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3D protein modeling suggests why COVID-19 infects some animals, but not others
Some animals are more susceptible to COVID-19 infection than others, and new research suggests this may be due to distinctive structural features of a protein found on the surface of animal cells.
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For nationalistic regimes, similar COVID-19 policies are the sincerest form of flattery
Analysis from a University of Texas at Arlington assistant professor of public policy suggests that nationalistic governments around the globe are more likely to copy other nationalistic governments in responding to the current pandemic.
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How the autonomous vehicle engineers at Ford are helping to make it safer to drive
Sponsored Content by: Individual sensors working in perfect harmony make driving safer and easier on urban and rural roads. *Preproduction computer-generated image shown. Available late 2020. (Ford/) Every year, driver-assistance technology grows more advanced. If you've driven a car made in the last few years, there's a good chance you've experienced enhanced vision at nearly all angles thanks t
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Leaf microbiomes are a neighborhood affair in northern forests
Forest leaves are teeming with bacterial life—but despite the vast extent of bacteria-covered foliage across the world, this habitat, known as the phyllosphere, remains full of mysteries. How do bacteria spread from tree to tree? Do certain types of bacteria only live on certain types of trees?
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Research leads to better modeling of hypersonic flow
Hypersonic flight is conventionally referred to as the ability to fly at speeds significantly faster than the speed of sound and presents an extraordinary set of technical challenges. As an example, when a space capsule re-enters Earth's atmosphere, it reaches hypersonic speeds—more than five times the speed of sound—and generates temperatures over 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit on its exterior surface.
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Study explores link between social status and trust in decision-makers
A recent study examining perceptions of power suggests that individuals with lower socioeconomic statuses are more likely to have a negative view of policy or decision-makers.
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Titanium atom that exists in two places at once in crystal to blame for unusual phenomenon
The crystalline solid BaTiS3 (barium titanium sulfide) is terrible at conducting heat, and it turns out that a wayward titanium atom that exists in two places at the same time is to blame.
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Leaf microbiomes are a neighborhood affair in northern forests
Forest leaves are teeming with bacterial life—but despite the vast extent of bacteria-covered foliage across the world, this habitat, known as the phyllosphere, remains full of mysteries. How do bacteria spread from tree to tree? Do certain types of bacteria only live on certain types of trees?
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Tree lifespan decline in forests could neutralize part of rise in net carbon uptake
Accelerating tree growth in recent years has been accompanied by a reduction in tree lifespan, which could eventually neutralize part of the increase in net uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2). This trade-off between tree growth and life expectancy applies to forests worldwide, including in the Amazon and other tropical regions, as well as temperate regions and the Arctic.
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Common pipe alloy can form cancer-causing chemical in drinking water
Rusted iron pipes can react with residual disinfectants in drinking water distribution systems to produce carcinogenic hexavalent chromium in drinking water, reports a study by engineers at UC Riverside.
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Marine mammals' adaptations to low oxygen offer new perspective on COVID-19
When Terrie Williams began hearing about the wide range of symptoms experienced by patients with COVID-19, she saw a connection between the various ways the disease is affecting people and the many physiological adaptations that have enabled marine mammals to tolerate low oxygen levels during dives.
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Patients receiving low dose steroid at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, study suggests
A new study suggests that even low doses of glucocorticoid may increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases.
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The impact of Neandertal DNA on human health
A researcher at the University of Tartu described new associations between Neandertal DNA and autoimmune diseases, prostate cancer and type 2 diabetes.
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How a police contact by middle school leads to different outcomes for Black, white youth
For Black youth, an encounter with police by eighth grade predicts they will be arrested by young adulthood—but the same is not true for white youth, a new University of Washington study finds.
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Marine mammals' adaptations to low oxygen offer new perspective on COVID-19
When Terrie Williams began hearing about the wide range of symptoms experienced by patients with COVID-19, she saw a connection between the various ways the disease is affecting people and the many physiological adaptations that have enabled marine mammals to tolerate low oxygen levels during dives.
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The impact of Neandertal DNA on human health
A researcher at the University of Tartu described new associations between Neandertal DNA and autoimmune diseases, prostate cancer and type 2 diabetes.
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Tech makes it possible to digitally communicate through human touch
Researchers have developed the first technology capable of sending digital information, such as a photo or password, by touching a surface with your finger.
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JNIS™: cuts in Medicare payments jeopardize patient access to care
The final 2021 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) issued this week by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will result in reimbursement cuts in the range of 10% for neurointerventional procedures, according to a detailed analysis published last week in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery™ , the leading international peer-reviewed journal for the clinical field of neurointe
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For nationalistic regimes, similar COVID-19 policies are the sincerest form of flattery
Analysis from a University of Texas at Arlington assistant professor of public policy suggests that nationalistic governments around the globe are more likely to copy other nationalistic governments in responding to the current pandemic.
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Physicists capture the sound of a perfect fluid
Physicists have observed sound waves moving through a 'perfect' fluid. The results should help scientists study the viscosity in neutron stars, the plasma of the early universe, and other strongly interacting fluids.
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First-of-its-kind African trial tests common drugs to prevent severe COVID-19
But decision to prioritize failed hydroxychloroquine treatment draws criticism
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The Atlantic Appoints Nicholas Thompson as CEO and Expands Board of Directors
The Atlantic announced that Nicholas Thompson, the editor in chief of Wired , will become its CEO in the new year. Thompson will begin as CEO in February 2021. In their announcement to The Atlantic 's staff, owners Laurene Powell Jobs and David Bradley wrote: "Nick is singular; we've seen no one like him. As to leading and supporting Atlantic strategy, Nick brings a surround-sound coverage of rel
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China Claims Quantum Supremacy
Quantum Supremacy 2.0 A team of researchers from University of Science and Technology of China have just claimed quantum supremacy, Wired reports — meaning their quantum computer completed a task that would take a conventional computer tens of thousands of years. Google became the first to claim quantum supremacy in October 2019 with its Sycamore quantum computer completing a random number genera
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Researchers create ingredients to produce food by 3D printing
Food engineers in Brazil and France developed gels based on modified starch for use as "ink" to make foods and novel materials by additive manufacturing
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Titanium atom that exists in two places at once in crystal to blame for unusual phenomenon
Bombarding a crystal with neutrons reveals a quantum quirk that frustrates heat transfer.
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Peanut treatment lowers risk of severe allergic reactions in preschoolers
This study is the first to demonstrate that exposing children to a small, regular dose of an allergen (in this case, peanuts) in a real-world setting (outside of a clinical trial) is effective in reducing the risk of allergic reactions.
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Human Brain Project-supported innovation published in Science
Human Brain Project research has helped lay the foundation for a brain implant that could one day give blind people their sight back. Recent discoveries at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) show that in monkeys, newly developed high-resolution implants in the visual cortex make it possible to recognize artificially induced images. The findings were published in Science on 3 December
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Leaf microbiomes are a neighborhood affair in northern forests
Leaf microbiomes of sugar maple trees vary across the species' range, changing in accordance with the types of trees in the surrounding "neighborhood."
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How to cool more efficiently
In the journal Applied Physics Reviews (DOI: 10.1063/5.0020755), an international research team from the University of Barcelona, the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), and TU Darmstadt report on possibilities for implementing more efficient and environmentally friendly refrigeration processes. For this purpose, they investigated the effects of simultaneously exposing certain alloys to m
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UBC study explores link between social status and trust in decision-makers
A recent study examining perceptions of power suggests that individuals with lower socioeconomic statuses are more likely to have a negative view of policy or decision-makers.
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Restoring a rudimentary form of vision in the blind
Restoration of vision in blind people through a brain implant is on the verge of becoming reality. Recent discoveries show that newly developed high-resolution implants in the visual cortex make it possible to recognize artificially induced shapes and percepts.
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Tire-related chemical is largely responsible for adult coho salmon deaths in urban streams
Scientists have discovered a chemical that kills coho salmon in urban streams before the fish can spawn.
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Shuttering fossil fuel power plants may cost less than expected
Decarbonizing US electricity production will require both construction of renewable energy sources and retirement of power plants now operated by fossil fuels. A generator-level model suggests that most fossil fuel power plants could complete normal lifespans and still close by 2035 because so many facilities are nearing the end of their operational lives.
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Physicists capture the sound of a perfect fluid
Physicists have observed sound waves moving through a 'perfect' fluid. The results should help scientists study the viscosity in neutron stars, the plasma of the early universe, and other strongly interacting fluids.
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The same vision for all primates
Primates process visual information similar to pixels in a digital camera, using small computing units located in their visual cortex. Scientists of the University of Geneva have investigated whether these computational units scale across the large differences in size between primates. The gray mouse lemur is one of the smallest of them and his visual processing units reveals that all primates, in
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The best car and automotive technologies of 2020
The year's most important developments in the world of autos. (Indycar/) Your car may not have gotten the kind of use it usually does this year. Travel restrictions put a lot of wanderlusty road trips on hold for the moment. Meanwhile, folks who had to trek to work increasingly opted to drive over riding public transit. And yet, the auto industry has continued to push technology forward. When we'
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Shuttering fossil fuel power plants may cost less than expected
Decarbonizing US electricity production will require both construction of renewable energy sources and retirement of power plants now operated by fossil fuels. A generator-level model suggests that most fossil fuel power plants could complete normal lifespans and still close by 2035 because so many facilities are nearing the end of their operational lives.
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Research leads to better modeling of hypersonic flow
Designing a thermal protection system to keep astronauts and cargo safe requires an understanding at the molecular level of the complicated physics going on in the gas that flows around the vehicle. Recent research at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign added new knowledge about the physical phenomena that occur as atoms vibrate, rotate, and collide in this extreme environment.
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Leaving so soon? Unusual planetary nebula fades mere decades after it arrived
The tiny Stingray Nebula unexpectedly appeared in the 1980s is by far the youngest planetary nebula in our sky. But a team of astronomers recently analyzed a more recent image of the nebula, taken in 2016 by Hubble, and found that it has faded significantly and changed shape over the course of just 20 years. If dimming continues at current rates, in 20 or 30 years the Stingray Nebula will be barel
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Tree lifespan decline in forests could neutralize part of rise in net carbon uptake
Study by Brazilian researchers reported in Nature Communications shows that trees are growing faster in forests worldwide, including the Amazon, but their lives are getting shorter
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Common pipe alloy can form cancer-causing chemical in drinking water
Rusted iron pipes can react with residual disinfectants in drinking water distribution systems to produce carcinogenic hexavalent chromium in drinking water, reports a study by engineers at UC Riverside.
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Thoughtful gifts for someone in grief
Certain objects and experiences can help with the grieving process. (PopSci/) There's a gift for every occasion, even somber ones like death. But when it comes to shopping for a person who's grappling with a recent loss , your gut might tell you to buy something that helps them forget the pain. That isn't necessary, says Kathryn Shear, the founding director of Columbia University's Center for Com
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Physicists in China challenge Google's 'quantum advantage'
Nature, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03434-7 Photon-based quantum computer does a calculation that ordinary computers might never be able to do.
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New report details links between widespread ocean pollution and human health risks
The new study "Human Health and Ocean Pollution" presents a broad and comprehensive examination of the multiple dangers to human and ecosystem health posed by pollution of the seas. Toxins in the ocean make landfall through the food chain and coastal tides, posing health risks to more than 3 billion humans, according to scientists led by the Centre Scientifique de Monaco and Boston College, with s
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Photonics meets surface science in a cheap and accurate sensor for biological liquids
A new, simple, and inexpensive method of testing liquid biological samples that can be further developed to work in clinical settings, including real-time testing during surgery. The team plans to continue their research in increasing specificity as well as the sensitivity of this approach. They are going to file a patent application and look for industrial partners and investors interested in dev
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Researchers discover life in deep ocean sediments at or above water's boiling point
Biologists found single-celled organisms living in sediments 1180 meters beneath the ocean at temperatures of 120 degrees Celsius.
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Satellite-tagged bottles show promise for tracking plastic litter through rivers
A new study demonstrates the potential for plastic bottles tagged with tracking devices to deepen our understanding of how plastic pollution moves through rivers.
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Personality changes predict early career outcomes
A new study by a psychologist may hold the key to job success. It finds young people who develop higher levels of conscientiousness and emotional stability during the transition to employment tend to be more successful in some aspects of their early careers.
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New platform generates hybrid light-matter excitations in highly charged graphene
Researchers report that they have achieved plasmonically active graphene with record-high charge density without an external gate. They accomplished this by exploiting novel interlayer charge transfer with a two-dimensional electron-acceptor.
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Supernova finding blows up an elemental origin theory
One of the most important reactions in the universe can get a huge and unexpected boost inside exploding stars known as supernovae, according to new research. This finding also challenges ideas behind how some of the Earth's heavy elements are made. In particular, it upends a theory explaining the planet's unusually high amounts of some forms, or isotopes, of the elements ruthenium and molybdenum
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How proteins find their place in the cell
Over a quarter of all proteins in a cell are found in the membrane, where they perform vital functions. To fulfill these roles, membrane proteins must be reliably transported from their site of production in the cell to their destination and correctly inserted into the target membrane. Researchers from the Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center (BZH) have succeeded in determining the three-dime
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How proteins find their place in the cell
Over a quarter of all proteins in a cell are found in the membrane, where they perform vital functions. To fulfill these roles, membrane proteins must be reliably transported from their site of production in the cell to their destination and correctly inserted into the target membrane. Researchers from the Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center (BZH) have succeeded in determining the three-dime
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Red Sea turtle hatchlings are feeling the heat
Analyses by KAUST researchers of sand temperatures at marine turtle nesting sites around the Red Sea indicate that turtle hatchlings born in the region could now be predominantly female. These findings hold significant implications for the survival of marine turtle species as temperature increases take hold, driven by anthropogenic climate change.
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Development of new stem cell type may lead to advances in regenerative medicine
A team led by UT Southwestern has derived a new "intermediate" embryonic stem cell type from multiple species that can contribute to chimeras and create precursors to sperm and eggs in a culture dish.
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Red Sea turtle hatchlings are feeling the heat
Analyses by KAUST researchers of sand temperatures at marine turtle nesting sites around the Red Sea indicate that turtle hatchlings born in the region could now be predominantly female. These findings hold significant implications for the survival of marine turtle species as temperature increases take hold, driven by anthropogenic climate change.
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Researchers confront optics and data-transfer challenges with 3D-printed lens
Researchers have developed new 3-D-printed microlenses with adjustable refractive indices—a property that gives them highly specialized light-focusing abilities. This advancement is poised to improve imaging, computing and communications by significantly increasing the data-routing capability of computer chips and other optical systems, the researchers said.
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Development of new stem cell type may lead to advances in regenerative medicine
A team led by UT Southwestern has derived a new "intermediate" embryonic stem cell type from multiple species that can contribute to chimeras and create precursors to sperm and eggs in a culture dish.
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Most countries are violating international law during the COVID-19 pandemic, legal experts says
Most countries are not fulfilling their international legal obligations during COVID-19 and other public health emergencies, reveals new research by a consortium of 13 leading global health law scholars, hosted by the Global Strategy Lab (GSL) at York University.
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Stanford engineers develop new light and sound tech to finally map the ocean floor
Neither light- nor sound-based imaging devices can penetrate the deep ocean from above. Stanford scientists have invented a new system that incorporates both light and sound to overcome the challenge of mapping the ocean floor. Deployed from a drone or helicopter, it may finally reveal what lies beneath our planet's seas. A great many areas of the ocean floor covering about 70 percent of the Eart
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Researchers discover life in deep ocean sediments at or above water's boiling point
Research published today in the journal Science found single-celled organisms living in sediments 1180 meters beneath the ocean at temperatures of 120 degrees Celsius
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Genetically engineered T cells could lead to therapies for autoimmune diseases
University of Arizona Health Sciences immunobiologists have created a five-module chimeric antigen receptor T cell that is showing early potential to fight Type 1 diabetes.
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Can we make bones heal faster?
A new paper in Science Advances describes for the first time how minerals come together at the molecular level to form bones and other hard tissues, like teeth and enamel.
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Light-based Quantum Computer Exceeds Fastest Classical Supercomputers
The setup of lasers and mirrors effectively "solved" a problem far too complicated for even the largest traditional computer system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Light-based Quantum Computer Exceeds Fastest Classical Supercomputers
The setup of lasers and mirrors effectively "solved" a problem far too complicated for even the largest traditional computer system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Shrew Brains Shrink During Winter
The animals kill off around one-quarter of the neurons in their somatosensory cortex, perhaps to save energy, and the cells appear to return the following summer.
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No poaching occurring within most Channel Islands marine protected areas
Fish are thriving and poachers are staying out of marine protected areas around California's Channel Islands, a new population analysis shows.
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Sensor can detect scarred or fatty liver tissue
Engineers have now developed a diagnostic tool, based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), that could be used to detect both fatty liver disease and liver fibrosis.
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No nanoparticle risks to humans found in field tests of spray sunscreens
People can continue using mineral-based aerosol sunscreens without fear of exposure to dangerous levels of nanoparticles or other respirable particulates, according to new research.
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New machine learning tool tracks urban traffic congestion
Using public data from the entire 1,500-square-mile Los Angeles metropolitan area, researchers reduced the time needed to create a traffic congestion model by an order of magnitude, from hours to minutes.
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After shipping, pallets pose big risk to public, cause many accidents, injuries
Shipping pallets — often used as display platforms in retail settings or seen as raw material for household projects — were responsible for sending more than 30,000 people to the emergency rooms of U.S. hospitals over a recent five-year period, according to a new study.
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New activity found for CHD7, a protein factor vital in embryonic development
Research has yielded fundamental insights into the causes of severe birth defects known as CHARGE syndrome cases. These congenital birth defects include severe and life-threatening heart malformations. Researchers successfully inactivated the gene for CHD7 in the neural crest cells of mouse embryos, and then rigorously probed how this change in developing cardiac neural crest cells caused severe d
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Scientists invent a new type of microscope that can see through an intact skull
Researchers invented a new type of microscope called reflective matrix microscope, which uses adaptive optics techniques.
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Harvard Scientists Claim to Reverse Mouse Aging at Cellular Level
A team of scientists has restored the eyesight of elderly mice by effectively reversing the process of aging at a molecular level . The cohort of Harvard Medical School researchers removed thousands of chemical markers that accumulate over time from the mice's DNA, essentially resetting their cells to a younger state. Shortly thereafter, mice with age-related vision loss or nerve damage in their
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A plant immune receptor: It takes four to tango
A collaborative study on a plant intracellular immune receptor from researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ) not only shows how an important resistance protein is activated during pathogen infection but also reveals some common operational principles with immunity proteins from humans.
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How plants compete for underground real estate affects climate change and food production
How do plant roots store carbon? Princeton researchers found that the energy a plant devotes to its roots depends on proximity to other plants: when close together, plants heavily invest in their root systems to compete for finite underground resources; if far apart, they invest less. As about a third of the world's vegetation biomass (and carbon) is belowground, this model provides a valuable too
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Physicists capture the sound of a "perfect" fluid
MIT physicists have observed sound waves moving through a "perfect" fluid. The results should help scientists study the viscosity in neutron stars, the plasma of the early universe, and other strongly interacting fluids.
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How hot is too hot for life deep below the ocean floor?
At what depth beneath the seabed does it become so hot that microbial life is no longer possible? This question is the focus of a close scientific cooperative effort between JAMSTEC and MARUM — Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen. An expedition by the drilling program IODP in 2016 has provided new insights into the temperature limits of life beneath the ocean floo
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New theory of root competition reveals rules governing growth
In the presence of competitors, plants overproduce roots to snatch up nearby resources but avoid foraging for nutrients near their neighbors, according to a new study, which provides a new theoretical foundation for understanding the rules that govern competitive root behavior.
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Can COVID-19 vaccine trials continue ethically once an efficacious candidate is found?
In a Perspective, David Wendler and colleagues propose guidance on when it can be ethical to continue placebo-controlled COVID-19 vaccine trials after an effective and safe candidate is found – a topic that is particularly relevant given the recent announcements of success in several late-stage clinical trials.
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High-definition brain prosthesis demonstrates artificial shape perception in monkeys
An implant packed with more than 1000 tiny, brain-stimulating electrodes generates recognizable perceptions of motion and complex shapes – including letters of the alphabet – in a monkey's mind.
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Chemical derived from car tires turns streams toxic, kills coho salmon
For Pacific Northwest coho salmon, returning to spawn in the streams and creeks near urban areas can be a death sentence, thanks to a ubiquitous additive in vehicle tires, a new study reveals.
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Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities
A new tool that uses light to map out the electronic structures of crystals could reveal the capabilities of emerging quantum materials and pave the way for advanced energy technologies and quantum computers, according to researchers at the University of Michigan, University of Regensburg and University of Marburg.
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How networks form: Charting the developing brain
Researchers use connectomic mapping in the developing cortex to uncover the developmental wiring rules for inhibitory neurons
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Dark excitons hit the spotlight
Heralding the end of a decade-long quest, in a promising new class of extremely thin, two-dimensional semiconductors, scientists in Japan have for the first time directly visualized and measured elusive particles, called dark excitons, that cannot be seen by light.The powerful technique, described in Science, could revolutionize research into two-dimensional semiconductors and excitons, with profo
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Patients receiving low dose steroid at increased risk of cardiovascular disease
Glucocorticoids are steroids widely prescribed to treat a range of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. While high doses of steroids are known to increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, the impact of lower doses is unknown. A study published in PLOS Medcine by Mar Pujades-Rodriguez at Leeds University and colleagues suggests that even low doses of glucocorticoid may increase the risk of car
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How the vaginal microbiome may affect HIV prevention
Healthy Lactobacillus bacteria in the vagina are critical for women's health, but the accumulation of additional bacterial genera can imbalance the vaginal ecosystem. Such an imbalance may result in bacterial metabolism of drugs designed to prevent HIV infection, thereby decreasing their effectiveness and enhancing risks to women, according to a study published December 3, 2020 in the open-access
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3D protein modeling suggests why COVID-19 infects some animals, but not others
Some animals are more susceptible to Covid-19 infection than others, and new research suggests this may be due to distinctive structural features of a protein found on the surface of animal cells. João Rodrigues of Stanford University, California, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology.
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Shuttering fossil fuel power plants may cost less than expected
Decarbonizing US electricity production will require both construction of renewable energy sources and retirement of power plants now operated by fossil fuels. A generator-level model described in the December 4, 2020 issue of the journal Science suggests that most fossil fuel power plants could complete normal lifespans and still close by 2035 because so many facilities are nearing the end of the
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Tire-related chemical is largely responsible for adult coho salmon deaths in urban streams
A team led by researchers at the University of Washington Tacoma, UW and Washington State University Puyallup have discovered a chemical that kills coho salmon in urban streams before the fish can spawn.
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Restoring a rudimentary form of vision in the blind
Restoration of vision in blind people through a brain implant is on the verge of becoming reality. Recent discoveries at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) show that newly developed high-resolution implants in the visual cortex make it possible to recognize artificially induced shapes and percepts. The findings were published in Science on 3 December.
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Natural selection plays major role in an organism's capacity to evolve and adapt
It's widely assumed within the evolutionary biology field that weak selection provides an advantage to an organism's ability to evolve. But new research, published in the journal Science, may offer the first experimental proof that strong selection pressure enhances an organism's evolvability, by boosting robustness.
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Does Dream Interpretation Have Any Scientific Basis?
Scientists are trying to wrap their heads around the content of your dreams, from the wild to the mundane.
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Here's the real story behind Alfred Hitchcock's 'The Birds'
A story about bird brains. (Tom McNamara/) Popular Science's WILD LIVES is a monthly video series that dives like an Emperor penguin into the life and times of history's noteworthy animals. With every episode debut on Youtube, we'll be publishing a story about the featured beasts, plus a lot more fascinating facts about the natural world. Click here to subscribe. Feature Creature: Of Sooty Shearw
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China Stakes Its Claim to Quantum Supremacy
Google trumpeted its quantum computer that outperformed a conventional supercomputer. A Chinese group says it's done the same, with different technology.
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Scientists peer into the 3D structure of the Milky Way
Scientists have helped produce a brand-new, three-dimensional survey of our galaxy, allowing them to peer into the inner structure and observe its star-forming processes in unprecedented detail.
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Autism study suggests connection between repetitive behaviors, gut problems
In children with autism, repetitive behaviors and gastrointestinal problems may be connected, new research has found. The study found that increased severity of other autism symptoms was also associated with more severe constipation, stomach pain and other gut difficulties.
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Medicine-carriers made from human cells can cure lung infections
Scientists used human white blood cell membranes to carry two drugs, an antibiotic and an anti-inflammatory, directly to infected lungs in mice. The nano-sized drug delivery method successfully treated both the bacterial growth and inflammation in the mice's lungs. The study shows a potential new strategy for treating infectious diseases, including COVID-19.
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Scientists invent a new type of microscope that can see through an intact skull
Researchers invented a new type of microscope called reflective matrix microscope, which uses adaptive optics techniques.
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News at a glance
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Saving sanctuaries
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Probing quantum materials
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Paring down pyroptosis
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Protection in the wings
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Competitive roots
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Watching sound die out
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Probing the dark state
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Slow pokes avoid gridlock
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Sensing an allergen
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Seeding the problem
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The N-glycome regulates the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition
Definitive hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) arise from the transdifferentiation of hemogenic endothelial cells (hemECs). The mechanisms of this endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT) are poorly understood. We show that microRNA-223 (miR-223)–mediated regulation of N-glycan biosynthesis in endothelial cells (ECs) regulates EHT. miR-223 is enriched in hemECs and in oligopotent
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Shape perception via a high-channel-count neuroprosthesis in monkey visual cortex
Blindness affects 40 million people across the world. A neuroprosthesis could one day restore functional vision in the blind. We implanted a 1024-channel prosthesis in areas V1 and V4 of the visual cortex of monkeys and used electrical stimulation to elicit percepts of dots of light (called phosphenes) on hundreds of electrodes, the locations of which matched the receptive fields of the stimulate
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The exploitative segregation of plant roots
Plant roots determine carbon uptake, survivorship, and agricultural yield and represent a large proportion of the world's vegetation carbon pool. Study of belowground competition, unlike aboveground shoot competition, is hampered by our inability to observe roots. We developed a consumer-resource model based in game theory that predicts the root density spatial distribution of individual plants a
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Directly visualizing the momentum-forbidden dark excitons and their dynamics in atomically thin semiconductors
Resolving momentum degrees of freedom of excitons, which are electron-hole pairs bound by the Coulomb attraction in a photoexcited semiconductor, has remained an elusive goal for decades. In atomically thin semiconductors, such a capability could probe the momentum-forbidden dark excitons, which critically affect proposed opto-electronic technologies but are not directly accessible using optical
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Super-resolution lightwave tomography of electronic bands in quantum materials
Searching for quantum functionalities requires access to the electronic structure, constituting the foundation of exquisite spin-valley–electronic, topological, and many-body effects. All-optical band-structure reconstruction could directly connect electronic structure with the coveted quantum phenomena if strong lightwaves transported localized electrons within preselected bands. Here, we demons
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De novo design of potent and resilient hACE2 decoys to neutralize SARS-CoV-2
We developed a de novo protein design strategy to swiftly engineer decoys for neutralizing pathogens that exploit extracellular host proteins to infect the cell. Our pipeline allowed the design, validation, and optimization of de novo human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2) decoys to neutralize severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The best monovalent decoy, CTC-445.
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Mechanisms of collision recovery in flying beetles and flapping-wing robots
At rest, beetles fold and tuck their hindwings under the elytra. For flight, the hindwings are deployed through a series of unfolding configurations that are passively driven by flapping forces. The folds lock into place as the wing fully unfolds and thereafter operates as a flat membrane to generate the aerodynamic forces. We show that in the rhinoceros beetle ( Allomyrina dichotoma ), these ori
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Long-term collapse in fruit availability threatens Central African forest megafauna
Afrotropical forests host much of the world's remaining megafauna, although these animals are confined to areas where direct human influences are low. We used a rare long-term dataset of tree reproduction and a photographic database of forest elephants to assess food availability and body condition of an emblematic megafauna species at Lopé National Park, Gabon. Our analysis reveals an 81% declin
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Universal sound diffusion in a strongly interacting Fermi gas
Transport of strongly interacting fermions is crucial for the properties of modern materials, nuclear fission, the merging of neutron stars, and the expansion of the early Universe. Here, we observe a universal quantum limit of diffusivity in a homogeneous, strongly interacting atomic Fermi gas by studying sound propagation and its attenuation through the coupled transport of momentum and heat. I
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Robust neutralizing antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 infection persist for months
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has caused a global pandemic with millions infected and more than 1 million fatalities. Questions regarding the robustness, functionality, and longevity of the antibody response to the virus remain unanswered. Here, on the basis of a dataset of 30,082 individuals screened at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City, we report that the
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Temperature limits to deep subseafloor life in the Nankai Trough subduction zone
Microorganisms in marine subsurface sediments substantially contribute to global biomass. Sediments warmer than 40°C account for roughly half the marine sediment volume, but the processes mediated by microbial populations in these hard-to-access environments are poorly understood. We investigated microbial life in up to 1.2-kilometer-deep and up to 120°C hot sediments in the Nankai Trough subduct
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New Products
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Enteroviral 3C protease activates the human NLRP1 inflammasome in airway epithelia
Immune sensor proteins are critical to the function of the human innate immune system. The full repertoire of cognate triggers for human immune sensors is not fully understood. Here, we report that human NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 1 (NLRP1) is activated by 3C proteases (3Cpros) of enteroviruses, such as human rhinovirus (HRV). 3Cpros directly cleave human NLRP1 at a single sit
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Direct pathogen-induced assembly of an NLR immune receptor complex to form a holoenzyme
Direct or indirect recognition of pathogen-derived effectors by plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptors (NLRs) initiates innate immune responses. The Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis effector ATR1 activates the N-terminal Toll–interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain of Arabidopsis NLR RPP1. We report a cryo–electron microscopy structure of RPP1 bound by ATR1. The structure reveals
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Selection enhances protein evolvability by increasing mutational robustness and foldability
Natural selection can promote or hinder a population's evolvability—the ability to evolve new and adaptive phenotypes—but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. To examine how the strength of selection affects evolvability, we subjected populations of yellow fluorescent protein to directed evolution under different selection regimes and then evolved them toward the new phenotype of gree
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The role of the microbiota in human genetic adaptation
As human populations spread across the world, they adapted genetically to local conditions. So too did the resident microorganism communities that everyone carries with them. However, the collective influence of the diverse and dynamic community of resident microbes on host evolution is poorly understood. The taxonomic composition of the microbiota varies among individuals and displays a range of
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Comparative host-coronavirus protein interaction networks reveal pan-viral disease mechanisms
The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is a grave threat to public health and the global economy. SARS-CoV-2 is closely related to the more lethal but less transmissible coronaviruses SARS-CoV-1 and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Here, we have carried out comparative viral-human protein-protein interaction and viral
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Structure of the activated ROQ1 resistosome directly recognizing the pathogen effector XopQ
Plants and animals detect pathogen infection using intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat receptors (NLRs) that directly or indirectly recognize pathogen effectors and activate an immune response. How effector sensing triggers NLR activation remains poorly understood. Here we describe the 3.8-angstrom-resolution cryo–electron microscopy structure of the activated ROQ1 (recognition o
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Common tire chemical implicated in mysterious deaths of at-risk salmon
Coho salmon in urban streams have been dying in the U.S. Pacific Northwest
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How Scientists Tracked Down a Mass Killer (of Salmon)
Something was decimating the salmon that had been restored to creeks around Puget Sound.
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Ny forskning: Bildäck dödar laxar
När det regnar i Seattle dör silverlaxar i bäckarna runt stan. I flera årtionden har forskare letat efter orsaken. Nu visar det sig att det är ett ämne i vanliga bildäck som ligger bakom laxdöden.
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This money problem may predict dementia
People on Medicare who later receive a diagnosis of dementia are more likely have unpaid bills as early as six years before a clinical diagnosis, research finds. The study also finds that these missed payments and other adverse financial outcomes lead to increased risk of developing subprime credit scores starting 2.5 years before a dementia diagnosis. Subprime credit scores fall in the fair and
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Probing quantum materials
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Paring down pyroptosis
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Protection in the wings
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Competitive roots
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Watching sound die out
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Probing the dark state
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Outbreak investigation reveals "super-spreader" potential of Andes virus
"Super-spreader" events and extensive person-to-person contact propelled an outbreak of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in a small village in Argentina from 2018-2019, according to research published today in The New England Journal of Medicine . An international scientific team reports the genetic, clinical, and epidemiologic features of the outbreak caused by the Andes virus, a member of the hanta
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How a police contact by middle school leads to different outcomes for Black, white youth
A new University of Washington study finds that Black youth are more likely than white youth to be treated as 'usual suspects' after a first encounter with police, leading to subsequent arrests over time. Even as white young adults report engaging in significantly more illegal behavior, Black young adults face more criminal penalties.
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Huntsman Cancer Institute researchers identify promising drug combination for melanoma
Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have identified a potential drug combination to treat uveal melanoma, a type of eye cancer. Lead author Amanda Truong, trainee in the McMahon Lab at HCI and student at the U of U, explains uveal melanoma patients frequently have changes in genes called GNAQ and GNA11, which are key targets for these drugs. This study was published
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No 'one-size-fits-all solution' for children exposed to domestic violence, researchers say
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University surveyed 105 agencies throughout Ohio to better understand service, policy and research needs–and get feedback about potential strategies to protect children from intimate partner violence.
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Study finds over 64% of people reported new health issues during 'work from home'
In a new study, researchers have found that working from home has negatively impacted our physical health and mental health, increased work expectations and distractions, reduced our communications with co-workers and ultimately lessened our productivity. The study finds that time spent at the workstation increased by approximately 1.5 hours. It also illustrates the differential impact of working
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Marine mammals' adaptations to low oxygen offer new perspective on COVID-19
When Terrie Williams began hearing about the wide range of symptoms experienced by patients with COVID-19, she saw a connection between the various ways the disease is affecting people and the many physiological adaptations that have enabled marine mammals to tolerate low oxygen levels during dives. In a new review article, Williams explores how the diving physiology of marine mammals can help us
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Most countries are violating international law during the COVID-19 pandemic: Legal experts
In 2019, the Global Health Law Consortium, hosted at York U, analyzed key aspects of the International Health Regulations (IHR) to authoritatively interpret what countries are legally allowed to do during public health crises like Ebola & SARS. This work became even more relevant when COVID-19 began spreading around the world early this year; the Consortium members reviewed how countries reacted t
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How plants compete for underground real estate affects climate change and food production
You might have observed plants competing for sunlight—the way they stretch upwards and outwards to block each other's access to the sun's rays—but out of sight, another type of competition is happening underground. In the same way that you might change the way you forage for free snacks in the break room when your colleagues are present, plants change their use of underground resources when they'r
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3-D protein modeling suggests why COVID-19 infects some animals, but not others
Some animals are more susceptible to COVID-19 infection than others, and new research suggests this may be due to distinctive structural features of a protein found on the surface of animal cells. João Rodrigues of Stanford University, California, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology.
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How hot is too hot for life deep below the ocean floor?
At what depth beneath the seabed does it become so hot that microbial life is no longer possible? This question is the focus of a close scientific cooperative effort between the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) and MARUM—Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen. An expedition by the drilling program IODP (International Ocean Discovery Progr
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Natural selection plays major role in an organism's capacity to evolve and adapt
Everywhere we look in the natural world, there's evidence of natural selection: the resin armor of a lodgepole pine cone evolved to defend against seed-hungry birds and squirrels; the long neck of a giraffe was evolutionarily favored for reaching high vegetation that the competition can't touch. We know that natural selection shapes how animals and plants evolve and adapt. But does natural selecti
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Tire-related chemical is largely responsible for adult coho salmon deaths in urban streams
Every fall more than half of the coho salmon that return to Puget Sound's urban streams die before they can spawn. In some streams, all of them die. But scientists didn't know why.
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How plants compete for underground real estate affects climate change and food production
You might have observed plants competing for sunlight—the way they stretch upwards and outwards to block each other's access to the sun's rays—but out of sight, another type of competition is happening underground. In the same way that you might change the way you forage for free snacks in the break room when your colleagues are present, plants change their use of underground resources when they'r
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3-D protein modeling suggests why COVID-19 infects some animals, but not others
Some animals are more susceptible to COVID-19 infection than others, and new research suggests this may be due to distinctive structural features of a protein found on the surface of animal cells. João Rodrigues of Stanford University, California, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology.
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Physicists capture the sound of a 'perfect' fluid
For some, the sound of a "perfect flow" might be the gentle lapping of a forest brook or perhaps the tinkling of water poured from a pitcher. For physicists, a perfect flow is more specific, referring to a fluid that flows with the smallest amount of friction, or viscosity, allowed by the laws of quantum mechanics. Such perfectly fluid behavior is rare in nature, but it is thought to occur in the
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Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities
A new tool that uses light to map out the electronic structures of crystals could reveal the capabilities of emerging quantum materials and pave the way for advanced energy technologies and quantum computers, according to researchers at the University of Michigan, University of Regensburg and University of Marburg.
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How hot is too hot for life deep below the ocean floor?
At what depth beneath the seabed does it become so hot that microbial life is no longer possible? This question is the focus of a close scientific cooperative effort between the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) and MARUM—Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen. An expedition by the drilling program IODP (International Ocean Discovery Progr
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Natural selection plays major role in an organism's capacity to evolve and adapt
Everywhere we look in the natural world, there's evidence of natural selection: the resin armor of a lodgepole pine cone evolved to defend against seed-hungry birds and squirrels; the long neck of a giraffe was evolutionarily favored for reaching high vegetation that the competition can't touch. We know that natural selection shapes how animals and plants evolve and adapt. But does natural selecti
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Tire-related chemical is largely responsible for adult coho salmon deaths in urban streams
Every fall more than half of the coho salmon that return to Puget Sound's urban streams die before they can spawn. In some streams, all of them die. But scientists didn't know why.
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Shuttering fossil fuel power plants may cost less than expected
Decarbonizing U.S. electricity production will require both construction of renewable energy sources and retirement of power plants now operated by fossil fuels. A generator-level model described in the December 4 issue of the journal Science suggests that most fossil fuel power plants could complete normal lifespans and still close by 2035 because so many facilities are nearing the end of their o
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Researchers pioneer a revolutionary new method to directly observe dark excitons
Heralding the end of a decade-long quest, in a promising new class of extremely thin, two-dimensional semiconductors, scientists have for the first time directly visualized and measured elusive particles, called dark excitons, that cannot be seen by light.
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7 000 runinskrifter nu sökbara på nätet
Databasen Runor bygger på gps-data för runristningar på bland annat stenar och bergshällar, precis som appen Fornsök med alla fornlämningar, som F&F tidigare skrivit om. Genom att ange sin position kan man se vilka ristningar som finns i närheten. Bakom båda apparna ligger Riksantikvarieämbetet, RAÄ.
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'High-value' executives entering England to get quarantine waiver
Performing arts professionals and recently signed elite sports players will also avoid need to self-isolate over Covid
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Archaeologists Could Help Bring Otters Back From the Dead
The sea mammals vanished from Oregon's coast long ago, but a technique from human archaeology offers a clue to restoring them.
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Stronger early immune reaction might make COVID worse
While having a robust immune response to coronavirus infection may sound helpful, a new study shows the opposite may be true. To better understand how variations in early host immune responses affect disease outcomes, researchers at the Tulane National Primate Research Center followed the course of disease in the four weeks following COVID-19 infection in non-human primates. They discovered robus
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Presto chango: tiny particles get a chemical makeover but keep their shape
Nature, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03407-w Self-assembling particles exhibit a mind-boggling array of structure and composition.
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Scientists find the "magic number" that links forces of the universe
A team of physicists carried out experiments to determine the precise value of the fine-structure constant. This pure number describes the strength of the electromagnetic forces between elementary particles. The scientists improved the accuracy of this measurement by 2.5 times. Physicists determined with tremendous accuracy the value of what's been called "a magic number" and considered one of th
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Drone footage shows Arecibo Observatory collapse in Puerto Rico – video
Footage released by the National Science Foundation shows the moment a huge radio telescope collapsed in Puerto Rico on Tuesday. The Arecibo Observatory played a key role in astronomical discoveries for more than half a century but had been scheduled for demolition because of pre-existing damage. The telescope's 900-ton receiver platform fell on to the reflector dish more than 400ft below Giant A
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On Section 230, It's Trump vs. Trump
The president is urging Congress to repeal a law that his own trade agreements commit the country to.
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Meet Christopher Lee – Shape matters! Stories of a "model" scientist
What does Lotso, the bear from Pixar's Toy Story 3, have in common with the research of computational scientist Dr. Christopher Lee? Lotso is created with a similar technology that Christopher uses to create real 3D models of neurons. For those who just started following this interview series, I am a researcher myself and conduct […]
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Major Companies Call on Biden to Act on Climate Change
Utilities, banks and car makers signed a statement urging the President-elect and Congress to enact ambitious climate policy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dramatic Drone Video Shows Collapse of Alien-Hunting Observatory
The Great Collapse December 1 was a sad day for astronomers everywhere. The iconic 57-year-old Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico met its final demise when the 900-ton platform suspended above the 1,000-foot-wide dish antenna came crashing down — an accident caused by failing cables that were already stretched to their limits by previous damage. Now, newly released footage shows the dramatic fail
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Facebook will remove misinformation about covid-19 vaccines
The news: Facebook will remove false claims that have been "debunked by public health experts" about covid-19 vaccines, it has announced. In a post , the company outlined how Facebook plans to apply its existing ban on covid misinformation—which is intended to screen out posts that could lead to "imminent physical harm"—as countries around the world move closer to acquiring and rolling out vaccin
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Study finds gamblers ignore important information when placing bet
People with gambling problems are less likely to consider important information that could prevent them from losing, according to new research published today from the UBC's Centre for Gambling Research.
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Chicago neighborhoods with barriers to social distancing had higher COVID-19 death rates
New research has found that Chicago neighborhoods with barriers to social distancing, including limited access to broadband internet and low rates of health insurance, had more COVID-19 deaths in spring 2020.
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Geisinger researchers explore safety of ventilator sharing to mitigate equipment shortages
Using a single ventilator to support two patients could be feasible in crisis situations involving a ventilator shortage, researchers have found.
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Vaccination against tuberculosis can reduce the spread of COVID-19 and ease its course
St Petersburg University scientists have analysed about 100 academic papers and statistics on the incidence of COVID-19 in different countries of the world. Analysis of these data showed that the spread of the new coronavirus infection occurs more slowly where there is a large percentage of people vaccinated against tuberculosis with the BCG vaccine. Moreover, this vaccination itself, given in ear
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Clinical trial results address concerns about pharmacogenetic testing
Researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial of pharmacogenetic testing related to cholesterol-lowering medications called statins.After one year, the cholesterol levels in the group who received their pharmacogenetic results were not higher than those in the group who did not receive their results, and they were not less likely to receive medical care meeting recommended guidelines.
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Army computer models unveil secret to quieter small drones
It's no secret the US Army wants its small unmanned aerial systems to operate quietly in densely-populated regions, but tests to achieve this can be expensive, time-consuming and labor-intensive according to researchers.
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Role of birth order on career choice might have been overestimated in previous research
In a new study that could turn what we know about birth order upside down, a University of Houston researcher has found that the role of birth order on career types, occupational creativity and status attainment might have been overestimated in previous research.
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Female Serial Killers Exist, but Their Motives Are Different
Male perpetrators may get more press, but they don't have a monopoly on serial murder
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This Is the Most Detailed Map of the Milky Way in History
Star Chart The European Space Agency (ESA) just released the most detailed map of the Milky Way galaxy ever assembled. The 3D map — which makes the Milky Way look like an egg-shaped lattice — includes the positions and movements of almost 2 billion stars within our galaxy, according to The Guardian . Aside from being an outstanding accomplishment on its own, the map has already helped scientists
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Covid's legacy is a corporate debt mountain
Public wealth funds can play a role to ensure economies recover
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Researchers confront optics and data-transfer challenges with 3D-printed lens
Researchers have developed new 3D-printed microlenses with adjustable refractive indices – a property that gives them highly specialized light-focusing abilities. This advancement is poised to improve imaging, computing and communications by significantly increasing the data-routing capability of computer chips and other optical systems, the researchers said.
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Red Sea turtle hatchlings are feeling the heat
The balance of the sexes in marine turtle hatchlings may be disrupted by high sand temperatures at nesting sites around the Red Sea.
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Correctly delivered and integrated: How proteins find their place in the cell
Over a quarter of all proteins in a cell are found in the membrane. To fulfil their roles, membrane proteins must be reliably transported from their site of production to their destination and correctly inserted into the target membrane. Researchers from Heidelberg University have succeeded in determining the three-dimensional structure of a molecular machine responsible for the correct placement
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Proverbial wolf can't blow down modern timber high-rises, says UBCO researcher
With an increasing demand for a more sustainable alternative for high-rise construction, new research from UBC Okanagan, in collaboration with Western University and FPInnovations, points to timber as a sustainable and effective way to make tall, high-density, and renewable buildings.
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Den kosmologiske konstant i en flerdimensional tid
DTU-forsker kan forklare størrelsen af den kosmologiske konstant – hvis tiden har to dimensioner.
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Nanomaterials enable dual-mode heating and cooling device
Engineers have demonstrated a dual-mode heating and cooling device for building climate control that, if widely deployed in the U.S., could cut HVAC energy use by nearly 20 percent. The invention uses a combination of mechanics and nanomaterials to either harness or expel certain wavelengths of light. Depending on conditions, rollers move a sheet back and forth to expose either heat-trapping mater
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Development of new stem cell type may lead to advances in regenerative medicine
A team led by UT Southwestern has derived a new "intermediate" embryonic stem cell type from multiple species that can contribute to chimeras and create precursors to sperm and eggs in a culture dish.
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Gut microbiome snapshot could reveal chemical exposures in children
Researchers have completed the most comprehensive study to date on how a class of persistent pollutants called semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are associated with the gut microbiome in human children. The results provide a potential mechanism for measuring exposure to a wide variety of these substances and suggests exposure to toxic halogenated compounds may create a niche for bacteria not
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What makes certain groups more vulnerable to COVID-19?
What makes the elderly and people with underlying conditions more vulnerable to COVID-19? According to a new study led by McGill University researchers, clues can be found in the proteins involved in initiating infection, as the virus binds to host cells of different animals. Greater cellular oxidation with aging and sickness may explain why seniors and people with chronic illness get infected mor
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Gaia space telescope measured the acceleration of the Solar System
The Gaia space telescope has measured the acceleration of the Solar System when it orbits the center of our Milky Way galaxy. The Solar System motion relative to the stars agrees with the results by Finnish astronomers in the 19th century.
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Oral drug blocks SARS-CoV-2 transmission, Georgia State biomedical sciences researchers find
Treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection with a new antiviral drug, MK-4482/EIDD-2801 or Molnupiravir, completely suppresses virus transmission within 24 hours, researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University have discovered.
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The impact of Neandertal DNA on human health
A researcher at the University of Tartu described new associations between Neandertal DNA and autoimmune diseases, prostate cancer and type 2 diabetes.
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Impactful science teaching requires minimum five hours instruction weekly
New research on middle-grades science teaching reveals that without at least 5 hours of instructional time dedicated to science during a typical school week, teachers are less likely to use the types of inquiry-based learning practices recommended by leading science and education professionals.
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In biology publishing shakeup, eLife will require submissions to be posted as preprints
The journal will also publish all peer reviews, including those of rejected papers
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China plants its flag on the moon as lunar probe heads back to Earth
China becomes second country to put national flag on moon Beijing has poured millions into military-run space programme China has become the second country in history to put its flag on the moon, more than 50 years after the US first planted the Stars and Stripes. Pictures from the country's National Space Administration show the five-starred Red Flag holding still on the windless lunar surface.
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Plant extinctions are more common than scientists knew
A new study reveals that 65 plant species have gone extinct in the continental United States and Canada since European colonization. That's more plant extinctions than any previous scientific study has ever documented. The team found that most plant extinctions occurred in the western United States, where the vegetation was minimally documented before widespread European settlement. Since many ex
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Best map of Milky Way reveals a billion stars in motion
Nature, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03432-9 Data haul from Gaia space observatory offers a glimpse of what Earth's night sky will look like for 1.6 million years to come.
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K9 chemistry: A safer way to train detection dogs
Trained dogs are better at detecting explosives and narcotics than any technological device scientists have invented. However, training dogs to detect hazardous substances can be inconvenient for the trainer and dangerous for the dog. NIST scientists are working to solve this problem with a material that can catch odors and safely release them over time.
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A new view of how the brain decides to make an effort
Nature Human Behavior published the research by scientists at Emory University. It gives the first detailed view of ventral striatum activity during three phases of effort-based decision-making — the anticipation of initiating an effort, the actual execution of the effort and the reward, or outcome, of the effort.
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Flightless bird species at risk of extinction
Bird species that have lost the ability to fly through evolution have become extinct more often than birds that have retained their ability to fly, according to new research from the University of Gothenburg.
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Impactful science teaching requires minimum five hours instruction weekly
Middle-grades science teachers that dedicate a minimum of five hours of instructional time to science each week are more likely to implement inquiry-based teaching, a best practice among science and education experts, in their classrooms. Roughly a third of U.S. classrooms meet that mark.
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China's Chang'e-5 mission leaves Moon's surface
The robotic probe lifts off from the lunar surface carrying samples of rock and dust to send to Earth.
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The Scientist's 2020 Gift Guide
We all deserve something nice this year.
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To increase organs available for transplant, reassess organ procurement organizations' metrics
A new article analyzes the metrics used to evaluate organ procurement organizations and proposes three complementary metrics to reflect more accurate and equitable performance rankings.
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Targets for avoidable sight loss 'not being met'
A new global study has found no significant reduction in the number of people with treatable sight loss since 2010.
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Gaia 'discovery machine' updates star catalogue
The world's most productive astronomical facility releases its third big tranche of sky data.
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New compact model for gene regulation in higher organisms
Although the DNA and its double-helix are one of the most familiar molecules of our time, our knowledge of how cells control what genes they want to express is still rather limited. In order to create, for example, an enzyme, the information that's inscribed in our DNA about this enzyme needs to be transcribed and translated. To start this highly complex process, special regulatory proteins called
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Higher frequency of financial reporting hinders corporate innovation
Company reporting frequency should be relaxed to allow for greater innovation and longer-term thinking, according to new research from the Business School (formerly Cass).
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Not enough hazelnuts? Our future climate points to Australia for new cultivation
Over the last decade, growing food industry-led demand for hazelnuts has not been satisfied globally with a corresponding expansion in supply. Most worldwide commercial hazelnut orchards are traditionally concentrated in a select few areas: in fact, more than half of the global production of in-shell hazelnuts is concentrated in Turkey, followed by Italy, Oregon and Azerbaijan.
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Coasts drown as coral reefs collapse under warming and acidification
A new study shows the coastal protection coral reefs currently provide will start eroding by the end of the century, as the world continues to warm and the oceans acidify.
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New compact model for gene regulation in higher organisms
Although the DNA and its double-helix are one of the most familiar molecules of our time, our knowledge of how cells control what genes they want to express is still rather limited. In order to create, for example, an enzyme, the information that's inscribed in our DNA about this enzyme needs to be transcribed and translated. To start this highly complex process, special regulatory proteins called
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Researchers uncover significant reason older adults are at greater risk of heart attack
A team of surgeons has found an insufficient level of the protein Sesn2 is the reason older individuals are at greater risk of heart attack, which indicates stabilizing the protein could be the answer to maintaining a healthy heart.
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Patients with kidney disease may delay AVF creation
Many patients start hemodialysis with temporary vascular access despite regular kidney care and pre-dialysis education. Delay is often related to patient choice but research on patients' perspectives is limited. In this study, researchers surveyed pre-dialysis patients and their family members about their perceptions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and their intentions to undergo access creation.
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The New Comedy of American Decline
L ast month, the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture at the University of Virginia published its most recent survey of American political life. One of its findings: 66 percent of Americans view their country to be in a state of decline. The survey arrived just after the publication of the latest Social Progress Index , which found that the United States is one of only three countries where
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Researchers identify bacteria that can make the Bolson tortoise ill
The Bolson tortoise (Bolson Gopherus flavomarginatus) is the largest land reptile in North America. It lives mainly in dry areas, in particular, in the Chihuahua desert in northern Mexico. In recent decades, its numbers have fallen by 50%, driving the International Union for Conservation of Nature to include it on its red list and it has been classified as endangered. Land tortoises are prone to s
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Physicists succeed in bringing movement of photons and electrons under same laws
Scientists from ITMO, Sheffield University, and the University of Iceland proved that the movement of electrons and photons in two-dimensional materials with hexagonal symmetry, such as graphene, submits to the same laws. Now, the properties of electrons in solids can be modeled with the help of classical optical systems where this task can be solved easier. The article was published in Nature Pho
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Study proves bits of DNA in seawater correlate to the weight of netted fish
Humanity is a step closer to answering one of the most ancient of questions—"how many fish in the sea?"—thanks to newly-published proof that the amount of fish DNA collected in a water sample closely corresponds to kilos of fish captured in a trawl with nets.
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Hubble captures unprecedented fading of Stingray nebula
Great things take time. This is true when it comes to many processes in the universe. For example, it takes millions of years for stars—the building blocks of the universe—to form. Then, many stars last for billions of years before they die and begin to eject shells of gas that glow against the vastness of space—what we call nebulas. It can be exceedingly rare to capture some of these processes in
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Researchers identify bacteria that can make the Bolson tortoise ill
The Bolson tortoise (Bolson Gopherus flavomarginatus) is the largest land reptile in North America. It lives mainly in dry areas, in particular, in the Chihuahua desert in northern Mexico. In recent decades, its numbers have fallen by 50%, driving the International Union for Conservation of Nature to include it on its red list and it has been classified as endangered. Land tortoises are prone to s
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Study proves bits of DNA in seawater correlate to the weight of netted fish
Humanity is a step closer to answering one of the most ancient of questions—"how many fish in the sea?"—thanks to newly-published proof that the amount of fish DNA collected in a water sample closely corresponds to kilos of fish captured in a trawl with nets.
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This is the most precise 3D map of the Milky Way ever made
Data collected by the European Space Agency's Gaia observatory has been used to create the most detailed 3D map of the galaxy ever made. The new data set could help scientists unravel many mysteries about the universe's expansion and the solar system's future. What is Gaia? Launched in 2013, the Gaia observatory is intended to observe as many of the galaxy's stars as possible. It is designed to m
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China Moon Mission: Watch Chang'e-5 Launch From the Lunar Surface
Chang'e-5 will soon attempt to dock in lunar orbit with another spacecraft, ahead of returning a cache of moon rocks and dirt to scientists on our planet.
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Inventing Us: How Inventions Shaped Humanity
Materials scientist and science writer Ainissa Ramirez talks about her latest book The Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Rocket-launching drone ready to take satellites into orbit
Aevum's RAVN-X targeting "smallsat" market with 2021 Space Force launch
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Chinese moon probe begins return to Earth with lunar samples
A Chinese lunar probe lifted off from the moon Thursday night with a cargo of lunar samples on the first stage of its return to Earth, the government space agency reported, on what is expected to be a breakthrough mission for the rising Asian space power.
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Astronomers to release most accurate data ever for nearly two billion stars
On 3 December 2020 an international team of astronomers will announce the most detailed ever catalogue of the stars in a huge swathe of our Milky Way galaxy. The measurements of stellar position and movement are in the third data release from the European Space Agency's Gaia space observatory.
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The 8 most helpful new home products of 2020
The year's most important developments in the world of home products. (3M /) To say this year has been challenging is a serious understatement. Thriving in (and after) 2020 is about gaining back some small sense of control over our lives, and that starts at home. A sanitizing vacuum helps kick pathogens out the door, a beast of an air treatment machine works to fix poor indoor air quality, and bu
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How officials will ensure the COVID-19 vaccine stays cold enough in transit
Fair distribution of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines is especially challenging because they need to be stored at extremely cold temperatures. Back in 2018, the WHO reported that over half of all vaccines are wasted worldwide due to lack of cold storage, and they were only talking about vaccines that need to be chilled or kept at standard freezer temperatures. Real-time logistics data, location tr
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COVID-19 advice may have reduced exposure to heart attack triggers
A new study suggests that COVID-19 guidance in Sweden may have reduced people's risks of having a heart attack. By using anonymous location data from mobile phones, researchers developed an aggregate picture of the activities of the Swedish population and mapped it against attendances at the country's 29 emergency cardiac angiography units.
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The UK has approved a COVID vaccine — here's what scientists now want to know
Nature, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03441-8 The Pfizer–BioNTech vaccine has passed safety and efficacy tests — but scientists still have many questions about how this and other vaccines will perform as they're rolled out to millions of people.
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Hyundai plans to build dozens of vehicles on its new modular EV platform
Hyundai's EV system combines essential components to maximize efficiency. (Hyundai/) Manufacturers can technically "electrify" vehicles by swapping out the internal combustion engine for electric parts. But, that strategy doesn't allow them to take full advantage of what EVs have to offer. To avoid that trap, Hyundai built its new Electric Global Modular Platform —or E-GMP—from scratch and it pla
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Earth Is on the Cusp of the Sixth Mass Extinction. Here's What Paleontologists Want You to Know
There have been five mass extinctions in our planet's history. The sixth will be more of a slow burn, and unlike the ones before it, humanity is to blame.
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What makes psoriasis sore: Novel role of immune system in the disease
More than 130 million people around the globe suffer from psoriasis vulgaris, a chronic condition characterized by skin inflammation, scales, and dry patches. However, its pathology is not fully clear. In a recent study, dermatology researchers from Japan have uncovered a complex cellular mechanism responsible for the onset of psoriasis and highlighted potential therapeutic targets for future trea
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Researchers developed a sequence analysis pipeline for virus discovery
A novel bioinformatics pipeline identifies both previously known and novel viruses.
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Better diabetes treatment: New insulin molecule can self-regulate blood sugar
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and biotech firm Gubra have developed a new insulin molecule that will make blood sugar regulation both easier and safer for those with type 1 diabetes.
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Higher frequency of financial reporting hinders corporate innovation
Research shows that more regular financial reporting increases managerial myopia and stifles innovation.
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Scientists peer into the 3D structure of the Milky Way
Scientists from Cardiff University have helped produce a brand-new, three-dimensional survey of our galaxy, allowing them to peer into the inner structure and observe its star-forming processes in unprecedented detail.
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Porsche og Siemens bygger anlæg til syntetisk brændstof
Pilotprojektet Haru Oni forventes at blive verdens første kommercielle produktionsanlæg til syntetisk brændstof i industriel skala .
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Meet Biden's Energy and Climate Cabinet Contenders
President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr.'s energy and environment team will have the difficult task of crafting climate policies that can bypass Congress and survive judicial review.
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Sale of Arctic Refuge Oil and Gas Leases Is Set for Early January
The Trump administration's announcement sets the stage for leases to be in the hands of oil companies before president-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. is sworn in.
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Voyager spacecraft detect new type of solar electron burst
The Voyager spacecraft continue to make discoveries even as they travel through interstellar space. In a new study, physicists report on the Voyagers' detection of cosmic ray electrons associated with eruptions from the sun — more than 14 billion miles away.
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Cluster of Alaskan islands could be single, interconnected giant volcano
A small group of volcanic islands in Alaska's Aleutian chain might be part of a single, undiscovered giant volcano, say scientists. If the researchers' suspicions are correct, the newfound volcanic caldera would belong to the same category of volcanoes as the Yellowstone Caldera and other volcanoes that have had super-eruptions with severe global consequences.
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Chaotic early solar system collisions resembled 'Asteroids' arcade game
One Friday evening in 1992, a meteorite ended a more than 150 million-mile journey by smashing into the trunk of a red Chevrolet Malibu in Peekskill, New York. Nearly 30 years later, a new analysis of that same Peekskill meteorite and 17 others has led to a new hypothesis about how asteroids formed during the early years of the solar system.
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Supernova surprise creates elemental mystery
Researchers have discovered that one of the most important reactions in the universe can get a huge and unexpected boost inside exploding stars known as supernovae.
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Incredible vision in ancient marine creatures drove an evolutionary arms race
Ancient deep sea creatures called radiodonts had incredible vision that likely drove an evolutionary arms race according to new research.
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Once in a lifetime floods to become regular occurrences by end of century
Superstorm Sandy brought flood-levels to the New York region that had not been seen in generations. Now, due to the impact of climate change, researchers have found that 100-year and 500-year flood levels could become regular occurrences for the thousands of homes surrounding Jamaica Bay, New York by the end of the century.
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Experimental study on the viscoelastic flow mixing in microfluidics
Experimental Study on the Viscoelastic Flow Mixing in Microfluidicshttps://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0029Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this article the authors Meng Zhang, Wu Zhang, Zihuang Wang and Weiqian Chen from Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA and Guangzhou University, Guangzhou, China review viscoelastic flow mi
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Not enough Hazelnuts? Our future climate points to Australia for new cultivations
The food industry is looking for new areas that are suitable for hazelnut farming to satisfy a growing global demand and to diversify supply. In a recent study, realized with a CMCC Foundation contribution, scientists analysed the effects of climate change on hazelnut production in Australia in the coming decades, revealing an expected yield increase in the southeastern coast of the country.
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Coasts drown as coral reefs collapse under warming and acidification
The coastal protection coral reefs currently provide will start eroding by the end of the century, as the world continues to warm and the oceans acidify. The rate of erosion of calcium carbonate on coral reefs will overtake the rate of accretion on the majority of present-day reefs by the end of the century.
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A new era is dawning in diagnosing sexually transmitted infections in men
Researchers and doctors from the University of Tartu and Tartu University Hospital evaluated the use of a novel revolutionary method, flow cytometry, for diagnosing urethritis in Estonian men. The study published in PLOS ONE confirmed the efficiency of the method and showed that most often urethritis was due to chlamydia. Gonorrhoea caused the strongest urethral inflammation.
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New compact model for gene regulation in higher organisms
Genes can be turned on and off as needed to adapt to environmental changes. But how do the different molecules involved interact with each other? Scientists from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) present a candidate mathematical model for gene regulation in eukaryotic cells. The study was published in PNAS.
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New COVID surveillance predicts direction, speed and acceleration of virus
A new COVID-19 global surveillance system has been developed which can dynamically track not just where the virus is now, but where it is going, how fast it will arrive and whether that speed is accelerating. The new system, the first to dynamically track the virus, is being rolled out in 195 countries Dec. 3. It also will dynamically track the virus in individual U.S. states and metropolitan area
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Mortality rate after cancer surgery drops, but gap persists between Black and white patients
Mortality rates after cancer surgery declined for Black as well as white patients during a recent ten-year period, although the mortality gap between the two groups did not narrow, according to new research by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard University investigators.
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The same vision for all primates
Primates process visual information similar to pixels in a digital camera, using small computing units located in their visual cortex. Scientists of the University of Geneva have investigated whether these computational units scale across the large differences in size between primates. The gray mouse lemur is one of the smallest of them and his visual processing units reveals that all primates, in
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US state government crisis standards of care guidelines
State crisis standards of care (CSC) guidelines in the U.S. allocate scarce health care resources among patients, and this study examined the implications of these guidelines for patients with cancer, including allocation methods, cancer-related categorical exclusions and deprioritizations, and provisions for blood products and palliative care.
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E-cigarette use by youth, young adults before, during COVID-19 pandemic
This survey study examines changes in the use of e-cigarettes by those 24 years old and younger during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Overdose-related cardiac arrests observed by emergency medical services during COVID-19 pandemic
Emerging changes in overdose-related cardiac arrests in the U.S. during the COVID-19 pandemic are described in this observational study using a large national emergency medical services database.
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New map provides scientists with head start on how to destroy cancer-related enzymes
In a new paper in the journal Cell, investigators at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute provide a guide to approximately 200 such kinases, the first comprehensive map for scientists working in a field expected to have a major impact on cancer treatment. The map, publicly available online, will assist researchers in designing molecules that target specific kinases for destruction. Such molecules could se
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Ancient migration was choice, not chance
The degree of intentionality behind ancient ocean migrations, such as that to the Ryukyu Islands between Taiwan and mainland Japan, has been widely debated. Researchers used satellite-tracked buoys to simulate ancient wayward drifters and found that the vast majority failed to make the contested crossing. They concluded that Paleolithic people 35,000-30,000 years ago must therefore have made the j
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Archaeology: Palaeolithic sea voyage to Japanese islands beyond the horizon
Modern humans may have deliberately crossed the sea to migrate to the Ryukyu Islands of southwestern Japan, even though the islands would not have been visible on the horizon when they set out, according to a study published Scientific Reports .
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The Supreme Court Is Colliding With a Less-Religious America
Updated at 12:45 p.m. ET on December 3, 2020 The Supreme Court's decision last week overturning New York State's limits on religious gatherings during the COVID-19 outbreak previewed what will likely become one of the coming decade's defining collisions between law and demography. The ruling continued the conservative majority's sustained drive to provide religious organizations more leeway to cl
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During COVID, older adults should avoid the grocery store
Older adults should avoid making trips to the grocery store during the pandemic and instead use curbside pick-up or food delivery, new data shows. The data reinforces guidance from the US Centers for Disease Control that in-person grocery shopping during the coronavirus pandemic is risky. Here, Leslie M. Kantor , professor and chair of the department of urban-global public health at the Rutgers S
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Whole-Slide Imaging
A new whole-slide scanner conveniently performs in-house whole-slide imaging in 5D.
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Breaking: Chinese Lander Takes Off From Lunar Surface
WOW! Chinese state news agency Xinhua just confirmed that the Chang'e-5 lunar lander's ascent vehicle has taken off, bringing with it the first lunar soil samples to have been collected since the mid-1970s. The return journey will take just shy of two weeks, with a landing expected in inner Mongolia around December 16 or 17. WOW! Moment of ignition of the Chang'e-5 ascent vehicle pic.twitter.com/
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Elon Musk's latest adventure
He hopes it will be a stepping stone to the Moon and Mars
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Britain becomes the first country to license a fully tested covid-19 vaccine
Inoculations with the Pfizer-BioNTech jab could start in less than a week
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Politics this week
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Business this week
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KAL's cartoon
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Report: Climate Change Is Now Causing "Worrying" Health Impacts
Global Impact Climate change is now impacting people's health and wellbeing in every part of the world . That's the conclusion of the 2020 Lancet Countdown report , published Monday in cooperation with the renowned Lancet medical journals. The report began in 2015 as an international group of experts tracking climate change and its impact on public health — and now, five years later, the report c
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Wind farm and sleep disruption
As wind power generation becomes more important, experts in Australia are examining whether wind 'farm' turbine background noise in the environmental can affect sleep and wellbeing of nearby residents. While five previous studies showed no systemic effects on common sleep markers such as time taken to fall asleep and total sleep time – they did reveal some more subtle effect on sleep such as shift
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Blackcurrants are favorable for glucose metabolism
Blackcurrants have a beneficial effect on post-meal glucose response, and the required portion size is much smaller than previously thought, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.
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Comparison of coronavirus antibody tests revealed too optimistic claims
A study by University of Tartu researchers indicates that the sensitivity of tests used to detect viral antibodies in a blood sample may differ significantly. The combination of several tests may give the best result.
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Adaptive Image Receive (AIR) coil from GE shows promise for whole-brain imaging
According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), a prototype 16-channel head Adaptive Image Receive (AIR) radiofrequency coil from GE Healthcare outperformed a conventional 8-channel head coil for in vivo whole-brain imaging, though it did not perform as well as a conventional 32-channel head coil.
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Researchers identify the bacteria that can make the Bolson tortoise become ill
The Bolson tortoise is a species indigenous to the Chihuahua desert in Mexico and is endangered. This research could help with conservation strategies for this species.
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Reproduction key to maintenance of marimo shape
A team of scientists from Hokkaido University has suggested that marimo maintain their characteristic spherical shape due to the rarity of the formation of reproductive cells.
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Public trust vital for Covid-19 vaccine programmes says WHO
Vaccination saves lives, fear endangers them, says regional director as colleagues stress need for government transparency Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The WHO has urged European countries to prepare for vaccinations against Covid-19, stressing that community acceptance will be crucial to the success of the health programmes. More than 200 Covid vaccines are under
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Best region for life on Mars was far below surface
The most habitable region for life on Mars would have been up to several miles below its surface, likely due to subsurface melting of thick ice sheets fueled by geothermal heat, a new study concludes. The study may help resolve what's known as the faint young sun paradox – a lingering key question in Mars science.
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New research on predator-prey relationships
One of the reasons that prey species migrate is to avoid predators over long time scales, this ultimately has a powerful effect on the balance of predator and prey in a given ecosystem. This is especially the case if the migration is seasonal and the predator lacks the capacity to migrate.
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World's smallest primate reveals incredible preservation of our visual system through millions of years of evolution
Primates process visual information in front of their eyes, similar to pixels in a digital camera, using small computing units located in the visual cortex of their brains. In order to understand the origins of our visual abilities, scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute in Göttingen and the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, have n
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Researchers develop a sequence analysis pipeline for virus discovery
Researchers from the University of Helsinki have developed a novel bioinformatics pipeline called Lazypipe for identifying viruses in host-associated or environmental samples.
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New research on predator-prey relationships
One of the reasons that prey species migrate is to avoid predators over long time scales, this ultimately has a powerful effect on the balance of predator and prey in a given ecosystem. This is especially the case if the migration is seasonal and the predator lacks the capacity to migrate.
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Ancient migration was choice, not chance, study finds
The degree of intentionality behind ancient ocean migrations, such as that to the Ryukyu Islands between Taiwan and mainland Japan, has been widely debated. Researchers used satellite-tracked buoys to simulate ancient wayward drifters and found that the vast majority failed to make the contested crossing. They concluded that Paleolithic people 35,000-30,000 years ago must therefore have made the j
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World's smallest primate reveals incredible preservation of our visual system through millions of years of evolution
Primates process visual information in front of their eyes, similar to pixels in a digital camera, using small computing units located in the visual cortex of their brains. In order to understand the origins of our visual abilities, scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute in Göttingen and the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, have n
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Gaia space telescope measures solar system's acceleration
The measurement of the acceleration of our solar system by astronomers of TU Dresden is a scientific highlight of the third Gaia catalog, which is now being released. With its publication on December 3, 2020, at 12:00 , the public will have access to high-precision astronomical data, such as positions, velocities, magnitudes and colors of about 1.8 billion astronomical objects.
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Researchers develop a sequence analysis pipeline for virus discovery
Researchers from the University of Helsinki have developed a novel bioinformatics pipeline called Lazypipe for identifying viruses in host-associated or environmental samples.
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The role of business in nurturing long-term diversity and inclusion | Rosalind G. Brewer
When companies think of diversity and inclusion, they too often focus on meeting metrics instead of building relationships with people of diverse backgrounds, says Starbucks COO Rosalind G. Brewer. In this personable and wide-ranging conversation with TED current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers, Brewer invites leaders to rethink what it takes to create a truly inclusive workplace — and
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Chinese Lander Sends Back Color Pictures of the Moon
Beige Moon China's lunar lander Chang'e-5 just beamed back color photos of the surface of the Moon — and they're a lot more, well, beige than what you'd expect. The spacecraft landed on the near side of the Moon earlier this week. Just hours after touchdown, the lander jumped into action, scooping up lunar soil to bring back home. It also took the opportunity to photograph its surroundings and se
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Tiny treetop flowers foster incredible beetle biodiversity
Biologist have long known that rainforest treetops support a huge number of beetle species, but why these canopies are so rich in beetle diversity has remained a mystery. New research by my colleague Susan Kirmse and me shows that flowering trees play a critical role in maintaining this diversity, and that beetles may be among the most diverse pollinators in the animal kingdom.
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How a flu virus shut down the US economy in 1872—by infecting horses
In 1872 the U.S. economy was growing as the young nation industrialized and expanded westward. Then in the autumn, a sudden shock paralyzed social and economic life. It was an energy crisis of sorts, but not a shortage of fossil fuels. Rather, the cause was a virus that spread among horses and mules from Canada to Central America.
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Tiny treetop flowers foster incredible beetle biodiversity
Biologist have long known that rainforest treetops support a huge number of beetle species, but why these canopies are so rich in beetle diversity has remained a mystery. New research by my colleague Susan Kirmse and me shows that flowering trees play a critical role in maintaining this diversity, and that beetles may be among the most diverse pollinators in the animal kingdom.
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Flood risk for low-income housing in U.S. could triple by 2050
The number of affordable housing units in the United States at risk of flooding could triple over the next three decades due to climate change, to nearly 25,000 by 2050, according to a new study from the research group Climate Central. Low-income residents in New York, Massachusetts, and New Jersey are particularly vulnerable, with each state containing thousands of affordable housing units at ris
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High speed filming reveals protein changes during photosynthesis
Photosynthesis is the primary source of energy for almost all life-on-earth. A new study, published in Nature, provide new insight into how evolution has optimized the light-driven movements of electrons in photosynthesis to achieve almost perfect overall efficiency.
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High speed filming reveals protein changes during photosynthesis
Photosynthesis is the primary source of energy for almost all life-on-earth. A new study, published in Nature, provide new insight into how evolution has optimized the light-driven movements of electrons in photosynthesis to achieve almost perfect overall efficiency.
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'Time' Names Its Kid Of The Year: Water-Testing Scientist Gitanjali Rao
Rao, a Colorado teenager who has won praise for her innovation in detecting lead levels in water, said, "I really want to put out that message: If I can do it, you can do it, and anyone can do it." (Image credit: Time)
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Gene protects against osteoarthritis in mice
A molecule previously linked to diabetes, cancer, and muscle atrophy appears to also be involved in the development of osteoarthritis, and may be a useful treatment target, new research with mice shows. Osteoarthritis is one of the most common problems associated with aging, and although therapies exist to treat the pain that results from the breakdown of the cartilage that cushions joints, there
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Pilot whale study reveals copycat calls to outsmart predators
New Curtin University research has found southern Australian long-finned pilot whales are able to mimic the calls of its natural predator and food rival – the killer whale, as a possible ploy to outsmart it.
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Amino acid connected to NAFLD could provide treatment clues
Basic science research explores the effects of impaired glycine metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease – and how to potentially use glycine-based treatment to help people with NAFLD.
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The helix of life: New study shows how 'our' RNA stably binds to artificial nucleic acids
Xeno nucleic acids are essential for the development of nucleic acid-based drugs. To be effective, they need to be able to stably bind to natural RNA (a cellular single-stranded version of the DNA, which is essential for all body processes). However, it is unclear how, if at all, RNA hybridizes with these xeno nucleic acids. A new study sheds light on this mechanism, opening doors to the developme
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NUS engineers invent fast and safe way to store natural gas for useful applications
Engineers from NUS have devised a method to convert natural gas into a non-explosive solid form known as gas hydrates, which can be easily stored and transported. Using a novel, low-toxicity additive mixture, the conversion can be completed in just 15 minutes – the fastest time ever reported.
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Spatial maps give new view of gut microbiome
What microbes are in your gut, and where?
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Hawaiian minerals increasing lung infection rates on the islands, study finds
If you have severe asthma, underlying pulmonary conditions or are immunocompromised, Hawaii's atmosphere may not be the place for you.
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Spatial maps give new view of gut microbiome
What microbes are in your gut, and where?
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Hawaiian minerals increasing lung infection rates on the islands, study finds
If you have severe asthma, underlying pulmonary conditions or are immunocompromised, Hawaii's atmosphere may not be the place for you.
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What makes the world's biggest surfable waves?
On Feb. 11, 2020, Brazilian Maya Gabeira surfed a wave off the coast of Nazaré, Portugal, that was 73.5 feet tall. Not only was this the biggest wave ever surfed by a woman, but it also turned out to be the biggest wave surfed by anyone in the 2019-2020 winter surfing season—the first time a woman has ridden the biggest wave of the year.
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Is Arctic warming behind a monster Saharan dust storm?
The Sahara Desert is the world's biggest source of dust and in 2020, it broke the June record for sending the largest and thickest dust cloud toward the Americas.
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Supercharge your microscope: Researchers share guide for ultra-precise 3-D imaging
UNSW Sydney researchers have shared step-by-step instructions to empower other scientists to enhance the resolution and stability of single-molecule microscopes.
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The floor is lava: After 1.5 billion years in flux, here's how a new, stronger crust set the stage for life on Earth
Our planet is unique in the solar system. It's the only one with active plate tectonics, ocean basins, continents and, as far as we know, life. But Earth in its current form is 4.5 billion years in the making; it's starkly different to what it was in a much earlier era.
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Paradoxen som kan vara nyckeln till effektivare vaccin
När ett nytt vaccin tillverkas använder man vanligen delar av mikroorganismens yta där flest antikroppar fastnar. Men en ny kunskapssammanställning landar i det motsatta: vaccin tycks bli effektivare om istället mindre "populära" delar används. Också coronavaccin kan vinna på detta omvända angreppssätt, menar Gunnar Lindahl, professor vid Lunds universitet. Influensa, malaria, streptokockinfektio
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Microbiologists discover key protein for controlling cell shape in magnetic bacteria
The living cells of all organisms contain a cytoskeleton that stabilizes their internal structure and external shape. This also applies to magnetotactic bacteria. They produce magnetic nanoparticles which are concatenated into intracellular chains and enable them to orient themselves to the Earth's magnetic field. Microbiologists at the University of Bayreuth have now discovered a protein in the c
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Research team develops software that cuts time, cost from gene sequencing
A team of Johns Hopkins University researchers has developed a new software that could revolutionize how DNA is sequenced, making it far faster and less expensive to map anything from yeast genomes to cancer genes.
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Microbiologists discover key protein for controlling cell shape in magnetic bacteria
The living cells of all organisms contain a cytoskeleton that stabilizes their internal structure and external shape. This also applies to magnetotactic bacteria. They produce magnetic nanoparticles which are concatenated into intracellular chains and enable them to orient themselves to the Earth's magnetic field. Microbiologists at the University of Bayreuth have now discovered a protein in the c
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Research team develops software that cuts time, cost from gene sequencing
A team of Johns Hopkins University researchers has developed a new software that could revolutionize how DNA is sequenced, making it far faster and less expensive to map anything from yeast genomes to cancer genes.
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The dangers of vaccine by press release
AstraZeneca's press release about its recent vaccine trials was filled with erroneous data. A manufacturing error meant that some participants only received half of the intended dosage. In the rush to produce a vaccine, science by press release is of growing concern. One of the bright spots of 2020 has been the collaborative effort of scientists in their search for a COVID-19 vaccine. Never befor
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Flere rygere end nogensinde har fået kommunalt rygestoptilbud
16 pct. flere rygere deltog på et kommunalt rygestoptilbud i 2019 sammenlignet med året før. Det viser ny årsrapport, der også afslører store kommunale forskelle på tilbuddene, hvilket ifølge professor i tobaksforebyggelse er problematisk.
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Potential means of improving learning and memory in people with mental illnesses
More than a dozen drugs are known to treat symptoms such as hallucinations, erratic behaviors, disordered thinking and emotional extremes associated with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses. But, drug treatments specifically able to target the learning, memory and concentration problems that may accompany such disorders remain elusive.
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Study proves bits of DNA in seawater correlate to the weight of netted fish
A breakthrough study proves DNA in seawater reveals not just species diversity but the relative biomass of ocean fish roughly as well as a "gold standard" US state government trawl with nets.The Rockefeller University, Monmouth University, New Jersey Bureau of Marine Fisheries study certifies "fishing for DNA" as an inexpensive, harmless complement to nets, acoustics and other tools used to monito
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A 'Front-Row Seat' to the Birth of a Comet
Astronomers are watching an object transform into a hyperactive comet that will head toward the inner solar system in the coming decades.
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New role for ultrasound: Imaging lungs
Advances in technique and technology have made ultrasound increasingly valuable for imaging a wide variety of medical applications, including pulmonary disease. That's remarkable, in part, because it was once thought that ultrasound, which most people associate with pregnant mothers and prenatal check-ups , would never be useful in assessing lung health. And it's important because it can improve
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Californians flee as strong winds push fire through canyons
Powerful winds pushed flames through Southern California canyons early Thursday as an out-of-control wildfire burned near homes and forced residents to flee.
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A New Theorem Maps Out the Limits of Quantum Physics
The founders of quantum mechanics understood it to be deeply, profoundly weird. Albert Einstein, for one, went to his grave convinced that the theory had to be just a steppingstone to a more complete description of nature, one that would do away with the disturbing quirks of the quantum. Then in 1964, John Stewart Bell proved a theorem that would test whether quantum theory was obscuring a full d
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Lysende robot skal fjerne coronavirus fra klasselokaler
PLUS. Odense Kommune vil teste en desinficerende robot i nogle af kommunens bygninger.
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The most life-friendly places on ancient Mars were deep below its surface
Whether ancient Mars was warm and wet or cold and arid, conditions could have been at least toasty enough to create a moist habitable environment that reached several miles below the planet's surface. (ESA/DLR/FU Berlin, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO. 3D rendered and colored by Lujendra Ojha./) The most inviting environments for life on ancient Mars might have been deep underground, suggest findings published
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Spoil Your Cat Over the Holidays With Our Favorite Gear
Between litter boxes, beds, scratchers, and trees, cats require a lot of supplies. These are our favorites.
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Astronomers Puzzled by "Ghostly" Unidentified Objects in Deep Space
In an essay for The Conversation , Western Sydney University astrophysics professor Ray Norris dishes how he and his colleagues spotted strange, unusually shaped objects in recent radio astronomical data. Norris' colleague Anna Kapinska first spotted "a picture of a ghostly circle of radio emission, hanging out in space like a cosmic smoke-ring," in September 2019, the professor recalls. "None of
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After 1.5 Billion Years in Flux, Here's How a New, Stronger Crust Set the Stage for Life on Earth
Our planet is unique in the solar system. It's the only one with active plate tectonics, ocean basins, continents and, as far as we know, life. But Earth in its current form is 4.5 billion years in the making; it's starkly different to what it was in a much earlier era. Details about how, when, and why the planet's early history unfolded as it did have largely eluded scientists, mainly because of
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Eksperimentel prostatakræftkirurgi får økonomisk indsprøjtning
Et nyt projekt, der tilbyder prostatakræftpatienter kirurgisk behandling efter endt strålebehandling, får knap en mio. kr. i støtte fra Sundheds- og Ældreministeriet. Pengene skal sikre, at flere patienter med prostatakræft overlever, siger overlæge.
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Johns Hopkins team develops software that cuts time, cost from gene sequencing
A team of Johns Hopkins University researchers has developed a new software that could revolutionize how DNA is sequenced, making it far faster and less expensive to map anything from yeast genomes to cancer genes.
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SWOG Cancer Research Network hits SABCS with high impact research
SWOG Cancer Research Network members will share results of five network-led studies at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, or SABCS, an international gathering of breast cancer physicians and researchers expected to draw 8,000 virtual attendees from more than 80 countries that runs Dec. 8-11.
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A Third Monolith Just Appeared in California
Here We Go Again Okay, seriously, who's doing this? Knock it off. A third monolith has appeared on top of Pine Mountain in Atascadero, California, as spotted by local news correspondent Connor Allen. BREAKING NEWS There is currently a monolith at the top of Pine Mountain in Atascadero!! (Photos by @Atownreporter ) pic.twitter.com/0vPhEWYkeY — Connor Allen (@ConnorCAllen) December 2, 2020 Freestan
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Menopausal palpitations causing distress
Many menopausal women report having palpitation distress. The likelihood of women reporting palpitation distress was higher with worse insomnia, depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and menopausal quality of life (QOL) issues.
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The Covid vaccine arrived quickly – but there's every reason to trust it | Charlotte Summers
It's safe, it works, and it gives a tantalising glimpse of what else might be achieved given sufficient political will Dr Charlotte Summers is a lecturer in intensive care medicine at the University of Cambridge Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Most of us have had endured some very dark days in 2020, whether trying to juggle working from home alongside schooling child
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Author Correction: Molecular estimation of neurodegeneration pseudotime in older brains
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20261-6
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Addendum: Genomic analysis on pygmy hog reveals extensive interbreeding during wild boar expansion
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20106-2
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Fåglar utan flygförmåga riskerar utrotning
Fågelarter som genom evolutionen förlorat förmågan att flyga har i högre grad blivit utrotade än fåglar som haft kvar flygförmågan, visar ny forskning från Göteborgs universitet. Vi vet idag att människans inverkan på miljön är orsak till att mängder växt- och djurarter dött ut. Mänsklig påverkan har väsentligt förändrat miljöer och har till exempel globalt orsakat utrotning av hundratals djurart
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'Stealth bomber' virus could fight metastatic cancer
Researchers have created a "stealth bomber" virus that could slip past body's defenses without detection to destroy cancer. Researchers have discussed and tested oncolytic viruses, or viruses that preferentially kill cancer cells, for decades. The FDA approved an oncolytic virus against melanoma in 2015. But against metastatic cancers , they've always faced an overwhelming barrier: the human immu
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Searching for sub-eV sterile neutrinos using two highly sensitive detectors
The standard model of particle physics only accounts for 20% of matter in the universe. Physicists have theorized that the remaining 80% is made up by so-called dark matter, which consists of particles that do not emit, absorb or reflect light and thus cannot be directly observed using any existing instruments.
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Researchers discover 16 million-year-old bat fossil
A new species of bat that is 16 million years old has been discovered by an international group that includes University of Valencia lecturers Francisco J. Ruiz Sánchez and Plini Montoya. The finding was made at the palaeontologic site of Mas d'Antolino B, in the town of l'Alcora, and corresponds to the lower Miocene in the Valencia region in Spain.
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Predicting breast cancer recurrences
A new tool combining traditional pathology with machine learning could predict which breast cancer patients actually need surgery. The technology, reported in the November issue of American Journal of Physiology — Cell Physiology (vol. 319: C910-C921; https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpcell.00280.2020), could spare women from unnecessary treatments, reduce medical expenses, and lead to a new generation o
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Anorexia patients tolerate rapid weight gain with meal-based behavioral support
A new study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers of adults hospitalized for the eating disorder anorexia nervosa has strengthened the case for promoting rapid weight gain as part of overall efforts.
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Gastric bypass surgery leads to long-term diabetes remission
More than half of adults with obesity had long-term diabetes remission following gastric bypass surgery, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
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Autism study suggests connection between repetitive behaviors, gut problems
In children with autism, repetitive behaviors and gastrointestinal problems may be connected, new research has found. The study found that increased severity of other autism symptoms was also associated with more severe constipation, stomach pain and other gut difficulties.
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Reproduction key to maintenance of marimo shape
The marimo is the aggregative form of the freshwater alga Aegagropila linnaei. In Japan, Lake Akan in Hokkaido is the best known habitat of the marimo. It is so emblematic of the lake and surrounding region that it has been designated as a special national monument. However, due to decades of deforestation and pollution, the marimo populations in Lake Akan have steeply dropped and have not recover
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Robot fleet dives for climate answers in 'marine snow'
A fleet of next-generation, deep-diving ocean robots will be deployed in the Southern Ocean in a major study of how marine life acts as a handbrake on global warming.
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Reproduction key to maintenance of marimo shape
The marimo is the aggregative form of the freshwater alga Aegagropila linnaei. In Japan, Lake Akan in Hokkaido is the best known habitat of the marimo. It is so emblematic of the lake and surrounding region that it has been designated as a special national monument. However, due to decades of deforestation and pollution, the marimo populations in Lake Akan have steeply dropped and have not recover
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The helix of life: New study shows how RNA stably binds to artificial nucleic acids
As medical research progresses, traditional treatment protocols are being rapidly exhausted. New approaches to treat diseases that do not respond to conventional drugs are the need of the hour. In search for these approaches, science has turned to a wide range of potential answers, including artificial nucleic acids. Artificial or xeno nucleic acids are similar to naturally occurring nucleic acids
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The helix of life: New study shows how RNA stably binds to artificial nucleic acids
As medical research progresses, traditional treatment protocols are being rapidly exhausted. New approaches to treat diseases that do not respond to conventional drugs are the need of the hour. In search for these approaches, science has turned to a wide range of potential answers, including artificial nucleic acids. Artificial or xeno nucleic acids are similar to naturally occurring nucleic acids
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How Dinosaurs Thrived in the Snow
Discoveries made in the past decades help show how many species coped with cold temperatures near both poles
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Slay Every Sauce and Soup With This $100 Stick Blender
Braun's new powerful and easy-to-use immersion blender is an essential kitchen upgrade.
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Underground Brine Could Be a Source of Oxygen on Mars
A new study tests a device that can efficiently split the resource's water into pure oxygen and hydrogen in Martian conditions.
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6 Ways the Coronavirus Pandemic Changed Science
COVID-19 uprooted much of human life — including how we do research. The pandemic could bring permanent changes to the field.
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The wildest engineering innovations of 2020
The year's most important developments in the world of engineering. (Rasmus Hjortshoj/) This year's top engineering feats smack of the sort of sci-fi future-gazing you can find in retro issues of Popular Science. Ski on top of a trash incineration plant—in the middle of a city! Eat bacon made from mushrooms! Control a prosthetic arm with your mind! But our winners have more going for them than ju
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DTU-rapport: Derfor skal ladestandere være smarte
PLUS. Smart styring af opladning, som udnytter elbilens egenskaber som fleksibel elforbruger, vil kunne reducere behovet for udbygningen af elnettet, lyder det i en ny DTU-rapport.
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Miley Cyrus Is Perfect for the Rock-and-Roll Revival
"I'm everything they said I would be," Miley Cyrus sings, her voice dewy with disappointment, on her new album, Plastic Hearts . She's apologizing to a lover she let down. But who's the "they"? It's you, the listener. It's the imagined audience of Hannah Montana, the fictional pop star Cyrus portrayed in her early teens on the Disney Channel. It's the actual audience of Hannah Montana who tracked
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Floods kill nine in southern Thailand
Flash floods have claimed at least nine lives in southern Thailand and affected half a million people, officials said Thursday as the region braced for even more rain.
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120,000-year-old supernova remnants detected in neighboring galaxy
Western Sydney University researchers have discovered the 'senior citizens' of our neighboring galaxy—close to 120,000-year-old remains of exploding stars known as supernova remnants.
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Rhizobium adapts lifestyles from rhizosphere to symbiosis
Rhizobia are soil-dwelling bacteria that form symbioses with legumes and provide biologically useable nitrogen as ammonium for the host plant. During symbiosis, rhizobia must adapt to several different lifestyles. These range from free-living growth in the rhizosphere, through root attachment and colonization, to passage along infection threads, differentiation into bacteroids that fix N2, and, fi
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Copernicus satellites keep eyes on icebergs for Vendée Globe
On 8 November, 33 intrepid sailors set off from Les Sables-D'Olonne in western France to take part in the most extreme, solo, non-stop, race around the world: the Vendée Globe. The route of around 45 000 km takes them down through the Atlantic and into the heart of the Southern Ocean—which is where they are heading now. Thanks to information from satellites, an ice exclusion zone has been establis
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Observations unveil dynamic magnetosphere of the magnetar Swift J1818.0−1607
Using the Parkes radio telescope, astronomers have investigated a radio-loud magnetar known as Swift J1818.0−1607. Results of these observations, providing more insights into the properties of this magnetar, unveiling its highly active and dynamic magnetosphere. The findings are reported in a paper published November 25 on the arXiv pre-print server.
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A three-dimensional view of the Milky Way
In our Milky Way, there are about 200 billion suns as well as large quantities of gas, some of which serves as raw material for star births. The gas collects in compact lumps but also appears as extended molecular clouds. Astronomers have used the Apex sub-millimeter telescope in Chile to look deep into the galactic plane and measure the interstellar medium. They studied the distribution of the co
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New SIMPLEx mission small satellite to blaze trails studying lunar surface
A small-satellite mission to understand the lunar water cycle—detecting and mapping water on the lunar surface in order to investigate how its form, abundance, and location relate to geology—has received NASA approval to proceed with the next phase of its development.
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Physicists describe a new type of amorphous solid bodies
Many substances with different chemical and physical properties, from diamonds to graphite, are made up of carbon atoms. Amorphous forms of solid carbon do not have a fixed crystal structure and consist of structural units—nanosized graphene particles. A team of physicists from RUDN University studied the structure of amorphous carbon and suggested classifying it as a separate type of amorphous so
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Rhizobium adapts lifestyles from rhizosphere to symbiosis
Rhizobia are soil-dwelling bacteria that form symbioses with legumes and provide biologically useable nitrogen as ammonium for the host plant. During symbiosis, rhizobia must adapt to several different lifestyles. These range from free-living growth in the rhizosphere, through root attachment and colonization, to passage along infection threads, differentiation into bacteroids that fix N2, and, fi
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COVID Pandemic Reduces Seismic Noise
Vibrations in the earth's crust generated by human activity dropped as lockdowns went into effect — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Cooling electronics efficiently with graphene-enhanced heat pipes
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have found that graphene-based heat pipes can help solve the problems of cooling electronics and power systems used in avionics, data centers and other power electronics.
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Bet on the geeks to boost the economy
Paradoxically, falling productivity in research strengthens the case for increasing spending on it
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To protect research subjects, account for the internet
The old ethics rules no longer offer adequate protection to field research subjects, say social scientists. As a result, individual people and even entire societies are left vulnerable to financial ruin, emotional manipulation, and more. "There's evidence that some of these recent experiments have stoked racial resentment, changed election outcomes, and caused huge societal divisions." In their p
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Elon Musk: SpaceX Will Send People to Mars in 4 to 6 Years
SpaceX and Tesla CEO Elon Musk likes to make bold claims. Sometimes he comes through, and we end up with a reusable Falcon 9 rocket, but Musk also has a tendency to get carried away, particularly when it comes to Mars. The SpaceX CEO has long promised a Mars colony on an aggressive, and some might say ill-advised timeline. Now, he's doubling down with a claim that SpaceX will land the first human
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Sundhedsstyrelsen udskyder beslutning om centralisering af børneonkologien
Efter massiv kritik flere steder i landet har Sundhedsstyrelsen valgt at udskyde sin beslutning om, hvordan behandlingen af kræftramte børn i fremtiden skal organiseres. En ny plan ventes på plads til foråret.
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Robot fleet dives for climate answers in 'marine snow'
Sailing from Hobart, twenty researchers aboard CSIRO's RV Investigator hope to capture the most detailed picture yet of how marine life in the Southern Ocean captures and stores carbon from the atmosphere.
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A first step to plant made dengue virus vaccines
Researchers have used plants to produce virus-like particles (VLPs) of the dengue virus in a potential first step towards novel vaccines against the growing threat.
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Study plots pythons' history in Australia
Pythons first arrived in Australia from Asia around 23 million years ago and then adapted to their new home by becoming incredibly diverse, according to new research from The Australian National University (ANU).
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A first step to plant made dengue virus vaccines
Researchers have used plants to produce virus-like particles (VLPs) of the dengue virus in a potential first step towards novel vaccines against the growing threat.
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'Unjustifiable': new report shows how the nation's gas expansion puts Australians in harm's way
Australia's latest emissions data, released this week, contained one particularly startling, and unjustifiable, fact. Against all odds, in a year when emissions fell in almost every sector, Australia's export gas industry still managed to do more climate damage.
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Study plots pythons' history in Australia
Pythons first arrived in Australia from Asia around 23 million years ago and then adapted to their new home by becoming incredibly diverse, according to new research from The Australian National University (ANU).
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Pacific killer whales are dying—new research shows why
Killer whales are icons of the northeastern Pacific Ocean. They are intimately associated with the region's natural history and First Nations communities. They are apex predators, with females living as long as 100 years old, and recognized a sentinels of ecosystem health—and some populations are currently threatened with extinction.
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Pacific killer whales are dying—new research shows why
Killer whales are icons of the northeastern Pacific Ocean. They are intimately associated with the region's natural history and First Nations communities. They are apex predators, with females living as long as 100 years old, and recognized a sentinels of ecosystem health—and some populations are currently threatened with extinction.
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Smithsonian Scholars Pick Their Favorite Books of 2020
This wide-ranging list offers much-needed context for the issues at the forefront of the national conversation
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Mask up without breaking out. Here's how to prevent pandemic acne.
Maskne is preventable and treatable. And no, it's not excuse to not wear a mask. (Andrea Piacquadio / Pexels/) Masks are an effective and easy way to protect ourselves and each other from COVID-19. Wearing one when you're out and about is critical to fighting the pandemic . But because they rest directly on your skin, they can wreak havoc on your beautiful face. Ok, let's talk about maskne. This
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Climate change is resulting in profound, immediate and worsening health impacts, over 120 researchers say
Climate change is resulting in profound, immediate and worsening health impacts, and no country is immune, a major new report from more than 120 researchers has declared.
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The Arecibo Observatory Is More Than Just a Telescope
The world's second largest radio telescope collapsed on Tuesday. But its legacy is indestructible.
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Stop Scapegoating Progressives
Updated at 11:01 a.m. ET on December 3, 2020. For weeks, President Donald Trump has spread misinformation by playing up the significance of voter fraud during the election without evidence, while playing down the significance of COVID-19, despite the evidence all around him. He has left his followers infected in more ways than one, harming themselves and others. But misinformation is hardly new f
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Pilot whale study reveals copycat calls to outsmart predators
New Curtin University research has found southern Australian long-finned pilot whales are able to mimic the calls of its natural predator and food rival—the killer whale, as a possible ploy to outsmart it.
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Researchers measure electron emission to improve understanding of laser-based metal 3-D printing
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have taken a promising step in improving the reliability of laser-based metal 3-D printing techniques by measuring the emission of electrons from the surface of stainless steel during laser processing.
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K9 chemistry: A safer way to train detection dogs
Trained dogs are incredible chemical sensors, far better at detecting explosives, narcotics and other substances than even the most advanced technological device. But one challenge is that dogs have to be trained, and training them with real hazardous substances can be inconvenient and dangerous.
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Water samples reveal microplastics in remote Patagonian fjord system
New research has found microplastics in every sample taken from a vast fjord system in remote Chilean Patagonia, showing the immense global scale of marine plastic pollution. Cristóbal Castillo and his research team from the Universidad de Concepción published their findings last month in the Marine Pollution Bulletin.
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Toxic waste dumping in the Gulf of Guinea amounts to environmental racism
Toxic waste and electronic waste (e-waste) is generated from a wide range of industries—such as health, hydrocarbon or manufacturing—and can come in many forms, such as sludges or gas. E-waste is used electronic items that are nearing the end of their useful life, and are discarded or given to be recycled. If these types of waste aren't properly discarded they can cause serious harm to human healt
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Pilot whale study reveals copycat calls to outsmart predators
New Curtin University research has found southern Australian long-finned pilot whales are able to mimic the calls of its natural predator and food rival—the killer whale, as a possible ploy to outsmart it.
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K9 chemistry: A safer way to train detection dogs
Trained dogs are incredible chemical sensors, far better at detecting explosives, narcotics and other substances than even the most advanced technological device. But one challenge is that dogs have to be trained, and training them with real hazardous substances can be inconvenient and dangerous.
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Ingen kan med sikkerhed forklare voldsom stigning i antallet af knæproteseoperationer
På to år er antallet af knæproteseoperationer steget med knap 30 pct. Svaret på den markante udvikling gemmer sig formentlig i en blanding af flere overvægtige, stigende levealder og en forventning om en fysisk aktiv tredje alder.
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Höghastighetsfilm avslöjar fotsyntesens ultrasnabba protein
Forskare vid Göteborgs universitet har med metoden tidsupplöst kristallografi kunnat följa de otroligt kortlivade förändringar som sker i ett protein vid fotosyntes. Med hjälp av ljuset stabiliseras strukturella förändringar i proteinet inom en tidsskala av pikosekunder. En pikosekund är en miljondels miljondels sekund. Nästan allt liv på jorden får energi från fotosyntesens kemiska reaktioner. D
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Foals' keyboardist Edwin says 'tour differently' to help climate
Keyboardist Edwin Congreave says musicians should stop global tours to slow climate change.
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Plastic bottles dumped in rivers can travel thousands of kilometres
Tracking the movements of plastic bottles released along the Ganges river shows they can travel as far as 3000 kilometres in less than 100 days.
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Covid-19 news: UK authorises Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for emergency use
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Health impacts of climate change have reached 'worrying' levels
The impacts of climate change on people's health around the world, including deaths due to heatwaves, are at their "most worrying" since an international initiative began tracking them five years ago
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Who Will Get COVID Vaccines First and Who Will Have to Wait
In the U.S., health workers come first, but for other groups scientists and policy makers are weighing a mix of disease risks, logistics and ethics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Who Will Get COVID Vaccines First and Who Will Have to Wait
In the U.S., health workers come first, but for other groups scientists and policy makers are weighing a mix of disease risks, logistics and ethics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The best entertainment tech of 2020
The year's most important developments in the world of entertainment. (Epic/) No time in history has been better for getting lost in a virtual world, and we've found the best new products to help you escape. This year brings a new fleet of headphones that perfectly block out the noise around us, consoles that dish out colorful landscapes, and new ways to make content of our own to share. It will
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Giving Gadgets As Gifts? Get Ready to Answer These Questions
Bestowing tech gifts means anticipating confusion about privacy and recurring fees. Here's how to ease the minds of loved ones this year.
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Do Diverse Corporate Boards Lead to a Fairer Workplace?
Nasdaq wants at least one woman and one underrepresented minority among directors at listed companies. The proposal goes further than most, but will it matter?
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Apple's New iPad Air Is a Great Tablet With a Few Quirks
The 2020 edition of the iPad Air is light, powerful, convenient. It's a good buy as long as you don't mind a few small annoyances.
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Warp Speed, Atomic Structure, and the Future of Vaccines
John Mascola, who worked on the research that led to the Moderna shot, thinks Covid-19 proves we have to prep for the next virus, too.
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Gaia: Most accurate data ever for nearly two billion stars
Today (3 December), an international team of astronomers announced the most detailed ever catalogue of the stars in a huge swathe of our Milky Way galaxy. The measurements of stellar positions, movement, brightness and colours are in the third early data release from the European Space Agency's Gaia space observatory, now publicly available. Initial findings include the first optical measurement o
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Conflicts of Interest and COVID
Financial incentives can be a factor in pandemic policy decisions—albeit frequently at a subconscious and unintentional level — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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When Same-Sex Mating Makes Reproductive Sense
Under the right circumstances, indiscriminate mating with both males and females can enhance animals' evolutionary success — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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When Same-Sex Mating Makes Reproductive Sense
Under the right circumstances, indiscriminate mating with both males and females can enhance animals' evolutionary success — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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America Needs a COVID-19 Reckoning
T he coronavirus pandemic is a far greater economic and societal threat than anything the United States has faced in recent memory. The 9/11 attacks took nearly 3,000 lives . COVID-19 has taken a quarter million. The nation's responses to these two threats—one a palpable and immediate terrorist attack; the other a virus that crossed our borders sight unseen—have been wildly divergent. About a yea
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When Same-Sex Mating Makes Reproductive Sense
Under the right circumstances, indiscriminate mating with both males and females can enhance animals' evolutionary success — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Daily briefing: UK approves Pfizer–BioNTech COVID vaccine
Nature, Published online: 02 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03429-4 The UK will start to roll out the Pfizer–BioNTech vaccine within days. Plus, China's Chang'e-5 spacecraft successfully lands on the Moon and we are 'within striking distance' of the Paris climate goals.
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Hackere angriber MacOS-brugere med en opdateret malware
Der er fundet en ny malware, som installerer en bagdør i de computere, den rammer. Angrebene kan forbindes til en vietnamesisk-støttet hackergruppe.
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Rapport: Brint i personbiler er en kommerciel fejlsatsning
PLUS. Brint er for dyrt og ikke tilstrækkelig energieffektiv, konkluderer en ny rapport fra analysebureauet IDTechEx Research. Men brint vil spille en afgørende rolle i forhold til at gøre tung transport CO2-neutral.
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Gaia: astronomers to release most accurate data ever for nearly two billion stars
On 3 December 2020 an international team of astronomers will announce the most detailed ever catalogue of the stars in a huge swathe of our Milky Way galaxy. The measurements of stellar position and movement are in the third data release from the European Space Agency's Gaia space observatory and will be publicly available.
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Kunstig intelligens knækker proteinfoldningsproblemet
Aminosyrer bestemmer, hvordan proteiner folder sig sammen og får deres virkemåde, men almindelige beregninger kan ikke forudsige hvordan. Et program baseret på kunstig intelligens trænet på 170.000 kendte proteiner kan nu løse opgaven.
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SMS på stereoider: Næste generation er klar – men kun for Android-brugere
PLUS. De danske teleselskaber og Google har for alvor rullet næste generation af SMS ud. Men langt over halvdelen af de danske mobiltelefoner kan ikke benytte den nye RCS-standard.
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Astronomers unveil most detailed 3D map yet of Milky Way
Images will enable scientists to measure acceleration of solar system and mass of galaxy Astronomers have unveiled the most precise 3D map yet of the Milky Way , an achievement that promises to shed fresh light on the workings of the galaxy and the mysteries of the broader universe. The vast electronic atlas was compiled from data gathered by the European Space Agency's Gaia observatory which has
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This chart shows how far we've come in fighting cancer
The past 87 years has seen a steady march of progress in cancer prevention, screening, and treatment. (In-House Int./) For much of the 20th century, cancer was an unspeakable diagnosis. Doctors often wouldn't tell patients about their illness because they generally couldn't treat it, and they considered it unethical to take away a person's hope. The equation began to shift when Richard Nixon sign
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Oxford vaccine professor Sarah Gilbert on working as the world watches
The scientist leading a team on a global rescue mission still had to raise money to fund her research
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Hackers Are Targeting the Covid-19 Vaccine 'Cold Chain'
As vaccines await US approval, a sophisticated global phishing campaign has tried to harvest credentials from companies involved in their distribution.
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This Notorious Botnet Has an Alarming New Trick
The hackers behind TrickBot have begun probing victim PCs for vulnerable firmware, which would let them persist on devices undetected.
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COVID-19 pneumonia paper earns expression of concern — for being similar to a pre-pandemic article
Researchers in China have received an expression of concern for a recent paper on COVID-19 pneumonia after editors were alerted to suspicious similarities between the tables in the article and those in a 2018 study by members of the same group. In case you missed that: The pandemic started long after 2018. The article, "Lung … Continue reading
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Trump's Election Litigation Will Have Lasting Effects
As most people know by now, the dozens of lawsuits filed by the Trump campaign and Republican supporters aimed at overturning Joe Biden's win have roundly failed. The public also seems to be gradually accepting the reality that the courts are not going to intervene in this election. Donald Trump himself recently told the Fox News presenter Maria Bartiromo, "The problem is it's hard to get into th
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Measuring Your Happiness Can Help Improve It
" How to Build a Life " is a biweekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. O n a scale of 0 to 10, I'd say my happiness ranks at about a 6. I'd guess my wife's is at least a 9. I try not to envy her natural Spanish alegría , but sometimes it's hard. Still, I'm glad to know I'm a 6, because, as a famous management maxim puts it, "You can't manage what you don't mea
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Iowa Is What Happens When Government Does Nothing
Updated on December 4, 2020 at 10:22 a.m. ET. IOWA CITY, IOWA—Nick Klein knew the man wasn't going to make it through the night. So the 31-year-old nurse at the University of Iowa ICU put on his gown, his gloves, his mask, and his face shield. He went into the patient's room, held a phone to his ear, and tried hard not to cry while he listened to the man's loved ones take turns saying goodbye. Wh
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Application of Raman spectroscopy and Machine Learning algorithms for fruit distillates discrimination
Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78159-8
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Metabolic reprogramming of osteoclasts represents a therapeutic target during the treatment of osteoporosis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-77892-4
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ALK variants, PD-L1 expression, and their association with outcomes in ALK-positive NSCLC patients
Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78152-1 ALK variants, PD-L1 expression, and their association with outcomes in ALK -positive NSCLC patients
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Biomimicking properties of cellulose nanofiber under ethanol/water mixture
Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78100-z
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Forecasting the long-term trend of COVID-19 epidemic using a dynamic model
Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78084-w
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An investigation of reconstituted terlipressin infusion stability for use in hepatorenal syndrome
Scientific Reports, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78044-4
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Planning a postdoc before moving to industry? Think again
Nature, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03109-3 Experience as a postdoctoral researcher might not fast-track your career outside academia, Julie Gould discovers.
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Brister i stöd till lågpresterande elever
Lågpresterande elever erbjuds förenklade uppgifter som sänker förväntningarna istället för stödåtgärder som lyfter dem till samma nivå som övriga elever. Det visar en enkätstudie med 1 700 elever. Enligt skollagen ska alla lågpresterande elever, alltså de elever som har svårt att nå kunskapsmålen, få extra anpassningar och särskilt stöd som hjälper dem att klara skolan. Trots det lämnar en av fyr
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The way we express grief for strangers is changing
In late March, Claire Rezba heard about the tragic death of Diedre Wilkes . Wilkes, a 42-year-old mammogram technician, had died alone of covid-19 in her home, her four-year-old child near her body. Rezba, a physician based in Richmond, Virginia, was shaken. "That story resonated with me," she says. "She was about my age." Wilkes's death also heightened Rezba's anxiety and her fears of bringing t
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FN-rapport: Trods klimakrise øges produktionen af olie kul og gas
Det går den forkerte vej. Produktionen af fossile brændstoffer forventes at stige med det dobbelte af, hvad der stemmer overens med Paris-aftalens mål om holde den globale opvarmning til 1,5 grader eller under 2 grader.
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Pandemic Shaming Can Backfire. Here's a Better Way.
As the pandemic continues to rage, the safest thing to do this holiday season is to avoid gatherings with friends and extended family. But blanket demands for abstinence can backfire. A better guiding principle may be harm reduction, a concept first developed by and for people who inject drugs.
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A droplet microfluidic platform for high-throughput photochemical reaction discovery
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19926-z Translating discovery scale vial-based batch reactions to continuous flow scale-up conditions is limited by significant time and resource constraints. Here, the authors report a photochemical droplet microfluidic platform, which enables high throughput reaction discovery in flow to generate pharmaceutically
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Promoting CO2 methanation via ligand-stabilized metal oxide clusters as hydrogen-donating motifs
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20004-7 Electroreduction uses renewable energy to upgrade carbon dioxide to value-added chemicals and fuels. Here, the authors design a suite of ligand-stabilized metal oxide clusters to modulate the reduction pathways on a copper catalyst, enabling record activity for CO2-to-methane conversion.
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Laser photonic-reduction stamping for graphene-based micro-supercapacitors ultrafast fabrication
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19985-2 Microfabrication for cost-effective miniaturized energy storage devices remains a challenge. Here, the authors propose a spatially shaped femtosecond laser method, which is ultrafast, one-step, high resolution and large-scale, for use in patterning flexible high-performance micro-supercapacitors.
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Upconversion NIR-II fluorophores for mitochondria-targeted cancer imaging and photothermal therapy
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19945-w Currently available mitochondria-targeted fluorescent dyes emit only one color in the visible or NIR-I and their applications are limited. Here, the authors develop upconversion mitochondria-targeted NIR-II fluorophores for synchronous upconversion-mitochondria-targeted cell imaging, in vivo NIR-II osteosarc
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