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The Many Kinds of Dishonesty
A study reveals that while many people bend the truth, few are entirely dishonest.
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Follow the Perseverance Rover in Real-Time With NASA's Eyes Simulation
NASA's Perseverance rover left Earth behind forever on July 30th, and there won't be much to say about the mission until it reaches Mars in February 2021. However, you can check in on the rover any time you want using NASA's " Eyes on the Solar System " tool. There, you can follow the mission's progress as it heads for the red planet. The NASA Eyes software is a simulation of the solar system tha
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Less aggressive treatment better for heart patients who go into shock
Less is sometimes more when treating heart patients who go into shock after a heart attack.
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Ludwig Chicago study identifies a novel drug target for the control of cancer metastasis
Researchers led by Ludwig Chicago Co-director Ralph Weichselbaum and Ronald Rock of the University of Chicago have identified in preclinical studies a potential drug target for curtailing cancer metastasis.
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Scientists get atomistic picture of platinum catalyst degradation
Degradation of platinum, used as a key electrode material in the hydrogen economy, severely shortens the lifetime of electrochemical energy conversion devices, such as fuel cells. For the first time, scientists elucidated the movements of the platinum atoms that lead to catalyst surface degradation.
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Patient monitoring systems for sepsis – mixed results on patient outcomes
Automated patient monitoring systems (PMSs) have been designed to reduce delays in diagnosis of sepsis in hospitalized patients. But so far, studies evaluating these systems have shown inconsistent effects on mortality rates and other patient outcomes, according to an evidence review in a special September supplement to the Journal of Patient Safety, which was funded by the Agency for Healthcare R
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Re-engineered enzyme could help reverse damage from spinal cord injury and stroke
Researchers have redesigned and enhanced a natural enzyme that shows promise in promoting the regrowth of nerve tissue following injury.
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Inflammatory bowel disease linked to an immune cell run amok
Researchers report that the lasting nature of inflammatory bowel disease may be due to a type of long-lived immune cell that can provoke persistent, damaging inflammation in the intestinal tract.
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Forskere kobler Covid-19 til udvikling af diabetes hos børn
Nyt studie peger på, at der kan være forbindelse mellem smitte med Covid-19 og udvikling af type 1-diabetes hos børn.
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Re-engineered enzyme could help reverse damage from spinal cord injury and stroke
A team of researchers from University of Toronto Engineering and the University of Michigan has redesigned and enhanced a natural enzyme that shows promise in promoting the regrowth of nerve tissue following injury.
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Study: Despite training, Vermont police departments still show widespread racial bias
In the wake of the George Floyd killing and other incidents of racially motivated police violence, communities across the country are examining the practices of their local police departments more closely. Some are undertaking comprehensive training and education programs to address racial bias on their forces.
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New approach to soft material flow may yield way to new materials, disaster prediction
How does toothpaste stay in its tube and not ooze out when we remove the cap? What causes seemingly solid ground to suddenly break free into a landslide? Defining exactly how soft materials flow and seize has eluded researchers for years, but a new study explains this complex motion using relatively simple experiments. The ability to define—and eventually predict—soft material flow will benefit pe
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Re-engineered enzyme could help reverse damage from spinal cord injury and stroke
A team of researchers from University of Toronto Engineering and the University of Michigan has redesigned and enhanced a natural enzyme that shows promise in promoting the regrowth of nerve tissue following injury.
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Reprogramming immune cells to reduce inflammation, promote tissue repair
A new study suggests that macrophage programming is more complex than previously thought. 'We found that macrophage programming is driven by more than the immune system — it is also driven by the environment in which the macrophages reside,' said lead study author Asrar Malik.
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Storing information in antiferromagnetic materials
Researchers have now not only been able to show that information storage in antiferromagnetic materials is fundamentally possible, but also to measure how efficiently information can be written electrically in insulating antiferromagnetic materials.
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Habitats for endangered green sea turtles will be federally protected in Florida
Endangered green sea turtles will have some of their nesting beaches in Florida protected by federal agencies under a new legal agreement with conservation groups.
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Habitats for endangered green sea turtles will be federally protected in Florida
Endangered green sea turtles will have some of their nesting beaches in Florida protected by federal agencies under a new legal agreement with conservation groups.
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NASA tracking Tropical Storm Laura near Cuba
As Tropical Storm Laura continues to move through the Caribbean Sea NASA satellites are providing forecasters with visible, infrared and microwave data. Laura continued to move through the Caribbean Sea on a march toward the Gulf of Mexico.
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First case of COVID-19 reinfection reported in Hong Kong
A 33-year-old man contracted the virus first in March, then again in August. Researchers at the University of Hong Kong compared the RNA of the two infections, finding them to be distinct. The immune system's response to the coronavirus remains unclear, but recent studies suggest T cells may help to battle subsequent infections even after antibody levels drop. A man in Hong Kong was infected with
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Newfound taste cells 'multitask' to sense it all
Researchers have discovered multitasking cells in mice that can detect bitter, sweet, umami, and sour stimuli. The findings challenge conventional notions of how taste works. In the past, researchers thought these cells were highly selective, capable of discerning only one or two types of the five basic stimuli (only sweet, for instance, or only salty and sour). Though many cells are indeed speci
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Why some people are more certain in their opinions
Some people may be more predisposed to certainty in their opinions than others, new research suggests. Researchers for years have understood how attitudes held with certainty might predict behavior, but the new research indicates there may be a more general disposition at work that predicts the certainty of newly formed evaluations. "…certainty in an attitude, including an attitude that has not b
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Contagion model predicts flooding in urban areas
Inspired by the same modeling and mathematical laws used to predict the spread of pandemics, researchers have created a model to accurately forecast the spread and recession process of floodwaters in urban road networks. With this new approach, researchers have created a simple and powerful mathematical approach to a complex problem.
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Excessive fructose consumption may cause a leaky gut, leading to fatty liver disease
Excessive consumption of fructose — a sweetener ubiquitous in the American diet — can result in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is comparably abundant in the United States. But contrary to previous understanding, researchers report that fructose only adversely affects the liver after it reaches the intestines, where the sugar disrupts the epithelial barrier protecting internal o
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Cancer and its treatment may accelerate the aging process in young patients
A new study examines the effects of cancer and its treatment on the aging process. Investigators found that expression of a gene associated with aging is higher in young patients with cancer after treatment with chemotherapy and in young cancer survivors who are frail.
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Electronic alert reduces excessive prescribing of short-acting asthma relievers
An automatic, electronic alert on general practitioners' computer screens can help to prevent excessive prescribing of short-acting asthma reliever medication, according to new research.
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Contagion model predicts flooding in urban areas
Inspired by the same modeling and mathematical laws used to predict the spread of pandemics, researchers have created a model to accurately forecast the spread and recession process of floodwaters in urban road networks. With this new approach, researchers have created a simple and powerful mathematical approach to a complex problem.
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The Air Force's Flying Car Looks… Incredibly Goofy
The Jetsons X Air Force The Air Force just showed off a prototype of a flying car that may soon become its newest aircraft of choice — and it looks, well, like something out of an early 2000s Pixar animation movie. The electric vertical takeoff and landing (eVTOL) vehicle, called Hexa, took to the skies during a August 20 test flight in Texas, Task and Purpose reports . Agility Prime The company
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What Science Knows About Fibromyalgia, a Painful Illness That is Often Invisible
We still don't know what causes the chronic condition. But researchers are exploring the symptoms, leading to new understanding of its many manifestations.
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4 lessons from Bhutan on the pursuit of happiness above GDP
Waking to the sound of monks chanting prayers and drumming their gongs during countless traditional pujas , a ceremony of honour, worship and devotion; running up the steep Himalayan mountain slopes under colourful prayer flags hung between trees in the lush natural landscape; looking out at the expanse of forests and mountains that surrounded its capital city, Thimphu. These are the memories tha
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MAGA TikTok Creators Stand by Trump—Despite a Potential Ban
Conservative influencers say they understand the president's moves to shut down the platform in the US, even if it costs them their audience.
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In one cancer therapy, two halves are safer than a whole
Splitting one type of cancer drug in half and delivering the pieces separately to cancer cells could reduce life-threatening side effects and protect healthy, non-cancerous cells, a new study suggests.
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Low health literacy may be a risk factor for postoperative infection
CHICAGO: Surgical patients are more likely to experience a postoperative infection if they have low health literacy, which is a limited capacity to understand and act on health information, according to results of a new study presented at the American College of Surgeons (ACS) 2020 Quality and Safety Conference VIRTUAL.
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Inflammatory bowel disease linked to an immune cell run amok
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine report that the lasting nature of inflammatory bowel disease may be due to a type of long-lived immune cell that can provoke persistent, damaging inflammation in the intestinal tract.
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New insights for sun-gathering technologies
Researchers are taking a page from Nature's lesson book. Inspired by the way plants and other photosynthetic organisms collect and use the sun's radiant energy, they hope to develop technologies that harvest sunlight and store it as carbon-free or carbon-neutral fuels.
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Having a doctor who shares the same race may ease patient's angst
When doctors are the same race as their patients, it can sometimes forge a sense of comfort that helps to reduce anxiety and pain, particularly for Black patients, new research suggests.
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Novel 3D-printed device demonstrates enhanced capture of carbon dioxide emissions
Researchers have designed and additively manufactured a first-of-its-kind aluminum device that enhances the capture of carbon dioxide emitted from fossil fuel plants and other industrial processes.
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Global gut health experts guide growth of synbiotics
Chances are you've heard of probiotics: supplements delivering 'good microbes' to the gut, providing a wide range of health benefits. You may also be aware of prebiotics: supplements designed to fuel the good microbes already living in our guts. The next wave of gut-health supplements, known as synbiotics, essentially combine pre- and probiotics. To keep research and development on the right track
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Jacques Cousteau's Grandson Wants to Build the International Space Station of the Sea
Off the coast of Curaçao, at a depth of 60 feet, aquanaut Fabien Cousteau is looking to create the world's largest underwater research habitat
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Neurobiologist Dave Schubert Dies
The Salk professor developed the institute's first neurobiology lab and used it to develop cell lines, describe amyloid beta toxicity, and screen for compounds that protect against neurodegeneration.
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Re-engineered enzyme could help reverse damage from spinal cord injury and stroke
A team of researchers from University of Toronto Engineering and the University of Michigan has redesigned and enhanced a natural enzyme that shows promise in promoting the regrowth of nerve tissue following injury.
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Study: Despite training, Vermont police departments still show widespread racial bias
New research conducted in Vermont shows that, while anti-bias police trainings resulted in small improvements in some police departments in the state, they did not by and large alter police behavior.
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New approach to soft material flow may yield way to new materials, disaster prediction
How does toothpaste stay in its tube and not ooze out when we remove the cap? What causes seemingly solid ground to suddenly break free into a landslide? Defining exactly how soft materials flow and seize has eluded researchers for years, but a new study explains this complex motion using relatively simple experiments. The ability to define – and eventually predict – soft material flow will benefi
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Machines rival expert analysis of stored red blood cell quality
Once outside the body, stored blood begins degrading until, by day 42, they're no longer usable. Until now, assessing its quality has required laborious microscopic examination by human experts. A new study reveals two methodologies that combine machine learning and state-of-the-art imaging to automate the process and eliminate human bias. If standardized, it could ensure more consistent, accurate
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Small molecule treatment reduces colon cancer metastasis
University of Chicago Medicine investigators have found a new way to slow the metastasis of colon cancer: by treating it with a small molecule that essentially locks up cancer cells' ability to change shape and move throughout the body.
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Spurring our understanding
Once in a while, over the history of life, a new trait evolves that leads to an explosion of diversity in a group of organisms. Take wings, for instance. Every group of animals that evolved them has spun off into a host of different species — birds, bats, insects and pterosaurs. Scientists call these "key innovations."
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Faulty brain circuits arise from abnormal fusion
University of Queensland (UQ) researchers have found that when nematode worms were engineered to express the molecules fusogens in their neurons, these nerve cells fused together, causing behavioural impairments. This has impications for understanding neurological diseases.
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Climate change and land use are accelerating soil erosion by water
Soil loss due to water runoff could increase greatly around the world over the next 50 years due to climate change and intensive land cultivation. This was the conclusion of an international team of researchers led by the University of Basel, which published the results from its model calculation in the scientific journal PNAS.
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Flexible targets help immune system make finely-tuned antibodies
An in-depth Garvan study of how the immune system generates effective antibodies provides new insights for vaccine design.
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20% of US nursing homes still report PPE shortages
Six months into the pandemic, more than 20% of nursing homes still report severe shortages of staff and personal protective equipment, a new study shows. Nursing home residents account for nearly half of all COVID-19 deaths in the US. Age, chronic medical conditions, and congregate living quarters place these residents and their caregivers at high risk of contracting the disease. "Twenty percent
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Bread Science: A Yeasty Conversation
"Baking is applied microbiology," according to the book Modernist Bread. During pandemic lockdowns, many people started baking their own bread. Scientific American contributing editor W…. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientists may have confirmed you can catch COVID-19 twice
At a news conference on Sunday, President Donald Trump touted this treatment as a "major therapeutic breakthrough," with a 35 percent mortality reduction. But no one has been able to pinpoint where that percentage comes from. (Unsplash /) As COVID-19 continues to rage in many parts of the country, public health experts warn people that it's important to keep practicing proper social distancing. E
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What is blood plasma therapy and does it work for Covid-19?
Trump announced the emergency authorization of convalescent plasma on Sunday – here's a quick guide on what it is On Sunday evening Donald Trump announced the emergency authorization of convalescent plasma , a method which has been used to treat flu and measles, for Covid-19 patients. Related: Coronavirus: Trump authorizes plasma treatment amid attacks on FDA Continue reading…
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Biologists discover a gene critical to the development of columbines' iconic spurs
Once in a while, over the history of life, a new trait evolves that leads to an explosion of diversity in a group of organisms. Take wings, for instance. Every group of animals that evolved them has spun off into a host of different species—birds, bats, insects and pterosaurs. Scientists call these "key innovations."
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Velcro method for more precise binding of drug particles
In order to deliver drug particles to the right place in the body—a field known as nanomedicine—selectivity plays an important role. After all, the drug only has to attach itself to the cells that need it. A theory from 2011 predicts that selectivity is not only based on the type of receptor, but also on the number and strength of the receptors on the cell. Researchers at Eindhoven University of T
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Advanced biofuels show real promise for replacing some fossil fuels
Biofuel and bioenergy systems are integral to scenarios for displacing fossil fuel use and producing negative emissions through carbon capture and storage. But the net greenhouse gas mitigation benefit of these systems has been controversial, due to concerns around carbon losses from changes in land use and foregone sequestration benefits from alternative land uses.
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Climate change and land use are accelerating soil erosion by water
Soil loss due to water runoff could increase greatly around the world over the next 50 years due to climate change and intensive land cultivation. This was the conclusion of an international team of researchers led by the University of Basel, which published the results from its model calculation in the scientific journal PNAS.
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Biologists discover a gene critical to the development of columbines' iconic spurs
Once in a while, over the history of life, a new trait evolves that leads to an explosion of diversity in a group of organisms. Take wings, for instance. Every group of animals that evolved them has spun off into a host of different species—birds, bats, insects and pterosaurs. Scientists call these "key innovations."
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Are antivitamins the new antibiotics?
Antibiotics are among the most important discoveries of modern medicine and have saved millions of lives since the discovery of penicillin almost 100 years ago. However, bacteria can develop resistance to antibiotics which then leaves doctors struggling to find effective treatments. Researchers have now described a promising new approach involving 'antivitamins' to develop new classes of antibioti
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Each human gut has a viral 'fingerprint'
Each person's gut virus composition is as unique as a fingerprint, according to the first study to assemble a comprehensive database of viral populations in the human digestive system.
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Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles are becoming longer lasting
An international research team has succeeded in developing an electrocatalyst for hydrogen fuel cells which, in contrast to the catalysts commonly used today, does not require a carbon carrier and is therefore much more stable. The new process is industrially applicable and can be used to further optimize fuel cell powered vehicles without CO2 emissions.
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Scientists: Unfortunately, Bacteria Scream When They Die
Necrosignaling Here's a pleasant thought for next time you spray down your kitchen counter — scientists say that bacteria "scream" as they die, giving off chemical alarms that warn their brethren of danger. Specifically, Live Science reports , swarming bacteria like E. coli appear to be able to detect the presence of danger such as antibiotics, and "necrosignal" to their compatriots as they die s
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Racism and harassment are common in field research — scientists are speaking up
Nature, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02328-y Researchers call on universities to offer inclusive policies that make fieldwork safer.
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Evidence for Convalescent Plasma Coronavirus Treatment Lags Behind Excitement
Despite calls for more rigorous clinical trials, the Food and Drug Administration has granted an emergency authorization for the therapy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Bread Science: A Yeasty Conversation
"Baking is applied microbiology," according to the book Modernist Bread. During pandemic lockdowns, many people started baking their own bread. Scientific American contributing editor W…. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Each human gut has a viral 'fingerprint'
Each person's gut virus composition is as unique as a fingerprint, according to the first study to assemble a comprehensive database of viral populations in the human digestive system.
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'Sluggish' immune response may explain more severe COVID-19
In severely ill COVID-19 patients, "first-responder" immune cells, which should react immediately to signs of viruses or bacteria in the body, instead respond sluggishly, according to a new study. The findings may explain the difference between severe and mild cases of COVID-19, the researchers report. That difference may stem from how our evolutionarily ancient innate immune system responds to S
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Stricken ship behind oil spill sunk off Mauritius
The broken stem of a Japanese-owned ship which ran aground causing a devastating oil spill in pristine waters off Mauritius, has been successfully sunk in the open ocean, the national crisis committee said Monday.
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Laura lashes Cuba, expected to become hurricane by US landfall
Tropical Storm Laura brushed Cuba's southern coast Monday on its way to the United States, where officials predicted it would worsen to a hurricane ahead of its landfall after leaving 13 people dead as it ripped through the Caribbean.
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Each human gut has a viral 'fingerprint'
Each person's gut virus composition is as unique as a fingerprint, according to the first study to assemble a comprehensive database of viral populations in the human digestive system.
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Having a doctor who shares the race of their patients may ease pain
When doctors are the same race as their patients, it can sometimes forge a sense of comfort that helps to reduce anxiety and pain, particularly for Black patients, new research from the University of Miami suggests.
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NASA tracking Tropical Storm Laura near Cuba
As Tropical Storm Laura continues to move through the Caribbean Sea NASA satellites are providing forecasters with visible, infrared and microwave data. Laura continued to move through the Caribbean Sea on a march toward the Gulf of Mexico.
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Less flocking behaviour among microorganisms reduces the risk of being eaten
When algae and bacteria with different swimming gaits gather in large groups, their flocking behavior diminishes, something that may reduce the risk of falling victim to aquatic predators. This finding is presented in an international study led from Lund University in Sweden.
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Wireless device makes clean fuel from sunlight, CO2 and water
Researchers have developed a standalone device that converts sunlight, carbon dioxide and water into a carbon-neutral fuel, without requiring any additional components or electricity.
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Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles are becoming longer lasting
An international research team has succeeded in developing an electrocatalyst for hydrogen fuel cells which, in contrast to the catalysts commonly used today, does not require a carbon carrier and is therefore much more stable. The new process is industrially applicable and can be used to further optimize fuel cell powered vehicles without CO2 emissions.
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Heart repair factor boosted by RNA-targeting compound
Damaged hearts require stem cell activation to heal, but heart attack silences a key signaling molecule. A newly discovered compound reactivates its production, in cell-based studies.
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Beam me up: Researchers use 'behavioral teleporting' to study social interactions
Researchers have devised a novel approach to getting physically separated fish to interact with each other, leading to insights about what kinds of cues influence social behavior.
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Mail delays may affect medication supply for nearly 1 in 4 Americans over 50
The timeliness of mail delivery may affect access to medication for many middle-aged and older adults, according to a new analysis of data from a national poll of people aged 50 to 80. Nearly one in four people in this age group said they receive at least one medication by mail, but that percentage rises to 29 percent when the poll results are limited to people who take at least one prescription m
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How dinosaur research can help medicine
The intervertebral discs connect the vertebrae and give the spine its mobility. The disc consists of a cartilaginous fibrous ring and a gelatinous core as a buffer. It has always been assumed that only humans and other mammals have discs. A misconception, as a research team under the leadership of the University of Bonn has now discovered: Even Tyrannosaurus rex could have suffered a slipped disc.
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New species of Cretaceous brittle star named in honour of Nightwish vocalist
Paleontologists from the Natural History Museums in Luxembourg and Maastricht have discovered a previously unknown species of brittle star that lived in the shallow, warm sea which covered parts of the present-day Netherlands at the end of the dinosaur era. The starfish-like creature was unearthed more than 20 years ago but has only now been identified as new to science. The name of the new fossil
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The mathematical magic of bending grids
An amazing construction method for curved structures was developed at TU Wien (Vienna): With a flick of the wrist, flat grids become a 3-D shape.
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Researchers create a contagion model to predict flooding in urban areas
Inspired by the same modeling and mathematical laws used to predict the spread of pandemics, researchers at Texas A&M University have created a model to accurately forecast the spread and recession process of floodwaters in urban road networks. With this new approach, researchers have created a simple and powerful mathematical approach to a complex problem.
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Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles are becoming longer lasting
Roughly 1 billion cars and trucks zoom about the world's roadways. Only a few run on hydrogen. This could change after a breakthrough achieved by researchers at the University of Copenhagen. The breakthrough? A new catalyst that can be used to produce cheaper and far more sustainable hydrogen powered vehicles.
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NASA's Terra Satellite shows smoky pall over most of California
More than 650 wildfires are blazing in California after unprecedented lightning strikes, storms, and a heatwave that has set new records in the state and NASA's Terra satellite captured the smoke-engulfed state on Aug. 24, 2020.
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Study offers new insights for sun-gathering technologies
Every hour, the sun saturates the earth with more energy than humans use in a year. Harnessing some of this energy to meet global demand has become a grand challenge, with the world poised to double its energy consumption in just thirty years.
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Government to urge UK companies to roll out workplace Covid-19 tests
Employers who check staff could be allowed to stay open even under local lockdown restrictions, according to talks
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Are antivitamins the new antibiotics?
Antibiotics are among the most important discoveries of modern medicine and have saved millions of lives since the discovery of penicillin almost 100 years ago. Many diseases caused by bacterial infections—such as pneumonia, meningitis or septicemia—are successfully treated with antibiotics. However, bacteria can develop resistance to antibiotics which then leaves doctors struggling to find effect
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Are antivitamins the new antibiotics?
Antibiotics are among the most important discoveries of modern medicine and have saved millions of lives since the discovery of penicillin almost 100 years ago. Many diseases caused by bacterial infections—such as pneumonia, meningitis or septicemia—are successfully treated with antibiotics. However, bacteria can develop resistance to antibiotics which then leaves doctors struggling to find effect
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Large molecules need more help to travel through a nuclear pore into the cell nucleus
A new study in the field of biophysics has revealed how large molecules are able to enter the nucleus of a cell. A team led by Professor Edward Lemke of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has thus provided important insights into how some viruses, for example, can penetrate into the nucleus of a cell, where they can continue to proliferate and infect others. They have also demonstrated that
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Researchers develop flat lens a thousand times thinner than a human hair
A lens that is a thousand times thinner than a human hair has been developed in Brazil by researchers at the University of São Paulo's São Carlos School of Engineering (EESC-USP). It can serve as a camera lens in smartphones or be used in other devices that depend on sensors.
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Large molecules need more help to travel through a nuclear pore into the cell nucleus
A new study in the field of biophysics has revealed how large molecules are able to enter the nucleus of a cell. A team led by Professor Edward Lemke of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has thus provided important insights into how some viruses, for example, can penetrate into the nucleus of a cell, where they can continue to proliferate and infect others. They have also demonstrated that
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Doctors Confirm For First Time That Patient Caught COVID Twice
For the first time, experts have been able to confirm that a former COVID-19 patient has been reinfected by the coronavirus. The news suggests that immunity to the coronavirus could only last several months — something that scientist have suspected for a while, but haven't been able to confirm so far using rigorous testing, according to The New York Times . A new study published in the journal Cl
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NASA's Terra Satellite shows smoky pall over most of California
More than 650 wildfires are blazing in California after unprecedented lightning strikes, storms, and a heatwave that has set new records in the state and NASA's Terra satellite captured the smoke-engulfed state on Aug. 24, 2020.
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Texas A&M researchers create a contagion model to predict flooding in urban areas
Inspired by the same modeling and mathematical laws used to predict the spread of pandemics, researchers at Texas A&M University have created a model to accurately forecast the spread and recession process of floodwaters in urban road networks. With this new approach, researchers have created a simple and powerful mathematical approach to a complex problem.
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Veterans undergoing elective PCI at community hospitals may have increased chance of death compared to those treated at VA hospitals
Veterans who underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable angina at a community facility were at a 33% increased hazard, or chance, of death compared to patients treated within the Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System, according to an analysis of nearly 9,000 veterans published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
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In reversal, Trump kills huge Alaskan gold mine. Here's why
Salmon fishing fans, including Trump's son, opposed project
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Ancient megadrought may explain civilization's 'missing millennia' in Southeast Asia
Scientists find first evidence of 5000-year-old drought in a cave in Laos
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Ancient teenager buried with head poking out of strange Spanish grave
An unusual 3700-year-old grave unearthed in Spain contains the remains of someone who appears to have been buried from only the shoulders down. The finding shows how little we know about some ancient burial practices
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Covid-19 news: Researchers find first case of coronavirus reinfection
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Solar system may have had a second sun that helped grab Planet Nine
In its youth our solar system may have contained two suns, which could explain how it had the gravitational pull to capture the hypothetical Planet Nine
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Large molecules need more help to travel through a nuclear pore into the cell nucleus
Model systems based on virus capsids have shown how large biomolecules are able to penetrate a cell nucleus. The larger the molecule, the more nuclear localization signals are needed.
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Reducing transmission risk of livestock disease
The risk of transmitting the livestock virus PPRV, which threatens 80% of the world's sheep and goats, increases with certain husbandry practices, including attendance at seasonal grazing camps and the introduction of livestock to the herd.
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Living at higher altitudes associated with higher levels of child stunting
Children living at high altitudes found to be more stunted, on average, than peers at lower altitudes. The deficit increases above 500 meters above sea level, and persists as children age, indicating the need to tailor nutrition interventions targeted at children living in high altitudes.
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Crossbreeding of Holstein cows improves fertility without detriment to milk production
Since 1960, Holstein dairy cows have exhibited a substantial decline in fertility, with serious economic consequences for farmers. Genetic selection programs in the United States and elsewhere have emphasized milk production at the expense of other traits. Attention has turned to improving these neglected traits for better overall well-being of cows and to ameliorate dairy producers' profitability
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Negative emissions technologies may not solve climate crisis
Researchers used the Global Change Assessment Model to compare the effects of three negative emissions technologies on global food supply, water use and energy demand. The work looked at the role having direct air capture available would have on future climate scenarios.
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Global forest restoration and the importance of empowering local communities
Forest restoration is a crucial element in strategies to mitigate climate change and conserve global biodiversity in the coming decades, and much of the focus is on formerly tree-covered lands in the tropics.
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Researchers to investigate wind power effects on bats in the Baltic Sea region
Despite the increasing numbers of wind turbines, their impacts on the environment are poorly known. A new study focuses on wind turbines in the Baltic Sea region and their impact on bats and their migration.
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Predicting computational power of early quantum computers
Quantum physicists have developed an algorithm which helps early quantum computers to perform calculations most efficiently.
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Hitting the nail on the head: overcoming therapeutic resistance in lung cancer
An interdisciplinary team at the Medical University of South Carolina has shown that Neuropilin 2, a protein highly expressed in lung cancer cells, is a critical player in conferring resistance to targeted therapy in lung cancer. Their findings are reported in an article published in The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.
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FDA Gives Plasma Go-Ahead to Treat COVID-19, Experts Skeptical
White House officials hail convalescent plasma as a major breakthrough, but scientists say evidence supporting its effectiveness is still lacking.
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Case of man reinfected with coronavirus stokes immunity fears
Hong Kong case leads scientists to doubt development of antibodies in previous patients, but other experts say it is no cause for alarm Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A young man has been diagnosed with coronavirus more than four months after he recovered from a first episode of the disease, suggesting that immunity to the virus can be short-lived and raising more q
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Large molecules need more help to travel through a nuclear pore into the cell nucleus
Model systems based on virus capsids have shown how large biomolecules are able to penetrate a cell nucleus. The larger the molecule, the more nuclear localization signals are needed.
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Negative emissions technologies may not solve climate crisis
Researchers used the Global Change Assessment Model to compare the effects of three negative emissions technologies on global food supply, water use and energy demand. The work looked at the role having direct air capture available would have on future climate scenarios.
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Researchers to investigate wind power effects on bats in the Baltic Sea region
Despite the increasing numbers of wind turbines, their impacts on the environment are poorly known. A new study focuses on wind turbines in the Baltic Sea region and their impact on bats and their migration.
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Study offers new insights for sun-gathering technologies
In a new study, researchers at the Biodesign Center for Applied Structural Discovery (CASD) and ASU's School of Molecular Sciences take a page from Nature's lesson book. Inspired by the way plants and other photosynthetic organisms collect and use the sun's radiant energy, they hope to develop technologies that harvest sunlight and store it as carbon-free or carbon-neutral fuels.
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Is it time to return to the office?
Workers in the US and UK remain wary as companies build in safety measures
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Covid-19 is becoming less deadly in Europe but we don't know why
It is becoming increasingly clear that people are less likely to die if they get covid-19 now compared with earlier in the pandemic, at least in Europe, but the reasons why are still shrouded in uncertainty
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First Documented Coronavirus Reinfection Reported in Hong Kong
The patient did mount an immune response to the new infection, however, and did not experience symptoms.
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Africa Celebrates the End of the Wild Poliovirus (but Not the End of All Polio)
A virus that once paralyzed tens of thousands of children a year is said to have been eradicated on the African continent, though a minor strain still infects hundreds.
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The US just approved the use of plasma from covid-19 survivors as a treatment
The US has approved wide emergency use of blood plasma from covid-19 survivors as a treatment for coronavirus infection, despite limited evidence it helps. Blood drug: The therapy, which the White House touted as a "breakthrough," involves giving plasma from survivors to those battling the infection. It has been tried since early in the year in China, the Netherlands, and also in the US, where mo
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Novel 3D-printed device demonstrates enhanced capture of carbon dioxide emissions
The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers have designed and additively manufactured a first-of-its-kind aluminum device that enhances the capture of carbon dioxide emitted from fossil fuel plants and other industrial processes.
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People can make better choices when it benefits others
People are better at learning and decision-making when trying to avoid harm to others, according to new research published in JNeurosci.
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Better robot batteries get inspiration from body fat
Like biological fat reserves store energy in animals, a new rechargeable zinc battery integrates into the structure of a robot to provide much more energy, researchers report. "Batteries that can do double duty—to store charge and protect the robot's 'organs'—replicate the multifunctionality of fat tissues serving to store energy in living creatures." This approach to increasing capacity will be
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Watch the Trailers for The Batman and Wonder Woman 1984
And while you're at it, check out the trailer for the Snyder cut of Justice League and a new one for The Suicide Squad too.
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Each human gut has a viral 'fingerprint'
Each person's gut virus composition is as unique as a fingerprint, according to the first study to assemble a comprehensive database of viral populations in the human digestive system.
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Elon Musk Is Planning to Show Off Neuralink Progress This Week
BrainPal Back in July, SpaceX founder Elon Musk announced an event that he said would show off technology by Neuralink, his startup that's working on an interface between human brains and computers. "Will show neurons firing in real-time on August 28th," he tweeted , mysteriously. "The matrix in the matrix." Now, with that date coming up on Friday, it could the public's first opportunity to learn
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Up your cocktail game by firing up the grill
Grilling fruits and vegetables for cocktails imparts a smoky, summery flavor. (Eric Medsker/) This story was originally featured on Saveur . There are few things more American than grilling. And as it happens, there are few inventions more American (and ingenious) than the cocktail. So it's only fitting that we, as headstrong and curious citizens of this great country, would think to marry the tw
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Birds of a feather flock together, but timing depends on typhoons
Six black-naped terns—a coastal seabird found in the Pacific and Indian Oceans—have given researchers a glimpse into how they navigate tropical typhoons.
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Unconventional farming methods could help smallholders fight back against climate change
New research from Ghana shows less popular methods of biochar application are more effective in promoting cowpea growth and yield. The article, "Method of biochar application affects growth, yield and nutrient uptake of cowpea" was published in the De Gruyter open access journal Open Agriculture.
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Routing valley exciton emission of a monolayer via in-plane inversion-symmetry broken PhC slabs
The valleys of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) offer a new degree of freedom for information processing and have attracted tremendous interest for their possible applications in valleytronics. To develop valleytronics devices based on TMDCs, effective approaches to separate valleys in the near or far field are indispensable. In recent research, kinds of nanostructures are
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Lensless light-field imaging through diffuser encoding
Microlens array based light-field imaging generally suffers from an intrinsic trade-off between the spatial and angular resolutions. To this end, scientists in China and German jointly proposed a lensless light-field imaging modality by using a diffuser as an encoder. Light rays can be decoupled from a detected image with adjustable spatio-angular resolutions, breaking through the resolution limit
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Birds of a feather flock together, but timing depends on typhoons
Six black-naped terns—a coastal seabird found in the Pacific and Indian Oceans—have given researchers a glimpse into how they navigate tropical typhoons.
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Excessive fructose consumption may cause a leaky gut, leading to fatty liver disease
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that fructose only adversely affects the liver after it reaches the intestines, where the sugar disrupts the epithelial barrier protecting internal organs from bacterial toxins in the gut
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Are antivitamins the new antibiotics?
Antibiotics are among the most important discoveries of modern medicine and have saved millions of lives since the discovery of penicillin almost 100 years ago. However, bacteria can develop resistance to antibiotics which then leaves doctors struggling to find effective treatments. Researchers at the University of Göttingen and the MPI for Biophysical Chemistry Göttingen have now described a prom
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Global gut health experts guide growth of synbiotics
Chances are you've heard of probiotics: supplements delivering 'good microbes' to the gut, providing a wide range of health benefits. You may also be aware of prebiotics: supplements designed to fuel the good microbes already living in our guts. The next wave of gut-health supplements, known as synbiotics, essentially combine pre- and probiotics. To keep research and development on the right track
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TikTok Officially Sues the Trump Administration Over Ban in US
TrumpTok TikTok has officially sued the White House over an August 6 executive order that banned transactions with its parent company ByteDance. "We do not take suing the government lightly, however we feel we have no choice but to take action to protect our rights, and the rights of our community and employees," the company wrote in a statement . Executive Ban President Donald Trump has repeated
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Start-knap, skrivebord og megetlængerefilnavne: Med Windows 95 kunne alle pludselig bruge en computer
I dag fejrer det revolutionerende styresystem 25-års fødselsdag.
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A novel approach produces a completely new kind of dynamic light structure
It is not every day that scientists are able to produce an entirely new kind of light, but when they do the implications can be dramatic. When twisted light beams carrying orbital angular momentum were uncovered in 1992, researchers realized the potential to increase data transmission speeds over current approaches. Separately, in 2005, the Nobel prize in physics was awarded for the invention of t
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New studies find agricultural pesticides can affect prawns and oysters
Researchers from the University's National Marine Science Centre have demonstrated that imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide, can impact the feeding behavior of prawns in a laboratory environment, leading to nutritional deficiency and reduced flesh quality.
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Fossil pollen record suggests vulnerability to mass extinction ahead
Reduced resilience of plant biomes in North America could be setting the stage for the kind of mass extinctions not seen since the retreat of glaciers and arrival of humans about 13,000 years ago, cautions a new study published August 20 in the journal Global Change Biology.
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New studies find agricultural pesticides can affect prawns and oysters
Researchers from the University's National Marine Science Centre have demonstrated that imidacloprid, a neonicotinoid insecticide, can impact the feeding behavior of prawns in a laboratory environment, leading to nutritional deficiency and reduced flesh quality.
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Fossil pollen record suggests vulnerability to mass extinction ahead
Reduced resilience of plant biomes in North America could be setting the stage for the kind of mass extinctions not seen since the retreat of glaciers and arrival of humans about 13,000 years ago, cautions a new study published August 20 in the journal Global Change Biology.
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Robo-teammate can detect, share 3D changes in real-time
Something is different, and you can't quite put your finger on it. But your robot can.
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Fat crystals trigger chronic inflammation
A congenital disorder of the fat metabolism can apparently cause chronic hyperreaction of the immune system.
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How dinosaur research can help medicine
The intervertebral discs connect the vertebrae and give the spine its mobility. The disc consists of a cartilaginous fibrous ring and a gelatinous core as a buffer. It has always been assumed that only humans and other mammals have discs. A misconception, as a research team has now discovered: Even Tyrannosaurus rex could have suffered a slipped disc.
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Big mammals at higher risk of extinction in world's poorest countries
A review, which looks at 81 studies carried out between 1980 and 2020, has found that illegal hunting is causing worrying declines in the big mammal populations of protected areas across the globe, and particularly in poorer countries.
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Wide variations in car seat breathing assessment conducted on premature newborns
A new study has found wide variations throughout the United States in the way hospitals ensure that premature or low birth weight infants can breathe safely in a car seat before discharging them. The same infant who passes a screening in one hospital's newborn nursery may fail in similar facilities at another hospital's nursery.
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Finding a way to STING tumor growth
The immune protein STING has long been noted for helping protect against viruses and tumors by signaling a well-known immune molecule. Now, scientists have revealed that STING also activates a separate pathway, one that directly kills tumor-fighting immune cells.
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Mother transmitted COVID-19 to baby during pregnancy, physicians report
A pregnant mother who tested positive for COVID-19 transmitted the virus causing the disease to her prematurely born baby, UT Southwestern physicians report. Both were treated and recovered.
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Autistic people's nerve cells differ before birth
A new study now shows in human brain cells that autism, a neurodevelopmental condition, can now be traced back to prenatal development, even though the disorder is not diagnosed until at least 18 months of age. The atypical development starts at the very earliest stages of brain organization, at the level of individual brain cells, according to scientists.
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Ecologists put biodiversity experiments to the test
Much of our knowledge of how biodiversity benefits ecosystems comes from experimental sites. These sites contain combinations of species that are not found in the real world, which has led some ecologists to question the findings from biodiversity experiments. But the positive effects of biodiversity for the functioning of ecosystems are more than an artifact of experimental design. This is the re
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Ecologists put biodiversity experiments to the test
Much of our knowledge of how biodiversity benefits ecosystems comes from experimental sites. These sites contain combinations of species that are not found in the real world, which has led some ecologists to question the findings from biodiversity experiments. But the positive effects of biodiversity for the functioning of ecosystems are more than an artifact of experimental design. This is the re
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Punitive sentencing led to higher incarceration rates throughout adulthood for certain birth cohorts in North Carolina
Although U.S. crime rates have dropped significantly since the mid-1990s, rates of incarceration peaked in 2008, and still remain high. The standard explanation for this pattern is that all people exposed to the criminal justice system today are treated more harshly than before. A new study using 45 years of incarceration data from North Carolina suggests an alternative explanation: this pattern i
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Ground segment testing a success for James Webb Space Telescope
Testing teams have successfully completed a critical milestone focused on demonstrating that NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will respond to commands once in space.
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Nose cells may be key entry point for coronavirus
Evidence suggests that odor-sensing cells are the key entry point for SARS COV-2, according to a new study. Researchers experimented with a small number of human cell samples. They report that the "hook" of cells SARS-CoV-2 uses to latch onto and infect cells is up to 700 times more prevalent in the olfactory supporting cells lining the inside of the upper part of the nose than in the lining cell
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Study projects lifetime risk of death by gun violence and drugs in the US
A new study found that the risk of a person dying from a gunshot is about one percent, while the risk of death by drug overdose is at 1.5 percent. If this death trend continues on this trajectory, it means that approximately one out of every 100 children today will die from a firearm while one out of 70 will die by drug overdose. Presenting these statistics in terms of "lifetime risk" makes the n
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Unconventional farming methods could help smallholders fight back against climate change
New research from Ghana shows less popular methods of biochar application are more effective in promoting cowpea growth and yield. Cowpea is widely cultivated in sub-Saharan Africa and in warm regions around the world. The crop is an important source of human food, livestock feed, and green manure, and generates income for smallholder farmers. It is valued for its ability to boost soil fertility b
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UK/UPenn researchers provide insights into new form of dementia
Working with their colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania, researchers at the University of Kentucky have found that they can differentiate between subtypes of dementia inducing brain disease. "For the first time we created criteria that could differentiate between frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and a common Alzheimer's 'mimic' called LATE disease," explained Dr. Peter Nelson of the Sanders-B
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Six of the most promising treatments for Covid-19 so far
While a cure-all drug or therapy is a long way off, there have been some breakthroughs Many different drugs and therapies are being trialled and used on patients with Covid-19. There are some positive results, which may be beginning to bring the hospital death toll down, but there is still a long way to go towards something that will cure all comers. These are some of the most promising. Continue
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Crossbreeding of Holstein cows improves fertility without detriment to milk production
Since 1960, Holstein dairy cows have exhibited a substantial decline in fertility, with serious economic consequences for farmers. Genetic selection programs in the United States and elsewhere have emphasized milk production at the expense of other traits. Attention has turned to improving these neglected traits for better overall well-being of cows and to ameliorate dairy producers' profitability
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Tropical songbirds stop breeding to survive drought
Songbirds in tropical rainforests curtail their reproduction to help them survive droughts, according to a study Monday.
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COVID-19 pandemic should be a wake-up call for water security
Urgent action on water security is essential to better prepare societies for future global health crises, say experts at the University of Birmingham in the U.K. and Northwestern University in the U.S.
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Crossbreeding of Holstein cows improves fertility without detriment to milk production
Since 1960, Holstein dairy cows have exhibited a substantial decline in fertility, with serious economic consequences for farmers. Genetic selection programs in the United States and elsewhere have emphasized milk production at the expense of other traits. Attention has turned to improving these neglected traits for better overall well-being of cows and to ameliorate dairy producers' profitability
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Tropical songbirds stop breeding to survive drought
Songbirds in tropical rainforests curtail their reproduction to help them survive droughts, according to a study Monday.
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This Guy Built a DIY Cyberquad and It's an Absolute Monster
Don't Try This At Home Tesla fanatic and DIY tinkerer YouTuber Rich Rebuilds just built a full-scale take on the "Cyberquad," the ATV cousin of the car company's gigantic Cybertruck . The vehicle, dubbed Starscream, is an absolute beast. Angry Power Drill "It sounds like an angry power drill," Rich concluded after building up a first version, comprising a traditional quad bike chassis, an electri
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Strigolactones increase tolerance to weevils in tobacco plants
A team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, has discovered that strigolactones, a class of novel plant hormones, mediate the fine-tuning of the production plant defensive substances in the stem of plants of the wild tobacco species Nicotiana attenuata. In a cooperative project with partners in China and Korea, they found that strigolactones and their cr
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Team warns negative emissions technologies may not solve climate crisis
A team led by researchers at the University of Virginia cautions that when it comes to climate change, the world is making a bet it might not be able to cover.
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New research on claims that Asian American students are harmed when they cannot attend their first-choice university
A new study finds evidence that contradicts claims in legal complaints to the U.S. Department of Justice arguing that Asian American students face negative consequences while in college as a result of not being admitted to and not attending their first-choice institution. These complaints led to the Trump administration launching formal investigations into the race-conscious admissions practices o
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Beam me up: Researchers use 'behavioral teleporting' to study social interactions
Teleporting is a science fiction trope often associated with Star Trek. But a different kind of teleporting is being explored at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, one that could let researchers investigate the very basis of social behavior, study interactions between invasive and native species to preserve natural ecosystems, explore predator/prey relationship without posing a risk to the welf
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Reducing transmission risk of livestock disease
The risk of transmitting the livestock virus PPRV, which threatens 80 percent of the world's sheep and goats, increases with certain husbandry practices but not herd size. A new study, led by researchers at Penn State, investigated how transmission of PPRV might change at different scales and identified specific husbandry practices associated with increased odds of infection—including the introduc
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New study: Eyes linger less on 'fake news' headlines
The term 'fake news' has been a part of our vocabulary since the 2016 US presidential election. As the amount of fake news in circulation grows larger and larger, particularly in the United States, it often spreads like wildfire. Subsequently, there is an ever-increasing need for fact-checking and other solutions to help people navigate the oceans of factual and fake news that surround us.
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Global forest restoration and the importance of empowering local communities
Forest restoration is a crucial element in strategies to mitigate climate change and conserve global biodiversity in the coming decades, and much of the focus is on formerly tree-covered lands in the tropics.
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Climate Is Taking On a Growing Role for Voters, Research Suggests
Concern about global warming is steady despite other crises, a survey found, and the number of voters who are deeply engaged on the issue is rising sharply.
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Strigolactones increase tolerance to weevils in tobacco plants
A team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, has discovered that strigolactones, a class of novel plant hormones, mediate the fine-tuning of the production plant defensive substances in the stem of plants of the wild tobacco species Nicotiana attenuata. In a cooperative project with partners in China and Korea, they found that strigolactones and their cr
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Beam me up: Researchers use 'behavioral teleporting' to study social interactions
Teleporting is a science fiction trope often associated with Star Trek. But a different kind of teleporting is being explored at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, one that could let researchers investigate the very basis of social behavior, study interactions between invasive and native species to preserve natural ecosystems, explore predator/prey relationship without posing a risk to the welf
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Reducing transmission risk of livestock disease
The risk of transmitting the livestock virus PPRV, which threatens 80 percent of the world's sheep and goats, increases with certain husbandry practices but not herd size. A new study, led by researchers at Penn State, investigated how transmission of PPRV might change at different scales and identified specific husbandry practices associated with increased odds of infection—including the introduc
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New deal housing programs dramatically increased segregation, new study finds
Housing programs adopted during the New Deal increased segregation in American cities and towns, creating racial disparities that continue to characterize life in the 21st century, finds a new study by New York University sociologist Jacob Faber.
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Convalescent Plasma: The Science and the Politics
I suppose that I'm going to have to say something about yesterday's convalescent plasma announcement. First, the medical aspects: in my view, for what that's worth, convalescent plasma is likely to be at least somewhat helpful to hospitalized coronavirus patients. I think that its safety profile is likely to be good as well, and I really have no problem with it being used. There are downsides. It
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Machine learning peeks into nano-aquariums
In the nanoworld, tiny particles such as proteins appear to dance as they transform and assemble to perform various tasks while suspended in a liquid. Recently developed methods have made it possible to watch and record these otherwise-elusive tiny motions, and researchers now take a step forward by developing a machine learning workflow to streamline the process.
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New surgical approach for women at risk of ovarian cancer
A new two-stage surgical approach for cancer prevention is highly acceptable among premenopausal women at high risk of ovarian cancer.
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Mechanisms identified to restore myelin sheaths after injury or in multiple sclerosis
A research team has identified an important mechanism that can be used to control the restoration of myelin sheaths following traumatic injury and in degenerative diseases. With the insights gained, the researchers were able to regenerate damaged myelin sheaths in mice by treating them with the active substance theophylline, thereby restoring their nerve cell function.
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When it comes to supporting candidates, ideology trumps race and gender
Voters who express prejudice against minorities and women are still more likely to support candidates who most closely align with their ideologies, regardless of the race or sex of such candidates, according to new research.
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Blood pressure medication improves COVID-19 survival rates, research finds
New research finds that medication for high blood pressure could improve Covid-19 survival rates and reduce the severity of infection.
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Big mammals at higher risk of extinction in world's poorest countries, study reveals
Big mammals such as elephants, rhinos and primates are at highest risk of extinction in the national parks and nature reserves of the world's poorest countries, a new global review has found.
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Big mammals at higher risk of extinction in world's poorest countries, study reveals
Big mammals such as elephants, rhinos and primates are at highest risk of extinction in the national parks and nature reserves of the world's poorest countries, a new global review has found.
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A volume on past progress and new frontiers in the study of early birds and their close relatives
The origins of birds and their flight was a major event in the history of life. A wealth of spectacular fossils has demonstrated that birds are theropod dinosaurs, with Pennaraptora being the most relevant subgroup to transition from non-avian dinosaurs to birds. Here we announce the publication of a landmark journal volume on pennaraptoran theropods edited by HKU Research Assistant Professor Dr.
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Study enables predicting computational power of early quantum computers
Quantum physicists at the University of Sussex have created an algorithm that speeds up the rate of calculations in the early quantum computers which are currently being developed. They have created a new way to route the ions—or charged atoms—around the quantum computer to boost the efficiency of the calculations.
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Did you solve it? Win the car, dodge the goat
The solution to today's problem Earlier today I set you the following problem, about a game show where objects are hidden behind three doors. Behind one door is a car . Behind a second door are the car keys . Behind the third door is a goat . The car, the keys and the goat were placed there randomly, meaning that each item has a 1/3 chance of being behind any particular door. Twins Timmy and Tamm
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Frank Barnaby obituary
Radiation physicist at Aldermaston who went on to warn of the dangers posed by the civil and military uses of nuclear energy The nuclear weapons scientist Frank Barnaby, who has died aged 92, became one of the most effective critics of the international arms race. As the cold war superpowers competed with ever more advanced weaponry to wage a war that could never be won, Barnaby helped amass an a
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Large molecules need more help to travel through a nuclear pore into the cell nucleus
A new study in the field of biophysics has revealed how large molecules are able to enter the nucleus of a cell.
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Punitive sentencing led to higher incarceration rates throughout adulthood for certain birth cohorts in North Carolina
A new study using 45 years of incarceration data from North Carolina suggests an alternative explanation to the current rates of incarceration: this pattern is driven by the prolonged involvement in the criminal justice system by members of Generation X, who came of age during the 1980s and early 1990s.
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Researchers find first proven case of Covid-19 reinfection
University of Hong Kong says 33-year-old man caught virus in March and again in August
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How We Can Use the CITES Wildlife Trade Agreement to Help Prevent Pandemics
At the moment, we can't—so let's adapt it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Machine learning peeks into nano-aquariums
In the nanoworld, tiny particles such as proteins appear to dance as they transform and assemble to perform various tasks while suspended in a liquid. Recently developed methods have made it possible to watch and record these otherwise-elusive tiny motions, and researchers now take a step forward by developing a machine learning workflow to streamline the process.
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An elephant-nosed creature 'lost to science' was living just next door
Nature, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02468-1 The Somali elephant shrew, unseen by scientists for decades, is well-known to people in Djibouti's rocky deserts.
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Heart repair factor boosted by RNA-targeting compound
Damaged hearts require stem cell activation to heal, but heart attack silences a key signaling molecule. A compound discovered in Disney lab reactivates its production, in cell-based studies.
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Living at higher altitudes associated with higher levels of child stunting
Children living at high altitudes found to be more stunted, on average, than peers at lower altitudes. The deficit increases above 500 meters above sea level, and persists as children age, indicating the need to tailor nutrition interventions targeted at children living in high altitudes.
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Beam me up: Researchers use 'behavioral teleporting' to study social interactions
The team, led by Maurizio Porfiri, Institute Professor at NYU Tandon, devised a novel approach to getting physically separated fish to interact with each other, leading to insights about what kinds of cues influence social behavior. The innovative system, called 'behavioral teleporting,' transfers the complete inventory of behaviors and actions (ethogram) of a live zebrafish onto a remotely locate
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Reducing transmission risk of livestock disease
The risk of transmitting the livestock virus PPRV, which threatens 80% of the world's sheep and goats, increases with certain husbandry practices, including attendance at seasonal grazing camps and the introduction of livestock to the herd.
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New research contradicts claims that Asian American students are harmed when they cannot attend their first-choice university
A new study finds evidence that contradicts claims in legal complaints to the U.S. Department of Justice arguing that Asian American students face negative consequences while in college as a result of not being admitted to and not attending their first-choice institution. These complaints led to the Trump administration launching formal investigations into the race-conscious admissions practices o
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Researchers develop flat lens a thousand times thinner than a human hair
The lens can be used to produce high-resolution images with a wide field of view. It can serve as a camera lens in smartphones and can be used in other devices that depend on sensors (high resolution wide angle selfie obtained using metalens
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Australia looks to be finally beating its second wave of coronavirus
Australia was hit with a second wave of covid-19 in June that has been deadlier than the first outbreak, but a local lockdown is helping bring the disease under control
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Antibodies that may protect against COVID-19
A new study suggests that COVID-19 specific IgA monoclonal antibodies may provide effective immunity in the respiratory system against the novel coronavirus — a potentially critical feature of an effective vaccine.
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Failure to 'flatten the curve' may kill more people than we thought
New research finds that every six additional ICU beds or seven additional non-ICU beds filled by COVID-19 patients leads to one additional COVID-19 death over the following week.
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Downstream effects: Sturgeon lifespan, fertility vary strikingly with river conditions
New research has found that pallid sturgeon stocked in a northerly segment of the Missouri River live an average of three times longer, produce roughly 10 times as many eggs and weigh up to seven times more than specimens stocked downriver. The findings represent a dramatic example of how environmental conditions — in this case, fast-flowing channels introduced via human intervention — can shape
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Can Vaccines for Wildlife Prevent Human Pandemics?
Scientists still debate whether the SARS-CoV-2 virus originated in a bat or a pangolin . But they are sure that this coronavirus is only the most recent example of a zoonosis — an infectious disease that passes from animals to humans. From HIV to Ebola virus, Nipah virus and bird flu, pathogens lurking in wildlife have repeatedly found a way to "spill over" into humans, as epidemiologists put it.
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For the first time in 87 years, there are two tropical storms in the Gulf of Mexico at once
Here are some some recent satellite images of strengthening Hurricane #Laura over the southeastern Gulf of Mexico. The next forecast update will be at 10 AM CDT. Follow @NHC_Atlantic for the latest forecast information and on the web at https://t.co/tW4KeFW0gB . pic.twitter.com/J5D7GI3gLn — National Hurricane Center (@NHC_Atlantic) August 25, 2020
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How animals and plants are evolving in cities | Menno Schilthuizen
In cities, evolution occurs constantly, as countless plants, animals and insects adapt to human-made habitats in spectacular ways. Evolutionary biologist Menno Schilthuizen calls on peculiar beings such as fast food-loving mice and self-cooling snails to illustrate the ever-transforming wonders of urban wildlife — and explains how you can observe this phenomenon in real-time, thanks to a global n
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Can the US government really ban TikTok?
Governments need cooperation from many companies to block an application like TikTok, but it is nearly impossible to ban any application completely, argues cybersecurity expert Randy Magiera. In recent weeks, President Donald Trump announced a US ban on TikTok, an extremely popular application that features short videos where their creators often dance or lip-sync to viral audio clips. Trump issu
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Crossbreeding of Holstein cows improves fertility without detriment to milk production
Genetic selection programs in the United States and elsewhere have emphasized milk production at the expense of other traits. Attention has turned to improving these neglected traits for better overall well-being of cows and to ameliorate dairy producers' profitability. In a recent article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from the University of Minnesota examined the effects o
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Roadmap for linking neurological and locomotor deficits
Scientists capture highly-detailed "locomotor signatures" of mouse models of neurological disease. This approach provides a novel way of mapping locomotion disorders onto their underlying neural circuits.
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UVA-led team warns negative emissions technologies may not solve climate crisis
A multidisciplinary team led by University of Virginia researchers used the Global Change Assessment Model developed at the University of Maryland to compare the effects of three negative emissions technologies on global food supply, water use and energy demand. The work looked at the role having direct air capture available would have on future climate scenarios.
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New syringe technology could enable injection of highly concentrated biologic drugs
MIT researchers have developed a simple, low-cost technology to administer powerful drug formulations that are too viscous to be injected using conventional medical syringes.
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Primary care at a crossroads: Experts call for change
Primary care providers have experienced a rise in responsibilities with little or no increase in the time they have to get it all done, or reduction in the number of patients assigned to them. In two new papers, researchers look at issues facing them and offer frameworks for improvement.
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Army robo-teammate can detect, share 3D changes in real-time
Something is different, and you can't quite put your finger on it. But your robot can.
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Dementia kills nearly three times more people than previously thought: BU study
Dementia may be an underlying cause of nearly three times more deaths in the U.S. than official records show, according to a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study.
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New study: Eyes linger less on 'fake news' headlines
A new study from the University of Copenhagen and Aalborg University reports that people spend a little less time looking at 'fake news' headlines than to factual ones — knowledge that could make it easier to sort through fake news.
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Ecologists put biodiversity experiments to the test
Much of our knowledge of how biodiversity benefits ecosystems comes from experimental sites. These sites contain combinations of species that are not found in the real world, which has led some ecologists to question the findings from biodiversity experiments. But the positive effects of biodiversity are more than an artefact of experimental design and previous findings are, indeed, reliable. This
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Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles are becoming longer lasting
An international research team led by the University of Bern has succeeded in developing an electrocatalyst for hydrogen fuel cells which, in contrast to the catalysts commonly used today, does not require a carbon carrier and is therefore much more stable. The new process is industrially applicable and can be used to further optimize fuel cell powered vehicles without CO2 emissions.
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Severe viral infection overwhelms immune cells
Melbourne researchers have identified mechanisms leading to the functional deterioration of the immunesystem in response to severe viral infections, such as HIV or COVID-19.
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Adapting ideas from quantum physics to calculate alternative interventions for infection and cancer
Published in Nature Physics, findings from a new study co-led by Cleveland Clinic and Case Western Reserve University teams show for the first time how ideas from quantum physics can help develop novel drug interventions for bacterial infections and cancer.
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Hydrogen vehicles might soon become the global norm
Roughly one billion cars and trucks zoom about the world's roadways. Only a few run on hydrogen. This could change after a breakthrough achieved by researchers at the University of Copenhagen. The breakthrough? A new catalyst that can be used to produce cheaper and far more sustainable hydrogen powered vehicles.
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Nooks, crannies and critters
A team of ecologists and engineers have developed a relatively simple way to standardize how habitat complexity is measured. This new approach allows for insights into how structural changes to land and seascapes will alter ecosystems.
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Locust swarm could improve collision avoidance
Plagues of locusts, containing millions of insects, fly across the sky to attack crops, but the individual insects do not collide with each other within these massive swarms. Now a team of engineers is creating a low-power collision detector that mimics the locust avoidance response and could help robots, drones and even self-driving cars avoid collisions.
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Wireless device makes clean fuel from sunlight, CO2 and water
Researchers have developed a standalone device that converts sunlight, carbon dioxide and water into a carbon-neutral fuel, without requiring any additional components or electricity.
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Species 'pushed out of the tropics' by climate change
The world's tropical regions are home to the widest range of plants and animals, but research from The University of Queensland reveals that climate change is pushing species away, and fast.UQ ARC Future Fellow Dr Tatsuya Amano led an international team that reviewed more than 1.3 million records of waterbird species, and found temperature increase is drastically affecting species abundance in the
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Growth of children living at higher altitudes
This observational study examined the association between living at higher altitudes and growth among children.
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Pediatric outpatient visits for notifiable infectious diseases in Beijing Hospital during COVID-19
Strict public health measures were implemented in China in response to COVID-19 but little is known about whether other types of hospital visits were affected, especially those for other infectious diseases. Researchers explored changes in pediatric outpatient visits for notifiable infectious diseases acquired through droplet transmission, contact transmission or both during Beijing's COVID-19 out
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Internet searches for acute anxiety during early stages of COVID-19 pandemic
To understand the association of COVID-19 with anxiety on a population basis, researchers examined internet searches indicative of acute anxiety during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.
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CPR choices of dialysis patients suggest many lack context
Globally some 2 million people with failed kidneys undergo hemodialysis treatment. Researchers queried 876 dialysis patients about whether, in the event of a cardiac arrest, they would want to be resuscitated. Nearly 85% said they definitely or probably would want CPR. The study's lead author said the findings raise concern that many patients are unaware that their likely outcomes of cardiac arres
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Am I having a panic attack? Internet searches for anxiety attacks take off during COVID-19
A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine finds that online help seeking for severe acute anxiety (including 'panic attacks' and 'anxiety attacks') hit record highs in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Meet the Smithsonian's Mosquito Keeper
Scientist Yvonne Linton reveals what it means to oversee a world-renowned collection of 1.9 million specimens
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Photo printers for making high-quality images at home
Put your favorite photos on the wall for everyone to enjoy. (Susan Yin via Unsplash/) We've all been guilty of it. You go on vacation, take thousands of photos, and then live on your phone or camera without being printed and displayed across your walls. Aside from backing up your photos, the next thing you should prioritize is printing. But the days of dropping off your film rolls at your local p
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Great crib options for your baby
Beautiful places for babies to sleep. (Ömürden Cengiz via Unsplash/) Being a first-time parent is already nerve-wracking enough and then you have to pick where your baby will sleep for at least the next two years of their life. That's a big decision. While yes, every parent wants a cute crib to go with their Instagram-friendly nursery, it's also important to think about comfort for you and the ba
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Laptops with a super long battery life
Don't worry about your battery. (XPS via Unsplash /) Working on the go can leave you scrambling for an outlet at the most inopportune time. Have you ever dashed into a cafe, only to find all the outlets are taken? Have you been minutes from filing a report, only to see the low-battery, shutdown-imminent warning flash across your screen? Thankfully, the tech heads who make laptops are aware of the
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Researchers to investigate wind power effects on bats in the Baltic Sea region
Researchers from the Universities of Turku and Helsinki in Finland have been looking into literature about wind farm impacts on bats in several countries around the Baltic Sea (Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Russia and Sweden) and in the rest of Europe. They published a review on the topic.
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Water availability has changed, and humans are to blame
Changes in the water cycle have important impacts on ecosystems and human activities. In the context of the current and expected temperature rise due to global warming, it is extremely important to understand the origin and extent of these changes.
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A leap forward for biomaterials design using AI
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have used artificial intelligence (AI) to predict the degree of water repulsion and protein adsorption by ultra-thin organic materials. By enabling accurate predictions of water repulsion and protein adsorption even by hypothetical materials, the team's approach opens up new possibilities for the screening and design of organic materials wi
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Brewing Mesopotamian beer brings a sip of this vibrant ancient drinking culture back to life
It's been about five months since I set foot in a bar. Like many of you navigating life in a pandemic, I miss bars. I miss the simple pleasure of sharing a beer with friends. And I know I'm not alone.
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Deadly Prehistoric Sea Monster Found Inside Second, Slightly Larger Sea Monster
Credit: Ryosuke Motani, UC Davis Paleontologists have made a unique find: A 5-meter Triassic ichthyosaur with a 4-meter Triassic thalattosaur jammed down its gullet. By all appearances, the former literally bit off more than it could chew and choked on it. One of the challenges of studying prehistoric ecosystems is figuring out what, exactly, was eating what. Coarse-grained distinctions and broad
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Fast-Moving California Wildfires Boosted by Climate Change
Nearly two dozen large blazes have burnt more than 1 million acres of the state — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Trump Wants to Approve a COVID Vaccine Before They're Done Testing It
According to the Financial Times , the Trump administration wants to fast-track a vaccine developed by Oxford University and pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca by October — in time for the November presidential election. But AstraZeneca insisted in response to the news that it has never discussed such an option with the White House, as The Guardian reports . Late phase 2 and 3 trials, which are e
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Climate change: Removing CO2 could spark big rise in food prices
Technologies that remove CO2 from air could drive up food prices five-fold in parts of the world
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Yoga, Tai Chi, and meditation bring specific benefits for veterans
Three popular complementary and integrative health (CIH) therapies – yoga, tai chi, and meditation – lead to significant improvements in key outcomes perceived by Veterans receiving care in the Veterans Health Administration (VA) system, suggests a study in a special September supplement to Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
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New study: MassBiologics discovers antibodies that may protect against COVID-19
A new study by researchers at MassBiologics of UMass Medical School published in Nature Communications suggests that COVID specific IgA monoclonal antibodies may provide effective immunity in the respiratory system against the novel coronavirus – a potentially critical feature of an effective vaccine.
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The mathematical magic of bending grids
A mathematical discovery opens up new possibilities for architecture and design: For any desired curved surface a flat grid of straight bars can be calculated that can be folded out to the desired curved structure. The result is a stable form that can even carry loads.
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Researchers discover immune predictors of COVID-19 cases that fare the worst
Mount Sinai scientists have identified two markers of inflammation that reliably predict the severity of COVID-19 cases and likelihood of survival, providing a foundation for a diagnostic platform and therapeutic targets, according to a study published in Nature Medicine in August.
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Mail delays may affect medication supply for nearly 1 in 4 Americans over 50
The timeliness of mail delivery may affect access to medication for many middle-aged and older adults, according to a new analysis of data from a national poll of people aged 50 to 80. Nearly one in four people in this age group said they receive at least one medication by mail, but that percentage rises to 29% when the poll results are limited to people who take at least one prescription medicati
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Fat crystals trigger chronic inflammation
A congenital disorder of the fat metabolism can apparently cause chronic hyperreaction of the immune system. This is the conclusion reached by researchers from the University of Bonn in a recent study. The results are published in the journal Autophagy.
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New surgical approach for women at risk of ovarian cancer
A new two-stage surgical approach for cancer prevention is highly acceptable among premenopausal women at high risk of ovarian cancer, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London.
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Ventilators could be adapted to help two COVID-19 patients at once
New research has shown how ventilators could be adapted to help two patients simultaneously in the event of a shortage.
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Global forest restoration and the importance of empowering local communities
Forest restoration is a crucial element in strategies to mitigate climate change and conserve global biodiversity in the coming decades, and much of the focus is on formerly tree-covered lands in the tropics.
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New deal housing programs dramatically increased segregation, new study finds
Housing programs adopted during the New Deal increased segregation in American cities and towns, creating racial disparities that continue to characterize life in the 21st century, finds a new study.
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'Safely returning America to work' — Occupational medicine specialists offer expertise
As the COVID 19 pandemic continues, business leaders face critical decisions on how to safely reopen and resume operations. A set of general guidelines for Safely Returning America to Work was published by the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official journal of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM). The journal is published in the Lippincott po
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SARS-CoV-2 in wastewater: Monitoring COVID-19 and estimating potential transmission risk
Since the beginning of the pandemic, research groups have been working on methods to detect SARS-CoV-2 viruses in wastewater to monitor the degree of COVID-19 transmission among the population. Since infected people shed SARS-CoV-2 viruses in their faeces, wastewater samples could give an indication of the infection numbers among all the residents connected to a wastewater treatment plant. If suff
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Ocean hitchhiker's sucker mechanism offers potential for underwater adhesion
A new study has revealed how remora suckerfish detach themselves from the surfaces they've clung to – and how the mechanism could provide inspiration for future reversible underwater adhesion devices.The research, by an international, multidisciplinary team working across robotics, comparative biology, and electrical engineering, investigated the detachment mechanism of the remora's suction disc,
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Animals are picky eaters too – we're trying to discover if parents teach them what's safe to eat
The internet is filled with blogs and articles offering advice for parents who are trying to coax children into eating greens. Anyone with kids can relate to stories of mealtimes becoming a succession of attritional confrontations, where you cycle through ineffectual strategies before accepting the reality of the situation and plead with your toddler to simply "take one bite of broccoli." In the e
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Species 'pushed out of the tropics' by climate change
The world's tropical regions are home to the widest range of plants and animals, but research from The University of Queensland reveals that climate change is pushing species away, and fast.
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Nooks, crannies and critters: Researchers develop new way to measure complexity of habitats
Places with lots of nooks and crannies contain lots of living things—that old brick-pile in the backyard has far more critters than the concrete driveway. This general rule is the same in natural habitats, from the abyssal trenches to the tops of mountains, from coral reefs to the tundra. These habitats range from relatively simple, flat surfaces to highly complex three-dimensional structures.
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Adapting ideas from quantum physics to calculate alternative interventions for infection and cancer
Published in Nature Physics, findings from a new study co-led by Cleveland Clinic and Case Western Reserve University teams show for the first time how ideas from quantum physics can help develop novel drug interventions for bacterial infections and cancer.
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Animals are picky eaters too – we're trying to discover if parents teach them what's safe to eat
The internet is filled with blogs and articles offering advice for parents who are trying to coax children into eating greens. Anyone with kids can relate to stories of mealtimes becoming a succession of attritional confrontations, where you cycle through ineffectual strategies before accepting the reality of the situation and plead with your toddler to simply "take one bite of broccoli." In the e
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Species 'pushed out of the tropics' by climate change
The world's tropical regions are home to the widest range of plants and animals, but research from The University of Queensland reveals that climate change is pushing species away, and fast.
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Nooks, crannies and critters: Researchers develop new way to measure complexity of habitats
Places with lots of nooks and crannies contain lots of living things—that old brick-pile in the backyard has far more critters than the concrete driveway. This general rule is the same in natural habitats, from the abyssal trenches to the tops of mountains, from coral reefs to the tundra. These habitats range from relatively simple, flat surfaces to highly complex three-dimensional structures.
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Agricultural pesticides can affect prawns and oysters
Exposure to imidacloprid, an agricultural insecticide, at environmentally-relevant concentrations in food or water, leaves both crustaceans and molluscs vulnerable to insecticides, weakening their immune system and leaving them susceptible to disease.
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Remdesivir-producent: Vi arbejder på at undgå sprøjten i covid-behandling
PLUS. Den pt. eneste anerkendte behandling af covid-19, Remdesivir, kommer måske snart som inhalérbart middel, hvis igangværende studier viser positive resultater.
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Getting to the root of the problem
Roots play a vital role in crop plants. They take up water and nutrients for the plant and keep it help firmly in the ground. But not all roots are the same.
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Uncommon dolphin repeatedly spotted in northern Adriatic
A dolphin species considered regionally extinct in the Adriatic has been spotted there repeatedly off the Italian and Slovenian coast, according to research led by a marine scientist at the University of St Andrews.
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Getting to the root of the problem
Roots play a vital role in crop plants. They take up water and nutrients for the plant and keep it help firmly in the ground. But not all roots are the same.
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Uncommon dolphin repeatedly spotted in northern Adriatic
A dolphin species considered regionally extinct in the Adriatic has been spotted there repeatedly off the Italian and Slovenian coast, according to research led by a marine scientist at the University of St Andrews.
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Some anemones like it hot
Many of us enjoy rock pooling when the tide is out but when it gets hot high temperatures can have a damaging effect on the pool's inhabitants.
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Machine learning peeks into nano-aquariums
In the nanoworld, tiny particles such as proteins appear to dance as they transform and assemble to perform various tasks while suspended in a liquid. Recently developed methods have made it possible to watch and record these otherwise-elusive tiny motions, and researchers now take a step forward by developing a machine learning workflow to streamline the process.
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Some anemones like it hot
Many of us enjoy rock pooling when the tide is out but when it gets hot high temperatures can have a damaging effect on the pool's inhabitants.
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Economic hardship from COVID-19 will hit minority seniors the most
For Americans 60 and older, COVID-19 is widespread and deadly. Its economic impact could also be devastating.
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How to recycle a huge ship – safely and sustainably
Shipbreaking is among the most dangerous jobs in the world, according to the International Labour Organisation. This is the process of breaking up huge old ships into spare parts. It almost always happens in developing countries and comes with an unacceptably high level of fatalities, injuries and work-related diseases.
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New technique to pinpoint source of food poisoning
Scientists at the University of Aberdeen have developed a new technique which could help to identify the source of food poisoning or infection more quickly and accurately than current methods.
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Research examines link between culture and inequality in Australia
New research by Western Sydney University highlights the pivotal role culture plays in social divisions and inequalities in Australia, between classes, age groups, ethnicities, genders, city and country locations, and Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.
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Big mammals at higher risk of extinction in world's poorest countries, study reveals
A review, which looks at 81 studies carried out between 1980 and 2020, has found that illegal hunting is causing worrying declines in the big mammal populations of protected areas across the globe, and particularly in poorer countries.
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How dinosaur research can help medicine
The intervertebral discs connect the vertebrae and give the spine its mobility. The disc consists of a cartilaginous fibrous ring and a gelatinous core as a buffer. It has always been assumed that only humans and other mammals have discs. A misconception, as a research team under the leadership of the University of Bonn has now discovered: Even Tyrannosaurus rex could have suffered a slipped disc.
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Researchers to investigate wind power effects on bats in the Baltic Sea region
Despite the increasing numbers of wind turbines, their impacts on the environment are poorly known. A new study published by researchers in Finland focuses on wind turbines in the Baltic Sea region and their impact on bats and their migration.
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A leap forward for biomaterials design using AI
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have used artificial intelligence (AI) to predict the degree of water repulsion and protein adsorption by ultra-thin organic materials. By enabling accurate predictions of water repulsion and protein adsorption even by hypothetical materials, the team's approach opens up new possibilities for the screening and design of organic materials with desired fu
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IKBFU scientists suggest using heather as an antioxidant
Researchers have proven heather to be effective herbal medicinal raw material. This small relict, evergreen shrub is a widespread plant in Europe and has long been used as a medicine for the treatment of rheumatism, arthritis, as well as an antiseptic, choleretic, wound healing, expectorant.
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Strigolactones increase tolerance to weevils in tobacco plants
Strigolactones mediate the fine-tuning of the production plant defensive substances in the stem of plants of the wild tobacco species Nicotiana attenuata. Their crosstalk with other hormones involved in plant defense is crucial for tobacco plants' ability to tolerate insects that live inside the stem. Plants that are no longer able to produce strigolactones also have altered concentrations of jasm
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Internet-of-Things air quality sensor that could save the lives of babies and ast
Scientists at the University of Sussex have collaborated with an Oxford company, M-SOLV, and a team of scientists from across Europe to develop a highly sensitive, accurate and affordable carbon-based Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) sensor.
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Machine learning peeks into nano-aquariums
In the nanoworld, tiny particles such as proteins appear to dance as they transform and assemble to perform various tasks while suspended in a liquid. Recently developed methods have made it possible to watch and record these otherwise-elusive tiny motions, and researchers now take a step forward by developing a machine learning workflow to streamline the process.
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Less flocking behavior among microorganisms reduces the risk of being eaten
When algae and bacteria with different swimming gaits gather in large groups, their flocking behaviour diminishes, something that may reduce the risk of falling victim to aquatic predators. This finding is presented in an international study led from Lund University in Sweden.
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Kritisk ledende overlæge indkaldt til tjenstlig samtale
Mahican Gielen, der tidligere har kritiseret Region Midtjyllands håndtering af fyringen af Ulrich Fredberg som chef for Diagnostisk Center i Silkeborg, risikerer nu selv at blive fyret.
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Lægedage er aflyst
PLO og DSAM aflyser Lægedage for at omfattende coronanedlukninger i almen praksis.
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Sändare ger kunskap om blåfenad tonfisk i Skagerrak
Blåfenad tonfisk har ökat längs västkusten. För fjärde året i rad utrustas nu den fredade fisken med sändare som ska hjälpa forskare vid SLU att få kunskap att stärka ett hållbart nyttjande och bevarande av fisken, både i svenska vatten och internationellt. För fjärde året i rad ska blåfenade tonfiskar utrustas med sändare i Skagerrak för att ge forskarna kunskap om hur fiske, klimatförändringar
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End of affirmative action at UC hurt Black, Latinx students, study finds
The end of affirmative action at California universities 22 years ago had a significant negative impact on Black and Latinx students, forcing many out of the University of California system and reducing their later earnings, according to a new study from the Center for the Study of Higher Education (CSHE) at UC Berkeley.
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Forging molecular bonds with green light
Scientists have created a new molecular coupling tool employing both green light and pH triggers that has potential for use in applications such as drug delivery and 3D cell culture platforms.
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Forging molecular bonds with green light
Scientists have created a new molecular coupling tool employing both green light and pH triggers that has potential for use in applications such as drug delivery and 3D cell culture platforms.
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Astronomers: There's Still a Chance 'Oumuamua Is Alien Tech
'Oumuamua In October 2017, astronomers were puzzled by the arrival of a strangely shaped object about 400 meters in length, which appeared to have entered our solar system at a highly unusual trajectory. Experts concluded that 'Oumuamua , as it was named later, was an interstellar visitor — kicking off years of speculation about whether or not it's a piece of extraterrestrial technology, visiting
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Frequent use of antimicrobial drugs in early life shifts bacterial profiles in saliva
The strongest associations were presented with azithromycin that is used for example to middle ear infections, strep throat and pneumonia.
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Failure to 'flatten the curve' may kill more people than we thought
New research by the University of Minnesota and the University of Washington finds that every six additional ICU beds or seven additional non-ICU beds filled by COVID-19 patients leads to one additional COVID-19 death over the following week.
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Energy-efficient design for mmWave-enabled NOMA-UAV networks
Combining NOMA with mmWave technology in UAV communication networks is promising to enhance the network performance. Spectrum-efficient mmWave transmission schemes have been extensively investigated in existing literatures. However, energy efficiency is of paramount importance for UAVs due to their limited energy storage. Recently, researchers from Dalian University of Technology have developed an
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Sussex study enables predicting computational power of early quantum computers
University of Sussex quantum physicists have developed an algorithm which helps early quantum computers to perform calculations most efficiently
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New treatment developed by CHOP shows success in high-risk solid tumors
In a breakthrough study, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have shown that an enhanced treatment developed in their lab leads to long-term remissions in 80% to 100% of mice with drug-resistant or high-risk solid tumors. The research, which could soon lead to clinical trials, is described in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
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Sofosbuvir/daclatasvir drugs may be effective coronavirus treatment
Several new papers in Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, published by Oxford University Press, suggest successful treatments for COVID-19.
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Asteroid 2018 VP₁ may be heading for Earth. But there's no need to worry
Social media around the world lit up over the weekend, discussing the possibility that an asteroid (known as 2018 VP₁) could crash into Earth on November 2.
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A new quantum paradox throws the foundations of observed reality into question
If a tree falls in a forest and no one is there to hear it, does it make a sound? Perhaps not, some say.
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A light touch for membrane selectivity
Membranes that change their pore size in response to external stimuli, such as pH, heat and light, are set to transform separation science and technology. Such smart membranes developed by KAUST researchers display tunable pore size, which means they can selectively separate compounds according to their size when exposed to different light wavelengths.
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Anæstesilæger trækker sig i protest fra arbejdsgruppe om ikke-medicinsk omskæring
DASAIM kan ikke stå fagligt inde for notat om ikke-medicinsk drengeomskæring. Selskabet fastslår, at det ikke er forsvarligt med lokalbedøvelse ved det kirurgiske indgreb og trækker sig derfor fra arbejdsgruppe, der skal gøre notat til vejledning.
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Trafikprofessoren: Her er de bedste forslag til en havnetunnel i København
PLUS. Havnetunnelen kan bygges som en vestlig eller østlig korridor. Men der er store forskelle.
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None of the most common blood pressure medications increased the risk of depression, some lowered the risk
Among the 41 most common blood pressure medications, none of them raised the risk of depression, according to an analysis from Denmark. The study also found that some high blood pressure medications lowered the risk of depression. These findings may help guide medical professionals in selecting the right hypertension medication, particularly for people with a personal or family history of depressi
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Deep chest compressions can prevent brain damage during cardiac arrest
Deep chest compressions can crack ribs, but they reduce brain damage during cardiac arrest, reports a new study.
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New tools track action on climate laws in New York State and NYC
Two tools recently launched by the Sabin Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia University, will help to monitor progress in implementing new climate laws in New York State and New York City.
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Ocean hitchhiker's sucker mechanism offers potential for underwater adhesion
A new study has revealed how remora suckerfish detach themselves from the surfaces they've clung to—and how the mechanism could provide inspiration for future reversible underwater adhesion devices.
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Fossils reveal diversity of animal species roaming Europe 2 million years ago
A re-analysis of fossils from one of Europe's most significant paleontological sites reveals a wide diversity of animal species, including a large terrestrial monkey, short-necked giraffe, rhinos and saber-toothed cats.
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Africa food organization 'fails to deliver on promise to double yields'
Large agricultural development programs have done little to reduce hunger while pushing farmers into debt, food security experts say, as they warn that such schemes risk failure if they do not move away from industrial fertilizers and seeds.
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As 2 storms menace Gulf Coast, residents brace for deluge
As two powerful storms menaced the Gulf Coast Monday, forecasters feared Marco would drive sea water onto the shore and unleash torrential rains just two days before Laura lashes the same region with potentially more powerful storm surge and hurricane-force winds.
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Scientists Used Protein Switches to Turn T-Cells Into Cancer-Fighting Guided Missiles
One of the main challenges in curing cancer is that unlike foreign invaders, tumor cells are part of the body and so able to hide in plain sight. Now researchers have found a way to turn white blood cells into precision guided missiles that can sniff out these wolves in sheep's clothing. One of the biggest breakthroughs in treating cancer in recent years has been the emergence of CAR T-cell thera
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Lensless light-field imaging through diffuser encoding
Microlens array based light-field imaging generally suffers from an intrinsic trade-off between the spatial and angular resolutions. To this end, Scientists in China and German jointly proposed a lensless light-field imaging modality by using a diffuser as an encoder. Light rays can be decoupled from a detected image with adjustable spatio-angular resolutions, breaking through the resolution limit
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Investigation of core-shell nanocatalyst AU@CDs for ammonia synthesis
In a paper published in NANO, a team of researchers from Xinjiang University, China have prepared Au@CDs photocatalyst with core-shell structure by combining coal-based carbon dots (CDs) with gold sol. This has far-reaching significance for the further development of coal resources to prepare high-performance materials.
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Finding a way to STING tumor growth
The immune protein STING has long been noted for helping protect against viruses and tumors by signaling a well-known immune molecule. Now, UT Southwestern scientists have revealed that STING also activates a separate pathway, one that directly kills tumor-fighting immune cells.
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Mechanisms identified to restore myelin sheaths after injury or in multiple sclerosis
A research team led by neurobiologist Professor Claire Jacob has identified an important mechanism that can be used to control the restoration of myelin sheaths following traumatic injury and in degenerative diseases. With the insights gained, the researchers were able to regenerate damaged myelin sheaths in mice by treating them with the active substance theophylline, thereby restoring their nerv
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Routing valley exciton emission of a WS2 monolayer via in-plane inversion-symmetry broken PhC slabs
The researchers demonstrate all-dielectric photonic crystal (PhC) slabs without in-plane inversion symmetry (C2 symmetry) could separate and route valley exciton emission of a WS2 monolayer at room temperature. Coupling with circularly polarized photonic Bloch modes of such PhC slabs, valley photons emitted by a WS2 monolayer are routed directionally and efficiently separated in the far field. In
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Water availability has changed, and humans are to blame
A new study, realized with the contribution of the CMCC Foundation, demonstrates for the first time that human-induced climate change has influenced water availability on land in the driest months of the year, over the last century.
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Wide variations in car seat breathing assessment conducted on premature newborns
A new study from the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found wide variations throughout the United States in the way hospitals ensure that premature or low birth weight infants can breathe safely in a car seat before discharging them. The same infant who passes a screening in one hospital's newborn nursery may fail in similar facilities at another hospital's nursery.
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RNA quality control system goes awry in frontotemporal lobar degeneration
Researchers from Osaka University have uncovered that the RNA exosome is critical for the degradation of defective repeat RNA derived from C9orf72 repeat expansions in patients with C9orf72 -associated frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The repeat RNA and resultant toxic proteins impaired RNA exosome function, which led to further accumulation of the defective RNA
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Forsker: Coronaepidemien afslører manglende forståelse på tværs af sektorer
Problemerne med det tværsektorielle samarbejde er nærmest blevet forstærket af epidemien, siger forsker Ditte Høgsgaard. Hun har interviewet 22 sundhedsprofessionelle, der synes at have begrænset indsigt i andre sektorer.
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20th century dam building found to have offset sea level rise
An international team of researchers has found that dam building in the 20th century offset some of the factors that would have led to a higher rise in sea levels. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their study of the factors that have led to a rise in global sea levels and what they learned.
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Children's fiction on terror is leading a youth 'write-back' against post-9/11 paranoia
A wave of children's fiction which tackles subjects such as suicide terrorism, militant jihadism and counter-terror violence is helping young readers to rethink and resist extremism and Islamophobia, new research suggests.
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Study seeks to increase adoption of soil conservation practices
Farmers who make soil health a priority are more likely to rotate three or more crops and to graze livestock on cropland, according to a survey of producers in South Dakota, North Dakota and Nebraska.
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Whale stranding increase may be due to military sonar exercises, say experts
It is thought sonar may scare animals into surfacing too quickly, causing narcosis An unusual series of strandings and sightings of 29 rare beaked whales has taken place around the shores of northern Europe. Experts have suggested the strandings may be linked to a military sonar exercise. The events, whose rarity indicates that they might be linked by a single cause, began two weeks ago with the
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Innovative cities follow a unique historical pattern, study shows
A new study from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University revealed a unique historical pattern that cities follow in order to become strong and innovative economies.
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With management resistance overcome, working from home may be here to stay
It has been almost 50 years ago since visionaries started predicting a digital revolution enabling many of us to work from home.
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Study seeks to increase adoption of soil conservation practices
Farmers who make soil health a priority are more likely to rotate three or more crops and to graze livestock on cropland, according to a survey of producers in South Dakota, North Dakota and Nebraska.
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Binding carbon dioxide using broken concrete
Thanks to technology from ETH spin-off Neustark, concrete recycling plants can store carbon dioxide over the long term.
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Super-Kamiokande gets an upgrade to see neutrinos from ancient supernovae
The Super-Kamiokande neutrino observatory can detect different kinds of neutrino-related phenomena, including supernova explosions in our own galaxy. It is normally full of pure water, but it has recently received a dose of the rare-earth element gadolinium. This will give the observatory the ability to see supernova explosions in more distant galaxies as well.
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Fleeing the climate: The 'great migration' ahead
One of the biggest challenges of today is the migration of people associated with the impacts of climate change on crops, water resources, droughts and risks related to health. Climate models are in agreement: higher temperatures and the increase in heat waves will make many areas of our already overpopulated planet unlivable. The results of a recent study speak for themselves, finding that in nex
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Social media information can predict a wide range of personality traits and attributes
The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology report the use of machine learning to analyze behavior on Twitter and predict a wide range of personality traits and attributes such as intelligence and extraversion. Specifically, the study uses component-wise gradient boosting to demonstrate that network features, such as the number of Tweets and the number of likes, and word us
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Landmark HKU-led volume on past progress and new frontiers in the study of early birds and their close relatives
A wealth of spectacular fossils has demonstrated that birds are theropod dinosaurs, with Pennaraptora being the most relevant subgroup to transition from non-avian dinosaurs to birds. Here we announce the publication of a landmark journal volume on pennaraptoran theropods edited by HKU Research Assistant Professor Dr. Michael Pittman and Prof. Xing Xu of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology an
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Could COVID-19 in wastewater be infectious?
Bar-Zeev, and his postdoc student, Anne Bogler, together with other renowned researchers, indicate that sewage leaking into natural watercourses might lead to infection via airborne spray. Similarly, treated wastewater used to fill recreational water facilities, like lakes and rivers, could also become sources of contagion. Lastly, fruits and vegetables irrigated with wastewater that were not prop
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The interplay of nonlinearity and topology–nontrivial eigenmodes coupling induced by nonlinearity
Trivial and nontrivial photonic SSH lattices are established by direct cw-laser writing in a bulk nonlinear crystal and thereby the nonlinearity-induced coupling of light into topological edge and interface states is experimentally demonstrated. A general theoretical framework is developed for interpreting the mode-coupling dynamics in nonlinear topological systems. This protocol is also applicabl
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5 tips from pediatric care for teachers wearing masks
As governments around the world debate the conditions for reopening schools, some regions have mandated that teachers wear masks when school resumes. Concerns have been expressed about loss of learning opportunities for linguistically diverse students and for children who read lips. For kindergarten and primary teachers, teaching younger children while masked also presents challenges—specifically
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Did Jupiter push Venus into a runaway greenhouse?
Venus has been garnering a lot of attention lately, though primarily in the scientific community, as the last Hollywood movie about the planet was released in the 1960s. This is in part due to its dramatic difference from Earth, and what that difference might mean for the study of exoplanets. If we can better understand what happened during Venus' formation to make it the hellscape it is today, we
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Could Planet 9 be a primordial black hole?
For several years, astronomers and cosmologists have theorized about the existence of an additional planet with a mass 10 times greater than that of Earth, situated in the outermost regions of the solar system. This hypothetical planet, dubbed Planet 9, could be the source of gravitational effects that would explain the unusual patterns in the orbits of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) highlighted b
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Ny chef skal organisere coronatest
Hospitalsenhed Midt ansætter Ann Herling som ny oversygeplejerske med ansvar for driften af testområdet.
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Childhood adversity ups risk of early death
Social adversity in childhood increases the risk of premature death in early adulthood, according to a new study of one million Danish children. The study finds that children who have experienced repeated serious adversity such as losing a parent, mental illness in the family, poverty, or being placed in foster care have a 4.5 times higher risk of dying in early adulthood than children who have n
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1,100-year-old gold coins found at dig site in Israel
Teenage volunteers on archaeological dig unearth 425 coins dating back to 9th century Israeli teenagers volunteering at an archaeological dig have unearthed hundreds of gold coins that were stashed away in a clay vessel for more than a millennium. The 425 24-carat pure gold coins date back to the 9th-century Abbasid caliphate period and would have been a significant amount of money at the time, s
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Yoga linked with improved symptoms in heart patients
Yoga postures and breathing could help patients with atrial fibrillation manage their symptoms, according to new research. Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder. One in four middle-aged adults in Europe and the US will develop the condition, which causes 20-30% of all strokes and increases the risk of death by 1.5-fold in men and 2-fold in women.
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East Antarctic melting hotspot identified
Ice is melting at a surprisingly fast rate underneath Shirase Glacier Tongue in East Antarctica due to the continuing influx of warm seawater into the Lützow-Holm Bay.
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New studies find agricultural pesticides can affect prawns and oysters
Exposure to imidacloprid, an agricultural insecticide, at environmentally-relevant concentrations in food or water, leaves both crustaceans and molluscs vulnerable to insecticides, weakening their immune system and leaving them susceptible to disease.
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Birds of a feather flock together, but timing depends on typhoons
Six black-naped terns — a coastal seabird found in the Pacific and Indian Oceans — have given researchers a glimpse into how they navigate tropical typhoons. The research team based in Japan published their analysis on May 30 in Marine Biology , a Springer journal.
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Small change makes cancer vaccine more effective in animal tests
Tweaking the adenovirus spike protein induces a more robust immune reaction for a cancer vaccine against gastric, pancreatic, esophageal and colon malignancies in animal models.
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When it comes to supporting candidates, ideology trumps race and gender
Voters who express prejudice against minorities and women are still more likely to support candidates who most closely align with their ideologies, regardless of the race or sex of such candidates, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
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Who Could Benefit From Exercise and Behavioral Treatment?
Aerobic exercise clearly benefits young adults with major depression, and a Rutgers-led study suggests it may be possible to predict those who would benefit from behavioral therapy with exercise. Unique to this precision medicine study, published in the journal Psychological Medicine, is an assessment of cognitive control and reward-related brain activity, two facets of brain function that are imp
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Media's pivotal pandemic power
The mass media's coverage of the pandemic health crisis carries an important responsibility to offer balanced messaging about COVID-19 and public behaviour, Flinders University public health researchers says. While freely available, trustworthy news is vital – in particular when conveying personal risk and government mandated guidelines – the Flinders University research warns of less favourable i
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Benefits and limitations of mega-event legacies for Russian cities
The paper reflects on the way that the 2018 FIFA World Cup Sustainability Strategy was implemented for Russian host cities through case studies of the cities of Kazan and Kaliningrad.
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Fossil pollen record suggests vulnerability to mass extinction ahead
Reduced resilience of plant biomes in North America could be setting the stage for the kind of mass extinctions not seen since the retreat of glaciers and arrival of humans about 13,000 years ago, cautions a new study published August 20 in the journal Global Change Biology.
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How Covid-19's Spread Could Drive an Increase in Malaria Deaths
Health professionals worry the pandemic could stress resources and lead to misdiagnosis in Africa
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Forging molecular bonds with green light
QUT researchers have created a new molecular coupling tool employing both green light and pH triggers that has potential for use in applications such as drug delivery and 3-D cell culture platforms.
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Fall risk rises for older adults before and after hospitalization
For older adults, the risk of a fall injury rises substantially in the month before a hospitalization and remains elevated after discharge, a new study shows. The findings suggest that if fall prevention measures were implemented earlier and across care settings—home, nursing home, rehab, hospital—trained professionals could uncover these underlying illnesses before they become so serious that th
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Forging molecular bonds with green light
QUT researchers have created a new molecular coupling tool employing both green light and pH triggers that has potential for use in applications such as drug delivery and 3-D cell culture platforms.
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Studies in mice give clues to combatting changes in aging muscle stem cells
Our muscles start to shrink and weaken when we reach our 50s and 60s in a process called sarcopenia, but new research in mice from the University of Michigan offers new insights into why this loss may occur, and how we might begin to prevent it.
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Hot sulfur breath: Extremophilic archaea provide clues on evolution of sufur metabolism
The use of sulfur compounds to produce energy is one of the most ancient types of metabolisms used by primitive microorganisms to thrive on the early anoxic Earth. How this microbial lifestyle has been evolving remains unclear.
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Antagonistic genes modify rice plant growth
Scientists at Nagoya University and colleagues in Japan have identified two antagonistic genes involved in rice plant stem growth. Their findings, published in the journal Nature, could lead to new ways for genetically modifying rice crops.
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Medieval texts reveal false Royal Navy origins
Alfred the Great, King of Wessex from 871 and King of the Anglo-Saxons from 886 to 899, is widely touted as establishing England's first Royal fleet but research led by Flinders Medieval Studies Ph.D. candidate Matt Firth has found evidence that the Anglo-Saxons' first recorded naval victory occurred 20 years before Alfred was crowned King of Wessex and 24 years before his first recorded naval vic
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The unequal scramble for coronavirus vaccines — by the numbers
Nature, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02450-x Wealthy countries have already pre-ordered more than two billion doses.
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Bridging the gap between biologists and physicists
Nature, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02463-6 Quantum engineer Clarice Aiello aims to discover how laws of quantum mechanics affect vision and other functions.
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Studies in mice give clues to combatting changes in aging muscle stem cells
Our muscles start to shrink and weaken when we reach our 50s and 60s in a process called sarcopenia, but new research in mice from the University of Michigan offers new insights into why this loss may occur, and how we might begin to prevent it.
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Could there be life in the cloudtops of Venus?
When it comes to places with the potential for habitability, Venus isn't usually on that list. The hot, greenhouse-effect-gone-mad neighboring planet with a crushing surface pressure and sulfuric acid clouds certainly isn't friendly to life as we know it, and the few spacecraft humanity has sent to Venus' surface have only endured a few minutes.
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Study suggests hot nights pose greater threat to public health than hot days
Hong Kong has been experiencing hotter summers and more scorcher days in recent years due to climate change and heat island effect. Amid the increasing number of "hot nights," it is found that consecutive "hot nights" are more detrimental to human health than "very hot days," although the actual temperature does not reach the level of daytime, according to a collaborative research conducted by the
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Hot sulfur breath: Extremophilic archaea provide clues on evolution of sufur metabolism
The use of sulfur compounds to produce energy is one of the most ancient types of metabolisms used by primitive microorganisms to thrive on the early anoxic Earth. How this microbial lifestyle has been evolving remains unclear.
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Deep space mine
Many resources essential to the technology on which we depend are dwindling or are increasingly inaccessible to certain nations for geopolitical reasons. A case in point is that several of the rare metallic elements that are needed to construct the components of modern electronic devices such as smartphones and tablet PCs, fuel cells, rechargeable batteries, photovoltaic systems, and other technol
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Nanoscale imaging of dopant nanostructures in silicon-based devices
When fabricating integrated circuits and different types of silicon-based devices, researchers need to position dopant nanostructures in specific ways with high levels of precision. However, arranging these structures at the nanometer scale can be challenging, as their small size makes them difficult to observe and closely examine. Incorrectly tampering with them can have detrimental effects, whic
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Antagonistic genes modify rice plant growth
Scientists at Nagoya University and colleagues in Japan have identified two antagonistic genes involved in rice plant stem growth. Their findings, published in the journal Nature, could lead to new ways for genetically modifying rice crops.
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Electrons boost solid-state caloric cooling in hexagonal sulfides
A research team has found a new type of giant barocaloric (BC) material (hexagonal sulfides) and discovered an important role of electrons in boosting the total entropy change driven by hydrostatic pressure.
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High-resolution and large field-of-view Fourier ptychographic microscopy
Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is a computational imaging and quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique. It effectively tackles the trade-off between resolution and field-of-view (FOV) in conventional microscopy. It can obtain a gigapixel image without mechanical scanning and has been applied in digital pathology in recent years.
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Application of two engineering nanomaterials provides novel way to improve salt tolerance in plants
Sophora alopecuroides is an important traditional Chinese medicine. Salt stress, as one of the most hampering abiotic factors, can severely affect plant growth and crop yield. It is of great significance to improve the salt tolerance of S. alopecuroides for increasing yield and quality, and thereby promoting the local sustainable development of agriculture.
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New ultra-long circulating nanoparticle developed for chronic myeloid leukemia
An ultra-long circulating nanomaterial has been developed by researchers through the conjugation of CHMFL-ABL-053 to an amphiphilic polymer and subsequent self-assembly into a nanoparticle (NP) with high loading.
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Scientists conduct first in situ radiation measurements 21 km in the air over Tibetan Plateau
Radiation variations over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) are crucial for global climate and regional ecological environment. Previous radiation studies over the TP were widely based on ground and satellite measurements of the radiation budget at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere.
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Cliff collapse reveals 313-million-year-old fossil footprints in Grand Canyon National Park
Paleontological research has confirmed a series of recently discovered fossils tracks are the oldest recorded tracks of their kind to date within Grand Canyon National Park. In 2016, Norwegian geology professor, Allan Krill, was hiking with his students when he made a surprising discovery. Lying next to the trail, in plain view of the many hikers, was a boulder containing conspicuous fossil footpr
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How to Create an Inviting Space for Yoga at Home
Whether you're a seasoned yogi or just getting started, here's all the gear you need to get your flow on.
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To Manage Wildfire, California Looks To What Tribes Have Known All Along
Native American tribes are restoring traditional burning in California, which could help the state reduce the risk of extreme wildfires. (Image credit: Lauren Sommer/NPR)
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A novel approach produces a completely new kind of dynamic light structure
In a paper published in Nature Communications, USC Viterbi School of Engineering researchers showed how combining twisted light and frequency combs together can produce an even more novel structure of light.
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Forging molecular bonds with green light
Scientists at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia, have created a new molecular coupling tool employing both green light and pH triggers that has potential for use in applications such as drug delivery and 3D cell culture platforms.
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Medieval texts reveal false Royal Navy origins
England's proud maritime history credits Alfred the Great as having established the Royal Navy but evidence from medieval text uncovered by Flinders University researchers show this popularly held belief to be false.
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Japanese expedition identifies East Antarctic melting hotspot
Ice is melting at a surprisingly fast rate underneath Shirase Glacier Tongue in East Antarctica due to the continuing influx of warm seawater into the Lützow-Holm Bay.
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New large optically bright supernova remnant discovered
Astronomers have reported the discovery of a new galactic supernova remnant (SNR) in the Cepheus constellation. The newly detected SNR is relatively large and optically bright, but faint in radio and X-ray bands. The finding is detailed in a paper published August 13 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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When it comes to supporting candidates, ideology trumps race and gender
Voters who express prejudice against minorities and women are still more likely to support candidates who most closely align with their ideologies, regardless of the race or sex of such candidates, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
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Democratized Information Is Transforming Society
Innovations are blurring the lines between consumers and producers, amateurs and professionals, and laypeople and experts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Global stocks rally on US Covid treatment approval
Shares rise in Europe and Asia after Trump allows use of convalescent plasma Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Financial markets around the world have rallied strongly after the US government approved a coronavirus treatment using the plasma of recovered patients and hopes rose for the development of a vaccine. Against a backdrop of growing optimism that medical advanc
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Genetic and Spatial Heterogeneity in Human Papillomavirus-Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer
Joseph Powell will discuss how heterogeneous subpopulations of HPV+ head and neck cancer cells drive unique disease states, cell-cell interactions, and microenvironment dynamics, and have implications for cancer behavior, metastasis, and response to treatment.
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Oxford University Covid-19 vaccine firm denies Trump talks
AstraZeneca says it has not discussed 'emergency use authorisation' with the US Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The company manufacturing the Oxford University coronavirus vaccine has denied it is in talks with the Trump administration about fast tracking its vaccine for emergency use ahead of November's presidential elections. With both Russia and China pressing ahe
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Mother transmitted COVID-19 to baby during pregnancy, UTSW physicians report
A pregnant mother who tested positive for COVID-19 transmitted the virus causing the disease to her prematurely born baby, UT Southwestern physicians report. Both were treated and recovered.
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Ugens debat: Elbiler er et dyrt klimatiltag – for dyrt?
PLUS. Afgiftsfrie elbiler er det dyreste af alle klimatiltag på finansloven, viser et svar fra finansministeren. Læserne på ing.dk var splittede om, hvorvidt det ikke desto mindre er nødvendigt.
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Flera utrotningshotade djurarter mottagliga för coronasmitta
Forskare har definierat ett stort antal däggdjur som potentiellt kan smittas av coronaviruset, via den så kallade ACE2-receptorn. Bland högriskarterna fanns många utrotningshotade arter. Flera djurarter har redan bekräftats vara infekterade av viruset, till exempel olika apor och en tiger på Bronx Zoo. För att i framtiden snabbt kunna hejda utbrott av covid-19 som orsakas av viruset SARS-CoV-2, o
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When TV Commercials Ruled American Culture
We open on a Chihuahua. Salsa music blares in the background. Where are we? Juárez, Havana, or Fort Worth, it doesn't matter—this is a land of yearning and appetite. The dog sees something in the distance: a pink collar. A potential mate. We keep pace as he runs, risking it all for love. But when he finally reaches her, he blows right past, barely registering her presence. He parks himself in fro
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Why Every City Feels the Same Now
S ome time ago , I woke up in a hotel room unable to determine where I was in the world. The room was like any other these days, with its neutral bedding, uncomfortable bouclé lounge chair, and wood-veneer accent wall—tasteful, but purgatorial. The eerie uniformity extended well beyond the interior design too: The building itself felt like it could've been located in any number of metropolises ac
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A Controllable Metalens
This is a (sort of) follow up to a previous post I wrote back in March about extreme depth-of-focus tiny flat nanolenses. The big ideas was that researchers are rapidly developing the technology to build a lens out of metamaterial that is structured on the nanoscale. Instead of using a large piece of curved glass to control light, these metalenses use the nanostructure on thin flat lenses. What i
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Inside the Sprint to Map the Asian Giant Hornet Genome
The arrival of the insect in the US sent scientists racing to unravel its DNA, looking for clues to where it came from and how to stop it from sticking around.
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These two celestial bodies share a heartbeat, puzzling scientists
The microquasar SS 433 (background) sways with a period of 162 days. The inconspicuous gas cloud Fermi J1913+0515 (foreground), about 100 light years away, pulsates with the same rhythm in gamma rays, suggesting a direct connection. But how exactly the microquasar drives this 'heartbeat' of the gas cloud is still puzzling. (DESY, Science Communication Lab/) About 15,000 light-years away from Eart
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Buried Skeletons Reveal Tsunami Threat in East Africa
Newly analyzed remains depict the scope of a devastating event — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Israeli youths unearth 1,100-year-old gold coins from Abbasid era
Volunteers at an archaeological dig find 425 coins, enough to buy a mansion when they were buried.
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Hurricanes: A guide to the world's deadliest storms
Animated guide explaining how hurricanes, typhoons or cyclones form, their effects and how they are measured.
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Ten countries kept out Covid. But did they win?
Covid-19 has infected almost every country in the world – apart from 10. So what do they do now?
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Your pictures on the theme of 'garden creatures'
A selection of pictures from our readers on the theme of "garden creatures".
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Coronavirus vaccine: What are human challenge trials?
Could human challenge trials speed up the development of a coronavirus vaccine?
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Coronavirus will be with us forever, Sage scientist warns
Sir Mark Walport says, unlike smallpox, coronavirus will not be eradicated by vaccination.
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Earth Overshoot Day: When consumption outstrips the planet's eco resources
Today is Earth Overshoot Day, when scientists say we've used all the resources the planet can produce in 12 months.
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Here's why you shouldn't try to republish a paper you had retracted for plagiarism
A trio of speech researchers in India has lost a 2020 paper for a trifecta of malpractice: plagiarism, self-plagiarism (of a previously retracted article, no less!) and falsification of data. The article, "Speech enhancement method using deep learning approach for hearing-impaired listeners," appeared in January in Health Informatics Journal, a Sage title. According to the … Continue reading
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Tätbyggd stad värst för pollinatörerna
Befolkningstäthet, inte andelen grönyta, är det som har störst påverkan på artrikedomen av pollinatörer i bostadsområden. Det visar en studie från Lunds universitet där trädgårdar och innergårdar i och omkring Malmö undersökts. Resultatet förvånar forskarna, som hade väntat sig att vegetationstäckningen skulle ha större betydelse. – Vi ser att desto mer tätbefolkat, desto färre arter av både vild
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Mass Extinction May Have Been Caused By Near-Earth Supernova
This montage features images of five different objects, ranging from a distant galaxy to a relatively close supernova remnant. Each image contains X-rays from Chandra along with data from other telescopes that detect different types of light. These images were released to commemorate the start of the International Year of Light 2015, a year-long celebration declared by the United Nations. These i
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Scientists develop air quality sensor that could save the lives of babies and asthma sufferers
Scientists at the University of Sussex have collaborated with an Oxford company, M-SOLV, and a team of scientists from across Europe to develop a highly sensitive and accurate nitrogen dioxide (NO2) sensor with life-saving potential in domestic, public and industrial settings. A major air pollutant that originates from combustion engines and industrial processes, long-term exposure to NO2 can caus
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Neural networks show potential for identifying gamma rays detected by the Cherenkov telescope array
With the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) that is currently under construction, researchers hope to observe highly energetic gamma rays that could lead to the discovery of new objects in and outside of our galaxy and even unravel the mystery of dark matter. However, identifying these gamma rays is not easy. Researchers from the CTA consortium are now trying to perfect it with neural networks traine
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New species of Cretaceous brittle star named in honour of Nightwish vocalist
Palaeontologists have discovered a previously unknown species of brittle star that lived in the shallow, warm sea which covered parts of the present-day Netherlands at the end of the Dinosaur Era. The starfish-like creature was unearthed more than 20 years ago but has only now been identified as new to science. The name of the new fossil pays tribute to Dutch metal vocalist Floor Jansen, in recogn
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'Biggest holes in the system'
Older adults living in very rural settings are less likely than those living closer to urban centers to receive available services in health, nutrition and transportation, according to a new study by a Washington State University scientist.
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Challenge to scientists: does your ten-year-old code still run?
Nature, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02462-7 Missing documentation and obsolete environments force participants in the Ten Years Reproducibility Challenge to get creative.
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Republicans' 'Canary in the Coal Mine'
Only a few short years ago, Chad Mayes was the Republican leader in the California State Assembly. Now he's out of the party, running for reelection as an independent. Ahead of the Republican National Convention, he joins Edward-Isaac Dovere on the podcast The Ticket: Politics from the Atlantic to discuss the GOP and the long impact of Donald Trump. Listen to their conversation here: Subscribe to
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The Party of No Content
W hat does the Republican Party want? Although Donald Trump's reelection campaign has shifted into full, strange force with an empty 2020 convention, it is a hard question to answer. In June, the Fox News host Sean Hannity asked Trump to name his top-priority agenda items for his second term at a town hall held in Green Bay, Wisconsin. The commander in chief's answer: "You know, the word experien
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Dear Therapist: My Family Takes Offense at Everything My Husband Does
Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I'm torn between my extended family and my husband. We have been married for 14 years. The last couple of times we've hosted a family gathering at our home, my husband has done one thing or another that my fam
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How Animal Activists Exposed the Brutality of Factory Farming
In the second part of a Get WIRED series, we go inside one man's mission to bring to light one of factory farming's most notorious practices.
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Covid Hits Minorities Hardest, but Data Often Doesn't Show It
Many states are not collecting the race or ethnicity of coronavirus patients, which can make it harder to know the true impact on low-income communities.
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What to Know Before Sending Your Kids Back to School Online
Whether your children are going back to class in person or remotely—or some combination—we have tips to help them make the most of the experience.
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A Postal Slowdown Is Scary for Those Who Get Meds By Mail
Many seniors, veterans, and chronically ill people rely on the USPS for prescriptions and medical supplies. During Covid-19, they can't just go to a drugstore.
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How Birds Evolved Their Incredible Diversity
An analysis of 391 skulls shows that birds evolved surprisingly slowly, compared with their dinosaur forerunners — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Penis Size Has Nothing to Do with Masculinity
Mocking men who tote big guns or drive fast cars as "compensating" for their presumably inadequate endowment is sexist and toxic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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What's the relationship between "ideas", "beliefs", "mental images" and "thoughts"?
I'd really like to know how psychology and neuroscience are working with the concepts of "ideas", "beliefs", "mental images" and "thoughts" nowadays. I'm designing some mental health training for school teachers and as a first step I am introducing them to familiar elements they can recognise in their own minds. Feelings, emotions, attention and goals are maybe easier to isolate and explain a bit
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Undergrad options for a career in CogSci
I'm interested in pursuing a career in Cognitive Science, however, schools offering undergrad programs aren't available where I am. I'm currently double-majoring CompSci and Philosophy with an Honours' in CompSci. Does this pursuit set me up for a graduate degree and research opportunities in CogSci? submitted by /u/ceoff [link] [comments]
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Morally okay to look into it?
Neuroscience has done some research about human desire and relationships. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10677-020-10114-y Would this be ethically permissible to look into? I think it would help people. submitted by /u/sstiel [link] [comments]
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Looking for research on the intersection of mental illnesses, cognitive science, and artificial intelligence
Hello, all and sorry if this is not the correct subreddit, but I recently just took my first Artificial Intelligence course that touched on Cognitive Science a lot, and I was wondering if there is research going on, on the intersection of Mental Illnesses and Cognitive Science with influences from Artificial Intelligence, if anyone can think of an article or journal or another subfield I should l
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Computer vision vs computational linguistics?
submitted by /u/timlee126 [link] [comments]
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Penis Size Has Nothing to Do with Masculinity
Mocking men who tote big guns or drive fast cars as "compensating" for their presumably inadequate endowment is sexist and toxic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Husker du Q113-højtaleren? Ingeniøren-læsere har hjulpet til at vinde stor pris
PLUS. For otte år siden fik Ole Witthøft en masse professionelle kammerater i Ingeniørens crowdsourcing-projekt Q113. De har nu hjulpet ham til at vinde, hvad han selv kalder 'VM i teknologi'.
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Studie: Øjet bruger mindre tid på 'fake news'-overskrifter
Et nyt studie fra Københavns Universitet og Aalborg Universitet viser, at folk kigger i lidt kortere…
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Udvidelse til Indens corona-app lader chefen kigge med i ansattes smittedata
En ny API til den indiske corona-app gør det muligt at dele informationer om smitte med arbejdsgivere, hvis brugerne giver samtykke.
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Nordeuropas største solcellepark bygges uden statsstøtte og gavner biodiversiteten
Parken fylder 222 hektar landbrugsjord, der omlægges til økologisk landbrugsdrift med kløver og blomsterfrø
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How Birds Evolved Their Incredible Diversity
An analysis of 391 skulls shows that birds evolved surprisingly slowly, compared with their dinosaur forerunners — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How Birds Evolved Their Incredible Diversity
An analysis of 391 skulls shows that birds evolved surprisingly slowly, compared with their dinosaur forerunners — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Så funkar bananflugan
Irriterande i fruktskålen, men en portalfigur inom forskningen. Bananflugan lever alltid nära människan – därför vet den när du har mogen frukt framme.
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Techtopia #160: Er Indien et marked for dansk teknologi?
Hvordan kommer man ind på det indiske marked som lille eller mellemstor teknologivirksomhed – det skal projektet Nordin hjælpe med at løse.
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It is time to do away with outlandish claims and make science duller
Hyped up claims and problems replicating research mean the values that make science so successful are being ignored. Science owes it to itself and the world to reform
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Covid-19: Live News and Updates
The ruling was a victory for the American Federation of Teachers, the second-largest teachers' union in the country, and one of its affiliates, the Florida Education Association. A patient was diagnosed with a second case of Covid-19 more than four months after the first, scientists in Hong Kong said.
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Roaming Through Lanzarote's Otherworldly Vineyards
The desolate beauty of the winemaking tradition on Lanzarote, the easternmost of the Canary Islands, is evidence of human resilience in the face of adversity.
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Why Do Some People Weather Coronavirus Infection Unscathed?
The prevailing theory is that their immune systems quickly and efficiently beat back pathogens. But some scientists see more to the story: Through "disease tolerance" the body could adjust to an infection so seamlessly that symptoms never materialize — and thus create the asymptomatic carriers of Covid-19.
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Bättre resultat när elever drivs av personlig utveckling
Vad är viktigast? Att nå sina egna mål, eller att jobba för att få erkännande av andra? Att sträva efter personlig utveckling är bättre än att försöka överglänsa sina klasskamrater. Och läraren kan stödja den typen av drivkraft genom den kultur de skapar i klassrummet, visar forskning från Umeå universitet. Med de krav som dagens skola ställer är det viktigt att eleverna är motiverade att engager
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Kombinationen af gigt og diabetes øger risiko for amputation
Ny forskning peger på, at kombinationen af gigt og diabetes dramatisk øger risikoen for amputation. Resultat er højrelevant for den kliniske praksis, siger forsker.
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Children raised in greener areas have higher IQ, study finds
Research also found lower levels of difficult behaviour in rich and poor neighbourhoods Growing up in a greener urban environment boosts children's intelligence and lowers levels of difficult behaviour, a study has found. The analysis of more than 600 children aged 10-15 showed a 3% increase in the greenness of their neighbourhood raised their IQ score by an average of 2.6 points. The effect was
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Green investments need global standards and independent scientific review
Nature, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02472-5
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Band insulator to Mott insulator transition in 1T-TaS2
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18040-4 1T-TaS2 possesses complex electronic phase behaviors in transition-metal di-chalcogenides, undergoing several charge-ordered phases before finally into an insulating state of unknown origin. Here, the authors determine its electronic and structural properties experimentally, revealing its origin.
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Grid cells are modulated by local head direction
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17500-1 Neurons with grid firing fields are thought to play important roles in spatial cognition. Here, the authors show that in contrast to assumptions underlying current models and analyses, grid fields are modulated by local head direction; this suggests different mechanisms and new roles for grid firing.
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Rhodium(II)-catalyzed multicomponent assembly of α,α,α-trisubstituted esters via formal insertion of O–C(sp3)–C(sp2) into C–C bonds
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17990-z The direct cleavage of C(CO)−C single bonds is usually restricted to strained ketone substrates or to chelating assistance. Here, the authors show a rhodium(II)-catalyzed three-component reaction of 1,3-diones, diazoesters, and DMF, leading to an unusual formal insertion of O–C(sp3)–C(sp2) into unstrained C(CO
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High-temperature-resistant silicon-polymer hybrid modulator operating at up to 200 Gbit s−1 for energy-efficient datacentres and harsh-environment applications
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18005-7 Information and communication datacentres require a large amount of energy for their cooling systems, which could be decreased by working at higher temperatures. Here, the authors introduce a silicon-polymer hybrid modulator that maintains high data rates for long periods at high temperatures that could be use
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De novo design of an intercellular signaling toolbox for multi-channel cell–cell communication and biological computation
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17993-w Intercellular signalling is fundamental for the formation of complex structures from single cells. Here the authors design six orthogonal cell–cell signalling channels for cell consortia communication and bio-computation.
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A discrete serotonergic circuit regulates vulnerability to social stress
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18010-w Serotonin is important in depression-like behavior. Here the authors show that dorsal raphe neurons that project to the ventral tegmental area are involved in regulating stress responses in mice.
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Uniaxial-strain control of nematic superconductivity in SrxBi2Se3
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17913-y Nematic superconductors, exhibiting rotational-symmetry breaking, can form domains; a counterpart of common magnetic domains. Here, the authors report control of nematic superconductivity and their domains of SrxBi2Se3 by uniaxial deformation, a step toward superconductive domain engineering.
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Integrated genomic analysis reveals mutated ELF3 as a potential gallbladder cancer vaccine candidate
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17880-4 Gallbladder cancer incidence shows characteristic geographic patterns. Here the authors perform a genomic analysis of gallbladder cancers in patients from countries with high incidence (South Korea, India and Chile) and identify ELF3 and other significantly mutated genes not previously associated with gallblad
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Oceaner under isen på Jupiters måne Ganymedes undersöks med svenskt instrument
Svenskt instrument är på väg till rymdfarkosten JUICE, för att undersöka Jupiters måne Ganymedes. Syftet är att mäta elektriska och magnetiska fält för att kartlägga Ganymedes oceaner under dess djupfrysta istäcke. År 2013 valdes Institutet för rymdfysik, IRF, ut av den europeiska rymdorganisationen ESA till att medverka på ett av deras största projekt inom planetutforskning. Sedan dess ansvarar
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Høreapparat får ekstra mikrofon i øret
PLUS. Efter ti års udviklingsarbejde er det lykkedes danske GN Hearing at integrere en mikrofon direkte i øre­kanalen på deres mest populære høreapparat. Det giver en mere naturlig lyd og kræver ekstra meget regne­kraft.
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Japanese expedition identifies East Antarctic melting hotspot
Ice is melting at a surprisingly fast rate underneath Shirase Glacier Tongue in East Antarctica due to the continuing influx of warm seawater into the Lützow-Holm Bay.
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None of the most common blood pressure medications increased the risk of depression, some lowered the risk
Among the 41 most common blood pressure medications, none of them raised the risk of depression, according to an analysis from Denmark.The study also found that some high blood pressure medications lowered the risk of depression.These findings may help guide medical professionals in selecting the right hypertension medication, particularly for people with a personal or family history of depression
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Scottish secondary school pupils set to wear face masks in corridors
Nicola Sturgeon consults councils and teaching bodies as fears grow over overcrowding Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Secondary school pupils in Scotland are expected to be told soon that they must wear face coverings in school corridors and communal areas after health fears escalated following a series of overcrowding incidents. Nicola Sturgeon, the Scottish first m
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Comparative analysis of racial differences in breast tumor microbiome
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71102-x
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C24:0 and C24:1 sphingolipids in cholesterol-containing, five- and six-component lipid membranes
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71008-8
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Circadian clock-controlled gene expression in co-cultured, mat-forming cyanobacteria
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-69294-3
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Ten years of vaccinovigilance in Italy: an overview of the pharmacovigilance data from 2008 to 2017
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70996-x
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Extrapyramidal plasticity predicts recovery after spinal cord injury
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70805-5
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How math predicts life on Earth and the universe beyond
There is a pervasive cultural attitude against mathematics, but it is actually a mind-blowing tool for analyzing and predicting the world around us—and far beyond. We asked mathematicians Edward Frenkel and Po-Shen Loh, and physicists Michio Kaku, Michelle Thaller, Janna Levin and Geoffrey West to explain the wonders of math. West explains the rule of 'quarter-power scaling' in biology—there is a
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Another COVID-19 Medical Mystery: Patients Come Off Ventilator But Linger In A Coma
Doctors are researching why some patients remain unconscious for days or weeks, even after sedating drugs are withdrawn. They also worry that these patients aren't being given time to recover. (Image credit: Go Nakamura/Getty Images)
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TDC Net åbner Danmarks første 5G-netværk
Danmarks første 5G-netværk åbner i store dele Danmark den 7. september. De ekstremt hurtige forbindelser er dog indtil videre forbeholdt mobilbrugere i centrum af København, Aarhus, Odense og Helsingør.
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Contaminated water sickens nearly 500 in China
Hundreds of people in eastern China have been infected with bacteria which can cause dysentery after drinking contaminated water, state media said Monday, prompting the closure of a local water plant.
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Covid vaccine tracker: when will we have a coronavirus vaccine?
More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progress Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…
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Tegelstenar lagrar elektricitet
"Tegelsten" är ett ord som används för att beskriva de riktigt tunga, svarta strömadaptrarna som kilats in bakom TVn och som man helst hanterar så lite som möjligt. I den engelska översättningen "power brick" är liknelsen ordagrann. Nu har forskare vid Washington University i St. Louis blivit först med att ladda riktiga, röda tegelstenar med elektricitet, och publicerat resultaten i Nature Communi
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Åbningskonference: Kunsten og de sociale fællesskaber
Hvilke sociale funktioner har kunstens fora haft, både historisk og aktuelt, og hvad betyder det…
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Ancient Egypt: Mummified animals 'digitally unwrapped' in 3D scans
The snake, bird and cat, from Swansea University's collection, are at least 2,000 years old.
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Ancient Mars Had Planet-Wide Rainstorms So Intense They Breached Its Lakes
A continuous event that may have lasted years.
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Deep chest compressions prevent brain damage during cardiac arrest
Deep chest compressions can crack ribs, but they reduce brain damage during cardiac arrest, reports a study presented today at ESC Congress 2020. Study author Dr. Irene Marco Clement of University Hospital La Paz, Madrid, Spain said: "Deep chest compressions improve blood flow to the brain, improving survival and brain function."
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Yoga linked with improved symptoms in heart patients
Yoga postures and breathing could help patients with atrial fibrillation manage their symptoms, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2020. Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder. One in four middle-aged adults in Europe and the US will develop the condition, which causes 20-30% of all strokes and increases the risk of death by 1.5-fold in men and 2-fold in wo
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Intensive lifestyle intervention focused on weight loss lowers obesity-related cancer risk
New research shows that an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) aimed at weight loss lowered incidence of obesity-related cancers in adults with overweight or obesity and type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online in Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society. This study is the only randomized clinical trial that has examined long-term cancer outcomes in an ILI focused on w
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Potenshöjande läkemedel med cancerhämmande potential
En ny studie visar att de potenshöjande läkemedlen fosfodiesteras typ 5, PDE5-hämmare, har en cancerhämmande potential med förmåga att förbättra prognosen hos män med tjock- och ändtarmscancer. PDE5-hämmare inkluderar några godkända läkemedel där sildenafil (Viagra) är det mest kända.
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Can you solve it? Win the car, dodge the goat
A new take on a famous problem UPDATE: Read the solution here If you are a reader of this column, you have probably heard of the Monty Hall problem . It's a famous probability puzzle that involves a game show host, Monty Hall, who asks a contestant to open one of three doors. Behind one of the doors is a car, and behind the other two are goats. (If you haven't heard of this puzzle, or want to rea
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Teleindustrien: Spoofing skal indgå i national cybersikkerhedsstrategi
Organisationen mener ikke, den kan løse udfordringen med spoofing alene, skriver den til Energistyrelsen.
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Moder Teresa
This is not the saint you're looking for… Anjezë Gonxhe Bojaxhiu, mer känd som , föddes 26 augusti 1910 i Skopje i dåvarande Osmanska riket (numera huvudstad i Nordmakedonien). I ung ålder flyttade hon via Irland till Indien, där hon blev kvar under större delen av sitt liv. Som hängiven katolik grundade hon "Missionaries […] The post Moder Teresa appeared first on Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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O du lieber Augustine MK Choi
Augustine Choi is Dean of Weill Cornell and a misunderstood genius. He discovered that carbon monoxide is a cure for all possible diseases, just add a bit of Photoshop.
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Does convalescent plasma work against COVID-19? Who knows?
Last night, the FDA issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for convalescent plasma to treat COVID-19, even though there are no randomized clinical trials demonstrating efficacy and safety. Does this plasma work? Who knows? But that didn't stop the FDA from issuing the EUA, almost certainly as a result of intense political pressure from the Trump Administration.
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Pigs grow new liver in lymph nodes, study shows
Hepatocytes — the chief functional cells of the liver – are natural regenerators, and the lymph nodes serve as a nurturing place where they can multiply. Researchers demonstrated that large animals with ailing livers can grow a new organ in their lymph nodes from their own hepatocytes.
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Autistic people's nerve cells differ before birth
A new study now shows in human brain cells that Autism, a neurodevelopmental condition, can now be traced back to prenatal development, even though the disorder is not diagnosed until at least 18 months of age. The atypical development starts at the very earliest stages of brain organization, at the level of individual brain cells, according to scientists at King's College London and Cambridge Uni
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Survey finds most Americans feel unprepared to aid victims after a mass casualty attack
A new national survey by Orlando Health finds the majority of Americans are not confident that they could provide life-saving aid following a violent mass attack. The survey found that although most Americans feel they could call 911 and about half could provide information to first responders, confidence drops when it comes to administering first aid (42%) or applying a tourniquet (41%).
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Illicit fentanyl, stimulants found in majority of overdose deaths in BC
Nonprescribed fentanyl and stimulants were the primary contributors to overdose mortality, while few people had prescribed opioids in their systems, according to new toxicology research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200191.
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Cancer and its treatment may accelerate the aging process in young patients
A new study examines the effects of cancer and its treatment on the aging process. Investigators found that expression of a gene associated with aging is higher in young patients with cancer after treatment with chemotherapy and in young cancer survivors who are frail. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS).
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This Is Why The Californian Wildfires Are So Dangerous This Year
The second and third largest fires in the state's history are burning at the same time.
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Time-saving vegetable chopping devices
Welcome to the chop shop. (Dan Gold via Unsplash/) Home chefs know that complicated recipes that involve chopping and dicing can take a great deal of time. Large and expensive food processors can be cumbersome and sometimes too powerful to handle delicate jobs. Luckily we found some gadgets designed to assist your chopping needs. With devices designed to handle a few key tasks, or devices that ca
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Effective pantry organizers for busy kitchens
Everything in its rightful place. (Jason Briscoe via Unsplash/) Traditional shelf cabinets are not designed with efficiency in mind. It's hard to organize food products of all different shapes and sizes, and nearly impossible to see what you have in the back. This inherently creates mess and waste—where your back stored items are left unnoticed and maybe even spoiling. When planning meals it's no
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The best cat trees and condos for your feline friends
No, not this kind of tree! (Jessica Lewis via Unsplash/) Every cat owner knows just how picky their pet can be about lounging spots—ignoring toys or abandoning a nice, cushy bed because they prefer the box the bed was delivered in. Likewise, cat owners can commiserate over cats scratching at furniture or climbing onto places they shouldn't be. A cat tree is a great way to give your kitty a safe p
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Earth Lost a 'Staggering' 28 Trillion Tonnes of Ice in Just 23 Years
Every centimetre of sea level rise displaces around 1 million people.
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Ny konverter fra DTU kan gøre opladning af batterier endnu mere effektiv
PLUS. Forskere fra DTU har udviklet en konverter, som kan øge effektiviteten fra 90 til 97 procent, når energi fra for eksempel solceller skal lagres i batterier eller omdannes til brint via elektrolyse.
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The FDA Just OK'd Emergency Use of Plasma for Covid-19
Sick people can already get the treatment, and the data is inconclusive. But the president is super into it.
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Wildfires Hit California's Redwoods And Condors, But There's Still Hope
Growing wildfires have overtaken old-growth redwoods and endangered condor nests, but biologists say they could survive. (Image credit: Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP)
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Report reveals young people felt less anxious and more connected to school in lockdown
Younger teenagers in the South West of England felt less anxious and more connected to school when they were away from it during the COVID-19 global pandemic public lockdown, a first-of-its-kind study has found.
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Blood pressure medication improves COVID-19 survival rates
New research finds that medication for high blood pressure could improve Covid-19 survival rates and reduce the severity of infection.Researchers studied 28,000 patients taking antihypertensives – a class of drugs that are used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure).They found that the risk of severe Covid-19 illness and death was reduced for patients with high blood pressure who were taking
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Research reveals toll of pandemic on those with eating disorders
The COVID-19 pandemic is having a profound, negative impact on nine out of ten people with experience of eating disorders, a new study from Northumbria University, Newcastle, reveals.
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Staying on usual drugs helps hypertension patients survive Covid-19 – study
Findings contradict earlier fears that pills for high blood pressure could worsen disease Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Blood pressure medicine improves survival rates from Covid-19 in people with hypertension, according to research that contradicts earlier fears the pills could make the disease worse. The risk of critical illness or death from Covid for people wit
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Coronavirus live news: send children to school, UK PM urges; France sees highest cases since May
Trump gives blood plasma treatment green light; UK schools to reopen in September ; Former Ukraine president in serious condition with Covid-19. Follow the latest updates France sees highest cases since May Trump authorises plasma treatment amid attacks on FDA Boris Johnson moves to seize control of schools agenda after exams chaos Global report: India passes 3m cases as South Korea sees biggest
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Coronavirus: Trump authorizes plasma treatment amid attacks on FDA
President blamed 'deep state or whoever' for slow progress Former FDA head hits back after chief of staff repeats claim Donald Trump on Sunday announced the emergency authorization of convalescent plasma , a method which has been used to treat flu and measles, for Covid-19 patients. The move comes after the US president expressed frustration at the slow pace of approval for coronavirus treatments
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Electronic alert reduces excessive prescribing of short-acting asthma relievers
An automatic, electronic alert on general practitioners' computer screens can help to prevent excessive prescribing of short-acting asthma reliever medication, according to research to be presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress
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Fewer fungi types in lungs linked to worse disease in acute respiratory distress syndrome
Many COVID-19 patients develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a life-threatening condition where the lungs cannot provide the body's vital organs with enough oxygen. Patients with ARDS are usually placed on ventilators to help get enough oxygen into their bodies. Now, new research to be presented at the 'virtual' European Respiratory Society International Congress has found that havin
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How to travel solo, according to an adventurous biker
Traveling alone gives you the opportunity to be completely responsible for yourself, revealing how capable you truly are. Santa Marta, Colombia. (Janelle Kaz/) This story originally featured on Motorcyclist . There's a lot of trepidation before setting out for the open road , leaving behind comfort and the known. This uncertainty can come from heading to a place you've never been before, perhaps
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Study: spinning black holes power jets with magnetic reconnection
New research discovers what mechanism powers radiation jets from blazars. Scientists found that magnetic reconnection is responsible for boosting the cores of the jets. The study's conclusion is like deciphering a "hieroglyph in the black hole alphabet," says author. A new study sheds light on the hidden mechanisms propelling plasma jets that shoot out from spinning black holes. One of the most d
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Researchers find out how spinning black holes power giant plasma jets
New research discovers what mechanism powers radiation jets from blazars. Scientists found that magnetic reconnection is responsible for boosting the cores of the jets. The study's conclusion is like deciphering a "hieroglyph in the black hole alphabet," says author. A new study sheds light on the hidden mechanisms propelling plasma jets that shoot out from spinning black holes. One of the most d
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Starwatch: silver moonlight in contrast with blood red Antares
The moon at first quarter will pass Antares, the heart of the scorpion, a red giant with an explosive future This week, the moon will coast past the blood-red northern summer star of Antares in the constellation of Scorpius, the scorpion. The chart shows the view looking south-south-west from London on 25 August at 21:00 BST. The moon and Antares will be low in the sky, but the white brilliance o
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California fires cover 1 million acres amid fears of new spread
Firefighters on Sunday battled some of California's largest-ever fires that have forced tens of thousands from their homes and burned one million acres, with further lightning strikes and gusty winds forecast in the days ahead.
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An Asteroid Just in Time for the 2020 Election?
The object has a slender chance of hitting Earth — but even if it does, it's too small to do any damage, astronomers say.
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How a 16-Year-Old Built Smart Glasses That Are Better Than Google's
submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]
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Is there a list of Kurzweil's predictions?
I wanted to know what predictions Ray Kurzweil made in his books and which of them are already realized. But I could only find lists containing very few predictions – and I don't want to read several books just to know what he predicts. submitted by /u/SatoriTWZ [link] [comments]
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Free hard copy of "Rethinking Humanity" by ReThinkX
I just finished "Rethinking Humanity" by RethinkX. The soft copy is free for download. I have a hard copy. DM me with a address and I'll mail it to you via USPS Media Mail. PO Boxes or General Delivery preferred so we can respect Reddit's no real name etiquette. While I enjoyed the book, I enjoyed their report on Precision Fermentation more; and I thought that the author understated the risk weap
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Here's the second part of my series on Immortality and Life extension.
submitted by /u/onlyartist6 [link] [comments]
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World's Biggest Battery Project Comes to Power-Hungry California
submitted by /u/Early-Wolverine-1262 [link] [comments]
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