Search Posts

Nyheder2020august28

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS?
Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

Indregning af biomassens udledning gør en dansk kilowatttime mere end dobbelt så sort
I 2018 var 37 procent af den biomasse, der blev brugt til energiformål i Danmark importeret og optræder derfor ikke i nogen danske klimaregnskaber.
3h
Corona-vaccine kan være godkendt om et halvt år: Her er de vacciner, der er med i slutspurten
De vacciner, der er ved at blive udviklet mod Covid-19, er vidt forskellige.
13h
Sunflower oil shows unexpected efficiency in corrosion prevention
Sunflower oil, which is found in almost every home, can be used not only in cooking, everyday life and cosmetology – it will help avoid complications (gas hydrates and corrosion) during oil and gas production. Scientists of the priority area of Kazan University intend to apply inhibitors developed on its basis in harsh Arctic conditions.
4h

LATEST

Republican Convention Ignored Climate Threat, But Americans' Attitudes Are Shifting
Many Americans have experienced climate-fueled disasters in the last four years and want to see federal action — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
now
Covid-19 news: Children at 'strikingly low' risk of severe illness
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
now
The promise of using WhatsApp for low-tech distance learning
WhatsApp is one of the most widely-used communication apps in South Africa. Though it's often portrayed in the news as a way to spread disinformation, it shows surprising potential as a tool for online learning during the era of social distancing. Grassroot, a civic technology organization based in South Africa, has developed a first-of-its-kind training course entirely on WhatsApp to improve the
7min
Forests recover from logging faster with a bit of help
Actively restored forests recover faster than areas left to regenerate naturally after logging, a new long-term study shows. For the new study, researchers examined an area of tropical forest in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo that had suffered heavy logging in the 1980s but was subsequently protected from further deforestation or conversion to agricultural land. The rainforests of Southeast Asia are amo
15min
AMC: curtain call
Investors should not expect movie-goers to trek back en masse to indoor venues
27min
Researchers dramatically downsize technology for fingerprinting drugs and other chemicals
As new infectious diseases emerge and spread, one of the best shots against novel pathogens is finding new medicines or vaccines. But before drugs can be used as potential cures, they have to be painstakingly screened for composition, safety and purity, among other things. Thus, there is an increasing demand for technologies that can characterize chemical compounds quickly and in real time.
28min
Study shows efforts in mangrove conservation and restoration paying off
In recent times, mangrove deforestation has raised alarms about increased carbon emissions into the atmosphere. Research led by the Singapore-ETH Centre shows that the net amount of carbon released from deforestation between 1996 and 2016 globally is only 1.8% – or less than 0.1% of global CO2 emissions. The new approach of quantifying net losses of mangrove carbon stocks is the first to take into
28min
Plant scientists study the interaction of heat stress responses in corn
A new study shows how two responses in separate locations inside plant cells work in concert to help corn plants respond to heat stress. The research was made possible by the Enviratron, an innovative plant sciences facility at Iowa State University that utilizes a robotic rover and highly controlled growth chambers.
28min
Farmers' quick sale of poultry during outbreaks may increase deadly virus transmission
Small-scale poultry farmers in Vietnam tend to respond to viral outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) by rapidly selling their birds as a way to avoid financial loss, according to a new study by an international team of researchers. As these birds are commingled with other birds in markets and trading networks, this practice may increase the likelihood of widespread disease transmi
28min
Emily Miller and Another P.R. Expert Ousted At F.D.A. After Blood Plasma Fiasco
The agency's chief spokeswoman, Emily Miller, was removed from her position just 11 days into the job.
30min
IBM has built a new drug-making lab entirely in the cloud
The news: IBM has built a new chemistry lab called RoboRXN in the cloud. It combines AI models, a cloud computing platform, and robots to help scientists design and synthesize new molecules while working from home. How it works: The online lab platform allows scientists to log on through a web browser. On a blank canvas, they draw the skeletal structure of the molecular compounds they want to mak
34min
Will a TikTok ban make using the app a crime?
Using TikTok or WeChat after a looming US government ban on the apps could put users at legal risk, experts say. But there are also still uncertainties about how the bans will affect communication and how the Trump administration will enforced the ban. "Can the president ban TikTok or WeChat? The answer to that is yes." It might seem like they are just online spaces to share buzzworthy content an
37min
How Pseudoscientists Get Away With It – Facts So Romantic
The honesty and humility of someone willing to tell you that they don't have all the answers, but they have some thoughtful questions to pursue, is easy to distinguish from the charlatans who have ready answers or claim that nothing should be done until we are an impossible 100-percent sure. Photograph from Everett Collection / Shutterstock The relentless and often unpredictable coronavirus has,
38min
A coffee and catnap keep you sharp on the nightshift, study suggests
A simple coffee and a quick catnap could be the cure for staying alert on the nightshift as new research shows that this unlikely combination can improve attention and reduce sleep inertia.
41min
Study explains multipronged SARS-CoV-2 attack and widepread COVID-19 infection
A study of a gateway receptor for SARS-CoV-2 may help explain the wide variety of symptoms and organs involved with SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19. The results suggest that a multi-organ infection with SARS-CoV-2 may be via the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor, which is found almost everywhere throughout the body.
41min
Cellular energy audit reveals energy producers and consumers
Researchers at Gladstone Institutes have performed a massive and detailed cellular energy audit; they analyzed every gene in the human genome to identify those that drive energy production or energy consumption. The result is a collection of data they call the "ATPome," which not only provides new directions for the field of metabolism research, but also identifies genes and proteins that can be t
42min
Scientists Saw Space Debris During the Day for the First Time
Clear View For the first time, scientists managed to spot space debris orbiting the Earth during the day. Near-Earth orbit is getting awfully crowded, as dead satellites, rocket parts , and the remains of in-orbit collisions or explosions turn space into a dangerous minefield — and that's saying nothing of the operational satellites that need to navigate the whole mess. Now, thanks to powerful ne
48min
Elon Musk: Tesla Security Was "Overzealous" In Kicking Out Drone Photographer
Drone Zone Tesla CEO Elon Musk has issued a mea culpa in the case of a drone photographer who was told to stop filming at the company's Giga Texas construction site yesterday. "I think our security was a little overzealous in this case," Musk tweeted early this morning . Over Zealots Photographer Jeff Roberts was using a drone to film construction of Tesla's new factory near Austin, Texas when he
48min
Tungsten isotope helps study how to armor future fusion reactors
A team of ORNL researchers working with tungsten to armor the inside of future fusion reactors had some surprising results when looking at the probability of contamination.
1h
Infants in households with very low food security may have greater obesity risk
Infants from households reporting very low 'food security,' a measure of access to adequate and healthy meals, tend to weigh more than those from households with relatively high food security.
1h
NASA sees wind shear still battering tropical storm Iselle
NASA infrared imagery shows wind shear continued to batter Tropical Storm Iselle in the Eastern Pacific Ocean for the second day.
1h
High-Tech Tracking Reveals 'Whole New Secret World of Birds'
A study of Kirtland's warblers found that some continue exploring long distances even after they reach their breeding grounds
1h
How special relativity can help AI predict the future
Nobody knows what will happen in the future , but some guesses are a lot better than others. A kicked football will not reverse in midair and return to the kicker's foot. A half-eaten cheeseburger will not become whole again. A broken arm will not heal overnight. By drawing on a fundamental description of cause and effect found in Einstein's theory of special relativity, researchers from Imperial
1h
The northern quoll: An amazingly versatile survivor?
The northern quoll, one of Australia's most adorable and endangered native carnivores, appears to be adapted to dramatically different landscapes — which may be key to the species' survival. A new study that found similarities between northern quoll skulls across a 5000 kilometer range, which has raised hopes scientists will be able to cross-breed isolated populations.
1h
The Books Briefing: Poetry of the Past, in the Present
Writers have already begun responding to the uncertainty of this pandemic era in their work, but sometimes we need to turn to the past to help make sense of the present. Recently, we've been publishing poetry from archival issues of The Atlantic , short pieces that can serve as lyrical salves on a lazy Sunday morning or as miniature escapes from the steady pace of weekday caretaking, work, stress
1h
The 'Double Dragon' Movie Should Be a Cult Classic
The adaptation of the 1987 arcade game didn't get the credit it deserved—and would probably fare much better with modern audiences.
1h
Learn how to add closed captions to video calls, Netflix, and more
It's a complete brain workout—you listen and read at the same time. (Bruno Gomiero / Unsplash/) People keep finding more uses for closed captions. They're good for making content more inclusive and watching films in foreign languages, but they also allow you to enjoy videos and video calls in quiet environments, skim through clips more quickly, and even focus more on what you're watching. With mo
1h
U of Illinois Returns to School with 20,000 Saliva Tests Per Day
The school requires each student, faculty, and staff member to be tested twice per week and sends the results straight to their cell phones.
1h
New research identifies brain regions responsible for fatigue
A team at Johns Hopkins discovered the brain regions responsible for fatigue. The insula and motor cortex create a feedback loop with muscles that produce more fatigue when you try to "power through." The researchers hope this will lead to the development of treatments for fatigue-related symptoms of depression and multiple sclerosis. Trying to power through fatigue is exhausting. The human body
1h
Millions Of Pounds Of Extra Pollution Were Released Before Hurricane Laura's Landfall
Hurricane Laura hit an area known for its refineries and chemical plants. They released millions of pounds of air pollution when they shut down, and many air monitors are not functioning. (Image credit: Gerald Herbert/AP)
1h
What did the katydids do when picking up bat sounds?
Ecosystems can be incredibly complex, with many interacting species. In many habitats, predators shape they behavior of prey and prey shape the behavior of predators. This paper provides a detailed look at the predator-prey relationship between bats and katydids, a group of insects related to crickets and grasshoppers.
1h
What did the katydids do when picking up bat sounds?
Ecosystems can be incredibly complex, with many interacting species. In many habitats, predators shape they behavior of prey and prey shape the behavior of predators. This paper provides a detailed look at the predator-prey relationship between bats and katydids, a group of insects related to crickets and grasshoppers.
1h
Preventing infection, facilitating healing: New biomaterials from spider silk
New biomaterials developed at the University of Bayreuth eliminate risk of infection and facilitate healing processes. A research team led by Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel has succeeded in combining these material properties which are highly relevant to biomedicine. These nanostructured materials are based on spider silk proteins. They prevent colonization by bacteria and fungi, but at the same time p
1h
How Neanderthals adjusted to climate change
Climate change occurring shortly before their disappearance triggered a complex change in the behavior of late Neanderthals in Europe: they developed more complex tools. This is the conclusion reached by a group of researchers from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Università degli Studi die Ferrara (UNIFE) on the basis of finds in the Sesselfelsgrotte cave in Lower Bavar
1h
Millions Of Pounds Of Extra Pollution Were Released Before Laura Made Landfall
Hurricane Laura hit an area known for its refineries and chemical plants. They released millions of pounds of air pollution when they shut down, and many air monitors are not functioning. (Image credit: Gerald Herbert/AP)
1h
Structural colors from cellulose-based polymers
A surface displays structural colors when light is reflected by tiny, regular structural elements in a transparent material. Researchers have now developed a method to make structural colors from cellulose-based polymers by using coated droplets that exist in a surrounding fluid — so-called liquid marbles. The system readily responds to environmental changes, which makes it interesting for applic
1h
Can't be away from your phone? Study finds link to higher levels of obsession-compulsion
Feelings of panic when a person is away from their smartphone could be connected to general feelings of inadequacy and inferiority, a new study of young people suggests.
1h
Women with higher neuroticism are less physically active
A new study shows that the role of personality may vary depending on how physical activity is measured.
1h
Engineers uncover biomechanical effects of skin rubbing
Understanding the skin damage caused by rubbing could lead to better topical skin treatments and help prevent the formation of new routes for viral and bacterial infection.
1h
Giant nanomachine aids the immune system
In order to kill diseased cells, our immune system must first identify them. The so-called peptide-loading complex plays a key role in this process. A research team has analyzed this nanomachine in atomic detail.
1h
Fidelity of El Niño simulation matters for predicting future climate
A new study revealed that correctly simulating ocean current variations hundreds of feet below the ocean surface – the so-called Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent – during El Niño events is key in reducing the uncertainty of predictions of future warming in the eastern tropical Pacific.
1h
COVID-19 less deadly and causes milder symptoms in children, UK study finds
Children and teenagers are less likely than adults to develop severe COVID-19 or die from the disease, according to the world's largest study of hospital patients with COVID-19.
1h
Using the past to maintain future biodiversity
New research shows that safeguarding species and ecosystems and the benefits they provide for society against future climatic change requires effective solutions which can only be formulated from reliable forecasts.
1h
Why 'one day at a time' works for recovering alcoholics
'One day at a time' is a mantra for recovering alcoholics, for whom each day without a drink builds the strength to go on to the next. A new brain imaging study shows why the approach works.
1h
Physiological test for autism proves effective independent of co-occurring conditions
Developing a physiological test for diagnosing autism spectrum disorder (ASD), one that measures certain components in the blood, has the potential to be a paradigm shift for diagnosing ASD. However, the large heterogeneity of how ASD affects individuals has long been viewed as a key obstacle to the development of such a test. Research conducted at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and published o
1h
Researchers explore how retail drone delivery may change logistics networks
Three UT Dallas researchers found that last-mile delivery networks will become more decentralized and the delivery speed of the drones will increase as the technology matures.
1h
Algorithm aims to alert consumers before they use illicit online pharmacies
In a study, a team of Penn State researchers report that an algorithm they developed may be able to spot illicit online pharmacies that could be providing customers with substandard medications without their knowledge, among other potential problems.
1h
What did the katydids do when picking up bat sounds?
Ecosystems can be incredibly complex, with many interacting species. In many habitats, predators shape they behavior of prey and prey shape the behavior of predators. This paper provides a detailed look at the predator-prey relationship between bats and katydids, a group of insects related to crickets and grasshoppers.
1h
Vibration i skallbenet ställer säkrare yrseldiagnoser
​Forskare på Chalmers har utvecklat en mätmetod som kan ge säkrare diagnos vid yrselsymptom och dessutom ger patienten mindre obehag. Resultaten är mycket lovande och flera patientstudier är nu på gång, där en speciellt utvecklad vibrator används för undersökning av balansorganets funktion då vibrationer leds genom skallbenet. ​Yrsel är en av de vanligaste orsakerna till att inte minst äldre pers
1h
Giant nanomachine aids the immune system
In order to kill diseased cells, our immune system must first identify them. The so-called peptide-loading complex plays a key role in this process. A research team has analyzed this nanomachine in atomic detail.
1h
Galaxy simulations shed light on Milky Way's origins
New galaxy simulations could help reveal the origins of the Milky Way and dozens of small neighboring dwarf galaxies, researchers report. The simulations, which the researchers believe to be the most advanced of their kind, could also aid the decades-old search for dark matter, which fills an estimated 27% of the universe. Further, the computer simulations of "ultra-faint" dwarf galaxies could he
1h
This Equation Calculates The Chances We Live In A Computer Simulation
And scuppers any possibility that we might ever escape.
1h
Lock of Lincoln's hair and bloodied telegram up for auction
This is one macabre auction: A lock of Abraham Lincoln's hair, wrapped in a bloodstained telegram about his 1865 assassination, is up for sale.
2h
A Hacker Reportedly Gained Access to Tesla's Entire Fleet
Big Hack A new Electrek story details the saga of Jason Hughes, a whitehat hacker who says he managed to gain a flabbergasting level of access to Tesla's internal servers — managing to seize control of the company's entire fleet of electric vehicles. The alleged hack took place back in March 2017, and Hughes immediately alerted Tesla's security team, which quickly patched the security hole. Still
2h
Preventing infection, facilitating healing: New biomaterials from spider silk
New biomaterials developed at the University of Bayreuth eliminate risk of infection and facilitate healing processes. These nanostructured materials are based on spider silk proteins. They prevent colonization by bacteria and fungi, but at the same time proactively assist in the regeneration of human tissue. They are therefore ideal for implants, wound dressings, prostheses, contact lenses, and o
2h
Why are there differing preferences for suffixes and prefixes across languages?
While speakers of English and other Western languages prefer using suffixes more than prefixes, a new study reveals that this preference is not as universal as once thought.
2h
Children with no COVID-19 symptoms may shed virus for weeks
New research suggests that children can shed SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, even if they never develop symptoms or for long after symptoms have cleared. But many questions remain about the significance of the pediatric population as vectors for this sometimes deadly disease, according to an invited commentary by Children's National Hospital doctors that accompanies this new study publ
2h
New palliative care model shown to reduce costs without compromising on quality of care
Findings from a large-scale clinical trial testing a new palliative care model have shown to be lower cost, viewed positively by patients and their carers while showing no difference in patient-reported outcomes when compared with standard care.
2h
Study: autistic brains develop differently before birth
Autism is known to emerge during prenatal development, but it can't be diagnosed until a child is 12-months-old at the earliest. A new study observed the differences between autistic and control nerve cells as they grew in vitro. Researchers found that developmental divergence in autistic neurons occurs early in prenatal neurodevelopment. Researchers have long known that autism spectrum condition
2h
A surprising protein player in diabetes
A study of pancreatic beta cells has found a link between a commonly found protein, a subset of switched-off genes and the development of diabetes.
2h
Högljudd sång sprider mest aerosoler
Sången behöver inte tystna, men just nu är det klokast att sjunga med distans. Rådet kommer från aerosolforskare vid LTH, Lunds universitet. De har studerat hur mycket partiklar vi egentligen avger när vi sjunger – och i förlängningen – om vi bidrar till ökad smittspridning av covid-19 genom att sjunga. – Det finns många rapporter om spridning av covid-19 i samband med körsång. Världen över har d
2h
Laser writing of nitrogen-doped silicon carbide for biological modulation
In materials science, conducting and semiconducting materials can be embedded in insulating polymeric substrates for useful biointerface applications. However, it is challenging to achieve the composite configuration directly using chemical processes. Laser-assisted synthesis is a fast and inexpensive technique used to prepare various materials but their applications in the construction of biophys
2h
A review of ridge subduction, magmatism and metallogenesis
Generally speaking, 'ridge subduction' involves subduction of spreading oceanic ridges, aseismic ridges or oceanic plateaus and inactive arc ridges, and this common and important geological process has become one of the hot topics in current geological research globally. However, many issues concerning ridge subductions need to be further studied.
2h
Failures of Germany's largest cliff coast sensed by seismometers
The ten km long, bright white coast of Germany's largest island, Rügen, is shaped by episodically occurring failures. These failures were typically assumed to happen due to strong rain storms. In a study carried out over more than two years, scientists of GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences were able to draw a new and surprisingly detailed picture of coastal cliff failure activity. The stud
2h
A novel salvinia-like slippery surface
Superhydrophobic surfaces are widely used in many industrial settings, which mainly consist of rough solid protrusions that entrap air to minimize the liquid/solid area. The stability of the superhydrophobic state favors a relatively small spacing between protrusions. However, this in turn increases the lateral adhesion force that retards the mobility of drops. Thus, the simultaneous optimization
2h
Lab finds new levels of detail about key membrane proteins
Portland State University researchers used advanced electron microscopy to create a 3-D reconstruction of a membrane protein at an unprecedented level of resolution, setting the stage for the development of drugs that could target the protein more effectively to treat a variety of diseases.
2h
Lab finds new levels of detail about key membrane proteins
Portland State University researchers used advanced electron microscopy to create a 3-D reconstruction of a membrane protein at an unprecedented level of resolution, setting the stage for the development of drugs that could target the protein more effectively to treat a variety of diseases.
2h
International screening of the effects of a pathogenic fungus
The pathogenic fungus Candida auris, which first surfaced in 2009, is proving challenging to control. It is resistant to many fungicides and not easy to diagnose. Researchers from Radboud university medical center, Canisius-Wilhelmina Hospital (CWZ) and international colleagues have discovered that the human immune system recognizes the fungus well. The study has been able to pin-point the fungus'
2h
Internet outage slows covid-19 contact tracing of thousands in England
An internet outage meant thousands of people who tested positive for the coronavirus in England failed to have their contacts traced and isolated for up to a week
2h
The "gold" in breast milk
Breast milk strengthens a child's immune system, supporting the intestinal flora. These facts are common knowledge. But how does this work? What are the molecular mechanisms behind this phenomenon? And why is this not possible the same way with bottle feeding? The reasons were unknown until a team from the RESIST Cluster of Excellence at Hannover Medical School (MHH) recently discovered how alarmi
2h
Change is constant: How the COVID-19 pandemic may shape the future of studying abroad
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has had a great impact on higher education systems. It has changed the way the university education is conducted and perceived. One pertinent question is: How will the pandemic affect the international student? In the "commentaries" sections of the latest issues of East China Normal University Review of Education, researchers approach this question from various perspe
2h
Failures of Germany's largest cliff coast sensed by seismometers
The ten km long, bright white coast of Germany's largest island, Rügen, is shaped by episodically occurring failures. These failures were typically assumed to happen due to strong rain storms. In a study carried out over more than two years, scientists of GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences were able to draw a new and surprisingly detailed picture of coastal cliff failure activity.
2h
Round nanoparticles improve quality factors of surface lattice resonances
Plasmonic surface lattice resonances (SLRs) supported by metal nanoparticle arrays have many merits such as strong field enhancements extended over large volumes, as well as long lifetimes, narrow linewidths, angle-dependent dispersion, and a wide range of wavelength tunability.
2h
International screening of the effects of a pathogenic fungus
The pathogenic fungus Candida auris, which first surfaced in 2009, is proving challenging to control. It is resistant to many fungicides and not easy to diagnose. Researchers from Radboud university medical center, Canisius-Wilhelmina Hospital (CWZ) and international colleagues have discovered that the human immune system recognizes the fungus well. The study has been able to pin-point the fungus'
2h
Growing demand for zero-deforestation cacao might not help Colombian forests
When Brazil refused soy grown on deforested land in the Amazon, the movement spread worldwide. Brazil's Soy Moratorium in 2006 became the first zero-deforestation agreement. And from cocoa in Ghana to palm oil in Indonesia, now companies would have to explain: Where was their product from? Did it contribute to deforestation?
2h
Japanese Company Tests a Flying Car — With a Human On Board
Flying Machine A Japanese company called SkyDrive just conducted a successful flight test of its "flying car" vehicle — with a human pilot on board. The vehicle, which looks sort of like a cross between a snowmobile and a quadrotor drone, hovered several feet off the ground for four minutes, AP News reports . While it sounds like a small feat, very few eVTOL (electric vertical takeoff and landing
2h
Memers are making deepfakes, and things are getting weird
Grace Windheim had heard of deepfakes before. But she had never considered how to make one. It was a viral meme using the technology that led her to research the possibility—and discover that it was super easy and completely free. Within a day, she had created a step-by-step YouTube tutorial to walk others through the process. "Making one of these deepfakes and overlaying audio is not as complica
2h
What Saturn's most mysterious moon could teach us about the origins of life | Elizabeth "Zibi" Turtle
NASA's Dragonfly — a robotic rotorcraft-lander that's designed to hop across the surface of an extraterrestrial body — is set to voyage deep into the solar system to explore Titan, Saturn's largest moon, in 2026. Planetary scientist Elizabeth "Zibi" Turtle shares how studying this mysterious moon that's thought to resemble the early Earth could bring us closer to understanding the habitability o
2h
An improved wearable, stretchable gas sensor using nanocomposites
A stretchable, wearable gas sensor for environmental sensing has been developed and tested.
2h
Nurses burned out and want to quit
A survey of nurses caring for children with heart problems has revealed that more than half are emotionally exhausted. The analysis also found that good working environments were linked with less burnout.
2h
Vaccines against respiratory infections linked to fewer heart failure deaths
Influenza and pneumonia vaccinations are associated with fewer hospital deaths in patients with heart failure. That's the result of a study in nearly 3 million Americans. One out of five individuals will develop heart failure in their lifetime. An estimated 26 million people are affected worldwide.
2h
New malaria transmission patterns emerge in Africa
An international study reveals how future climate change could affect malaria transmission in Africa over the next century.
2h
Making brain cancers in children respond better to treatment
Research has identified a small molecule compound that can activate the Wnt pathway in non-Wnt subtypes of medulloblastoma, making these aggressive forms of cancer more responsive to therapies. The work also found the Wnt pathway, which has historically been considered cancer-promoting, to function as a cancer inhibitor in certain contexts.
2h
New study examines long-term aesthetic outcomes of implant-based breast reconstruction
Breast reconstruction is an important option for women undergoing mastectomy, and a two-stage approach using implants is by far the most common reconstruction technique. Thousands of women undergo this procedure every year – despite the conventional wisdom among many surgeons that the results of implant-based breast reconstruction don't hold up over the long term.
2h
A coffee and catnap keep you sharp on the nightshift
A simple coffee and a quick catnap could be the cure for staying alert on the nightshift as new research from the University of South Australia shows that this unlikely combination can improve attention and reduce sleep inertia.
2h
LSU Health study explains multipronged SARS-CoV-2 attack and widespread COVID-19 infection
A study of a gateway receptor for SARS-CoV-2 led by Walter J. Lukiw, PhD, Professor of Neuroscience, Neurology and Ophthalmology at LSU Health New Orleans' Neuroscience Center of Excellence and School of Medicine, may help explain the wide variety of symptoms and organs involved with SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19. The results suggest that a multi-organ infection with SARS-CoV-2 may be via the
2h
Maternal insecticide use during pregnancy and neonatal jaundice
Association between pesticide usage during pregnancy and neonatal hyperbilirubinemia requiring treatment: The Japan Environment and Children's study.
2h
A review of ridge subduction, magmatism and metallogenesis
Ridge subduction events are very common and important geodynamic processes in modern oceanic plate tectonics (Figure 1), and play an important role in the generation of arc magmatism, material recycling, growth and evolution of continental crust, deformation and modification of overlying plates and metallogenesis. Many issues concerning ridge subductions remain controversial. Recently, researchers
2h
How Neanderthals adjusted to climate change
Climate change occurring shortly before their disappearance triggered a complex change in the behaviour of late Neanderthals in Europe: they developed more complex tools. This is the conclusion reached by a group of researchers from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Università degli Studi die Ferrara (UNIFE) on the basis of finds in the Sesselfelsgrotte cave in Lower Bava
2h
A novel salvinia-like slippery surface
Inspired by the hydrophobic leaves of Salvinia molesta and the slippery Nepenthes pitcher plants, a Salvinia-like slippery surface (SSS) consisting of protrusions with slippery heads was designed. Compared to a control surface, the SSS exhibits increased stability against pressure and impact, the enhanced lateral mobility of water drops as well as the reduced hydrodynamic drag.
2h
How bacteria adhere to fiber in the gut
Researchers have revealed a new molecular mechanism by which bacteria adhere to cellulose fibers in the human gut. Thanks to two different binding modes, they can withstand the shear forces in the body. Scientists of the University of Basel and ETH Zurich published their results in the journal "Nature Communications".
2h
Trump Is a Secessionist From the Top
President Trump read a boring speech badly last night. The long recitation was punctuated by odd comprehension errors. At one point, "walled-off cities and communities" came out sounding like "Waldorf cities and communities." Through most of the long recitation, the members of the partisan crowd seemed quiet, even listless. But there were rare sparks of enthusiasm, moments when Trump excited them
2h
The Empty Space Where Normal Once Lived
On the first day of summer, Siberia and I were the same temperature. In Verkhoyansk, roughly 3,000 miles northeast of Moscow, a searing week ended in an afternoon hotter than any before recorded north of the Arctic Circle. Half a planet away in New England, a thermometer under my tongue gave the same reading: 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit. In a human, this is the clinical threshold for a fever. We had
2h
When Retirement Comes Too Early
Workplaces have grown steadily less friendly to older employees, and the pandemic has pushed more of these workers from the labor market.
2h
Dansk arbejdskultur er det største trækplaster for udenlandske ingeniører
Muligheden for at få et liv med balance mellem arbejde og privatliv er den vigtigste årsag til, at højtuddannede udlændinge vælger at arbejde i Danmark, men spændende jobmuligheder tæller også. Næsten hver anden bliver længere end først planlagt.
2h
Optical imaging enters sub-nanometer era
Prof. Dong Zhenchao and Prof. Hou Jianguo from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have improved the spatial resolution from 8 nm to ~8 Å of photoluminescence imaging. This has realized sub-molecular resolution with single molecule photofluorescence imaging for the first time.
3h
This motorized kayak can drive itself
Plugging a sod bank behind Fire Island's new Old Inlet. (Matt Whelen/) This story originally featured on Outdoor Life . Sight fishing in shallow water is one of the most exciting ways to chase fish on inshore waters. Kayaks are ideal for fishing in such places. They have a stealthy hull and shallow draft, but some models are difficult to fish from while standing up. It's not a boat stability issu
3h
Observation charge accumulation at nanocavity on plasmonic photocatalyst
Understanding where the plasmonic charge accumulated at catalysts surface and how to improve local charge density at catalytic sites is promising for solar energy conversion. Scientists find plasmonic charge accumulation at nanocavity of Au nanoparticle dimer/TiO2 photocatalyst at the single particle level. Such charge accumulation at catalytic sites can significantly accelerate the water oxidatio
3h
Structural colors from cellulose-based polymers
A surface displays structural colors when light is reflected by tiny, regular structural elements in a transparent material. Researchers have now developed a method to make structural colors from cellulose-based polymers by using coated droplets that exist in a surrounding fluid–so-called liquid marbles. The system readily responds to environmental changes, which makes it interesting for applicat
3h
International screening of the effects of a pathogenic fungus
The pathogenic fungus Candida auris, which first surfaced in 2009, is proving challenging to control. It is resistant to many fungicides and not easy to diagnose. Researchers from Radboud university medical center, Canisius-Wilhelmina Hospital (CWZ) and international colleagues have discovered that the human immune system recognizes the fungus well. The study has been able to pin-point the fungus'
3h
How a $1 million plot to hack Tesla failed
Hacking isn't all 1 s and 0 s—more often than you'd think, it's about people. A Tesla employee was offered a $1 million bribe in early August to install ransomware on the car company's networks in Nevada, a scheme that could have netted a cybercrime gang many more millions in extortion, according to a newly unsealed US Justice Department indictment (pdf). Egor Igorevich Kriuchkov, a 27-year-old R
3h
Age no criteria for decisions on heart attack treatment, new research finds
Elderly patients suffering the most common type of heart attack may benefit from more invasive treatment, new research has shown.
3h
Elderly in the US: Risk of dementia has been rising for years – instead of falling
The risk of cognitive impairment increased from 1996 to 2014.
3h
Photonics researchers report breakthrough in miniaturizing light-based chips
Electrical engineers have created the smallest electro-optical modulator yet, using a thin film of lithium niobate bonded on a silicon dioxide layer. This key component of a photonics-based chip controls how light moves through its circuits and has broad applications in data communication, microwave photonics, and quantum photonics.
3h
Cells Solve an English Hedge Maze with the Same Skills They Use to Traverse the Body
A study reveals the Pac-Man-like strategies adopted by different cell types when making long journeys through an organism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Cells Solve an English Hedge Maze with the Same Skills They Use to Traverse the Body
A study reveals the Pac-Man-like strategies adopted by different cell types when making long journeys through an organism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
A Carnival of Disinformation
A mericans who tuned in to this week's Republican National Convention were treated to a slickly produced, four-day dispatch from an alternate reality—one in which the president has defeated the pandemic, healed America's racial wounds, and ushered in a booming economy. In this carnival of propaganda, Donald Trump was presented not just as a great president, but as a quasi-messianic figure who was
3h
Algorithms Workers Can't See Are Increasingly Pulling the Management Strings
"I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that." HAL's cold, if polite, refusal to open the pod bay doors in 2001: A Space Odyssey has become a defining warning about putting too much trust in artificial intelligence, particularly if you work in space. In the movies, when a machine decides to be the boss (or humans let it) things go wrong. Yet despite myriad dystopian warnings, control by machines
3h
Can't be away from your phone? Study finds link to higher levels of obsession-compulsion
Feelings of panic when a person is away from their smartphone could be connected to general feelings of inadequacy and inferiority, a new study of young people in Portugal suggests.
3h
Cells Solve an English Hedge Maze with the Same Skills They Use to Traverse the Body
A study reveals the Pac-Man-like strategies adopted by different cell types when making long journeys through an organism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
AC can boost COVID-19's spread indoors
Air circulation and ventilation is key to preventing a build-up of droplets and aerosols that spread COVID-19, researchers say. Most COVID guidelines have stressed the 6-foot physical distancing rule, with the idea being that the virus spreads through large droplets produced when we talk, cough, or sneeze. Relatively heavy, these droplets tend to fall to the ground before they travel more than a
3h
Disasters Compound on Gulf Coast and in California
Hurricane Laura, which reached land as a Category 4 storm early Thursday, arrived during a week of multiple and intersecting natural disasters in the U.S. As with many so-called natural disasters, it can be difficult to disentangle the roles that nature and human decisions have played in their impacts.
3h
UK to fast-track Covid-19 vaccine approval if sought before end of Brexit transition
Government to use domestic regulator to grant temporary authorisation
3h
New analysis reveals where marine heatwaves will intensify fastest
High-resolution ocean modelling has found the world's strongest ocean currents, which play key roles in fisheries and ocean ecosystems, will experience more intense marine heatwaves than the global average over the coming decades.
3h
QUT algorithm could quash Twitter abuse of women
Online abuse targeting women, including threats of harm or sexual violence, has proliferated across all social media platforms but QUT researchers have developed a sophisticated statistical model to identify misogynistic content and help drum it out of the Twittersphere. They now hope their machine-learning solution can be adopted by social media platforms.
3h
The northern quoll: An amazingly versatile survivor?
The northern quoll, one of Australia's most adorable and endangered native carnivores, appears to be adapted to dramatically different landscapes — which may be key to the species' survival. University of Queensland Ph.D. candidate Pietro Viacava co-led a study that found similarities between northern quoll skulls across a 5000 kilometre range, which has raised hopes scientists will be able to cr
3h
Study confirms link between influenza, heart complications
The link between influenza and serious heart conditions just grew stronger. A CDC study looking at more than 80,000 adult patients hospitalized with flu over eight seasons found that sudden, serious heart complications were common, occurring in 12% of patients, or 1 in 8. The study, published Aug. 25 in the Annals of Internal Medicine, underscores the importance of getting a flu shot early, and th
3h
New evaluation of universal health coverage, world will likely fall short of WHO goal
This study uses a new framework to capture how well countries align health services with the needs of the population and how well or poorly those services contribute to people's health.
3h
Laura's leftovers move east, leaving a disaster in Louisiana
The remnants of Hurricane Laura unleashed heavy rain and twisters hundreds of miles inland from a path of death and mangled buildings along the Gulf Coast, and forecasters warn of new dangers as the tropical weather blows toward the Eastern Seaboard this weekend.
3h
Demonstrating vortices as Brownian particles in turbulent flows
Brownian motion of particles in fluid is a common collective behavior in biological and physical systems. In a new report on Science Advances, Kai Leong Chong, and a team of researchers in physics, engineering, and aerospace engineering in China, conducted experiments and numerical simulations to show how the movement of vortices resembled inertial Brownian particles. During the experiments, the r
3h
How Three New Tools Will Revolutionize Our Understanding of the Sun
Two spacecrafts and a telescope are set to jumpstart a new age of solar astronomy
4h
Women with higher neuroticism are less physically active
A new study from the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, shows that the role of personality may vary depending on how physical activity is measured.
4h
Portland State lab finds finds new levels of detail about key membrane proteins
Portland State University researchers used advanced electron microscopy to create a 3-D reconstruction of a membrane protein at an unprecedented level of resolution, setting the stage for the development of drugs that could target the protein more effectively to treat a variety of diseases.
4h
COVID-19 exposes broadband gaps
The COVID-19 crisis has increasingly highlighted shortcomings in Australia's National Broadband Network, Flinders University experts say. With access to high-speed broadband (HSB) and the internet via the NBN now central to people's livelihoods, education, healthcare delivery and even social connections, the Flinders University researchers say the "short-term politics of the 2013 federal election"
4h
Engineers uncover biomechanical effects of skin rubbing
Understanding the skin damage caused by rubbing could lead to better topical skin treatments and help prevent the formation of new routes for viral and bacterial infection.
4h
Knowledge about the past can preserve the biodiversity of tomorrow
Climate change threatens plants and animals across the planet. Interdisciplinary research by, among others, climate and biodiversity researchers at the University of Copenhagen, has mapped responds of biodiversity caused by abrupt climate changes in the past. The findings can be used to protect both individual species and entire ecosystems in the warmer climates of the future and can strengthen ef
4h
Giant nanomachine aids the immune system
In order to kill diseased cells, our immune system must first identify them. The so-called peptide-loading complex plays a key role in this process. In collaboration with colleagues from Jülich, a research team at Ruhr-Universität Bochum has analysed this nanomachine in atomic detail. They report their results in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, PNAS for short, from 11.
4h
Round nanoparticles improve quality factors of surface lattice resonances: Study
A research group led by Dr. LI Guangyuan from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has found that nanohemisphere arrays can significantly improve the quality factors of surface lattice resonances.
4h
Optical imaging enters sub-nanometer era
Researchers improved the spatial resolution from 8 nm to ~8 Å of photoluminescence imaging. It realized sub-molecular resolution with single molecule photofluorescence imaging for the first time.
4h
Painting with bacteria could revolutionise wastewater treatment
Improvements to a new type of water-based paint containing bacteria could pave the way for advancements in waste management and the production of biomass or biofuel gasses, a new study in the American Chemical Society journal, Biomacromolecules reports.
4h
Hurricane Katrina gave former prisoners a fresh start in new cities: How to give more people this route out of crime
Hurricane Laura's landfall on the coasts of Louisiana and Texas came just as New Orleans prepared to mark the 15th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, and with the region already reeling from the coronavirus pandemic. For many, the wounds of the COVID-19 disaster and now Hurricane Laura are all too reminiscent of the way the US handled the devastation of Katrina.
4h
AI removes unwanted objects from photos to give a clearer view
Photos can be spoiled if there is a distracting object in the foreground, but a new AI tool can digitally remove the obstructions to give a clearer view
4h
Painting with bacteria could revolutionise wastewater treatment
Improvements to a new type of water-based paint containing bacteria could pave the way for advancements in waste management and the production of biomass or biofuel gasses, a new study in the American Chemical Society journal, Biomacromolecules reports.
4h
Study finds 'nomophobia' is associated with poor sleep health in college students
A new study found that the fear of being out of mobile phone contact — 'nomophobia' — is extremely common among college students and is associated with poor sleep health.
4h
Research illuminates new element of plant immune defense response to biotic stress
Scientists have addressed the involvement of cytosolic calcium oscillations and waves in the immune response of P. patens to a biotic stress. Specifically, the scientists administered chitin oligosaccharides to simulate a fungal infection.
4h
New study takes aim at advanced types of non-addictive pain therapies
Scientists have recently helped clarify the contributions to an ion channel's temperature – dependent activation. This in turn should aid in the development of new types of non-addictive pain therapies.
4h
Study finds younger and older drivers more likely to drive older, less safe vehicles
A new study found that teen drivers and drivers 65 years and older – two age groups at a higher risk of being involved in an automobile accident – are more likely to be driving vehicles that are less safe, putting them at even higher risk of injury. The findings underscore the need for these groups to prioritize driving the safest vehicle they can afford.
4h
How cells can find their way through the human body
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.K. has discovered how cells are able to travel so accurately through the human body. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes a theory they developed to explain cell orienteering and how they tested it using mazes.
4h
How bacteria adhere to fiber in the gut
Researchers have revealed a new molecular mechanism by which bacteria adhere to cellulose fibers in the human gut. Thanks to two different binding modes, they can withstand the shear forces in the body. Scientists of the University of Basel and ETH Zurich published their results in the journal Nature Communications.
4h
How cells can find their way through the human body
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.K. has discovered how cells are able to travel so accurately through the human body. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes a theory they developed to explain cell orienteering and how they tested it using mazes.
4h
How bacteria adhere to fiber in the gut
Researchers have revealed a new molecular mechanism by which bacteria adhere to cellulose fibers in the human gut. Thanks to two different binding modes, they can withstand the shear forces in the body. Scientists of the University of Basel and ETH Zurich published their results in the journal Nature Communications.
4h
Bill and Ted's Excellent Midlife Crisis
If you hopped inside a telephone booth and traveled back through the space-time continuum to your first encounter with Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure , you might be surprised to discover that its early scenes were, to paraphrase our heroes, totally bogus. In Bill & Ted vernacular, bogus doesn't mean "counterfeit," it means "bummer, dude," and in the original 1989 film, their excellent adventure
4h
There's a Reason Parents Miss Back-to-School Shopping
Late August should be a time of melancholy for the waning days of summer, mixed with excitement for the new and unknown. Kids fret over which outfit will best express their new selves. Teachers write names on cubbies, hang posters, and prepare lessons. Parents brace for the day when they send their kids off on the bus, free, finally, from having to organize what their children do every minute of
4h
Productivity could be improved by a permanent shift towards remote working, research shows
Nine out of ten employees who have worked at home during lockdown would like to continue doing so in some capacity, research suggests.
4h
Google conducts largest chemical simulation on a quantum computer to date
A team of researchers with Google's AI Quantum team (working with unspecified collaborators) has conducted the largest chemical simulation on a quantum computer to date. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their work and why they believe it was a step forward in quantum computing. Xiao Yuan of Stanford University has written a Perspective piece outlining the potent
4h
Debat: Producentansvar er til for miljøet – ikke industrien
Det kommende producentansvar kan gøre emballager grønnere og mere affaldsvenlige. Men kun, hvis det skrues rigtigt sammen. Og faldgruberne er fortsat mange.
4h
Google Offers to Help Others With the Tricky Ethics of AI
After learning its own ethics lessons the hard way, the tech giant will offer services like spotting racial bias or developing guidelines around AI projects.
4h
How Many of Maria Ressa's Warnings Will We Ignore?
Plus: An unheeded red flag at Facebook, TikTok security questions, and this week's once-in-a-century disaster.
4h
Turns Out Late Night Talk Show Hosts Are Just Like Us
We had really started to worry about James Corden, TBH.
4h
Growing demand for zero-deforestation cacao might not help Colombian forests
Cacao in Colombia is not a major driver of deforestation – yet. But increased demand could imperil forests in the future. New research shows cacao stakeholders have to overcome barriers to reach markets that value zero-deforestation, complicating one of Colombia's post-conflict strategies.
4h
Space debris observed for the first time during the day
On the afternoon of February 10, 2009, the operational communications satellite Iridium 33 collided with the obsolete Cosmos 2251 communications satellite over Siberia at an altitude of roughly 800 kilometers. The collision was at a speed of 11.7 kilometers a second and produced a cloud of more than 2,000 pieces of debris larger than ten centimeters. This debris spread out over an extensive area w
4h
New analysis reveals where marine heatwaves will intensify fastest
The world's strongest ocean currents, which play key roles in fisheries and ocean ecosystems, will experience more intense marine heatwaves than the global average over coming decades, according to a paper published today in Nature Communications by researchers from the ARC Center of Excellence for Climate Extremes at the University of Tasmania and CSIRO.
4h
Self-assembly of responsive photonic biobased materials in liquid marbles
A surface displays structural colors when light is reflected by tiny, regular structural elements in a transparent material. Researchers have now developed a method to make structural colors from cellulose-based polymers by using coated droplets that exist in a surrounding fluid—so-called liquid marbles. The system readily responds to environmental changes, which makes it interesting for applicati
4h
Q&A: Experts discuss extreme weather's role in current and future wildfires
Something unfamiliar to many Californians—an intense thunderstorm with widespread lightning strikes—spawned the all-too-familiar wildfires that have so far burned more than 1 million acres across the state's north. That contrast may foreshadow a future of increasingly frequent extreme weather that drives natural disasters.
4h
Att "byta kropp" med en vän kan ändra din självbild
Hur påverkas vår självbild och personlighet av vår kropp? Skulle vår personlighet förändras om vårt medvetande en dag plötsligt vaknade upp i vår bästa väns kropp? Detta tankeexperiment har länge varit ett populärt tema inom science-fiction men en ny studie visar att frågan går att undersöka vetenskapligt med hjälp av beteendeexperiment. Ett av studiens viktigaste fynd är att deltagarna under ill
4h
Practicing sustainability during a pandemic
The coronavirus pandemic has complicated, well, everything, including everyday efforts to reduce, reuse and recycle.
4h
Brain circuit activated by hunger makes starved fish fight for longer
Depriving a zebrafish of food for six days boosts its chances of winning a fight against a well-fed fish because starvation activates a certain pathway in its brain, neuroscientists at RIKEN have shown. This finding could well have implications for other animals and humans since the neural pathway is conserved across species.
4h
Hurricane Laura is the strongest storm to hit Louisiana in 160 years. How can communities defend themselves?
Arriving as a Category 4 storm on the week of the 15th anniversary of a catastrophic hurricane that devastated the Gulf Coast, Hurricane Laura is the strongest storm to make landfall in Louisiana in 160 years, says a coastal engineer who teaches at Northeastern.
4h
Brain circuit activated by hunger makes starved fish fight for longer
Depriving a zebrafish of food for six days boosts its chances of winning a fight against a well-fed fish because starvation activates a certain pathway in its brain, neuroscientists at RIKEN have shown. This finding could well have implications for other animals and humans since the neural pathway is conserved across species.
4h
How I launched WHO's covid-19 response in the Central African Republic
Marie-Roseline Darnycka Bélizaire of the WHO explains the challenges of responding to coronavirus in the Central African Republic in the face of limited resources
4h
Sådan vil regeringen konvertere danskernes olie- og gasfyr til varmepumper
To nye støttepuljer skal få danskerne til at vælge varmepumper og skrotte olie- eller gasfyret, viser høringsudkast. Puljerne fremrykkes nu, så de åbner for ansøgninger allerede til oktober.
4h
Study finds income, job rut for millions in U.S.
At a time when evictions and mortgage defaults have been likened to an oncoming tsunami across America, a big-data study of loan-to-value ratios in the wake of the 2007-08 recession carries a cautionary forecast for vexing economic weather ahead:
4h
80% of Indonesian rainforest vulnerable to palm oil destruction is not protected
More than 80 percent of the Indonesian rainforest, mangroves and peatlands most vulnerable to being cleared for palm oil production is completely unprotected by the country's Forest Moratorium, according to new research.
4h
No, we won't change the corporate world with divestment and boycotts
Boe Pahari's short reign as boss of AMP's lucrative investment management division and the resignations this week of AMP chairman David Murray and board member John Fraser have shown the power of major shareholders in public companies.
4h
"Jag trodde att det var för bra för att vara sant"
För några veckor sedan kom studien som överraskade en hel forskarvärld: Alzheimers sjukdom går att upptäcka med ett enkelt blodprov.
4h
The coronavirus is most deadly if you are older and male — new data reveal the risks
Nature, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02483-2 A slew of detailed studies has now quantified the increased risk the virus poses to older people, men, and other groups.
5h
Reopening schools: how different countries are tackling Covid dilemma
As schools in England prepare to reopen, we examine the situation around the world Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As schools in England and Wales get set to reopen amid continued controversy over safe conditions, attention has focussed both on potential evidence of coronavirus transmission in the classroom and the experiences of other countries. If the issue is comp
5h
Short exercise breaks during class improve concentration for senior students
Primary school teachers often provide students with short physical activity breaks to energize kids and minimize classroom disruptions. Our study, published in the journal Educational Psychology Review, found we should be doing this for senior students too.
5h
Soviet-Era 'Sea Monster' Stranded in Caspian Sea During Tow Effort
The Soviet-era Lun -class ekranoplan, aka MD-160, looks a bit like a unit you might see in the Command & Conquer series. It's also currently beached in the Caspian Sea and taking on water. It's possible the ekranoplan may be hammered apart by Mother Nature, joining the original "Caspian Sea Monster" on the sea bottom, before it can be repaired and put on display as a museum showpiece as originall
5h
Mount Rainier's first wolverine mama in a century is a sign of the species' comeback
Wolverines Return to Mount Rainier National Park After More Than 100 Years, News Release: https://t.co/qmCkTDsFAU Video of three wolverines at the end of a snowfield then running through a meadow into a forest. Credit: Travis Harris -kl pic.twitter.com/ALwJoAOmTG — MountRainierNPS (@MountRainierNPS) August 20, 2020
5h
Inequality drives deep divide between Australian children
Children living in the most disadvantaged communities across Australia are far less likely to attend the required 15 hours of preschool and more likely to become developmentally vulnerable in their first five years of life, a new Bankwest Curtin Economics Center (BCEC) report has found.
5h
Does Sony Think You're Worthy Enough to Preorder a PS5?
A unique direct-sales program extends purchase invites to players based on "previous interests and PlayStation activities."
5h
What Virtual Reality for Flies Teaches Us About Human Vision
Optical illusions can be a useful tool for studying how we see stuff, but it's hard to uncover just how they work. Unless, that is, you show them to flies.
5h
Alexa, Play My Alibi: The Smart Home Gets Taken to Court
This week, we discuss the growing trend of data from smart speakers and other connected devices being used to solve crimes.
5h
Når det gælder sprogteknologi, er størrelse altafgørende
PLUS. Sprogprogrammet ­GPT-3 har læst hele internettet – nu kan det oversætte, programmere, skrive nyhedsartikler og meget mere.
5h
Giant nanomachine aids the immune system
Cells that are infected by a virus or carry a carcinogenic mutation, for example, produce proteins foreign to the body. Antigenic peptides resulting from the degradation of these exogenous proteins inside the cell are loaded by the peptide-loading complex onto so-called major histocompatibility complex molecules (MHC for short) and presented on the cell surface. There, they are specifically identi
5h
The northern quoll: An amazingly versatile survivor?
The northern quoll, one of Australia's most adorable and endangered native carnivores, appears to be adapted to dramatically different landscapes—which may be key to the species' survival.
5h
NASA's Webb solar array reconnects to the telescope
One kilowatt is about what it takes to heat up some leftovers in a microwave—or to power the largest and most technically advanced telescope ever built. Thanks to its solar array, NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will stay energy-efficient more than 1 million miles (1.5 million kilometers) from Earth.
5h
How changes in ancient soil microbes could predict the future of the Arctic
Microbial communities in Arctic permafrost changed drastically at the end of the last ice age—and the shift could happen again due to modern climate change, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists.
5h
The northern quoll: An amazingly versatile survivor?
The northern quoll, one of Australia's most adorable and endangered native carnivores, appears to be adapted to dramatically different landscapes—which may be key to the species' survival.
5h
When several lines are better than one
Everyone knows the existential dread that comes along with standing in line for what seems like an eternity. But new research by Wharton operations, information and decisions professor Hummy Song, Guillaume Roels from INSEAD and Mor Armony from New York University's Stern School of Business suggests that knowledge-based industries should rethink how they approach this aspect of customer service. I
5h
COVID, politics and voting by mail
The topic of mail-in voting has been top news lately, with Democrats touting its benefits early in the pandemic while some Republicans, President Trump in particular, insisted that the method is rife with fraud, a claim with no evidence to support it. Then came the report of recent cost-cutting measures by the U.S. Postal Service, just as record numbers of voters are expected to send their ballots
5h
New framework for natural capital approach to transform policy decisions
How governments and the private sector consider the natural environment when constructing policy is being transformed thanks to a new "natural capital" decision-making framework.
5h
Scientists find direct evidence of thickening organic film at soil-water micro-interfaces
Soil organic matter is essential for the maintenance of soil fertility, absorption of pollutants and mitigation of global climate change. In the past few decades, the long-term protection mechanism of organic matter in soil and sediment has been extensively studied.
5h
Scientists measure HONO and NOX flux in farmland
Researchers at the Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, developed an automated dynamic chamber system to simultaneously measure the HONO flux and NOX flux in farmland ecosystems. Their work was published in Science of The Total Environment.
5h
Multidimensional, dual-channel vortex beam generator
Optical vortices, characterized by a helical phase front and doughnut-shaped intensity distribution, contribute to a broad range of applications, from microscopy to optical communications. And applications for optical vortices are proliferating. So, what's the best way to generate optical vortices? Active, direct emission from a laser cavity is considered one of the best approaches. For applicatio
5h
Low-cost, fly footpad-like adhesive structure capable of repeated attachment/detachment
NIMS, HUE and HUSM have developed a method of easily and cheaply producing an adhesive structure capable of repeated attachment and detachment. The design of this structure was inspired by the adhesive spatula-shaped hairs (setae) found on the footpads of flies, while the method of producing it was hinted at by seta formation in fly pupae. These environmentally sound technologies could potentially
5h
Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti: 'There's nothing permanent about us'
The International Space Station veteran on the new space economy, and what life in orbit taught her about humanity
5h
Major indexing service rejects appeals by two suppressed journals
Journals hoping that Clarivate Analytics — the company behind the Impact Factor — would reverse their decision to suppress their titles from the closely watched metric are batting .500. In July, as we reported, Clarivate suppressed 33 journals from its Journal Citation Reports (JCR), which means they will not have a 2019 Impact Factor, because … Continue reading
5h
Everyone I Know Keeps Breaking Things
Over Memorial Day Weekend, a tree tried to kill me. I was sitting on a park bench with a friend, drinking a few clandestine beers, when one of its enormous boughs snapped off at the trunk and crashed to the ground beside me, its leaves brushing my arm on the way down. After two terrifying months in New York City, it struck me as darkly funny that I could have survived living in the epicenter of t
6h
The Problem with Implicit Bias Training
It's well motivated, but there's little evidence that it leads to meaningful changes in behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
iMac Review (27-Inch, 2020): A Powerful and Reliable Mac
This Intel-powered all-in-one desktop computer is back and retuned for working from home.
6h
To Stop the Eviction Tsunami, We Need Online Chats
Tenants who get dragged to court are often at a disadvantage. But a new system, known as online dispute resolution, gives them a better shot.
6h
Elon Musk Is About to Show Off His Neuralink Brain Implant
Musk tweeted that his "V2" update will blow our minds. But how close is he to putting computer chips in them?
6h
The Problem with Implicit Bias Training
It's well motivated, but there's little evidence that it leads to meaningful changes in behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Will Trumpism Change Republican Foreign Policy Permanently?
Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET on August 28, 2020. Last week, more than 70 Republican foreign-policy officials, including two from the Trump administration, signed a letter endorsing Joe Biden for president. Dozens more Republican foreign-policy experts signed earlier letters condemning Donald Trump. Many of these officials hope that, if Trump loses, as current polls suggest, Republican foreign policy
6h
Cheap, Self-Powered Fire Sensor Could Sound an Early Alarm
A new sensor printed on an ordinary piece of paper can send a wireless alert — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Analogia, by George Dyson — merging with the machines
How computing's fourth age will call time on human mastery of technology
6h
This Is How Biden Loses
Here is a prediction about the November election: If Donald Trump wins, in a trustworthy vote, what's happening this week in Kenosha, Wisconsin, will be one reason. Maybe the reason. And yet Joe Biden has it in his power to spare the country a second Trump term. Events are unfolding with the inevitable logic of a nightmare. A white police officer shoots a Black man as he's leaning into a car with
7h
Sri Lanka to ban imports of plastic goods to protect elephants
Sri Lanka will ban the import of most plastic products in a bid to protect wild elephants and deer that die eating the waste, the environment minister announced Friday.
7h
Avancerad bildteknik visar dinosaurieungen i sitt ägg
Med hjälp av avancerad visualiseringsteknik har forskare från bland annat Uppsala universitet kunnat ge en glimt av hur en långhalsad dinosauriebaby såg ut inuti sitt ägg före kläckning: Ögonen är enorma och riktade framåt, nosen är kort och överdelen på huvudet runt och välvt. De stora långhalsade dinosaurierna, eller sauropoderna, så som Brontosaurus och Argentinosaurus, är de största djuren so
7h
Spiggen sprider sig som en flodvåg i Östersjön
Storspiggen har successivt tagit över allt större delar av Östersjökusten och trots sitt lilla format har den blivit ett allvarligt hot mot gädda, abborre såväl som mot kusternas ekosystem. Förändringen presenteras i en studie gjord av forskare från Stockholms universitet, Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet och universitetet i Groningen (Nederländerna). Dramatisk ökning Storspigg är en viktig del av Ö
7h
Sri Lanka to ban imports of plastic goods to protect elephants
Sri Lanka will ban the import of most plastic products in a bid to protect wild elephants and deer that die eating the waste, the environment minister announced Friday.
7h
Mysteriet om Jordens vand
PLUS. Forskerne har længe diskuteret, hvor Jordens vand stammer fra. Måske er den mest enkle forklaring, som man tidligere har afvist, den rigtige.
7h
Trump Has a Different Definition of Corruption
On Wednesday, in response to criticism that Donald Trump and other administration officials violated federal law by using government resources at the Republican National Convention, White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows declared , "Nobody outside of the Beltway really cares. They expect that Donald Trump is going to promote Republican values." If Meadows is referring to those Americans outside
7h
Covid-19 News: Live Updates
A coalition of local health departments called on the C.D.C. to change new recommendations that people without Covid-19 symptoms do not need to be tested.
7h
Following the science: lessons from a 19th-century showman
The nature of scientific knowledge has been abused during the pandemic — politicians could learn from the story of Sir Humphry Davy
7h
Seaweed: The food and fuel of the future?
The farming of seaweed is accelerating as firms exploit its fast growth and green credentials.
7h
Kyle Rittenhouse, Kenosha, and the Sheepdog Mentality
"I'd rather be judged by 12 than carried out by six." Most gun owners have heard that nugget of homicidal wisdom, often from the person who sold them their guns. In other words: Better to attend your own trial by jury for killing someone than your own funeral for hesitating and being killed instead. The final count on Tuesday night in Kenosha, Wisconsin, was 12 and 12: a dozen pallbearers for two
7h
Dual-mode solid-state thermal rectification
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18212-2 Here, the authors present a dual-mode solid state thermal rectification effect using a heterogeneous irradiated-pristine polyethylene nanofiber junction as a nanoscale thermal diode, in which heat flow can be rectified in both directions by changing the working temperature.
7h
7h
Intracellular sodium elevation reprograms cardiac metabolism
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18160-x The failing heart is characterised by both alterations in mitochondrial metabolism and an elevation of cytosolic sodium. Here, the authors use 23Na NMR and metabolic profiling to show these are related, and that elevation in intracellular Na reprograms cardiac substrate utilisation via effects on mitochondrial
7h
Sex differences in oncogenic mutational processes
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17359-2 There's an emerging body of evidence to show how biological sex impacts cancer incidence, treatment and underlying biology. Here, using a large pan-cancer dataset, the authors further highlight how sex differences shape the cancer genome.
7h
Connecting shear localization with the long-range correlated polarized stress fields in granular materials
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18217-x Understanding the behavior of jammed granular matter is important for a range of phenomena, from materials science to geology. Wang et al. uncover relations between stress correlations and emergence of localized shear bands due to external shear stress, which breaks the rotational symmetry.
7h
Connexin-46/50 in a dynamic lipid environment resolved by CryoEM at 1.9 Å
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18120-5 The local lipid environment is known to affect the structure, stability and intercellular channel activity of gap junctions, however, the molecular basis for these effects remains unknown. Here authors report the CryoEM structure of Cx46/50 lipid-embedded channels, by which they reveal a lipid-induced stabiliz
7h
Dynamics for El Niño-La Niña asymmetry constrain equatorial-Pacific warming pattern
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17983-y The asymmetry between El Niño and La Niña episodes in the tropical Pacific is often not well represented in models. Here, the authors show that this asymmetry is related to subsurface nonlinear dynamical heating and that a realistic representation of this process can potentially improve tropical climate projec
7h
Genetically controlled membrane synthesis in liposomes
Nature Communications, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17863-5 Controlled membrane synthesis in liposomes is a prerequisite for synthetic systems emulating the fundamental properties of living cells. Here authors present that a de novo synthesized metabolic pathway converts precursors into a variety of lipids, including the constituents of the parental liposome.
7h
Glue bird traps: Macron suspends use amid EU row
President Emmanuel Macron orders an end to the much-criticised method for catching songbirds.
7h
Researchers find potential to make brain cancers in children respond better to treatment
Research has identified a small molecule compound that can activate the Wnt pathway in non-Wnt subtypes of medulloblastoma, making these aggressive forms of cancer more responsive to therapies. The work also found the Wnt pathway, which has historically been considered cancer-promoting, to function as a cancer inhibitor in certain contexts.
8h
New malaria transmission patterns emerge in Africa
An international study reveals how future climate change could affect malaria transmission in Africa over the next century.
8h
A surprising protein player in diabetes
Conducted by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University and Riken Center of Integrative Medical Sciences, a study looking at pancreatic beta cells has found a link between a commonly found protein, a subset of switched-off genes and the development of diabetes.
8h
Fidelity of El Niño simulation matters for predicting future climate
A new study led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa researchers, published in the journal Nature Communications this week, revealed that correctly simulating ocean current variations hundreds of feet below the ocean surface – the so-called Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent – during El Niño events is key in reducing the uncertainty of predictions of future warming in the eastern tropical Pacific.
8h
A CogSci problem worth millions!
Apologize for the clickbaity title out of the gate, but Reddit can be an unforgiving place and this question has been important to me for about 28 years now (so please bear with me). About me: US military. A 28-year career in bomb disposal including my share of combat deployments. Providing just for context. This ain't about me. Let me try to outline a question that has plagued me for a better pa
8h
Do you ever forget extremely basic words?
I'm 18 and honestly kinda scared about my memory. It feels like the last year or so I keep forgetting a lot more than usual, and getting distracted/not being able to concentrate very often. I always sleep at least 8 hours a night as well, though it's certainly not always restful sleep. Something that happens relatively frequently to me is forgetting words, either briefly or until I can search it
8h
How Does Our Brain Influence Our View of Reality?
submitted by /u/TheLavinGuy [link] [comments]
8h
8h
8h
Hard Problem of Consciousness
What do you guys think about the hard problem of consiousness? I don't know if I should feel embarrassed or not, but I don't see why there's a problem in the first place. And I know that many philosophers hold this view and deny the hard problem, but I can't help but think that they came to their stand after understanding Chalmers' point. And I think that maybe I don't get his argument at all. If
8h
8h
Consequences of the "brains are like computers" metaphor
I think it's safe to say many conceptual metaphors like this are both useful and problematic at the same time. None is perfect in reflecting the nature of the original subject, so inevitably, imperfections will misguide or limit understanding. I'm curious to hear this subreddit's thoughts on the consequences of the "brains are like computers" metaphor given its wide and casual use. To be clear, I
8h
Should we add flairs to posts? | Community Thread | Aug 24, 2020
Hi everyone, The mod team would love to get your opinion on whether or not we should add flairs to posts? If yes – what flairs do you think would be relevant? If not, curious to hear your reasoning. submitted by /u/MostlyAffable [link] [comments]
8h
UK to give emergency approval to any Covid vaccine breakthrough
Legal change will enable population to be immunised as quickly as possible Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Any new and effective Covid vaccine will be given emergency approval for use in the UK and an expanded workforce will be trained to give the injections to immunise as much of the population as possible quickly, the government has said. A change in the law will a
8h
Clinically relevant autistic traits predict greater reliance on detail for image recognition
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70953-8
8h
Prehistoric agriculture and social structure in the southwestern Tarim Basin: multiproxy analyses at Wupaer
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70515-y
8h
Increasing incidence of acute autoimmune hepatitis: a nationwide survey in Japan
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71296-0
8h
Species distribution models advance our knowledge of the Neanderthals' paleoecology on the Iranian Plateau
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71166-9
8h
Age- and season-dependent pattern of flavonol glycosides in Cabernet Sauvignon grapevine leaves
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70706-7
8h
8h
Knowledge and social relatedness shape research portfolio diversification
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71009-7
8h
Comparison of 68Ga-DOTANOC with 18F-FDG using PET/MRI imaging in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71127-2
8h
How Many Coronavirus Cases Are Happening In Schools? This Tracker Keeps Count
Alisha Morris, a Kansas theater teacher, created a database of COVID-19 cases in schools. Now maintained by the National Education Association, it shares data that some schools prefer to keep quiet. (Image credit: US schools tracker/Screenshot by NPR)
8h
Everything Is Unprecedented. Welcome To Your Hotter Earth
Hurricanes, wildfires, heat waves and disease outbreaks are all a preview of our hotter future. Dramatically cutting greenhouse gas emissions would help. (Image credit: Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images)
8h
Elon Musk to show off working brain-hacking device
Neuralink is working on ways to connect the human brain to machines.
8h
Book Review: A Lyrical Glimpse Into the World of Whales
In "Fathoms: The World in the Whale," Rebecca Giggs makes the case for saving the whales with a wide and wild array of facts and memoirs featuring cetacean life. Intertwined with startling and compelling descriptions, Giggs argues that the unintended consequences of human activity on whales must be minimized.
8h
What A Nasal Spray Vaccine Against COVID-19 Might Do Even Better Than A Shot
A vaccine against the coronavirus needs to keep people from getting very sick and dying. But preventing the spread of the disease is also important, and vaccines delivered by nasal spray may do that. (Image credit: Tim Sloan /AFP via Getty Images)
8h
Poor Neighborhoods Feel Brunt Of Rising Heat. Cities Are Mapping Them To Bring Relief
In 13 U.S. cities this summer, volunteers are capturing detailed measurements that will include the heat index people experience. Cities will use the new heat maps to help cool the hottest spots. (Image credit: Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT News)
8h
Myggans immunsystem kartläggs i kampen mot malaria
Att bryta överföringen från människa till mygga till människa igen, är nyckeln till minskad malariaspridning. Forskare kartlägger myggans immunsystem för att avslöja hur myggan själv bekämpar malaria och andra infektioner, och på så sätt hitta nya sätt att bryta överföringskedjan. Forskare från Umeå och USA har gjort den första kartläggningen över immunceller hos mygga för att förstå hur myggor b
8h
Tusindvis af hjertelæger mødes virtuelt
Dagens Medicins faste videnskabsjournalist Kristian Sjøgren rapporterer fra ESC om de største videnskabelige resultater og interviewer danske eksperter om rækkevidden og effekten af studierne
8h
Fidelity of El Nino simulation matters for predicting future climate
A new study led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa researchers, published in the journal Nature Communications this week, revealed that correctly simulating ocean current variations hundreds of feet below the ocean surface—the so-called Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent—during El Niño events is key in reducing the uncertainty of predictions of future warming in the eastern tropical Pacific.
8h
Why school leadership and student critical thinking need a desperate do-over
For many people in the world, the idea that education is not changing at the same rate as the rest of the world became more apparent at the start of the coronavirus pandemic. Grant Lichtman argues that the hierarchical systems that govern education and other organizations (military, political, business, etc.) don't work in times of rapid change, and thus need to be overhauled. "What has started t
8h
PODCAST: Havudsigt kan koste på husprisen. AI er en mester i fake news
Det er så dejligt at bo ved vandet – men risikoen for oversvømmelse kan gøre huse usælgelige. Et tiårigt forlig fra 2009 om grøn transportpolitik endte kulsort. Sprogmodellen GPT-3 kan skrive en fiktiv nyhedsartikel, blot den får en overskrift.
8h
8h
Small-volume point-of-care analytical methods
Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70903-4 Detecting clinically relevant diagnostic biomarkers, suitable for point-of-care detection, may facilitate rapid treatment and prevention of disease. However, medical diagnosis for which there are limited quantities of testable tissue or fluid, require point-of-care technologies with superior sensitivity and speci
8h
Ultrasnabb mätning av övergången mellan ettor och nollor
Behovet att snabbt hantera stora mängder digital information ökar ständigt. Ett sätt att lagra digitala bits i till exempel hårddiskar är genom magnetism, men det är svårt att mäta hur snabbt en magnetisk bit byter tillstånd. Nu har fysiker från bland annat Uppsala universitet utvecklat en exakt metod för att mäta ultrasnabba förändringar av magnetiska tillstånd i ett material. Morgondagens magne
8h
Kvantfysiken öppnar för väderprognoser på solen
Solens magnetfält är mycket komplicerat, och bildar olika strukturer som ibland kan kollapsa och släppa lös energi i form av soleruptioner – flares. Sådana utbrott går inte att förutsäga, bland annat för att det saknas information om magnetfälten i den yttre delen av solens atmosfär, koronan. Hittills har dessa fält bara kunnat mätas med indirekta metoder. Nu har en grupp fysiker hittat en metod f
8h
Wild windstorm kills 3, taints water in Melbourne, Australia
A wild storm that hit Australia's second-largest city knocked out power to 56,000 homes, contaminated the water supply and felled trees that killed three people, authorities said Friday.
8h
Studie fra ISS: Hårdføre bakterier kan klare rumvejr i årevis og måske rejse til Mars
Kugler af bakterier har efter tre år på ydersiden af rumstationen klaret sig overraskende godt. Forskerne overvejer derfor, om de derfor nemt ville kunne 'smitte' andre planeter med liv.
8h
Microsoft og Walmart vil købe TikTok i USA
Walmart og Microsoft går sammen om at byde på den amerikanske del af videoappen TikTok, efter de kinesiske ejere er under pres fra USA's præsident.
8h
Laura thrashes Louisiana, nearby states face tornado threats
One of the strongest hurricanes ever to strike the U.S., Laura barreled across Louisiana on Thursday, shearing off roofs and killing at least six people while carving a destructive path hundreds of miles inland.
9h
Jakob van Zyl, key Jet Propulsion Laboratory engineer, dies
Jakob van Zyl, an engineer who held crucial positions at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and was involved in numerous space exploration missions over decades, has died. He was 63.
9h
Skal testes på dyr og tusindvis af mennesker: Her er de trin, en vaccine skal igennem før du kan få den
Danmark har lagt billet ind på en corona-vaccine. Se, hvordan den er opbygget.
9h
Grant Shapps says it is safe to return to work in offices in England
UK transport minister attempts to reassure public amid warnings for future of high street Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK transport secretary, Grant Shapps has said it is safe to go back to work in England, as the government prepares to launch a publicity drive to persuade the public to return to the office. Ministers are concerned about the prospects for city
9h
Kunstig menneskehud kan gøre forskere klogere på psoriasis og hudkræft
Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har udviklet en genetisk manipuleret model af menneskets hud,…
9h
An improved wearable, stretchable gas sensor using nanocomposites
A stretchable, wearable gas sensor for environmental sensing has been developed and tested by researchers at Penn State, Northeastern University and five universities in China.
9h
Vi skal udnytte de gamle veje bedre, før vi bygger nye
PLUS. Mere infrastruktur skal ikke være et mål i sig selv, når transportministeren inden længe skal finde opbakning til den næste transportplan, lyder det fra eksperter.
9h
Nurses burned out and want to quit
A survey of nurses caring for children with heart problems has revealed that more than half are emotionally exhausted. The analysis, presented today at ESC Congress 2020, also found that good working environments were linked with less burnout. "Nurses' wellbeing is central to ensuring the best outcomes for patients," said study author Dr. Annamaria Bagnasco of the University of Genoa, Italy.
10h
How to treat high blood pressure without ruining your sex life
Men with untreated high blood pressure have poorer penile blood flow than those with normal blood pressure, according to research presented today at ESC Congress 2020.1 The differences disappeared with blood pressure medication. The results provide reassurance to men concerned about the effects of blood pressure-lowering medications.
10h
Vaccines against respiratory infections linked with less heart failure deaths
Influenza and pneumonia vaccinations are associated with fewer hospital deaths in patients with heart failure. That's the result of a study in nearly 3 million Americans released today at ESC Congress 2020. One out of five individuals will develop heart failure in their lifetime. An estimated 26 million people are affected worldwide.
10h
The First Multiple Sclerosis Patient
Twenty years before Charcot described the nerve-destroying disease multiple sclerosis, an illegitimate British noble spent much of his adult life describing the disease aid its effects.
10h
Cholesterol drug combinations could cut health risk for European patients
More patients could benefit from combinations of cholesterol-lowering drugs to reduce their risk of stroke and heart attacks.
10h
Danmarks bedste matematikspeciale handlede om statistisk analyse af DNA-spor i drabssager
Nye resultater i drabssag og forklaring af problemer ved DNA-identifikation indbringer Malte Bødkergaard…
10h
Norwegian Air warns bailout will not be enough
Imposition of Covid-19 related quarantines across Europe has dashed carrier's recovery hopes
10h
UK coronavirus live: Shapps insists return to office is safe amid push to save town and city centres
Transport secretary urges people to go back to the office ; researchers say risk of severe illness or death very small for children Push to get staff back to offices amid warning of 'ghost towns' 'Vanishingly small' risk of severe illness or death for children Global coronavirus updates – live UK registers highest number of Covid infections since mid-June 8.27am BST Shapps is being repeatedly cha
11h
Eksperter: It-skandaler i Politiet kan skyldes ulige kamp om talenterne
Lønnen er bedre og opgaverne mere spændende i det private, og derfor kniber det med at skaffe de rette it-kompetencer. Sådan forklarer flere eksperter de seneste sager om fejlbehæftede, tekniske beviser. Politiet bør stille sig selv et par kritiske spørgsmål, mener IDA.
11h
11h
11h
12h
12h
12h
Photos of the Week: Buffalo Dip, Giraffe Calf, Winter Wallaby
A socially distanced Santa school in London, gold panning in France, heavy-metal music in China, gondoliers in Mexico, Hurricane Laura damage in Louisiana, protests in Kenosha, Red Rocks yoga in Colorado, an acrobatic fairy tale in Prague, Senegal's first female professional surfer, and much more
12h
Amateur drone videos could aid in natural disaster damage assessment
It wasn't long after Hurricane Laura hit the Gulf Coast Thursday that people began flying drones to record the damage and posting videos on social media. Those videos are a precious resource, say researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, who are working on ways to use them for rapid damage assessment. By using artificial intelligence, the researchers are developing a system that can automatically
13h
Low-cost, fly footpad-like adhesive structure capable of repeated attachment/detachment
NIMS, HUE and HUSM have succeeded in developing a method of easily and cheaply producing an adhesive structure capable of repeated attachment and detachment. The design of this structure was inspired by the adhesive spatula-shaped hairs (setae) found on the footpads of flies, while the method of producing it was hinted at by seta formation in fly pupae. These environmentally sound technologies cou
13h
Which OCD treatment works best? New brain study could lead to more personalized choices
New research could improve the odds that people with obsessive-compulsive disorder will receive a therapy that really works for them – something that eludes more than a third of those who currently get OCD treatment. The study suggests the possibility of predicting which of two types of therapy will help people with OCD: One that exposes them to the subject of their obsessive thoughts and behavior
13h
Michael Steele Isn't Having It
N ight after night, the Republican National Convention invited Black speakers to the stage to testify that President Donald Trump is not a bigot. "It hurt my soul to hear the terrible names that people call Donald," said the former NFL player Herschel Walker, who once worked for a team owned by Trump. "The worst one is 'racist.' I take it as a personal insult that people would think I've had a 37
13h
End of 'Green Sahara' May Have Spurred a Megadrought in Southeast Asia
That drought may have brought about societal shifts in the region 5,000 years ago. Christopher Intagliata reports.
13h
A Tesla Employee Thwarted an Alleged Ransomware Plot
Elon Musk confirmed Thursday night that a ransomware gang had approached a Gigafactory employee with alleged promises of a big payout.
13h
Auckland lockdown to ease despite new Covid cases
Finance minister says 'we are nearly there' but urges residents to get tested if they display symptoms Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Auckland is on track to move out of level 3 lockdown on Sunday despite new cases of Covid-19. New Zealand's largest city has been in level 3 for more than two weeks and on Friday the finance minister, Grant Robertson, said that at mid
14h
End of 'Green Sahara' May Have Spurred a Megadrought in Southeast Asia
That drought may have brought about societal shifts in the region 5,000 years ago. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14h
15h
White House, Petri Dish
D uring a reporting trip to the White House in late May, I passed through a magnetometer and met a government agent who pointed an infrared thermometer at my forehead. At that point, the United States was seeing about 21,000 new coronavirus cases a day. Had I been coughing or experienced any recent headaches? the agent asked. No, I said, and was allowed into the building. Today, the country is ex
15h
Simple Cells Just Solved One of The World's Most Infamous Mazes
They're able to 'see' around corners.
15h
Scientists target coronavirus immunity puzzle
There's to be a new effort to understand how the immune system responds to Covid-19.
16h
Structural impact of K63 ubiquitin on yeast translocating ribosomes under oxidative stress [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Subpopulations of ribosomes are responsible for fine tuning the control of protein synthesis in dynamic environments. K63 ubiquitination of ribosomes has emerged as a new posttranslational modification that regulates protein synthesis during cellular response to oxidative stress. K63 ubiquitin, a type of ubiquitin chain that functions independently of the proteasome,…
16h
Baboons, bonds, biology, and lessons about early life adversity [Commentaries]
Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been defined as those that exhibit a dose–response relationship with health risk behaviors and chronic diseases known to increase mortality (1). ACEs are also associated with biomarkers related to inflammation, genetics, and endocrine functioning (e.g., cortisol) (2). The standard compendium of 10 ACEs includes abuse…
16h
Glycosylation-dependent opsonophagocytic activity of staphylococcal protein A antibodies [Microbiology]
Antibodies may bind to bacterial pathogens or their toxins to control infections, and their effector activity is mediated through the recruitment of complement component C1q or the engagement with Fcγ receptors (FcγRs). For bacterial pathogens that rely on a single toxin to cause disease, immunity correlates with toxin neutralization. Most…
16h
The cryoelectron microscopy structure of the human CDK-activating kinase [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The human CDK-activating kinase (CAK), a complex composed of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 7, cyclin H, and MAT1, is a critical regulator of transcription initiation and the cell cycle. It acts by phosphorylating the C-terminal heptapeptide repeat domain of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) subunit RPB1, which is an important…
16h
Conformational diversity facilitates antibody mutation trajectories and discrimination between foreign and self-antigens [Immunology and Inflammation]
Conformational diversity and self-cross-reactivity of antigens have been correlated with evasion from neutralizing antibody responses. We utilized single cell B cell sequencing, biolayer interferometry and X-ray crystallography to trace mutation selection pathways where the antibody response must resolve cross-reactivity between foreign and self-proteins bearing near-identical contact surfaces, bu
16h
Developing a population-state decision system for intelligently reprogramming extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella oneidensis [Microbiology]
The unique extracellular electron transfer (EET) ability has positioned electroactive bacteria (EAB) as a major class of cellular chassis for genetic engineering aimed at favorable environmental, energy, and geoscience applications. However, previous efforts to genetically enhance EET ability have often impaired the basal metabolism and cellular growth due to the…
16h
Fusogen-mediated neuron-neuron fusion disrupts neural circuit connectivity and alters animal behavior [Neuroscience]
The 100-y-old neuron doctrine from Ramón y Cajal states that neurons are individual cells, rejecting the process of cell−cell fusion in the normal development and function of the nervous system. However, fusogens—specialized molecules essential and sufficient for the fusion of cells—are expressed in the nervous system of different species under…
16h
Nonholomorphic Ramanujan-type congruences for Hurwitz class numbers [Mathematics]
In contrast to all other known Ramanujan-type congruences, we discover that Ramanujan-type congruences for Hurwitz class numbers can be supported on nonholomorphic generating series. We establish a divisibility result for such nonholomorphic congruences of Hurwitz class numbers. The two key tools in our proof are the holomorphic projection of products…
16h
Ambitiøs 10-årsplan for grøn transport endte kulsort
PLUS. Dansk transportpolitik er »på et grønt spor frem til 2020«, lød skåltalerne for 10 år siden. Men i praksis blev det en vej fuld af biler.
16h
16h
A New Era of Coronavirus Testing Is About to Begin
In 24 hours, the testing landscape of the United States has transformed. Yesterday morning, all of the tests for COVID-19—traditional or rapid—that had received emergency authorization from the Food and Drug Administration required an expensive machine and cost around $40 or more. In the afternoon, the pharmaceutical company Abbott announced that it had received FDA authorization to distribute a
17h
Duchenne: 'Crosstalk' between muscle and spleen
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common muscle disease in children and is passed on by X-linked recessive inheritance. Characteristic is a progressive muscular atrophy. Researchers have found a connection between dystrophic muscles and the lymphatic system in mice with Duchenne disease.
17h
17h
Microbes working together multiply biomass conversion possibilities
Non-edible plants are a promising alternative to crude oil, but their heterogenous composition can be a challenge to producing high yields of useful products. Scientists have developed a platform that combines different microorganisms that can make a dramatic difference.
17h
C.D.C.'s 'Clarification' on Coronavirus Testing Offers More Confusion
After saying that those exposed to the virus need not get tested, the agency's director clarified that "testing may be considered" for those people.
17h
The Atlantic Daily: The Real Message of the RNC
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / AFP Going into this week's convention, the Republican Party was, our staff writer Annie Lowrey pointed out, remarkably quiet on how they plan to govern . So how has the party
17h
Children notice race several years before adults want to talk about it
Adults in the United States believe children should be almost 5 years old before talking with them about race, even though some infants are aware of race and preschoolers may have already developed racist beliefs, according to new research.
17h
Microbes working together multiply biomass conversion possibilities
Non-edible plants are a promising alternative to crude oil, but their heterogenous composition can be a challenge to producing high yields of useful products. Scientists have developed a platform that combines different microorganisms that can make a dramatic difference.
17h
Single-use N95 respirators can be decontaminated and used again, study finds
N95 respirators, which are widely worn by health care workers treating patients with COVID-19 and are designed to be used only once, can be decontaminated effectively and used up to three times, scientists report.
17h
How genetics could impact COVID-19 treatments
A new study looked at how pharmacogenomics could improve the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 drug therapies.
17h
Antiviral used to treat cat coronavirus also works against SARS-CoV-2
Researchers are preparing to launch clinical trials of a drug used to cure a deadly disease caused by a coronavirus in cats that they expect will also be effective as a treatment for humans against COVID-19.
18h
Genetics of the tree of life
Baobab trees can live for more than a thousand years and provide food, livestock fodder, medicinal compounds, and raw materials. Scientists counted the significant tree's chromosomes — information critical for conservation, agricultural improvement, and further genetic work.
18h
Estrogen may lessen severity of COVID-19 symptoms in women, study finds
Why are men at greater risk than women for more severe symptoms and worse outcomes from COVID-19 regardless of age?
18h
Hubble maps giant halo around Andromeda Galaxy
In a landmark study, scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have mapped the immense halo of gas enveloping the Andromeda galaxy, our nearest large galactic neighbor.
18h
Researchers develop a fast, accurate, low-cost COVID-19 test
A new low-cost diagnostic test for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) quickly delivers accurate results without the need for sophisticated equipment, according to a new study.
18h
Forest emissions: A chiral surprise in the rainforest
Reversed ratio of chiral volatile organic compounds over the Amazon rainforest reveal insects as unexplored important source of forest emissions.
18h
18h
Historic Gulf Coast Hurricanes: How Does Laura Compare?
Hurricane Laura has been described as one of the most powerful storms to hit the Gulf Coast in decades. We take a look at other infamous storms to strike the region. (Image credit: Jack Thornell/AP)
18h
COVID-19 less deadly and causes milder symptoms in children
Children and teenagers are less likely than adults to develop severe Covid-19 or die from the disease, according to the world's largest study of hospital patients with Covid-19.Obesity, Black ethnicity and being under one month old are factors that increased the risk of a child being admitted into intensive care with the condition, the report said. The findings also identify new symptoms of a seve
18h
Children and young people have less severe COVID-19 than adults and death is exceptionally rare
Children and young people have less severe covid-19 than adults and death is exceptionally rare, only occurring in children with serious underlying conditions, confirms a study published by The BMJ today.
18h
South African wildlife management/conservation models do not protect carnivores equally
Wildlife ecologists reports that the trend toward more reliance on private game farms and reserves to manage and conserve free-ranging carnivores in South Africa is more complicated than it appears – 'a mosaic' of unequal protection across different land management types. The private areas do not play the same role, and may not be a conservation panacea.
18h
Genomes published for major agricultural weeds
Representing some of the most troublesome agricultural weeds, waterhemp, smooth pigweed, and Palmer amaranth impact crop production systems across the US and elsewhere with ripple effects felt by economies worldwide. In a landmark study, scientists have published the most comprehensive genome information to date for all three species, marking a new era of scientific discovery toward potential solu
18h
Study examines link between sperm quality and light from devices at night
Men might want to think twice before reaching for their smartphone at night. A new study found correlations between electronic media use at night and poor sperm quality.
18h
Lung injuries from vaping have characteristic patterns on CT
Injuries to the lungs from vaping have suggestive patterns on CT scans that could help physicians make accurate diagnoses and reduce unnecessary biopsies, according to a new study.
18h
Fabrication of a single-crystal giant magnetoresistive device on a polycrystalline film
Engineers have succeeded in fabricating a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) device comprising single-crystal Heusler alloys on an practical silicon substrate. The team demonstrated for the first time that a single-crystal magnetoresistive device can be bonded onto the surface of a polycrystalline electrode using a wafer bonding technique.
18h
These Citizen Science Projects Help Researchers Track Climate Change Hazards
Climate change is fueling natural disasters and more extreme events around the world. Citizen scientists can help researchers track these changes in real time.
18h
Cochlear implants should be recommended for adults more often
An international group of hearing specialists has released a new set of recommendations emphasizing that cochlear implants should be offered to adults who have moderate to severe or worse hearing loss much more often than is the current practice. The group hopes the recommendations help increase usage of such devices, potentially improving hearing and quality of life for millions worldwide.
19h
Gout treatment may aid patients with congenital heart disease
A drug used to treat gout, probenecid, may improve heart function in individuals with a particular heart defect, according to results from a small pilot study. Individuals with congenital univentricular circulation ran better and their heart performed better while taking probenecid. The change was small partially because of the small number of study participants.
19h
Neighborhoods with high walk and bike scores also have greater crash risks
Neighbourhoods with high bikeability and walkability scores actually present higher crash risks to cyclists and pedestrians in Vancouver, according to new research.
19h
Chemical industry: Trapping of acetylene contaminants
Ethylene, a key feedstock in the chemical industry, often includes traces of acetylene contaminants, which need to be removed. Researchers describe a robust and regenerable porous metal-organic framework that captures acetylene with extraordinary efficiency and selectively. Its synergistic combination of tailor-made pore sizes and chemical docking sites makes the material especially efficient, the
19h
Researchers develop a yeast-based platform to boost production of rare natural molecules
Researchers outline a method to synthesize complex bioactive molecules much more quickly and efficiently. Using cutting-edge synthetic biology approaches, They were able to produce a large amount of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid (BIA) to synthesize an array of natural and new-to-nature chemical structures in a yeast-based platform. This can provide a blueprint for the large-scale production of thous
19h
Chemical industry: Trapping of acetylene contaminants
Ethylene, a key feedstock in the chemical industry, often includes traces of acetylene contaminants, which need to be removed. Researchers describe a robust and regenerable porous metal-organic framework that captures acetylene with extraordinary efficiency and selectively. Its synergistic combination of tailor-made pore sizes and chemical docking sites makes the material especially efficient, the
19h
Songbirds reduce reproduction to help survive drought
New research suggests tropical songbirds in both the Old and New Worlds reduce reproduction during severe droughts, and this – somewhat surprisingly — may actually increase their survival rates.
19h
Phase 1 human trials suggest breast cancer drug is safe, effective
A new type of breast cancer drug can help halt progression of disease and is not toxic, according to phase 1 clinical trials.
19h
Beating HIV and COVID-19 may depend on tweaking vaccine molecules
In a new study, researchers show that one way to improve the body's immune response to vaccines is to factor in antigen valency. Valency refers to the number of antibody binding sites on an antigen.
19h
Researchers develop a yeast-based platform to boost production of rare natural molecules
Researchers outline a method to synthesize complex bioactive molecules much more quickly and efficiently. Using cutting-edge synthetic biology approaches, They were able to produce a large amount of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid (BIA) to synthesize an array of natural and new-to-nature chemical structures in a yeast-based platform. This can provide a blueprint for the large-scale production of thous
19h
DNA repair: Locating and severing lethal links
Covalent cross-links between proteins and DNA are among the most hazardous types of DNA damage. Researchers have now characterized an enzyme that breaks such bonds, and elucidated how it specifically recognizes sites of damage.
19h
Search for COVID-19 drugs boosted by SARS discovery
An extensive search and testing of current drugs and drug-like compounds has revealed compounds previously developed to fight SARS might also work against COVID-19.
19h
Genetic link between cattle temperament and autism in humans
Researchers have discovered that cattle share an overlap of genes with humans that are critical in brain function and response to fear stimuli. The results open the way for research conducted on behavioral traits in humans to shed further light on temperament in cattle.
19h
How WeChat Censored the Coronavirus Pandemic
In China, the messaging platform blocked thousands of keywords related to the virus, a new report reveals.
19h
Kristoffer Marså savner kolleger – og det rammer alvorligt syge og døende
»Jeg har ikke brug for flere vejledninger eller anbefalinger. Jeg har brug for flere veluddannede kolleger.« Sådan lyder budskabet fra overlæge i lindrende behandling Kristoffer Marså, der kan konstatere, at patienterne dør på venteliste, fordi hans enhed på Herlev-Gentofte Hospital har for lille kapacitet.
19h
Better Models, More Computing Power Led to Accurate Hurricane Laura Predictions
The National Hurricane Center is finally seeing their ability to predict a storm's strength catch up to their ability to track it. Hurricane-Laura-August-26.jpg Hurricane Laura on August 26, 2020. Image credits: NASA's Earth Observatory Rights information: Available for reuse Earth Thursday, August 27, 2020 – 17:15 Meredith Fore, Contributor (Inside Science) — On August 25, 2020, the National H
20h
Laura Hits Petrochemical Region, and a Factory Goes Up in Flames
The hurricane rolled over a coast studded with oil, gas and chemical plants. Other storms have caused the release of toxic substances, often affecting minority communities.
20h
Phase 1 human trials suggest UIC-developed breast cancer drug is safe, effective
A new type of breast cancer drug can help halt progression of disease and is not toxic, according to phase 1 clinical trials.
20h
Water heist: Up to half of the world's supply is being stolen, study finds
From 30% to 50% of the world's water is illegally or improperly taken. Agriculture industries are implicated in the majority of water theft. In some areas, it's so normal that it's barely noticed. The title of a new study, "Grand theft water and the calculus of compliance," is deliberately dramatic, aimed at drawing attention from people across the globe to a largely unnoticed, serious problem: O
20h
Flashlights for emergency scenarios and outdoor fun
Lead the way. (Nathan Anderson via Unsplash/) A flashlight is an invaluable tool, whether you're rummaging through a dark basement, tromping through the woods on a nighttime hike, or stuck on the side of the road in the evening with a flat tire. Gone are the days of cheap, incandescent bulbs; today's flashlights employ advanced LED technology to deliver bright beams while lasting days without dra
20h
Twinkle lights that instantly cheer up your home
Brighten up your space. (Sharon McCutcheon via Unsplash/) If you want to make your house feel a little brighter and cozier, string lights can help do the trick. Drape them around your window, patio, garden, or bed frame and you'll enjoy a warm, home-y glow. We found twinkle lights that offer a cute decor touch and additional perks, like waterproof features and multiple brightness modes. Comes wit
20h
Misconceptions about weather and seasonality impact COVID-19 response
Misconceptions about the way climate and weather impact exposure and transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, create false confidence and have adversely shaped risk perceptions, say researchers.
20h
U.S. hospital admissions for stroke fell by almost a third during lockdown
Almost a third fewer cases of stroke and mini-stroke (TIA) were seen in U.S. hospitals during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic between March and April this year compared to the same time in 2019, research finds.
20h
50 percent drop in patients attending cardiology services during coronavirus lockdown
The number of NHS patients presenting to cardiology services for serious heart problems more than halved while the number of heart attacks diagnosed fell by 40 percent at one center in Scotland during the coronavirus lockdown, research finds.
20h
Rigid social distancing rules for COVID-19 based on outdated science, say experts
Rules which stipulate a single specific physical distance (1 or 2 metres) between individuals to reduce the spread of covid-19 are based on outdated science and experiences of past viruses, say researchers in a new article.
20h
Water flossers that get between your teeth
Add to your nightly routine. (Matheus Ferrero via Unsplash/) If you've had braces, you likely know about water flossers. These dental care appliances shoot a pinpoint jet of water at teeth to dislodge any food particles—particularly around the wires and brackets of orthodontic appliances. But they're also useful tools for everyone else, cleaning teeth while massaging gums to promote good oral hea
20h
Clumps of bacteria could spread life between planets
The bacterial exposure experiment took place from 2015 to 2018 using the Exposed Facility located on the exterior of Kibo, the Japanese Experimental Module of the International Space Station. (JAXA/NASA/) For decades, astronomers have theorized microbes could drift through the vastness of space like pollen in the wind, planting the seeds of life across the cosmos. New research from the astrobiolo
20h
An improved wearable, stretchable gas sensor using nanocomposites
A stretchable, wearable gas sensor for environmental sensing has been developed and tested by researchers at Penn State, Northeastern University and five universities in China.
20h
Songbirds reduce reproduction to help survive drought
New research from the University of Montana suggests tropical songbirds in both the Old and New Worlds reduce reproduction during severe droughts, and this – somewhat surprisingly — may actually increase their survival rates.
20h
Regionerne forsømmer døendes adgang til specialiseret palliation
Statsrevisorerne kritiserer regionernes indsats på det specialiserede palliative område.
20h
Black children with cancer three times less likely to receive proton radiotherapy than White children
A retrospective analysis led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital has found racial disparities in the use of the therapy for patients enrolled in trials.
20h
Older adults's faced mental health issues during the pandemic
Older adults experienced greater depression and loneliness during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study by Indiana University researchers, and relationship strength (perceived closeness to network members) moderated the relationship between loneliness and depression.
20h
A.I. tool promises faster, more accurate Alzheimer's diagnosis
By detecting subtle differences in the way that Alzheimer's sufferers use language, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed an A.I. algorithm that promises to accurately diagnose Alzheimer's without the need for expensive scans or in-person testing. The software not only can diagnose Alzheimer's, at negligible cost, with more than 95 percent accuracy, but is also capable of e
20h
A nighttime view of Tropical Storm Hernan from a NASA-NOAA satellite
Nighttime imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Storm Hernan along the coast of western Mexico. By the weekend, Hernan is expected to absorb nearby Tropical Storm Iselle.
20h
NASA's Terra Satellite reveals burn scars from California's two largest fires
On Aug. 26, 2020, NASA's Terra satellite was able to image the two areas in California where the fires have been most active and using the false color reflectance bands on the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Infrared Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard. Using these bands, the burned areas or fire-affected areas are characterized by deposits of charcoal and ash, removal of vegetation and/or the alterat
20h
American Academy of Sleep Medicine calls for elimination of daylight saving time
Public health and safety would benefit from eliminating daylight saving time, according to a position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
20h
Stop! Grand theft water
Researchers have developed a new method to better understand the drivers of water theft, a significant worldwide phenomenon, and deterrents to help protect this essential resource.
20h
Daylight study reveals how animals adapt between seasons
Scientists have discovered how a biological switch helps animals make the seasonal changes crucial for survival, such as growing a warm winter coat and adjusting body temperatures.
20h
What is cerebral venous thrombosis? Study finds blood clot condition on the rise
Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) occurs when a blood clot forms in one of the veins in the brain, preventing blood from draining out of the brain. A new analysis has found that the incidence of CVT in the United States is higher than previously reported and has increased over time.
20h
This Dumbass Comet Just Flew Directly Into the Sun
Leeeeroy Jenkins On Thursday, NASA watched as a "sungrazer comet" sailed through space on a self-destructive collision course with the Sun. Unfortunately, the poor fella didn't survive its close encounter, CNET reports . Perhaps that's not all that surprising for anything hurtling toward the Sun, but astronomers did get some fascinating footage as they watched the comet break apart in real-time.
20h
Just how cold was the Ice Age? New study finds the temperature
A new study analyzes fossil data to find the average temperatures during the last Ice Age. This period of time, about 20,000 years ago, had the average temperature of about 46 degrees Fahrenheit (7.8 C). The study has implications for understanding climate change. How cold was the Ice Age? While one can imagine layers of ice covering everything around the world, that's not exactly what happened.
21h
NASA's Terra Satellite reveals burn scars from California's two largest fires
On Aug. 26, 2020, NASA's Terra satellite was able to image the two areas in California where the fires have been most active and using the false color reflectance bands on the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Infrared Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard. Using these bands, the burned areas or fire-affected areas are characterized by deposits of charcoal and ash, removal of vegetation and/or the alterat
21h
A nighttime view of Tropical Storm Hernan from a NASA-NOAA satellite
Nighttime imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite revealed the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Tropical Storm Hernan along the coast of western Mexico. By the weekend, Hernan is expected to absorb nearby Tropical Storm Iselle.
21h
To save this palm-filled paradise, biologists must kill the trees
Invasive coconut palms threaten native forests and seabirds
21h
Research: LSD Microdoses as Effective as Opioids at Treating Pain
According to new research, tiny doses of the psychedelic drug LSD could be an effective painkiller — perhaps as powerful, the scientists found, as conventional opioids like morphine. "This study in healthy volunteers shows that a low dose of LSD produces an analgesic effect in the absence of a psychedelic effect, as assessed with a cold pressure tests," said lead researcher Jan Ramaekers, a profe
21h
Cannabis research database shows how U.S. funding focuses on harms of the drug
Analysis of 50 funders finds cannabis treatment research is growing slowly
21h
Where Did Earth's Water Come From?
Scientists have long debated whether the Earth's water was here when the planet formed or whether it arrived later. A study suggests much of the water originated in rocks from which Earth is built.
21h
How vitamin C could help over 50s retain muscle mass
New research shows that vitamin C could help over 50s retain muscle mass in later life. The study shows that older people who eat plenty of vitamin C — commonly found in citrus fruits, berries and vegetables — have the best skeletal muscle mass.
21h
Interventions stem antibiotic prescribing rates in telemedicine
Two different interventions both worked to significantly reduce the rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions made by physicians in a telemedicine practice, a new study shows. The finding could offer a new way to stem the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, particularly as telemedicine grows due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
21h
NASA's Terra Satellite sees the end of Bavi
NASA's Terra satellite captured visible imagery as Tropical Storm Bavi made landfall in northwestern North Korea and moved inland.
21h
NASA finds new Tropical Storm Iselle already battling wind shear
NASA infrared imagery shows that newly formed Tropical Storm Iselle is already battling for its life under wind shear.
21h
Researchers develop a yeast-based platform to boost production of rare natural molecules
Many modern medicines, including analgesics and opioids, are derived from rare molecules found in plants and bacteria. While they are effective against a host of ailments, a number of these molecules have proven to be difficult to produce in large quantities. Some are so labor intensive that it is uneconomical for pharmaceutical companies to produce them in sufficient amounts to bring them to mark
21h
Genetics of the tree of life
The African baobab tree (Adansonia digitata) is called the tree of life. Baobab trees can live for more than a thousand years and provide food, livestock fodder, medicinal compounds, and raw materials. Baobab trees are incredibly significant. However, there are growing conservation concerns and until now, a lack of genetic information.
21h
Researchers develop a yeast-based platform to boost production of rare natural molecules
Many modern medicines, including analgesics and opioids, are derived from rare molecules found in plants and bacteria. While they are effective against a host of ailments, a number of these molecules have proven to be difficult to produce in large quantities. Some are so labor intensive that it is uneconomical for pharmaceutical companies to produce them in sufficient amounts to bring them to mark
21h
Genetics of the tree of life
The African baobab tree (Adansonia digitata) is called the tree of life. Baobab trees can live for more than a thousand years and provide food, livestock fodder, medicinal compounds, and raw materials. Baobab trees are incredibly significant. However, there are growing conservation concerns and until now, a lack of genetic information.
21h
Beating HIV and COVID-19 may depend on tweaking vaccine molecules
In a new Immunity study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) show that one way to improve the body's immune response to vaccines is to factor in antigen valency. Valency refers to the number of antibody binding sites on an antigen.
21h
Estrogen may lessen severity of COVID-19 symptoms in women, study says
Why are men at greater risk than women for more severe symptoms and worse outcomes from COVID-19 regardless of age?
21h
It's Time to Revisit the Games That Gave Rise to 'Halo'
'Halo Infinite,' the latest entry in the blockbuster franchise, has been delayed. But we'll always have 'Marathon.'
21h
The Violence Could Get Much Worse
The killings in Kenosha, Wisconsin, represent an alarming escalation of the fight over police violence that has consumed the country this summer: It wasn't an agent of the state who shot two Americans dead this week. Instead, an American man turned his weapon on other civilians during a protest—and law enforcement let him walk right by them and out of town. Police and political leaders have faile
21h
Earth may have formed with enough water to fill the oceans three times
A fresh look at the type of space rocks thought to have formed our planet suggests they contain more water than we thought, indicating early Earth was very wet
21h
Watch cells sniff their way around the maze from Hampton Court Palace
Cells can navigate artificial mazes by generating chemical gradients to predict the best route, a finding that may explain how they migrate through the body
21h
Google performed the first quantum simulation of a chemical reaction
For the first time, Google has used its quantum computer Sycamore to simulate a chemical reaction, paving the way for quantum chemistry algorithms
21h
Mouse-adapted SARS-CoV-2 model provides new tool for COVID-19 discoveries
A new mouse model is laying the groundwork for antivirals, vaccines and antibodies in the fight against COVID-19. In some cases, the model developed at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the first to show these medical countermeasures work in a living organism.
21h
Age-appropriate contraception counseling helps health care providers educate teens
Preventing unplanned pregnancies in adolescents with effective and easy-to-use contraception is key to ensuring that adolescents do not become parents before they are ready. Adolescents view their health care providers as trusted sources of medical information. Thus, providers are tasked with providing adolescent patients with comprehensive, age-appropriate and nonjudgmental contraception counseli
21h
Genetics of the tree of life
The African baobab tree (Adansonia digitata) is called the tree of life. Baobab trees can live for more than a thousand years and provide food, livestock fodder, medicinal compounds, and raw materials. USDA scientists counted the significant tree's chromosomes – information critical for conservation, agricultural improvement, and further genetic work. Their findings were published in the journal S
21h
NASA finds new Tropical Storm Iselle already battling wind shear
NASA infrared imagery shows that newly formed Tropical Storm Iselle is already battling for its life under wind shear.
21h
NASA's Terra Satellite sees the end of Bavi
NASA's Terra satellite captured visible imagery as Tropical Storm Bavi made landfall in northwestern North Korea and moved inland.
21h
Researchers develop a yeast-based platform to boost production of rare natural molecules
Researchers at Concordia University in Montreal and in Berkeley, California outline a method to synthesize complex bioactive molecules much more quickly and efficiently. Using cutting-edge synthetic biology approaches, They were able to produce a large amount of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid (BIA) to synthesize an array of natural and new-to-nature chemical structures in a yeast-based platform. This
21h
A rush is on to mine the deep seabed, with effects on ocean life that aren't well understood
Mining the ocean floor for submerged minerals is a little-known, experimental industry. But soon it will take place on the deep seabed, which belongs to everyone , according to international law. Seabed mining for valuable materials like copper, zinc and lithium already takes place within countries' marine territories . As soon as 2025 , larger projects could start in international waters – areas
21h
 

Leave a Reply