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What to Know About Colon Cancer
The cancer that killed Chadwick Boseman is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, and rates are rising among younger people.
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A Pandemic of Wildfire
Images from space reveal the scope and intensity of 2020's burning season — from Siberia to the western United States.
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LATEST

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This Is The Most Exciting Crisis in Cosmology
Why fixing the Hubble constant could change how we see the Universe.
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Coronavirus live news: Queensland steps up alert; protesters try to storm Reichstag
Demonstrations in Germany and UK against coronavirus restrictions; Australian opposition calls for wider care home inquiry; Turkey sees two-month high in cases. Follow all the developments live UK care homes still denied Covid test despite minister's pledge New York: pandemic lays bare city's problems Germany: far-right extremists try to storm Reichstag World map: which countries have most cases?
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175 Years of Scientific American: The Good, the Bad, and Debunking
We look back at some highlights, midlights and lowlights of the 175 years of Scientific American, featuring former editor-in-chief John Rennie. Astrophysicist Alan Guth also appears in a sponsored… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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175 Years of Scientific American: The Good, the Bad, and Debunking
We look back at some highlights, midlights and lowlights of the 175 years of Scientific American, featuring former editor-in-chief John Rennie. Astrophysicist Alan Guth also appears in a sponsored… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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10 classic motorcycles to drool over
Honda CBX engine. (Honda/) This story originally featured on Motorcyclist . For a motorcycle to stand the test of time it needs to be in some way significant to the motorcycle world. Some motorcycles prove their import by the length of their production run. Others, particularly ahead-of-their-time motorcycles, prove their worth by increasing their appeal long after their production run ends. It s
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NASA scientists propose sending a submarine to explore Titan's seas
A team of scientists have been developing a proposal that would send a semi-autonomous submarine to explore the seas of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Titan is the only body in our solar system that has large bodies of liquid on its surface. It's also a top candidate in the search for alien life. What lies in the alien seas of Titan, Saturn's largest moon? To find out, a team of researchers has sp
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What happens when babies with heart defects become adults?
More than 90% of babies born with heart defects survive into adulthood. As a result, there are now more adults living with congenital heart disease than children. These adults have a chronic, lifelong condition and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) has produced advice to give the best chance of a normal life.
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How to treat the most common heart attacks
One in five patients die within a year after the most common type of heart attack.
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Study finds that sleep restriction amplifies anger
Feeling angry these days? New research suggests that a good night of sleep may be just what you need.
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Look beyond opioids to solve national substance use epidemic
A new study published reveals that three-quarters of participants in an inpatient addiction intervention program came into the hospital using more than one substance. The findings suggests that a singular focus on opioids may do more harm than good if doctors overlook the complexity of each individual's actual substance use.
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Natural disasters must be unusual or deadly to prompt local climate policy change
Natural disasters alone are not enough to motivate local communities to engage in climate change mitigation or adaptation, a new study has found. Rather, policy change in response to extreme weather events appears to depend on a combination of factors, including fatalities, sustained media coverage, the unusualness of the event and the political makeup of the community.
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How retail drone delivery may change logistics networks
Researchers found that last-mile delivery networks will become more decentralized and the delivery speed of the drones will increase as the technology matures.
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Why are there differing preferences for suffixes and prefixes across languages?
While speakers of English and other Western languages prefer using suffixes more than prefixes, a new study reveals that this preference is not as universal as once thought.
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Hader du at bære mundbind? Derfor gør påbud nogle mennesker rasende
Mundbind invaderer vores personlige rum og kan let blive en del af konspirationsteorier.
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What Climate Change Does to the Human Body
An ENT physician sees the effects in her patients all the time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The 'gold' in breast milk
Breast milk strengthens a child's immune system, supporting the intestinal flora. These facts are common knowledge. But how does this work? What are the molecular mechanisms behind this phenomenon? And why is this not possible the same way with bottle feeding? The reasons were unknown until a team recently discovered the role of alarmins.
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Preventing infection, facilitating healing: New biomaterials from spider silk
New biomaterials reduce the risk of infection and facilitate the body's healing processes. These nanostructured materials are based on spider silk proteins. They prevent colonization by bacteria and fungi, but at the same time proactively assist in the regeneration of human tissue. They could be used for implants, wound dressings, prostheses, contact lenses, and other everyday aids.
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Mauritius oil spill: Thousands march in Port Louis
Massive amounts of oil spilled into a wildlife sanctuary, and 39 dead dolphins have been discovered.
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The Hidden Science Behind 2020's Biggest Video Games
From the parasitic fungus in "The Last of Us Part II" to plant genetics in "Animal Crossing: New Horizons," examples of real-life science in gaming might be right under your nose.
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Far right 'using coronavirus as excuse to attack Chinese and south-east Asians'
Government urged to give extra protection to targeted communities after hate attacks rise by a third Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Police chiefs have warned that the far right is using coronavirus as an excuse to attack east and south-east Asians as new figures show hate crime against them is rising. Attacks on people classified by the Metropolitan Police as "orien
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Where marine heatwaves will intensify fastest: New analysis
High-resolution ocean modelling has found the world's strongest ocean currents, which play key roles in fisheries and ocean ecosystems, will experience more intense marine heatwaves than the global average over the coming decades.
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This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through August 29)
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE How Special Relativity Can Help AI Predict the Future Will Douglas Heaven | MIT Technology Review "The AI can make guesses about the future without having to learn anything about the progression of time, says Vlontzos. To do this, the team developed an algorithm inspired by light cones, a mathematical description of the boundaries of cause and effect in spacetime, which wa
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Weekend reads: A plagiarizing priest; a journal of trial and error; disappearing journals
Before we present this week's Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: Why you shouldn't try to republish a paper you had … Continue reading
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Medicin holdt Christina vågen to uger i træk: Hun lider af voldsomme bivirkninger
En forklaring på bivirkninger kan være, at meget medicin ikke er testet på kvinder.
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A Spate of Arrests Sends the Piracy World Reeling
Plus: ATM hacks, the Belarus internet shutdown, and more of the week's top security news.
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The Excellent Evolution of 'Bill and Ted Face the Music'
A conversation with director Dean Parisot and writers Ed Solomon and Chris Matheson about how they updated the franchise for its third film.
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Covid-19: Live Updates
The Berlin police broke up a demonstration against pandemic measures because marchers were not social distancing. Some college students are decamping to far-flung locations.
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The Biblical Flood That Will Drown California
The Great Flood of 1861–1862 was a preview of what scientists expect to see again, and soon.
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Tillidsrepræsentanten lagde moderrollen fra sig
Man er ikke mor, men sparringspartner for sine kolleger. Det var en af ahaoplevelserne, da Betina Hylleberg Skjøth var på sit første kursus som tillidsrepræsentant.
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I Know What Makes Conventions So Maddening
Having been to many political conventions over the years and watched many more slumped on the sofa bed in my home bunker, and now having watched two mostly remote events courtesy of Republicans and Democrats, I have finally isolated the element that has historically made these occasions so maddening and unpleasant: people. Specifically, I have in mind the people who go to political conventions. E
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California Lawmakers Push for More Diversity in the Boardroom
If it succeeds, AB979 would require Facebook, Netflix, Nvidia, Salesforce, and others to add directors of color.
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14 Best Weekend Deals: Video Games, Headphones, and More
Want 'Fall Guys'? It's free if you have PlayStation Plus! We've also rounded up a ton of other sales, including discounts on robot vacuums and earbuds.
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'America First' Enters Its Most Combustible Moment
The months before and after a presidential election are particularly fragile for foreign policy. Each of the five presidents I served understood, as did his team, the weight of this time. Politics and legacy were always front of mind. They were all also conscious of the ways they could help pave an easier path for their successors. They all ultimately put country over party. That won't be the cas
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I'm Optimistic That We Will Have a COVID-19 Vaccine Soon
On January 11, a Chinese team reported online the RNA genome sequence of a novel coronavirus causing a strange new pneumonia-like disease in Wuhan, China. Within 48 hours, scientists at Moderna, a Massachusetts biotechnology company, had the entire genome synthesized. Remarkably, about 60 days later, the company, in collaboration with the Vaccine Research Center at the National Institutes of Heal
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Automatiserer kompleks kompositproduktion på fly med sugekopper
PLUS. Efter seks års forskning og 29 millioner kroners udviklingsstøtte har robotforskere fra SDU sammen med Terma og Technicon udviklet et færdigt robotteknologisk system til fremstilling af kompositdele.
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Scientists Explore Why Some People Are Able To Live With An Infection Unscathed
What if your body could corral an infection instead of eliminating it? Immunologists who see this sort of "disease tolerance" in plants wonder what role it might play in asymptomatic human infections. (Image credit: Alexander Spatari/Getty Images)
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Airline analysts warn 'the hardest part' is yet to come
Uncertainty is jarring to an industry that thrives on predicting demand with mathematical precision
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A wobble, luck and preparations lessened Laura's devastation
Hurricane Laura was a monster storm that could have, even should have, wreaked much more destruction than it did, except for a few lucky breaks and some smart thinking by Gulf Coast residents, experts say.
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The Red State That Isn't Worried About a Mail-In Election
P resident Donald Trump has spent months trying to convince Americans that universal mail-in voting would be a disaster for democracy. It is "dangerous," he says, potentially "catastrophic"—an "embarrassment" that would "make our country the laughingstock of the world." Just this week, in his speech kicking off the Republican National Convention, Trump called voting by mail "the greatest scam in
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Your Coronavirus Test Is Positive. Maybe It Shouldn't Be.
The usual diagnostic tests may simply be too sensitive and too slow to contain the spread of the virus.
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Did Something Burp? It Was an Earthquake
Years of observations in central Italy show that more carbon dioxide percolates through Earth's crust during periods of strong seismic activity.
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Reportage: Oplev H.C. Ørsted Værket efter 100 år med el og varme til København
PLUS. Ved Kalvebod Strand i København har H.C. Ørsted Værket leveret el og varme til københavnere i 100 år, og nu har driftskoordinator, Jens Philip Møller, slået dørene op for Ingeniøren, som tager dig på rundtur blandt dampkedler og turbiner, helt tæt på fjernvarmens start.
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Risk of heart attacks halves in patients with diabetes in 15 years
Dramatic reductions in the risk of heart attacks in patients with diabetes coincides with major increases in the use of preventive medications. That's the finding of late breaking research presented today at ESC Congress 2020. 'Our results suggest that when patients are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, starting medications to prevent cardiovascular disease has a substantial impact on the risk of he
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The experience of Covid-19 shows how easily catastrophe can befall our species | Raghu Karnad
A previous generation understood the destructive power of humanity. We would do well to heed their insights Months after the end of the second world war, Albert Einstein gave an interview to urge Americans to imagine the third one. It was vital, he said , "to recognise that unless another war is prevented it is likely to bring destruction on a scale … even now hardly conceived, and that little ci
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Vacciner koblet til færre dødsfald blandt patienter med hjertesvigt
Ny forskning viser, at vacciner mod influenza og lungebetændelse er associeret med fald i risikoen for hospitalsdødsfald blandt patienter med hjertesvigt.
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Victoria's new coronavirus cases fall to lowest rate in two months as 18 more die from Covid-19
Premier Daniel Andrews says it is 'too early' to allow people who live alone to visit other households NSW reveals 14 new cases and sacking of quarantine guards as Queensland infections climb Follow today's coronavirus blog Australia's state by state lockdown rules and restrictions Melbourne and Victoria trend map Melbourne stage 4 restrictions The number of new Covid-19 cases in Victoria has dro
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How to treat the most common heart attacks
One in five patients die within a year after the most common type of heart attack. European Society of Cardiology (ESC) treatment guidelines for non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome are published online today in European Heart Journal, and on the ESC website.
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Heart rhythm disorders are best managed when patients are listened to
Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder and increases the risk of stroke by fivefold. Patients with irregular heartbeats should choose the treatment plan with their health professionals, according to European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Guidelines published online today in European Heart Journal, and on the ESC website. The document was developed in collaboration with the Euro
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What happens when babies with heart defects become adults?
More than 90% of babies born with heart defects survive into adulthood. As a result, there are now more adults living with congenital heart disease than children. These adults have a chronic, lifelong condition and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) has produced advice to give the best chance of a normal life. The guidelines are published online today in European Heart Journal, and on the ES
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Can people with heart disease exercise safely?
The first recommendations on sports and physical activity in all types of heart disease are launched today by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The document is published online in European Heart Journal, and on the ESC website. "With rising levels of obesity and sedentary lifestyles, promoting physical activity is more crucial now than ever before," said Professor Antonio Pelliccia, Chairp
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Nye guidelines skal hjælpe voksne med medfødte hjertefejl
Voksne, der har medfødt hjertedefekt, oplever begrænsninger i jobmuligheder og det sociale liv. ESC udsender nye retningslinjer, der skal hjælpe denne gruppe til at leve så normalt som muligt.
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Hjertesyge bør også motionere hver dag
ESC har udgivet nye retningslinjer for, hvordan og hvor meget personer med hjerte-kar-sygdomme kan og bør træne.
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Queensland minister says NSW woman whose unborn twin baby died was not denied healthcare
Steven Miles says border closures do not apply to those seeking emergency healthcare after Scott Morrison calls for explanation NSW reveals 14 new cases and sacking of quarantine guards as Queensland infections climb Follow today's coronavirus blog Australia's state by state lockdown rules and restrictions Melbourne and Victoria trend map Melbourne stage 4 restrictions The Queensland health minis
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Medicin er ofte testet på mænd: Kvinder får dobbelt så mange bivirkninger
Smertestillende og mere end 80 andre typer medicin giver flere gener hos kvinder end mænd, viser ny forskning.
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Højrisiko-patienter har måske ikke høj risiko for hjertesygdom
Patienter med ondt i brystet, men uden koronararteriesygdom, oplever færre blodpropper og har lavere risiko for dødsfald sammenlignet med et bredt udsnit af befolkningen.
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Kunstig intelligens kan risikoinddele patienter efter blodprop i hjertet
Ny forskning viser, at kunstig intelligens kan risikostratificere patienter efter blodprop i hjertet på baggrund af data ekstraheret fra ultralydsscanninger af deres hjerte.
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The Profound Heroism of Chadwick Boseman
Almost as shocking as the news that Chadwick Boseman died yesterday at the age of 43 was the revelation that the actor had spent the past four years battling colon cancer. This timeline means that he was diagnosed in 2016—the year that he debuted as King T'Challa in Marvel's Captain America: Civil War . And it means that after his diagnosis, Boseman filmed and appeared in Marshall , Black Panther
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Alaska's Salmon are Shrinking
Every year, Alaska's big salmon runs feature smaller salmon—climate change and competition with farmed salmon may be to blame. Julia Rosen reports.
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Yoga koblet til forbedring i symptomer hos hjertepatienter
Patienter med atrieflimren oplever færre symptomer på deres, når de dyrker yoga og øver vejrtrækningsteknikker.
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Forskare: "Spiggvåg" hotar Östersjöns ekosystem
Ökningen av storspigg i Östersjön sker på bekostnad av rovfiskarna abborre och gädda. En svensk forskargrupp har följt utvecklingen under 40 års tid. Spela videon för att se hur spiggen tar över kusterna.
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Meteorit avslöjar var jordens vatten kommer ifrån
Beståndsdelarna till jordens vatten fanns redan i det stoftmoln som jorden bildades ur. Det visar analyser från meteoriter som är lika gamla som solsystemet. Spela videon för att se hur det gick till.
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Alaska's Salmon are Shrinking
Every year, Alaska's big salmon runs feature smaller salmon—climate change and competition with farmed salmon may be to blame. Julia Rosen reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Elon Musk demonstrated a Neuralink brain implant in a live pig
A pig named Gertrude demonstrated a working Neuralink brain implant for the first time, and Elon Musk says the next step is to move into human trials soon
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Cholesterol drug combinations could cut health risk
More patients could benefit from combinations of cholesterol-lowering drugs to reduce their risk of stroke and heart attacks.
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Which OCD treatment works best? New brain study could lead to more personalized choices
New research could improve the odds that people with obsessive-compulsive disorder will receive a therapy that really works for them – something that eludes more than a third of those who currently get OCD treatment. The study suggests the possibility of predicting which of two types of therapy will help people with OCD: One that exposes them to the subject of their obsessive thoughts and behavior
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Amateur drone videos could aid in natural disaster damage assessment
It wasn't long after Hurricane Laura hit the Gulf Coast Thursday that people began flying drones to record the damage and posting videos on social media. Those videos are a precious resource, say researchers who are working on ways to use them for rapid damage assessment. By using artificial intelligence, the researchers are developing a system that can automatically identify buildings and make an
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Synthetic compound could serve as prototype for novel class of drugs to treat neurological damage
Researchers have developed a neurologically acting protein and tested it in laboratory studies. In mice, the experimental compound ameliorated symptoms of certain neurological injuries and diseases, while on the microscopic level it was able to establish and repair connections between neurons. This proof-of-principle study suggests that biologics, which act on neuronal connectivity, could be of cl
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Prior Zika virus infection increases risk of severe dengue disease
A new study finds that people who have antibodies to the mosquito-borne Zika virus are more vulnerable to developing dengue disease. This immune interaction, called antibody-dependent enhancement, could complicate the search for a safe and effective vaccine that protects against Zika without also increasing the risk of dengue.
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Amateur drone videos could aid in natural disaster damage assessment
It wasn't long after Hurricane Laura hit the Gulf Coast Thursday that people began flying drones to record the damage and posting videos on social media. Those videos are a precious resource, say researchers who are working on ways to use them for rapid damage assessment. By using artificial intelligence, the researchers are developing a system that can automatically identify buildings and make an
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Stereocenters rendered dynamic in one succinct step
Princeton Chemistry labs collaborate to demonstrate the ability of photoredox catalysis to take traditionally static stereocenters and render them dynamic by continuously and controllably breaking and re-forming molecular bonds.
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Mosquito immune system mapped to help fight malaria
Scientists have created the first cell atlas of mosquito immune cells, to understand how mosquitoes fight malaria and other infections. Researchers discovered new types of mosquito immune cells, including a rare cell type that could be involved in limiting malaria infection. The findings offer opportunities for uncovering novel ways to prevent mosquitoes from spreading the malaria parasite to huma
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Breakthrough in using stem cells to treat enteric nervous system disorders
Scientists have made a breakthrough in understanding how the enteric nervous system forms, which could pave the way for new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's.
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Hurricanes could be up to five times more likely in the Caribbean if tougher targets are missed
Global warming is dramatically increasing the risk of extreme hurricanes in the Caribbean, but meeting more ambitious climate change goals could up to halve the likelihood of such disasters in the region, according to new research.
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A leap forward for biomaterials design using AI
Researchers have used artificial intelligence (AI) to predict the degree of water repulsion and protein adsorption by ultra-thin organic materials. By enabling accurate predictions of water repulsion and protein adsorption even by hypothetical materials, the team's approach opens up new possibilities for the screening and design of organic materials with desired functions.
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Visualization of human T lymphocyte-mediated eradication of cancer cells in vivo [Immunology and Inflammation]
Lymphocyte-based immunotherapy has emerged as a breakthrough in cancer therapy for both hematologic and solid malignancies. In a subpopulation of cancer patients, this powerful therapeutic modality converts malignancy to clinically manageable disease. However, the T cell- and chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell-mediated antimetastatic activity, especially their impacts on microscopic…
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A chemical dynamics study on the gas phase formation of thioformaldehyde (H2CS) and its thiohydroxycarbene isomer (HCSH) [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Complex organosulfur molecules are ubiquitous in interstellar molecular clouds, but their fundamental formation mechanisms have remained largely elusive. These processes are of critical importance in initiating a series of elementary chemical reactions, leading eventually to organosulfur molecules—among them potential precursors to iron-sulfide grains and to astrobiologically important molecules,
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Multivalent weak interactions enhance selectivity of interparticle binding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Targeted drug delivery critically depends on the binding selectivity of cargo-transporting colloidal particles. Extensive theoretical work has shown that two factors are necessary to achieve high selectivity for a threshold receptor density: multivalency and weak interactions. Here, we study a model system of DNA-coated particles with multivalent and weak interactions…
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Characterization and validation of a preventative therapy for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a murine model of the disease [Physiology]
Currently there is an unmet need for treatments that can prevent hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Using a murine model we previously identified that HCM causing cardiac troponin I mutation Gly203Ser (cTnI-G203S) is associated with increased mitochondrial metabolic activity, consistent with the human condition. These alterations precede development of the cardiomyopathy. Here…
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A pathogenic and clonally expanded B cell transcriptome in active multiple sclerosis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Central nervous system B cells have several potential roles in multiple sclerosis (MS): secretors of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, presenters of autoantigens to T cells, producers of pathogenic antibodies, and reservoirs for viruses that trigger demyelination. To interrogate these roles, single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-Seq) was performed on paired cerebrospinal fluid…
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Statistical prediction of the future impairs episodic encoding of the present [Neuroscience]
Memory is typically thought of as enabling reminiscence about past experiences. However, memory also informs and guides processing of future experiences. These two functions of memory are often at odds: Remembering specific experiences from the past requires storing idiosyncratic properties that define particular moments in space and time, but by…
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Low-dimensional dynamics for working memory and time encoding [Neuroscience]
Our decisions often depend on multiple sensory experiences separated by time delays. The brain can remember these experiences and, simultaneously, estimate the timing between events. To understand the mechanisms underlying working memory and time encoding, we analyze neural activity recorded during delays in four experiments on nonhuman primates. To disambiguate…
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RNA-protein interaction mapping via MS2- or Cas13-based APEX targeting [Biochemistry]
RNA–protein interactions underlie a wide range of cellular processes. Improved methods are needed to systematically map RNA–protein interactions in living cells in an unbiased manner. We used two approaches to target the engineered peroxidase APEX2 to specific cellular RNAs for RNA-centered proximity biotinylation of protein interaction partners. Both an MS2-MCP…
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Multiscale computation delivers organophosphorus reactivity and stereoselectivity to immunoglobulin scavengers [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) maturation of an immunoglobulin (Ig) powered by supercomputation delivers novel functionality to this catalytic template and facilitates artificial evolution of biocatalysts. We here employ density functional theory-based (DFT-b) tight binding and funnel metadynamics to advance our earlier QM/MM maturation of A17 Ig-paraoxonase (WTIgP) as a reactibody.
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Watch These Vivid Views From Space as the Cyclonic Buzzsaw of Hurricane Laura Cut Into the Coast
Higher resolution imagery from weather satellites reveals fine scale features within storms and is also playing a role in improving forecasts
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Elon Musk Compares Neuralink to "a 'Black Mirror' Episode"
Black Mirror During Elon Musk's live event about his secretive startup Neuralink on Friday night, the eccentric billionaire made a surprising comparison — invoking the dystopian science fiction show "Black Mirror." The remark came when he was replying to an audience question about whether the technology could eventually allow users to save and replay memories. "Yes, I think in the future you'll b
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Elon Musk: We've Already Implanted Neuralink in Live Pigs
On Friday evening, SpaceX and Tesla CEO used a live event to release a number of rare updates about his secretive other startup, Neuralink, which is trying to build an interface between human brains and computers. The demo focused on a device that Musk called "Link," which appears to be the company's prototype version of the hardware it wants to implant in users surgically. It takes the form of a
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Coronavirus live news: Europe cases continue to rise as Victoria sees fewest in two months
France racks up post-lockdown high in new infections; Australian state sees 18 deaths and 94 cases; India sets new daily record with more than 77,000 cases. Follow all the updates live Global report: India sets new daily case record Repatriating 100,000 stranded Australians could take six months Locals rediscover streets and beaches absent of foreign tourists UK businesses offer incentives to lur
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Physicists Just Found a New Quantum Paradox That Casts Doubt on a Pillar of Reality
When someone observes an event, did it really happen?
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Infants in households with very low food security may have greater obesity risk
Infants from households reporting very low 'food security,' a measure of access to adequate and healthy meals, tend to weigh more than those from households with relatively high food security.
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Tungsten isotope helps study how to armor future fusion reactors
Researchers working with tungsten to armor the inside of future fusion reactors had some surprising results when looking at the probability of contamination.
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How Neanderthals adjusted to climate change
Climate change occurring shortly before their disappearance triggered a complex change in the behavior of late Neanderthals in Europe: they developed more complex tools, suggests new research.
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How bacteria adhere to fiber in the gut
Researchers have revealed a new molecular mechanism by which bacteria adhere to cellulose fibers in the human gut. Thanks to two different binding modes, they can withstand the shear forces in the body.
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Failures of Germany's largest cliff coast sensed by seismometers
In a study carried out over more than two years, scientists were able to draw a new and surprisingly detailed picture of coastal cliff failure activity.
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Here's how the U.S. could release a COVID-19 vaccine before the election—and why that scares some
Science explains FDA's emergency use authorization and other ways countries can speed approvals for vaccines to the new coronavirus
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How bacteria adhere to fiber in the gut
Researchers have revealed a new molecular mechanism by which bacteria adhere to cellulose fibers in the human gut. Thanks to two different binding modes, they can withstand the shear forces in the body.
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Remembering Sir Ken Robinson, the educationalist who changed thinking on schools
Robinson was a world-renowned educationalist who promoted creativity and more diverse and individualized curricula. Robinson's 2006 TED Talk "Do Schools Kill Creativity?" remains the organization's most popular presentation. He also authored five books and advised numerous organizations around the world. Do schools kill creativity? That was the central question of a wildly popular TED Talk given
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Can People Without Symptoms Get Tested for Covid? Who Knows
Top health officials have issued contradictory statements, and the CDC's newest guidance limiting testing comes just as the Trump Administration invests in rapid tests.
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Watch Elon Musk unveil the next version of his AI-powered brain implant, Neuralink
We first heard about Neuralink back in 2017. Elon Musk had a grand vision of implanting a computer chip in the human brain allowing for direct interface with computers. It's a grand vision that pictures humans as flesh, blood, bone, and AI hybrids. Amputees could use the interface to control artificial limbs. Non-verbal people could operate communication devices without the need for hands. We cou
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Researchers 3D print lifelike heart valve models
Researchers have developed a groundbreaking process for multi-material 3D printing of lifelike models of the heart's aortic valve and the surrounding structures that mimic the exact look and feel of a real patient.
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Plant scientists study the interaction of heat stress responses in corn
A new study shows how two responses in separate locations inside plant cells work in concert to help corn plants respond to heat stress. The research was made possible by the Enviratron, an innovative plant sciences facility at Iowa State University that utilizes a robotic rover and highly controlled growth chambers.
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'Jumping' DNA regulates human neurons
'Jumping' sequences of DNA, known as transposable elements, partner up with evolutionarily recent proteins to influence the differentiation and physiological functioning of human neurons.
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Fossil trees on Peru's Central Andean Plateau tell a tale of dramatic environmental change
The anatomy of plant fossils including an enormous tree that grew 10 million years ago in the now arid, high-elevation Central Andean Plateau calls current paleoclimate models into question, suggesting that the area was more humid than models predict.
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Researchers 3D print lifelike heart valve models
Researchers have developed a groundbreaking process for multi-material 3D printing of lifelike models of the heart's aortic valve and the surrounding structures that mimic the exact look and feel of a real patient.
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Plant scientists study the interaction of heat stress responses in corn
A new study shows how two responses in separate locations inside plant cells work in concert to help corn plants respond to heat stress. The research was made possible by the Enviratron, an innovative plant sciences facility at Iowa State University that utilizes a robotic rover and highly controlled growth chambers.
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Tales from the storm: how four scientists tracked Hurricane Laura
They came by air, by land, and by internet
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NASA-NOAA satellite nighttime imagery tracks Tropical Depression Laura over US
A new animation of nighttime imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite followed the path of former Hurricane Laura from its landfall in southwestern Louisiana to its movement over the Mississippi Valley.
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NASA Terra Satellite examines Tropical Storm Hernan's relocated center
NASA infrared imagery revealed a burst of strength in Tropical Storm Hernan, located over the Gulf of California. At 12:30 a.m. EDT, NOAA's National Hurricane Center or NHC noted that recent satellite-based wind data indicated Hernan was located northeast of previous estimates.
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NASA Terra Satellite sees development of Tropical Storm Maysak
NASA infrared imagery revealed several areas of strong thunderstorms around the center of the recently organized Tropical Storm Maysak.
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Researchers dramatically downsize technology for fingerprinting drugs and other chemicals
Researchers have invented a new technology that can drastically downsize the apparatus used for Raman spectroscopy, a well-known technique that uses light to identify the molecular makeup of compounds.
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Adoptive Cell Therapy Summit
Join us to learn about adoptive cell therapies from leading experts in the field of cancer immunology.
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Waiting for Godot Metaphor
Author suggests a gradated Pandemic Index as an initial effort.
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Natural disasters must be unusual or deadly to prompt local climate policy change
Natural disasters alone are not enough to motivate local communities to engage in climate change mitigation or adaptation, a new study from Oregon State University found. Rather, policy change in response to extreme weather events appears to depend on a combination of factors, including fatalities, sustained media coverage, the unusualness of the event and the political makeup of the community.
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Experiment contradicts assumptions about sleep loss and criminal interrogations
An experimental study suggests that sleep restriction may hinder information disclosure during criminal interviews, contradicting widespread assumptions about the effectiveness of sleep deprivation as an interrogation tool.
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Which Ancient City Is Considered the Oldest in the World?
Archaeologists still debate which city came first — let alone how to define one in the first place.
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Atheists are more likely to sleep better than Catholics and Baptists
A new study of sleep, religious affiliation, and perceptions of heaven found that atheists and agnostics are significantly more likely to be better sleepers than Catholics and Baptists.
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Scientists listed the main approaches to the treatment of coronavirus
Researchers from Sechenov University together with Russian and Iranian colleagues described currently known approaches to the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection. In the paper published in Journal of Molecular Medicine, they wrote about how different groups of drugs worked and how promising each approach was.
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How cats and dogs see the world
What can dogs see? (Stan Horaczek /) Ever wish you could peer into your cat, dog, skink, or betta fish's brain? It would give you a far better perspective of the world—or at least help you be a smarter pet parent. We're here to demystify your animals (to some extent), while also shedding advice on how you can best thrive together. Welcome to Pet Psychic. Take a quick flash picture of your dog or
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NASA Terra Satellite sees development of Tropical Storm Maysak
NASA infrared imagery revealed several areas of strong thunderstorms around the center of the recently organized Tropical Storm Maysak.
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Look beyond opioids to solve national substance use epidemic, study suggests
A new study published reveals that three-quarters of participants in an inpatient addiction intervention program at Oregon Health & Science University came into the hospital using more than one substance. The findings suggests that a singular focus on opioids may do more harm than good if doctors overlook the complexity of each individual's actual substance use.
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NASA-NOAA satellite nighttime imagery tracks Tropical Depression Laura over US
A new animation of nighttime imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite followed the path of former Hurricane Laura from its landfall in southwestern Louisiana to its movement over the Mississippi Valley.
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The Atlantic Daily: The Post-Truth Convention
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . GETTY / THE ATLANTIC 1. Events in Kenosha are "unfolding with the inevitable logic of a nightmare," George Packer writes. If President Trump wins in November, George argues, the situation in Keno
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Why flu vaccines only last a year
Researchers at Emory Vaccine Center looked at bone marrow to better understand antibody production. Due to constant mutations, identifying a "universal vaccine" has been challenging. The team found that blood markers are reliable indicators of what's occurring inside of bone marrow. We've known that this Fall might present serious problems. Now experts are warning of a twindemic : the potential f
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The abandoned illness: schizophrenia and how it took seven years to get a diagnosis | Anonymous
It is unlikely Sunny will ever work again. How could he explain to any potential employer that his only crime was the 'crime' of schizophrenia? As a child, his grandmother nicknamed him Sunny because he was always so bright and happy. On leaving primary school, he achieved a "band 6" in both maths and English. His mother was optimistic; perhaps he would be a scholar like his grandfather. It wasn'
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Australian researchers condemn 'groundless vilification' of their work with China
Without global collaboration, the nation would be 'in really serious trouble', Universities Australia head says Australian scientists have been vilified for working with Chinese researchers even though the nation would be "in really serious trouble" without international partnerships, top representatives of the sector have warned. In an emphatic defence of global research efforts, the Australian
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How transforming riverbanks can clean contaminated waterways
Removing humanmade banks of polluted sediment transforms streams to their former glory
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Caution greets UK's at-home spending splurge
Lockdown has provided a revenue boost for some, but joblessness concerns remain
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NASA Terra Satellite examines Tropical Storm Hernan's relocated center
NASA infrared imagery revealed a burst of strength in Tropical Storm Hernan, located over the Gulf of California. At 12:30 a.m. EDT, NOAA's National Hurricane Center or NHC noted that recent satellite-based wind data indicated Hernan was located northeast of previous estimates.
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Study finds that sleep restriction amplifies anger
Feeling angry these days? New research suggests that a good night of sleep may be just what you need.
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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
Standard testing for SARSCoV-2 requires a nasopharyngeal or oropharyngeal swab but has several limitations, such as the need for health care human resources and PPE, and also has the potential for transmission in transit to or at the testing center. There is an urgent need for innovative testing strategies to expedite identification of cases and facilitate mass testing.
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Orangutang, rensdyr og spækhugger: Coronavirusset kan være farligt for mange vilde dyr
40 procent af de dyr, der er i risiko for at blive smittet med SARS-CoV-2, er truede.
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Bacteria-Laced Mosquitoes Limit Spread of Dengue
Cases of dengue were greatly reduced in areas of a city where Wolbachia-infected mosquitos were released, according to preliminary data from a field study.
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How Reading Fiction Increases Empathy and Encourages Understanding
There might some truth to the beloved quote, "A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies." Researchers say reading fiction can show us different viewpoints — and shape how we relate to each other.
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Lockdown to be eased in northern England
Some local restrictions to be lifted next week as coronavirus infection rates decline
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Six Ways to Buy A Ticket to Space in 2021
Space tourism could finally become a reality next year. These space companies are either already selling seats to private customers, or soon will be.
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Cardiac biomarker shows stronger associations with kidney disease progression than BP
Identifying biomarkers for kidney disease progression may elucidate disease pathways and inform treatment. In a study of 3,379 adults with kidney disease followed for 12 years (47% with diabetes), elevated levels of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, a cardiac biomarker, were strongly associated with kidney disease progression; associations were stronger than those with systolic blood pres
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Coronavirus News Roundup, August 22-August 28
Pandemic highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Researchers Forced Living Cells to Navigate Tiny Mazes
Escape Room Individual cells are capable of traveling great distances within our bodies — and scientists built an almost-cartoonish experiment to figure out how they know where to go. Cells are attracted to certain chemicals and repelled by others. For instance, infection-fighting white blood cells are drawn to chemicals called chemoattractants that are released at the scene of an injury, accordi
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SpaceX Is Planning to Fly Its Starship Prototype This Weekend
Hop on Pop After its first successful flight test of a Starship prototype earlier this month, SpaceX is planning to try again on Sunday. According to CEO Elon Musk, this will be another l0w altitude test, intended to work out the bugs before moving on to more ambitious launches. We'll do several short hops to smooth out launch process, then go high altitude with body flaps — Elon Musk (@elonmusk)
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Opioids during pregnancy may disrupt the placenta
Newly-discovered biomarkers could one day help identify the presence of an opioid use disorder during human pregnancy, researchers say. Women often take opioids for pain regulation during pregnancy, including oxycodone, so it's important to understand the effects of these drugs on the fetal placenta, a temporary organ essential in providing nutrients from a mother to her unborn child, says Cheryl
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China again boosts R&D spending by more than 10%
But nation likely to miss 2020 goal of spending 2.5% of GDP on R&D
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Pubs will shut before schools in a Covid upsurge, says PM
Boris Johnson says in video Q&A that English schools will close as a last resort this winter Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson has stressed that ministers will prioritise keeping schools open this winter as they tackle any upsurge in coronavirus cases. The government intends to continue using local lockdowns to control the spread of the virus in the worst
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As clubs and parties went virtual, drug use did too
As social distancing has closed nightclubs and festivals, people are opting to use drugs at virtual raves and Zoom happy hours, according to a new study. The study is the first to examine drug use during virtual raves and happy hours. "We explored whether stay-at-home orders changed how people use drugs—and it appears that drug use during virtual gatherings is somewhat prevalent among the party-g
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Host tissue T cells may have an unexpected role in graft-versus-host disease
A new study has found that skin and intestinal T cells in the recipient survive conditioning regimens and continue to perform their normal functions. Under certain conditions, these T cells can become activated by donor white blood cells and play a previously unappreciated role in acute GVHD.
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Research brief: Researchers 3D print lifelike heart valve models
Researchers from the University of Minnesota, with support from Medtronic, have developed a groundbreaking process for multi-material 3D printing of lifelike models of the heart's aortic valve and the surrounding structures that mimic the exact look and feel of a real patient.
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Tungsten isotope helps study how to armor future fusion reactors
The inside of future nuclear fusion energy reactors will be among the harshest environments ever produced on Earth. What's strong enough to protect the inside of a fusion reactor from plasma-produced heat fluxes akin to space shuttles reentering Earth's atmosphere?
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Cellular energy audit reveals energy producers and consumers
Adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, is the cellular energy currency that is as valuable to the human body as the dollar is to the US economy. Too high or too low levels of ATP in some cell types have been linked to a variety of diseases. However, scientists have lacked an understanding of how cells regulate ATP levels on a broad scale and how cells' energy levels can be protected or restored in the se
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Farmers' quick sale of poultry during outbreaks may increase deadly virus transmission
Small-scale poultry farmers in Vietnam tend to respond to viral outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) by rapidly selling their birds as a way to avoid financial loss, according to a new study by an international team of researchers. As these birds are commingled with other birds in markets and trading networks, this practice may increase the likelihood of widespread disease transmi
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First-ever mission to the Trojan asteroids passes NASA milestone
NASA has approved the final development stage of the Southwest Research Institute-led Lucy mission to explore the Trojan asteroids in preparation for its October 2021 launch.
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Cellular energy audit reveals energy producers and consumers
Adenosine triphosphate, or ATP, is the cellular energy currency that is as valuable to the human body as the dollar is to the US economy. Too high or too low levels of ATP in some cell types have been linked to a variety of diseases. However, scientists have lacked an understanding of how cells regulate ATP levels on a broad scale and how cells' energy levels can be protected or restored in the se
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"Jumping" DNA regulates human neurons
"Jumping" sequences of DNA, known as transposable elements, partner up with evolutionarily recent proteins to influence the differentiation and physiological functioning of human neurons.
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Fossil trees on Peru's Central Andean Plateau tell a tale of dramatic environmental change
The anatomy of plant fossils including an enormous tree that grew 10 million years ago in the now arid, high-elevation Central Andean Plateau calls current paleoclimate models into question, suggesting that the area was more humid than models predict.
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Researchers dramatically downsize technology for fingerprinting drugs and other chemicals
As new infectious diseases emerge and spread, one of the best shots against novel pathogens is finding new medicines or vaccines. But before drugs can be used as potential cures, they have to be painstakingly screened for composition, safety and purity, among other things. Thus, there is an increasing demand for technologies that can characterize chemical compounds quickly and in real time.
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Farmers' quick sale of poultry during outbreaks may increase deadly virus transmission
Small-scale poultry farmers in Vietnam tend to respond to viral outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) by rapidly selling their birds as a way to avoid financial loss, according to a new study by an international team of researchers. As these birds are commingled with other birds in markets and trading networks, this practice may increase the likelihood of widespread disease transmi
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NASA sees wind shear still battering tropical storm Iselle
NASA infrared imagery shows wind shear continued to batter Tropical Storm Iselle in the Eastern Pacific Ocean for the second day.
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Ingestible transiently anchoring electronics for microstimulation and conductive signaling
Ingestible electronic devices enable noninvasive evaluation and diagnosis of pathologies in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract but generally cannot therapeutically interact with the tissue wall. Here, we report the development of an orally administered electrical stimulation device characterized in ex vivo human tissue and in in vivo swine models, which transiently anchored itself to the stomach by
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Neogene precipitation, vegetation, and elevation history of the Central Andean Plateau
Andean uplift played a fundamental role in shaping South American climate and species distribution, but the relationship between the rise of the Andes, plant composition, and local climatic evolution is poorly known. We investigated the fossil record (pollen, leaves, and wood) from the Neogene of the Central Andean Plateau and documented the earliest evidence of a puna-like ecosystem in the Plioc
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Disruption in ACTL7A causes acrosomal ultrastructural defects in human and mouse sperm as a novel male factor inducing early embryonic arrest
Early embryonic arrest is a challenge for in vitro fertilization (IVF). No genetic factors were previously revealed in the sperm-derived arrest of embryonic development. Here, we reported two infertile brothers presenting normal in conventional semen analysis, but both couples had no embryos for transfer after several IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Whole-exome sequencing identif
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Unmasking selective path integration deficits in Alzheimers disease risk carriers
Alzheimer's disease (AD) manifests with progressive memory loss and spatial disorientation. Neuropathological studies suggest early AD pathology in the entorhinal cortex (EC) of young adults at genetic risk for AD ( APOE 4-carriers). Because the EC harbors grid cells, a likely neural substrate of path integration (PI), we examined PI performance in APOE 4-carriers during a virtual navigation task
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Accumulation of collagen molecular unfolding is the mechanism of cyclic fatigue damage and failure in collagenous tissues
Overuse injuries to dense collagenous tissues are common, but their etiology is poorly understood. The predominant hypothesis that micro-damage accumulation exceeds the rate of biological repair is missing a mechanistic explanation. Here, we used collagen hybridizing peptides to measure collagen molecular damage during tendon cyclic fatigue loading and computational simulations to identify potent
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Primate-restricted KRAB zinc finger proteins and target retrotransposons control gene expression in human neurons
In the first days of embryogenesis, transposable element–embedded regulatory sequences (TEeRS) are silenced by Kruppel-associated box (KRAB) zinc finger proteins (KZFPs). Many TEeRS are subsequently co-opted in transcription networks, but how KZFPs influence this process is largely unknown. We identify ZNF417 and ZNF587 as primate-specific KZFPs repressing HERVK (human endogenous retrovirus K) an
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Cryo-EM structure of human Cx31.3/GJC3 connexin hemichannel
Connexin family proteins assemble into hexameric channels called hemichannels/connexons, which function as transmembrane channels or dock together to form gap junction intercellular channels (GJIChs). We determined the cryo–electron microscopy structures of human connexin 31.3 (Cx31.3)/GJC3 hemichannels in the presence and absence of calcium ions and with a hearing-loss mutation R15G at 2.3-, 2.5
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Immunotherapy via PD-L1-presenting biomaterials leads to long-term islet graft survival
Antibody-mediated immune checkpoint blockade is a transformative immunotherapy for cancer. These same mechanisms can be repurposed for the control of destructive alloreactive immune responses in the transplantation setting. Here, we implement a synthetic biomaterial platform for the local delivery of a chimeric streptavidin/programmed cell death-1 (SA-PD-L1) protein to direct "reprogramming" of l
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Wnt signaling activates MFSD2A to suppress vascular endothelial transcytosis and maintain blood-retinal barrier
Breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) causes retinal edema and vision loss. We investigated the role of Wnt signaling in maintaining the BRB by limiting transcytosis. Mice lacking either the Wnt co-receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 5 ( Lrp5 –/– ) or the Wnt ligand Norrin ( Ndp y/– ) exhibit increased retinal vascular leakage and enhanced endothelial transcytosis. Wn
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Viruses harness YxxO motif to interact with host AP2M1 for replication: A vulnerable broad-spectrum antiviral target
Targeting a universal host protein exploited by most viruses would be a game-changing strategy that offers broad-spectrum solution and rapid pandemic control including the current COVID-19. Here, we found a common YxxØ-motif of multiple viruses that exploits host AP2M1 for intracellular trafficking. A library chemical, N -(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid (ACA), was identified to interrupt AP2M1-
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Neuronal metabolic rewiring promotes resilience to neurodegeneration caused by mitochondrial dysfunction
Neurodegeneration in mitochondrial disorders is considered irreversible because of limited metabolic plasticity in neurons, yet the cell-autonomous implications of mitochondrial dysfunction for neuronal metabolism in vivo are poorly understood. Here, we profiled the cell-specific proteome of Purkinje neurons undergoing progressive OXPHOS deficiency caused by disrupted mitochondrial fusion dynamic
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Cardiolipin, conformation, and respiratory complex-dependent oligomerization of the major mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier in yeast
The phospholipid cardiolipin has pleiotropic structural and functional roles that are collectively essential for mitochondrial biology. Yet, the molecular details of how this lipid supports the structure and function of proteins and protein complexes are poorly understood. To address this property of cardiolipin, we use the mitochondrial adenosine 5'-diphosphate/adenosine 5'-triphosphate carrier
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Wirelessly controlled, bioresorbable drug delivery device with active valves that exploit electrochemically triggered crevice corrosion
Implantable drug release platforms that offer wirelessly programmable control over pharmacokinetics have potential in advanced treatment protocols for hormone imbalances, malignant cancers, diabetic conditions, and others. We present a system with this type of functionality in which the constituent materials undergo complete bioresorption to eliminate device load from the patient after completing
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The NEMP family supports metazoan fertility and nuclear envelope stiffness
Human genome-wide association studies have linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NEMP1 ( nuclear envelope membrane protein 1 ) with early menopause; however, it is unclear whether NEMP1 has any role in fertility. We show that whole-animal loss of NEMP1 homologs in Drosophila , Caenorhabditis elegans , zebrafish, and mice leads to sterility or early loss of fertility. Loss of Nemp leads
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3D printed patient-specific aortic root models with internal sensors for minimally invasive applications
Minimally invasive surgeries have numerous advantages, yet complications may arise from limited knowledge about the anatomical site targeted for the delivery of therapy. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a minimally invasive procedure for treating aortic stenosis. Here, we demonstrate multimaterial three-dimensional printing of patient-specific soft aortic root models with internal
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Glove-based sensors for multimodal monitoring of natural sweat
Sweat sensors targeting exercise or chemically induced sweat have shown promise for noninvasive health monitoring. Natural thermoregulatory sweat is an attractive alternative as it can be accessed during routine and sedentary activity without impeding user lifestyles and potentially preserves correlations between sweat and blood biomarkers. We present simple glove-based sensors to accumulate natu
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Kondo physics in antiferromagnetic Weyl semimetal Mn3+xSn1-x films
Topology and strong electron correlations are crucial ingredients in emerging quantum materials, yet their intersection in experimental systems has been relatively limited to date. Strongly correlated Weyl semimetals, particularly when magnetism is incorporated, offer a unique and fertile platform to explore emergent phenomena in novel topological matter and topological spintronics. The antiferro
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Predicting short-range order and correlated phenomena in disordered crystalline materials
Disordered crystalline materials are used in a wide variety of energy-related technologies. Recent results from neutron total scattering experiments have shown that the atomic arrangements of many disordered crystalline materials are not random nor are they represented by the long-range structure observed from diffraction experiments. Despite the importance of disordered materials and the impact
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Nanoparticle-enhanced chemo-immunotherapy to trigger robust antitumor immunity
Mounting evidence suggests that immunotherapies are a promising new class of anticancer therapies. However, the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME), poor immunogenicity, and off-target toxicity hinder the broader implementation of immunotherapies. Here, we describe a novel strategy combining chemotherapy and immunotherapy to modulate the TME by systemically and concurrently delivering
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Swiss to ban foreign trophy hunters from killing Alpine ibex
A Swiss region that has faced heavy criticism for allowing wealthy foreigners to pay large sums to shoot protected Alpine ibexes, a species of wild goat, for trophies decided Friday to end the practice.
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Low-oxygen zones in Danish seas double in a year
The area of Danish seas affected by low oxygen levels—a problem triggered by climate change—has doubled in the space of a year, according to a university report published Friday.
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Swiss to ban foreign trophy hunters from killing Alpine ibex
A Swiss region that has faced heavy criticism for allowing wealthy foreigners to pay large sums to shoot protected Alpine ibexes, a species of wild goat, for trophies decided Friday to end the practice.
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Will social media's impact on the elections be different this time?
The effective subversion of social media during the 2016 U.S. presidential election was unprecedented and highlighted the major role social media plays in politics. Today, it's harder to repurpose private social data than it was four years ago, but paid and organic audience microtargeting continues. Fake news and disinformation still spread freely. Networks of fake accounts are being taken down,
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We finally know how cold the last ice age was
Researchers have nailed down the temperature of the last ice age, known as the Last Glacial Maximum of 20,000 years ago, to about 46 degrees Fahrenheit. Their findings allow climate scientists to better understand the relationship between today's rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide—a major greenhouse gas—and average global temperature. The Last Glacial Maximum, or LGM, was a frigid period
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Simple nudge gets more people to start retirement nest egg
When it comes to nudging people to start saving for retirement, a new study shows one simple nudge really works. Motivating people to save for retirement isn't easy. Fraught decisions around when to start a nest egg, how much to set aside, and where to invest can be so overwhelming that inertia often sets in. The number of families participating in retirement plans has steadily declined since 200
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The quest to snare—and save—the world's largest owl
With a wingspan of 5 to 6 feet and a home range in Japan and the Russian Far East, the Blakiston's fish owl is one of the most secretive birds known to conservationists. (Sergey Gafitski/) Excerpted from Owls of the Eastern Ice by Jonathan C. Slaght. Published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Copyright © 2020 by Jonathan C. Slaght. All rights reserved. The fall traps did not pan out. Either the resi
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University of Kentucky demotes cancer researcher following finding of misconduct by scientist in his lab
A misconduct scandal at the University of Kentucky has led to the demotion of a senior cancer researcher for his lack of oversight of a now-former scientist who fabricated data in at least four papers and two grant applications. According to the university, the inquiry began in April 2019, after the institution received complaints about … Continue reading
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This Specially Formulated Mix Helps Prevent Dehydration Better Than Water Alone
We all know that we should be drinking more water . It's the magical liquid that composes most of our bodies and makes our biological functions run properly. Yet many of us have a problem hitting that generally accepted benchmark of eight glasses per day. To help reinforce this healthy habit and prevent dehydration, some have taken to adding a little extra flavor to their water. And with the Hydr
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Fossil trees on Peru's Central Andean Plateau tell a tale of dramatic environmental change
On an expedition to the Central Andean Plateau, researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and colleagues were astounded to find a huge fossil-tree buried in the cold, grassy plain. The plant fossil record from this high-altitude site in southern Peru contains dramatic reminders that the environment in the Andes mountains changed drastically during the past 10 million year
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A NASA Satellite From the 1960s Is About to Die
The OGO This weekend, a 56-year old NASA satellite is set to be retired in a glorious blaze of fire. The Orbiting Geophysics Observatory 1 (OGO-1) satellite studied how the Sun affects the Earth's magnetic field between 1964 and 1969, according to Space.com . Now, after roughly 50 years of peaceful retirement, the satellite will come back home — and incinerate as it re-enters the atmosphere. Peac
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Africa declared free from wild polio — but vaccine-derived strains remain
Nature, Published online: 28 August 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02501-3 No new cases of wild poliovirus have been recorded on the continent since 2016, but other types of the virus persist.
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The Guardian view on studying dinosaurs: ancient creatures, cutting-edge science | Editorial
A discovery in the Isle of Wight should remind us that we are living in a golden age of palaeontology It could be said that we live in the age of the dinosaurs. It is, of course, 66m years since a great extinction wiped out three-quarters of the animals on Earth, including non-avian dinosaurs. The first fossil was described in scientific literature around two centuries ago, and Richard Owen coine
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