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Engineers use heat-free technology to make metallic replicas of a rose's surface texture
Scientists have developed technology to make metallic replicas of soft, natural surfaces such as rose petals. The team's metallic surfaces retained properties of the originals, including a rose petal's sticky, yet water-repelling textures.
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The Le Teil earthquake provides new insights on seismic risk in France and Western Europe
On 11 November 2019, a magnitude 5 earthquake occurred near the village of Le Teil in the Rhône River Valley in southern France producing an unexpected surface rupture with ground displacement. For the first time in France, scientists had the opportunity to use all modern seismological, geodetical, and geological techniques available to study this historically unprecedented seismic event.
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Land use change leads to increased flooding in Indonesia
While high greenhouse gas emissions and biodiversity loss are often associated with rapid land-use change in Indonesia, impacts on local water cycles have been largely overlooked. Researchers now show that the expansion of monocultures, such as oil palm and rubber plantations, leads to more frequent and more severe flooding.
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Astronomers Warn Massive Satellite Fleets Could Change Astronomy Forever
A new generation of rockets is democratizing access to space, and that's a good thing — mostly. Astronomers have been sounding the alarm for months that new mega-constellations of satellites could interfere with important observations, and fundamentally alter the way we study the cosmos. A new report from a group of astronomers lays out the scale of the problem , but the good news is the companie
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Pollution Dissolved This Shark's Teeth and Skin, Researchers Say
I'm Melting! Scientists recently found a new victim of climate change and pollution: a blackmouth catshark that had its teeth, skin, and other features dissolved away from swimming in contaminated water. It's the first time that scientists have seen such extensive environmental damage on a shark, according to The Evening Standard . The team of University of Cagliari scientists aren't exactly sure
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Engineers use heat-free technology to make metallic replicas of a rose's surface texture
Scientists have developed technology to make metallic replicas of soft, natural surfaces such as rose petals. The team's metallic surfaces retained properties of the originals, including a rose petal's sticky, yet water-repelling textures.
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Photos: The Aftermath of Hurricane Laura
Overnight, Hurricane Laura made landfall as a Category 4 storm, slamming into parts of Louisiana and Texas with 150 mph winds and a powerful storm surge. While the impact so far does not appear to have been as bad as anticipated, the damage is still severe and widespread, especially in the Lake Charles area. Below are some of the early photographs from the hard-hit Gulf Coast, the day after Laura
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Antiviral used to treat cat coronavirus also works against SARS-CoV-2
Researchers at the University of Alberta are preparing to launch clinical trials of a drug used to cure a deadly disease caused by a coronavirus in cats that they expect will also be effective as a treatment for humans against COVID-19.
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Study: COVID-19 messaging less effective when tied to Trump
According to a new study on how the source of a COVID-19 prevention message affects its perceived effectiveness, when Trump's name was associated with the message, the effectiveness of those messages decreased, not just compared to other sources, but even when there was no source at all.
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Cardiology compensation continues to rise; new interventional measures reported
MedAxiom, an American College of Cardiology Company and the premier source for cardiovascular organizational performance solutions, has released its eighth annual Cardiovascular Provider Compensation and Production Survey. The report reveals trends across cardiology, surgery, advanced practice providers (APPs) and non-clinical compensation that help cardiovascular organizations as they face a new
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Medical errors increase following the spring change to daylight saving time
Seeking medical care after springing forward to daylight saving time could be a risky proposition. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic found a statistically significant increase in adverse medical events that might be related to human error in the week after the annual time change in the spring.
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How Stress, Climate and Trauma Can Trigger Sex Changes in Nature
Sex expression in hundreds of species is remarkably flexible. Researchers are uncovering what makes trees, fish and other animals change sex.
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Watch amoebas solve a microscopic version of London's Hampton Court Maze
The cells break down chemicals to sense their surroundings
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How to Vote by Mail and Make Sure It Counts
There's a lot going on with the USPS right now. Here's a complete state-by-state guide to how to get your ballot—and when it's due.
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Early Cambrian fossil: Bizarre half-billion-year-old worm with tentacles solves evolutionary mystery
A half-a-billion years old fossil species of marine animal sheds light on how the anatomies of the two main types of an animal group called the hemichordates are related, and provides new evidence in the historical debate among zoologists. The fossils are over half-a-billion years old and were discovered at a Burgess Shale site in the Canadian Rockies.
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A new method for making a key component of plastics
Scientists have discovered a previously unknown way that some bacteria produce the chemical ethylene – a finding that could lead to new ways to produce plastics without using fossil fuels. The study showed that the bacteria created ethylene gas as a byproduct of metabolizing sulfur, which they need to survive.
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Civilization may need to 'forget the flame' to reduce CO2 emissions
Current world energy consumption is tied to unchangeable past economic production. And the way out of an ever-increasing rate of carbon emissions may not necessarily be ever-increasing energy efficiency — in fact it may be the opposite.
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A new method for making a key component of plastics
Scientists have discovered a previously unknown way that some bacteria produce the chemical ethylene – a finding that could lead to new ways to produce plastics without using fossil fuels. The study showed that the bacteria created ethylene gas as a byproduct of metabolizing sulfur, which they need to survive.
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Hubble maps giant halo around Andromeda Galaxy
In a landmark study, scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have mapped the immense envelope of gas, called a halo, surrounding the Andromeda galaxy, our nearest large galactic neighbor. Scientists were surprised to find that this tenuous, nearly invisible halo of diffuse plasma extends 1.3 million light-years from the galaxy—about halfway to our Milky Way—and as far as 2 million light-yea
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New data show few states require specific action for implementation of Complete Streets policies
Nearly half of all US states have mandatory Complete Streets policies, according to new data published today to LawAtlas.org.
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Wolverines return to Mount Rainier National Park after 100 years
Mount Rainier National Park is now home to wolverines again after a more than 100-year hiatus.
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August is open season for hunting invasive insects
It's a busy time of year for the Texas A&M Forest Service—many highly destructive pests are emerging in their adult form to reproduce and lay eggs. One such pest on the Forest Service's most wanted list is the emerald ash borer.
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Wolverines return to Mount Rainier National Park after 100 years
Mount Rainier National Park is now home to wolverines again after a more than 100-year hiatus.
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August is open season for hunting invasive insects
It's a busy time of year for the Texas A&M Forest Service—many highly destructive pests are emerging in their adult form to reproduce and lay eggs. One such pest on the Forest Service's most wanted list is the emerald ash borer.
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Test and trace drops further behind target as cases rise
Number of daily instances of virus has increased to levels last recorded in mid-June
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Harvard study suggests avoiding TV and daytime naps to avoid depression
Depression is a very common mental disorder, with more than 264 million people struggling with this issue worldwide. According to WHO, depression is a leading cause of disability. Depression results from a complex interaction of social, psychological, and biological factors. A new large-scale Harvard Medical School study suggests daytime napping and frequent television-watching may be negatively
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American Academy of Sleep Medicine calls for elimination of daylight saving time
Public health and safety would benefit from eliminating daylight saving time, according to a position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
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Children notice race several years before adults want to talk about it
Adults in the United States believe children should be almost 5 years old before talking with them about race, even though some infants are aware of race and preschoolers may have already developed racist beliefs, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.
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Success rates for Everest climbers doubled in 30 years
The success rate of reaching the summit of Mount Everest has doubled in the last 30 years while the death rate has remained pretty much unchanged, a new study shows. As the world's tallest peak, Mount Everest draws more than 500 climbers each spring to attempt the summit during a small window of favorable conditions on the rugged Himalayan mountain that tops out at just over 29,000 feet. "Mount E
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Meteorite study suggests Earth may have been wet since it formed
A new study finds that Earth's water may have come from materials that were present in the inner solar system at the time the planet formed — instead of far-reaching comets or asteroids delivering such water. The findings suggest that Earth may have always been wet.
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Helminth infections common in Medieval Europe, grave study finds
Although helminth infections — including tapeworms and roundworms — are among the world's top neglected diseases, they are no longer endemic in Europe. However, researchers report that these infections were common in Medieval Europe, according to grave samples analyzed from across the continent.
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Quantum simulation of quantum crystals
A research team describes the new possibilities offered by the use of ultracold dipolar atoms.
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Ocean acidification causing coral 'osteoporosis' on iconic reefs
Scientists have long suspected that ocean acidification is affecting corals' ability to build their skeletons, but it has been challenging to isolate its effect from that of simultaneous warming ocean temperatures, which also influence coral growth. New research reveals the distinct impact that ocean acidification is having on coral growth on some of the world's iconic reefs.
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How sticklebacks dominate perch
A research project on algal blooms along the Swedish coast, caused by eutrophication, revealed that large predators such as perch and pike are also necessary to restrict these blooms. Ecologists have now shown that stickleback domination moves like a wave through the island archipelagos, changing the ecosystem from predator-dominated to algae-dominated.
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Metabolic syndrome triples COVID-19 death risk
Patients hospitalized with COVID-19 who had a combination of high blood pressure, obesity, and diabetes were over three times more likely to die from the disease, according to a new study. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of at least three of five conditions—hypertension, high blood sugar, obesity, high triglycerides, and low HDL cholesterol—that increases risk for cardiovascular disease . "The mo
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Anti-covid-19 medicines are being approved too easily
And maybe for the wrong reasons
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How aerial firefighters battle blazes from the skies
An Erickson Aero Tanker aircraft, left, dropping fire retardant. (Shelby Snow /) The most dramatic way to fight a fire is from the sky. An air tanker may fly about 150 feet off the ground at 161 miles per hour and can paint up to a mile-long line of retardant on the ground. A big helicopter could dump as much as 2,000 gallons of water to try to save a house. And smokejumpers fling themselves from
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America Is Being Pummeled by Disasters
In the United States, disaster tends to strike in the late summer and fall, when hurricanes come ashore, wildfires rage across the West, and droughts reach their maxima. Beyond our borders, these months are the time of Amazon wildfires, of sweltering heat waves, of great urban floods. For some years now, I've covered climate change, which means covering the day-to-day convulsions of the Earth sys
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Brain-inspired electronic system could vastly reduce AI's carbon footprint
Extremely energy-efficient artificial intelligence is now closer to reality after a study by UCL researchers found a way to improve the accuracy of a brain-inspired computing system.The system, which uses memristors to create artificial neural networks, is at least 1,000 times more energy efficient than conventional transistor-based AI hardware, but has until now been more prone to error.
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MHC class II transactivator CIITA induces cell resistance to Ebola Virus and SARS-like coronaviruses
Discoveries from the Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason (BRI) have identified a new cellular protection pathway that targets a common vulnerability in several different pandemic viruses, and collaborators at Case Western Reserve University, Boston University School of Medicine and MRIGlobal have shown that this pathway can protect cells from infection by Ebola virus and coronaviruses, l
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Discovered: Cellular pathway involved in resistance to Ebola virus and SARS-like coronaviruses
Researchers working in human cells have identified a new pathway that targets a common vulnerability in several different pandemic viruses.
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Earth may always have been wet
The Earth is the only planet known to have liquid water on its surface, a fundamental characteristic when it comes to explaining the emergence of life. However, its origin is still debated. In the journal Science dated 28 August 2020, scientists from the CNRS and Université de Lorraine contribute to this debate by showing that most of the water present on the Earth today has probably been there ri
23h
Microbes working together multiply biomass conversion possibilities
Non-edible plants are a promising alternative to crude oil, but their heterogenous composition can be a challenge to producing high yields of useful products. Scientists from EPFL, the University of Cambridge, and the Bern University of Applied Sciences have developed a platform that combines different microorganisms that can make a dramatic difference.
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Meteorite study suggests Earth may have been wet since it formed
A new study finds that Earth's water may have come from materials that were present in the inner solar system at the time the planet formed — instead of far-reaching comets or asteroids delivering such water. The findings published Aug. 28 in Science suggest that Earth may have always been wet.
23h
Our energy hunger is tethered to our economic past
Current world energy consumption is tied to unchangeable past economic production. And the way out of an ever-increasing rate of carbon emissions may not necessarily be ever-increasing energy efficiency–in fact it may be the opposite.
23h
Mosquito immune system mapped to help fight malaria
Scientists have created the first cell atlas of mosquito immune cells, to understand how mosquitoes fight malaria and other infections. Researchers from the Sanger Institute and collaborators discovered new types of mosquito immune cells, including a rare cell type that could be involved in limiting malaria infection. The findings offer opportunities for uncovering novel ways to prevent mosquitoes
23h
Princeton labs report new platform for stereocontrol
Princeton Chemistry labs collaborate to demonstrate the ability of photoredox catalysis to take traditionally static stereocenters and render them dynamic by continuously and controllably breaking and re-forming molecular bonds.
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Prior Zika virus infection increases risk of severe dengue disease
A new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, finds that people who have antibodies to the mosquito-borne Zika virus are more vulnerable to developing dengue disease. This immune interaction, called antibody-dependent enhancement, could complicate the search for a safe and effective vaccine that protects against Zika without also increasing the risk of dengue.
23h
Expanding researchers' knowledge of the microbial defense toolkit
A new study identifies a wide array of previously unknown molecular functions and enzymatic activities microbes use to protect against viral threats.
23h
How cells solve mazes and traverse great distances through the body
Cells are particularly good at solving mazes, according to a new study, which demonstrates how they are able to navigate long and complicated routes through the body using self-generated chemoattractant gradients.
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Unexpected abundance of hydrogen in meteorites reveals the origin of Earth's water
Meteorite material presumed to be devoid of water because it formed in the dry inner Solar System appears to have contained sufficient hydrogen to have delivered to Earth at least three times the mass of water in its oceans, a new study shows.
23h
Zika infection enhances Dengue disease risk
Prior Zika virus infection can enhance the risk of severe dengue disease, according to a new study, which uses a unique cohort from Nicaragua to confirm previous reports that have suggested the action of cross-reactive antibodies between the two closely related flaviviruses.
23h
Using the past to maintain future biodiversity
New research shows that safeguarding species and ecosystems and the benefits they provide for society against future climatic change requires effective solutions which can only be formulated from reliable forecasts.An international team of scientists led by researchers from the University of Adelaide and University of Copenhagen, has identified and examined past warming events similar to those ant
23h
In Alaska forest, Reagan biographer sees a winning GOP strategy
Craig Shirley sees an opportunity in the trees.
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Penis bones, echolocation calls, and genes reveal new kinds of bats
If you've ever seen a bat flying around at sunset, chances are good it was a vesper bat. They're the biggest bat family, made up of 500 species, found on every continent except Antarctica. And most of them look a lot alike—they're little, with fuzzy grayish-brown fur, sort of the sparrows of the bat world. That can make it hard to tell the different species apart. But scientists just discovered th
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Penis bones, echolocation calls, and genes reveal new kinds of bats
If you've ever seen a bat flying around at sunset, chances are good it was a vesper bat. They're the biggest bat family, made up of 500 species, found on every continent except Antarctica. And most of them look a lot alike—they're little, with fuzzy grayish-brown fur, sort of the sparrows of the bat world. That can make it hard to tell the different species apart. But scientists just discovered th
23h
In 'milestone,' FDA OKs simple, accurate coronavirus test that could cost just $5
Antigen tests could help schools and workplaces reopen safely
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Neural mechanisms resolving exploitation-exploration dilemmas in the medial prefrontal cortex
Everyday life often requires arbitrating between pursuing an ongoing action plan by possibly adjusting it versus exploring a new action plan instead. Resolving this so-called exploitation-exploration dilemma involves the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Using human intracranial electrophysiological recordings, we discovered that neural activity in the ventral mPFC infers and tracks the reliabilit
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News at a glance
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Ridding paradise of palms
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The origins of water
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Zena Werb (1945-2020)
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Secrets of the Vikings
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Easing water apart
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Digital health in India
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You can find your own way
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From cough to splutter
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Double whammy
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Tuning membrane tension
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Diverse enzymatic activities mediate antiviral immunity in prokaryotes
Bacteria and archaea are frequently attacked by viruses and other mobile genetic elements and rely on dedicated antiviral defense systems, such as restriction endonucleases and CRISPR, to survive. The enormous diversity of viruses suggests that more types of defense systems exist than are currently known. By systematic defense gene prediction and heterologous reconstitution, here we discover 29 w
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Hartree-Fock on a superconducting qubit quantum computer
The simulation of fermionic systems is among the most anticipated applications of quantum computing. We performed several quantum simulations of chemistry with up to one dozen qubits, including modeling the isomerization mechanism of diazene. We also demonstrated error-mitigation strategies based on N -representability that dramatically improve the effective fidelity of our experiments. Our param
23h
Architecture of a catalytically active homotrimeric plant cellulose synthase complex
Cellulose is an essential plant cell wall component and represents the most abundant biopolymer on Earth. Supramolecular plant cellulose synthase complexes organize multiple linear glucose polymers into microfibrils as load-bearing wall components. We determined the structure of a poplar cellulose synthase CesA homotrimer that suggests a molecular basis for cellulose microfibril formation. This c
23h
A nitrogenase-like enzyme system catalyzes methionine, ethylene, and methane biogenesis
Bacterial production of gaseous hydrocarbons such as ethylene and methane affects soil environments and atmospheric climate. We demonstrate that biogenic methane and ethylene from terrestrial and freshwater bacteria are directly produced by a previously unknown methionine biosynthesis pathway. This pathway, present in numerous species, uses a nitrogenase-like reductase that is distinct from known
23h
Accelerating water dissociation in bipolar membranes and for electrocatalysis
Catalyzing water dissociation (WD) into protons and hydroxide ions is important both for fabricating bipolar membranes (BPMs) that can couple different pH environments into a single electrochemical device and for accelerating electrocatalytic reactions that consume protons in neutral to alkaline media. We designed a BPM electrolyzer to quantitatively measure WD kinetics and show that, for metal n
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Super-durable ultralong carbon nanotubes
Fatigue resistance is a key property of the service lifetime of structural materials. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the strongest materials ever discovered, but measuring their fatigue resistance is a challenge because of their size and the lack of effective measurement methods for such small samples. We developed a noncontact acoustic resonance test system for investigating the fatigue beha
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Serial interval of SARS-CoV-2 was shortened over time by nonpharmaceutical interventions
Studies of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), have reported varying estimates of epidemiological parameters, including serial interval distributions—i.e., the time between illness onset in successive cases in a transmission chain—and reproduction numbers. By compiling a line-list database of transmission pair
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Earths water may have been inherited from material similar to enstatite chondrite meteorites
The origin of Earth's water remains unknown. Enstatite chondrite (EC) meteorites have similar isotopic composition to terrestrial rocks and thus may be representative of the material that formed Earth. ECs are presumed to be devoid of water because they formed in the inner Solar System. Earth's water is therefore generally attributed to the late addition of a small fraction of hydrated materials,
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Static to inducibly dynamic stereocontrol: The convergent use of racemic {beta}-substituted ketones
The synthesis of stereochemically complex molecules in the pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries requires precise control over each distinct stereocenter, a feat that can be challenging and time consuming using traditional asymmetric synthesis. Although stereoconvergent processes have the potential to streamline and simplify synthetic routes, they are currently limited by a narrow scope of i
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Structural basis of a shared antibody response to SARS-CoV-2
Molecular understanding of neutralizing antibody responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) could accelerate vaccine design and drug discovery. We analyzed 294 anti–SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and found that immunoglobulin G heavy-chain variable region 3-53 (IGHV3-53) is the most frequently used IGHV gene for targeting the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the spike protei
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Zika virus infection enhances future risk of severe dengue disease
The Zika pandemic sparked intense interest in whether immune interactions among dengue virus serotypes 1 to 4 (DENV1 to -4) extend to the closely related Zika virus (ZIKV). We investigated prospective pediatric cohorts in Nicaragua that experienced sequential DENV1 to -3 (2004 to 2015), Zika (2016 to 2017), and DENV2 (2018 to 2020) epidemics. Risk of symptomatic DENV2 infection and severe disease
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Mosquito cellular immunity at single-cell resolution
Hemocytes limit the capacity of mosquitoes to transmit human pathogens. Here we profile the transcriptomes of 8506 hemocytes of Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti mosquito vectors. Our data reveal the functional diversity of hemocytes, with different subtypes of granulocytes expressing distinct and evolutionarily conserved subsets of effector genes. A previously unidentified cell type in An. gam
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Expanding the space of protein geometries by computational design of de novo fold families
Naturally occurring proteins vary the precise geometries of structural elements to create distinct shapes optimal for function. We present a computational design method, loop-helix-loop unit combinatorial sampling (LUCS), that mimics nature's ability to create families of proteins with the same overall fold but precisely tunable geometries. Through near-exhaustive sampling of loop-helix-loop elem
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One, two, three, thrive
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A heterogeneous microbial consortium producing short-chain fatty acids from lignocellulose
Microbial consortia are a promising alternative to monocultures of genetically modified microorganisms for complex biotransformations. We developed a versatile consortium-based strategy for the direct conversion of lignocellulose to short-chain fatty acids, which included the funneling of the lignocellulosic carbohydrates to lactate as a central intermediate in engineered food chains. A spatial n
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A synthetic synaptic organizer protein restores glutamatergic neuronal circuits
Neuronal synapses undergo structural and functional changes throughout life, which are essential for nervous system physiology. However, these changes may also perturb the excitatory–inhibitory neurotransmission balance and trigger neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. Molecular tools to restore this balance are highly desirable. Here, we designed and characterized CPTX, a synthetic synapt
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Using paleo-archives to safeguard biodiversity under climate change
Strategies for 21st-century environmental management and conservation under global change require a strong understanding of the biological mechanisms that mediate responses to climate- and human-driven change to successfully mitigate range contractions, extinctions, and the degradation of ecosystem services. Biodiversity responses to past rapid warming events can be followed in situ and over exte
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Seeing around corners: Cells solve mazes and respond at a distance using attractant breakdown
During development and metastasis, cells migrate large distances through complex environments. Migration is often guided by chemotaxis, but simple chemoattractant gradients between a source and sink cannot direct cells over such ranges. We describe how self-generated gradients, created by cells locally degrading attractant, allow single cells to navigate long, tortuous paths and make accurate cho
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Land use change leads to increased flooding in Indonesia, study shows
While high greenhouse gas emissions and biodiversity loss are often associated with rapid land-use change in Indonesia, impacts on local water cycles have been largely overlooked. Researchers from the University of Göttingen, IPB University in Bogor and BMKG in Jakarta have now published a new study on this issue. They show that the expansion of monocultures, such as oil palm and rubber plantation
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Easing water apart
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Digital health in India
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You can find your own way
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From cough to splutter
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Double whammy
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Live-cell Imaging
Download this eBook to take a closer look at past efforts, modern challenges, and future advances!
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Zika Infection Increases Risk of Severe Dengue Fever
A study of Nicaraguan children links prior Zika virus infection with aggravated dengue fever symptoms.
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Vertebral body tethering shows clinical success as treatment for scoliosis
Scoliosis is the most common spinal deformity affecting pediatric patients. A posterior spinal fusion (PSF) is the gold standard treatment for patients with curves exceeding 45 degrees, but the procedure's drawbacks include the loss of spinal mobility, persistent pain and adjacent segment disc disease. However, a new retrospective study shows an alternative to PSF called vertebral body tethering (
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Artificial intelligence learns continental hydrology
The data sets on the Earth's gravitational field which are required for this, stem from the GRACE and GRACE-FO satellite missions. Using the South American continent as an example, Earth system modellers have developed a new Deep-Learning-Method, which quantifies small as well as large-scale changes to the water storage with the help of satellite data.
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Mosquito immune system mapped to help fight malaria
Scientists have created the first cell atlas of mosquito immune cells, to understand how mosquitoes fight malaria and other infections. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Umeå University, Sweden and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S., discovered new types of mosquito immune cells, including a rare cell type that could be involved in limiting malaria infection. They also ide
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Using the past to maintain future biodiversity
New research shows that safeguarding species and ecosystems and the benefits they provide for society against future climatic change requires effective solutions which can only be formulated from reliable forecasts.
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Criminal recycling scams 'profit from plastic waste surge'
Criminal networks are profiting from an "overwhelming" surge in plastic waste being shipped from rich countries to Asia and stoking pollution by burning and dumping waste that was supposed to be recycled, a report by Interpol said Thursday.
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Our energy hunger is tethered to our economic past: study
Just as a living organism continually needs food to maintain itself, an economy consumes energy to do work and keep things going. That consumption comes with the cost of greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, though. So, how can we use energy to keep the economy alive without burning out the planet in the process?
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Sulfur-scavenging bacteria could be key to making common component in plastic
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Ohio State University discovered a new microbial pathway that produces ethylene, providing a potential avenue for biomanufacturing a common component of plastics, adhesives, coolants and other everyday products.
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Microbes working together multiply biomass conversion possibilities
With the race for renewable energy sources in full swing, plants offer one of the most promising candidates for replacing crude oil. Lignocellulose in particular—biomass from non-edible plants like grass, leaves, and wood that don't compete with food crops—is abundant and renewable and offers a great alternative source to petroleum for a whole range of chemicals.
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Meteorite study suggests Earth may have been wet since it formed
A new study finds that Earth's water may have come from materials that were present in the inner solar system at the time the planet formed—instead of far-reaching comets or asteroids delivering such water. The findings published Aug. 28 in Science suggest that Earth may have always been wet.
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Researchers report new platform for stereocontrol
A collaboration between two labs at Princeton University's Department of Chemistry has yielded a striking new platform that allows chemists to reinterpret the rules of stereochemistry and stereocontrol with important implications for the pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries.
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Mosquito immune system mapped to help fight malaria
Scientists have created the first cell atlas of mosquito immune cells, to understand how mosquitoes fight malaria and other infections. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Umeå University, Sweden and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S., discovered new types of mosquito immune cells, including a rare cell type that could be involved in limiting malaria infection. They also ide
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Using the past to maintain future biodiversity
New research shows that safeguarding species and ecosystems and the benefits they provide for society against future climatic change requires effective solutions which can only be formulated from reliable forecasts.
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FBI Foils Russian Hack at Tesla Factory
Factory Reset The sharp-eyed bloggers at Electrek noticed a fascinating drop today: an FBI complaint detailing how the feds helped foil a plot by Russian hackers to target the electric carmaker's Nevada Gigafactory with a massive ransomware hack and data breach. Intriguingly, it sounds as though the hackers weren't just after ransom — they also wanted to steal corporate secrets about the company'
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Hubble maps giant halo around Andromeda Galaxy
In a landmark study, scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have mapped the immense halo of gas enveloping the Andromeda galaxy, our nearest large galactic neighbor.
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Water, Water, Every Where — And Now Scientists Know Where It Came From
Some unusual meteorites suggest that Earth got its water at its start, rather than forming dry and being watered by comets later on. (Image credit: Stocktrek Images/Getty Images)
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Why your rapport with coworkers is about much more than small talk
A recent Rutgers study has found that although small talk in the office can be distracting, employees and employers alike gain far more from these seemingly trivial interactions than we lose. Non-work banter can lead to more cohesive culture and higher-quality output. To deliver output with a higher value, you need to view productivity through a different lens, one that has leeway for freeform di
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Antarctica's Ice Shelves May Be at Growing Risk of Collapse
Surface melting that causes fractures in the ice could threaten more than half of the continent's floating ice platforms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Sulfur-scavenging bacteria could be key to making common component in plastic
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Ohio State University discovered a new microbial pathway that produces ethylene, providing a potential avenue for biomanufacturing a common component of plastics, adhesives, coolants and other everyday products.
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Microbes working together multiply biomass conversion possibilities
With the race for renewable energy sources in full swing, plants offer one of the most promising candidates for replacing crude oil. Lignocellulose in particular—biomass from non-edible plants like grass, leaves, and wood that don't compete with food crops—is abundant and renewable and offers a great alternative source to petroleum for a whole range of chemicals.
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Reopened Schools Find Health Risks in Water After Covid-19 Lockdowns
A number of schools found the bacteria that causes Legionnaires' disease in their water, and experts say more should expect to see it.
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The CDC's new COVID-19 testing guidelines could make the pandemic worse
Experts worry that the decision is based more in politics than scientific fact. (Photographer: James Gathany/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . American policy surrounding COVID-19 has been nearly universally confusing, and yesterday things became even
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Physicists: Wormholes Large Enough to Travel Through Are Possible
Warp Zone A team of physicists believes that it's found a way to bring a science fiction staple to life. According to new research, wormholes that are both large and stable enough for humans to traverse should be possible to create. Doing so would require some gnarly quantum physics. And, unfortunately, actually manufacturing one of these wormholes would require technology so far beyond our capab
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Covid-19 news: Europe faces 'tricky moment' as coronavirus cases climb
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
23h
How the environment and the microbiome jointly shape the body
All multicellular living beings are colonized by an unimaginably large number of microorganisms and have developed together with them from the very beginning of multicellular life. The natural microbiome, i.e. the totality of these bacteria, viruses and fungi that live in and on a body, is of fundamental importance for the entire organism: it supports, for example, the absorption of nutrients or f
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Structural biology reveals new target to neutralize COVID-19
An international team of researchers have discovered a new and highly conserved site on the SARS-CoV-2 virus that can be neutralized by a specific antibody. Previous studies have reported that antibodies that block the virus interaction with the human receptor (ACE2) have a significant neutralizing effect and can be used to save the lives of critically ill patients. However, this recent study publ
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Extra genome copies might protect aging fruit fly brains
Scientists have discovered a new anti-aging defense in the brain cells of adult fruit flies: they produce extra copies of the genome. The findings could help explain how the brain, which rarely produces new cells, is able to cope with the accumulation of cell damage over time and prevent excess cell loss during aging. They may also help scientists answer questions about human age-related brain di
23h
How the environment and the microbiome jointly shape the body
All multicellular living beings are colonized by an unimaginably large number of microorganisms and have developed together with them from the very beginning of multicellular life. The natural microbiome, i.e. the totality of these bacteria, viruses and fungi that live in and on a body, is of fundamental importance for the entire organism: it supports, for example, the absorption of nutrients or f
23h
Structural biology reveals new target to neutralize COVID-19
An international team of researchers have discovered a new and highly conserved site on the SARS-CoV-2 virus that can be neutralized by a specific antibody. Previous studies have reported that antibodies that block the virus interaction with the human receptor (ACE2) have a significant neutralizing effect and can be used to save the lives of critically ill patients. However, this recent study publ
23h
Student research team develops hybrid rocket engine
In a year defined by obstacles, a student rocket team persevered. Working together across five time zones, they successfully designed a hybrid rocket engine that uses paraffin and a novel nitrous oxide-oxygen mixture called Nytrox.
23h
New tool identifies which cancer patients are most likely to benefit from immunotherapy
A new diagnostic tool that can predict whether a cancer patient would respond to immunotherapy treatment has been developed. This advance in precision medicine will allow clinicians to tailor treatments specifically to patients and avoid treatment paths that are unlikely to be successful.
23h
Japanese sake: the new pick-me-up? Yeast strain makes fatigue-fighting ornithine
Researchers have found that that a mutant strain of sake yeast produces high levels of the amino acid ornithine. Ornithine has been found to reduce fatigue and improve sleep quality, and the non-genetically modified mutant yeast strain discovered in this study could be easily applied to brewing sake, a traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage, as well as wine and beer.
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A prion-related protein senses warmer temperature in plants
Many plants and trees flower in the spring when it gets warmer. How plants sense Scientists from the UK, France, Korea and Germany focused on a protein called EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3). ELF3 is a key part of the circadian clock and is necessary for plants to respond correctly to changes in temperature. In the model plant Arabidopsis (thale cress), ELF3 responds to temperature directly. In mild tempe
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Locating and severing lethal links in DNA
Chemical lesions in the genetic material DNA can have catastrophic consequences for cells, and even for the organism concerned. This explains why the efficient identification and rapid repair of DNA damage is vital for survival. DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs), which are formed when proteins are adventitiously attached to DNA, are particularly harmful. DPCs are removed by the action of a dedicated e
23h
Quantum simulation of quantum crystals
The quantum properties underlying crystal formation can be replicated and investigated with the help of ultracold atoms. A team led by Dr. Axel U. J. Lode from the University of Freiburg's Institute of Physics has now described in the journal Physical Review Letters how the use of dipolar atoms enables even the realization and precise measurement of structures that have not yet been observed in an
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Diversity networks: Good start, but improvement necessary
The number of diversity networks within large organizations has greatly increased in recent years. Many modern companies wish to further the promotion of employees with a specific social identity, so they promote networks where these employees can meet one other. A good start—but unfortunately companies are not always open to the organizational changes these kinds of networks want to bring about.
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New study contradicts assumptions of constant element conditions in the oceans
The compositional ratios of elements such as magnesium, calcium or strontium in seawater are an important means for the reconstruction of past oceanic processes. So far it has been assumed that these ratios are constant over long periods of time and over large areas. However, a study led by Kiel University (CAU) and the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel shows that important element r
23h
A prion-related protein senses warmer temperature in plants
Many plants and trees flower in the spring when it gets warmer. How plants sense Scientists from the UK, France, Korea and Germany focused on a protein called EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3). ELF3 is a key part of the circadian clock and is necessary for plants to respond correctly to changes in temperature. In the model plant Arabidopsis (thale cress), ELF3 responds to temperature directly. In mild tempe
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Hurricanes and Wildfires Are Compounding COVID-19 Risks
Crowded grocery stores and emergency shelters are potential concerns — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New study questions decades of research on the evolution of spiral galaxies
Previous studies on the formation and evolution of spiral galaxies might have been based on an incorrect assumption, suggests a team of researchers of Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA).
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The Le Teil earthquake provides new insights on seismic risk in France and Western Europe
On 11 November 2019, a magnitude 5 earthquake occurred near the village of Le Teil in the Rhône River Valley in southern France, producing an unexpected surface rupture with ground displacement.
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Locating and severing lethal links in DNA
Chemical lesions in the genetic material DNA can have catastrophic consequences for cells, and even for the organism concerned. This explains why the efficient identification and rapid repair of DNA damage is vital for survival. DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs), which are formed when proteins are adventitiously attached to DNA, are particularly harmful. DPCs are removed by the action of a dedicated e
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Land use change leads to increased flooding in Indonesia
While high greenhouse gas emissions and biodiversity loss are often associated with rapid land-use change in Indonesia, impacts on local water cycles have been largely overlooked. Researchers from the University of Göttingen, IPB University in Bogor and BMKG in Jakarta now show that the expansion of monocultures, such as oil palm and rubber plantations, leads to more frequent and more severe flood
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Penis bones, echolocation calls, and genes reveal new kinds of bats
Vesper bats are the biggest family of bats in the world, and they all kind of look alike, making it hard to tell different species apart. But scientists just discovered three new species and two new genera of vesper bats in Africa by comparing the bats' genes, their teeth and skulls, the high-frequency calls they make when echolocating, and the tiny bones in their penises.
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Can a robot guess what you're thinking?
What on earth are you thinking? Other people think they know, and many could make a pretty decent guess, simply from observing your behavior for a short while. We do this almost automatically, following convoluted cognitive trails with relative ease, like understanding that Zoe is convinced Yvonne believes Xavier ate the last avocado, although he didn't. Or how Wendy is pretending to ignore Victo
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The internet of protest is being built on single-page websites
On Sunday evening, Jacob Blake was shot in the back by police in Kenosha, Wisconsin. By Tuesday, a 16-year-old Texan, Kel, had built a one-page website, Justice for Jacob Blake , that offered context, templates for contacting officials, mental-health resources, and donation links. To build it, Kel turned to Carrd, a simple tool that lets anyone throw together a site in minutes. All it takes is an
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Music goes terahertz
An international research team from Germany, Italy, and the U.K. has developed a key photonics component for the terahertz spectral range. By mixing electronic resonances in semiconductor nanostructures with the photon field of microresonators, they designed a stained mirror that bleaches more easily than ever and could make terahertz lasers ultrafast. The results are published in the current issu
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Hurricanes could be up to five times more likely in the Caribbean if tougher targets are missed
Global warming is dramatically increasing the risk of extreme hurricanes in the Caribbean, but meeting more ambitious climate change goals could up to halve the likelihood of such disasters in the region, according to new research.
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The Neuwrite Times
We here at NeuwriteSD have been hard at work creating a print edition of some of our recent articles. This is something we have done in the past to hand out at local science communication and outreach events, and for the first time we are posting a pdf version of online. Huge […]
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Newly discovered rare dinosaur embryos show sauropods had rhino-like horns
An incredibly rare dinosaur embryo discovered perfectly preserved inside its egg has shown scientists new details of the development and appearance of sauropods which lived 80 million years ago.
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Atlantic sturgeon in the king's pantry — unique discovery in Baltic shipwreck from 1495
Researchers can now reveal what the Danish King Hans had planned to offer when laying claim to the Swedish throne in 1495: A two-meter-long Atlantic sturgeon. The well-preserved fish remains were found in a wreck on the bottom of the Baltic Sea last year, and species identification was made possible through DNA analysis.
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Binding sites for protein-making machinery
Researchers can predict how tightly a cell's protein synthesis machinery will bind to RNA sequences – even when dealing with many billions of different RNA sequences. This binding plays a key role in determining how much of a specific protein is produced. The scientists are developing their prediction model using a combination of synthetic biology experiments and machine learning algorithms.
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MRI scans reveal how your brain handles fatigue
Researchers have further pinpointed areas of the human brain that regulate efforts to deal with fatigue. The findings, they say, could advance the development of behavioral and other strategies that increase physical performance in healthy people. They could also illuminate the neural mechanisms that contribute to fatigue in people with depression , multiple sclerosis, and stroke. "We know the ph
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Student research team develops hybrid rocket engine
In a year defined by obstacles, a University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign student rocket team persevered. Working together across five time zones, they successfully designed a hybrid rocket engine that uses paraffin and a novel nitrous oxide-oxygen mixture called Nytrox. The team has its sights set on launching a rocket with the new engine at the 2021 Intercollegiate Rocketry and Engineering Co
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Hurricanes could be up to five times more likely in the Caribbean if tougher targets are missed
Global warming is dramatically increasing the risk of extreme hurricanes in the Caribbean, but meeting more ambitious climate change goals could up to halve the likelihood of such disasters in the region, according to new research.
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More patients in hospital beds ups COVID-19 deaths
Every six additional ICU beds or seven additional non-ICU beds filled by COVID-19 patients leads to one additional COVID-19 death over the following week, new research shows. "A spike in hospitalization naturally leads to more deaths, but these deaths may not only come from those who are hospitalized, but also from those who should have been hospitalized but were not," says coauthor Anirban Basu,
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Best-preserved titanosaur embryo reveals they had nose horns as babies
A well-preserved dinosaur embryo has revealed that young titanosaurs, the largest ever dinosaurs, had nasal horns that we have never seen in adult fossils
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How wholesome memes could save us all
It is time to rekindle the idea of netizens – upstanding internet citizens that band together to tackle important global problems, writes Annalee Newitz
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Methane: Emissions increase and it's not good news
Of course, carbon dioxide plays a key role in global warming, but among all the greenhouse gases, methane deserves special attention because of its larger global warming potential (28 times higher than carbon dioxide on a 100-year time horizon). Moreover, once in the atmosphere carbon dioxide can continue to affect climate for thousands of years. Methane, by contrast, is mostly removed from the at
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How Italy's 'father of the swabs' fought the coronavirus
Microbiologist Andrea Crisanti defied the authorities to launch his COVID-19 testing campaign
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Octupole corner state in a three-dimensional topological circuit
Higher-order topological insulators featuring quantized bulk polarizations and zero-dimensional corner states are attracting increasing interest due to their strong mode confinement. Recently, scientists from China and the UK demonstrated in a 3-D topological circuit the existence of an octupole corner state, which is induced by the octupole moment of the bulk circuit and topologically protected b
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America's Summer of Viral Meltdowns
The sign outside the Panera Bread in Chico, California, clearly informed customers that they must wear a mask in order to enter. But inside, one day in July, someone was breaking the rules, and William Cuthbertson, a 49-year-old librarian, instinctively started filming. In the video, a woman waits in line and lets a surgical mask dangle from her hand rather than put it on her face to satisfy the
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Single-use N95 respirators can be decontaminated and used again, study finds
N95 respirators, which are widely worn by health care workers treating patients with COVID-19 and are designed to be used only once, can be decontaminated effectively and used up to three times, UCLA scientists and colleagues report.
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Hurricanes Like Laura Are More Likely Because Of Climate Change
Hurricane Laura rapidly intensified before it made landfall. Abnormally hot water in the Gulf of Mexico helped it gain power. (Image credit: NOAA via AP)
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Decoded: The structure of the barrier between three cells
Organs in animals and in humans have one thing in common: they are bounded by so-called epithelial cells. These, along with the muscle, connective and nervous tissues, belong to the basic types of tissue. Epithelial cells form special connections with one another in order to prevent substances or pathogens from passing between the cells, i.e. they have a protective and sealing function for the bod
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Genetic link between cattle temperament and autism
A strong association between the genes influencing cattle temperament and autism in humans has been discovered by University of Queensland researchers.
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Artificial intelligence learns continental hydrology
Changes to water masses which are stored on the continents can be detected with the help of satellites. The data sets on the Earth's gravitational field which are required for this, stem from the GRACE and GRACE-FO satellite missions. As these data sets only include the typical large-scale mass anomalies, no conclusions about small scale structures, such as the actual distribution of water masses
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NASA sees Hurricane Laura's nighttime landfall
Many NASA assets were used to provide forecasters with information to incorporate into their analysis of Hurricane Laura. Satellite imagery, photographs from the International Space Station, and a computer program that produces animations of imagery are all things that NASA used to analyze the storm. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite also caught a nighttime image of Laura just after landfall.
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Study reveals DNA 'grammar'
DNA three-dimensional structure is determined by a series of spatial rules based on particular protein sequences and their order. This was the finding of a study recently published in Genome Biology by Luca Nanni, Ph.D. student in Computer Science and Engineering at Politecnico di Milano, together with Professors Stefano Ceri of the same University and Colin Logie of the University of Nijmegen.
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South African wildlife management/conservation models do not protect carnivores equally
In results released this week, an international team of wildlife ecologists reports that the trend toward more reliance on private game farms and reserves to manage and conserve free-ranging carnivores in South Africa is more complicated than it appears—"a mosaic" of unequal protection across different land management types.
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How sticklebacks dominate perch
A research project on algal blooms along the Swedish coast, caused by eutrophication, revealed that large predators such as perch and pike are also necessary to restrict these blooms. Ecologist Britas Klemens Eriksson from the University of Groningen and his colleagues from Stockholm University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden have now shown that stickleback domination m
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Survey finds election concerns vary by race, education levels, party affiliation
Although most voters say they believe that voting will be safe and that their ballot will be counted despite the coronavirus pandemic, those who question election safety and some who question election integrity appear less likely to vote, according to a new RAND Corporation survey.
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A government program that reduces mortgage defaults
Lower-income households that received mortgages through state affordable mortgage programs were less likely to default or foreclose than similar households that received conventional financing, a national study found.
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Planetary ball-milling helps protect our planet from plastics pollution
Plastics are ubiquitous in modern life; unfortunately, once they lose function, they pollute the environment. Now, researchers at Osaka University have developed polymer materials that combine self-healing with strength and recyclability that could extend the functional lifetimes of manufactured plastics, thus minimizing the surging problem of discarded remnants.
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Decoded: The structure of the barrier between three cells
Organs in animals and in humans have one thing in common: they are bounded by so-called epithelial cells. These, along with the muscle, connective and nervous tissues, belong to the basic types of tissue. Epithelial cells form special connections with one another in order to prevent substances or pathogens from passing between the cells, i.e. they have a protective and sealing function for the bod
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Genetic link between cattle temperament and autism
A strong association between the genes influencing cattle temperament and autism in humans has been discovered by University of Queensland researchers.
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Improving weather forecasts with observations from the microwave instruments onboard China's FY-3D satellite
China's FengYun-3 (FY-3) satellite program is an important part of the Earth observing system and provides observations for numerical weather prediction (NWP), reanalyses, and climate studies. The latest platform in the program, FY-3-D, carries the Microwave Temperature Sounder 2 (MWTS-2), the Microwave Humidity Sounder 2 (MWHS-2), and the Microwave Radiation Imager (MWRI). Together, these instrum
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Molecular dispersion enhances quasi-bilayer organic solar cells
In the last couple of years, organic solar cells (OSCs) based on non-fullerene (NF) acceptors have demonstrated tremendous progress in power conversion efficiency (PCE). The majority of state-of-the-art OSCs in the lab is based on the so-called bulk heterojunction (BHJ) architecture consisting of a photoactive layer in blend of an electron donor and acceptor. The presence of numerous microscopic p
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Study reveals DNA 'grammar'
DNA three-dimensional structure is determined by a series of spatial rules based on particular protein sequences and their order. This was the finding of a study recently published in Genome Biology by Luca Nanni, Ph.D. student in Computer Science and Engineering at Politecnico di Milano, together with Professors Stefano Ceri of the same University and Colin Logie of the University of Nijmegen.
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South African wildlife management/conservation models do not protect carnivores equally
In results released this week, an international team of wildlife ecologists reports that the trend toward more reliance on private game farms and reserves to manage and conserve free-ranging carnivores in South Africa is more complicated than it appears—"a mosaic" of unequal protection across different land management types.
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Fossil evidence of 'hibernation-like' state in 250-million-year-old Antarctic animal
Scientists report evidence of a hibernation-like state in Lystrosaurus, an animal that lived in Antarctica during the Early Triassic, some 250 million years ago. The fossils are the oldest evidence of a hibernation-like state in a vertebrate, and indicate that torpor — a general term for hibernation and similar states in which animals temporarily lower their metabolic rate to get through a tough
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Genomes published for major agricultural weeds
Representing some of the most troublesome agricultural weeds, waterhemp, smooth pigweed, and Palmer amaranth impact crop production systems across the U.S. and elsewhere with ripple effects felt by economies worldwide. In a landmark study, scientists have published the most comprehensive genome information to date for all three species, marking a new era of scientific discovery toward potential so
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How sticklebacks dominate perch
A research project on algal blooms along the Swedish coast, caused by eutrophication, revealed that large predators such as perch and pike are also necessary to restrict these blooms. Ecologist Britas Klemens Eriksson from the University of Groningen and his colleagues from Stockholm University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden have now shown that stickleback domination m
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Dealing a blow on monetarism
This year's third issue of the Financial Journal opens with an article by Marina Malkina, Professor at the Department of Economic Theory and Methodology of the UNN Institute of Economics and Entrepreneurship, and Igor Moiseev, research assistant at the Center for Macroeconomics and Microeconomics of the same Institute. Their article entitled "Endogeneity of Money Supply in the Russian Economy in t
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High walk and bike scores associated with greater crash risk
Neighborhoods with high bikeability and walkability scores actually present higher crash risks to cyclists and pedestrians in Vancouver, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.
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Genomes published for major agricultural weeds
Representing some of the most troublesome agricultural weeds, waterhemp, smooth pigweed, and Palmer amaranth impact crop production systems across the U.S. and elsewhere with ripple effects felt by economies worldwide. In a landmark study, scientists have published the most comprehensive genome information to date for all three species, marking a new era of scientific discovery toward potential so
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Artificial intelligence learns continental hydrology
The data sets on the Earth's gravitational field which are required for this, stem from the GRACE and GRACE-FO satellite missions. Using the South American continent as an example, the Earth system modellers at the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ, have developed a new Deep-Learning-Method, which quantifies small as well as large-scale changes to the water storage with the help of satell
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NASA sees Hurricane Laura's nighttime landfall
Many NASA assets were used to provide forecasters with information to incorporate into their analysis of Hurricane Laura. Satellite imagery, photographs from the International Space Station, and a computer program that produces animations of imagery are all things that NASA used to analyze the storm.
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For healthcare organizations responding to COVID-19, 'creative destruction' leads to accelerated innovation
COVID-19 has upended essentially every sector of the economy, and none more so than healthcare. Healthcare leaders from across the United States share their experiences with disruption and innovation in responding to the COVID-19 crisis in the Fall 2020 issue of Frontiers of Health Services Management, a publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE). This journal is published
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Research brief: How genetics could impact COVID-19 treatments
U of M study looked at how pharmacogenomics could improve the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 drug therapies.
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When liver cirrhosis is deadly
A study by an international team of researchers headed by Professor Jonel Trebicka from the Frankfurt University Hospital and funded by the foundation EF Clif, has discovered which patients are particularly at risk for acute-on-chronic liver failure. With their findings, the scientists have laid the foundation for the development of preventive therapy to prevent acute-on-chronic liver failure.
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How Close Are Computers to Automating Mathematical Reasoning?
In the 1970s, the late mathematician Paul Cohen, the only person to ever win a Fields Medal for work in mathematical logic, reportedly made a sweeping prediction that continues to excite and irritate mathematicians — that "at some unspecified future time, mathematicians would be replaced by computers." Cohen, legendary for his daring methods in set theory, predicted that all of mathematics could
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Local lockdowns based on arbitrary figures are punishing England's poorest | Carl Heneghan
The coronavirus watchlist system is a new version of an old rule: people given the least protection are the ones who need it the most Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As a general practitioner, Julian Tudor Hart lived and worked in south Wales. He pioneered much of what now constitutes modern routine preventive care, seeking out those most in need. His research from t
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Toilet training your cat isn't as great as it sounds
Litter boxes allow cats to fulfill their natural instincts, such as digging and covering after going to the bathroom. (Unsplash/) Ever wish you could peer into your cat, dog, skink, or betta fish's brain? It would give you a far better perspective of the world—or at least help you be a smarter pet parent. We're here to demystify your animals (to some extent), while also shedding advice on how you
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NBA Players Put America on Notice
Updated at 2:28 p.m. ET on August 27, 2020. Back in June, before the NBA began playing in its Florida bubble, the Brooklyn Nets star Kyrie Irving was passionately opposed to continuing the season. The death of George Floyd under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer the previous month had prompted a national upheaval over racial injustice. On a conference call with more than 80 players, The At
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How Italy's 'father of the swabs' fought the virus
Microbiologist Andrea Crisanti defied the authorities to launch his testing campaign
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Rare encounters between cosmic heavyweights
Astronomers have discovered three pairs of merging galaxies. Each of the galaxies contain a supermassive black hole that's feasting on material surrounding it, creating a phenomenon called a quasar. These luminous dual quasars are rare; only about 0.3% of all known quasars have two supermassive black holes that are on a collision course with each other.
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Decoded: The structure of the barrier between three cells
Organs in animals and in humans have one thing in common: they are bounded by so-called epithelial cells. Researchers at the Institute of Animal Physiology at the University of Munster have found out how two proteins called Anakonda and M6 interact in epithelial cells in fruit flies in order to produce a functioning barrier at corner points between three of those cells. The study has been publishe
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Evidence of hibernation-like state in Antarctic animal
Among the many winter survival strategies in the animal world, hibernation is one of the most common. According to new research, this type of adaptation has a long history. In a paper published in the journal Communications Biology, scientists at Harvard University and the University of Washington report evidence of a hibernation-like state in an animal that lived in Antarctica during the Early Tr
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The mosquito strategy that could eliminate dengue
Nature, Published online: 27 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02492-1 Infecting the insects with a bacterium to stop disease transmission produces 'staggering' reduction in cases.
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Device speeds up tests for lead in water
A miniature device can measure trace levels of toxic lead in sediments at the bottom of harbors, rivers, and other waterways within minutes, researchers report. That's far faster than currently available laboratory-based tests, which take days. "…someday you could go to a sushi bar and check whether the fish you ordered has lead or mercury in it." The affordable lab-on-a-chip device could also al
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Russian scientists predicted increased unrest in the United States back in 2010
Beginning in May 2020, after the police killing of George Floyd, a Black American man, 'Black Lives Matter' demonstrations and riots engulfed the United States, the United Kingdom, and several European countries. Though Mr. Floyd's killing served as the immediate catalyst for the unrest, many scholars suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic crisis played a deeper, more pivota
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Ocean acidification causing coral 'osteoporosis' on iconic reefs
Scientists have long suspected that ocean acidification is affecting corals' ability to build their skeletons, but it has been challenging to isolate its effect from that of simultaneous warming ocean temperatures, which also influence coral growth. New research from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) reveals the distinct impact that ocean acidification is having on coral growth on so
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Gout treatment may aid patients with congenital heart disease
A drug used to treat gout, probenecid, may improve heart function in individuals with a particular heart defect, according to results from a small pilot study run by a University of Cincinnati researcher. Individuals with congenital univentricular circulation ran better and their heart performed better while taking probenecid. The change was small partially because of the small number of study par
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FEFU scientists are paving way for future tiny electronics and gadgets
Scientists of the School of Natural Sciences of Far Eastern Federal University (SNS FEFU) with colleagues from Russia, South Korea, and Australia suggest the breaking new ground approach to manage spin-electronic properties and functionality of the thin-film magnetic nanosystems. The method is important for the development of a new generation of tiny electronics (spin-orbitronics) and superfast hi
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'Racial Inequality May Be As Deadly As COVID-19,' Analysis Finds
A century of U.S. statistics finds mortality rates and life expectancy were much worse for Black Americans during pre-pandemic y ears than they have been for white people during the COVID-19 crisis. (Image credit: Matt Rourke/AP)
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A topography of extremes
Scientists have successfully combined various extreme experimental conditions in a unique way, revealing exciting insights into the conducting properties of the crystalline metal CeRhIn5. They report on their exploration of previously uncharted regions of the metal´s phase diagram, which is considered a promising model system for understanding unconventional superconductors.
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Playfulness can be trained – here's why you should do it
Simple exercises can help to make people more playful and consequently feel more satisfied with their lives. This has been revealed in a new study by psychologists. The researchers had participants in an experiment perform a week of exercises to boost their playfulness. They found that the trait can be stimulated and trained – and that this improves a person's mood.
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Call of the wild: Individual dolphin calls used to estimate population size and movement
A new study has shown for the first time that acoustic monitoring can be used in place of photographs to generate abundance estimates of dolphin populations.
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Are all vegetarian diets healthy?
Vegetarian foods are not equally healthy, according to new research.
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Gut microbes could unlock the secret to healthy aging
Bacteria and other microorganisms in the digestive tract are linked with dozens of health conditions including high blood pressure, high blood lipids, and body mass index (BMI) according to new research.
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Spouses shed more pounds together than alone
Weight loss is most successful in heart attack survivors when partners join in the effort to diet, according to new research.
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Contributors to the black-white life expectancy gap in Washington D.C.
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70046-6
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Could Carbon-Foam Probes Sail to Nearby Stars?
Boosted by sunlight, "bubblecraft" might reach Proxima Centauri after a 185-year voyage — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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South African wildlife management/conservation models do not protect carnivores equally
In results released this week, an international team of wildlife ecologists reports that the trend toward more reliance on private game farms and reserves to manage and conserve free-ranging carnivores in South Africa is more complicated than it appears – "a mosaic" of unequal protection across different land management types. The private areas do not play the same role, and may not be a conservat
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Quantum simulation of quantum crystals
International research team describes the new possibilities offered by the use of ultracold dipolar atoms
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How sticklebacks dominate perch
A research project on algal blooms along the Swedish coast, caused by eutrophication, revealed that large predators such as perch and pike are also necessary to restrict these blooms. Ecologists from the Netherlands and Sweden have now shown that stickleback domination moves like a wave through the island archipelagos, changing the ecosystem from predator-dominated to algae-dominated. Their study
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Vertebral body tethering shows clinical success as treatment for scoliosis
Scoliosis is the most common spinal deformity affecting pediatric patients. A posterior spinal fusion (PSF) is the gold standard treatment for patients with curves exceeding 45 degrees, but the procedure's drawbacks include the loss of spinal mobility, persistent pain and adjacent segment disc disease. However, a new retrospective study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine shows an a
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A spatial regime shift to stickleback dominance
Large numbers of three-spined stickleback have gradually taken over larger parts of the Baltic Sea's coastal ecosystem, shows a new scientific study. Stickleback is a small prey fish common in aquatic food webs across temperate Europe. The stickleback contributes to local ecosystem 'regime shifts', where young-of-the-year pike and perch decline in individual bays, and these shifts gradually spread
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Cochlear implants should be recommended for adults more often
An international group of hearing specialists has released a new set of recommendations emphasizing that cochlear implants should be offered to adults who have moderate to severe or worse hearing loss much more often than is the current practice. The group hopes the recommendations help increase usage of such devices, potentially improving hearing and quality of life for millions worldwide.
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Breakthrough in using stem cells to treat enteric nervous system disorders
Scientists have made a breakthrough in understanding how the enteric nervous system forms, which could pave the way for new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's.
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Newly discovered rare dinosaur embryos show sauropods had rhino-like horns
An incredibly rare dinosaur embryo discovered perfectly preserved inside its egg has shown scientists new details of the development and appearance of sauropods which lived 80 million years ago.
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AI as good as the average radiologist in identifying breast cancer
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital in Sweden have compared the ability of three different artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms to identify breast cancer based on previously taken mammograms. The best algorithm proved to be as accurate as the average radiologist. The results, published in JAMA Oncology, may lead the way in reorganising breast cancer screening
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The Le Teil earthquake provides new insights on seismic risk in France and Western Europe
On 11 November 2019, a magnitude 5 earthquake occurred near the village of Le Teil in the Rhône River Valley in southern France producing an unexpected surface rupture with ground displacement. For the first time in France, scientists had the opportunity to use all modern seismological, geodetical, and geological techniques available to study this historically unprecedented seismic event. Their re
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Archaeology: Ceramic cooking pots record history of ancient food practices
Analysing three components of ceramic cooking pots — charred remains, inner surface residues and lipids absorbed within the ceramic walls — may help archaeologists uncover detailed timelines of culinary cooking practices used by ancient civilizations. The findings, from a year-long cooking experiment, are published this week in Scientific Reports.
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Life expectancy gap between Black and white people in Washington, DC, analyzed
Heart disease, homicide and cancer are leading contributing factors to stark differences in life expectancy between Black people and white people in Washington, DC, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.
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Early Cambrian fossil discovery gives new understanding into the origin of hemichordates
A half-a-billion years old fossil species of marine animal sheds light on how the anatomies of the two main types of an animal group called the hemichordates are related, and provides new evidence in the historical debate among zoologists. The fossils are over half-a-billion years old and were discovered at a Burgess Shale site in the Canadian Rockies by scientists at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM
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First 3D look at an embryonic sauropod dinosaur reveals unexpected facial features
About 25 years ago, researchers discovered the first dinosaur embryos in an enormous nesting ground of titanosaurian dinosaurs. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on August 27 describe the first near-intact embryonic skull. The finding adds to our understanding of the development of sauropod dinosaurs, like the long-necked Brontosaurus, and suggests that they may have had specialized fa
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A chiral surprise in the rainforest
Forests such as the Amazon rainforest emit huge amounts of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) into the atmosphere. These compounds impact the physical and chemical properties of the atmosphere and also our climate. The molecules react rapidly with ambient OH radicals and ozone, thereby influencing the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere for pollutants such as carbon monoxide and greenhous
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Atlantic sturgeon in the king's pantry: Unique discovery in Baltic Sea wreck from 1495
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden can now reveal what the Danish King Hans had planned to offer when laying claim to the Swedish throne in 1495: a two-meter-long Atlantic sturgeon. The well-preserved fish remains were found in a wreck on the bottom of the Baltic Sea last year, and species identification was made possible through DNA analysis.
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Scientist: We Should Grant the Moon Legal Personhood
New Neighbor Many space agencies and private space companies see the Moon as a treasure trove of resources to use for long-term outposts or settlements. That has some scientists worried, because harvesting lunar ice or minerals could damage its environment through contamination or outright destruction. Conservationists already have a tough enough time protecting landmarks on Earth — so keeping th
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Tesla Driver, Watching Movie on Autopilot, Slams Into Police Cars
Crash Course North Carolina NBC affiliate WRAL reports that a Raleigh doctor named Devainder Goli was watching a movie on his phone, while his Tesla was on Autopilot, when the vehicle narrowly missed one police vehicle only to slam into two more. "Luckily, the state trooper pushed our deputy out of the way when he heard the tires squall and in an instant we could have lost a life or several lives
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Scientists: Bacteria Could Survive Trip to Mars on Outside of Spacecraft
The Hitcher Researchers in Japan say that a sample of bacteria managed to survive in the vacuum of space, on the exterior of the International Space Station, for three entire years — raising the possibility that errant organisms could unknowing hitch a ride to Mars on an exploration mission. "The results suggest that [bacteria] could survive during the travel from Earth to Mars and vice versa, wh
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Five cool ways to upcycle old coffee sacks
You see burlap, we see couture. ( Thomas Thompson / Unsplash/) Fresh coffee goes stale too fast to travel far. The beans in that daily espresso you get from your local shop were probably roasted just a few miles down the road—or even in the shop itself. Your local independent roaster is probably buying big bags of raw coffee from Asia, South America, or Africa, and the burlap bags it comes in— pr
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Early Cambrian fossil discovery gives new understanding into the origin of hemichordates
New research undertaken by scientists at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and University of Montreal, has uncovered fossils of a new species of marine animal, Gyaltsenglossus senis, (pronounced Gen-zay-gloss-us senis) that provides new evidence in the historical debate among zoologists: how the anatomies of the two main types of an animal group called
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First 3D look at an embryonic sauropod dinosaur reveals unexpected facial features
About 25 years ago, researchers discovered the first dinosaur embryos in an enormous nesting ground of titanosaurian dinosaurs that lived about 80 million years ago in a place known as Auca Mahuevo in Patagonia, Argentina. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on August 27 describe the first near-intact embryonic skull. The finding adds to our understanding of the development o
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Ceramic cooking pots record history of ancient food practices
Analyzing three components of ceramic cooking pots—charred remains, inner surface residues and lipids absorbed within the ceramic walls—may help archaeologists uncover detailed timelines of culinary cooking practices used by ancient civilizations. The findings, from a year-long cooking experiment, are published this week in Scientific Reports.
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Fossil Reveals 'One of the Cutest Dinosaurs' Ever Found
While many fossils have been flattened by time and the elements, a titanosaur found in an egg was preserved in three dimensions.
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250 Million Years Ago, They Hibernated at the Bottom of the World
In the tusks of creatures that lived before dinosaurs, paleontologists found signs of hibernation-like metabolism.
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How the US medical community fails Black mothers | Wanda Irving
In the US, Black women are nearly 300 percent more likely to die as a result of childbirth than white women. Sharing appalling statistics on maternal mortality as well as her own tragic story of loss, Wanda Irving explains how racism and bias in health care minimizes and dismisses Black women's pain — and makes a personal plea for leaders in the medical community to take steps toward reform.
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A tiny fish takes on its predators—and wins, transforming the Baltic coast
Predator-prey reversal has dramatically altered the underwater ecosystem
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Reduce insecticide spraying by using ant pheromones to catch crop pests
Scientists have developed a molecular sponge that soaks up the pheromones of ants and releases them slowly to attract the pests to an insecticide trap.
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First complete dinosaur skeleton ever found is ready for its closeup at last
The first complete dinosaur skeleton ever identified has finally been studied in detail and found its place in the dinosaur family tree, completing a project that began more than a century and a half ago.
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Artificial pancreas effectively controls type 1 diabetes in children age 6 and up
A clinical trial at four pediatric diabetes centers in the United States has found that a new artificial pancreas system — which automatically monitors and regulates blood glucose levels — is safe and effective at managing blood glucose levels in children as young as age six with type 1 diabetes.
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Female chromosomes offer resilience to Alzheimer's
Women live longer than men with Alzheimer's because their sex chromosomes give them genetic protection from the ravages of the disease. Women get two 'doses' of a gene that only exists on the X chromosome. And some people, both male and female, have an especially potent variant of this gene. Long-term studies of older people, many of whom already had mild cognitive impairment, showed women with on
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Majority of groundwater stores resilient to climate change
Fewer of the world's large aquifers are depleting than previously estimated, according to a new study.
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High walk and bike scores associated with greater crash risk
Neighbourhoods with high bikeability and walkability scores actually present higher crash risks to cyclists and pedestrians in Vancouver, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.
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Engineers use heat-free technology to make metallic replicas of a rose's surface texture
Iowa State's Martin Thuo and his research group have developed technology to make metallic replicas of soft, natural surfaces such as rose petals. The team's metallic surfaces retained properties of the originals, including a rose petal's sticky, yet water-repelling textures.
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Genomes published for major agricultural weeds
Representing some of the most troublesome agricultural weeds, waterhemp, smooth pigweed, and Palmer amaranth impact crop production systems across the US and elsewhere with ripple effects felt by economies worldwide. In a landmark study, scientists have published the most comprehensive genome information to date for all three species, marking a new era of scientific discovery toward potential solu
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Scientists establish first lethal mouse model for COVID-19
Army scientists have developed the first lethal mouse model of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, using mice that were genetically engineered to express the human ACE2 gene — a key mechanism by which the virus enters human cells. In addition to shedding light on the pathogenesis of COVID-19, this work directly contributes to the advancement of medical countermeasures against the virus.
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Methane: emissions increase and it's not a good news
It is the second greenhouse gas with even a global warming potential larger than CO2. An international study realized in the framework of the Global Carbon Project provides updated information and data on its increasing concentrations in the atmosphere. Eyes on many sectors, such as agriculture, waste and fossil fuel sectors. Among the authors, CMCC researchers Simona Castaldi and Sergio Noce.
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Duchenne: "Crosstalk" between muscle and spleen
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common muscle disease in children and is passed on by X-linked recessive inheritance. Characteristic is a progressive muscular atrophy. The disease often results in death before the third decade of life. Researchers of the Universities of Maynooth (Ireland) and Bonn have found a connection between dystrophic muscles and the lymphatic system in mice wit
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How climate change may reshape pine plantations
Climate change is going to change a lot of things, which might include how we manage the pine plantations that are found across much of the southern landscape – and which play an important role in the wood and paper industry.
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On the track of unconventional superconductivity, researchers are charting unknown territory
An international team of scientists from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, and colleagues from the USA and Switzerland have successfully combined various extreme experimental conditions in a completely unique way, revealing exciting insights into the mysterious conducting properties of the crystalline metal CeRhIn5. In the jou
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Scientists perfect knot-tying techniques with molecular string
A group of chemists from Manchester have successfully tied a series of microscopic knots using individual molecules for the first time, ushering in the advent of a form of nano-scale weaving which could create a new generation of advanced materials.
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Image: Sensing the moon
A new sensor to identify lunar volatiles is being assembled in a clean room at The Open University, UK ahead of some exciting missions to the moon.
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Monitoring the Arctic heatwave
,Over the past months, the Arctic has experienced alarmingly high temperatures, extreme wildfires and a significant loss of sea ice. While hot summer weather is not uncommon in the Arctic, the region is warming at two to three times the global average—impacting nature and humanity on a global scale. Observations from space offer a unique opportunity to understand the changes occurring in this remo
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Version2 vinder journalistpris for afdækning af sim-sløseri i telebranchen
Version2 har gennem længere tid afdækket, hvordan man i danske telebutikker let kan få udleveret aktive sim-kort uden at fremvise det påkrævede billede-id. Den praksis gør borgere sårbare overfor en lang række angreb, og afdækningen udløste i dag Anders Bordings journalistpris til to Version2-jou…
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Call of the wild: Individual dolphin calls used to estimate population size and movement
An international team of scientists has succeeded in using the signature whistles of individual bottlenose dolphins to estimate the size of the population and track their movement.
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Call of the wild: Individual dolphin calls used to estimate population size and movement
An international team of scientists has succeeded in using the signature whistles of individual bottlenose dolphins to estimate the size of the population and track their movement.
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UVA-developed artificial pancreas effective for children ages 6-13, study finds
An artificial pancreas originally developed at the University of Virginia Center for Diabetes Technology safely and effectively manages blood sugar levels in children ages 6 to 13 with type 1 diabetes, a national clinical trial has found. Data from this and other studies has prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to approve the device for use by children ages 6 and older.
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Elderly in the US: Risk of dementia has been rising for years – instead of falling
Risk of cognitive impairment increased from 1996 to 2014.
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Why 'one day at a time' works for recovering alcoholics
"One day at a time" is a mantra for recovering alcoholics, for whom each day without a drink builds the strength to go on to the next. A new brain imaging study by Yale researchers shows why the approach works.
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A chiral surprise in the rainforest
Reversed ratio of chiral volatile organic compounds over the Amazon rainforest reveal insects as unexplored important source of forest emissions.
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How to make AI trustworthy
One of the biggest impediments to adoption of new technologies is trust in AI.Now, a new tool developed by USC Viterbi Engineering researchers generates automatic indicators if data and predictions generated by AI algorithms are trustworthy
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Binding sites for protein-making machinery
ETH Zurich researchers can predict how tightly a cell's protein synthesis machinery will bind to RNA sequences – even when dealing with many billions of different RNA sequences. This binding plays a key role in determining how much of a specific protein is produced. The scientists are developing their prediction model using a combination of synthetic biology experiments and machine learning algori
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A topography of extremes
An international team of scientists from Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, and colleagues from the USA and Switzerland have successfully combined various extreme experimental conditions in a unique way, revealing exciting insights into the conducting properties of the crystalline metal CeRhIn5. In Nature Communications, they report on their
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Trapping of acetylene
Ethylene, a key feedstock in the chemical industry, often includes traces of acetylene contaminants, which need to be removed. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers describe a robust and regenerable porous metal-organic framework that captures acetylene with extraordinary efficiency and selectively. Its synergistic combination of tailor-made pore sizes and chemical docking sites makes the
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Just how cold was the Ice Age? New study finds the temperature.
A new study analyzes fossil data to find the average temperatures during the last ice age. This period of time, about 20,000 years ago, had the average temperature of about 46 degrees Fahrenheit (7.8 C). The study has implications for understanding climate change. How cold was the Ice Age? While one can imagine layers of ice covering everything around the world, that's not exactly what happened.
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All that glitters is not gold: Misuse of AI by big tech can harm developing countries
Artificial Intelligence (AI) has generated considerable interest over the past few decades, owing to its promising applications across a wide range of fields. But, it has also sparked an ongoing debate on whether the risks of using AI outweigh its benefits. The biggest concern with AI is a lack of governance, which gives large companies (popularly called as the "Big Tech") unlimited access to priv
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Big data delivers important new tool in conservation decision making
The Harry Butler Institute has collaborated with researchers around the world to develop a new tool to inform conservation decisions across Europe. The research is poised to have a direct and immediate impact—on both science and practice.
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Why wasps become so annoying at the end of summer
The sausages are sizzling, the burgers browned, and the beer is cold. You're all set for the perfect end-of-summer BBQ. Alfresco dining, drinks in a garden of a country pub, ice-creams—we grasp at the last shreds of summer, precious times with loved ones before an uncertain winter of local lockdowns and Zoom.
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New Cretaceous Jehol fossil sheds light on evolution of ancestral mammalian middle ear
A joint research team led by Dr. Mao Fangyuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Prof. Meng Jin from the American Museum of Natural History has reported a new multituberculate mammal, Sinobaatar pani, with well-preserved middle ear bones.
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Topological superconducting phase protected by 1-D local magnetic symmetries
Topological superconductors (TSCs) are new kind of topological quantum states with fully superconducting gapped band structure in the bulk, but they support gapless excitations called Majorana zero modes (MZMs) at the boundaries. Because of their nonlocal correlation and non-Abelian statistic nature, MZMs are proposed as the qubits of topological quantum computation. Hence, searching and operating
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Technology and planning help museums manage outdated exhibitions
Museum exhibitions are all about the "Wow!", "What?" and "Why?" as they showcase beauty and wonder, spark curiosity, and share some of the important lessons museum scientists have learnt through detailed study of these objects.
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Gas reaches young stars along magnetic field lines
Astronomers have used the GRAVITY instrument to study the immediate vicinity of a young star in more detail than ever before. Their observations confirm a thirty-year-old theory about the growth of young stars: the magnetic field produced by the star itself directs material from a surrounding accretion disk of gas and dust onto its surface. The results, published today in the journal Nature, help
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Big data delivers important new tool in conservation decision making
The Harry Butler Institute has collaborated with researchers around the world to develop a new tool to inform conservation decisions across Europe. The research is poised to have a direct and immediate impact—on both science and practice.
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Ocean acidification causing coral 'osteoporosis' on iconic reefs
Scientists have long suspected that ocean acidification is affecting corals' ability to build their skeletons, but it has been challenging to isolate its effect from that of simultaneous warming ocean temperatures, which also influence coral growth. New research from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) reveals the distinct impact that ocean acidification is having on coral growth on so
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Hurricanes Like Laura Are More Likely Because Of Climate Change
Hurricane Laura rapidly intensified before it made landfall. Abnormally hot water in the Gulf of Mexico helped it gain power. (Image credit: NOAA via AP)
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Research illuminates new element of plant immune defense response to biotic stress
Plants are at the mercy of many stresses, both abiotic, such as drought and heat, and biotic, such as pathogens. Researchers know that the plant immune system often responds to infection with an increased cytosolic calcium concentration, which activates immune response regulators. Previous research has studied the cytosolic calcium response in Physcomitrella patens (a moss plant often used in stud
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Top 1% of EU households have carbon footprints 22 times larger than climate targets allow
To keep global warming below 1.5°C, we need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to 2.5 tonnes of CO₂ per person per year by 2030. But we recently analysed more than 275,000 household budget surveys from 26 countries for an academic study, and we found that only about 5% of EU households live within these limits.
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Why wasps become so annoying at the end of summer
The sausages are sizzling, the burgers browned, and the beer is cold. You're all set for the perfect end-of-summer BBQ. Alfresco dining, drinks in a garden of a country pub, ice-creams—we grasp at the last shreds of summer, precious times with loved ones before an uncertain winter of local lockdowns and Zoom.
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Research illuminates new element of plant immune defense response to biotic stress
Plants are at the mercy of many stresses, both abiotic, such as drought and heat, and biotic, such as pathogens. Researchers know that the plant immune system often responds to infection with an increased cytosolic calcium concentration, which activates immune response regulators. Previous research has studied the cytosolic calcium response in Physcomitrella patens (a moss plant often used in stud
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DNA repair – Locating and severing lethal links
Covalent cross-links between proteins and DNA are among the most hazardous types of DNA damage. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have now characterized an enzyme that breaks such bonds, and elucidated how it specifically recognizes sites of damage.
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Atlantic sturgeon in the king's pantry — unique discovery in Baltic sea wreck from 1495
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden can now reveal what the Danish King Hans had planned to offer when laying claim to the Swedish throne in 1495: A two-metre-long Atlantic sturgeon. The well-preserved fish remains were found in a wreck on the bottom of the Baltic Sea last year, and species identification was made possible through DNA analysis.
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Two discoveries boost next-generation organoid development
Scientists from Cincinnati Children's and RIKEN in Japan report detecting a set of signals within the foregut–a proto-organ in very early-stage embryos–that trigger how and when the other organs form. Specifically, they found that the signals are driven by the genes Wnt and SHH, which travel between cells in the endoderm and mesoderm layers of very early embryos. The discovery will help experts
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New genetic markers of glucosinolates in rapeseed may help improve oil composition
A group of scientists performed a genetic analysis of the Russian rapeseed collection. The research was published in the Genes journal. Scientists described the genetic diversity of Russian rapeseed lines and discovered new candidate genes that are potentially involved in controlling the content of glucosinolates, toxic secondary metabolites in rapeseed oil. Their findings can be used by crop bree
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Call of the wild: Individual dolphin calls used to estimate population size and movement
A new study has shown for the first time that acoustic monitoring can be used in place of photographs to generate abundance estimates of dolphin populations.
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Photonics researchers report breakthrough in miniaturizing light-based chips
Electrical engineers at the University of Rochester have created the smallest electro-optical modulator yet, using a thin film of lithium niobate bonded on a silicon dioxide layer. This key component of a photonics-based chip controls how light moves through its circuits and has broad applications in data communication, microwave photonics, and quantum photonics.
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Dealing a blow on monetarism
This year's third issue of the Financial Journal opens with an article by Marina Malkina, Professor at the Department of Economic Theory and Methodology of the UNN Institute of Economics and Entrepreneurship, and Igor Moiseev, research assistant at the Center for Macroeconomics and Microeconomics of the same Institute. Their article entitled "Endogeneity of Money Supply in the Russian Economy in t
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The Newtonian gravitational constant: Latest advances of the measurements
The Newtonian gravitational constant G, which is one of the most important fundamental physical constants in nature, describes the strength of the gravitational interaction between objects, while it is considered to be one of the most difficult to measure accurately so far due to the extreme weakness and unshieldability of gravity. Scientists based in Sun Yat-sen University and Huazhong University
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All that glitters is not gold: Misuse of AI by big tech can harm developing countries
The debate on the risks and benefits of Artificial Intelligence (AI) is still ongoing, but one thing is certain: without appropriate regulatory measures, AI is potentially dangerous. A recent study explores how AI can be a threat to the society, especially developing nations, if left unregulated. The study also talks about why AI should comply with the Sustainable Development Goals set by the Unit
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New tool identifies which cancer patients are most likely to benefit from immunotherapy
A new diagnostic tool that can predict whether a cancer patient would respond to immunotherapy treatment has been developed by scientists at the University of Bath. This advance in precision medicine will allow clinicians to tailor treatments specifically to patients and avoid treatment paths that are unlikely to be successful.
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Lung injuries from vaping have characteristic patterns on CT
Injuries to the lungs from vaping have suggestive patterns on CT scans that could help physicians make accurate diagnoses and reduce unnecessary biopsies, according to a new study.
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Researchers identify RNA molecule that helps lung cancer cells evade immune system
Researchers in Spain have identified a non-coding RNA molecule that helps lung cancer cells proliferate and avoid being killed by the body's immune cells. The study, which will be published August 27 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that targeting this RNA molecule could boost the effectiveness of immunotherapies that are currently only successful in ~20% of lung cancer patients.
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Researchers identify mechanism underlying cancer cells' immune evasion
Researchers in China have discovered how brain cancer cells increase production of a key protein that allows them to evade the body's immune system. The study, which will be published August 27 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that targeting this cellular pathway could help treat the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma, as well as other cancers that are resistant to current for
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Research illuminates new element of plant immune defense response to biotic stress
A collaboration between scientists with the Vidali at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and the Centro de Biotecnología y Genómica de Plantas in Madrid resulted in the first article addressing the involvement of cytosolic calcium oscillations and waves in the immune response of P. patens to a biotic stress. Specifically, the scientists administered chitin oligosaccharides to simulate a fungal infect
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Hurricane Laura is the strongest storm to hit Louisiana in more than a century
Hurricane Laura sweeping inland on Thursday morning (NOAA/) Hurricane Laura made landfall as a Category 4 storm in the early hours of Thursday morning, with winds just a few miles per hour shy of the Category 5 mark . Wind speeds hit 150 mph, tying with a hurricane from 1856 for the strongest storm to ever hit Louisiana. Laura has now been downgraded to Category 2 storm , but it's still barreling
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With More People Getting Outside This Summer, Scientists Wonder if Lyme Disease Cases Will Jump
It's too soon to know exactly how the pandemic will influence Lyme disease cases. But experts speculate that common viral infection symptoms could cause some confusion.
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Psychologist suggests negative impact of pandemic on friendships likely to be fleeting
Robin Ian MacDonald Dunbar, a psychologist at the University of Oxford, has conducted a review of the literature and concluded that the impact of the pandemic on friendships is likely to be fleeting. He has published a paper in Proceedings of the Royal Society A outlining his research and findings, and his theories regarding the impact of the pandemic on social networks.
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Deer researchers see face coverings differently
For students who work in the University of Georgia's Deer Research Laboratory, the concept of face coverings is not new.
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Deer researchers see face coverings differently
For students who work in the University of Georgia's Deer Research Laboratory, the concept of face coverings is not new.
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Separation of trace acetylene from ethylene in ultramicroporous metal–Organic frameworks
Ethylene, a key feedstock in the chemical industry, often includes traces of acetylene contaminants, which need to be removed. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers describe a robust and regenerable porous metal–organic framework that captures acetylene with extraordinary efficiency and selectively. Its synergistic combination of tailor-made pore sizes and chemical docking sites makes the
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Svenskerne satser på CO2-fri stålproduktion
PLUS. Mandag åbner den svenske statsminister et nyt procesanlæg, der skal producere miljøvenligt stål.
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Protecting estuarine cities from rising sea levels
As climate change raises sea levels, estuarine cities are facing up to the dual threat of flooding and significant erosion. Research by a joint team from EPFL and the UNSW Sydney sheds new light on the hydrodynamic forces at play and paves the way for preventive strategies.
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From the Neolithic to the modern day: York's rich history revealed during major archaeological dig
The results of a major archeological dig—which included the discovery of a 2,500-year-old brain—on what is now the University of York's Campus East have been published.
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Finnish town offers prizes to turn residents green
Inhabitants of a town in Finland can now earn rewards, including bus tickets or free food, if they cut car use, under a scheme to lure the public into lower-carbon lifestyles.
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Waymo Just Started Testing Its Driverless Trucks in Texas
It's been almost four years since Uber shipped 50,000 cans of beer across Colorado in a self-driving truck . It was the first-ever commercial shipment completed using self-driving technology. Now competitor Waymo is launching a much larger driverless trucking experiment. With a new hub in Dallas, Waymo's heavy-duty trucks took to the Texas roads this week to start the company's road testing of it
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La Nina likely, but temperatures set to remain high: UN
Global temperatures boosted by climate change will still be higher than usual despite the cooling effect of a La Nina weather phenomenon expected to develop in the coming months, the UN said Thursday.
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Using light-harvesting polymers to speed up photosynthesis in algae
A team of researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences has found a way to speed up photosynthesis in algae by applying a conjugated polymer. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes experiments with applying polymers to algae and what they learned from them.
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Harvey's overall impact dwarfs subsequent storms, Texas Flood Registry finds
Hurricane Harvey ravaged the Houston area three years ago, but as another major storm threatens the upper Texas coast, a new report from the Texas Flood Registry shows the 2017 disaster's lasting impact is felt more strongly than that of subsequent storms, including Tropical Storm Imelda.
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Using light-harvesting polymers to speed up photosynthesis in algae
A team of researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences has found a way to speed up photosynthesis in algae by applying a conjugated polymer. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes experiments with applying polymers to algae and what they learned from them.
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Playfulness can be trained – here's why you should do it
Simple exercises can help to make people more playful and consequently feel more satisfied with their lives. This has been revealed in a new study by psychologists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) in the journal "Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being". The researchers had participants in an experiment perform a week of exercises to boost their playfulness. They found that t
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Molecular dispersion enhances quasi-bilayer organic solar cells
Based on a polymeric donor PBDBT-2F and a nonfullerene (NF) acceptor Y6, researchers proposed a strategy to improve the properties of photovoltaic performances in PHJ-based OSCs through dilute dispersions of the PBDBT-2F donor into the acceptor-dominant phase with the sequential film deposition.
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A Politecnico di Milano study reveals DNA "grammar"
DNA three-dimensional structure is determined by a series of spatial rules based on particular protein sequences and their order. This was the finding of a study recently published in Genome Biology by Luca Nanni, PhD student in Computer Science and Engineering at Politecnico di Milano, together with Professors Stefano Ceri of the same University and Colin Logie of the University of Nijmegen.
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Japanese sake: the new pick-me-up? Yeast strain makes fatigue-fighting ornithine
Researchers from the Nara Institute of Science and Technology and the Nara Prefecture Institute of Industrial Development have found that that a mutant strain of sake yeast produces high levels of the amino acid ornithine. Ornithine has been found to reduce fatigue and improve sleep quality, and the non-genetically modified mutant yeast strain discovered in this study could be easily applied to br
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Study examines link between sperm quality and light from devices at night
Men might want to think twice before reaching for their smartphone at night. A new study found correlations between electronic media use at night and poor sperm quality.
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Study finds 'nomophobia' is associated with poor sleep health in college students
A new study found that the fear of being out of mobile phone contact — 'nomophobia' — is extremely common among college students and is associated with poor sleep health.
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Octupole corner state in a three-dimensional topological circuit
Higher-order topological insulators featuring quantized bulk polarizations and zero-dimensional corner states are attracting increasing interest due to their strong mode confinement. Recently, scientists from China and UK demonstrated in a 3D topological circuit the existence of octupole corner state, which is induced by the octupole moment of the bulk circuit and topologically protected by three
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Study finds association between nightmares and heart disease in veterans
A new study found a surprising association between frequent and severe nightmares and cardiovascular disease in veterans, even after controlling for post-traumatic stress disorder.
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New Cretaceous Jehol fossil sheds light on evolution of ancestral mammalian middle ear
A joint research team led by Dr. MAO Fangyuan from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Prof. MENG Jin from the American Museum of Natural History identified various evolutionary stages and ancestral phenotypes of the mammalian middle ear from a new multituberculate mammal from the Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota in Northeast Chi
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How a 19-year-old lion fathered 35 cubs in 18 months
Lion tamer at work. Though no evidence is available, the mustachioed man is unlikely to have survived this scene. (Library of Congress, 1873/) Popular Science 's WILD LIVES is a monthly video series that dives like an Emperor penguin into the life and times of history's noteworthy animals. With every episode debut on Youtube, we'll be publishing a story about the featured beasts, plus a lot more
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Where now for renewable energy on farms?
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For the first time, humans have been placed in biostasis
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In a first, a person's immune system fought HIV — and won
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Robots smaller than the eye can see could revolutionise micro-robotics
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Thin Skinned Solar Panels Printed by Inkjet
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Additive manufacturing company Desktop Metal to go public | ZDNet
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Breakthrough AI identifies 50 new planets from old NASA data
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'A Momentous Milestone': Africa Now Free From Wild Polio Virus
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Increase in release of underground CO2 emissions in Italy tied to earthquakes
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Italy has found a possible link between increases in CO2 emissions from groundwater and earthquake occurrences in Italy's Apennine Mountains. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their decade-long study of CO2 emissions in the area and what they learned about them.
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Supernovae could enable the discovery of new Muonic physics
A supernova, the explosion of a white-dwarf or massive star, can create as much light as billions of normal stars. This transient astronomical phenomenon can occur at any point after a star has reached its final evolutionary stages.
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When good intentions aren't enough: Where New Zealand's border quarantine system really went wrong
Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has shown a remarkable grasp of fine detail and an ability to communicate it under pressure. But short of monitoring every flight, border interaction and hotel perimeter herself, she must rely on various forms of authority to ensure her government's directions are carried out.
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Thoughts On a New Coronavirus Test (And on Testing)
Word came yesterday that Abbott received an Emergency Use Authorization for a new coronavirus test , one that is faster and cheaper than anything currently out there. The two types of tests that we see in use now are RT-PCR, the nasal-swab test that detects viral RNA, and various antibody tests, that tell you if you have raised an immune response due to past exposure to the virus. This one has fe
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Medicinrådet afviser to behandlinger
Lægemidlerne Berinert og Spravato får ingen anbefaling af Medicinrådet. Kadcyla medtages lægemiddelrekommendation for behandling af brystkræft.
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Want to save shelter animals? Fight for social justice
Overpolicing and constant surveillance of low-income urban communities leads to the incarceration of animals as well as people with many pets being killed in public animal shelters, argues UC Riverside Associate Professor of Gender & Sexuality Studies Katja M. Guentherin her new book, "The Lives and Deaths of Shelter Animals."
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Scientists propose deep learning method for atmospheric aerosol retrieval
Small particles known as aerosols suspended in the Earth's atmosphere can degrade visibility, affect human health and influence the climate.
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Fish waste as a raw input for industrial goods
The raw materials left after a salmon has been fileted are equivalent to more than 60 percent of its slaughtered weight. It will soon be possible to convert these into a high-quality fish oil, taste-neutral fish proteins, fish gelatin and flame-retardant materials. Ensuring that not a single gram goes to waste.
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Viking sword found in grave in central Norway
During the Viking Age—probably sometime in the 800s-900s—a man died in the village we call Vinjeøra today, south of Trøndelag county. He was buried with a full set of weapons: ax, spear, shield and sword.
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Onkologisk afdeling på OUH får ny chef
Stefan Starup Jeppesen er ansat som ledende overlæge på Onkologisk Afdeling R på Odense Universitetshospital.
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Genetic link between cattle temperament and autism
Researchers have discovered that cattle share an overlap of genes with humans that are critical in brain function and response to fear stimuli. The results open the way for research conducted on behavioural traits in humans to shed further light on temperament in cattle. The study confirms that temperament has a significant genetic basis in cattle – around 35 per cent – and it is the first time a
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Search for COVID-19 drugs boosted by SARS discovery
An extensive search and testing of current drugs and drug-like compounds has revealed compounds previously developed to fight SARS might also work against COVID-19.Using the National Drug Discovery Centre, researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute identified drug-like compounds that could block a key coronavirus protein called PLpro. Initially developed as potential treatments for SARS,
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First in situ radiation measurements 21 km up into the air over Tibetan Plateau
In situ vertical radiation measurements from the surface up to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), about 10~22 km in altitude, are rare over the TP or even over a large territory of China. The Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), in collaboration with the Aerospace Information Research Institute of CAS, developed a balloon-based measurement sy
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Improving weather forecasts with observations from the microwave instruments onboard China's FY-3D satellite
Observations from FY-3D microwave instruments not only benefit both the NWP and climate communities by complementing the current observing system but also ensure the continuity of Earth observations between FY-3C and FY-3E.
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Topological superconducting phase protected by 1D local magnetic symmetries
Scientists from China and USA classified 1D gapped topological superconducting quantum wires with local magnetic symmetries (LMSs), in which the time-reversal symmetry is broken but its combinations with certain crystalline symmetries, such as MxT, C2zT, C4zT, and C6zT, are preserved. Two new types of topological superconducting phases with multiple Majorana Kramer pairs and multiple Majorana zero
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Want to save shelter animals? Fight for social justice
Overpolicing and constant surveillance of low-income urban communities leads to the incarceration of animals as well as people with many pets being killed in public animal shelters, argues UC Riverside Associate Professor of Gender & Sexuality Studies Katja M. Guentherin her new book, "The Lives and Deaths of Shelter Animals."
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Need a mood lift? We've tracked 4 ways Australia's environment has repaired itself in 2020
When the clock ticked over to 2020, Australia was in the grip of a brutal drought and unprecedented bushfires. But in the months since, while many of us were indoors avoiding the pandemic, nature has started its slow recovery. That is the message of our new analysis released today.
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Plant scientists study the interaction of heat stress responses in corn
Environmental extremes driven by climate change create stresses in crops, and plant breeders are attempting to untangle the genetic factors that endow plants with tolerance to stress. A new study from Iowa State University scientists shows how two seemingly unrelated responses in corn plants interact to help the crop survive heat stress.
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Report reveals continued global imbalance in distribution of peer review
A new global peer review study from IOP Publishing has found that the imbalance in the distribution of peer review continues to be felt by Western and more experienced reviewers.
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When bushfires meet old septic tanks, a disease outbreak is only a matter of time
The Royal Commission into the summer fires is an opportunity to start seriously reconsidering our built environment. We need to prepare for accelerating climate change, our changing natural landscape and future natural disasters.
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Researchers explore how retail drone delivery may change logistics networks
Researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas say drone technology has the potential to be a genuine game changer in the retail industry, with its promise to enable retailers to offer unheard-of delivery lead times and near-perfect delivery-time customization adaptability.
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Photonics researchers report breakthrough in miniaturizing light-based chips
Photonic integrated circuits that use light instead of electricity for computing and signal processing promise greater speed, increased bandwidth, and greater energy efficiency than traditional circuits using electricity.
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Hurricanes and wildfires are colliding with the COVID-19 pandemic, and compounding the risks
With the "extremely dangerous" Hurricane Laura hitting Louisiana and Texas and wildfires menacing the western U.S., millions of Americans are facing the complex risks of a natural disaster striking in the middle of a pandemic.
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40 years of voting history reveals vote-by-mail does not give either political party an edge
Researchers evaluated over 40 million individual voting records and found the system is unlikely to advantage Democrats, disadvantage Republicans.
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Plant scientists study the interaction of heat stress responses in corn
Environmental extremes driven by climate change create stresses in crops, and plant breeders are attempting to untangle the genetic factors that endow plants with tolerance to stress. A new study from Iowa State University scientists shows how two seemingly unrelated responses in corn plants interact to help the crop survive heat stress.
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Engineers use heat-free technology to make metallic replicas of a rose's surface texture
Nature has worked for eons to perfect surface textures that protect, hide and otherwise help all kinds of creatures survive.
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Mathematicians forecast COVID-19 spread
A highly accurate forecast tool created by mathematicians from Case Western Reserve University and The University of Akron is being used by Cuyahoga County health officials to gage the Northeast Ohio spread of the virus that causes COVID-19.
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Can the moon be a person? As lunar mining looms, a change of perspective could protect Earth's ancient companion
Everyone is planning to return to the moon. At least 10 missions by half a dozen nations are scheduled before the end of 2021, and that's only the beginning.
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The tech field failed a 25-year challenge to achieve gender equality by 2020
In 1995, pioneering computer scientist Anita Borg challenged the tech community to a moonshot: equal representation of women in tech by 2020. Twenty-five years later, we're still far from that goal. In 2018, fewer than 30% of the employees in tech's biggest companies and 20% of faculty in university computer science departments were women.
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Misconceptions about weather and seasonality impact COVID-19 response
Misconceptions about the way climate and weather impact exposure and transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, create false confidence and have adversely shaped risk perceptions, say a team of Georgetown University researchers.
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Artificial pancreas can prevent dangerously low blood sugar in people with T1D
A new artificial pancreas system can prevent hypoglycemia–episodes of dangerously low blood sugar–during and after heavy exercise in people with type 1 diabetes, according to a small study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
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Artificial pancreas effectively controls type 1 diabetes in children age 6 and up
A clinical trial at the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center and three other pediatric diabetes centers in the United States has found that a new artificial pancreas system — which automatically monitors and regulates blood glucose levels — is safe and effective at managing blood glucose levels in children as young as age six with type
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New study takes aim at advanced types of non-addictive pain therapies
A team of scientists from ASU's School of Molecular Sciences and the Biodesign Institute have recently published a study in Nature Communications that helps clarify the contributions to an ion channel's temperature – dependent activation. This in turn should aid in the development of new types of non-addictive pain therapies.
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Planetary ball-milling helps protect our planet from plastics pollution
Researchers at Osaka University have developed supramolecular polymeric materials that combine rapid self-healing with high toughness by using the efficient molecular mixing method of planetary ball-milling. These materials retain their unique properties even after recycling, thus extending their functional lifespan. In a time of overabundant waste plastics, prolonging their usage is an eco-friend
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From photons to feelings: Researchers reveal a color palette in brain
A recent study conducted by researchers from the Institute of Neuroscience and Peking University described in greater detail than ever before the anatomical embodiment of color sensations in the cerebral cortex, linking brain structure to perceptual function.
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Stop! Grand theft water
An international team of researchers led by the University of Adelaide has developed a new method to better understand the drivers of water theft, a significant worldwide phenomenon, and deterrents to help protect this essential resource.
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Rare encounters between cosmic heavyweights
Astronomers using Maunakea Observatories – Subaru Telescope, W. M. Keck Observatory, and Gemini Observatory – have discovered three pairs of merging galaxies. Each of the galaxies contain a supermassive black hole that's feasting on material surrounding it, creating a phenomenon called a quasar. These luminous dual quasars are rare; only about 0.3% of all known quasars have two supermassive black
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One theory beyond the standard model could allow wormholes that you could actually fly through
Wormholes are a popular feature in science fiction, the means through which spacecraft can achieve faster-than-light (FTL) travel and instantaneously move from one point in spacetime to another. And while the General Theory of Relativity forbids the existence of "traversable wormholes," recent research has shown that they are actually possible within the domain of quantum physics.
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Japanese sake: The new pick-me-up? Yeast strain makes fatigue-fighting amino acid
Fans of sake, the traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage, may have even more reason to enjoy it now: Japanese scientists have discovered that a mutant strain of sake yeast produces high levels of the amino acid ornithine.
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Search for the wings of a crustacean sheds light on origins of insect wings
Genes from a tiny shrimp-like crustacean could help in the search for the origin of insect wings, a new study finds.
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First year chemistry throws away the textbook
In one of the first of its kind, first-year Modern Chemistry has been turned on its head at Flinders University in a pioneering new program which removes lectures, tutorials and even the final exam.
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Reduction in social distancing guidance opens up cities to pedestrians
The change in social distancing rules to one meter plus has made towns and cities in England on average over 40% more accessible to pedestrians, new research has revealed.
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Rapid evolution under climate change
Certain plant species can evolve very quickly under drought conditions. This means that the modified plant traits are genetically fixed and passed on to the next generation. A research team led by Professor Katja Tielbörger from the Institute of Evolution and Ecology, together with other colleagues from the University of Tübingen and the Universities of Hildesheim, Münster and Cologne, has shown t
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Japanese sake: The new pick-me-up? Yeast strain makes fatigue-fighting amino acid
Fans of sake, the traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage, may have even more reason to enjoy it now: Japanese scientists have discovered that a mutant strain of sake yeast produces high levels of the amino acid ornithine.
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Search for the wings of a crustacean sheds light on origins of insect wings
Genes from a tiny shrimp-like crustacean could help in the search for the origin of insect wings, a new study finds.
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Rapid evolution under climate change
Certain plant species can evolve very quickly under drought conditions. This means that the modified plant traits are genetically fixed and passed on to the next generation. A research team led by Professor Katja Tielbörger from the Institute of Evolution and Ecology, together with other colleagues from the University of Tübingen and the Universities of Hildesheim, Münster and Cologne, has shown t
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Nyt jysk trafikknudepunkt sætter fart på det danske forskningsnet
Internetforbindelserne på de danske universiteter bliver nu opgraderet med nye fiberforbindelser, så den internationale trafik samles i en enkelt netværksinfrastruktur. Samtidig overtager Esbjerg rollen som trafikknudepunkt for den danske internettrafik til udlandet.
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Claims of 99% accuracy for UK Covid antibody test 'cannot be trusted'
Leading scientist calls for findings of rapid finger pricktest research to be made public Too many corners being cut in race to find antibody test Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Claims that a rapid Covid-19 antibody test the government hopes to roll out this year is more than 99% accurate cannot be trusted, says a leading expert, calling for the full trial data to b
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Too many corners are being cut in the race to find a Covid-19 antibody test | Jon Deeks
Despite optimistic coverage, the results from a new test seem too good to be true Report: Claims of 99% accuracy for UK Covid antibody test 'cannot be trusted' Coronavirus – latest updates During the pandemic, Covid-19 tests have provided a rich source of media coverage. Most of us now know a bit about how these tests work, and that they can generate errors that lead to wrong and harmful decision
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Scientists Want to Ditch Formula for Lab-Grown Breast Milk
Formula has come a long way, but it still lacks many nutrients and takes a toll on the environment. A few companies are hoping to provide an alternative.
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Covid-19 Proves It's Time to Abolish 'Predictive' Policing Algorithms
Research collected during the pandemic backs up the national calls for racial and criminal justice. So why are we still relying on punitive software?
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Vrakfynd på Gribshunden: Atlantisk stör i kungens matförråd
Nu kan forskare i Lund avslöja vad danske kung Hans tänkte bjuda på när han skulle göra anspråk på den svenska tronen i Kalmar år 1495: en två meter lång atlantisk stör. De välbevarade fiskdelarna hittades i ett vrak på Östersjöns botten förra året och har nu kunnat artbestämmas genom DNA-analys. Vid midsommar år 1495 var danske kung Hans på väg från Köpenhamn till Kalmar på det påkostade flaggsk
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The Flight 93 Convention
In 2016, an anonymous author described the battle between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton as the " Flight 93 election ." In dark, urgent terms, the article argued that a Hillary Clinton victory would change America so irrevocably that conservatives needed to think of themselves as the passengers on United Airlines Flight 93 on September 11—the passengers who chose to bring down the plane to save
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Blood Test Allows Safer Turtle Sex Determination
A new process could help conservationists save imperiled species — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Blood Test Allows Safer Turtle Sex Determination
A new process could help conservationists save imperiled species — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Helbredet halter hos danskere med diabetes
Mennesker med diabetes har det både fysisk og psykisk dårligere end resten af befolkningen, viser ny rapport. Der er behov for mere fokus på især motion, mener Diabetesforeningen.
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First mass extinctions in 13,000 years may be on the way
Reduced resilience of plant biomes in North America could be setting the stage for the kind of mass extinctions not seen since the retreat of glaciers and arrival of humans about 13,000 years ago, a new study shows. The warning comes from a study of 14,189 fossil pollen samples taken from 358 locations across the continent. "…landscapes today are once again exhibiting low resilience, foreboding p
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Binding sites for protein-making machinery
ETH Zurich researchers can predict how tightly a cell's protein synthesis machinery will bind to RNA sequences—even when dealing with many billions of different RNA sequences. This binding plays a key role in determining how much of a specific protein is produced. The scientists are developing their prediction model using a combination of synthetic biology experiments and machine learning algorith
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Shedding light on rapid emergence of new species
New international research led by Monash University scientists has changed our understanding of the evolutionary processes that can lead to the rapid emergence of new species.
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Binding sites for protein-making machinery
ETH Zurich researchers can predict how tightly a cell's protein synthesis machinery will bind to RNA sequences—even when dealing with many billions of different RNA sequences. This binding plays a key role in determining how much of a specific protein is produced. The scientists are developing their prediction model using a combination of synthetic biology experiments and machine learning algorith
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Shedding light on rapid emergence of new species
New international research led by Monash University scientists has changed our understanding of the evolutionary processes that can lead to the rapid emergence of new species.
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Maunakea observatories discover three pairs of merging supermassive black holes
A cosmic dance between two merging galaxies, each one containing a supermassive black hole that's rapidly feeding on so much material it creates a phenomenon known as a quasar, is a rare find.
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Thin-skinned solar panels printed with inkjet
Solar cells can now be made so thin, light and flexible that they can rest on a soap bubble. The new cells, which efficiently capture energy from light, could offer an alternative way to power novel electronic devices, such as medical skin patches, where conventional energy sources are unsuitable.
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Continuous infrared winds discovered during the eruption of a stellar mass black hole
A team of researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has, for the first time, detected constant infrared emission from winds produced during the eruption of a black hole in an X-ray binary.
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A government program that reduces mortgage defaults
Lower-income households that received mortgages through state affordable mortgage programs were less likely to default or foreclose than similar households that received conventional financing, a national study found. Researchers examined the outcomes of homeownership programs administered by Housing Finance Agencies (HFAs), which are state chartered agencies operating in all 50 states that work t
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Survey finds election concerns vary by race, education levels, party affiliation
The coronavirus pandemic is creating concerns about the safety of the 2020 elections, with some people also questioning the integrity of the safety precautions being taken. A new survey finds that while most voters believe that voting will be safe and that their ballot will be counted despite the pandemic, those who question election safety and some who question election integrity appear less like
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Weight in first years of life can affect lung health in later childhood
Study of more than 1,200 children analyses body mass index trajectories from birth to age four years and their relationship to lung function at age seven years
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Trafikulykker koster 27 milliarder om året: »Det er et urimelig højt beløb«
PLUS. Rådet for Sikker Trafik efterlyser bedre undervisning og mere politikontrol.
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Nuclear Diamond Batteries
Articles are making the rounds on social media claiming a new battery technology that can make batteries that will last 28,000 years on a single charge. There is some truth to these claims, but they are mostly misleading. They make some unwarranted claims and leave out some critical context. This is likely mostly corporate self-promotion and fishing for investors, but what is the real science beh
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U.S. political parties become extremist to get more votes
New mathematical modeling shows that U.S. political parties are becoming increasingly polarized due to their quest for voters — not because voters themselves are becoming more extremist.
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Neutralizing antibodies appear to protect humans from coronavirus infection
A Seattle fishing vessel that departed port in May returned 18 days later with an unusual haul: the first human evidence that neutralizing antibodies provide protection from reinfection by SARS-CoV-2.
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Tao Clean Sonic Toothbrush Review: Zaps Germs After Each Use
This electric toothbrush nestles into a base station that also cleans and dries the brush head.
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Firefox Launched a New Android App to Lure Users From Chrome
Mozilla has rewritten the app to rely on its own infrastructure rather than Google's. But will its privacy and UI tweaks convince people to make the switch?
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India coronavirus: Covid strikes remote Greater Andamanese tribe
There are just 53 members of the Greater Andamanese tribe left- 10 have contracted the virus.
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