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11h
Solcelle-amok: Kapaciteten femdobles frem mod 2025
PLUS. Øget kapacitet kommer primært fra solcelleparker på grund af faldende priser.
6h
Once infected, twice infected
A key to surviving in the wild is fighting off infection — and not just once. For plants, as with humans, one infection may or may not leave a plant with lasting immunity. Biologists conducted a series of elegant experiments that capture how pathogen strains naturally accumulate on plants over a growing season. Their findings, reported in Nature Ecology & Evolution, reveal the importance of under
4h

LATEST

Secret weapon to stop invasive honeysuckle: Satellites
One common invasive species is so widespread that you can see it from space.
6min
Scientists reveal secret of material for promising infrared cameras
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and the RAS Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electromagnetics have discovered what makes vanadium dioxide films conduct electricity. Published in Physical Review B, their findings will enable thermal imaging devices with a sensitivity and reaction rate superior to those of the currently existing analogs.
6min
Newly discovered sugar transporter might help beans tolerate hot temperatures
MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory (PRL) scientists have characterized a sucrose transporter protein found in common beans. The recently discovered protein could help us understand how beans tolerate hot temperatures. The transporter, called PvSUT1.1, is reported in the journal Plant Direct.
6min
Listen: Plasma and Immunity
The writer F. T. Kola had COVID-19 in March , and she's still dealing with the aftermath. She returns to the podcast Social Distance to ask about whether she should donate plasma, and if she should worry about "reinfection." Also on this episode: Atlantic senior editor John Hendrickson talks about disability at the Democratic National Convention. Read his definitive story on Joe Biden and stutter
8min
Secret weapon to stop invasive honeysuckle: Satellites
One common invasive species is so widespread that you can see it from space.
9min
Newly discovered sugar transporter might help beans tolerate hot temperatures
MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory (PRL) scientists have characterized a sucrose transporter protein found in common beans. The recently discovered protein could help us understand how beans tolerate hot temperatures. The transporter, called PvSUT1.1, is reported in the journal Plant Direct.
9min
Scientists Are Running Out of Primates to Test Vaccines On
Right now, anyone in the U.S. trying to develop a vaccine for COVID-19 will likely run into a crucial roadblock: There simply aren't enough primate research subjects to go around. American labs have run into a critical shortage of monkeys, The Atlantic reports . And without them, scientists have no hope of completing the animal testing phases of clinical tests before they can move on to trials wi
11min
Rubber debris litters miles of Puyallup River after artificial turf was used in dam project without permit
In black waves, drifts and bands, crumbs of rubber are polluting miles of the Puyallup River after a spill at a dam project last month.
12min
U.S. will agree to remove plutonium waste from South Carolina
The Trump administration is settling a long-running dispute with South Carolina over cleaning up weapons-grade plutonium stashed in the state.
12min
Scientists develop first drug-like compounds to inhibit elusive cancer-linked enzymes
Structural biology techniques helped researchers target the nuclear receptor-binding SET domain family for the first time; its malfunction is associated with several types of cancer.
19min
To the choir: Forward-thinking faculty sharing innovations mostly among themselves
Surveys and network analyses of 192 STEM faculty at three universities revealed that frequent users of evidence-based instructional practices are far more likely to engage one another than colleagues less familiar with the practices. The finding suggests that faculty networks alone are not enough to disseminate and drive the adoption of evidence-based practices that could improve undergraduate ins
19min
Scientists unlock crops' power to resist floods
Foundational science has discovered the molecular structure of plant enzymes that could be manipulated to create flood-resistant crops, vital as weather events become more extreme due to global warming. Co-author, Dr Mark White at the University of Sydney, explains the science.
19min
Warning witnesses of the possibility of misinformation helps protect their memory accuracy
Warning about the threat of misinformation — before or after an event — significantly reduces the negative impact of misinformation on memory, according to research at Tufts University. The findings could have important implications for improving the accuracy of everyday memory and eyewitness testimony.
19min
Being a selfish jerk doesn't get you ahead, research finds
Two studies provide empirical evidence to settle the question of whether being aggressively Machiavellian helps people get ahead. The studies concluded that being a jerk provides no advantage in career advancement. Any power boost disagreeable people get from being intimidating is offset by their poor interpersonal relationships, the studies concluded.
19min
Discovery of an ancient dog species may teach us about human vocalization
In a study published in PNAS, researchers used conservation biology and genomics to discover that the New Guinea singing dog, thought to be extinct for 50 years, still thrives. This finding opens new doors for protecting a remarkable creature that can teach biologists about human vocal learning.
19min
Dodder uses the flowering signal of its host plant to flower
Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology have investigated how the parasitic dodder Cuscuta australis controls flower formation. They showed that the parasite eavesdrops on the flowering signals of its host plants in order to activate its own flowering machinery. By synchronizing flowering with its host plant, the parasite makes sure that i
19min
Imaging an estrogen related enzyme may help to predict obesity, self-control issues
Findings to be published in PNAS from a positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging study of the amygdala reveals that low levels of the enzyme aromatase, which catalyzes estrogen biosynthesis, are associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) and lower self-control, as measured by a standard personality test.
19min
Stealing information from host plants: How the parasitic dodder plant flowers
Recently, researchers led by WU Jianqiang from the Kunming Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences uncovered the underlying mechanism for dodder flowering. The team first investigated the flowering time of the dodder Cuscuta australis and found that C. australis always synchronizes its flowering time with the flowering time of its hosts.
19min
24min
Getting ahead isn't a nasty business, US study reveals
Researchers found 'nice, generous' people advanced at work just as much as bullies The question has puzzled humans from the earliest philosophers to the ranks of home workers who have swapped water cooler gossip for rants on Zoom: does being a jerk help people get to the top? Now, after a study lasting more than a decade, researchers believe they finally have the answer. Nasty colleagues are no m
24min
New Guinea's mysterious singing dogs found again in the wild
DNA reveals highland wild dogs are almost identical to their captive cousins
29min
Singing Dogs Re-emerge From Extinction for Another Tune
The animal was believed to have disappeared from the highlands of New Guinea, but was found on the island's Indonesian side.
33min
Discovery of an ancient dog species may teach us about human vocalization
In a study published in PNAS, researchers used conservation biology and genomics to discover that the New Guinea singing dog, thought to be extinct for 50 years, still thrives. Scientists found that the ancestral dog population still stealthily wanders in the Highlands of New Guinea. This finding opens new doors for protecting a remarkable creature that can teach biologists about human vocal learn
36min
Scientists unlock crops' power to resist floods
Enzymes that control a plant's response to lower oxygen levels could be manipulated to make vital crops resistant to the impacts of flooding triggered by climate change, new research shows.
36min
To the choir: Forward-thinking faculty sharing innovations mostly among themselves
Eager to learn the latest in instructional practices that research says will better engage and educate her students, an assistant professor of biochemistry attends a virtual workshop devoted to exactly that.
36min
Stealing information from host plants: How the parasitic dodder plant flowers
About 4,000 to 5,000 parasitic plant species exist. Among these, dodders (Cuscuta, Convolvulaceae) are distributed worldwide. Compared with normal autotrophic plants, they have a unique morphology—they are rootless and leafless and carry out no or very little photosynthesis.
36min
Discovery of an ancient dog species may teach us about human vocalization
In a study published in PNAS, researchers used conservation biology and genomics to discover that the New Guinea singing dog, thought to be extinct for 50 years, still thrives. Scientists found that the ancestral dog population still stealthily wanders in the Highlands of New Guinea. This finding opens new doors for protecting a remarkable creature that can teach biologists about human vocal learn
39min
Scientists unlock crops' power to resist floods
Enzymes that control a plant's response to lower oxygen levels could be manipulated to make vital crops resistant to the impacts of flooding triggered by climate change, new research shows.
39min
Stealing information from host plants: How the parasitic dodder plant flowers
About 4,000 to 5,000 parasitic plant species exist. Among these, dodders (Cuscuta, Convolvulaceae) are distributed worldwide. Compared with normal autotrophic plants, they have a unique morphology—they are rootless and leafless and carry out no or very little photosynthesis.
39min
Secret weapon to stop invasive honeysuckle: Satellites
The University of Cincinnati found that satellite imagery can identify nonnative and invasive Amur honeysuckle, an ornamental shrub introduced from Asia that has spread in forests across much of the United States.
41min
Could simple tests predict which OCD treatment will work?
New research could improve the odds that people with obsessive-compulsive disorder will receive a therapy that really works for them. A working treatment eludes more than a third of people with OCD who currently get treatment. The study suggests the possibility of predicting which of two types of therapy will help teens and adults with OCD: One that exposes them to the specific subject of their o
41min
One way to slow the spread of COVID-19? Stop talking. Seriously.
Talking quietly, or not at all, could be an effective way to control the spread of the coronavirus, especially in crowded and indoor spaces. (Pexels/) As Labor Day approaches and autumn inches closer, the coronavirus continues to spread across the country. When fall hits, it will mark the start of the third full season that many Americans have spent practicing social distancing to prevent the nov
46min
Ingenza meets a key milestone in the deployment of novel cost-effective COVID-19 vaccine technology
Edinburgh-based biotech company Ingenza Ltd. has made a significant breakthrough in the race to develop and manufacture a cost-effective vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the current COVID-19 pandemic.
47min
How antibiotics interact
Understanding bottleneck effects in the translation of bacterial proteins can lead to a more effective combination of antibiotics.
53min
New evidence for quantum fluctuations near a quantum critical point in a superconductor
A study has found evidence for quantum fluctuations near a quantum critical point in a superconductor. Theory suggests that these quantum critical points may be analogous to black holes as places where all sorts of strange phenomena can exist in a quantum material.
53min
Fungi in gut linked to higher Alzheimer's risk can be reduced through ketogenic diet
Specific fungi in the gut associated with a higher risk of Alzheimer's disease and found in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can be altered in a beneficial manner by eating a modified Mediterranean diet, researchers have found.
53min
Microgel immuno-acceptance method could improve pancreatic islet transplant success
Researchers have developed a new microgel drug delivery method that could extend the effectiveness of pancreatic islet transplantations — from several years to possibly the entire lifespan of a recipient.
53min
COVID-19 patients get needless antibiotics, data suggests
More than half of patients hospitalized with suspected COVID-19 in Michigan during the state's peak months received unnecessary antibiotics early in their stay, a new study shows. Testing soon showed, however, that 96.5% of these patients only had the coronavirus, which antibiotics don't affect. The 3.5% of patients who arrived at the hospital with both kinds of infection were more likely to die.
1h
Study finds missing link in the evolutionary history of carbon-fixing protein Rubisco
A team led by researchers at the University of California, Davis, has discovered a missing link in the evolution of photosynthesis and carbon fixation. Dating back more than 2.4 billion years, a newly discovered form of the plant enzyme rubisco could give new insight into plant evolution and breeding.
1h
NASA's Suomi NPP satellite shows two views of California's smoky skies
NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite captured two images that tell the story about the smoke coming off the fires in California. One instrument on the provided a visible image of the smoke, while another analyzed the aerosol content within. The images were captured on August 30, 2020.
1h
Study finds missing link in the evolutionary history of carbon-fixing protein Rubisco
A team led by researchers at the University of California, Davis, has discovered a missing link in the evolution of photosynthesis and carbon fixation. Dating back more than 2.4 billion years, a newly discovered form of the plant enzyme rubisco could give new insight into plant evolution and breeding.
1h
SpaceX Makes History With 100th Rocket Launch
SpaceX had hoped to launch a pair of Falcon 9 rockets on Sunday, but weather early in the day threatened to scuttle the entire event. However, the skies cleared just in time for SpaceX to make history late in the day . The launch of the SAOCOM 1B satellite was SpaceX's 100th and its first-ever polar orbit insertion from Florida. In fact, it was the first by anyone in decades. Early on Sunday (Aug
1h
Stylish sunglasses for active people
Eyewear for people who love sports and adventure. (Yolanda Sun via Unsplash/) If you've got an active lifestyle and spend time working or exercising outdoors, a good pair of sports sunglasses is key to protecting your eyes from both the sun and whatever else might come your way. While any old pair of spectacles might do in a pinch if you need simple eye protection, sports sunglasses are designed
1h
A White House Advisor Is Pushing a Reckless Herd Immunity COVID Strategy
A new top medical advisor to president Donald Trump is pushing the White House to embrace a "herd immunity" strategy to tackle the coronavirus pandemic, the Washington Post reports . Herd immunity is a form of protection that arises when a sufficient percentage of a population has grown immune to an infection that the pathogen can no longer easily spread. Sweden modeled its strategies around the
1h
Implant choice more important than surgeon skill for hip replacement success
A study analysing over 650,000 hip replacement patients across England and Wales over 14 years sought to investigate why one hospital has consistently been identified as having better than expected outcomes compared to other settings. The findings have shown that the outstanding hip implant survival results seen in one centre in the UK are associated with implant choice more than surgeon skill.
1h
In Brazil's wealthiest state, scientists fear a budget plan could cripple research
São Paulo wants universities and a science foundation to hand over $180 million in reserve funds
1h
1 dose of COVID nasal vaccine prevents infection in mice
One dose of a new nasal vaccine that targets the SARS-CoV-2 virus effectively prevents infection in mice susceptible to the novel coronavirus, a new study shows. Investigators next plan to test the vaccine in nonhuman primates and humans to see if it is safe and effective in preventing COVID-19 infection. Unlike other COVID-19 vaccines in development, this one is delivered via the nose, often the
1h
Study finds missing link in the evolutionary history of carbon-fixing protein Rubisco
A team has discovered a missing link in the evolution of photosynthesis and carbon fixation. Dating back more than 2.4 billion years, a newly discovered form of the plant enzyme rubisco could give new insight into plant evolution and breeding.
1h
Prior exposure to powdery mildew makes plants more vulnerable to subsequent disease
A key to surviving in the wild is fighting off infection — and not just once. For plants, as with humans, one infection may or may not leave a plant with lasting immunity. Biologists conducted a series of elegant experiments that capture how pathogen strains naturally accumulate on plants over a growing season. Their findings reveal the importance of understanding interactions among pathogens whe
1h
Early rhythm control therapy improves outcomes in patients with atrial fibrillation
Patients with newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation benefit from early rhythm control therapy, according to new results.
1h
Astrophysics: A direct view of star/disk interactions
Astronomers have for the first time directly observed the columns of matter that build up newborn stars. This was observed in the young star TW Hydrae system located approximately 163 light years from Earth.
1h
Atheists are more likely to sleep better than Catholics and Baptists, study finds
A new study of sleep, religious affiliation, and perceptions of heaven found that atheists and agnostics are significantly more likely to be better sleepers than Catholics and Baptists.
1h
Experiment contradicts assumptions about sleep loss and criminal interrogations
An experimental study suggests that sleep restriction may hinder information disclosure during criminal interviews, contradicting widespread assumptions about the effectiveness of sleep deprivation as an interrogation tool.
1h
Algorithm aims to alert consumers before they use illicit online pharmacies
Researchers have developed an algorithm that may be able to spot illicit online pharmacies that could be providing customers with substandard medications without their knowledge, among other potential problems.
1h
Physiological test for autism proves effective independent of co-occurring conditions
Developing a physiological test for diagnosing autism spectrum disorder (ASD), one that measures certain components in the blood, has the potential to be a paradigm shift for diagnosing ASD. Researchers now report a significant step toward addressing this challenge.
1h
NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite shows two views of California's smoky skies
NOAA/NASA's Suomi NPP satellite captured two images that tell the story about the smoke coming off the fires in California. One instrument on the provided a visible image of the smoke, while another analyzed the aerosol content within. The images were captured on August 30, 2020.
1h
Research shows how a diet change might help US veterans with Gulf War illness
A new study shows the results from a dietary intervention in U.S. veterans suffering from Gulf War Illness, a neurological disorder in veterans who served in the Persian Gulf War from 1990 to 1991.
1h
Wearable device could help EMTs, surgeons assess hemorrhage blood loss
Emergency medical technicians (EMTs), military medics, and emergency room physicians could one day be better able to treat victims of vehicular accidents, gunshot wounds, and battlefield injuries thanks to a new device under development that may more accurately assess the effects of blood loss due to hemorrhage.
1h
Early vaccine approval is biggest test yet for FDA chief
Head of US medicines watchdog hits back at accusations of responding to political pressure from Trump
2h
Nano diamond batteries have one company all charged-up
Nuclear reactor parts converted to radioactive carbon-14 diamonds produce energy. To keep them safe, the carbon-14 diamonds are encased in a second protective diamond layer. The company predicts batteries for personal devices could last about nine years. We have an insatiable need for energy. When we need to operate something that cannot be simply plugged in, power is going to have to come from a
2h
Demonstrating the dynamics of electron-light interaction originating from first principle
Quantum-physical fundamentals can be studied particularly well by the interactions between electrons and photons. Excited with laser light, for example, the energy, mass or velocity of the electrons changes. A professor has invented a new toolbox to extend the theoretical description of electron-light interactions to the highest accurate level possible.
2h
Molecule to store solar energy developed
Researchers have developed a molecule that absorbs energy from sunlight and stores it in chemical bonds. A possible long-term use of the molecule is to capture solar energy efficiently and store it for later consumption.
2h
Police Brutality Videos Are Giving Teens PTSD Symptoms
It's difficult to go online these days without seeing yet another video of police attacking protestors or killing civilians. These videos are an essential aspect of holding the powerful accountable, but The Verge reports that they're also having a disastrous effect on young people's mental health. According to research published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, Black and Latinx teens who were
2h
Trump eyes aquaculture boom, but environmentalists dig in
President Donald Trump wants to dramatically expand aquaculture production in the United States, but a coalition of environmentalists believes his plan would be bad for the oceans, unnecessary for food security and difficult to implement.
2h
Study finds missing link in the evolutionary history of carbon-fixing protein Rubisco
A team led by researchers at UC Davis has discovered a missing link in the evolution of photosynthesis and carbon fixation. Dating back more than 2.4 billion years, a newly discovered form of the plant enzyme rubisco could give new insight into plant evolution and breeding
2h
Brainstem protein mediates exercise-based stress relief
Exercise fights off stress by increasing levels of the brain protein galanin, according to research in mice recently published in JNeurosci.
2h
Trump eyes aquaculture boom, but environmentalists dig in
President Donald Trump wants to dramatically expand aquaculture production in the United States, but a coalition of environmentalists believes his plan would be bad for the oceans, unnecessary for food security and difficult to implement.
2h
Hydroacoustic 3-D snapshots of fish habitats could help stem overfishing
Robotic eyes and ears under the water's surface could help researchers figure out how much fish are in our oceans—and how much we can eat.
2h
Hydroacoustic 3-D snapshots of fish habitats could help stem overfishing
Robotic eyes and ears under the water's surface could help researchers figure out how much fish are in our oceans—and how much we can eat.
2h
10 caveperson survival skills you need to know
If your ancestors managed to find their way without an app, so can you. ( Timothy Meinberg / Unsplash/) This story originally featured on Outdoor Life . Modern survival gear can make any emergency easier to navigate, but what happens when you get caught in a perilous situation without it? These 10 stone-age survival skills are well worth knowing and highly efficient—especially in a time when we r
2h
Demonstrating the dynamics of electron-light interaction originating from first principle
Quantum-physical fundamentals can be studied particularly well by the interactions between electrons and photons. Excited with laser light, for example, the energy, mass or velocity of the electrons changes. A professor has invented a new toolbox to extend the theoretical description of electron-light interactions to the highest accurate level possible.
2h
Molecule to store solar energy developed
Researchers have developed a molecule that absorbs energy from sunlight and stores it in chemical bonds. A possible long-term use of the molecule is to capture solar energy efficiently and store it for later consumption.
2h
Researchers develop dustbuster for the moon
A new solution to the problem of spring cleaning on the moon: Why not zap away the grime using a beam of electrons?
2h
Trin for trin: Se, hvor vildt dansk natur har forandret sig efter bæverens comeback
I 1999 blev 18 bævere sat ud i Vestjylland. Det har startet en dominoeffekt.
2h
Tech gets metal to mimic natural rose petal powers
A new technology can make metallic replicas of soft, natural surfaces such as rose petals, researchers report. Their metallic surfaces retain properties of the originals, including a rose petal's sticky, yet water-repelling texture. The researchers work addresses the question of how we can use natural textures and properties in the engineered world. For instance, could we somehow apply the water-
2h
Neurotoxic microglia promote TDP-43 proteinopathy in progranulin deficiency
Nature, Published online: 31 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2709-7
2h
Researchers develop molecule to store solar energy
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a molecule that absorbs energy from sunlight and stores it in chemical bonds. A possible long-term use of the molecule is to capture solar energy efficiently and store it for later consumption. The current results have been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS).
2h
Researchers develop dustbuster for the moon
A team led by the University of Colorado Boulder is pioneering a new solution to the problem of spring cleaning on the moon: Why not zap away the grime using a beam of electrons?
2h
Demonstrating the dynamics of electron-light interaction originating from first principle
With the highest possible spatial resolution of less than a millionth of a millimeter, electron microscopes make it possible to study the properties of materials at the atomic level and thus demonstrate the realm of quantum mechanics. Quantum-physical fundamentals can be studied particularly well by the interactions between electrons and photons. Excited with laser light, for example, the energy,
2h
Saving marine life: Novel method quantifies the effects of plastic on marine wildlife
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology together with their international collaborators have developed a novel quantitative method to quantify the effects of plastic on marine animals. This method successfully shows that plastic ingestion by sea turtles might be causing population declines, despite a lack of strong effects on individual turtles.
2h
Cold Chain (And Colder Chain) Distribution
OK, it looks like we're finally going to be talking about a vaccine logistics issue that many people (including me) have been worried about. Specifically, how are these things going to be transported and stored? If you're not in the biomedical field, that question might seem a bit boring and bring up mental pictures of 18-wheel trucks and forklifts of cartons, but remember, these vaccines general
2h
Saving marine life: Novel method quantifies the effects of plastic on marine wildlife
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology together with their international collaborators have developed a novel quantitative method to quantify the effects of plastic on marine animals. This method successfully shows that plastic ingestion by sea turtles might be causing population declines, despite a lack of strong effects on individual turtles.
2h
Following African elephant trails to approach conservation differently
Elephant trails may lead the way to better conservation approaches.
2h
Following African elephant trails to approach conservation differently
Elephant trails may lead the way to better conservation approaches.
2h
New evidence for quantum fluctuations near a quantum critical point in a superconductor
Among all the curious states of matter that can coexist in a quantum material, jostling for preeminence as temperature, electron density and other factors change, some scientists think a particularly weird juxtaposition exists at a single intersection of factors, called the quantum critical point or QCP.
2h
Bamboozling the bark beetles
The forest is struggling to cope with the largest bark beetle plague in 70 years. While the trees are suffering due to the heat and the drought, the pests are proliferating rampantly in the warm weather: A pair of European spruce bark beetles, for example, can produce up to 30,000 offspring. Starting in 2004 and most recently in the joint project "bioProtect" (2015-2020), Professor Michael Müller,
2h
Bamboozling the bark beetles
The forest is struggling to cope with the largest bark beetle plague in 70 years. While the trees are suffering due to the heat and the drought, the pests are proliferating rampantly in the warm weather: A pair of European spruce bark beetles, for example, can produce up to 30,000 offspring. Starting in 2004 and most recently in the joint project "bioProtect" (2015-2020), Professor Michael Müller,
2h
The Recycling Dilemma, And How We Can Do Better
Recycling materials correctly in the age of international restrictions and a pandemic isn't easy.
2h
2h
Reprogramming cardiac fibroblast cells to transform into beating heart muscle
Researchers have clarified the roles of matrix stiffness and mechanotransduction as well as the signaling pathways in the transformation of cardiac fibroblasts into contractile cardiomyocytes and show that soft substrates comparable to native myocardium improve the efficiency of this cardiac reprogramming. This has potential for research into biomaterials and may lead to clinical advances in regen
2h
The world's deepest freshwater cave just got a whole lot deeper
Hranice Abyss finding could call into question origin of other deep caves
2h
Serengeti leopard population densities healthy but vary seasonally, study finds
A study of camera-trap data from Serengeti National Park in Tanzania found that leopard population densities in the 3.7-million-acre park are similar to those in other protected areas but vary between wet and dry seasons. The fluctuations appear to be driven by the abundance of prey and how this affects interactions with other large carnivores like lions, researchers report.
2h
New theory hints at more efficient way to develop quantum algorithms
A new theory could bring a way to make quantum algorithm development less of an accidental process, say scientists.
2h
Insect shows promise as a good, sustainable food source
With global food on the rise, a new study has found new evidence that the yellow mealworm shows promise as alternative source of nutritional protein.
2h
Team's flexible micro LEDs may reshape future of wearable technology
Researchers have developed a method to create micro LEDs that can be folded, twisted, cut and stuck to different surfaces.
2h
Is being generous the next beauty trend?
New research found that more attractive people are more likely to be givers, and givers are rated as more attractive.
2h
Reprogramming cardiac fibroblast cells to transform into beating heart muscle
Researchers have clarified the roles of matrix stiffness and mechanotransduction as well as the signaling pathways in the transformation of cardiac fibroblasts into contractile cardiomyocytes and show that soft substrates comparable to native myocardium improve the efficiency of this cardiac reprogramming. This has potential for research into biomaterials and may lead to clinical advances in regen
2h
Vietnam farmers' poultry sales during outbreaks may increase virus transmission
Small-scale poultry farmers in Vietnam tend to respond to viral outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) by rapidly selling their birds as a way to avoid financial loss, according to a new study. As these birds are commingled with other birds in markets and trading networks, this practice may increase the likelihood of widespread disease transmission.
2h
Study advances research of cycads as an ecotoxin
University of Guam research has revealed that younger cycad seeds pose a greater risk for toxicity when consumed than more mature seeds, bringing the scientific community one step closer to understanding the origins of a neurodegenerative disease prevalent on Guam in World War II and closer to understanding related neurological disorders elsewhere. The research was the cover story of the June 2020
2h
Researchers design continuous-scanning sky brightness monitor in 2.5- to 5-μm band
A research group led by Prof. Wang Jian from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) proposed a continuous-scanning near-infrared sky brightness monitor (CNISBM). It can measure 2.5 to 5 μm infrared sky brightness based on an InSb detector and a linear variable filter.
2h
Hots dogs, chicken wings and city living helped wetland wood storks thrive
Natural wetlands continue to disappear due to city and human development and are being replaced with manmade swales, ponds and canals. This degradation and replacement of natural wetlands suggest that urban areas may be imperative to wetland species, especially when natural conditions are unpredictable. Wetland birds are often seen in and around cities; however, they have been largely ignored in u
2h
How weather affects crawfish harvests
The life cycle of a crawfish can be fairly straight forward. In the summer months, crawfish reproduce in underground mud burrows with a plug of mud on top of the burrow to protect them from predators. In late summer and early fall, rain softens the mud plugs so the crawfish can push their way out of the burrows and enter ponds, where they feed, molt and grow throughout Louisiana's typically mild w
2h
Biocompatible TeSex nano-alloys for PT/PA/CT/PET imaging-guided NIR-II-photothermal therapy
Nanotheranostics, integrating diagnostic and therapeutic functions by nanoplatform, exhibits a great potential in precision and personalized medicine, and also raises the requirement on multifunctional nanomaterials in pursuit of both good biocompatibility and high theranostic performance.
2h
How antibiotics interact
Understanding bottleneck effects in the translation of bacterial proteins can lead to a more effective combination of antibiotics / study in 'Nature Communications'
2h
Fungi in gut linked to higher Alzheimer's risk can be reduced through ketogenic diet
Specific fungi in the gut associated with a higher risk of Alzheimer's disease and found in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) can be altered in a beneficial manner by eating a modified Mediterranean diet, researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine have found.
2h
Study advances research of cycads as an ecotoxin
University of Guam research has revealed that younger cycad seeds pose a greater risk for toxicity when consumed than more mature seeds, bringing the scientific community one step closer to understanding the origins of a neurodegenerative disease prevalent on Guam in World War II and closer to understanding related neurological disorders elsewhere. The research was the cover story of the June 2020
2h
Hots dogs, chicken wings and city living helped wetland wood storks thrive
Natural wetlands continue to disappear due to city and human development and are being replaced with manmade swales, ponds and canals. This degradation and replacement of natural wetlands suggest that urban areas may be imperative to wetland species, especially when natural conditions are unpredictable. Wetland birds are often seen in and around cities; however, they have been largely ignored in u
2h
Citizen scientists bring surprising insights into cowslip mating system
About half of the individuals of cowslip (Primula veris) have flowers with a short style, while the other half of individuals produce flowers with a long style. Recent discoveries have suggested that the loss and fragmentation of habitats may shake this optimal balance of morphologically different plants. This, in turn, decreases the reproductive success of plants and jeopardizes their future viab
2h
Eating your vegetables is easier said than done
"Food systems have the potential to nurture human health and support environmental sustainability; however, they are currently threatening both." This sentence, the opening statement of the EAT-Lancet Report published last year, reflects a growing consensus among global experts on food, nutrition and the environment: Our food system is broken and we need to fix it, fast.
2h
In an Era of Face Masks, We're All a Little More Face Blind
Your brain's powers of facial recognition are going to need some time to get used to the coverings we're wearing to keep each other healthy.
2h
True holographic movies are within grasp
Holographic movies, like the one R2D2 projected of Princess Leia in "Star Wars: A New Hope," have long been the province of science fiction, but for most of us, the extent of our experience with holograms may be the dime-sized stamps on our passports and credit cards. By using 'metasurface' materials that can manipulate light in ways that natural materials cannot, researchers reckon they have fina
3h
Citizen scientists bring surprising insights into cowslip mating system
About half of the individuals of cowslip (Primula veris) have flowers with a short style, while the other half of individuals produce flowers with a long style. Recent discoveries have suggested that the loss and fragmentation of habitats may shake this optimal balance of morphologically different plants. This, in turn, decreases the reproductive success of plants and jeopardizes their future viab
3h
Eating your vegetables is easier said than done
"Food systems have the potential to nurture human health and support environmental sustainability; however, they are currently threatening both." This sentence, the opening statement of the EAT-Lancet Report published last year, reflects a growing consensus among global experts on food, nutrition and the environment: Our food system is broken and we need to fix it, fast.
3h
Amazon Gets Permission to Start Making Drone Deliveries
Carrier Status Amazon Prime Air, the retail giant's drone delivery project, was just designated an "air carrier" by the Federal Aviation Administration today, as Bloomberg reports — meaning it can start trialing drone package deliveries. "[curly] This certification is an important step forward for Prime Air and indicates the FAA's confidence in Amazon's operating and safety procedures for an auto
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Some mosquitoes already have resistance to the latest weapon against malaria
Cameroon study finds one malaria-carrying species can sometimes survive exposure to insecticide intended for spraying inside houses
3h
College students access eating disorders therapy via phone app
Studying college women with eating disorders, a team led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that a phone-based app that delivers a form of cognitive behavioral therapy was an effective means of intervention in addressing specific disorders.
3h
Amid the covid-19 pandemic, shifting business priorities
Remember all those articles you read in January with headlines like "2020 trends to watch in your industry?" You tossed those predictions out long ago. But while everyone knows that the coronavirus pandemic changed everything, none of us is sure how. This content was produced by Insights, the custom content arm of MIT Technology Review. It was not written by MIT Technology Review's editorial staf
3h
Following African elephant trails to approach conservation differently
Elephant trails may lead the way to better conservation approaches. 'Think of elephants as engineers of the forests. Elephants shape the landscape in many ways that benefit humans. We're talking thousands of miles of trails. If we think about the loss of elephants over time, then we will see the forest structure change and human activities also would shift.'
3h
Cell phone location used to estimate COVID-19 growth rates
Cell phone location data shows that in counties where activity declined at workplaces and increased at home, coronavirus infection rates were lower.
3h
Insight on how to build a better flu vaccine
Repeated exposure to influenza viruses may undermine the effectiveness of the annual flu vaccine. A team of researchers has developed an approach to assess whether a vaccine activates the kind of immune cells needed for long-lasting immunity against new influenza strains. The findings could aid efforts to design an improved flu vaccine.
3h
For people with high blood pressure, telemonitoring may cut heart attack, stroke rate by 50%
Adults with uncontrolled high blood pressure were about half as likely to have serious cardiovascular events in the five years after a pharmacist-led telemonitoring program compared to those receiving routine primary care. By reducing cardiovascular events, the telemonitoring intervention saved about $1,900 over five years in overall health care costs for each individual.
3h
Sea level rise from ice sheets track worst-case climate change scenario
Ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica whose melting rates are rapidly increasing have raised the global sea level by 1.8cm since the 1990s, and are matching the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's worst-case climate warming scenarios.
3h
People with increased risk of Alzheimer's have deficits in navigating
Alzheimer's patients develop severe symptoms of spatial disorientation as the disease progresses and are unable to find even the simplest ways.
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Can a black hole fire up the cold heart of the Phoenix Galaxy Cluster?
Radio astronomers have detected jets of hot gas blasted out by a black hole in the galaxy at the heart of the Phoenix Galaxy Cluster, located 5.9 billion light-years away in the constellation Phoenix. This is an important result for understanding the coevolution of galaxies, gas, and black holes in galaxy clusters.
3h
How weather affects crawfish harvests
To help inform farmers, researchers have quantified how rainfall and temperature affect crawfish harvest yields.
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Antibody blockade effective in treatment of severe COVID-19
Researchers find an overlap in the pathogenesis of cytokine release syndrome and COVID-19, and show that the symptoms of both can be alleviated by IL-6 signaling blockade.
3h
India suffers Covid-19 double whammy
GDP drops almost a quarter in country where daily infections have hit a global record
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Neuralink's Demo Didn't Impress Experts
On Friday, SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk demonstrated the Link device , a prototype built by his secretive brain-computer interface company Neuralink. The demo involved three live pigs, only one of which actually had a Neuralink device in its brain. Musk made a lot of bold claims during the event, according to MIT Technology Review , like Neuralink someday treating blindness and paralysis, as we
3h
New evidence for quantum fluctuations near a quantum critical point in a superconductor
A study has found evidence for quantum fluctuations near a quantum critical point in a superconductor. Theory suggests that these quantum critical points may be analogous to black holes as places where all sorts of strange phenomena can exist in a quantum material.
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Study highlights keys to helping dads be there for kids when they don't have custody
A recent study highlights several factors that play key roles in determining the extent to which fathers who don't have custody are involved in their children's lives – specifically in cases where the children are in "kinship care."
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Vaccine narrows racial disparities in pneumococcal disease
In a major public health success, the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine PCV13, or Prevnar 13, in 2010 in the United States is associated with reduction in socioeconomic disparities and the near elimination of Black-white-based racial disparities for invasive pneumococcal disease.
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Mathematicians Report New Discovery About the Dodecahedron
Even though mathematicians have spent over 2,000 years dissecting the structure of the five Platonic solids — the tetrahedron, cube, octahedron, icosahedron and dodecahedron — there's still a lot we don't know about them. Now, a trio of mathematicians has resolved one of the most basic questions about the dodecahedron. Suppose you stand at one of the corners of a Platonic solid. Is there some str
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COVID-19 Can Wreck Your Heart, Even if You Haven't Had Any Symptoms
A growing body of research is raising concerns about the cardiac consequences of the coronavirus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3,000-pound Triceratops skull unearthed in South Dakota
The triceratops skull was first discovered in 2019, but was excavated over the summer of 2020. It was discovered in the South Dakota Badlands, an area where the Triceratops roamed some 66 million years ago. Studying dinosaurs helps scientists better understand the evolution of all life on Earth. David Schmidt, a geology professor at Westminster College, had just arrived in the South Dakota Badlan
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Hots dogs, chicken wings and city living helped wetland wood storks thrive
Using the Wood Stork, researchers compared city storks with natural wetland storks to gauge their success in urban environments based on their diet and food opportunities. Results provide evidence of how a wetland species persists and even thrives in an urban environment by switching to human foods like chicken wings and hots dogs when natural marshes are in bad shape. These findings indicate that
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Researchers develop molecule to store solar energy
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a molecule that absorbs energy from sunlight and stores it in chemical bonds. A possible long-term use of the molecule is to capture solar energy efficiently and store it for later consumption. The current results have been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, JACS.
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Researchers develop dustbuster for the moon
A team led by the University of Colorado Boulder is pioneering a new solution to the problem of spring cleaning on the moon: Why not zap away the grime using a beam of electrons?
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Demonstrating the dynamics of electron-light interaction originating from first principle
Quantum-physical fundamentals can be studied particularly well by the interactions between electrons and photons. Excited with laser light, for example, the energy, mass or velocity of the electrons changes. Professor Nahid Talebi from the Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics at Kiel University has invented a new toolbox to extend the theoretical description of electron-light interaction
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Saving marine life: Novel method quantifies the effects of plastic on marine wildlife
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology together with their international collaborators developed a novel quantitative method to quantify the effects of plastic on marine animals. This method successfully shows that plastic ingestion by sea turtles might be causing population declines, despite a lack of strong effects on individual turtles.
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Study examines the heart risks and benefits of today's most popular fad diets
In a review of existing scientific studies on trendy ketogenic and intermittent fasting diets, researchers at National Jewish Health concluded these diets do seem to help people lose weight in the short-term, and modest evidence suggests they may contribute to cardiovascular health. However, these diets also allow consumption of foods that are known to increase cardiovascular risk and are unlikely
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Human germinal centres engage memory and naive B cells after influenza vaccination
Nature, Published online: 31 August 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2711-0
4h
A Beautiful Yet Grim Map Shows How Wildfire Smoke Spreads
California's blazes have sent a haze across the United States. An experimental model shows where that cloud ends up.
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Mail delays could affect prescriptions for 1 in 4 adults over 50
Mail delays may affect access to medication for many middle-aged and older adults, according to a new analysis of data from a national poll of people aged 50 to 80. Nearly one in four people in this age group said they receive at least one medication by mail. That percentage rises to 29% when the poll results are limited to people who take at least one prescription medication. Nearly 17% of peopl
4h
Face Selectivity in the Blind Brain
The fusiform face area (FFA) responds to touching faces in people born blind.
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Anthony Fauci and Alan Alda Talk Science and 26 Other Smithsonian Programs Streaming in September
This month drop in on events about global climate justice, Picasso's 'Guernica,' bird brains, the Supreme Court, William Faulkner, orchids and more
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Following African elephant trails to approach conservation differently
Elephant trails may lead the way to better conservation approaches. 'Think of elephants as engineers of the forests. Elephants shape the landscape in many ways that benefit humans. We're talking thousands of miles of trails. If we think about the loss of elephants over time, then we will see the forest structure change and human activities also would shift.'
4h
Is being generous the next beauty trend?
Research from Indiana University found that more attractive people are more likely to be givers, and givers are rated as more attractive.
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Study: Anonymized cell phone location data can help monitor COVID-19 growth rates
In a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers from Mount Auburn Hospital and the University of Pennsylvania analyzed anonymous, county-level cell phone location data and incidence of COVID-19. The researchers found that changes in cell phone activity in workplaces, transit stations, retail locations, and at places of residence were associated with COVID-19 incidence. The findings
4h
Sea level rise from ice sheets track worst-case climate change scenario
Ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica whose melting rates are rapidly increasing have raised the global sea level by 1.8cm since the 1990s, and are matching the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's worst-case climate warming scenarios.
4h
Humans' construction 'footprint' on ocean quantified for first time
In a world-first, the extent of human development in oceans has been mapped. An area totalling approximately 30,000 square kilometres – the equivalent of 0.008 percent of the ocean – has been modified by human construction, a study led by Dr Ana Bugnot from the University of Sydney School of Life and Environmental Sciences and the Sydney Institute of Marine Science has found.
4h
Researchers discover a specific brain circuit damaged by social isolation during childhood
Study shows long-lasting effects and points the way to potential treatments.
4h
Study provides insight on how to build a better flu vaccine
Repeated exposure to influenza viruses may undermine the effectiveness of the annual flu vaccine. A team of researchers led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has developed an approach to assess whether a vaccine activates the kind of immune cells needed for long-lasting immunity against new influenza strains. The findings could aid efforts to design an improved flu vaccine.
4h
Pesticide-free crop protection yields up to US$ 20 billion/year benefits in Asia-Pacific
Scientists have estimated for the first time how nature-based solutions for agricultural pest control deliver US$ 14.6 to US$ 19.5 billion annually across 23 countries in the Asia-Pacific region.The new research, published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, suggests that non-chemical crop protection (or biological control) delivers economic dividends that far surpass those attained through
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Warmer, acidifying ocean brings extinction for reef-building corals, renewal for relatives
A new study, published Aug. 31 in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, finds that reef-building corals emerged only when ocean conditions supported the construction of these creatures' stony skeletons, whereas diverse softer corals and sea anemones flourished at other times. Without a significant change to anthropogenic carbon emissions, the new findings present stark implications for the pre
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Sex cells have a sweet tooth, and they pass it on to the brain
Scientists discover that a small group of sex cells instruct a fundamental behavioural change in the female fruit fly – developing a sweet tooth. These findings prompt new investigation into dietary strategies for preventing age-related fertility decline and cancer.
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Cell phone location used to estimate COVID-19 growth rates
Cell phone location data shows that in counties where activity declined at workplaces and increased at home, coronavirus infection rates were lower.
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Study finds asymptomatic Chagas patients are at a high risk for cardiac disease
People living with Chagas disease without symptoms or signs of cardiac injury are at high risk of developing cardiomyopathy, a progressive heart disease, and the risk more than doubled among patients with acute infections, according to a new study from the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus.
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Regeringen vil styrke sundhedsberedskabet med coronafinanslov
Sundhedsberedskabet skal styrkes med 30,5 mio. kr. årligt de næste to år, og så skal der etableres en helt ny styrelse, der skal øge forsyningssikkerheden. Det foreslår regeringen i sit forslag til næste års finanslov, hvor man desuden fastholder et offentligt forskningsbudget på 1 pct. af BNP.
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Warmer, acidifying ocean brings extinction for reef-building corals, renewal for relatives
Changes in ocean chemistry and temperature have had a dramatic effect on the diversity of corals and sea anemones, according to a team of scientists who have traced their evolution through deep time. A new study, published Aug. 31 in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, finds that reef-building corals emerged only when ocean conditions supported the construction of these creatures' stony skel
4h
Prior exposure to powdery mildew makes plants more vulnerable to subsequent disease
Next time you head outside for a socially distant walk in between your Zoom meetings, notice the rich diversity of plants along your path. As we approach late summer, be sure to also notice the diversity of disease symptoms on those plants, including spots, blotches or fuzzy growth caused by bacteria, viruses or fungi.
4h
Pesticide-free crop protection yields up to US$ 20 billion/year benefits in Asia-Pacific
Scientists have estimated for the first time how nature-based solutions for agricultural pest control deliver US$14.6 to US$19.5 billion annually across 23 countries in the Asia-Pacific region.
4h
Sex cells have a sweet tooth, and they pass it on to the brain
Our job seems easy when compared with that of our cells. While they are hard at work, breaking some molecules and building others, we mainly have to do one thing—feed them. But what exactly should we feed them? This is not an easy problem to solve considering the constant competition happening inside. Whereas some cell types, like fat cells, crave lipids, others may prefer protein or sugars. How d
4h
Sea level rise from ice sheets track worst-case climate change scenario
Ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica whose melting rates are rapidly increasing have raised the global sea level by 1.8cm since the 1990s, and are matching the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's worst-case climate warming scenarios.
4h
Humans' construction 'footprint' on ocean quantified for first time
In a world-first, the extent of human development in oceans has been mapped. An area totalling approximately 30,000 square kilometres—the equivalent of 0.008 percent of the ocean—has been modified by human construction, a study led by Dr. Ana Bugnot from the University of Sydney School of Life and Environmental Sciences and the Sydney Institute of Marine Science has found.
4h
Bredbåndspuljen er – igen – sparet væk i årets finanslovsforslag
Landdistrikternes Fællesråd kalder det en "katastrofe", mens teleindustrien trækker på skuldrene. Regeringen har endnu ikke meldt ud hvordan de vil sikre sig at alle danske adresser får adgang til hurtigt bredbånd.
4h
Warmer, acidifying ocean brings extinction for reef-building corals, renewal for relatives
Changes in ocean chemistry and temperature have had a dramatic effect on the diversity of corals and sea anemones, according to a team of scientists who have traced their evolution through deep time. A new study, published Aug. 31 in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, finds that reef-building corals emerged only when ocean conditions supported the construction of these creatures' stony skel
4h
Prior exposure to powdery mildew makes plants more vulnerable to subsequent disease
Next time you head outside for a socially distant walk in between your Zoom meetings, notice the rich diversity of plants along your path. As we approach late summer, be sure to also notice the diversity of disease symptoms on those plants, including spots, blotches or fuzzy growth caused by bacteria, viruses or fungi.
4h
Pesticide-free crop protection yields up to US$ 20 billion/year benefits in Asia-Pacific
Scientists have estimated for the first time how nature-based solutions for agricultural pest control deliver US$14.6 to US$19.5 billion annually across 23 countries in the Asia-Pacific region.
4h
Sex cells have a sweet tooth, and they pass it on to the brain
Our job seems easy when compared with that of our cells. While they are hard at work, breaking some molecules and building others, we mainly have to do one thing—feed them. But what exactly should we feed them? This is not an easy problem to solve considering the constant competition happening inside. Whereas some cell types, like fat cells, crave lipids, others may prefer protein or sugars. How d
4h
Veterans Are Taking a Psychedelic Plant to Fight PTSD
Veterans are spending thousands on retreats in central America where they take ayahuasca, a psychedelic drug one attendant called a "Hail Mary" for PTSD symptoms, according to The New York Times . The trend has grown significantly over the last couple years, becoming a sought-after alternative to common prescription drugs like antidepressants. Specialized facilities feature therapy sessions and p
4h
Common medicine used to treat gout found to prevent progression of coronary disease
A major clinical trial involving 5,500 patients in Australia and the Netherlands found heart attacks and the need for coronary stenting or bypass surgery reduced by 30% in patients taking low dose colchicine, an old and widely available drug commonly used to treat gout.
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NASA finds Typhoon Maysak moving near Okinawa, Japan
Typhoon Maysak continued to move through the Northwestern Pacific and was closing in on Japan's Okinawa Island when NASA's Terra satellite obtained a visible image of the storm. Maysak's eye is not expected to go over the island, but pass just west of it.
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Nature, folklore and serendipitous photo collaborations | Riitta Ikonen and Karoline Hjorth
Inspired by Nordic folklore, artists Karoline Hjorth and Riitta Ikonen collaborate with local elders — farmers, fishermen, cosmologists and more — to create richly imaginative portraits that explore humanity's connection to nature. Discover their serendipitous artistic practice as they share a selection of fantastical imagery where nature and myth intersect to awaken a sense of wonder.
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Study finds insect shows promise as a good, sustainable food source
With global food demands rising at an alarming rate, a study led by IUPUI scientists has found new evidence that a previously overlooked insect shows promise as alternative protein source: the yellow mealworm.
4h
Nanomaterials based strategies for treatment of hypoxic tumor
Hypoxia is a typical characteristic of most tumors, owing to the fast consumption of oxygen by tumor tissue over the supply through malformed and abnormal tumor vasculature. Hypoxia in tumor tissue promotes the probability of tumor metastasis and endows hypoxia-tolerant tumor cells with resistance to some tumor therapies, including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, photodynamic therapy, and immunotherap
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Study finds insect shows promise as a good, sustainable food source
With global food demands rising at an alarming rate, a study led by IUPUI scientists has found new evidence that a previously overlooked insect shows promise as alternative protein source: the yellow mealworm.
4h
New theory hints at more efficient way to develop quantum algorithms
In 2019, Google claimed it was the first to demonstrate a quantum computer performing a calculation beyond the abilities of today's most powerful supercomputers.
4h
Strokes in babies are surprisingly common; here's how the body rushes to the rescue
New research is shedding light on the development of the brain's immune defenses – and how those defenses respond to strokes that strike one in 4,000 babies in the first month of life.
4h
CU scientists create batteries that could make it easier to explore Mars
Electrifying research by Clemson University scientists could lead to the creation of lighter, faster-charging batteries suitable for powering a spacesuit, or even a Mars rover.
4h
Astrophysics: A direct view of star/disk interactions
'Nature' publication: The GRAVITY instrument developed for the Very Large Telescope in Chile probes deep into the TW Hydrae system to shape our view of accretion processes in young stars similar to the young Sun
4h
NASA finds Typhoon Maysak moving near Okinawa, Japan
Typhoon Maysak continued to move through the Northwestern Pacific and was closing in on Japan's Okinawa Island when NASA's Terra satellite obtained a visible image of the storm. Maysak's eye is not expected to go over the island, but pass just west of it.
4h
Aluminium in antiperspirants
Consumers can take up aluminium compounds from various sources, including antiperspirants containing aluminium. As stated in the BfR Opinion of 2019 (045/2019) on aluminium intake, the total burden resulting from all sources of exposure is too high in some population groups. This finding is not affected by the current reassessment of the contribution of aluminium chlorohydrate in antiperspirants,
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Microgel immuno-acceptance method could improve pancreatic islet transplant success
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and University of Missouri have developed a new microgel drug delivery method that could extend the effectiveness of pancreatic islet transplantations — from several years to possibly the entire lifespan of a recipient.
4h
Are Radioactive Diamond Batteries a Cure for Nuclear Waste?
Researchers are developing a new battery powered by lab-grown gems made from reformed nuclear waste. If it works, it will last thousands of years.
5h
Newly hatched Florida sea turtles are consuming dangerous quantities of floating plastic
Plastic pollution has been found in practically every environment on the planet, with especially severe effects on ocean life. Plastic waste harms marine life in many ways—most notably, when animals become entangled in it or consume it.
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Grön vätgas ska rädda klimatet
EU:s ambition är ett klimatneutralt Europa till 2050. En nyckel i omställningen är grön vätgas som tillverkas av el från vind och sol. I sin nya vätgasstrategi hoppas EU-kommissionen på mångmiljardinvesteringar och massor av nya jobb när produktionen av grön vätgas skjuter fart. I dag tillverkas nästan all vätgas av fossil naturgas. Den används framförallt i oljeindustrin och den kemiska industrin
5h
Ny professor vil mindske dødelighed blandt akutte patienter
Nicolai Bang Foss er tiltrådt et nyoprettet professorat i akut perioperativ medicin på Amager og Hvidovre Hospital.
5h
Biocompatible TeSex nano-alloys for PT/PA/CT/PET imaging-guided NIR-II-photothermal therapy
Photothermal nanotheranostics, especially in the NIR-II region, exhibits a great potential in precision and personalized medicine, owing to high tissue penetration of NIR-II light. The development of NIR-II-photothermal theranostic nanoplatforms with high biocompatibility and photothermal efficiency are urgently needed. In this work, researchers propose a nano-alloying strategy to dop Se into Te n
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SGLT2 inhibitors can slow progression of chronic kidney disease
The CREDENCE trial [3] provided evidence that the SGLT2 inhibitor Canagliflozin slows the progression of CKD in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and CKD with albuminuria. The Phase III DAPA-CKD trial [1] has now shown that the SGLT2 inhibitor Dapagliflozin can significantly slow CKD progression in all CKD patients, not only in those with diabetes. This breakthrough in kidney disease treatmen
5h
Team's flexible micro LEDs may reshape future of wearable technology
University of Texas at Dallas researchers and their international colleagues have developed a method to create micro LEDs that can be folded, twisted, cut and stuck to different surfaces.
5h
True holographic movie is within grasp
Holographic movies, like the one R2D2 projected of Princess Leia in the Star Wars: A New Hope, have long been the province of science fiction, but for most of us, the extent of our experience with holograms may be the dime-sized stamps on our passports and credit cards. By using 'metasurface' materials that can manipulate light in ways that natural materials cannot, researchers reckon they have fi
5h
Study finds insect shows promise as a good, sustainable food source
With global food on the rise, a study led by IUPUI scientists has found new evidence that the yellow mealworm shows promise as alternative source of nutritional protein.
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DAPA-CKD trial meets primary endpoint in patients with chronic kidney disease
Dapagliflozin reduces the risk of kidney failure, death from cardiovascular causes or heart failure hospitalisation and all-cause mortality in chronic kidney disease patients with or without type 2 diabetes. That's the main result of the DAPA-CKD trial presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020.
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Serengeti leopard population densities healthy but vary seasonally, study finds
A study of camera-trap data from Serengeti National Park in Tanzania found that leopard population densities in the 3.7-million-acre park are similar to those in other protected areas but vary between wet and dry seasons. The fluctuations appear to be driven by the abundance of prey and how this affects interactions with other large carnivores like lions, researchers report.
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Genomic analysis predicts survival benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy following radiotherapy over radiotherapy alone in low-grade gliomas in NRG Oncology clinical trial
A practice-changing study, NRG Oncology clinical trial NRG-RTOG 9802, has demonstrated, for the first time, a survival benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy following radiotherapy over radiotherapy alone in certain subgroups of patients with high-risk, low-grade glioma (WHO classification: LGG, grade II), a type of brain tumor that originates from glial cells.
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Nanomaterials based strategies for treatment of hypoxic tumor
Hypoxic tumor microenvironment restricts efficiency of tumor therapies and leads to serious results of tumor recurrence and high mortality. Different strategies to treat hypoxic tumors based on nanomaterials have been utilized to eliminate the side effects of hypoxia on tumor therapies. The strategies could be summarized into two classes, i) elevating oxygen level in tumor by nanomaterials and ii)
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New hydrogels for T-cell growth to be used in cancer immunotherapy
A team with the participation of researchers from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has designed new hydrogels that allow the culture of T-cells or T-lymphocytes, cells of the immune system that are used in cancer immunotherapy since they have the capacity to destroy tumor cells. These hydrogels can mimic lymph nodes, where T-cells reproduce and, therefore, provide high rates of cell pr
5h
Gout drug repurposed to fight heart disease
Colchicine reduces the risk of major cardiovascular events in patients with chronic coronary disease, according to results of the LoDoCo2 trial presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020.1 "Over a decade, more than one in three heart patients will have another heart attack or stroke, or die from heart disease, despite taking preventive medication," said study author Dr. Mark Nidorf
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Trial clarifies which patients with acute pulmonary embolism can be managed at home
Patients with acute pulmonary embolism can be selected for home management using the sPESI score or the Hestia criteria, according to results of the HOME-PE trial presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020.1 Principal investigator Professor Pierre-Marie Roy of the University Hospital of Angers, France said: "The pragmatic Hestia method was at least as safe as the sPESI score for tr
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New theory hints at more efficient way to develop quantum algorithms
A new theory could bring a way to make quantum algorithm development less of an accidental process, say Purdue University scientists.
5h
Prior health insurance coverage disruptions linked to issues with healthcare access
A new American Cancer Society study finds health insurance coverage disruptions in the prior year led to issues with healthcare access and affordability for currently insured cancer survivors. The study appears in the Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
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A burning chemical plant may be just the tip of Hurricane Laura's damage in this area of oil fields and industry
Hurricane Laura plowed through the heart of Louisiana's oil and chemical industries as a powerful Category 4 storm, leaving a chlorine plant on fire and the potential for more hazardous damage in its wake.
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Manganese single-atom catalyst boosts performance of electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction
Electrochemical CO2 reduction reaction (CO2RR) is a promising approach to convert CO2 into useful chemicals.
5h
Cool touch shirts can make you feel cool on hot days, but which materials work best?
It's another hot and sweaty summer day, and you see an ad for a sports T-shirt claiming it is made out of a material that will instantly make your skin feel cool. Intriguing, but does it work, and if so, how?
5h
I Was a Floating Head at an NBA Game. It Gets Weirder
Crowds of spectral, legless virtual fans are part of the league's stab at preserving the ambiance of pre-pandemic basketball. I took a seat.
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When politicians cite Covid-19 statistics, they may be wrong – it doesn't mean the numbers are | David Spiegelhalter
Statisticians would welcome an inquiry into their role in this crisis – they have done a good job David Spiegelhalter is the author of The Art of Statistics "Sooner or later we are going to have to have an inquiry into the role of statisticians in the Covid-19 crisis," declared the journalist Ross Clark in the Daily Telegraph recently. "They will have to be put in the hot seat and grilled as to w
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People love winning streaks by individuals — teams, not so much
People enjoy witnessing extraordinary individuals – from athletes to CEOs – extend long runs of dominance in their fields, a new study suggests. But they aren't as interested in seeing similar streaks of success by teams or groups.
5h
Cells can remain functional despite damage to mitochondria
Mitochondria are the power plants of our cells and play an important role in providing energy for normal function of the tissues in our body. Thanks to a metabolic adjustment, cells can remain functional despite damage to the mitochondria.
5h
Body mass index is a more powerful risk factor for diabetes than genetics
Losing weight could prevent or even reverse diabetes, according to new research.
5h
Intelligent software tackles plant cell jigsaw puzzle
Scientists have developed a machine learning-based algorithm to study the morphogenesis of plants at a cellular level. So far it was impossible to solve this evolving and changing puzzle.
5h
Apple Accidentally Approved Malware to Run on MacOS
The ubiquitous Shlayer adware has picked up a new trick, slipping past Cupertino's "notarization" defenses for the first time.
5h
Serengeti leopard population densities healthy but vary seasonally, study finds
A study of camera-trap data from Serengeti National Park in Tanzania found that leopard population densities in the 3.7-million-acre park are similar to those in other protected areas but vary between wet and dry seasons. The fluctuations appear to be driven by the abundance of prey and how this affects interactions with other large carnivores like lions, researchers report.
5h
Why Kenya's urban poor are exploited by informal water markets
Informal urban water markets—as opposed to piped water—have long supported many of Kenya's urban areas. Those that use them are either unserved, or inadequately served, by public utilities.
5h
How power shaped the 'success story' of genetically modified cotton in Burkina Faso
The West African nation of Burkina Faso was once the poster child for genetically modified (GM) crop advocates. Its 2008 adoption of GM cotton for smallholder farmers was hailed as an example of how these technologies could alleviate poverty and food insecurity by protecting crops from pests and increasing yields.
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Allergic reaction: How the immune system identifies nickel
The metal nickel is one of the most common triggers of allergic contact dermatitis in humans. This skin inflammation results from a gradual immune reaction in allergic people, e.g. if the skin repeatedly comes into contact with nickel-containing jewellery, piercings or jeans buttons. BfR scientists have gained new insights into how the body's defences react to nickel. Their results have been publi
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Vast majority supports mandatory corona tests for returnees
Should people who come to Germany from risk areas be tested for the novel coronavirus? 91 percent of the respondents are in favour of this. This is shown by the BfR-Corona-Monitor, a regular survey by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). Acceptance of the other containment measures also remains at a high level. For example, the distance regulation, the mandatory use of masks and
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Research shows how a diet change might help US veterans with Gulf War illness
A new study from American University shows the results from a dietary intervention in U.S. veterans suffering from Gulf War Illness, a neurological disorder in veterans who served in the Persian Gulf War from 1990 to 1991.
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Wearable device could help EMTs, surgeons assess hemorrhage blood loss
Emergency medical technicians (EMTs), military medics, and emergency room physicians could one day be better able to treat victims of vehicular accidents, gunshot wounds, and battlefield injuries thanks to a new device under development that may more accurately assess the effects of blood loss due to hemorrhage.
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PARALLAX meets one primary endpoint in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction
Sacubitril/valsartan reduces NT-proBNP, a biomarker predictive of long-term clinical outcomes in heart failure, but does not improve functional capacity compared to individualised background therapy in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. That's the main finding of the PARALLAX trial presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020.
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Individual dolphin calls used to estimate population size and movement in the wild
An international team of scientists has succeeded in using the signature whistles of individual bottlenose dolphins off the coast of Namibia to estimate the size of the population and track their movement. The research, led by Stellenbosch University and the University of Plymouth, marks the first time that acoustic monitoring has been used in place of photographs to generate abundance estimates o
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Manganese single-atom catalyst boosts performance of electrochemical CO2 Reduction
A research team led by Prof. ZHANG Suojiang from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences prepared a manganese (Mn) single-atom catalyst (SAC) with Mn-N 3 site supported by graphitic C 3 N 4 , which exhibited efficient performance of CO 2 electroreduction.
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Can black hole fire up cold heart of the phoenix?
Radio astronomers have detected jets of hot gas blasted out by a black hole in the galaxy at the heart of the Phoenix Galaxy Cluster, located 5.9 billion light-years away in the constellation Phoenix. This is an important result for understanding the coevolution of galaxies, gas, and black holes in galaxy clusters.
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Serengeti leopard population densities healthy but vary seasonally, study finds
A study of camera-trap data from Serengeti National Park in Tanzania found that leopard population densities in the 3.7-million-acre park are similar to those in other protected areas but vary between wet and dry seasons. The fluctuations appear to be driven by the abundance of prey and how this affects interactions with other large carnivores like lions, researchers report.
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How power shaped the 'success story' of genetically modified cotton in Burkina Faso
The West African nation of Burkina Faso was once the poster child for genetically modified (GM) crop advocates. Its 2008 adoption of GM cotton for smallholder farmers was hailed as an example of how these technologies could alleviate poverty and food insecurity by protecting crops from pests and increasing yields.
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Could Quantum Computing Progress Be Halted by Background Radiation?
Doing calculations with a quantum computer is a race against time, thanks to the fragility of the quantum states at their heart. And new research suggests we may soon hit a wall in how long we can hold them together thanks to interference from natural background radiation . While quantum computing could one day enable us to carry out calculations beyond even the most powerful supercomputer imagin
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We asked kids who their favourite teacher is, and why. Here's what they said
Most of us can remember a favorite teacher. Some of us can also remember a teacher we didn't get on with or with whom we always seemed to get in trouble.
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Carbon footprints are hard to understand—here's what you need to know
Imagine drinking endless orange juice from concentrate because you're convinced this is the best way to lose weight. In moderation, orange juice is fine, but it wouldn't be a doctor's first recommendation for a patient wanting to shed pounds.
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California is on fire. From across the Pacific, Australians watch and buckle up
California is ablaze, again. Currently, the second and third largest fires in the US state's history are burning at the same time, and are only partially controlled. Already, seven people have died and 2,144 structures are damaged—and their fire season still has months to run.
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How Donald Trump Is Killing Politics
After a caravan of Donald Trump's supporters descended on Portland, Oregon, this weekend, aching to grapple, he praised them as "great patriots." In cheering them on, Trump is pointing them, and others like them, toward a specific target. What he seeks to eliminate is politics itself. Politics is such a ubiquitous term in the English language, such a seemingly fixed part of American life, that it
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People with increased risk of Alzheimer's have deficits in navigating
Alzheimer's patients develop severe symptoms of spatial disorientation as the disease progresses and are unable to find even the simplest ways.
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EMPEROR-Reduced meets primary endpoint in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction
Empagliflozin reduces the risk of cardiovascular death or hospitalisation for heart failure in patients with heart failure and a reduced ejection fraction. That's the finding of the EMPEROR-Reduced trial presented in a Hot Line session today at ESC Congress 2020.
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