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Metabolic syndrome linked to worse outcomes for COVID-19 patients
Patients hospitalized with COVID-19 who had a combination of high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes were over three times more likely to die from the disease, according to a new Tulane University study published in Diabetes Care.
6h
Amager-højhus: Første prøver tyder på lav betonstyrke
PLUS. Borekerneprøver af fundamentet på et nyt højhusbyggeri på næsten 90 m viser trykstyrke helt ned til 15,5 MPa i betonen, der er projekteret til 35 MPa.
20h
Ny professor sætter fokus på vaccination af børn
Rigshospitalet udnævner Lone Graff Stensballe til professor i infektionspædiatri.
9h
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Astronomers Slam SpaceX's Growing Starlink Satellite Constellation
Extreme Impact According to a new report by the Satellite Constellations 1 (Satcon1) workshop, attended by more than 250 astronomers in late July, SpaceX's Starlink internet-beaming satellite constellation could have an "extreme" impact on astronomy and scientific progress. The workshop used computer simulations to examine how satellite constellations such as Starlink, once fully deployed, could
now
2min
Climate change probably contributed to the woolly rhino's rapid demise
The cousins of this fully preserved woolly rhino named Sasha were still genetically fit thousands of years after humans arrived. (Albert Protopopov/) Pyrenean ibexes, dodo birds, passenger pigeons, and Tasmanian tigers are just a few of the many species of animals that humans have over hunted and wiped out. Whether for a prize or a meal, these animals met their end when they came face-to-face wit
2min
Opioid prescription rates for knee surgery vary, but higher strength dosage common
Examining insurance data, Penn researchers found 36% of patients received an opioid prescription that was stronger than the CDC-recommended dose.
6min
Coastal development, changing climate threaten sea turtle nesting habitat
A research team led by Florida State University found that sea turtles in the US will have less suitable nesting habitat in the future because of climate change and coastal development.
6min
Thin layer protects battery, allows cold charging
In the search for a reliable, quick-charging, cold-weather battery for automobiles, a self-assembling, thin layer of electrochemically active molecules may be the solution, according to a team or researchers.
6min
Study: Student debt may hurt chances at full-time employment
A recently published study led by The University of Texas at Arlington says that student debt may hurt students' chances of securing full-time employment due to added pressure in their job search. Ariane Froidevaux, assistant professor of management in the College of Business, is first author of 'Is Student Loan Debt Good or Bad for Full-Time Employment Upon Graduation From College?' in the Journa
6min
Cyberintimacy: Technology-mediated romance in the digital age
Digital technology has had a transformative effect on our romantic lives. This scoping review reports on measurable outcomes for the three stages of the romantic relationship lifecycle – initiation, maintenance, and dissolution.
6min
Can You Get a Flu Shot Now? Yes, and Doctors Say You Should
You could help prevent a "twindemic" of influenza and Covid-19, they say. Doctors have specific advice for people over 65, pregnant women and those with egg allergies. Here's what you need to know.
7min
Robots that can walk are now striding to market
They will be able to go where people can, but existing bots cannot
10min
One size may not fit all: BILH psychiatrists develop mental health app assessment tool
Researcher-clinicians from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, both part of Beth Israel Lahey Health, have collaborated to develop an online assessment tool to help patients and providers make more informed decisions about choosing and using a mental health app.
20min
Revised code could help improve efficiency of fusion experiments
Researchers led by PPPL have upgraded a key computer code for calculating forces acting on magnetically confined plasma in fusion energy experiments. The upgrade will help scientists further improve the design of breakfast-cruller-shaped facilities known as stellarators.
20min
Using light's properties to indirectly see inside a cell membrane
Using properties of light from fluorescent probes is at the heart of a new imaging technique developed at Washington University's McKelvey School of Engineering that allows for an unprecedented look inside cell membranes.
20min
Covid-19 vaccine makers lobby EU for legal protection
Pharma body urges exemption from civil liability in case speedily developed drugs go wrong
34min
Demographers put COVID-19 death toll into perspective
With over 170,000 COVID-19 deaths to date, and 1,000 more each day, America's life expectancy may appear to be plummeting. But in estimating the magnitude of the pandemic, demographers have found that COVID-19 is likely to shorten the average US lifespan in 2020 by only about a year.
35min
Virtual imaging trials optimize CT, radiography for COVID-19
A new article looks at the use of virtual imaging trials in effective assessment and optimization of CT and radiography acquisitions and analysis tools to help manage the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic.
35min
Scientists create protein models to explore toxic methylmercury formation
A team has created a computational model of the proteins responsible for the transformation of mercury to toxic methylmercury, marking a step forward in understanding how the reaction occurs and how mercury cycles through the environment.
35min
Importance of rainfall highlighted for tropical animals
Imagine a tropical forest, and you might conjure up tall trees hung with vines, brightly colored birds, howling monkeys, and … rain. Indeed, precipitation patterns, along with temperature, dictate where tropical forests are distributed around the world, but surprisingly, scientists know very little about the direct effects of rainfall on animals. A new conceptual framework calls for the scientif
35min
Scientists create protein models to explore toxic methylmercury formation
A team has created a computational model of the proteins responsible for the transformation of mercury to toxic methylmercury, marking a step forward in understanding how the reaction occurs and how mercury cycles through the environment.
48min
Why the United States is having a coronavirus data crisis
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02478-z Political meddling, disorganization and years of neglect of public-health data management mean the country is flying blind.
55min
Researchers reveal molecular structures involved in plant respiration
All plants and animals respire, releasing energy from food. At the cellular level, this process occurs in the mitochondria. But there are differences at the molecular level between how plants and animals extract energy from food sources. Discovering those differences could help revolutionize agriculture.
55min
Researchers uncover unusual glassy behavior in a disordered protein
When UC Santa Barbara materials scientist Omar Saleh and graduate student Ian Morgan sought to understand the mechanical behaviors of disordered proteins in the lab, they expected that after being stretched, one particular model protein would snap back instantaneously, like a rubber band.
55min
Researchers reveal molecular structures involved in plant respiration
All plants and animals respire, releasing energy from food. At the cellular level, this process occurs in the mitochondria. But there are differences at the molecular level between how plants and animals extract energy from food sources. Discovering those differences could help revolutionize agriculture.
55min
Measuring the sensitivity of COVID tests with new material from NIST
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have produced synthetic gene fragments from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. This material, which is non-infectious and safe to handle, can help manufacturers produce more accurate and reliable diagnostic tests for the disease.
55min
It Hasn't Always Been So Quiet for Cascade Volcanoes
Although people are most familiar with Mount St. Helens, a new study shows it is really the Cascade volcanoes in Central Oregon and Northern California that are the most active.
58min
Measuring the sensitivity of COVID tests with new material from NIST
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have produced synthetic gene fragments from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. This material, which is non-infectious and safe to handle, can help manufacturers produce more accurate and reliable diagnostic tests for the disease.
1h
Socially isolated elderly more likely to use hospital and emergency room resources
Those over age 65 who self-reported as socially isolated were more likely to have a future hospital admission or emergency room visit.
1h
Pain 'catastrophizing' may lead to little exercise, more time sedentary
Chronic pain affects the majority of older adults in the US, and getting enough exercise plays a key role in pain management. New research suggests that how people think about their pain can have a significant effect on whether they get enough physical activity – or if they spend more time sedentary.
1h
A multicenter look at gene therapy for spinal muscular atrophy
A new study confirms the safety and efficacy of gene therapy in children with spinal muscular atrophy under two years old.
1h
Virtual imaging trials optimize CT, radiography for coronavirus disease (COVID-19)
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), virtual imaging trials using computational patient models and a human phantom with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) abnormalities via multidiagnostic confirmation of SARS-CoV-2 infection yield simulations of 'realistic' texture and shape–suggesting that such trials could be utilized to compare CT and radiography, improve both screening and
1h
Researchers introduce new theory to calculate emissions liability
A new study questions conventional methods of calculating carbon emissions liability based on point source pollution by introducing new 'bottleneck' theory.
1h
Rates of e-cigarette and marijuana use not associated with vaping-related lung injuries, study finds
Higher rates of e-cigarette and marijuana use in U.S. states did not result in more e-cigarette or vaping-related lung injuries (known as EVALI), a new study from the Yale School of Public Health finds.
1h
Compared to placebo, vitamin D has no benefit for severe asthma attacks, study finds
Contrary to earlier observational results, vitamin D supplements do not prevent severe asthma attacks in at-risk children, according to the first placebo-controlled clinical trial to test this relationship.
1h
The FDA's Approach to Covid-19 Is a Bloody Mess
It's already looking shaky and politicized on the subject of convalescent plasma. What will happen with vaccines?
1h
Researchers develop AI to detect fentanyl and derivatives remotely
To help keep first responders safe, researchers have developed an artificial intelligence method that not only rapidly and remotely detects the powerful drug fentanyl, but also teaches itself to detect any previously unknown derivatives made in clandestine batches. The method uses infrared light spectroscopy and can be used in a portable, tabletop device.
1h
This Miniature Surgery Robot Was Inspired by Origami
Tiny Surgeon Researchers at Harvard collaborated with Sony to build a tiny, origami-inspired surgical robot . The robot is only about the size of a tennis ball and weighs only as much as a penny. And it's not just tiny: in a study published in Nature Machine Intelligence , the researchers described how it managed to perform a tricky mock surgical task. The research is part of a greater vision in
1h
Video is not always effective in science communication, study suggests
Audiences shown a video about coral reefs had less willingness to pay (WTP) for conservation than when shown a slideshow of texts and photographs. The findings suggest the importance of the type and amount of information used in science communication.
1h
Study reveals two major microbial groups can't breathe
A new scientific study has revealed unique life strategies of two major groups of microbes that live below Earth's surface. A publication in Frontiers in Microbiology reports that these groups, originally thought to rely on symbiotic relationships with other organisms, may also live independently and use an ancient mode of energy production.
1h
Researchers use fossilized teeth to reveal dietary shifts in ancient herbivores and hominins
A new study published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences documents dietary shifts in herbivores that lived between 1-3 million years ago in Ethiopia's Lower Omo Valley. The research team, led by Enquye Negash, a postdoctoral researcher in the George Washington University Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology, examined stable isotopes in the fossi
1h
Patients Reinfected with Coronavirus in Hong Kong, Europe
So far, there are three patients known to have been infected with SARS-CoV-2 twice, and in at least one case the second time around was asymptomatic.
1h
Study reveals two major microbial groups can't breathe
A new scientific study has revealed unique life strategies of two major groups of microbes that live below Earth's surface. A publication in Frontiers in Microbiology reports that these groups, originally thought to rely on symbiotic relationships with other organisms, may also live independently and use an ancient mode of energy production.
1h
Memory protein
When UC Santa Barbara materials scientist Omar Saleh and graduate student Ian Morgan sought to understand the mechanical behaviors of disordered proteins in the lab, they expected that after being stretched, one particular model protein would snap back instantaneously, like a rubber band.
1h
UC Berkeley demographers put COVID-19 death toll into perspective
With over 170,000 COVID-19 deaths to date, and 1,000 more each day, America's life expectancy may appear to be plummeting. But in estimating the magnitude of the pandemic, UC Berkeley demographers have found that COVID-19 is likely to shorten the average US lifespan in 2020 by only about a year.
1h
UC Davis researchers reveal molecular structures involved in plant respiration
A study published today (Aug. 25, 2020) in eLife provides the first-ever, atomic-level, 3D structure of the largest protein complex (complex I) involved in the plant mitochondrial electron transport chain. The results could unlock new advances in agriculture.
1h
To be or not to be in the ER, that is the question
Researchers discovered a new way cells can dispose of misfolded proteins that may help better understand human NGLY1 deficiency.
1h
Single-cell RNA sequencing sheds new light on cancer cells' varied response to chemotherapy
Single-cell analysis, done in three colon cancer cell lines, is believed to be the first to profile transcriptome-level changes in response to DNA damage across individual cells.
1h
Vast stone monuments constructed in Arabia 7,000 years ago
New archaeological research in Saudi Arabia documents hundreds of stone structures interpreted as monumental sites where early pastoralists carried out rituals.
1h
Researchers develop AI to detect fentanyl and derivatives remotely
To help keep first responders safe, researchers have developed an artificial intelligence method that not only rapidly and remotely detects the powerful drug fentanyl, but also teaches itself to detect any previously unknown derivatives made in clandestine batches. The method uses infrared light spectroscopy and can be used in a portable, tabletop device.
1h
Nursing home study suggests dialysis patients at greater risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection
New research finds that nursing home residents receiving hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease may be at greater risk for infection from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.
1h
Study leads to potential for new treatment approach for Alzheimer's
Research looking at a possible new therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease focuses on targeting inflammation by using an antibody.
1h
Breastfeeding's legacy may protect against diabetes
Breastfeeding secures delivery of sugar and fat for milk production by changing the insulin sensitivity of organs that supply or demand these nutrients, a new study suggests. The findings could explain how different tissues cooperate to start and maintain lactation and offer strategies to help improve breastfeeding success for mothers who have insufficient milk production.
1h
Coronary calcium better predicts death risk for diabetic women
Women with diabetes and significant levels of calcium in their coronary arteries have higher rates of death from cardiovascular disease and all causes than their male counterparts do, research finds. As reported in Diabetes Care , researchers from the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center compared the sex-specific impact of coronary artery calcium (CA
1h
The eruption that helped to destroy one of China's great dynasties
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02467-2 Cooling particles in a volcanic plume intensified the drought that toppled the Ming dynasty.
1h
Study shines new light on how young tree seedlings develop
The first few weeks of a tree seedling's life can be the most precarious.
1h
NASA gathers nighttime images of Laura becoming a Hurricane
Tropical Storm Laura strengthened to a hurricane in the morning hours of Aug. 25, and NASA provided infrared imagery that showed the structure, temperature and rainmaking capabilities of the storm. When NASA's Terra satellite and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead, both provided different images of Laura as it was about to exit the Caribbean Sea and move into the Gulf of Mexico.
1h
Study shines new light on how young tree seedlings develop
The first few weeks of a tree seedling's life can be the most precarious.
1h
Accumulating extra genome copies may protect fly brain cells during aging
Scientists have discovered a novel anti-aging defense in the brain cells of adult fruit flies: producing extra copies of the genome, according to a new study.
2h
Computer modeling used to predict reef health
A researcher has developed a way to predict the future health of the planet's coral reefs. He has been studying the ecosystems of the world's endangered reefs.
2h
Fossilized teeth reveal dietary shifts in ancient herbivores and hominins
A new study documents dietary shifts in herbivores that lived between 1-3 million years ago in Ethiopia's Lower Omo Valley.
2h
New blood, new hope: Transfusions protect the brain from stroke damage
Neuroscientists found that blood substitution therapy rescues the brains of mice from ischemic damage, a potential breakthrough in stroke therapy.
2h
Some of America's favorite produce crops may need to get a move on by 2045
New research shows that by the years 2045-2049 future temperatures will have more of an effect on when cool-season crops, such as broccoli and lettuce, can be grown than on where, while for warm-season crops (cantaloupe, tomatoes, carrots) the impact will be greater for where they can be grown versus when.
2h
New study shows evolutionary breakdown of 'social' chromosome in ants
Scientists have found that harmful mutations accumulating in the fire ant social chromosome are causing its breakdown.
2h
Researchers on a path to build powerful and practical quantum computer
For the first time, researchers have designed a fully connected 32-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer register operating at cryogenic temperatures. The new system represents an important step toward developing practical quantum computers.
2h
Some COVID-19 Patients Lack Key Structures for Antibody Creation
An absence of germinal centers–which arise during infections to produce long-lived antibody-generating cells–might explain rapidly waning antibody levels in the disease.
2h
New Deal programs still segregate cities and towns
Housing programs adopted during the New Deal increased segregation in American cities and towns, creating racial disparities that continue to characterize life in the 21st century, research finds. "New Deal housing policies encouraged racial segregation and their substantial impact on American cities and towns can still be seen today," says New York University sociologist Jacob Faber, whose resea
2h
New system for accurate telomere profiling in less than 3 hours
A novel assay can be used to rapidly determine telomere dysregulation in cancers and age-related diseases in clinical settings. This helps clinicians to make faster diagnosis and plan targeted treatments for patients.
2h
Why we distort probability
A team of scientists has concluded that our cognitive limitations lead to probability distortions and to subsequent errors in decision-making.
2h
NASA Still Hasn't Found the Damn Leak on the Space Station
Deflating NASA is still struggling to find the leak in its segment of the International Space Station. The good news is that the air is leaking out of the segment very slowly, and NASA is downplaying the risk. But the bad news is that they still haven't found it yet — forcing the NASA crew to spend yet another night in the Russian segment of the station. Fresh Air The news comes after NASA evacua
2h
The flamboyant cuttlefish rarely looks flashy
Despite their flashy reputation, flamboyant cuttlefish are nearly always camouflaged, research finds. "This animal is well known in the internet community, has been on TV many times, and is popular in public aquariums," says Roger Hanlon, senior scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory, which is affiliated with the University of Chicago. "In almost all cases, (its skin) is showing this brill
2h
Israeli phone hacking company faces court fight over sales to Hong Kong
Human rights advocates filed a new court petition against the Israeli phone hacking company Cellebrite, urging Israel's Ministry of Defense to halt the firm's exports to Hong Kong where security forces have been using the technology in crackdowns against dissidents as China takes greater control of Hong Kong. Hong Kong police documents show the use of Cellebrite to hack and unlock phones of demon
2h
That Mysterious Space Signal Just Woke Up Again, Just as Predicted
Fast Radio Bursts Over the last five years , researchers have been closely following a type of strange radio signal emanating from deep space. Astronomers refer to these puzzling signals as " fast radio bursts ," or FRBs. They're pulses of radio waves that only last fractions of a second — and to this day, their origins remain a mystery. FRB 121102 Since the discovery of FRBs, researchers have fo
2h
3 days of rains in Pakistan kill 90, disrupt life in Karachi
Three days of monsoon rains have killed at least 90 people and damaged at least a thousand homes across Pakistan, the country's national disaster management agency said Tuesday, as another spell of heavy rain lashed the port city of Karachi.
2h
Video is not always effective in science communication
What we can learn for online public relations:- Keep the information concise so that one can go thorough it within about 1 minute.- A diagram (a schematic image) may help to understand complex issue.- People should be able to go through the information in their own pace.
2h
Electric fish ignore their own zaps with a cool trick
New research clarifies how electric fish that use zaps to communicate block their own messages out and how the trick evolved. These fish generate electric pulses to communicate with other fish and sense their surroundings. Some species broadcast shorter electric pulses, while others send out long ones. But all that zip-zapping in the water can get confusing. The fish need to filter out their own
2h
Hydroxychloroquine plus azithromycin increases heart risk, finds global study
In the largest observational study of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin, the drug combination has been linked to significant cardiovascular risks, including death.
2h
Scientists catalogue shark and ray distribution in Florida lagoon
A study is the first long-term, in-depth analysis of the elasmobranch community in Florida's Indian River Lagoon and develops capacity to understand how these species may respond to further environmental changes. From 2016 to 2018, researchers caught 630 individuals of 16 species, including two critically endangered smalltooth sawfish. Results showed that many elasmobranchs use the southern Indian
2h
New system for accurate telomere profiling in less than 3 hours
A novel assay can be used to rapidly determine telomere dysregulation in cancers and age-related diseases in clinical settings. This helps clinicians to make faster diagnosis and plan targeted treatments for patients.
2h
Life in a nutshell: New species found in the carapace of late cretaceous marine turtle
Scientists have identified a new ichnospecies from the shell of an extinct marine turtle fossil, the first known species coexisting on living marine vertebrates.
2h
Galactic bar paradox resolved in cosmic dance
New light has been shed on a mysterious and long-standing conundrum at the very heart of our galaxy. The new work offers a potential solution to the so-called 'Galactic bar paradox', whereby different observations produce contradictory estimates of the motion of the central regions of the Milky Way.
2h
Study shines new light on young tree seedlings
X-ray images show a plant's power source may be different than thought.
2h
Researchers show potential for subseasonal forecasts to predict dengue outbreaks
A new study demonstrates for the first time that subseasonal rainfall and temperature forecasts can be used to predict outbreaks of dengue fever by estimating mosquito abundance.
2h
Trust the power of markets
Organizations using groups or committees to make decisions might do better to crowdsource their decisions, says UC Riverside-led research. The study found that people trust groups even though their susceptibility to manipulation can cause poor decisions. Information markets, in which people bet on potential outcomes, make more accurate decisions, but people trust them less. Once people get used to
2h
'Oral' bacteria may disrupt the balance of the vaginal microbiome
A study published in PLOS Biology by Amanda Lewis at University of California, San Diego, and colleagues suggests that mutually beneficial relationships between different species of vaginal bacteria may encourage growth of potentially harmful pathogens, such as the common oral bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum. The work challenges the belief that a suitable living environment supporting pathogen c
2h
You Hate 'The Legend of Korra' for All the Wrong Reasons
It's not that Korra is a bad protagonist. It's that she isn't Aang—and that's fine to say.
2h
Photos: China's Summer of Floods
Throughout the summer, unusually heavy rainfall has caused a series of devastating floods across parts of central and southwestern China. Tens of thousands of residents have been forced from their homes, hundreds have been killed, and authorities now warn that the Three Gorges Dam is facing the largest flood peak in its history. Gathered here are images of the high water and some of the damage it
3h
Researchers see an increase in fraudulent COVID-19 posts on social media
In a new study from UC San Diego School of Medicine, thousands of fake social media posts tied to COVID-19 and financial scams are found on two popular platforms.
3h
NASA gathers nighttime images of Laura becoming a Hurricane
Tropical Storm Laura strengthened to a hurricane in the morning hours of Aug. 25, 2020, and NASA provided infrared imagery that showed the structure, temperature and rainmaking capabilities of the storm.
3h
Hydroxychloroquine plus azithromycin increases heart risk, finds global study
In the largest observational study of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin, the drug combination has been linked to significant cardiovascular risks, including death.
3h
Plant living with only one leaf reveals fundamental genetics of plant growth
Clinging to the walls of tropical caves is a type of plant with a single leaf that continues to grow larger for as long as the plant survives. Researchers hope that their study of this unusual species may help inspire future genetic tools to control the size of common crop plants.
3h
Before eyes open, they get ready to see?
A research team's computational simulations demonstrated that the waves of spontaneous neural activity in the retinas of still-closed eyes in mammals develop long-range horizontal connections in the visual cortex during early developmental stages.
3h
High human population density negative for pollinators
Population density, and not the proportion of green spaces, has the biggest impact on species richness of pollinators in residential areas. This is the result of a study from Lund University in Sweden of gardens and residential courtyards in and around Malmö, Sweden.
3h
Study revealing structure of a protein complex may open doors to better disease research
More than two decades ago scientists discovered the Arp2/3 complex, an actin (cellular protein) cytoskeketal nucleator which plays a crucial role in cell division, immune response, neurodevelopment other biological processes. But there has been no determined structure of the activated state of the complex until now.
3h
Researchers pinpoint hierarchy of breast cancer cells as potential cause for treatment resistance
Researchers say it can take cells in different forms or 'life stages' to cause cancer to grow and spread.
3h
Fresh tumor biopsies in world-first technique for cancer treatments
An innovative technique to improve cancer treatments using tumor biopsies less than 30 minutes after they're taken has been developed.
3h
More than half of 'sudden' cardiac arrest victims had contacted health services before
Today scientists report that 58% of 'sudden' cardiac arrest sufferers sought medical help during the two weeks before the event. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Cardiac arrest is lethal within minutes if left untreated and it is estimated that, on average, fewer than 10% of victims survive.
3h
Study revealing structure of a protein complex may open doors to better disease research
More than two decades ago scientists discovered the Arp2/3 complex, an actin (cellular protein) cytoskeketal nucleator which plays a crucial role in cell division, immune response, neurodevelopment other biological processes. But there has been no determined structure of the activated state of the complex until now.
3h
How Politics Muddied the Waters on a Promising COVID-19 Treatment
On the eve of the Republican Convention, Trump pressured the FDA to allow emergency use of convalescent plasma—before the agency was ready to do so — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Nottinghamshire woman, 75, may be first known UK Covid victim
Scientific analysis suggests coronavirus was spreading in UK weeks earlier than thought Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists believe a 75-year-old woman from Nottinghamshire was the first known person to catch coronavirus in the UK and the earliest to die from it, as research shows the disease was circulating widely in communities in early February. Samples ana
3h
Hurricane Laura tracks toward US Gulf Coast after slamming Haiti
Storm Laura was upgraded to a destructive hurricane on Tuesday and is forecast to make landfall along the Texas or Louisiana coasts on Wednesday night, after earlier causing 20 deaths in Haiti.
3h
Where the Pandemic Is Cover for Authoritarianism
This month, two young men stood outside a high-end Hong Kong shopping mall, clutching bouquets of white flowers as they held a memorial for a protester who had died nearby last year. The event, like any marking the milestones or memories of the prodemocracy movement, drew police attention; more than a dozen gathered to keep watch, one holding a video camera to record the events. When a passerby s
3h
The First Repeat Covid-19 Infection Case Isn't All Bad News
A report from Hong Kong provides the first credible evidence that it's possible to catch the virus twice. Some immunologists are breathing a sigh of relief.
3h
A case for botanical gardens to lead in global plant crisis
The world is experiencing a sixth global mass extinction event, and a new paper advocates that botanical gardens are uniquely positioned to preserve the world's plant diversity.
3h
New tool for identifying endangered corals could aid conservation efforts
Coral conservation efforts could get a boost from a newly developed genotyping "chip"—the first of its kind for corals. The chip allows researchers to genetically identify corals and the symbiotic algae that live within the coral's cells, a vital step for establishing and maintaining genetic diversity in reef restoration efforts. The chip and its accompanying online analysis pipeline help to democ
3h
Researchers introduce new theory to calculate emissions liability
A comparison of the results for conventional point source pollution and bottleneck carbon emissions sources shows that oil and natural gas pipelines are far more important than simple point-source emissions calculations would indicate. It also shifts the emissions liability towards the East Coast from the Midwest. Most surprisingly, the study found that seven out of eight oil pipelines in the U.S.
3h
Global magnetic field of the solar corona measured for the first time
An international team led by Professor Tian Hui from Peking University has recently measured the global magnetic field of the solar corona for the first time. The team used observations from the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter, an instrument designed by Dr. Steve Tomczyk at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, USA. Their results have been recently published in Science and Science China
3h
A case for botanical gardens to lead in global plant crisis
The world is experiencing a sixth global mass extinction event, and a new paper advocates that botanical gardens are uniquely positioned to preserve the world's plant diversity.
3h
New tool for identifying endangered corals could aid conservation efforts
Coral conservation efforts could get a boost from a newly developed genotyping "chip"—the first of its kind for corals. The chip allows researchers to genetically identify corals and the symbiotic algae that live within the coral's cells, a vital step for establishing and maintaining genetic diversity in reef restoration efforts. The chip and its accompanying online analysis pipeline help to democ
3h
Growing underwater heat blob speeds demise of Arctic sea ice
New feedbacks add to the impact of warming air
3h
FDA's Hahn Apologizes For Overselling Plasma's Benefits As A COVID-19 Treatment
The Food and Drug Administration's chief said Sunday the therapy reduces deaths among COVID-19 patients by 35%. On Monday he apologized, acknowledging that statistic greatly exaggerates any benefit. (Image credit: Kevin Dietsch/AP)
3h
Australia Floats Plan to Better Protect Great Barrier Reef
The proposal aims to control water pollution and coastal development that can damage the diverse ecosystem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Researchers discover a new way cells can dispose of misfolded proteins
During the process of cellular protein synthesis mistakes can happen. Sometimes, proteins end up being misfolded. They do not shape up into the specific 3-D structure that is required for proper function. Misshaped secreted and transmembrane proteins usually trigger safety mechanisms that dispose of them by shuttling them from their place of synthesis, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), to the cytoso
3h
Researchers discover a new way cells can dispose of misfolded proteins
During the process of cellular protein synthesis mistakes can happen. Sometimes, proteins end up being misfolded. They do not shape up into the specific 3-D structure that is required for proper function. Misshaped secreted and transmembrane proteins usually trigger safety mechanisms that dispose of them by shuttling them from their place of synthesis, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), to the cytoso
3h
Researcher uses computer modeling to predict reef health
A UBC Okanagan researcher has developed a way to predict the future health of the planet's coral reefs.
3h
New insights into lithium-ion battery failure mechanism
Researchers have identified a potential new degradation mechanism for electric vehicle batteries – a key step to designing effective methods to improve battery lifespan.
3h
Researchers reversibly disable brain pathway in primates
For the first time ever, neurophysiologists have succeeded in reversibly disabling a connection between two areas in the brains of primates while they were performing cognitive tasks, or while their entire brain activity was being monitored. The disconnection had a negative impact on the motivation of the animals, but not on their learning behavior. The study may eventually lead to more targeted t
3h
Mineral dust ingested with food leaves characteristic wear on herbivore teeth
In a controlled feeding study of guinea pigs, paleontologists have discovered that mineral dust ingested with food causes distinct signs of wear on the teeth of plant-eating vertebrates, which can differ considerably depending on the type of dust.
3h
Magnetic stimulation dramatically improves fecal incontinence
Painless magnetic stimulation of nerves that regulate muscles in the anus and rectum appears to improve their function and dramatically reduce episodes of fecal incontinence, a debilitating problem affecting about 10% of the population, investigators report.
3h
Less 'sticky' cells become more cancerous
Researchers have investigated the structure of tumor tissue and the behavior of tumor cells in detail, gaining important insights that could improve cancer diagnosis and therapy in the future.
3h
Battery life for wearable electronic devices could be improved
Researchers have found that asymmetric stresses within electrodes used in certain wearable electronic devices provides an important clue as to how to improve the durability and lifespan of these batteries.
3h
Beware leaders' rush to approve vaccines
Political pressure to bring out Covid inoculations plays into anti-vaxxers' hands
3h
Corona-behandling er blevet stormagternes nye kampplads: 'Der er paralleller til rumkapløbet'
Trump og Putin får medicin godkendt, der ikke er tilstrækkeligt klinisk godkendt.
3h
Covid-19 news: UK criticised for confusing school face covering rules
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
3h
Heat, Smoke and Covid Are Battering the Workers Who Feed America
Climate change is piling on to the hazards already faced by California farm laborers, some of the country's poorest, most neglected workers.
3h
Treatment for teen anxiety
In a new National Institute of Mental Health-funded study, led by Jeffrey Strawn and published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, UC researchers took a first look at one particular medication for treatment of anxiety disorders in pediatric patients to see if it was beneficial.
3h
New Video Shows Largest Hydrogen Bomb Ever Exploded
A Russian nuclear energy agency released formerly classified footage of the Soviet Union's 1961 Tsar Bomba test.
3h
NASA missions explore a 'TIE fighter' active galaxy
Not so long ago, astronomers mapped a galaxy far, far away using radio waves and found it has a strikingly familiar shape. In the process, they discovered the object, called TXS 0128+554, experienced two powerful bouts of activity in the last century.
3h
Effectiveness of cloth masks depends on type of covering
Wearing a mask while out in public has become the recommended practice during the COVID-19 pandemic. Researchers have now experimentally visualized the flow fields of coughs under various common mouth covering scenarios.
4h
Hydrochloric acid boosts catalyst activity
A research team has developed a synthesis process which drastically increases the activity of catalysts for the desulfurization of crude oil. The new process could perhaps also be used for catalysts in fuel cells.
4h
Faster, more efficient energy storage could stem from holistic study of layered materials
A team has developed a novel, integrated approach to track energy-transporting ions within an ultra-thin material, which could unlock its energy storage potential leading toward faster charging, longer lasting devices.
4h
A galaxy's stop-and-start young radio jets
A new VLBA image shows details of a young jet emitted from the core of an active galaxy, revealing that the jet activity stopped, then restarted only a decade ago.
4h
Deep learning algorithm to speed up materials discovery in emerging tech industries
Solid-state inorganic materials are critical to the growth and development of electric vehicle, cellphone, laptop battery and solar energy technologies. However, finding the ideal materials with the desired functions for these industries is extremely challenging.
4h
Tracing the cosmic origin of complex organic molecules with their radiofrequency footprint
How did organic matter reach the Earth in the first place? One way to ponder this question is by observing the distribution and abundance of complex organic molecules in interstellar gas clouds. However, detecting such molecules in the less dense regions of these gas clouds has been challenging. Now, scientists have found concluding evidence for the presence of a particular complex organic molecul
4h
A galaxy's stop-and-start young radio jets
In this image, made with the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), young, radio-emitting jets of material emerge from the core of an elliptical galaxy some 500 million light-years from Earth. After NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected high-energy gamma rays coming from the object, scientists used the VLBA to make high-resolution images of the galaxy, dubbed TXS
4h
Hållbar jakt kan skydda regnskogen
Värdefull kunskap om Amazonas växt- och djurliv riskerar att falla i glömska när ursprungsbefolkningen nekas sälja kött till framför allt lokala skolor. – Det är bättre att utnyttja de resurser som redan finns i skogen på ett förnuftigt och hållbart sätt, säger miljöforskaren Torsten Krause. I Colombias sydligaste landspets, med den breda Amazonasfloden i väster som gräns mot Peru och Brasilien 8
4h
Scientists catalogue shark and ray distribution in Florida lagoon
Many elasmobranch species, which include sharks, skates, and rays, use estuaries as nurseries, for birthing, and as foraging grounds. Florida's Indian River Lagoon is one of 28 estuaries designated as an "estuary of national significance" by the Environmental Protection Agency's National Estuary Program. In recent decades, this estuary has experienced many environmental impacts, such as habitat de
4h
Beating noise via superposition of order
Information can successfully be transmitted through noisy channels using quantum mechanics, according to new research from The University of Queensland and Griffith University.
4h
Scientists catalogue shark and ray distribution in Florida lagoon
Many elasmobranch species, which include sharks, skates, and rays, use estuaries as nurseries, for birthing, and as foraging grounds. Florida's Indian River Lagoon is one of 28 estuaries designated as an "estuary of national significance" by the Environmental Protection Agency's National Estuary Program. In recent decades, this estuary has experienced many environmental impacts, such as habitat de
4h
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
Whale shark genome reveals insights into life span Whale shark. Image credit: iStock/crisod. The whale shark (Rhincodon typus), an endangered species and the largest living fish, can grow to a length of 20 m, weigh up to 42 tons, and live to an estimated 80 years. Jessica Weber, Seung Gu…
4h
One size does not fit all in Drosophila olfactory habituation [Biological Sciences]
In the paper by Shen et al. (1), the authors derive an algorithm to model the contention that habituation acts as an "online" discrimination against background odors and by extension to other constant or repetitive environmental stimuli. Their modeling work is based on the previously proposed "negative image" model of…
4h
Reply to Semelidou and Skoulakis: "Short-term" habituation has multiple distinct mechanisms [Biological Sciences]
The Letter by Semelidou and Skoulakis (1) questions the congruence of our model (2) with current experimental evidence of olfactory habituation. We thank the authors for their Letter and would like to make three points in response. 1) Re: "and is independent of the mushroom bodies, unlike what the authors…
4h
Does the brain encode the gaze of others as beams emitted by their eyes? [Biological Sciences]
With great interest we read the recent report of Guterstam et al. (1) in which they show that the direction of someone's gaze can be decoded from blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activity in areas MT+ (middle temporal complex) (and temporo-parietal junction). In preceding publications, they presented evidence that the observation…
4h
Reply to Gorner et al.: Encoding gaze as implied motion [Biological Sciences]
We thank Görner et al. (1) for a welcome comment on our study (2). We report brain activity that suggested people implicitly code the gaze of an agent as a stream of motion emanating from the agent. Görner et al. (1) offer an alternative explanation: The motion-related brain activity may…
4h
QnAs with Mark T. Nelson [QnAs]
Mark T. Nelson has long been interested in the mechanisms that control blood flow in the brain in response to neuronal activity. During his research career, he has examined ion channels in smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and how the channels are regulated. Nelson's work has improved researchers' understanding of…
4h
Profile of James R. Ehleringer [Profiles]
For the past 40 years, ecologist James R. Ehleringer has led students and colleagues to California's Death Valley to collect leaves from Encelia farinosa, a common desert shrub known as brittlebrush. The little shrub launched Ehleringer's career, sending it in multiple directions and leading to major discoveries and unforeseen applications….
4h
MutS sliding clamps on an uncertain track to DNA mismatch repair [Biochemistry]
Mispairs in DNA are base pairs that violate Watson–Crick base-pairing rules or small insertions or deletions that affect only one strand. Most mispairs are DNA replication errors caused by incorporation of incorrect nucleotides or, more frequently, "slippage" of DNA polymerases on low-complexity sequences. Unrepaired mispairs alter RNA and protein sequences…
4h
Role of Hippo signaling pathway in early placental development [Developmental Biology]
The placenta is an organ of fetal origin that develops at the interface with the maternal uterus (1). It performs numerous and diverse functions fundamental for the proper growth and development of the semiallogeneic fetus, including gas, nutrient, and waste exchange; production of hormones; and modulation of maternal immune response….
4h
Reinventing the wheel with a synthetic plant inflammasome [Plant Biology]
Both animal and plant cells rely on innate immune systems to recognize and appropriately respond to pathogens. These systems have many similar themes and surprising commonalities, both in the protein domains used and in the mechanisms of larger immune complexes (1). In PNAS, Duxbury et al. (2) explore these commonalities…
4h
Seeing is believing: Visualizing immune cells and calcium signals at different stages of neuroinflammation [Immunology and Inflammation]
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neuroinflammatory disease characterized by demyelination of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) (1). While the ultimate cause of the disease is unknown, MS is commonly considered to be an autoimmune disorder in which autoreactive CD4+ T cells are activated by an (unknown) autoantigen presented…
4h
Attuning to a changing ocean [Environmental Sciences]
The ocean is a lifeline for human existence, but current practices risk severely undermining ocean sustainability. Present and future social−ecological challenges necessitate the maintenance and development of knowledge and action by stimulating collaboration among scientists and between science, policy, and practice. Here we explore not only how such collaborations have…
4h
Opinion: To understand how migrations affect human securities, look to the past [Anthropology]
Every day 37,000 people leave their homes and join the 258 million migrants who live in a different country from where they were born (1, 2). And experts believe that the number of migrants will continue to grow. Climate change alone is expected to force 200 million people to leave…
4h
Mathematical model of colorectal cancer initiation [Applied Mathematics]
Quantifying evolutionary dynamics of cancer initiation and progression can provide insights into more effective strategies of early detection and treatment. Here we develop a mathematical model of colorectal cancer initiation through inactivation of two tumor suppressor genes and activation of one oncogene, accounting for the well-known path to colorectal cancer…
4h
Optical properties of metasurfaces infiltrated with liquid crystals [Applied Physical Sciences]
Optical metasurfaces allow the ability to precisely manipulate the wavefront of light, creating many interesting and exotic optical phenomena. However, they generally lack dynamic control over their optical properties and are limited to passive optical elements. In this work, we report the nontrivial infiltration of nanostructured metalenses with three respective…
4h
Noncovalent {pi}-stacked robust topological organic framework [Applied Physical Sciences]
Organic frameworks (OFs) offer a novel strategy for assembling organic semiconductors into robust networks that facilitate transport, especially the covalent organic frameworks (COFs). However, poor electrical conductivity through covalent bonds and insolubility of COFs limit their practical applications in organic electronics. It is known that the two-dimensional intralayer π∙∙∙π transfer…
4h
Optimal control of aging in complex networks [Applied Physical Sciences]
Many complex systems experience damage accumulation, which leads to aging, manifest as an increasing probability of system collapse with time. This naturally raises the question of how to maximize health and longevity in an aging system at minimal cost of maintenance and intervention. Here, we pose this question in the…
4h
Defect tolerant zero-bias topological photocurrent in a ferroelectric semiconductor [Applied Physical Sciences]
Lattice defect is a major cause of energy dissipation in conventional electric current due to the drift and diffusion motions of electrons. Different nature of current emerges when noncentrosymmetric materials are excited by light. This current, called the shift current, originates from the change in the Berry connection of electrons'…
4h
Dimple drainage before the coalescence of a droplet deposited on a smooth substrate [Applied Physical Sciences]
Thin liquid or gas films are everywhere in nature, from foams to submillimetric bubbles at a free surface, and their rupture leaves a collection of small drops and bubbles. However, the mechanisms at play responsible for the bursting of these films is still in debate. The present study thus aims…
4h
Multicolor 3D MINFLUX nanoscopy of mitochondrial MICOS proteins [Applied Physical Sciences]
The mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) is a multisubunit protein complex that is essential for the proper architecture of the mitochondrial inner membrane. MICOS plays a key role in establishing and maintaining crista junctions, tubular or slit-like structures that connect the cristae membrane with the inner boundary…
4h
Sarecycline interferes with tRNA accommodation and tethers mRNA to the 70S ribosome [Biochemistry]
Sarecycline is a new narrow-spectrum tetracycline-class antibiotic approved for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Tetracyclines share a common four-ring naphthacene core and inhibit protein synthesis by interacting with the 70S bacterial ribosome. Sarecycline is distinguished chemically from other tetracyclines because it has a 7-[[methoxy(methyl)amino]methyl] group attached at the C7 position…
4h
Mechanism of PRL2 phosphatase-mediated PTEN degradation and tumorigenesis [Biochemistry]
Tumor suppressor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) levels are frequently found reduced in human cancers, but how PTEN is down-regulated is not fully understood. In addition, although a compelling connection exists between PRL (phosphatase of regenerating liver) 2 and cancer, how this phosphatase induces oncogenesis has…
4h
Mismatch sensing by nucleofilament deciphers mechanism of RecA-mediated homologous recombination [Biochemistry]
Recombinases polymerize along single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) at the end of a broken DNA to form a helical nucleofilament with a periodicity of ∼18 bases. The filament catalyzes the search and checking for homologous sequences and promotes strand exchange with a donor duplex during homologous recombination (HR), the mechanism of which…
4h
Mitochondrial [4Fe-4S] protein assembly involves reductive [2Fe-2S] cluster fusion on ISCA1-ISCA2 by electron flow from ferredoxin FDX2 [Biochemistry]
The essential process of iron-sulfur (Fe/S) cluster assembly (ISC) in mitochondria occurs in three major phases. First, [2Fe-2S] clusters are synthesized on the scaffold protein ISCU2; second, these clusters are transferred to the monothiol glutaredoxin GLRX5 by an Hsp70 system followed by insertion into [2Fe-2S] apoproteins; third, [4Fe-4S] clusters are…
4h
Physical modeling of the heritability and maintenance of epigenetic modifications [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
We develop a predictive theoretical model of the physical mechanisms that govern the heritability and maintenance of epigenetic modifications. This model focuses on a particular modification, methylation of lysine-9 of histone H3 (H3K9), which is one of the most representative and critical epigenetic marks that affects chromatin organization and gene…
4h
In-cell destabilization of a homodimeric protein complex detected by DEER spectroscopy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The complexity of the cellular medium can affect proteins' properties, and, therefore, in-cell characterization of proteins is essential. We explored the stability and conformation of the first baculoviral IAP repeat (BIR) domain of X chromosome-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP), BIR1, as a model for a homodimer protein in human HeLa…
4h
Revealing the mechanism of repressor inactivation during switching of a temperate bacteriophage [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Temperate bacteriophages can enter one of two life cycles following infection of a sensitive host: the lysogenic or the lytic life cycle. The choice between the two alternative life cycles is dependent upon a tight regulation of promoters and their cognate regulatory proteins within the phage genome. We investigated the…
4h
Nucleosome allostery in pioneer transcription factor binding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
While recent experiments revealed that some pioneer transcription factors (TFs) can bind to their target DNA sequences inside a nucleosome, the binding dynamics of their target recognitions are poorly understood. Here we used the latest coarse-grained models and molecular dynamics simulations to study the nucleosome-binding procedure of the two pioneer…
4h
Atomistic structure and dynamics of the human MHC-I peptide-loading complex [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The major histocompatibility complex class-I (MHC-I) peptide-loading complex (PLC) is a cornerstone of the human adaptive immune system, being responsible for processing antigens that allow killer T cells to distinguish between healthy and compromised cells. Based on a recent low-resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of this large membrane-bound protein complex,…
4h
Syntaxin 3 is essential for photoreceptor outer segment protein trafficking and survival [Cell Biology]
Trafficking of photoreceptor membrane proteins from their site of synthesis in the inner segment (IS) to the outer segment (OS) is critical for photoreceptor function and vision. Here we evaluate the role of syntaxin 3 (STX3), in trafficking of OS membrane proteins such as peripherin 2 (PRPH2) and rhodopsin. Photoreceptor-specific…
4h
Electronic structure and photophysics of a supermolecular iron complex having a long MLCT-state lifetime and panchromatic absorption [Chemistry]
Exploiting earth-abundant iron-based metal complexes as high-performance photosensitizers demands long-lived electronically excited metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) states, but these species suffer typically from femtosecond timescale charge-transfer (CT)-state quenching by low-lying nonreactive metal-centered (MC) states. Here, we engineer supermolecular Fe(II) chromophores based on the bis
4h
The roles of long-range proton-coupled electron transfer in the directionality and efficiency of [FeFe]-hydrogenases [Chemistry]
As paradigms for proton-coupled electron transfer in enzymes and benchmarks for a fully renewable H2 technology, [FeFe]-hydrogenases behave as highly reversible electrocatalysts when immobilized on an electrode, operating in both catalytic directions with minimal overpotential requirement. Using the [FeFe]-hydrogenases from Clostridium pasteurianum (CpI) and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrHydA1) we
4h
MicroRNA-dependent inhibition of PFN2 orchestrates ERK activation and pluripotent state transitions by regulating endocytosis [Developmental Biology]
Profilin2 (PFN2) is a target of the embryonic stem cell (ESC)-enriched miR-290 family of microRNAs (miRNAs) and an actin/dynamin-binding protein implicated in endocytosis. Here we show that the miR-290-PFN2 pathway regulates many aspects of ESC biology. In the absence of miRNAs, PFN2 is up-regulated in ESCs, with a resulting decrease…
4h
Enhancer evolutionary co-option through shared chromatin accessibility input [Developmental Biology]
The diversity of forms in multicellular organisms originates largely from the spatial redeployment of developmental genes [S. B. Carroll, Cell 134, 25–36 (2008)]. Several scenarios can explain the emergence of cis-regulatory elements that govern novel aspects of a gene expression pattern [M. Rebeiz, M. Tsiantis, Curr. Opin. Genet. Dev. 45,…
4h
Large stocks of peatland carbon and nitrogen are vulnerable to permafrost thaw [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Northern peatlands have accumulated large stocks of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), but their spatial distribution and vulnerability to climate warming remain uncertain. Here, we used machine-learning techniques with extensive peat core data (n > 7,000) to create observation-based maps of northern peatland C and N stocks, and to…
4h
Constraining the atmospheric OCS budget from sulfur isotopes [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Carbonyl sulfide (OCS), the most abundant sulfur-containing gas in the atmosphere, is used as a proxy for photosynthesis rate estimation. However, a large missing source of atmospheric OCS has been inferred. Sulfur isotope measurements (34S/32S ratio and δ34S) on OCS are a feasible tool to distinguish OCS sources from oceanic…
4h
Abiotic redox reactions in hydrothermal mixing zones: Decreased energy availability for the subsurface biosphere [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Subseafloor mixing of high-temperature hot-spring fluids with cold seawater creates intermediate-temperature diffuse fluids that are replete with potential chemical energy. This energy can be harnessed by a chemosynthetic biosphere that permeates hydrothermal regions on Earth. Shifts in the abundance of redox-reactive species in diffuse fluids are often interpreted to reflect…
4h
Photoperiod and temperature as dominant environmental drivers triggering secondary growth resumption in Northern Hemisphere conifers [Ecology]
Wood formation consumes around 15% of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions per year and plays a critical role in long-term sequestration of carbon on Earth. However, the exogenous factors driving wood formation onset and the underlying cellular mechanisms are still poorly understood and quantified, and this hampers an effective assessment of…
4h
A field-based quantitative analysis of sublethal effects of air pollution on pollinators [Ecology]
While the impact of air pollution on human health is well studied, mechanistic impacts of air pollution on wild systems, including those providing essential ecosystem services, are largely unknown, but directly impact our health and well-being. India is the world's largest fruit producer, second most populous country, and contains 9…
4h
Social distancing laws cause only small losses of economic activity during the COVID-19 pandemic in Scandinavia [Economic Sciences]
This paper uses real-time transaction data from a large bank in Scandinavia to estimate the effect of social distancing laws on consumer spending in the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The analysis exploits a natural experiment to disentangle the effects of the virus and the laws aiming to contain it: Denmark…
4h
The whale shark genome reveals how genomic and physiological properties scale with body size [Evolution]
The endangered whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is the largest fish on Earth and a long-lived member of the ancient Elasmobranchii clade. To characterize the relationship between genome features and biological traits, we sequenced and assembled the genome of the whale shark and compared its genomic and physiological features to those…
4h
Estimating the genome-wide contribution of selection to temporal allele frequency change [Evolution]
Rapid phenotypic adaptation is often observed in natural populations and selection experiments. However, detecting the genome-wide impact of this selection is difficult since adaptation often proceeds from standing variation and selection on polygenic traits, both of which may leave faint genomic signals indistinguishable from a noisy background of genetic drift….
4h
RNA abasic sites in yeast and human cells [Genetics]
RNA abasic sites and the mechanisms involved in their regulation are mostly unknown; in contrast, DNA abasic sites are well-studied. We found surprisingly that, in yeast and human cells, RNA abasic sites are prevalent. When a base is lost from RNA, the remaining ribose is found as a closed-ring or…
4h
Proenkephalin+ regulatory T cells expanded by ultraviolet B exposure maintain skin homeostasis with a healing function [Immunology and Inflammation]
Regulatory T (Treg) cells, expressing CD25 (interleukin-2 receptor α chain) and Foxp3 transcription factor, maintain immunological self-tolerance and suppress various immune responses. Here we report a feature of skin Treg cells expanded by ultraviolet B (UVB) exposure. We found that skin Treg cells possessing a healing function are expanded by…
4h
The histone methyltransferase DOT1L prevents antigen-independent differentiation and safeguards epigenetic identity of CD8+ T cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
Cytotoxic T cell differentiation is guided by epigenome adaptations, but how epigenetic mechanisms control lymphocyte development has not been well defined. Here we show that the histone methyltransferase DOT1L, which marks the nucleosome core on active genes, safeguards normal differentiation of CD8+ T cells. T cell-specific ablation of Dot1L resulted…
4h
Evasion of MAIT cell recognition by the African Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 pathovar that causes invasive disease [Immunology and Inflammation]
Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are innate T lymphocytes activated by bacteria that produce vitamin B2 metabolites. Mouse models of infection have demonstrated a role for MAIT cells in antimicrobial defense. However, proposed protective roles of MAIT cells in human infections remain unproven and clinical conditions associated with selective absence…
4h
Heterogeneous origins and functions of mouse skeletal muscle-resident macrophages [Immunology and Inflammation]
Tissue-resident macrophages can originate from embryonic or adult hematopoiesis. They play important roles in a wide range of biological processes including tissue remodeling during organogenesis, organ homeostasis, repair following injury, and immune response to pathogens. Although the origins and tissue-specific functions of resident macrophages have been extensively studied in many…
4h
Neural transcription factor Pou4f1 promotes renal fibrosis via macrophage-myofibroblast transition [Immunology and Inflammation]
Unresolved inflammation can lead to tissue fibrosis and impaired organ function. Macrophage–myofibroblast transition (MMT) is one newly identified mechanism by which ongoing chronic inflammation causes progressive fibrosis in different forms of kidney disease. However, the mechanisms underlying MMT are still largely unknown. Here, we discovered a brain-specific homeobox/POU domain protein…
4h
Identifying collagen VI as a target of fibrotic diseases regulated by CREBBP/EP300 [Medical Sciences]
Fibrotic diseases remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality, yet there are few effective therapies. The underlying pathology of all fibrotic conditions is the activity of myofibroblasts. Using cells from freshly excised disease tissue from patients with Dupuytren's disease (DD), a localized fibrotic disorder of the palm, we sought…
4h
Large-scale informatic analysis to algorithmically identify blood biomarkers of neurological damage [Medical Sciences]
The identification of precision blood biomarkers which can accurately indicate damage to brain tissue could yield molecular diagnostics with the potential to improve how we detect and treat neurological pathologies. However, a majority of candidate blood biomarkers for neurological damage that are studied today are proteins which were arbitrarily proposed…
4h
Negative MAPK-ERK regulation sustains CIC-DUX4 oncoprotein expression in undifferentiated sarcoma [Medical Sciences]
Transcription factor fusions (TFFs) are present in ∼30% of soft-tissue sarcomas. TFFs are not readily "druggable" in a direct pharmacologic manner and thus have proven difficult to target in the clinic. A prime example is the CIC-DUX4 oncoprotein, which fuses Capicua (CIC) to the double homeobox 4 gene, DUX4. CIC-DUX4…
4h
Epigenetic loss of the transfer RNA-modifying enzyme TYW2 induces ribosome frameshifts in colon cancer [Medical Sciences]
Transfer RNA (tRNA) activity is tightly regulated to provide a physiological protein translation, and tRNA chemical modifications control its function in a complex with ribosomes and messenger RNAs (mRNAs). In this regard, the correct hypermodification of position G37 of phenylalanine-tRNA, adjacent to the anticodon, is critical to prevent ribosome frameshifting…
4h
Structural elucidation of the cis-prenyltransferase NgBR/DHDDS complex reveals insights in regulation of protein glycosylation [Medical Sciences]
Cis-prenyltransferase (cis-PTase) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of glycosyl carrier lipids required for protein glycosylation in the lumen of endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human NgBR/DHDDS complex, which represents an atomic resolution structure for any heterodimeric cis-PTase. The crystal structure sheds light on…
4h
Inhibition of PIKfyve kinase prevents infection by Zaire ebolavirus and SARS-CoV-2 [Medical Sciences]
Virus entry is a multistep process. It initiates when the virus attaches to the host cell and ends when the viral contents reach the cytosol. Genetically unrelated viruses can subvert analogous subcellular mechanisms and use similar trafficking pathways for successful entry. Antiviral strategies targeting early steps of infection are therefore…
4h
Genesis and spread of multiple reassortants during the 2016/2017 H5 avian influenza epidemic in Eurasia [Microbiology]
Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the H5 A/goose/Guangdong/1/96 lineage can cause severe disease in poultry and wild birds, and occasionally in humans. In recent years, H5 HPAI viruses of this lineage infecting poultry in Asia have spilled over into wild birds and spread via bird migration to countries…
4h
An ATP-dependent partner switch links flagellar C-ring assembly with gene expression [Microbiology]
Bacterial flagella differ in their number and spatial arrangement. In many species, the MinD-type ATPase FlhG (also YlxH/FleN) is central to the numerical control of bacterial flagella, and its deletion in polarly flagellated bacteria typically leads to hyperflagellation. The molecular mechanism underlying this numerical control, however, remains enigmatic. Using the…
4h
A membrane-depolarizing toxin substrate of the Staphylococcus aureus type VII secretion system mediates intraspecies competition [Microbiology]
The type VII protein secretion system (T7SS) is conserved across Staphylococcus aureus strains and plays important roles in virulence and interbacterial competition. To date, only one T7SS substrate protein, encoded in a subset of S. aureus genomes, has been functionally characterized. Here, using an unbiased proteomic approach, we identify TspA…
4h
Mucosal delivery of ESX-1-expressing BCG strains provides superior immunity against tuberculosis in murine type 2 diabetes [Microbiology]
Tuberculosis (TB) claims 1.5 million lives per year. This situation is largely due to the low efficacy of the only licensed TB vaccine, Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) against pulmonary TB. The metabolic disease type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a risk factor for TB and the mechanisms underlying increased TB susceptibility in…
4h
Activator protein-1 transactivation of the major immediate early locus is a determinant of cytomegalovirus reactivation from latency [Microbiology]
Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that latently infects hematopoietic cells and has the ability to reactivate when triggered by immunological stress. This reactivation causes significant morbidity and mortality in immune-deficient patients, who are unable to control viral dissemination. While a competent immune system helps prevent clinically detectable viremia,…
4h
Chronic Gq signaling in AgRP neurons does not cause obesity [Neuroscience]
Maintaining energy homeostasis requires coordinating physiology and behavior both on an acute timescale to adapt to rapid fluctuations in caloric intake and on a chronic timescale to regulate body composition. Hypothalamic agouti-related peptide (AgRP)-expressing neurons are acutely activated by caloric need, and this acute activation promotes increased food intake and…
4h
Neuronal spike-rate adaptation supports working memory in language processing [Neuroscience]
Language processing involves the ability to store and integrate pieces of information in working memory over short periods of time. According to the dominant view, information is maintained through sustained, elevated neural activity. Other work has argued that short-term synaptic facilitation can serve as a substrate of memory. Here we…
4h
Hierarchical dynamics as a macroscopic organizing principle of the human brain [Neuroscience]
Multimodal evidence suggests that brain regions accumulate information over timescales that vary according to anatomical hierarchy. Thus, these experimentally defined "temporal receptive windows" are longest in cortical regions that are distant from sensory input. Interestingly, spontaneous activity in these regions also plays out over relatively slow timescales (i.e., exhibits slower…
4h
Magnon Bose-Einstein condensation and superconductivity in a frustrated Kondo lattice [Physics]
Motivated by recent experiments on magnetically frustrated heavy fermion metals, we theoretically study the phase diagram of the Kondo lattice model with a nonmagnetic valence bond solid ground state on a ladder. A similar physical setting may be naturally occurring in YbAl3C3, CeAgBi2, and TmB4 compounds. In the insulating limit,…
4h
PIP2: A critical regulator of vascular ion channels hiding in plain sight [Physiology]
The phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), has long been established as a major contributor to intracellular signaling, primarily by virtue of its role as a substrate for phospholipase C (PLC). Signaling by Gq-protein–coupled receptors triggers PLC-mediated hydrolysis of PIP2 into inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, which are well known to modulate vascular…
4h
Dimer interaction in the Hv1 proton channel [Physiology]
The voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is a member of the voltage-gated ion channel superfamily, which stands out in design: It is a dimer of two voltage-sensing domains (VSDs), each containing a pore pathway, a voltage sensor (S4), and a gate (S1) and forming its own ion channel. Opening of the…
4h
Necrotic upper tips1 mimics heat and drought stress and encodes a protoxylem-specific transcription factor in maize [Plant Biology]
Maintaining sufficient water transport during flowering is essential for proper organ growth, fertilization, and yield. Water deficits that coincide with flowering result in leaf wilting, necrosis, tassel browning, and sterility, a stress condition known as "tassel blasting." We identified a mutant, necrotic upper tips1 (nut1), that mimics tassel blasting and…
4h
Channelrhodopsin-mediated optogenetics highlights a central role of depolarization-dependent plant proton pumps [Plant Biology]
In plants, environmental stressors trigger plasma membrane depolarizations. Being electrically interconnected via plasmodesmata, proper functional dissection of electrical signaling by electrophysiology is basically impossible. The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii evolved blue light-excited channelrhodopsins (ChR1, 2) to navigate. When expressed in excitable nerve and muscle cells, ChRs can be
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Tuning the circadian period of cyanobacteria up to 6.6 days by the single amino acid substitutions in KaiC [Plant Biology]
The circadian clock of cyanobacteria consists of only three clock proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, which generate a circadian rhythm of KaiC phosphorylation in vitro. The adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of KaiC is the source of the 24-h period and temperature compensation. Although numerous circadian mutants of KaiC have been…
4h
Stomatal immunity against fungal invasion comprises not only chitin-induced stomatal closure but also chitosan-induced guard cell death [Plant Biology]
Many pathogenic fungi exploit stomata as invasion routes, causing destructive diseases of major cereal crops. Intensive interaction is expected to occur between guard cells and fungi. In the present study, we took advantage of well-conserved molecules derived from the fungal cell wall, chitin oligosaccharide (CTOS), and chitosan oligosaccharide (CSOS) to…
4h
From one cell to many: Morphogenetic field of lateral root founder cells in Arabidopsis thaliana is built by gradual recruitment [Plant Biology]
The reiterative process of lateral root (LR) formation is widespread and underlies root system formation. However, early LR primordium (LRP) morphogenesis is not fully understood. In this study, we conducted both a clonal analysis and time-lapse experiments to decipher the pattern and sequence of pericycle founder cell (FC) participation in…
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A 25-y longitudinal dolphin cohort supports that long-lived individuals in same environment exhibit variation in aging rates [Population Biology]
While it is believed that humans age at different rates, a lack of robust longitudinal human studies using consensus biomarkers meant to capture aging rates has hindered an understanding of the degree to which individuals vary in their rates of aging. Because bottlenose dolphins are long-lived mammals that develop comorbidities…
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Stochastic sampling provides a unifying account of visual working memory limits [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Research into human working memory limits has been shaped by the competition between different formal models, with a central point of contention being whether internal representations are continuous or discrete. Here we describe a sampling approach derived from principles of neural coding as a framework to understand working memory limits….
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Virtuous violence from the war room to death row [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
How likely is it that someone would approve of using a nuclear weapon to kill millions of enemy civilians in the hope of ending a ground war that threatens thousands of American troops? Ask them how they feel about prosecuting immigrants, banning abortion, supporting the death penalty, and protecting gun…
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An exploratory data analysis of word form prediction during word-by-word reading [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
In 2005, we reported evidence indicating that upcoming phonological word forms—e.g., kite vs. airplane—were predicted during reading. We recorded brainwaves (electroencephalograms [EEGs]) as people read word-by-word and then correlated the predictability in context of indefinite articles that preceded nouns (a kite vs. an airplane) with the average event-related brain potentials…
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Brain circuits signaling the absence of emotion in body language [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Adaptive social behavior and mental well-being depend on not only recognizing emotional expressions but also, inferring the absence of emotion. While the neurobiology underwriting the perception of emotions is well studied, the mechanisms for detecting a lack of emotional content in social signals remain largely unknown. Here, using cutting-edge analyses…
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Collective property rights reduce deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon [Social Sciences]
In this paper, we draw on common-pool resource theory to argue that indigenous territories, when granted full property rights, will be effective at curbing deforestation. Using satellite data, we test the effect of property rights on deforestation between 1982 and 2016. In order to identify causal effects, we combine a…
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Field experimental evidence shows that self-interest attracts more sunlight [Sustainability Science]
This study examines how messaging approaches in a prosocial intervention can influence not only the effectiveness of the intervention but also, contagion afterward. Our investigation focuses on leveraging two motivations for solar adoption: self-interest and prosocial. Using data from a natural field experiment in 29 municipalities containing 684,000 people, we…
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Assessing multidimensional sustainability: Lessons from Brazil's social protection programs [Sustainability Science]
Examining linkages among multiple sustainable development outcomes is key for understanding sustainability transitions. Yet rigorous evidence on social and environmental outcomes of sustainable development policies remains scarce. We conduct a national-level analysis of Brazil's flagship social protection program, Zero Hunger (ZH), which aims to reduce food insecurity and poverty. Using…
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Correction for Baresch and Garbin, Acoustic trapping of microbubbles in complex environments and controlled payload release [Correction]
ENGINEERING Correction for "Acoustic trapping of microbubbles in complex environments and controlled payload release," by Diego Baresch and Valeria Garbin, which was first published June 22, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2003569117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 15490–15496). The authors note that, due to a printer's error, the article title for reference 39…
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Correction for Lin et al., Induction of USP25 by viral infection promotes innate antiviral responses by mediating the stabilization of TRAF3 and TRAF6 [Correction]
IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for "Induction of USP25 by viral infection promotes innate antiviral responses by mediating the stabilization of TRAF3 and TRAF6," by Dandan Lin, Man Zhang, Meng-Xin Zhang, Yujie Ren, Jie Jin, Quanyi Zhao, Zishu Pan, Min Wu, Hong-Bing Shu, Chen Dong, and Bo Zhong, which was first…
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Correction for Wu et al., A negative reciprocal regulatory axis between cyclin D1 and HNF4{alpha} modulates cell cycle progression and metabolism in the liver [Correction]
MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for "A negative reciprocal regulatory axis between cyclin D1 and HNF4α modulates cell cycle progression and metabolism in the liver," by Heng Wu, Tzachi Reizel, Yue J. Wang, Jessica L. Lapiro, Betsy T. Kren, Jonathan Schug, Shilpa Rao, Ashleigh Morgan, Adam Herman, Laurie L. Shekels, Matthew S….
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Correction for Schroeder et al., Seizure pathways change on circadian and slower timescales in individual patients with focal epilepsy [Correction]
NEUROSCIENCE, BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for "Seizure pathways change on circadian and slower timescales in individual patients with focal epilepsy," by Gabrielle M. Schroeder, Beate Diehl, Fahmida A. Chowdhury, John S. Duncan, Jane de Tisi, Andrew J. Trevelyan, Rob Forsyth, Andrew Jackson, Peter N. Taylor, and Yujiang Wang, which…
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Housing First proves cost effective especially for the most-vulnerable homeless group
Canadians spend big money dealing with the consequences of homelessness, but the money spent could be far more effective. According to a new McGill-led analysis, housing homeless people with severe mental illness is even more cost-effective than housing homeless people with moderate needs. A Housing-First strategy aimed at helping these individuals regain and keep permanent housing generates savin
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Some of America's favorite produce crops may need to get a move on by 2045
Record drought and heat have some farmers worried about where and when crops can be grown in the future, even in California where unprecedented microclimate diversity creates ideal growing conditions for many of the most popular items in America's grocery stores. A third of the vegetables and two-thirds of fruits and nuts consumed by Americans are now grown on more than 76,000 farms across the sta
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Democrats Are Trying to Save Climate Policy From the Senate
Why has the United States done so little politically to combat climate change? Blame the Senate. For the past quarter century, the world's greatest deliberative body has killed virtually any bill that would ensure the continued habitability of the world. Through its slow process, excessive use of the filibuster, and scheme of allotting votes without regard to a state's population, the Senate has
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Enzyme prisons: Cell signaling with just one molecule
A team at the Max Dellbruck Center has answered a question that has puzzled scientists for some 40 years. In the journal Cell, the group explains how cells are able to switch on completely different signaling pathways using only one signaling molecule: the nucleotide cAMP. To achieve this, the molecule is virtually imprisoned in nanometer-sized spaces.
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Microwaving new materials
Microwave ovens are the mainstay of cooking appliances in our homes. Five years ago, when Reeja Jayan was a new professor at Carnegie Mellon University, she was intrigued by the idea of using microwaves to grow materials. She and other researchers had shown that microwave radiation enabled temperature crystallization and growth of ceramic oxides. Exactly how microwaves did this was not well unders
4h
Enzyme prisons: Cell signaling with just one molecule
A team at the Max Dellbruck Center has answered a question that has puzzled scientists for some 40 years. In the journal Cell, the group explains how cells are able to switch on completely different signaling pathways using only one signaling molecule: the nucleotide cAMP. To achieve this, the molecule is virtually imprisoned in nanometer-sized spaces.
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Life in a nutshell: New species found in the carapace of late cretaceous marine turtle
While paleontologists have a wealth of vertebrate fossils at their disposal, their knowledge of the ecology of ancient extinct species, particularly regarding their relationship with invertebrate species, is relatively poor. As bones and hard shells fossilize much better than soft tissues and cartilage, scientists are limited in their ability to infer the presence of parasitic or symbiotic organis
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Ancient mammoth ivory carving technology reconstructed by archeologists
A team of archeologists from Siberian Federal University and Novosibirsk State University provided a detailed reconstruction of a technology that was used to carve ornaments and sculptures from mammoth ivory. The team studied a string of beads and an ancient animal figurine found at the Paleolithic site of Ust-Kova in Krasnoyarsk Territory. Over 20 thousand years ago its residents used drills, cut
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A case for botanical gardens to lead in global plant crisis
In a paper published in Plants, People, Planet, The Morton Arboretum scientists Murphy Westwood, Ph.D., and Nicole Cavender, Ph.D., in collaboration with Abby Meyer, and Paul Smith, Ph.D., from Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI), detail how botanical gardens have the skills and knowledge, facilities, plant collections, and access to the public required to advance plant conservation,
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New tool for identifying endangered corals could aid conservation efforts
A newly developed genotyping "chip"–the first of its kind for corals–allows researchers to genetically identify corals and the symbiotic algae that live within the coral's cells, a vital step for establishing and maintaining genetic diversity in reef restoration efforts.
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Researchers introduce new theory to calculate emissions liability
A new study by Michigan Tech researchers questions conventional methods of calculating carbon emissions liability based on point source pollution by introducing new "bottleneck" theory.
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Hydroxychloroquine reduces in-hospital COVID-19 mortality
An Italian observational study contributes to the ongoing debate regarding the use of hydroxychloroquine in the current pandemic. The research, conducted on 3,451 patients treated in 33 hospitals throughout the Italian territory, shows that the use of this drug reduces by 30% the risk of death in hospitalized patients affected by Covid-19.
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The McCloskeys' Unsubtle Message to White America
P atricia and Mark McCloskey sat close together on their burnt-red scalloped couch, the dark wood-paneled walls behind them teasing the grandeur of their St. Louis home, which has been decorated with French silk damask wall coverings, classical-style ceiling murals, and marble urns depicting the Roman god Neptune out front. In June, the pair stood on their lawn, barefoot in slacks, beside careful
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Studying water polo for kicks
Scientists measure the propulsive force of water polo players executing highly efficient 'eggbeater' kicks, paving the way to improved sports performance and new undersea transportation methods.
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The secret life of melons revealed: 'Jumping sequences' may alter gene expression
Researchers find that retrotransposons (a.k.a. 'jumping sequences') may affect gene expression in melons.
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A colorful detector: Crystalline material reversibly changes color when absorbing water
Scientists unveil a new crystalline material that reversibly changes color from yellow to red when absorbing water, paving the way for chemically sensitive detectors that can work without electricity.
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New method to track ultrafast change of magnetic state
Physicists have developed a precise method to measure the ultrafast change of a magnetic state in materials. The international research team recorded emissions of terahertz radiation.
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In sickness and in health: Cardiovascular disease in couples
Researchers show that the wives of men with major cardiovascular disease risk factors, namely hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, are more prone to suffer from the same disorders.
4h
How zebrafish maintain efficient and fair foraging behaviors
New insight on how zebrafish achieve near-optimal foraging efficiency and fairness among groups has been published today.
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Two major microbial groups living deep underground can't breathe
A new scientific study has revealed unique life strategies of two major groups of microbes that live below Earth's surface. These groups, originally thought to rely on symbiotic relationships with other organisms, may also live independently and use an ancient mode of energy production.
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Fifty new planets confirmed in machine learning first
Fifty potential planets have had their existence confirmed by a new machine learning algorithm.
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Teamwork can make the 5G dream work: A collaborative system architecture for 5G networks
Scientists explain how collaboration between cloud and network service providers could enable advanced 5G applications.
4h
Pots of gold engineered to help with early disease detection
Researchers have developed biosensors that use nanoengineered porous gold which more effectively detect early signs of disease, potentially improving patient outcomes.
4h
Western Wildfires Are Spinning Off Tornadoes — Here's How Fires Create Their Own Freakish Weather
Extreme wildfires can fuel tornadoes, creating erratic and dangerous conditions for firefighters.
4h
Researchers Test Battery Powered by Nuclear Waste
Waste Potential An energy startup called NDB says it's making progress on a battery technology powered by small pieces of nuclear waste. In fact, it's claiming that a pair of tests at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Cambridge University show that the battery is already managing a 40 percent charge. When the tech matures, it hopes the batteries could last for between a decade and 28,000
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Importance of rainfall highlighted for tropical animals
Imagine a tropical forest, and you might conjure up tall trees hung with vines, brightly colored birds, howling monkeys, and … rain. Indeed, precipitation patterns, along with temperature, dictate where tropical forests are distributed around the world, but surprisingly, scientists know very little about the direct effects of rainfall on animals. A new conceptual framework calls for the scientif
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Scientists create protein models to explore toxic methylmercury formation
A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory created a computational model of the proteins responsible for the transformation of mercury to toxic methylmercury, marking a step forward in understanding how the reaction occurs and how mercury cycles through the environment.
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Quantum simulation for 3D chiral topological phase
Professor Liu at PKU, Professor Du and Professor Wang at USTC build up a quantum simulator using nitrogen-vacancy center to investigate a three-dimensional (3D) chiral topological insulator which was not realized in solid state system, and demonstrate a complete study of both the bulk and surface topological physics by quantum quenches.
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Three-dimensional quantum Hall effect and global picture of edge states in Weyl semimetals
Recently, Professor Xie and his collaborators investigate the three-dimensional quantum Hall effect in Weyl semimetals and elucidate a global picture of the edge states.
4h
Hubble has spotted comet Neowise after it survived its journey around the sun
NASA has released new photos of Comet Neowise taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, revealing a close-up view of the brightest comet observed in decades after it passed around the sun this summer. What happened: The new image, taken on August 8, centers on the comet's coma, the outer shell of gas and dust expelled as the comet is heated by the sun. It's one of the best photos Hubble has ever taken
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NASA Amused by Galaxy That Looks Like a TIE Fighter
TIE Fighter Galaxy Using NASA's Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope in 2015, a team of astronomers spotted, a galaxy with an unusual shape. Several years later, they returned for a much closer look at the object far, far away, using the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a system of ten radio telescopes in Hawaii, and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. "After the Fermi announcement, we zoomed in a milli
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Nomad Base Station Pro Wireless Charger: An AirPower Alternative
Nomad's Base Station Pro can charge multiple devices at once without needing to place them just so on the mat.
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Why scientific papers are growing increasingly inscrutable
Researchers found that the proportion of words in a scientific paper that are acronyms has more than tripled since 1950. (Pexels/) Reading a scientific paper can sometimes feel like deciphering a wall of code. Academic writing is usually jam-packed with sophisticated scientific concepts, but in recent decades studies have also become filled with endless acronyms and abbreviations. Some researcher
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Rates of e-cigarette and marijuana use not associated with vaping-related lung injuries
Higher rates of e-cigarette and marijuana use in U.S. states did not result in more e-cigarette or vaping-related lung injuries (known as EVALI), a new study from the Yale School of Public Health finds.
5h
Enzyme prisons
A team at the MDC has answered a question that has puzzled scientists for some 40 years. In the journal Cell, the group explains how cells are able to switch on completely different signaling pathways using only one signaling molecule: the nucleotide cAMP. To achieve this, the molecule is virtually imprisoned in nanometer-sized spaces.
5h
Global magnetic field of the solar corona measured for the first time
An international team led by Professor Tian Hui from Peking University has recently measured the global magnetic field of the solar corona for the first time. The team used observations from the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter, an instrument designed by Dr. Steve Tomczyk at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, USA.
5h
COVID-19 human milk studies should continue without stopping breastfeeding
It is not easy to conduct human milk research during a pandemic. Yet despite the consistent lack of quality evidence for transmission of viral RNA from breast milk, some leaders are pushing ahead by altering public health and clinical practice guidance, according to E.A. Quinn, associate professor of biological anthropology in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis.
5h
Single-cell RNA sequencing sheds new light on cancer cells' varied response to chemotherapy
Single-cell analysis, done in three colon cancer cell lines, is believed to be the first to profile transcriptome-level changes in response to DNA damage across individual cells.
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To be or not to be in the ER, that is the question
Researchers discovered a new way cells can dispose of misfolded proteins that may help better understand human NGLY1 deficiency.
5h
Small quake clusters can't hide from AI
A deep learning algorithm analyzes data from a deadly landslide in Greenland to show how it may someday predict seismic events like earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.
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COVID-19 taking a toll on everyday lives, research suggests
Research shows that COVID-19 has severely affected people's daily emotional lives and mental health.
5h
Ancient star explosions revealed in deep-sea sediments
A mystery surrounding the space around our solar system is unfolding thanks to evidence of supernovae found in deep-sea sediments.
5h
Pots of gold engineered to help with early disease detection
Researchers have developed biosensors that use nanoengineered porous gold which more effectively detect early signs of disease, potentially improving patient outcomes.
5h
Most adults with lupus or common types of arthritis have similar risks of getting admitted to hospital as other COVID-19 patients
Most adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are not at increased risk of hospitalization from COVID-19 due to medications used to dampen their altered immune system, the cause of their disease.
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Treating COVID-19 could lead to increased antimicrobial resistance
Research suggests that the increased use of antibiotics in the treatment of COVID-19 patients could be placing an additional burden on waste water treatment works, particularly those serving large or emergency hospitals.
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Cutting surgical robots down to size
Teleoperated surgical robots are becoming commonplace in operating rooms, but many are massive (sometimes taking up an entire room) and difficult to manipulate. Medical researchers and engineers have now created the mini-RCM, a surgical robot the size of a tennis ball that weighs as much as a penny, and performed significantly better than manually operated tools in delicate mock-surgical procedure
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Should children in England wear face masks in schools?
Case for and against pupils wearing a face covering as England prepares to reopen schools Schools in England prepare to defy official advice Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Although the Scottish government has given secondary schools "obligatory guidance" that pupils should wear face coverings in corridors, communal areas and school buses, at the moment there are no
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Schools in England prepare to defy official advice on face masks
Headteachers call for urgent rethink on facial coverings as part of coronavirus strategy Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Hundreds of schools in England are preparing to allow or encourage pupils to wear face coverings in communal areas in defiance of UK government guidance on coronavirus. Boris Johnson is under growing pressure to review Public Health England advice
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Convalescent plasma treatment for covid-19 has been oversold by the US
The US Food and Drug Administration has granted an emergency authorisation to use donated blood plasma from covid-19 survivors to treat the disease, but the evidence that it works is lacking
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How effective does a COVID-19 vaccine need to be to stop the pandemic?
The American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, is committed to publishing the most robust, evidence-based research and commentary on COVID-19 as they unfold to keep readers up to date and aware of issues relevant to community and individual health during this continually evolving global outbreak. All articles featured here are freely available.
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Study shows socioeconomic status linked to heart failure mortality in United States
A variety of treatments exist to address heart failure, yet it continues to carry a poor prognosis. A new study from University Hospitals showed that a person's address can help predict their chance of mortality from heart disease.
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Health IT improves engagement in preconception health to reduce racial disparities
New research from Boston Medical Center highlights the benefits of using health technology to engage African American and Black women earlier in preconception care in an effort to close the gap on racial disparities in birth outcomes and maternal mortality.
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New blood, new hope: Transfusions protect the brain from stroke damage
In a study led by Xuefang "Sophie" Ren, a research assistant professor in the Department of Neuroscience, a team of West Virginia University neuroscientists found that blood substitution therapy rescues the brains of mice from ischemic damage, a potential breakthrough in stroke therapy.
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A Man Was Reinfected With Coronavirus After Recovery — What Does This Mean for Immunity?
Reports describe a Hong Kong man who was reinfected with the coronavirus after returning from Europe. Why wasn't the man immune to reinfection?
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Metabolic syndrome linked to worse outcomes for COVID-19 patients
Patients hospitalized with COVID-19 who had a combination of high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes were over three times more likely to die from the disease, according to a new study.
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No safe level of caffeine consumption for pregnant women and would-be mothers
Women who are pregnant or trying to conceive should be advised to avoid caffeine because the evidence suggests that maternal caffeine consumption is associated with negative pregnancy outcomes and that there is no safe level of consumption, finds an analysis of observational studies.
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Changing landscapes, changing diets
A new study led by Enquye Negash, a postdoctoral researcher in the George Washington University Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology, published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences documents dietary shifts in herbivores that lived between 1-3 million years ago in Ethiopia's Lower Omo Valley.
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Housing First proves cost effective especially for the most-vulnerable homeless group
Canadians spend big money dealing with the consequences of homelessness, but the money spent could be far more effective. According to a new McGill-led analysis, housing homeless people with severe mental illness is even more cost-effective than housing homeless people with moderate needs. A Housing-First strategy aimed at helping these individuals regain and keep permanent housing generates savin
5h
UBCO researcher uses computer modelling to predict reef health
A UBC Okanagan researcher has developed a way to predict the future health of the planet's coral reefs. Working with scientists from Australia's Flinders' University and privately-owned research firm Nova Blue Environment, biology doctoral student Bruno Carturan has been studying the ecosystems of the world's endangered reefs.
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Nursing home study suggests dialysis patients at greater risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection
It's widely known that the causative agent for COVID-19, the SARS-CoV-2 virus, can spread rapidly among residents in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities, leading to high numbers of cases and deaths in a very vulnerable population. According to a new study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine, residents receiving hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease may be at even greater r
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NASA missions explore a 'TIE Fighter' active galaxy
Not so long ago, astronomers mapped a galaxy far, far away using radio waves and found it has a strikingly familiar shape. In the process, they discovered the object, called TXS 0128+554, experienced two powerful bouts of activity in the last century.
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Deep learning algorithm to speed up materials discovery in emerging tech industries
Solid-state inorganic materials are critical to the growth and development of electric vehicle, cellphone, laptop battery and solar energy technologies. However, finding the ideal materials with the desired functions for these industries is extremely challenging.
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A galaxy's stop-and-start young radio jets
VLBA image shows details of a young jet emitted from the core of an active galaxy, revealing that the jet activity stopped, then restarted only a decade ago.
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Restoring the world's forests requires partnering with local communities
Global forest restoration is a critical strategy for removing carbon from the atmosphere but its success depends on empowering local communities, according to a new study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution.
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Discovery of new genes that influence the success of cancer treatment
One of the great mysteries of cancer research is why certain patients respond better to radiation therapy than others. Researchers at the University of Bern have now discovered which genes play an important role in this. This results in new findings for cancer treatment.
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Clinical trial shows potential benefit to anti-platelet therapy
Heart patients who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or stent placement? nonsurgical procedures to improve blood flow to the heart are typically prescribed anti-platelet therapy to avoid blood clots that can lead to a heart attack or stroke. New research from the international TAILOR-PCI trial, the largest pharmacogenetics clinical trial in cardiology, suggests that genetic testing
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Cardiology trial shows potential benefit of genetic testing when selecting blood thinners
An international, first-of-its-kind cardiology trial used personalized genetic testing to reduce by 34 per cent the number of serious adverse events following balloon angioplasty, a treatment for the most common form of heart disease.
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To stop COVID-19 spread in schools, start with local data and do the math
As schools across the country continue to wrestle with configurations of online and in-classroom learning, a new study from UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals shows that public data and a simple equation may be all that is required to estimate the number of infected students who might be in a classroom. The result may help school districts make tough decisions on whether it is safe for students to
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Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children without COVID-19 symptoms
The rate of positive test results for SARS-CoV-2 in children without symptoms who were treated in U.S. hospitals for other conditions was examined in this study.
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Polymers prevent potentially hazardous mist during dentist visit
If the mist in a dentist's office — sent flying into the air by spinning, vibrating tools — contains a virus or some other pathogen, it is a health hazard. So researchers in Illinois studied the viscoelastic properties of food-grade polymers and discovered that the forces of a vibrating tool or dentist's drill are no match for them. Not only did a small admixture of polymers completely eliminate
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Compared to placebo, vitamin D has no benefit for severe asthma attacks
Contrary to earlier observational results, vitamin D supplements do not prevent severe asthma attacks in at-risk children, according to the first placebo-controlled clinical trial to test this relationship.
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Effectiveness of cloth masks depends on type of covering
Months into the COVID-19 pandemic, wearing a mask while out in public has become the recommended practice. However, many still question the effectiveness of this. To allay doubts, Padmanabha Prasanna Simha, from the Indian Space Research Organisation, and Prasanna Simha Mohan Rao, from the Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research, experimentally visualized the flow fields of
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Building mechanical memory boards using origami
Origami can be used to create mechanical, binary switches, and in Applied Physics Letters, researchers report the fabrication of such a paper device, using the Kresling pattern, that can act as a mechanical switch. By putting several together on a single platform, the investigators built a functioning mechanical memory board. They found that oscillating the platform up and down at a certain speed
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Moving bits, not watts
The phrase "too much of a good thing" may sound like a contradiction, but it encapsulates one of the key hurdles preventing the expansion of renewable energy generation. Too much of a service or commodity makes it harder for companies to sell them, so they curtail production.
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Can your smartphone detect how drunk you are?
The legal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit for driving in the U.S is 0.08 percent. You can measure your BAC 15 minutes after your first drink and your levels will remain safe if you consume no more than one standard drink per hour. Portable breathalyzers can be used to measure BAC, but not many people own these devices. A small proof-of-concept study suggests that your smartphone could det
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The Shape-Shifting Squeeze Coolers
After losing his sight to smallpox in 1759 at the age of 2, John Gough developed a heightened sense of touch. The budding naturalist soon learned to identify plants by feel, touching their hairs with his lower lip and their stamens and pistils with his tongue. So when as an adult he quickly stretched a piece of natural rubber and felt its sudden warmth on his lip — and its subsequent coolness as
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An AI Just Confirmed the Existence of 50 Planets By Digging Through NASA Data
A machine learning algorithm just confirmed the existence of 50 new planets. The team behind the algorithm, from Warwick University, fed it huge datasets originating from NASA's now-retired Kepler mission and the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), a space telescope that launched in 2018. The scientists are hoping their research could pave the way for future planet validation techniques
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How zebrafish maintain efficient and fair foraging behaviours
New insight on how zebrafish achieve near-optimal foraging efficiency and fairness among groups has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.
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NASA's terra satellite catches the demise of post-tropical cyclone Marco
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Gulf of Mexico early on Aug. 25 and found a very small area of convection from post-tropical cyclone Marco, northeast of its center. All watches and warnings have been dropped as the storm continues to weaken toward dissipation.
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Tracing the cosmic origin of complex organic molecules with their radiofrequency footprint
The origin of life on Earth is a topic that has piqued human curiosity since probably before recorded history began. But how did the organic matter that constitutes lifeforms even arrive at our planet? Though this is still a subject of debate among scholars and practitioners in related fields, one approach to answering this question involves finding and studying complex organic molecules (COMs) in
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How zebrafish maintain efficient and fair foraging behaviours
New insight on how zebrafish achieve near-optimal foraging efficiency and fairness among groups has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.
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UCF researchers develop AI to detect fentanyl and derivatives remotely
To help keep first responders safe, University of Central Florida researchers have developed an artificial intelligence method that not only rapidly and remotely detects the powerful drug fentanyl, but also teaches itself to detect any previously unknown derivatives made in clandestine batches. The method, published recently in the journal Scientific Reports, uses infrared light spectroscopy and c
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NASA's terra satellite catches the demise of post-tropical cyclone Marco
NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Gulf of Mexico early on Aug. 25 and found a very small area of convection from post-tropical cyclone Marco, northeast of its center. All watches and warnings have been dropped as the storm continues to weaken toward dissipation.
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Vast stone monuments constructed in Arabia 7,000 years ago
In a new study published in The Holocene, researchers from the Max Planck Society in Jena together with Saudi and international collaborators, present the first detailed study of 'mustatil' stone structures in the Arabian Desert. These are vast structures made of stone piled into rectangles, which are some of the oldest large-scale structures in the world. They give insights into how early pastora
6h
Building mechanical memory boards using origami
The ancient Japanese art of paper folding, known as origami, can be used to create mechanical, binary switches.
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Effectiveness of cloth masks depends on type of covering
Months into the COVID-19 pandemic, wearing a mask while out in public has become the recommended practice. However, many still question the effectiveness of this.
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Citizens' adherence to COVID-19 social distancing measures depends on government response
New research finds that while social distancing is an effective preventative measure in the fight against COVID-19, there are significant variations being observed in how and why individuals follow the restrictions in South Korea, North American and Kuwait.
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Affordable and scalable nitrogen dioxide sensor
Scientists have developed a highly sensitive, accurate and affordable carbon-based nitrogen dioxide sensor. The gas sensor could provide accurate readings of the nitrogen dioxide levels in the local environment in an affordable and portable Internet-of-Things device, which could sync with smartphones and applications.
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Research reveals toll of pandemic on those with eating disorders
The COVID-19 pandemic is having a profound, negative impact on nine out of ten people with experience of eating disorders, a new study reveals.
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The tyranny of merit | Michael Sandel
What accounts for our polarized public life, and how can we begin to heal it? Political philosopher Michael Sandel offers a surprising answer: those who have flourished need to look in the mirror. He explores how "meritocratic hubris" leads many to believe their success is their own doing and to look down on those who haven't made it, provoking resentment and inflaming the divide between "winners"
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Confidence eases shift from pediatric to adult care
Increasing young people's confidence in disease self-management could help them transition from pediatric to adult care, according to a new study. Approximately 90% of children diagnosed with a chronic disease now live into adulthood, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. However, many young people who age out of the often nurturing and supportive pediatric health care system struggle
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Why Do Some People Weather Coronavirus Infection Unscathed?
Some scientists are confident that the immune system's aggressive response is only part of the story — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Polymers prevent potentially hazardous mist during dentist visit
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago couldn't stop thinking about the spinning, vibrating tools in a dentist's office that turn water into mist and send it flying into the air. If that mist contains a virus or some other pathogen, it is a health hazard for dentists and patients.
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Accumulating extra genome copies may protect fly brain cells during aging
Scientists have discovered a novel anti-aging defense in the brain cells of adult fruit flies: producing extra copies of the genome, according to a new study published today in eLife.
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Historic California wildfires likely to be fuelled by climate change
For the fourth year in a row, California is experiencing major wildfires – probably because climate change has left the region unusually hot and dry, say researchers
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Accumulating extra genome copies may protect fly brain cells during aging
Scientists have discovered a novel anti-aging defense in the brain cells of adult fruit flies: producing extra copies of the genome, according to a new study published today in eLife.
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Plastics, waste and recycling: It's not just a packaging problem
Discussions of the growing plastic waste problem often focus on reducing the volume of single-use plastic packaging items such as bags, bottles, tubs and films.
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Fifty new planets confirmed in machine learning first
Fifty potential planets have had their existence confirmed by a new machine learning algorithm developed by University of Warwick scientists.
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Tracing the cosmic origin of complex organic molecules with their radiofrequency footprint
How did organic matter reach the Earth in the first place? One way to ponder this question is by observing the distribution and abundance of complex organic molecules in interstellar gas clouds. However, detecting such molecules in the less dense regions of these gas clouds has been challenging. Now, scientists from Japan have found concluding evidence for the presence of a particular complex orga
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Study reveals two major microbial groups can't breathe
A new scientific study has revealed unique life strategies of two major groups of microbes that live below Earth's surface. A publication in Frontiers in Microbiology reports that these groups, originally thought to rely on symbiotic relationships with other organisms, may also live independently and use an ancient mode of energy production.
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How zebrafish maintain efficient and fair foraging behaviours
New insight on how zebrafish achieve near-optimal foraging efficiency and fairness among groups has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.
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Plastics, waste and recycling: It's not just a packaging problem
Discussions of the growing plastic waste problem often focus on reducing the volume of single-use plastic packaging items such as bags, bottles, tubs and films.
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Accumulating extra genome copies may protect fly brain cells during aging
Scientists have discovered a novel anti-aging defence in the brain cells of adult fruit flies: producing extra copies of the genome, according to a new study published today in eLife.
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Scientists: Earth Moving Through Radioactive Debris of Exploded Stars
Scientists have found new evidence that Earth has been moving through the remains of exploded stars for at least the last 33,000 years. In a new study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , a team of Australian researchers describe how they extracted a special isotope of iron called iron-60 from five deep-sea sediment samples using mass spectrometry. That's ill
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'Earth breathing': mountain erosion a missing piece in the climate puzzle
Mountains release the same amount of carbon each year as volcanoes – about 100 megatons – and yet we know very little about the process. Understanding these emissions could tell us more about their effects on climate, both in the past and the future.
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Less is more: A soft, self-actuated pump to simplify mechatronic devices
Modern mechatronic devices, from industrial machinery to robots, have seen a drastic increase in complexity and intricacy. With sophisticated functionalities being unlocked with each passing day, there has been an inevitable rise in the number of components that the devices need. And although these advancements are undeniably impressive, the sheer bulkiness and large number of components are a maj
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Hydrochloric acid boosts catalyst activity
A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) led by chemist Johannes Lercher has developed a synthesis process which drastically increases the activity of catalysts for the desulfurization of crude oil. The new process could perhaps also be used for catalysts in fuel cells.
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Coronavirus/antibody treatments: rapid response
Companies are right to do what they can to expedite another promising therapy
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Eksplosioner på neutronstjerne kan give mere præcist billede af solsystemets dannelse
PLUS. Data for 200.000 termonukleare eksplosioner på neutronstjerner i Mælkevejen er nu samlet i verdens største database inden for området. Det kan give ny viden om, hvordan grundstoffer dannes.
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Study revealing structure of a protein complex may open doors to better disease research
More than two decades ago scientists discovered the Arp2/3 complex, an actin (cellular protein) cytoskeketal nucleator which plays a crucial role in cell division, immune response, neurodevelopment other biological processes. But there has been no determined structure of the activated state of the complex until now, an achievement that may lay the foundation for uncovering its role in biology and
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Study revealing structure of a protein complex may open doors to better disease research
More than two decades ago scientists discovered the Arp2/3 complex, an actin (cellular protein) cytoskeketal nucleator which plays a crucial role in cell division, immune response, neurodevelopment other biological processes. But there has been no determined structure of the activated state of the complex until now, an achievement that may lay the foundation for uncovering its role in biology and
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Self-powered wildfire detector could help prevent deadly blazes
Prototype has not been tested in field, but could be cheaper and easier than current approaches
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Small quake clusters can't hide from AI
Researchers at Rice University's Brown School of Engineering are using data gathered before a deadly 2017 landslide in Greenland to show how deep learning may someday help predict seismic events like earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.
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In sickness and in health
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have shown that for men with major cardiovascular disease risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, their wives are more likely to suffer from the same diseases. These results emphasize the need for extending disease concerns beyond relatives who share ancestry to the patient's spouse. Further, couple-based interventions are desirable f
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UC researchers pinpoint hierarchy of breast cancer cells as potential cause for treatment resistance
In a recent study, published in the journal eLife, University of Cincinnati researchers say it can take cells in different forms or "life stages" to cause cancer to grow and spread.
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New method to track ultrafast change of magnetic state
An international team of physicists from Bielefeld University, Uppsala University, the University of Strasbourg, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, ETH Zurich, and the Free University Berlin have developed a precise method to measure the ultrafast change of a magnetic state in materials. Their study, titled 'Ultrafast terahertz magnetometr
6h
Galactic bar paradox resolved in cosmic dance
New light has been shed on a mysterious and long-standing conundrum at the very heart of our galaxy. The new work offers a potential solution to the so-called 'Galactic bar paradox', whereby different observations produce contradictory estimates of the motion of the central regions of the Milky Way. The results are published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
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Less is more: A soft, self-actuated pump to simplify mechatronic devices
As electromechanical devices become increasingly small and complex, the high number of required components becomes a limiting factor. Now, scientists at Shibaura Institute of Technology, Japan, have tapped into the potential of hydrogels driven by oscillating chemical reactions to create the first self-actuated, single-component pump. This device could act as a practical power source for microflui
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A colorful detector
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba introduced a new type of porous crystal that can indicate the presence of moisture based on a reversible change in color. This research may open the way for many new gas sensors in industrial applications.
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Less "sticky" cells become more cancerous
In cooperation with colleagues from Germany, Italy and the Netherlands, researchers at Leipzig University have investigated the structure of tumour tissue and the behaviour of tumour cells in detail, gaining important insights that could improve cancer diagnosis and therapy in the future.
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Battery life for wearable electronic devices could be improved
Researchers in WMG and the Department of Physics at the University of Warwick have found that asymmetric stresses within electrodes used in certain wearable electronic devices provides an important clue as to how to improve the durability and lifespan of these batteries.
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Hydrochloric acid boosts catalyst activity
A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) led by chemist Johannes Lercher has developed a synthesis process which drastically increases the activity of catalysts for the desulfurization of crude oil. The new process could perhaps also be used for catalysts in fuel cells.
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Confusion over Europe's data-protection law is stalling scientific progress
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02454-7 Two steps will help collaborations worldwide to share information and comply with EU privacy rules.
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The Unending Influence of 'Boys Will Be Boys'
Updated at 1:18 p.m. ET on August 25, 2020. W hen you were 13, a guy you'd never met got a nude photo of you. He demanded that you give him more naked pictures of yourself, or he'd send the one he had to everyone you knew. You did not do what he asked. So he sent out the photo of your naked body to your schoolmates, your friends, your family. Several years ago, a guy began harassing you. He got y
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'From the mundane to the sublime in a second': Samantha Cristoforetti on life in space
Her 200 days in orbit turned the first female Italian astronaut into a celebrity – and the model for a Barbie doll. Back on Earth, she says, it was hard to find authentic relationships There's something surreal about talking to someone who's been to space. Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti might be at home in Cologne while I'm Zooming her from London – but there's still an awareness: those
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Blocking cellular communication stops SARS-CoV-2
In the transmission of signals within the cell which, for example, stimulate cell growth or trigger metabolic processes, phosphate groups play an important biochemical role. The phosphate groups are often attached to proteins or removed to control activity. In this process, a change in the protein triggers the next one and the signal is transmitted in a signaling cascade. The target is usually the
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This Is How Your Brain Responds to Social Influence
I'm a doormat when it comes to peer pressure. Jump off a 32-foot (10 meter) diving board without any experience? Sure! Propel off a cliff my first time outdoor climbing? I'll try! Those were obviously terrible decisions for someone afraid of heights, and each ended with "I really should've known better." But it illustrates a point: it's obvious that our decisions don't solely come from our own ex
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Faster, more efficient energy storage could stem from holistic study of layered materials
A team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory developed a novel, integrated approach to track energy-transporting ions within an ultra-thin material, which could unlock its energy storage potential leading toward faster charging, longer lasting devices.
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Study revealing structure of a protein complex may open doors to better disease research
More than two decades ago scientists discovered the Arp2/3 complex, an actin (cellular protein) cytoskeketal nucleator which plays a crucial role in cell division, immune response, neurodevelopment other biological processes. But there has been no determined structure of the activated state of the complex until now, work led by researchers at Stony Brook University.
7h
New insights into lithium-ion battery failure mechanism
Researchers have identified a potential new degradation mechanism for electric vehicle batteries – a key step to designing effective methods to improve battery lifespan.
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Researchers reversibly disable brain pathway in primates
For the first time ever, neurophysiologists of KU Leuven, Harvard and the University of Kyoto have succeeded in reversibly disabling a connection between two areas in the brains of primates while they were performing cognitive tasks, or while their entire brain activity was being monitored. The disconnection had a negative impact on the motivation of the animals, but not on their learning behaviou
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First review of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 infection models
The first comprehensive review of all relevant animal and cellular models of SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 aims to assist with fast-tracking ongoing research into new preventions and treatments.
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Blocking cellular communication stops SARS-CoV-2
In the transmission of signals within the cell which, for example, stimulate cell growth or trigger metabolic processes, phosphate groups play an important biochemical role. The phosphate groups are often attached to proteins or removed to control activity. In this process, a change in the protein triggers the next one and the signal is transmitted in a signaling cascade. The target is usually the
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Cities: build networks and share plans to emerge stronger from COVID-19
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02459-2 Responses to the pandemic in India's slums, Brazil's favelas and Africa's marketplaces show that networks play a crucial part in making cities more resilient. Let's enhance and empower them.
7h
What is the chemical agent that was reportedly used to poison Russian politician Alexei Navalny?
The medical evacuation of Alexei Navalny, the outspoken political critic of Vladimir Putin who was allegedly poisoned last week, has shed more light on his illness.
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Addressing the urban heat effect in new research report on cooling common spaces
Landcom is excited to release a new report on the urban heat island effect titled "Cooling Common Spaces in Densifying Urban Environments" that offers ways to address the very serious issue of rising heat levels in urban environments.
7h
Historic California wildfires likely fuelled by climate change
For the fourth year in a row, California is experiencing major wildfires – likely because climate change has left the region unusually hot and dry, say researchers
7h
Mineral dust ingested with food leaves characteristic wear on herbivore teeth
In a controlled feeding study of guinea pigs, paleontologists have discovered that mineral dust ingested with food causes distinct signs of wear on the teeth of plant-eating vertebrates, which can differ considerably depending on the type of dust.
7h
High human population density negative for pollinators
Population density, and not the proportion of green spaces, has the biggest impact on species richness of pollinators in residential areas. This is the result of a study from Lund University in Sweden of gardens and residential courtyards in and around Malmö, Sweden.
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Blocking cellular communication stops SARS-CoV-2
Many viruses use and manipulate the communication pathways of their host cells to boost their own replication. Now biochemists and virologists from Goethe University and University Hospital Frankfurt have drawn a complete picture of communication within human cells infected with SARS-CoV-2. In cell culture experiments, the researchers succeeded in stopping virus replication with a series of cancer
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Plant living with only one leaf reveals fundamental genetics of plant growth
Clinging to the walls of tropical caves is a type of plant with a single leaf that continues to grow larger for as long as the plant survives. Researchers at the University of Tokyo hope that their study of this unusual species may help inspire future genetic tools to control the size of common crop plants.
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Scientists prove SARS-CoV-2 potential to infect human brain organoids
SARS-CoV-2 can infect human neural progenitor cells and brain organoids, as shown by researchers from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators from The University of Hong Kong (HKU).
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New study shows evolutionary breakdown of 'social' chromosome in ants
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found that harmful mutations accumulating in the fire ant social chromosome are causing its breakdown.
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Life in a nutshell: New species found in the carapace of late cretaceous marine turtle
Fossils have often been known to tell stories of immobile organisms living in the hard tissues of dead ancient marine animals. Now, scientists from Japan have discovered a new species of extinct bivalves that seem to have lived in a unique habitat: the shell of an ancient, now extinct, leatherback sea turtle while the turtle was alive, which allowed this species to colonize new environments and fa
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Finnish children get to participate in the evaluation of their early childhood education and care
Finnish children have a very positive attitude towards early childhood education and care (ECEC), according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. Published in Early Child Development and Care this August, the study explored children's negative experiences of early childhood education and care. The researchers have published an article on children's positive experiences already ea
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Climate Insights 2020: Climate opinions unchanged by pandemic, but increasingly entrenched
A new survey provides a snapshot of American opinion on climate change as the nation's public health, economy, and social identity are put to the test.
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COVID-19 taking a toll on everyday lives, UC Davis research suggests
Rare research on the effects of a pandemic undertaken during an ongoing disaster shows that COVID-19 has severely affected people's daily emotional lives and mental health.
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Ancient star explosions revealed in the deep sea
A mystery surrounding the space around our solar system is unfolding thanks to evidence of supernovae found in deep-sea sediments.
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Plant living with only one leaf reveals fundamental genetics of plant growth
Clinging to the walls of tropical caves is a type of plant with a single leaf that continues to grow larger for as long as the plant survives. Researchers at the University of Tokyo hope that their study of this unusual species may help inspire future genetic tools to control the size of common crop plants.
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Conceptual model shows why changes in rain may matter more than temperature changes to tropical animals
Precipitation patterns, along with temperature, dictate where tropical forests are distributed around the world. Surprisingly, though, scientists know very little about the direct effects of rainfall on tropical animals.
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Researcher puts a number on man's best friend
Here's a question for you: How much is your dog's life worth?
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Recently discovered planets not as safe from stellar flares as first thought
A nearby star, the host of two (and possibly three) planets, was initially thought to be quiet and boring. These attributes are sought-after as they create a safe environment for their planets, especially those that may be in what scientists call "the habitable zone" where liquid water could exist on their surfaces and life might be possible. But astronomers at Arizona State University have announ
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Five ways to support new parents returning to work during the pandemic
Returning to work after having a baby is highly taxing under normal circumstances, but it's especially tough now. Returning parents currently face a triple whammy of readjusting to work, sorting out childcare and coping with pandemic-related restrictions that weren't there when they went on leave.
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Survey of mustatils shows them to be some of the oldest stone structures in the world
An international team of researchers has conducted one of the most intense studies of mustatils to date, and in so doing, have found them to be some of the oldest stone structures in the world. In their paper published in the journal The Holocene, the group describes their study of the unique structures and what they learned about them.
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Physicists pin down the pay off between speed and entropy
"You have to work harder to get the job done faster," explains Gianmaria Falasco, a researcher at the University of Luxembourg as he sums up the results of his latest work with Massimiliano Esposito. This will come as no surprise to anyone with any experience of racing around trying to meet appointments and deadlines, but by defining specific parameters for the relation between work expended in te
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Climate change and the challenge of community relocation
Climate change will profoundly affect how people move and where people live. Coastal communities, home to approximately 40% of the U.S. population, face the prospect of continuing sea level rise. Inland areas are not immune, faced as they are with the potential for flooding rivers and the prospect of wetter, slower-moving storms like hurricanes Harvey and Florence. Melting permafrost and increasin
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Mineral dust ingested with food leaves characteristic wear on herbivore teeth
Mineral dust ingested with food causes distinct signs of wear on the teeth of plant-eating vertebrates, which can differ considerably depending on the type of dust. This is what paleontologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have discovered in a controlled feeding study of guinea pigs. As they report in the current issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the Unite
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Plant living with only one leaf reveals fundamental genetics of plant growth
Clinging to the walls of tropical caves is a type of plant with a single leaf that continues to grow larger for as long as the plant survives. Researchers at the University of Tokyo hope that their study of this unusual species may help inspire future genetic tools to control the size of common crop plants.
7h
New method to track ultrafast change of magnetic state
An international team of physicists from Bielefeld University, Uppsala University, the University of Strasbourg, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, ETH Zurich, and the Free University Berlin have developed a precise method to measure the ultrafast change of a magnetic state in materials. They do this by observing the emission of terahertz
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Conceptual model shows why changes in rain may matter more than temperature changes to tropical animals
Precipitation patterns, along with temperature, dictate where tropical forests are distributed around the world. Surprisingly, though, scientists know very little about the direct effects of rainfall on tropical animals.
7h
A new generation of synchrotron
Inside the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility's 844-meter-diameter storage ring, electrons traveling at almost the speed of light produce some of the brightest X-ray beams in the world. These X-rays can reveal the position and motions of atoms in all kinds of matter. Seven of the facility's 44 beamlines are dedicated to structural biology research and run under the auspices of an EMBL-ESRF pa
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Gemini Observatory images reveal striking details of comet NEOWISE
When Comet NEOWISE (C/2020 F3) sped through the inner Solar System during the middle of 2020, astronomers and the general public watched in awe as this "dirty snowball" shed gas and dust into space, producing a striking show visible to the naked eye. Close-up observations, led by Michal Drahus and Piotr Guzik of Jagiellonian University in Krakow, used the international Gemini Observatory, a Progra
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Buldrer gennem fiberoptisk mur: Sender 178 terabit i sekundet
En forskningsgruppe fra UCL i London er lykkedes med at sende data med 178 terabit i sekundet med et konventionelt fiberoptisk kabel. Den nye britiske verdensrekord cementerer et teknologiskift, der har været undervejs i ti år.
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New insights into lithium-ion battery failure mechanism
Researchers have identified a potential new degradation mechanism for electric vehicle batteries—a key step to designing effective methods to improve battery lifespan.
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Physicists discover new two-dimensional material
University of Arkansas scientists are part of an international team that has discovered a two-dimensional ferroelectric material just two atoms thick.
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Beyond chip-and-PIN: Graphene's quick, hygienic solution to restaurant payment
A new graphene-based contactless payment system, developed in collaboration with the University of Manchester, has begun a restaurant pilot that could pave the way for the end of chip-and-PIN, cutting customer wait-time and reducing the risk of infectious transmission.
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Researcher puts a number on man's best friend
Here's a question for you: How much is your dog's life worth?
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Betesdjurens storlek påverkar växternas näringstillgång
Den genomsnittliga kroppsstorleken hos de vilda djur som betar i ett landskap påverkar balansen mellan de näringsämnen som växtligheten kan utnyttja. Det visar en savannstudie gjord av ett forskarlag lett av Joris Cromsigt från SLU. Växtnäringsbalansen, särskilt förhållandet mellan kväve och fosfor, bestämmer i sin tur växtlighetens produktivitet. Spillning från växtätare är en viktig källa till
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How to fix that annoying audio delay on your soundbar
No amount of angrily button-mashing the remote is going to fix this. (JESHOOTS.com/Pexels/) If you're unsatisfied with the quiet, tinny sound coming from your TV's speakers, a soundbar can seriously improve your movie-watching experience . But while most soundbars are space-efficient and easy to hook up, they still have an occasional quirk or two—most notably an audio delay that causes dialogue t
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One step closer to earlier diagnosis of bipolar disorder and psychoses
In a new study from the Danish psychiatry project iPSYCH, researchers have identified genetic risk factors for developing bipolar disorder and psychoses among people with depression. In the longer term, the results may contribute to ensuring the correct diagnosis is made earlier, so that the patients can receive the correct treatment as quickly as possible.
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Studying water polo for kicks
Scientists at the University of Tsukuba monitored the motion and forces associated with the "eggbeater" kick of water polo players. They find higher efficiency than expected, which may lead to new water propulsion methods.
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Before eyes open, they get ready to see?
A KAIST research team's computational simulations demonstrated that the waves of spontaneous neural activity in the retinas of still-closed eyes in mammals develop long-range horizontal connections in the visual cortex during early developmental stages.
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The secret life of melons revealed: "Jumping sequences" may alter gene expression
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found in a comparison of melon genomes that retrotransposons (a.k.a. "jumping sequences") may affect gene expression. Fruit ripening physiology varies widely in melons, and retrotransposons may have contributed to changes in gene expression as melon genomes diversified. Some retrotransposon sequences were transcriptionally induced under heat stress,
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Magnetic stimulation dramatically improves fecal incontinence
Painless magnetic stimulation of nerves that regulate muscles in the anus and rectum appears to improve their function and dramatically reduce episodes of fecal incontinence, a debilitating problem affecting about 10% of the population, investigators report.
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Scientists catalogue shark and ray distribution in Florida lagoon
A study is the first long-term, in-depth analysis of the elasmobranch community in Florida's Indian River Lagoon and develops capacity to understand how these species may respond to further environmental changes. From 2016 to 2018, researchers caught 630 individuals of 16 species, including two critically endangered smalltooth sawfish. Results showed that many elasmobranchs use the southern Indian
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Small quake clusters can't hide from AI
A deep learning algorithm developed at Rice University analyzes data from a deadly landslide in Greenland to show how it may someday predict seismic events like earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.
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Fresh tumor biopsies in world-first technique for cancer treatments
An innovative technique to improve cancer treatments using tumour biopsies less than 30 minutes after they're taken has been developed at The University of Queensland.
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Teamwork can make the 5G dream work: A collaborative system architecture for 5G networks
A research team led by Prof Jeongho Kwak from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) has designed a novel system architecture where collaboration between cloud service providers and mobile network operators plays a central role. Such a collaborative architecture would allow for optimizing the use of network, computing, and storage resources, thereby unlocking the potential of
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Scientists create protein models to explore toxic methylmercury formation
A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory created a computational model of the proteins responsible for the transformation of mercury to toxic methylmercury, marking a step forward in understanding how the reaction occurs and how mercury cycles through the environment.
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What new research reveals about rude workplace emails
With the advent of the coronavirus pandemic and remote work on the rise, the sheer volume of email exchanges has skyrocketed. Electronic communication is efficient, but it's also distant and detached, and often can be rude.
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Nanoengineered biosensors for early disease detection
University of Queensland researchers have developed biosensors that use nanoengineered porous gold which more effectively detect early signs of disease, improving patient outcomes.
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Scientists create protein models to explore toxic methylmercury formation
A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory created a computational model of the proteins responsible for the transformation of mercury to toxic methylmercury, marking a step forward in understanding how the reaction occurs and how mercury cycles through the environment.
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Supercomputer helps scientists find new features, mechanisms in tornadoes
At their most extreme, supercell thunderstorms—those with persistent rotating updrafts—can spawn tornadoes, causing widespread devastation.
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New imaging technique helps resolve nanodomains, chemical composition in cell membranes
For those not involved in chemistry or biology, picturing a cell likely brings to mind several discrete, blob-shaped objects; maybe the nucleus, mitochondria, ribosomes and the like.
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50 new planets confirmed in machine learning first
Fifty potential planets have been confirmed by a new machine learning algorithm developed by University of Warwick scientists.
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Galactic bar paradox resolved in cosmic dance
New light has been shed on a mysterious and long-standing conundrum at the very heart of our galaxy. The new work offers a potential solution to the so-called "Galactic bar paradox," whereby different observations produce contradictory estimates of the motion of the central regions of the Milky Way. The results are published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
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A colorful detector
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have developed a new kind of color-shifting crystalline material that can be used to indicate the presence of water. The change in hue is dramatic enough to be gaged by the unaided human eye. This work could lead to the creation of highly sensitive "vapochromic" sensors that can show if a particular gas or water vapor is present without the need for externa
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Researchers develop new system to conduct accurate telomere profiling in less than 3 hours
The plastic tips attached to the ends of shoelaces keep them from fraying. Telomeres are repetitive DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) sequences that serve a similar function at the end of chromosomes, protecting its accompanying genetic material against genome instability, preventing cancers and regulating the aging process.
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Potential of achieving climate target with bioenergy is limited
Large-scale implementation of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) is often considered to be an important measure to reach the climate targets set out in the Paris Agreement. A new study from researchers at Radboud University, Utrecht University and the PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency shows, however, that over a period of 30 years, BECCS can only play a modest role. Ev
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Researchers develop new system to conduct accurate telomere profiling in less than 3 hours
The plastic tips attached to the ends of shoelaces keep them from fraying. Telomeres are repetitive DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) sequences that serve a similar function at the end of chromosomes, protecting its accompanying genetic material against genome instability, preventing cancers and regulating the aging process.
7h
High human population density negative for pollinators
Population density, and not the proportion of green spaces, has the biggest impact on species richness of pollinators in residential areas. This is the result of a study from Lund University in Sweden of gardens and residential courtyards in and around Malmö, Sweden.
7h
Wahoo Fitness Kickr Smart Trainer Review: Brings the Backroads Indoors
The newest update to this smart bicycle trainer improves—and futureproofs—the indoor riding experience.
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How students learn from their mistakes
An fMRI-based study of error-monitoring shows that students who are focused on monitoring their own learning process, rather than on getting right answers, learn better over time.
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What defunding the police could mean for missing persons
In the wake of sustained protests and calls to defund police forces, cities across North America have been busily engaging in police reform.
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High human population density negative for pollinators
Population density, and not the proportion of green spaces, has the biggest impact on species richness of pollinators in residential areas. This is the result of a study from Lund University in Sweden of gardens and residential courtyards in and around Malmö, Sweden.
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Four new open clusters detected in the Cygnus Cloud
By analyzing the data from ESA's Gaia satellite, Chinese astronomers have discovered four new open clusters in the Cygnus Nebula Cloud. The newfound clusters, designated QC1 to QC 4, are located between 4,100 and 7,600 light-years away. The finding is reported in a paper published August 17 on arXiv.org.
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NUS researchers develop new system for accurate telomere profiling in less than 3 hours
The novel STAR assay developed by NUS researchers can be used to rapidly determine telomere dysregulation in cancers and age-related diseases in clinical settings. This helps clinicians to make faster diagnosis and plan targeted treatments for patients.
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Beating noise via superposition of order
Information can successfully be transmitted through noisy channels using quantum mechanics, according to new research from The University of Queensland and Griffith University.We all know it's impossible to take a picture through thick smoke or fog–physicists would say, 'it's impossible to send information through a completely noisy channel'.
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Pot of gold engineered to help with early disease detection
University of Queensland researchers have developed biosensors that use nanoengineered porous gold which more effectively detect early signs of disease, potentially improving patient outcomes.
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Ancient mammoth ivory carving technology reconstructed by archeologists
A team of archeologists from Siberian Federal University and Novosibirsk State University provided a detailed reconstruction of a technology that was used to carve ornaments and sculptures from mammoth ivory. The team studied a string of beads and an ancient animal figurine found at the Paleolithic site of Ust-Kova in Krasnoyarsk Territory. Over 20 thousand years ago its residents used drills, cut
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Scientists Are Racing to Develop Paper-Based Tests for Covid-19
Inexpensive—and potentially at-home—tools could take only minutes to tell if someone is infected
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Yes, it's been raining a lot, but that doesn't mean Australia's drought has broken
Heavy rain in parts of Australia in recent months has raised hopes Australia's protracted drought is finally over. But determining whether a region has recovered from drought is a complex undertaking.
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4 reasons why a gas-led economic recovery is a terrible, naïve idea
Australia's leading scientists today sent an open letter to Chief Scientist Alan Finkel, speaking out against his support for natural gas.
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Ultrasensitive measurements keep tabs on nuclear explosions
Imagine being able to detect the faintest of radionuclide signals from hundreds of miles away.
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Study finds urbanization means different things to different watersheds
Prior to urbanization, the natural landscape and climate determined how much water flowed into streams and rivers. Urban development now dramatically affects how much and where water flows, but Civil and Environmental Engineering Assistant Professor Aditi Bhaskar has found changes to streamflow vary significantly from city to city.
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Filling in the blanks: How supercomputing can aid high-resolution X-ray imaging
Scientists are preparing for the increased brightness and resolution of next-generation light sources with a computing technique that reconstructs images faster and with more precision.
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New book on sport marriages details systemic subordination of women
In a new book based on nearly 30 years of study, Oregon State University researcher Steven M. Ortiz delves into the marital realities facing women married to professional athletes, including infidelity, sexism and a significant power imbalance in their relationships.
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Natural disasters must be unusual or deadly to prompt local climate policy change, study finds
Natural disasters alone are not enough to motivate local communities to engage in climate change mitigation or adaptation, a new study from Oregon State University found.
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New study shows evolutionary breakdown of 'social' chromosome in ants
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found that harmful mutations accumulating in the fire ant social chromosome are causing its breakdown.
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New study shows evolutionary breakdown of 'social' chromosome in ants
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found that harmful mutations accumulating in the fire ant social chromosome are causing its breakdown.
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Transparent near-infrared light-emitting diodes
NUS researchers have developed transparent, near-infrared-light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that could be integrated into the displays of smart watches, smart phones and augmented or virtual reality devices.
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Pristine space rock offers NASA scientists peek at evolution of life's building blocks
During a 2012 expedition to Antarctica, a team of Japanese and Belgian researchers picked up a small rock that appeared coal black against the snow white. Now known as meteorite Asuka 12236, it was roughly the size of a golf ball.
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Researchers develop essential road map to drive down vehicle emissions
Ground transportation is responsible for almost a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions globally—and account for about 40 percent of emissions in British Columbia.
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Ancient star explosions revealed in the deep sea
A mystery surrounding the space around our solar system is unfolding thanks to evidence of supernovae found in deep-sea sediments.
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Scientists get atomistic picture of platinum catalyst degradation
Degradation of platinum, used as a key electrode material in the hydrogen economy, severely shortens the lifetime of electrochemical energy conversion devices, such as fuel cells. For the first time, scientists elucidated the movements of the platinum atoms that lead to catalyst surface degradation. Their results are published today in Nature Catalysis.
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Storing information in antiferromagnetic materials
Researchers at Mainz University have shown that information can be stored in antiferromagnetic materials and to measure the efficiency of the writing operation
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Computers excel in chemistry class
Machine learning models can rapidly and accurately estimate key chemical parameters related to molecular reactivity.
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Laptop docking stations that increase your connection capabilities
Now's the time to upgrade your work station. (Amazon/) If you live and work on the go, a desktop probably isn't the right type of computer for you. Still, a laptop can have its limits. With a docking station, you can augment your laptop's options for charging devices, connecting to monitors, and more. Most laptops no longer come with ethernet ports, HDMI ports, or other specialized options like S
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Preparing For the Vaccine Results
So let's take a few minutes to think about what happens when the vaccine trials start to read out. I'm making the assumption that the data will be freely available in a timely manner (which means before any decisions are made), because the alternative to that is Not Real Good. Another not-real-good alternative would be to declare the first one to read out the instant winner, because ( as noted by
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Small dishwashers that fit in almost any kitchen
Keep it all clean with a small footprint. (Brooke Lark via Unsplash /) If your apartment comes with a dishwasher, you feel like you won the lottery. No more long nights or gross sponges, trying to avoid dirty dishes in your sink. But if it doesn't, you still have a few options. Luckily for those without a built-in one, you have a few small, portable dishwashers available for purchase. Here are ou
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Dish drying racks you'll actually want to display in the kitchen
Soak and air dry. (Catt Liu via Unsplash/) Doing the dishes may be a necessary evil, but the tools you use don't have to also bring you down. Lots of drying racks are eyesores, made from bamboo that easily molds, or unpolished steel that frequently rusts. It doesn't have to be that way—we've chosen our favorite stylish looking dish drying racks, that will actually boost the ambience of your kitch
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The Star Trek Tricorder Gets Raspberry Pi'd: Behold the Picorder!
Efforts to build a Star Trek tricorder-like device have been ongoing for at least a decade or two now, with various individuals and organizations contributing their own idea to the concept. For those of you who aren't Star Trek fans: A tricorder is a small, handheld device capable of determining various types of information about the local environment. In science fiction terms, this often takes t
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Hubble Spots Supernova Blast Wave 2,400 Light Years Away
The Hubble Space Telescope has provided some amazing views of the universe. It's easy to become complacent after seeing so many remarkable images, but Hubble can still wow us after 30 years. In a recent observation, the aging space telescope captured the expanding edge of a supernova blast wave. Yes, that luminous wave above is real, though it may look like something from Star Trek. This barrier
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Tesla biopic, starring Ethan Hawke: eccentric portrayal
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02457-4 The inventor of alternating current, motors and more is back — and this time, he sings.
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Racism in academia, and why the 'little things' matter
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02471-6 Subtle biases and structural inequalities need challenging just like overt acts of racial aggression and discrimination.
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Why do Covid fatalities seem steady when infection numbers are rising?
While some scientists believe the virus has become less deadly, others look at the factors that suggest otherwise Are Covid-19 death rates decreasing? Most statistics indicate that although cases of Covid-19 are rising in many parts of Europe and the United States, the number of deaths and cases of severe complications remain relatively low. For example, patients on ventilators have dropped from
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Sandfodring: Danmark risikerer EU-sag om skader på laks og stavsild
PLUS. Danmarks Naturfredningsforening (DN) bebuder, at man vil gå til EU-Kommissionen, fordi statens sandfodring ved den jyske vestkyst kan skade laks og stavsild. Miljøstyrelsen mener, at det er nok at lave kompenserende foranstaltninger for de to følsomme arter.
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Legacy
Breastfeeding secures delivery of sugar and fat for milk production by changing the insulin sensitivity of organs that supply or demand these nutrients, a new study led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. The findings, published in this month's print issue of Diabetes, could explain how different tissues cooperate to start and maintain lactation and offer strategies to help improve breastfeedi
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Entangled Life — of mushrooms, magic and more
Fungi are only the tip of complex networks that we are barely beginning to understand
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Colgate Hum Review: A Smart Toothbrush That Nails App-Guided Brushing
The smart toothbrush perfects connected brushing tech—and costs a fraction of the price of its competitors.
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A Dogfight Renews Concerns About AI's Lethal Potential
Alphabet's DeepMind pioneered reinforcement learning. A California company used it to create an algorithm that defeated an F-16 pilot in a simulation.
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Is Your Chart a Detective Story? Or a Police Report?
Every data visualization is a story, a plot to be unraveled—but some are more approachable than others.
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The Battle for the Future of the GOP Is No Contest
T im Scott stood in front of a row of American flags in a stately, COVID-emptied Washington, D.C., auditorium, talking about family. The South Carolina Republican explained that his grandfather, who grew up in the segregated South and never learned to read or write, had to cross the street if a white person was passing his way. Scott leaned to the left to represent the discrimination his grandfat
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Supernova Mass Extinction
Over the history of life on Earth there have been many extinction events, but the top 5 mass extinctions are the big ones. Fortunately, such events don't happen often. Understanding what caused these massive die-offs is inherently interesting, just so that we better understand the world, but might also provide some insight into potential future threats. A recent study suggests an interesting pote
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Covid vaccine tracker: when will we have a coronavirus vaccine?
More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progress Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…
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How David Ojcius and Jie Yan solved Leptospirosis
Beware of Chinese collaborators bearing gift authorships!
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AI thrashes human fighter pilot 5-0 in simulated F-16 dogfights
In the first contest of its kind, artificial intelligence has taken on a trained US Air Force pilot in a simulation of air-to-air combat. The AI defeated the human with ease, winning 5-0
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Common dolphins may finally be returning to the Adriatic sea
The common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) was regionally extinct in the Adriatic Sea for 40 years, but there now appear to be four individuals living in the region
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Some of America's favorite produce crops may need to get a move on by 2045
New research from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) shows that by the years 2045-2049 future temperatures will have more of an effect on when cool-season crops, such as broccoli and lettuce, can be grown than on where, while for warm-season crops (cantaloupe, tomatoes, carrots) the impact will be greater for where they can be grown versus when.
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Measles outbreaks in Niger linked to rainfall and temperature, study finds
Rainfall and temperature drive agricultural activity, which, in turn, influences patterns of measles outbreaks in the West African nation of Niger, according to an international team of researchers. The findings may be useful for improving vaccine coverage for seasonally mobile populations within Niger and other countries.
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First case of coronavirus reinfection leaves big questions unanswered
A man appears to have caught two lineages of the coronavirus around four and a half months apart, suggesting people can be reinfected with the virus after making a recovery – but there is much we still don't know
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Hospital indkalder narkoseoverlæge til tjenstlig samtale
Overlæge på Regionshospitalet Silkeborg risikerer fyring efter kritiske mails til hospitalsledelsen.
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The Platform the GOP Is Too Scared to Publish
R epublicans have decided not to publish a party platform for 2020. This omission has led some to conclude that the GOP lacks ideas, that it stands for nothing, that it has shriveled to little more than a Trump cult. This conclusion is wrong. The Republican Party of 2020 has lots of ideas. I'm about to list 13 ideas that command almost universal assent within the Trump administration, within the
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A Huge Covid-19 Natural Experiment Is Underway—in Classrooms
As K-12 students head back to school, epidemiologists are watching for clues about how kids spread the virus, and what can stop it.
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How to Undo Gender Stereotypes in Math—With Math!
A mathematician uses her craft to unravel arguments about differences between men and women.
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Amazon and FedEx Push to Put Delivery Robots on Your Sidewalk
The companies are backing bills in more than a dozen states that would legalize the devices. Some bills would block cities from regulating them at all.
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India Is in Denial about the COVID-19 Crisis
The country is headed for disaster as the pandemic devastates health services and livelihoods — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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No review of face mask rules in English schools, says minister
Alok Sharma says there are no plans to look again at guidance despite Scottish pupils being asked to wear coverings Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The business secretary, Alok Sharma, has said there are no plans to review the wearing of face masks in English schools despite a plea from headteachers. The Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), a trade union
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'Warp Speed' COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts Aim for Diverse Volunteers and Long-Lasting Protection
The Trump administration's Operation Warp Speed program is backing six efforts with the ambitious goal of delivering an effective vaccine by January — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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'Please Don't Convert to Whiteness'
Johann N. Neem was born in India. Before he turned 3, his parents immigrated from Mumbai to San Francisco, part of the first wave of newcomers admitted to the United States after the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965. He didn't feel any conflict between his immigrant identity and his American identity. He grew up surrounded by other recent immigrants, joining their families for trips into B
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Preparing Your Mind for Uncertain Times
This is a time of questions without answers. Will I get infected? When will there be a vaccine? Is my job secure? When will life be normal again? The experts may have guesses, or estimates, for some of these quandaries but there is no certainty, and this drives us nuts. Humans abhor uncertainty, and will do just about anything to avoid it, even choosing a known bad outcome over an unknown but pos
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My Son Is Looking to Me for Answers—And I Don't Have Them Anymore
A s I tucked my 5-year-old son into bed one evening this past spring, drained of all my energy and ideas, I turned to him in exhaustion: "What do you want to learn tomorrow?" The act of desperation, brought on by months of unexpectedly homeschooling my children, became something more. Every night since, I have given him the same prompt. And my wide-eyed son has countered with life's biggest quest
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'Warp Speed' COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts Aim for Diverse Volunteers and Long-Lasting Protection
The Trump administration's Operation Warp Speed program is backing six efforts with the ambitious goal of delivering an effective vaccine by January — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The U.S. Is Facing the Possibility of a Truly Illegitimate Election
On Election Day, 1888, approximately one hour after the last vote was cast, four masked men burst into a polling place in Plumerville, Arkansas. Waving pistols and shouting threats, they forced election officials against a wall, seized the ballot box, and disappeared on horseback into the rainy night. There was nothing random about the heist. Plumerville was a Republican stronghold, a mostly Blac
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Coronavirus: Dr Anthony Fauci warns against rushing out vaccine
US President Donald Trump reportedly is considering skipping regulatory steps to get out a vaccine.
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Hong Kong reports 'first case' of virus reinfection
Experts say no conclusions on immunity can be drawn from one patient – and larger studies are needed.
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Bletchley Park: New crisis for code-breaking hub
The chief executive of the Bletchley Park Trust says it is struggling to survive.
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Rio Tinto bosses lose bonuses over Aboriginal cave destruction
Executives at the mining giant Rio Tinto have had their payouts cut over the culturally important site.
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Storbritannien kørte 55 dage uden kul
Den 12. august sluttede den næstlængste kulfrie periode i Storbritannien. Med undtagelse af en kulfri periode tidligere i år er det den længste, siden landet kastede sig over kullet under 1800-tallets industrielle revolution.
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Anger Can Build a Better World
R acism is alive in our society. It lives in store aisles, discriminatory 911 calls, policing, the racial wealth gap, and asymmetrical government responses to communities afflicted by COVID-19. Through protest, diverse voices are boldly standing up to racial injustice. And they are expressing anger while doing it. This rage is not a distraction, nor is it destructive to American ideals. It is pla
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The Conspiracy Theory to Rule Them All
Photography by Tereza Zelenkova T he modern world's most consequential conspiracy text was barely noticed when it first appeared in a little-read Russian newspaper in 1903. The message of The Protocols of the Elders of Zion is straightforward, and terrifying: The rise of liberalism had provided Jews with the tools to destroy institutions—the nobility, the church, the sanctity of marriage—whole. S
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Duke engineering prof corrects seven papers for failures to disclose startup he co-founded
A chemistry journal has issued corrections for seven papers after learning that one of the authors failed to list his ownership of a company with a stake in the research. The articles, which appeared in Lab on a Chip — a journal "at the interface between physical technological advancements and high impact applications" from the … Continue reading
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Er brint fremtiden? Dansk bil-teknologi kan gøre brintbiler billigere
Den nye katalysator er stadig i laboratoriet, men kan få afgørende betydning for brintbiler.
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Africa to be declared free of polio
Announcement that Nigeria is clear will mark milestone in global fight against infectious disease
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Should pregnant people not drink coffee? The answer is complicated.
Drinking coffee while pregnant has long been considered safe (Fallon Michael/Unsplash/) Pregnant people and their healthcare team should be paying more attention to coffee consumption: that's one of the messages of a new meta-analysis that builds the case that ingesting any amount of caffeine is associated with negative pregnancy outcomes. But studying coffee consumption is more complicated than
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Färre "mellanrum" i livet ökar risk för ohälsa
Mellanrummen, tiden för återhämtning på jobbet och hemma, minskar i det moderna, digitala arbetslivet. På sikt kan det drabba vår hälsa negativt, enligt Ulf Ericsson, lektor i arbets- och organisationspsykologi vid Lunds universitet. Han och kollegan Pär Pettersson, Högskolan Kristianstad, har nyligen presenterat sina forskningsresultat i tidskiften Arbetsliv i omvandling.
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How Wildfire Crew Camps Are Dealing With Covid-19
With closely packed conditions and limited medical care, wildfire crew camps are notorious for the spread of infectious disease. In response to Covid-19, officials launched new procedures, including keeping crews isolated for the entire season and bringing medical experts on board. Are their plans working?
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Oleandrin: Trump allies pitch extract from poisonous plant to fight Covid
Experts raise concern over compound that has not been proven safe but could reach public as dietary supplement Allies of Donald Trump have promoted a plant extract called oleandrin to people seeking to ward off Covid-19. The plant the extract is derived from, oleander, is poisonous and there is no proof the compound is either safe or effective to treat or prevent Covid-19, experts say. But unlike
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Has England learned any lessons from the first wave of coronavirus? | Philip Ball
There's still a long way to go to prepare for a winter surge. But the country is no longer as vulnerable as it was in March No one knows what the next months hold, but suggestions that Britain will be back to normal by Christmas seem unlikely. Already, Leicester , Greater Manchester and Preston have enforced local lockdowns after registering rises in Covid-19 cases, while increases in Spain and G
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Covid-19 Live Updates: Colleges are Suspending Students Over Virus Safety Violations
More than 500 cases have surfaced at the University of Alabama's Tuscaloosa campus since classes resumed Wednesday. Uganda recalled its ambassador to Denmark after she was accused of plotting to steal funds earmarked to fight the pandemic.
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Long-term threat to Mauritius ecology after spill: Japan experts
The major oil spill caused by a Japanese ship that ran aground in Mauritius may pose a long-term threat to the region's ecology, including to the Indian Ocean island's delicate mangroves, Japanese experts said Tuesday.
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Inspirationsföreläsning gör nyblivna föräldrar tryggare
Känsla av mer kontroll under förlossningen, ökad kvalitet i parrelationen och förmåga att känna hanterbarhet i livet. Det är några av de positiva effekter som barnmorskors inspirationsföreläsningar för blivande föräldrar har. Det konstaterar forskare vid Högskolan i Skövde och Högskolan Väst. Nu har forskningsstudien även publicerats internationellt. Inspirationsföreläsningarna fungerar som ett k
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The engines of the Internet, digital nature, and colour from shrimp to cyborg: Books in brief
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02458-3 Andrew Robinson reviews five of the week's best science picks.
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A toxic trio of parental problems strongly linked to childhood sexual abuse
A new study has found that adults who had parents who struggled with substance dependence, intimate partner violence and mental illness are more than 10 times more likely to have been victims of childhood sexual abuse than those whose parents did not have these problems, once age and race are taken into account.
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Stronger together in the microbiome: How gut microbes feed each other to overcome dietary deficiencies, change host behavior, and improve reproduction
To study how the microbiome affects their host behavior, a group of researchers at the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, in Lisbon – Portugal, used the fruit fly combined with high-tech tools to show that two gut bacteria establish a metabolic cross-feeding that enables them to grow in diets that lack the nutrients that are essential for their growth and to allow them to change host decision ma
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Reduced serial dependence suggests deficits in synaptic potentiation in anti-NMDAR encephalitis and schizophrenia
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18033-3 Stein, Barbosa et al. show that anti-NMDAR encephalitis and schizophrenia are characterized by reduced serial dependence in spatial working memory. Cortical network simulations show that this can be parsimoniously explained by a reduction in NMDAR-dependent short-term synaptic potentiation in these diseases.
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Author Correction: Distinct thalamocortical network dynamics are associated with the pathophysiology of chronic low back pain
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18191-4
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Coordination engineering of iridium nanocluster bifunctional electrocatalyst for highly efficient and pH-universal overall water splitting
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18064-w Water electrolysis offers a promising energy conversion technology, although there is still a need to understand the catalysis on the atomic-level. Here, the authors report Ir nanoclusters coordinated with both N and S as an efficient and pH-universal electrocatalyst for overall water splitting.
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Spatially selective manipulation of cells with single-beam acoustical tweezers
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18000-y Acoustical tweezers can exert forces several orders of magnitude greater than optical tweezers but the absence of spatial selectivity and their limited resolution has prevented their use for many applications in microbiology. Here the authors perform spatially selective contactless manipulation and positioning
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Activation of subnanometric Pt on Cu-modified CeO2 via redox-coupled atomic layer deposition for CO oxidation
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18076-6 Improving low-temperature activity and noble-metal efficiency remains a challenge for next generation exhaust catalysts. Here, the authors achieve the activation of subnanometric Pt on Cu-modified CeO2 for low-temperature CO oxidation with an onset below room temperature.
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KIN10 promotes stomatal development through stabilization of the SPEECHLESS transcription factor
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18048-w Stomata development in plants is tightly regulated by developmental and environmental cues. Here the authors show that the energy-sensing SnRK1 complex promotes stomatal development by phosphorylating the SPEECHLESS transcription factor thereby connecting energy signalling and stomatal development.
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Origin and cross-species transmission of bat coronaviruses in China
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17687-3 Bats are a likely reservoir of zoonotic coronaviruses (CoVs). Here, analyzing bat CoV sequences in China, the authors find that alpha-CoVs have switched hosts more frequently than betaCoVs, identify a bat family and genus that are highly involved in host-switching, and define hotspots of CoV evolutionary diver
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A broad-spectrum virus- and host-targeting peptide against respiratory viruses including influenza virus and SARS-CoV-2
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17986-9 Here Zhao et al. report a promising broad-spectrum antiviral alkaline peptide—P9R—that is active against several respiratory, pH-dependent viruses, including Influenza and SARS-CoV-2. P9R interferes with virus internalization by binding to the virus and subsequent inhibition of endosomal acidification.
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Participation-washing could be the next dangerous fad in machine learning
The AI community is finally waking up to the fact that machine learning can cause disproportionate harm to already oppressed and disadvantaged groups. We have activists and organizers to thank for that. Now, machine-learning researchers and scholars are looking for ways to make AI more fair, accountable, and transparent—but also, recently, more participatory. One of the most exciting and well-att
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Risk factors for retinopathy in hemodialysis patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus
Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70998-9
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New water-soluble colorimetric pH and metal ione sensor based on graphene quantum dot modified with alizarine red S
Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70821-5
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The α2 Na+/K+-ATPase isoform mediates LPS-induced neuroinflammation
Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71027-5 The α 2 Na + /K + -ATPase isoform mediates LPS-induced neuroinflammation
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Plasma cell-free DNA methylation marks for episodic memory impairment: a pilot twin study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71239-9
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Haptic sound-localisation for use in cochlear implant and hearing-aid users
Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70379-2
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Genomic profiling of the transcription factor Zfp148 and its impact on the p53 pathway
Scientific Reports, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70824-2
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Minister vil øge kontrollen med Energinets store infrastruktur-projekter
PLUS. Allerede i år vil klimaministeren ændre loven om Energinet for at sikre transparens og åbenhed om selskabets investeringer.
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Tufft för behovsanställda när företagen vill ha flexibilitet
Sedan 1990-talet har allt fler i Sverige en tidsbegränsad anställning. De som kallas in när arbetsgivaren ser ett kortvarigt behov har ökat markant. Men de behovsanställda betalar ett högt pris för arbetsgivarens önskan om flexibilitet. De har svårt att planera sina liv och många upplever ekonomisk stress. Sociologen Johan Alfonsson har i sin avhandling vid Göteborgs universitet undersökt vad som
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How to build on Britain's economic recovery
A resurgence of the virus could still stop it in its tracks
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Miljarder från EU:s jordbruksstöd hamnar fel
En ny studie har i detalj analyserat hur EU-stödet till lantbrukare fördelas. Resultaten visar att utbetalningarna oftast går till redan rika lantbrukare som dessutom genererar både störst växthusgasutsläpp och skada för den biologiska mångfalden. Pengarna går alltså i huvudsak till dem som orsakar den största miljöskadan och behöver bidragen minst. En ny studie har i detalj analyserat hur EU-stö
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Toronto seeks to save oak tree older than Canada
In the shadow of Canada's largest cluster of skyscrapers, Toronto is looking to preserve a majestic, centuries-old oak tree—but efforts have been complicated by the pandemic.
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Toronto seeks to save oak tree older than Canada
In the shadow of Canada's largest cluster of skyscrapers, Toronto is looking to preserve a majestic, centuries-old oak tree—but efforts have been complicated by the pandemic.
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Climate change 'clearly' fuelled Australia bushfires: inquest
Australia's devastating 2019-2020 bushfires were "clearly" fuelled by climate change, a government inquiry reported Tuesday following some of the largest forest fires ever recorded worldwide.
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Coronakrisen sætter turbo på reparationer
PLUS. Mange industrivirksom­heder investerer nu i reparationer i stedet for at købe nyt udstyr – en tendens, der kan fortsætte på grund af politisk pres.
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From the archives: nudge theory and the psychology of persuasion
While the Science Weekly team take a summer break, we're bringing you an episode from the archives – one that seems particularly pertinent as the pandemic continues and governments take a more prominent role in our day-to-day lives. Back in 2017, Ian Sample investigated how we're constantly "nudged" to change how we act. Exploring the psychology, history and ethics of nudge theory, Ian spoke to th
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Retsstaten er under pres
Både blandt magtfulde internationale spillere som Rusland og Kina og blandt EU-lande som Polen,…
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'In the bullseye:' Gulf preps for Laura to slam as hurricane
As Tropical Storm Marco made landfall, the Gulf Coast turned its attention Monday to Laura, another system following just behind that could grow into a supercharged Category 3 hurricane with winds topping 110 mph (177 kph) and a storm surge that could swamp entire towns.
12h
Protein 'chameleon' colors long-term memory
A chameleonlike protein in neurons can change its mind, and in the process change our brains.
13h
Protein 'chameleon' colors long-term memory
A chameleonlike protein in neurons can change its mind, and in the process change our brains.
13h
How men and women network impacts their labor market performance
A new paper in The Economic Journal, published by Oxford University Press, develops a theory of how people's social network structure impacts productivity and earnings. While large and loosely connected networks lead to better access to information, smaller and tighter networks lead to more peer pressure. Information is relatively more beneficial in uncertain work environments while for peer press
13h
Research shows potential to improve paints, coatings
New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York could lead to more environmentally friendly paints and coatings.
13h
Covid-19: 'possible' Oxford vaccine data will be put before regulators this year
Director of group says Chris Whitty right to be cautious but hopes vaccine will be ready before winter 2021 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Trials of the Oxford coronavirus vaccine may have gathered enough data to show whether it works and is safe by the end of the year – but it will then need to go through the regulatory process, scientists say. Prof Andrew Pollard,
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Quit smoking to reduce stroke risk if you have irregular heartbeat
Scientists today urged people with atrial fibrillation – the most common heart rhythm disorder – to kick the habit and cut their stroke risk. The research is presented today at ESC Congress 2020. One in four middle-aged adults in Europe and the US will develop atrial fibrillation, a condition set to affect up to 17 million people in the EU by 2030.
13h
More than half of "sudden" cardiac arrest victims had contacted health services before
Today scientists report that 58% of "sudden" cardiac arrest sufferers sought medical help during the two weeks before the event. The research is presented today at ESC Congress 2020. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Cardiac arrest is lethal within minutes if left untreated and it is estimated that, on average, less than 10% of victims survive.
13h
How Bacteria-Eating Bacteria Could Help Win the War Against Germs
While microscopic and little known, predatory bacteria are among the world's fiercest and most effective hunters.
13h
Derfor går du kold til skærm-mødet: Online møder sender hjernen på overarbejde
Vi går glip af en masse informationer, som er en del af det fysiske møde, blandt andet kropssprog, gestikulation og blikretning.
14h
"(Un)Well:" Netflix's Documentary Series Is Poor Journalism That Neglects Science
The (Un)Well documentary series on Netflix asks "Wellness: does it bring health and healing, or are we falling victim to false promises?" But instead of answers, it offers false balance and confusion.
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'The aliens to watch': how the humble earthworm is altering the Arctic
After hitching a ride with humans, the species has colonised entire areas and may be making the soil too fertile, say scientists They are a gardener's best friend, good for the soil and a treat for birds. But the humble earthworm may not always be good news, according to a study that suggests invasive earthworms could be making Arctic soils too fertile. The earthworm is not typically thought of a
14h
Kan man odla kantareller?
Varför kan man odla champinjoner men inte kantareller? Jesper Nyström, fil.dr i ekologi och redaktör på Forskning & Framsteg, fick frågan av sin dotter under en skogsvandring. Och blev svaret skyldigt. Han bestämde sig för att ta reda på mer om svampar, vilket resulterade i boken Svamparnas planet – Det uråldriga nätverket som bryter ner och bygger upp vår värld som släpps på Bonnier fakta i augus
15h
Van Morrison blasts Covid gig limits as 'pseudoscience'
Star calls for live music to challenge social distancing rules, but faces fan backlash Van Morrison has denounced the supposed "pseudoscience" around coronavirus and is attempting to rally musicians in a campaign to restore live music concerts with full capacity audiences. The 74-year-old Northern Irish singer launched a campaign to "save live music" on his website, saying socially distanced gigs
15h
Country diary: oilseed rape is a mixed blessing for bumblebees
Empingham, Rutland : The effects of mass-flowering crops are complex and there is often a twist in the tail for pollinators Most of our 24 British bumblebee species follow the familiar stripy, mousy or red-tailed formats, but a few beautiful and rare ones are more distinctive. Darting between the honeysuckle flowers in an Empingham garden is a big bumblebee, sooty black from frons to tail. Bombus
16h
Treating COVID-19 could lead to increased antimicrobial resistance
Research led by the University of Plymouth suggests the increased use of antibiotics in the treatment of COVID-19 patients could be placing an additional burden on waste water treatment works, particularly those serving large or emergency hospitals
16h
Most adults with lupus or common types of arthritis have similar risks of getting admitted to hospital as other COVID-19 patients
Most adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are not at increased risk of hospitalization from COVID-19 due to medications used to dampen their altered immune system, the cause of their disease.
16h
University of Ky study leads to potential for new treatment approach to Alzheimer's
The paper explains that current therapeutic approaches to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease focus on the major pathological hallmarks of the disease which are amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. They are the requirements for a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the authors say there has been an explosion of genetic data suggesting the risk for sporadic Alzheimer's disease is dr
16h
Cutting surgical robots down to size
Teleoperated surgical robots are becoming commonplace in operating rooms, but many are massive (sometimes taking up an entire room) and difficult to manipulate. A new collaboration between Harvard's Wyss Institute and Sony Corporation has created the mini-RCM, a surgical robot the size of a tennis ball that weighs as much as a penny, and performed significantly better than manually operated tools
16h
New technique to prevent imaging cyberthreats proposed by Ben-Gurion University researchers
As part of his Ph.D. research, Ben-Gurion University researcher Tom Mahler has developed a technique using artificial intelligence that analyzes the instructions sent from the PC to the physical components using a new architecture for the detection of anomalous instructions.
16h
Research shows potential to improve paints, coatings
New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York could lead to more environmentally friendly paints and coatings.
16h
How men and women network impacts their labor market performance
A new paper in The Economic Journal, published by Oxford University Press, develops a theory of how people's social network structure impacts productivity and earnings.
16h
From the archives: nudge theory and the psychology of persuasion – podcast
While the Science Weekly team take a summer break, we're bringing you an episode from the archives – one that seems particularly pertinent as the pandemic continues and governments take a more prominent role in our day-to-day lives. Back in 2017, Ian Sample investigated how we're constantly "nudged" to change how we act. Exploring the psychology, history and ethics of nudge theory, Ian spoke to t
16h
The real fake news about Covid-19
The idea that we are suffering an 'infodemic' when it comes to coronavirus is attractive — and wrong
17h
US braced for political row over who gets first Covid-19 vaccines
Health experts warn most vulnerable communities must be given priority
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Why UK coronavirus deaths are falling even as cases are rising
Changing age profile of infections and improved care are among the factors driving a reduction in mortality rates
18h
Climate change: New UK law to curb deforestation in supply chains
UK businesses will have to show that products and supply lines are free from illegal deforestation.
18h
People can make better choices when it benefits others
People are better at learning and decision-making when trying to avoid harm to others, according to new research.
18h
Skarp kritik af politiet: Data-bommerter truer retssystemets troværdighed
Politiforsker og jurist kritiserer politiet for dårlig håndtering af tekniske data, efter en række af sager er dukket op de seneste par år. Fejlene kan i værste fald skade borgernes tillid til retssystemet, lyder det.
19h
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Optical illusions explained in a fly's eyes
Why people perceive motion in some static images has mystified not only those who view these optical illusions but neuroscientists who have tried to explain the phenomenon. Now neuroscientists have found some answers in the eyes of flies.
19h
Climate change and land use are accelerating soil erosion by water
Soil loss due to water runoff could increase greatly around the world over the next 50 years due to climate change and intensive land cultivation.
19h
Advanced biofuels show real promise for replacing some fossil fuels
A new study predicted significant climate benefits stemming from the use of advanced biofuel technologies.
19h
In one cancer therapy, two halves are safer than a whole
Splitting one type of cancer drug in half and delivering the pieces separately to cancer cells could reduce life-threatening side effects and protect healthy, non-cancerous cells, a new study suggests.
19h
Ventilators could be adapted to help two COVID-19 patients at once
New research has shown how ventilators could be adapted to help two patients simultaneously in the event of a shortage.
19h
F.D.A. 'Grossly Misrepresented' Blood Plasma Data, Scientists Say
Many experts — including a scientist who worked on the Mayo Clinic study — were bewildered about where a key statistic came from.
19h
In FDA's green light for treating COVID-19 with plasma, critics see thin evidence—and politics
Scientists question justification for the emergency authorization and worry about its effects on clinical trials of other possible treatments
20h
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F.D.A. 'Grossly Misrepresented' Blood Plasma Data, Scientists Say
Many experts — including a scientist who worked on the Mayo Clinic study — were bewildered about where a key statistic came from.
20h
Machines rival expert analysis of stored red blood cell quality
Once outside the body, stored blood begins degrading until, by day 42, they're no longer usable. Until now, assessing its quality has required laborious microscopic examination by human experts. A new study reveals two methodologies that combine machine learning and state-of-the-art imaging to automate the process and eliminate human bias. If standardized, it could ensure more consistent, accurate
20h
Study identifies first step to beating water scarcity
New research has revealed the locations and industries in the USA where efforts to improve water consumption would have the greatest benefit for economic activity and the environment.The study, led by researchers from Virginia Tech, used a spatially detailed database of water productivity to set realistic benchmarks for more than 400 industries and products. It is published today in the IOP Publis
21h
Meet antivitamins. They may replace your antibiotics one day
As pathogens' resistance grows, scientists are searching for a class of drugs that could replace antibiotics. Antivitamins that switch off vitamins in bacteria are being investigated. Scientists have been struggling to understand how naturally occurring antivitamins do what they do. Though many of us have never heard of antivitamins, scientists have known about them since Sir Edward Mellanby iden
21h
Coronavirus live news: Gaza in lockdown following first local cases; Hong Kong man re-infected
Four cases detected in Gaza outside of quarantine facilities ; First known case of re-infection prompts immunity concerns ; Usain bolt awaiting Covid-19 test results . Follow the latest updates 'Very low evidence' Trump plasma treatment is safe and effective – WHO Oxford University Covid-19 vaccine firm denies Trump talks Six of the most promising treatments for Covid-19 so far See all our corona
21h
Online searches for 'chest pain' rise, emergency visits for heart attack drop amid COVID-19
A study of search engine queries addressed the question of whether online searches for chest pain symptoms correlated to reports of fewer people going to the emergency department with acute heart problems during the COVID-19 pandemic.
22h
Study identifies first step to beating water scarcity
New research has revealed the locations and industries in the U.S. where efforts to improve water consumption would have the greatest benefit for economic activity and the environment.
22h
The Atlantic Daily: Things May Get Tougher for Some American Workers
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . PAT GREENHOUSE / THE BOSTON GLOBE / GETTY Five months into the coronavirus recession, millions of Americans remain unemployed. Much of the temporary assistance authorized at the start of the outb
22h
Google's Pixel 4a is a lot of smartphone for $349
The screen doesn't have a high refresh rate, but it's bright and sharp. (Stan Horaczek /) Pick up Google's new Pixel 4a phone and it's obvious that it's not a flagship. The 5.8-inch screen is bright and contrasty, but can feel puny when directly compared to massive devices like the Note 20 Ultra or the iPhone 11 Max. The Pixel 4a's case is plastic and broadcasts its lack of ruggedness or water re
22h
Infants exposed to air pollution have less lung power as adolescents – study
Researchers find that even exposure to levels below EU limits has an impact Infants exposed to even low levels of air pollution experience reduced lung function as children and teenagers, researchers have found. Their study found that exposure to air pollution in the first year of life reduced lung function development from the ages of six to 15, even at pollution levels below EU standards. Conti
22h
Publisher Correction: Temperature-dependent growth contributes to long-term cold sensing
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2694-x
22h
German Experiment Tests How The Coronavirus Spreads At A Concert
Researchers hope the study can provide insight as to how COVID-19 spreads in large stadiums — and how to prevent it. (Image credit: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
23h
Why COVID-19 infection curves behave so unexpectedly
Most epidemics show infection curves with a typical S-shape. The COVID-19 outbreak, however, shows most infection curves exhibiting a linear growth after the first peak. Scientists at the Complexity Science Hub Vienna extend traditional models by describing the spread of disease as so-called cluster transmission. In this way, they are able to explain the typical linear shape of curves.
23h
No safe level of coffee drinking for pregnant women, study says
Cut out caffeine to help avoid miscarriage, low birth weight and stillbirth, paper advises Pregnant women should cut out coffee completely to help avoid miscarriage, low birth weight and stillbirth, according to a study of international evidence about caffeine and pregnancy. In contradiction to official guidance in the UK, US and Europe, there is no safe level for caffeine consumption during preg
23h
Reprogramming immune cells to reduce inflammation, promote tissue repair
A new study suggests that macrophage programming is more complex than previously thought.
23h
Scientists get atomistic picture of platinum catalyst degradation
Degradation of platinum, used as a key electrode material in the hydrogen economy, severely shortens the lifetime of electrochemical energy conversion devices, such as fuel cells. For the first time, scientists elucidated the movements of the platinum atoms that lead to catalyst surface degradation.
23h
Fossils reveal diversity of animal life roaming Europe 2 million years ago
A re-analysis of fossils from one of Europe's most significant paleontological sites reveals a wide diversity of animal species, including a large terrestrial monkey, short-necked giraffe, rhinos and saber-toothed cats. These and other species roamed the open grasslands of Eastern Europe approximately 2 million years ago.
23h
Some people can get the pandemic virus twice, a study suggests. That is no reason to panic
A man in Hong Kong was found to be reinfected with COVID-19, but what that means for vaccines and immunity is unclear
23h
Hong Kong researchers say they've found the world's first case of covid-19 reinfection
The 33-year-old-man arrived by plane in Hong Kong on August 15. After disembarking, he headed to one of the airport's covid-19 testing stations. Someone swabbed his throat, and then he waited for the results. The man had come down with the coronavirus in March, suffered fever and headaches, and spent two weeks in a hospital. So he probably didn't expect to test positive again just 142 days later.
23h
Protein 'chameleon' colors long-term memory
Researchers model the binding structures of actin and associated proteins they believe are responsible for the formation of longterm memory.
23h
Will the 2020 census numbers be good enough, and how soon will we know?
Mounting fears of massive undercount spur push for independent oversight, more time
23h
New drool-based tests are replacing the dreaded coronavirus nasal swab
Saliva could be the key to a faster, cheaper, safer test
23h
Citizens' adherence to COVID-19 social distancing measures depends on government response
CU Denver researcher and Business School associate professor Jiban Khuntia, PhD, found while social distancing is an effective preventative measure in the fight against COVID-19, there are significant variations being observed in how and why individuals follow the restrictions in South Korea, North American and Kuwait.
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Online searches for 'chest pain' rise, emergency visits for heart attack drop amid COVID
A study of search engine queries addressed the question of whether online searches for chest pain symptoms correlated to reports of fewer people going to the emergency department with acute heart problems during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Fossils reveal diversity of animal life roaming Europe 2 million years ago
A re-analysis of fossils from one of Europe's most significant paleontological sites reveals a wide diversity of animal species, including a large terrestrial monkey, short-necked giraffe, rhinos and saber-toothed cats. These and other species roamed the open grasslands of Eastern Europe approximately 2 million years ago.
1d
The Shooting of Jacob Blake Is a Wake-Up Call
The shooting of Jacob Blake on Sunday in Kenosha, Wisconsin, is at once freshly horrifying and achingly familiar, in the way that only a police shooting in the United States in 2020 can be. The Kenosha shooting has the dubious distinction of being the first high-profile shooting of a Black man by police since massive Black Lives Matter protests erupted earlier this summer, bringing with them enor
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