning.
11h
'DiceKeys' Creates a Master Password for Life With One Roll
A new kit leaves your cryptographic destiny up to 25 cubes in a plastic box.
11h
Mummified leaves offer a glimpse of Earth's ancient climate—and our future
New Zealand, where the fossilized leaves were found (Tyler Lastovich/Pexels/) 23 million-year-old mummified leaves might give us a peak at how plants might respond to our changing climate in the distant future. In a study published on August 20 in the journal Climate of the Past , Biologists and geologists examined exceptionally well-preserved fossils from a lakebed in New Zealand and found evide
11h
Små partiklar i blodet avslöjar cancer i tidigt skede
Via små partiklar i blodet kan celler kommunicera med varandra på avstånd – både i friskt tillstånd och vid sjukdom. De kallas extracellulära vesiklar och partiklar, EVP – och forskning. Målet för forskning vid Linköoings universitet är att kunna använda dem som diagnosverktyg för att upptäcka cancer i ett tidigt skede. Ju tidigare cancer upptäcks, desto större chans att lyckas bota sjukdomen. I
11h
Se F-16 pilot få lammetæv af AI i luftduel
En af amerikansk luftvåbens dygtigste F-16 piloter måtte se sig besejret af en kunstig algoritme i en virtuel luftkamp. For DARPA er det en god ting.
11h
Why the DNC Worked So Well
One of the first events of the Democratic National Convention, as it began airing on national television on Monday evening, was an "In Memoriam" segment that mourned the more than 165,000 Americans who have died of COVID-19. You can read the segment as mawkish, or as a cynical exploitation of emotion for partisan ends: the stuff of a Hollywood awards show, wandering awkwardly into the wrong theat
12h
Scientists crack mystery of how Spain's prized albariño wine came to be
Study suggests grape was not brought from elsewhere, but cultivated from wild strain and has been in the region since Roman times Myths, mysteries and legends surround the origin of albariño, widely regarded as Spain's finest white wine, and how the grape from which it derives wound up in the far north-west of the country. Now scientists at a research institute in Galicia have debunked theories t
12h
97,000 People Got Convalescent Plasma. Who Knows If It Works?
A treatment made from the blood of recovered Covid-19 patients seemed promising in March. Today … well, it's still just promising.
12h
How One Man Broke Through Google's Election Ad Defenses
A Long Island search marketer found a way to exploit Google search ads and spread misinformation about candidates. The company pledges to fix the issue.
12h
5 Password Manager Perks You Might Not Be Using
These tools don't just keep your accounts safe and secure. Here's how you can use them to streamline your whole online experience.
12h
A Rocket Scientist's Love Algorithm Adds Up During Covid-19
On the brink of a breakup, a JPL engineer computed a relationship prediction formula. It eventually became a dating app—and its value is rising in the midst of a pandemic.
12h
CDC Issues Warning: Be on the Lookout for a Surge in Pediatric Paralysis Cases This Fall
The CDC is warning parents and pediatric medical professionals to be on the lookout for a potentially devastating viral disease this fall. It isn't the novel coronavirus, but the impact of the pandemic might make things worse…or better.
12h
The Surprising Advantages of Virtual Conferences
Among other things, they're easier on the environment and more inclusive than in-person meetings — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
The 22-Year-Old Blogger Behind Protests in Belarus
In the videos posted last Sunday from Belarus, thousands of people can be seen streaming into the center of Minsk, walking up the broad avenues, gathering in a park. In smaller cities and even little towns—Brest, Gomel, Khotsimsk, Molodechno, Shklov—they are walking down main streets, meeting in squares, singing pop songs and folk songs. They are remarkably peaceful, and remarkably united. Many o
12h
The U.S. Shouldn't Get to Decide If a Navajo Man Dies
Imagine you live in a state where the death penalty for serious crimes is prohibited. Imagine you are accused of a serious crime against another resident of your state, but your trial is moved to a state where the government can seek the death penalty. Over your objections, the objections of the victim's family, the objections of your home state, and even the objections of the original prosecutor
12h
Sea level rise quickens as Greenland ice sheet sheds record amount
Greenland's massive ice sheet saw a record net loss of 532 billion tonnes last year, raising red flags about accelerating sea level rise, according to new findings.
12h
Lidar Advances Show Mosquito Rush Hours
New research shows how a laser-based system can help detect mosquito movements — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
The climate crisis has already arrived. Just look to California's abnormal wildfires | Alastair Gee, Dani Anguiano
In the last decade, amid drought and searing heat, California has entered the 'era of megafires' and has become the 'examplar for climate change extreme events today' There's an idea that when the climate crisis begins, we will know it. Movies present it as a moment when the world's weather suddenly turns apocalyptic: winds howl, sea levels surge, capital cities are decimated. Climate messaging c
12h
VIDEO For nogle er teknologien en drøm, for andre et mareridt: Sådan virker atomkraft
Kernekraft kan producere enorme mængder energi helt uden at udlede CO2.
12h
Latest Coronavirus News: Live Updates
With cases surging, Europe braces for a new phase in the pandemic. U.S. debt is now larger than the size of the nation's economy.
13h
Syringe shortage could hamper delivery of Covid-19 vaccine, experts warn
US companies make roughly 663m syringes a year but the Trump administration has calculated that an extra 850m may be needed As the race for a vaccine against the coronavirus heats up, the US faces another potential crisis: a shortage of syringes. The US federal government has already spent hundreds of millions of dollars in hopes of warding off a syringe shortage, if and when a Covid-19 vaccine i
13h
The Lesson Americans Never Learn
Across the country, parents are using Facebook to form "pandemic pods," hiring tutors or out-of-work teachers to educate their kids as school district after school district announces that it will go partially or fully virtual. Beloved mom-and-pop stores are flooding sites such as GoFundMe to seek support from their sheltered-in-place patrons. Sick people are relying on COVID-19 relief funds and h
13h
Nyttiga insekter gynnas av mångfald på grödor och variation i landskapet
Genom att odla fler grödor kan vi gynna nyttoinsekter, till exempel jordlöpare som håller skadegörare i schack eller bin som pollinerar blommande grödor. Men den positiva effekten syntes bara om det också fanns till exempel skog och hagmark i landskapet. Studien från SLU genomfördes i Skåne. Många insekter och spindlar trivs dåligt i det intensivt brukade odlingslandskapet eftersom utbudet av föd
13h
How likely are you to be infected by the coronavirus on a flight?
Hard evidence on the risks of in-flight transmission of coronavirus is scarce, but what we know suggests that flying may be less risky than other activities such as eating out or going to the pub
13h
Independent phase modulation for quadruplex polarization channels enabled by chirality-assisted geometric-phase metasurfaces
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17773-6 Here the authors propose an approach to construct metasurfaces, which activate all circularly polarized channels and make full utilization of transmitted energy simultaneously. By introducing chirality-assisted phase all the components in the Jones matrix can be decoupled and independently tuned.
13h
Pumping up the charge density of a triboelectric nanogenerator by charge-shuttling
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17891-1 Conventionally, triboelectric nanogenerators are based on static charges fixed on dielectric surfaces. Here, the authors report a new mechanism using shuttling of mirror charge carriers corralled in quasi-symmetrical conduction domains, which boosts performance for blue energy harvesting.
13h
The mechanism of activation of the actin binding protein EHBP1 by Rab8 family members
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17792-3 EHBP1 is an adaptor protein that regulates vesicular trafficking and links endosomes to the actin cytoskeleton. Here, authors show that both termini of EHBP1 have membrane targeting potential and that in the absence of its binding partner Rab8, the bMERB and CH domain of EHBP1 form an intramolecular complex wh
13h
Single cell RNA sequencing identifies early diversity of sensory neurons forming via bi-potential intermediates
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17929-4 The diversity of primary sensory neurons and how fate choice is determined is unclear. Here, the authors use single cell RNA sequencing analysis of early murine somatosensory neurons to show that sensory neuron diversity is achieved by a transition through a bi-potential intermediate state.
13h
Room-temperature formation of CdS magic-size clusters in aqueous solutions assisted by primary amines
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18014-6 CdS magic-size clusters have, so far, been prepared only in organic solvents. Here, the authors report an aqueous-phase synthesis for CdS magic-size clusters at room temperature and reveal insights into the formation mechanism, including the key role of primary amines.
13h
Interface chemistry of an amide electrolyte for highly reversible lithium metal batteries
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17976-x Interface chemistry is essential for highly reversible lithium-metal batteries. Here the authors investigate amide-based electrolyte that lead to desirable interface species, resulting in dense Li-metal plating and top-down Li-metal stripping, responsible for the highly reversible cycling.
13h
Gamma-ray flares from relativistic magnetic reconnection in the jet of the quasar 3C 279
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17912-z Blazars show variable non-thermal emission across the electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to gamma rays. Here, the authors show blazar 3C 279 reveals a characteristic peak-in-peak variability pattern on time scales of minutes if particle acceleration is due to relativistic magnetic reconnection.
13h
CORE GREML for estimating covariance between random effects in linear mixed models for complex trait analyses
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18085-5 Linear mixed models have bias due to the assumed independence between random effects. Here, the authors describe a genome-based restricted maximum likelihood, CORE GREML, which estimates covariance between random effects. Application to UK Biobank data highlights this as an important parameter for multi-omics
13h
Research links Southeast Asia megadrought to drying in Africa
Physical evidence found in caves in Laos connects the end of the Green Sahara, when once heavily vegetated Northern Africa became a hyper-arid landscape, and a previously unknown megadrought that crippled Southeast Asia 4,000 to 5,000 years ago. Scientists at the University of California, Irvine, University of Pennsylvania, William Paterson University of New Jersey and other international institut
13h
Researchers link end of Green Sahara with SE Asia megadrought
In a new study published by Nature Communications, an interdisciplinary team of researchers link the end of the Green Sahara with a previously unknown megadrought which caused mass population shifts in Southeast Asia during the mid-Holocene period.
13h
Meet hedge fund managers of avian world
New research from Washington University in St. Louis finds that brood parasites living in more variable and unpredictable habitats tend to parasitize — or squat and drop their eggs in — the nests of a greater variety and number of hosts. The study is published Aug. 21 in Nature Communications.
13h
In times of ecological uncertainty, brood parasites hedge their bets
Some birds lay their eggs in the nests of other bird species and let the host parents raise their young. A new study finds that in times of environmental flux, these brood parasites 'diversify their portfolios,' minimizing the risks of their unorthodox lifestyle by increasing the number and variety of hosts they select as adoptive parents.
13h
Scientists discover a social cue of safety
Are you in danger? Looking at how others behave is one of the ways social animals, such as humans, find the answer. Even though the existence of social cues of danger is well known, no social cues of safety have been identified until just now.
13h
PODCAST: Apple i slagsmål med spilgigant. Altaner dratter ned – men ingen gør noget
Efter to altanulykker på få år efterlyser eksperter igen tilsyn med aldrende altaner. Apple tager det tunge skyts i brug for spilgiganten Epic Games. Begmand til dansk innovation.
13h
Hackerangreb mod Aalborg Universitet politianmeldt
Et hackerangreb kompromitterede omkring månedsskiftet brugerdatabasen på Aalborg Universitet, og siden blev der lukket ned for adgangen til alle systemer, mens man undersøgte sagen. Nu er der indgivet en politianmeldelse.
13h
Book Review: Invention Through the Lens of Materials Science
In "The Alchemy of Us," Ainissa Ramirez highlights the transformative impact of eight different inventions, from glass and clocks to telegraph wires and silicon chips. In each chapter, Ramirez shines light on the unsung heroes of these inventions and lays bare their unintended consequences.
13h
Urmager søger hjælp: Hvad er det mystiske sorte pulver i Jens Olsens Verdensur?
En læser undrer sig over, at verdensuret på Københavns Rådhus står stille. Vi har spurgt urmager Søren Andersen, som har passet og plejet uret i årtier. Han har opdaget et mystisk, sort pulver i uret.
13h
Biological responses to extreme weather events are detectable but difficult to formally attribute to anthropogenic climate change
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70901-6
14h
14h
Prevalence of canine obesity in the city of São Paulo, Brazil
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70937-8
14h
Improved adaptive impedance matching for RF front-end systems of wireless transceivers
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71056-0
14h
TGF-β is insufficient to induce adipocyte state loss without concurrent PPARγ downregulation
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71100-z
14h
The D2.mdx mouse as a preclinical model of the skeletal muscle pathology associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70987-y The D2. mdx mouse as a preclinical model of the skeletal muscle pathology associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy
14h
Cytokine profiling in serum-derived exosomes isolated by different methods
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70584-z
14h
Novel antimicrobial phosphate-free glass–ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68370-y
14h
Human consumption of the Earth's resources declined in 2020
Covid-19 led to 9.3% reduction in humanity's ecological footprint compared with same period last year The rate at which humanity is consuming the Earth's resources declined sharply this year as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, according to researchers. Consequently, Earth Overshoot Day, the point at which human consumption exceeds the amount nature can regenerate in a year, has moved back by ov
14h
Altaner skal tilsyneladende falde ned, før man – igen – opdager, hvor farlige de kan være
PLUS. Kollektiv glemsomhed har kostet dyrt – igen og igen. Men efter to altanulykker på få år er der en chance for, at branchen ikke får lov til at glemme igen.
14h
Education: Why 'energy vampires' must be slain
There are some aspects of the current education system that are, at best, inefficient and, at worst, actually slowing progress and hindering the learning process. Kevin Bartlett, co-founder and co-director of The Common Ground Collaborative , calls these "energy vampires" and says that now is the time to identify and get rid of them. Bartlett argues that the education space is constrained by comp
14h
In times of ecological uncertainty, brood parasites hedge their bets
Some birds lay their eggs in the nests of other bird species and let the host parents raise their young. A new study finds that in times of environmental flux, these brood parasites "diversify their portfolios," minimizing the risks of their unorthodox lifestyle by increasing the number and variety of hosts they select as adoptive parents.
14h
Research links Southeast Asia megadrought to drying in Africa
Physical evidence found in caves in Laos helps tell a story about a connection between the end of the Green Sahara, when once heavily vegetated Northern Africa became a hyper-arid landscape, and a previously unknown megadrought that crippled Southeast Asia 4,000 to 5,000 years ago.
14h
This Team Made a $500 Ventilator—but It May Never Be Used
Fears of a ventilator shortage inspired doctors and engineers to improvise new designs. Inside the race to build a cheap, reliable machine.
14h
In times of ecological uncertainty, brood parasites hedge their bets
Some birds lay their eggs in the nests of other bird species and let the host parents raise their young. A new study finds that in times of environmental flux, these brood parasites "diversify their portfolios," minimizing the risks of their unorthodox lifestyle by increasing the number and variety of hosts they select as adoptive parents.
14h
More evacuations as massive fires rapidly expand in California
A series of massive fires in northern and central California forced more evacuations as they quickly spread Thursday, darkening the skies and dangerously affecting air quality.
14h
Strong and deep undersea earthquake shakes eastern Indonesia
A strong, deep undersea earthquake shook eastern Indonesia on Friday, but no damage has been reported.
14h
A new lens on the world: Improving the metalens with liquid crystal
For more than 500 years, humans have mastered the art of refracting light by shaping glass into lenses, then bending or combining those lenses to amplify and clarify images either close-up and far-off.
14h
Scientists create 3D-printed buildings from soil
Eco-friendly technology could potentially replace concrete and revolutionise sector Scientists have developed a method to 3D-print greener buildings using local soil that they say has the potential to revolutionise the construction industry. The technology is designed to be a sustainable alternative to concrete, which accounts for approximately 7% of carbon dioxide emissions, according to the Int
14h
15h
Bevist: Fortidens klimaændringer skete samtidig i flere verdensdele
Forskere fra bl.a. Københavns Universitet beviser i nyt studie, at gentagne bratte klimaændringer…
15h
Forundersøgelser: Havnetunnel vil koste op mod 31 mia. kr. og ny metro op til 20 mia. kr
En ny havnetunnel i København vil ifølge en forundersøgelse kræve massiv offentlig støtte, men så er den også samfundsøkonomisk rentabel. Metroforslagene har intern rente på 1,6 til 2 procent.
15h
En uventet kvante-sommerfugleeffekt
PLUS. Kaos er overraskende forskelligt i kvanteverdenen og den klassiske verden, viser nyt eksperiment.
16h
16h
16h
Coronavirus UK: Birmingham residents urged to act to prevent local lockdown – live news
Birmingham sees 'extremely concerning' rise to 30 cases per 100,000 as positive tests in Britain hit highest level since mid-June Lockdown fears for Birmingham amid sharp rise in UK coronavirus cases Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage 8.30am BST Whitehall departments have spent more than £56m on consultancy firms to help deal with the coronavirus pandemic, mostly withou
16h
Large tin monosulfide crystal opens pathway for next generation solar cells
A team at Tohoku University has succeeded in growing large single crystals of tin monosulfide, a material used in next generation solar cells.
16h
Vanligt med bråk om barnbarnens uppfostran
När det kommer till barnuppfostran svarar fyra av tio amerikanska föräldrar i en enkät att mormor, morfar, farmor eller farfar har åsikter som går på tvärs med vad de själva tycker. Oenigheterna handlar sällan om att mor- och farföräldrar bara är för stränga. Istället var de fler än fyra gånger av fem för snälla, eller både överdrivet snälla och stränga på olika punkter.
17h
Stuttering Through It
Y ou could hear the stutter in Brayden's lungs, all those heavy inhalations, his search for sounds that wouldn't come. The 13-year-old stared into a stationary camera and told the world about his problem, the affliction he shares with 3 million Americans, one of whom is now the Democratic nominee for president. "Without Joe Biden, I wouldn't be talking with you today," Brayden began. A big smile
17h
18h
Photos of the Week: Flooded Buddha, Tokyo Skytree, Damp Moose
Retired-police-dog adoptions in Ecuador, ballet in Brazil, an open-air brass-band rehearsal in Wales, the Criterium du Dauphine cycling race in France, record heat in Death Valley and wildfires across California, a cool bear in Kosovo, scenes from the Democratic National Convention, a sail-in floating cinema in Israel, and much more
18h
Research team develops the first physics-based method for predicting large solar flares
A research team recently succeeded in developing the first physics-based model that can accurately predict imminent large solar flares, which can cause severe space weather disturbances affecting Earth. The work has been published in the journal Science.
18h
Et tal i en rapport stoppede et langt lægeliv
Axel Tilmas karriere i det nordjyske sundhedsvæsen fik en brat ende. Den erfarne mave-tarm-kirurg blev fritaget for tjeneste, da regionen fik mistanke om, at kvaliteten af tarmkræftundersøgelser på Sygehus Vendsyssel var for ringe. Efter halvandet år har Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed og Regionernes Kliniske Kvalitetsprogram sagt god for kvaliteten af hans arbejde. Tilbage står Axel Tilma med et
19h
Some 'Healthy' Kids Can Carry as Much COVID-19 Virus as Severely Sick Adults
More evidence that reopening schools could be deadly.
19h
Afvigelser i kvalitetsrapport førte til mistanke mod erfaren kirurg
Årsrapport fra Dansk Tarmkræftscreeningsdatabase blev startskuddet til en proces, hvor Axel Tilma blev mistænkt for at udføre kikkertundersøgelser med lav faglig kvalitet.
19h
Region Nordjylland: »Vi har udvist rettidig omhu«
Det var den korrekte fremgangsmåde at få en ekstern instans til at vurdere kvaliteten af tarmkræftundersøgelser, siger Anne Bukh, koncerndirektør i Region Nordjylland. Hun mener, at sammenfald mellem screeningssag og bekymringsskrivelser førte til, at søgelyset blev rettet mod Axel Tilma.
19h
Elektrochok skaber nye hjerneforbindelser efter depression
Svær depression får hippocampus til at skrumpe. Men elektrochok får den til at vokse igen. Det indikerer et igangværende forskningsprojekt under ledelse af professor Poul Videbech.
20h
Når immunforsvaret sætter hjernen skakmat
Dansk forskning skal gøre verden klogere på, hvorfor og hvordan immunsystemet kan påvirke hjernen og lede til udvikling af psykiatriske sygdomme.
20h
Hold fast i naturvidenskaben
I denne uge lukkede Hjerteforeningen det omstridte projekt 'PS I love you', som har været i stærk modvind, siden det blev lanceret i maj.
20h
Psykofarmaka må ­aldrig blive rutine
Over 700.000 danskere bruger psykofarmaka. Det er for mange. Derfor er det tid til at stoppe op og tjekke nationens helbred for at se, om pillerne fylder for meget.
20h
Blood clots and lung injuries found in patients who have died of COVID-19
A new post-mortem study of patients who have died from COVID-19 found severe damage to the lungs and signs of blood clotting in major organs.
20h
20h
20h
Teknologiens talsmand lover nye revolutioner
Peder Jest har i 30 år skubbet på de teknologiske landvindinger, der har været med til at forbedre forholdene for personale og patienter. Nu stopper han som lægelig direktør på Odense Universitetshospital, men han ser frem til ny innovation i i det danske sundhedsvæsen og spår, at kunstig intelligens vil skabe revolutioner på sygehusene.
21h
Cykling, guitarspil og John Lennons breve
Hjemme på Tåsinge holder Peder Jest bl.a. af at cykle, spille på en af sine 16 guitarer og læse litteratur. Favoritfilmen er 'Forrest Gump', fordi den handler om livets grundvilkår, og at alle har en opgave at udfylde.
21h
Target search and recognition mechanisms of glycosylase AlkD revealed by scanning FRET-FCS and Markov state models [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
DNA glycosylase is responsible for repairing DNA damage to maintain the genome stability and integrity. However, how glycosylase can efficiently and accurately recognize DNA lesions across the enormous DNA genome remains elusive. It has been hypothesized that glycosylase translocates along the DNA by alternating between a fast but low-accuracy diffusion…
21h
Phosphoglycolate salvage in a chemolithoautotroph using the Calvin cycle [Microbiology]
Carbon fixation via the Calvin cycle is constrained by the side activity of Rubisco with dioxygen, generating 2-phosphoglycolate. The metabolic recycling of phosphoglycolate was extensively studied in photoautotrophic organisms, including plants, algae, and cyanobacteria, where it is referred to as photorespiration. While receiving little attention so far, aerobic chemolithoautotrophic bacteria…
21h
Characterizing superspreading events and age-specific infectiousness of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in Georgia, USA [Medical Sciences]
It is imperative to advance our understanding of heterogeneities in the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 such as age-specific infectiousness and superspreading. To this end, it is important to exploit multiple data streams that are becoming abundantly available during the pandemic. In this paper, we formulate an individual-level spatiotemporal mechanistic framework to…
21h
The effect of big-city news on rural America during the COVID-19 pandemic [Political Sciences]
Can "urban-centric" local television news coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic affect the behavior of rural residents with lived experiences so different from their "local" news coverage? Leveraging quasi-random geographic variation in media markets for 771 matched rural counties, we show that rural residents are more likely to practice social distancing…
21h
Self-template-assisted micro-phase segregation in blended liquid-crystalline block copolymers films toward three-dimensional structures [Chemistry]
In-plane mesopatterns derived from block-copolymer (BCP) micro-phase segregation in thin films have attracted much interest in practical applications as well as fundamental research programs. However, phase segregation along the film-normal direction has been less studied. Here, we describe a strategy to concurrently, yet independently, control in-plane micro-phase and out-of-plane macro-phase…
21h
Demographic perspectives on the mortality of COVID-19 and other epidemics [Social Sciences]
To put estimates of COVID-19 mortality into perspective, we estimate age-specific mortality for an epidemic claiming for illustrative purposes 1 million US lives, with results approximately scalable over a broad range of deaths. We calculate the impact on period life expectancy (down 2.94 y) and remaining life years (11.7 y…
21h
Social and behavioral consequences of mask policies during the COVID-19 pandemic [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Mandatory and voluntary mask policies may have yet unknown social and behavioral consequences related to the effectiveness of the measure, stigmatization, and perceived fairness. Serial cross-sectional data (April 14 to May 26, 2020) from nearly 7,000 German participants demonstrate that implementing a mandatory policy increased actual compliance despite moderate acceptance;…
21h
KSHV LANA acetylation-selective acidic domain reader sequence mediates virus persistence [Microbiology]
Viruses modulate biochemical cellular pathways to permit infection. A recently described mechanism mediates selective protein interactions between acidic domain readers and unacetylated, lysine-rich regions, opposite of bromodomain function. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is tightly linked with KS, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV latently
21h
Allosteric regulation of thioesterase superfamily member 1 by lipid sensor domain binding fatty acids and lysophosphatidylcholine [Biochemistry]
Nonshivering thermogenesis occurs in brown adipose tissue to generate heat in response to cold ambient temperatures. Thioesterase superfamily member 1 (Them1) is transcriptionally up-regulated in brown adipose tissue upon exposure to the cold and suppresses thermogenesis in order to conserve energy reserves. It hydrolyzes long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs that are derived…
21h
Prevention and treatment of SHIVAD8 infection in rhesus macaques by a potent d-peptide HIV entry inhibitor [Microbiology]
Cholesterol-PIE12-trimer (CPT31) is a potent d-peptide HIV entry inhibitor that targets the highly conserved gp41 N-peptide pocket region. CPT31 exhibited strong inhibitory breadth against diverse panels of primary virus isolates. In a simian-HIV chimeric virus AD8 (SHIVAD8) macaque model, CPT31 prevented infection from a single high-dose rectal challenge. In chronically…
21h
Denial and Alarmism in the Near-Term Extinction and Collapse Debate
Guest article by Alastair McIntosh, honorary professor in the College of Social Sciences at the University of Glasgow in Scotland. This is an excerpt from his new book, Riders on the Storm: The Climate Crisis and the Survival of Being Mostly, we only know what we think we know about climate science because of the climate science. I have had many run-ins with denialists, contrarians or climate cha
21h
22h
Byggebranchen: Stil krav om tilsyn med altaner
PLUS. To farlige altanulykker på fire år har overbevist eksperter og fagfolk om, at det er nødvendigt med systematisk kontrol af gamle altaner. For problemerne har været kendt i årtier.
22h
China's research-misconduct rules target 'paper mills' that churn out fake studies
Nature, Published online: 21 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02445-8 Measures to crack down harder on falsified work look good on paper, but critics say that enforcement will continue to be a problem.
22h
The United States Versus Steve Bannon
S hortly after 4 p.m. this afternoon, the sunburned visage of Steve Bannon popped up on a projector screen inside the Daniel Patrick Moynihan Courthouse in Lower Manhattan. President Donald Trump's former chief strategist was sitting in what appeared to be a holding cell in lieu of a courtroom, wearing an open-collared shirt, a white mask, and handcuffs. Hours earlier, federal agents had arrested
22h
Australia's biggest bats fly thousands of kilometers a year—farther than wildebeest and caribou
Flying foxes can't sit still, complicating their conservation and management
23h
23h
Tænkeboks: Peberbøssen poppede op på 1,50 sekunder
Her får du den længe ventede løsning på opgaven!
23h
The Atlantic Daily: Obama Makes Fear a Rallying Cry
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . GETTY Unable to gather in person, the Democrats took their party's convention digital—and nailed it , argues David Frum, who served as a speechwriter for President George W. Bush. In the process,
23h
Coronavirus live news: Latin America deaths near 250,000; Russia to start mass vaccine trials
Another 1,204 fatalities in Brazil push continent's toll higher; Russian test to involve 40,000 people; UK's second city Birmingham faces lockdown Global report: WHO in talks with Russia about its vaccine Australia updates: Canberra at odds with states over border closures Lockdown looms for Birmingham after spike in UK's second-biggest city Chinese media dismisses attacks on Wuhan's pool party a
23h
Konsten att flisa för effektivare användning av vedråvara
Det finns en ökad efterfrågan på produkter från skogen. Därmed blir det allt viktigare att skogsråvaran används så effektivt som möjligt, menar Jessica Gard Timmerfors, doktorand vid Umeå universitet, som varit med och utvecklat en trumhuggsteknik som ger större andel användbar flis för massaproduktion. De första stegen är viktiga för att öka utbytet från skogsråvaran. Flisens kvalitet påverkar h
23h
1d

 

Leave a Reply