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Researchers discover new particle in the blood of septic patients
Researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have found that people with sepsis have never-before-seen particles in their blood. The scientists are the first to show that these particles, called elongated neutrophil-derived structures (ENDS), break off of immune cells and change their shape as they course through the body.
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Coronavirus infection rate drops across UK, data show
Latest estimate for R value falls to between 0.8 and 1, separate report reveals
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Divers find Nazis' Enigma code machine in Baltic Sea
German divers who recently fished an Enigma encryption machine out of the Baltic Sea, used by the Nazis to send coded messages during World War II, handed their rare find over to a museum for restoration on Friday.
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Study suggests most "dark web" users are not engaging in illicit activities
Despite its reputation as a tool for criminals, only a small percentage of Tor users were actually going to the dark web. The rate was higher in free countries and lower in countries with censored internet access. The findings are controversial, and may be limited by their methodology to be general assumptions. Various parts of the internet have earned stereotypes about how people use them. Some
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Lab-Grown Chicken Sandwich Tastes Like Real Thing, Says Person Who Ate It
Lab-To-Table In Israel, a new half-lab-half-restaurant called the Chicken is the first in the world to offer lab-grown meat to diners. The restaurant, which gives out cultured chicken burgers for free — the texture of chicken breast is difficult to mimic — seems to have nailed the flavor and texture of the fried chicken sandwich, according to The Guardian correspondent Oliver Holmes , who tested
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Satellite tag tracks activity levels of highly migratory species across the vast ocean
MIAMI–Scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and Wildlife Computers, Inc. today announced the release of a new activity data product application for marine animal tracking. The technology is designed to remotely track and transmit data gathered on an animal's activity levels over several months along with the temperatures and depths they exp
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Secukinumab in children with plaque psoriasis: Study unsuitable for benefit assessment
Secukinumab in children with plaque psoriasis: study unsuitable for benefit assessmentThe comparator group was not treated appropriately. Firstly, therapy in this group remained unchanged despite non-response, and secondly, it was continued for longer than approved.
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Donor stem cell transplant shown to improve survival in older patients with MDS
A new clinical trial offers the most compelling evidence to date that a donor stem cell transplant can improve survival rates for older patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators report at the virtual 62nd American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting.
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The climate changed rapidly alongside sea ice decline in the north
Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen have, in collaboration with Norwegian researchers in the ERC Synergy project, ICE2ICE, have shown that abrupt climate change occurred as a result of widespread decrease of sea ice. This scientific breakthrough concludes a long-running debate on the mechanisms causing abrupt climate change during the glacial period. It also documen
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Methanethiol, a potential new feedstock in C1 chemistry
Catalytic conversion of molecules with one carbon atom such as methane, carbon dioxide (CO2), methanol (CH3OH) and others into higher-value chemicals is of major importance for a viable and sustainable chemical industry. Ph.D. candidate Miao Yu, of the TU/e Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, explored the synthesis of an alternative building block, methanethiol (CH3SH)—the sulfur ana
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Ionic defect landscape in perovskite solar cells revealed
The group of so-called metal halide perovskites as materials has revolutionized the field of photovoltaics in recent years. Generally speaking, metal halide perovskites are crystalline materials that follow the structure ABX3, with varying composition. Here, A, B, and X can represent a combination of different organic and inorganic ions. These materials have a number of properties that are ideal f
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Can countries end overfishing and plastic pollution in just 10 years?
In my career as a marine biologist, I've been fortunate enough to visit some of the most remote islands in the world. These beautiful places continue to remind me why I have this job in the first place, but they also bring home the pervasive influence of human societies. Uninhabited bird colonies on the Canadian West Coast, remote tropical Japanese islands, and tiny bits of land in South East Asia
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I'm an astronomer and I think aliens may be out there—but UFO sightings aren't persuasive
If intelligent aliens visit the Earth, it would be one of the most profound events in human history.
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The Voyagers Found a Small Surprise in Interstellar Space
The missions that humankind has sent farthest into space, a pair of NASA spacecraft called the Voyagers, are billions of miles from Earth. The last time one of them took a picture of its surroundings was in 1990 , after flying by Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, and Uranus on its way to interstellar space, the mysterious expanse between stars. This far beyond the planets, there's not much to see. But th
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Covid infection rates fall across most of England, Northern Ireland and Scotland
New ONS figures reveal the impact of stricter lockdown measures Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The percentage of people testing positive for coronavirus is falling across almost all of England, as well as in Northern Ireland and Scotland, as new figures reveal the impact of tighter restrictions on transmission. According to the Office for National Statistics , which
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'Harvesting' microparticles from a liquid jet
Microspheres, microlenses and microfibers can now be produced by irradiating a fluid jet with ultraviolet light. The result is that locally, a polymer of a desired shape is formed. This process, called in-air photopolymerization, enables manufacturing of a wide range of bio-inspired microparticles. The technique is faster than existing techniques and delivers particles of very constant quality. Re
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First physics results from prototype detector published
The DUNE collaboration has published their first scientific paper based on data collected with the ProtoDUNE single-phase detector located at CERN's Neutrino Platform. The results show that the detector is performing with greater than 99% efficiency, making it not only the largest, but also the best-performing liquid-argon time projection chamber to date. Scientists now are using their findings to
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As the pandemic rages, the U.S. could use a little bit more 'samfundssind'
In recent years, the English-speaking world has found two Danish concepts, 'pyt' and 'hygge,' useful for dealing with anxiety and stress.
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Protein storytelling to address the pandemic
In the last five decades, we've learned a lot about the secret lives of proteins—how they work, what they interact with, the machinery that makes them function—and the pace of discovery is accelerating.
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Protein storytelling to address the pandemic
In the last five decades, we've learned a lot about the secret lives of proteins—how they work, what they interact with, the machinery that makes them function—and the pace of discovery is accelerating.
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Forsker om ny biodiversitetspakke: Statsskovene kan ikke stå alene
Regeringen har vedtaget en ny biodiversitetspakke, der skal skabe 13 nye naturnationalparker. Det vigtigste bliver dog at kunne få de private jorder med i parkerne, vurderer miljøøkonom med speciale i biodiversitet.
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Unlocking the secrets of chemical bonding with machine learning
A new machine learning approach offers important insights into catalysis, a fundamental process that makes it possible to reduce the emission of toxic exhaust gases or produce essential materials like fabric.
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Project 5-100 universities see a dramatic increase in publications in leading journals
Nataliya Matveeva, Ivan Sterligov, and Maria Yudkevich have analyzed the research activity of universities participating in Russia's Academic Excellence Project 5-100. Overall, the quality of publications of these universities has improved. Collectively, participating universities have tripled their number of publications in reputable journals in the past three years, and researchers have begun to
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Researchers uncover key clues about the solar system's history
In a new paper published in the journal Nature Communications Earth and Environment, researchers at the University of Rochester were able to use magnetism to determine, for the first time, when carbonaceous chondrite asteroids—asteroids that are rich in water and amino acids—first arrived in the inner solar system. The research provides data that helps inform scientists about the early origins of
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Solar telescope releases first image of a sunspot
The world's largest solar observatory, the U.S. National Science Foundation's Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope, just released its first image of a sunspot. Although the telescope is still in the final phases of completion, the image is an indication of how the telescope's advanced optics and four-meter primary mirror will give scientists the best view of the Sun from Earth throughout the next sola
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Detecting solar neutrinos with the Borexino experiment
Neutrinos are chargeless particles with about a mass about a millionth that of an electron that are created by the nuclear processes that occur in the Sun and other stars. These particles are often colorfully described as the 'ghosts' of the particle zoo because they interact so weakly with matter. A paper published in EPJ C by the Borexino collaboration—including XueFeng Ding, Postdoc Associate o
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New CCNY-developed resource measures severity of work-related depression
First came their pioneering research a few years ago linking burnout and depression. Now CCNY psychologist Irvin Schonfeld and his University of Neuchâtel collaborator Renzo Bianchi present the Occupational Depression Inventory [ODI], a measure designed to quantify the severity of work-attributed depressive symptoms and establish provisional diagnoses of job-ascribed depression.
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COVID-19 pandemic responsible for decrease in hepatitis C testing
New research from Boston Medical Center finds that the COVID-19 emergency systemic changes made to decrease in-person visits during the pandemic have led to a decrease in hospital-wide Hepatitis C (HCV) testing by 50 percent, and a reduction in new HCV diagnoses by more than 60 percent.
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Protein storytelling to address the pandemic
Computer molecular physics has contributed to the understanding of protein behavior by creating 3D models of molecular machines and setting them in motion. Researchers at Stony Brook University are using the Frontera supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to make structure predictions for 19 proteins from the SARS-CoV-2 virus about which little is known. Their team uses a method they
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BC Partners seeks to sell Springer Nature stake to itself
Private equity transaction could value the academic publisher at about €6bn
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Lider du av smärtor efter covid-19?
Efter att ha varit sjuk i covid-19 drabbas en del av smärta och domningar i armar och ben. Inflammation på nerverna tros vara anledningen till att symptomen uppstår enligt ny studie. I videon berättar neurologen om när du ska söka vård och hur hjälpen kan se ut.
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Betyder det danske oliestop overhovedet noget for klimaet?
Fra 2050 skal det være slut med det danske olieeventyr. Her er de vigtigste spørgsmål og svar til at forstå, hvad det betyder for klimaet.
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Vaccines and the appliance of science
Inoculating the world would be impossible without the humble fridge
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Overlooked No More: Barbara Waxman Fiduccia, Reproductive Rights Advocate
A sexual health educator and counselor in Los Angeles, she challenged a dominant culture that viewed people with disabilities as asexual beings.
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Teddy Roosevelt Is Basically a Fantasy Character
Erin Lindsey's Rose Gallagher books give America's 26th president the paranormal cowboy stories he deserves.
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Unlocking the secrets of chemical bonding with machine learning
In a report published in Nature Communications, Hongliang Xin, associate professor of chemical engineering at Virginia Tech, and his team of researchers developed a Bayesian learning model of chemisorption, or Bayeschem for short, aiming to use artificial intelligence to unlock the nature of chemical bonding at catalyst surfaces.
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Hayabusa-2: Rocks from an asteroid set for delivery to Earth
A Japanese spacecraft has released a container with material grabbed from a primitive space rock.
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Get Ready for False Side Effects
We're in the beginning of the vaccine endgame now: regulatory approval and actual distribution/rollout into the population. The data for the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines continue to look good (here's a new report on the longevity of immune respons e after the Moderna one), with the J&J and Novavax efforts still to report. The AZ/Oxford candidate is more of a puzzle, thanks to some very po
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Covid vaccines offer chance for big pharma to improve its image
They make life-saving medicines, but no one likes them. Could this year be a turning point? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Never before has the world awaited a new medicine with such bated breath. A vaccine for Covid-19 has the potential to unlock society and save millions of people from death and serious disease, and the hero of the hour is an industry that is ofte
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Elon Musk's Boring Company Turned Its Vegas Tunnel Into a "Rave"
Tunnel Rave Elon Musk's Boring Company clearly had a lot of fun decorating its Las Vegas tunnel. A video uploaded to the company's Twitter shows the entire Las Vegas Convention Center Loop terminal lit up in gaudy RGB lighting, pulsating in waves of rainbow colors like an overpriced trophy gaming PC. The video also shows off a powerful sound system, pumping out EDM to go with the flashing lights.
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Immune Response In Animals Good News For COVID-19 Vaccine Development
Researchers found that a class of antibodies in a monkey's blood provides protection from COVID-19. If that hold true for humans, a blood test may predict whether a vaccine candidate is working. (Image credit: CMB/Getty Images)
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Project 5-100 universities see a dramatic increase in publications in leading journals
A team of HSE researchers have analyzed the research activity of universities participating in Russia's Academic Excellence Project 5-100. Overall, the quality of publications of these universities has improved. Collectively, participating universities have tripled their number of publications in reputable journals in the past three years, and researchers have begun to collaborate with each other
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Hubble captures unprecedented fading of Stingray nebula
Astronomers have caught a rare look at a rapidly fading shroud of gas around an aging star. Archival data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope reveal that the nebula Hen 3-1357, nicknamed the Stingray nebula, has faded precipitously over just the past two decades. Witnessing such a swift rate of change in a planetary nebula is exceeding rare, say researchers.
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Biologists from RUDN University discovered the secret of flaxseed oil with long shelf life
Biologists from RUDN University working together with their colleagues from the Institute of Molecular Biology of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Flax studied the genes that determine the fatty acid composition in flaxseed oil and identified polymorphisms in six of them. The team also found out what gene variations could extend the shelf life of flaxseed oil. This data can be
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Researchers urge priority vaccination for individuals with diabetes
Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers have discovered individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes infected with COVID-19 are three times more likely to have a severe illness or require hospitalization compared with people without diabetes.
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Rochester researchers uncover key clues about the solar system's history
Researchers have used magnetism to determine, for the first time, when asteroids that are rich in water and amino acids first arrived in the inner solar system.
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Digital breast tomosynthesis improves invasive cancer detection
Breast cancer screening with digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) offers significant advantages over digital mammography, including improved cancer detection and lower false negative rates, according to a new study.
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Inouye Solar Telescope releases first image of a sunspot
The US NSF's Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope just released its first image of a sunspot. The telescope's four-meter primary mirror will give the best views of the sun from Earth throughout the next solar cycle. This image is an indication of the telescope's advanced optics. The image is released along with the first of a series of Inouye-related articles featured in the Solar Physics journal.
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Scientists find the "magic number" that links forces of the universe
A team of physicists carried out experiments to determine the precise value of the fine-structure constant. This pure number describes the strength of the electromagnetic forces between elementary particles. The scientists improved the accuracy of this measurement by 2.5 times. Physicists determined with tremendous accuracy the value of what's been called "a magic number" and considered one of th
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US Official Claims China Is Testing Biologically Enhanced Supersoldiers
Rebuild Him John Ratcliffe, the U.S. director of national intelligence, says that China is using CRISPR technology to try and gene-hack members of the military into supersoldiers. It's a provocative claim, and just one of many topics Ratcliffe breezed through in a Wall Street Journal op-ed he penned to argue that China is the greatest threat to the U.S. and the world. It's certainly possible that
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RUDN University chemists synthesized new fluorescent substances for medical applications
Indolizines are a group of substances with biological and optical properties. A team of chemists from RUDN University developed a new approach to the synthesis of indolizines using pyridinium salts and enamiones. The new substances turned out to be able to emit light in the green range which can be useful for medical applications.
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Immunity passports: Ethical conflict and opportunity
Ikerbasque Research Professor Iñigo de Miguel Beriain, who works with the UPV/EHU Chair in Law and the Human Genome, defends the usefulness of immunity passports, providing they are used to protect the rights of those who are immune. He also warns that vaccine distribution will create similar problems related to immunity-based licenses.
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The climate changed rapidly alongside sea ice decline in the north
Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen have, in collaboration with Norwegian researchers in the ERC Synergy project, ICE2ICE, shown that abrupt climate change occurred as a result of widespread decrease of sea ice. This scientific breakthrough concludes a long-lasting debate on the mechanisms causing abrupt climate change during the glacial period. It also documents th
22h
LSU Health conducts first study on neighborhood deprivation and COVID in Louisiana
A study by researchers at LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health, believed to be the first study to investigate the role of neighborhood deprivation on COVID-19 in Louisiana, found that the more a neighborhood is deprived, the higher the risk for cases of COVID-19. They report that people living in the most deprived neighborhoods had an almost 40% higher risk of COVID-19 compared to those
22h
New study debunks blood type diet
A study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics by researchers with the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine — a nonprofit of 12,000 doctors — debunks the 'blood type diet' by finding that blood type was not associated with the effects of a plant-based diet on body weight, body fat, plasma lipid concentrations, or glycemic control.
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PTSD with depression may significantly increase risk of early death in women
Women with post-traumatic stress disorder and depression have an almost fourfold greater risk of early death than women without trauma exposure or depression. The findings are particularly relevant during the current pandemic, which is exposing many women to unusually high levels of stress.
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Pediatric appendix perforation rate at children's hospital during COVID-19 pandemic
This observational study assessed the rate of appendix perforations during the COVID-19 pandemic at a children's hospital compared with 2019.
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Assessment of racial/ethnic disparities in hospitalization, mortality in patients with COVID-19 in New York City
COVID-19 outcomes based on race and ethnicity were compared in this observational study of patients in a large health system in New York City, and the association of any disparities with coexisting medical conditions and neighborhood characteristics also was assessed.
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New testing system could become the IoT of photovoltaics
New Suns Voc testing measures system voltage as a function of light intensity in outdoor setting, enabling real-time performance measurement and diagnostics
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Kidney injury in diabetic ketoacidosis linked to brain injury
Researchers have identified factors that make children with diabetic ketoacidosis more likely to experience acute kidney injury. Analyzing data from a large, multicenter clinical trial, the researchers also found that children who experience acute kidney injury are more likely to also experience subtle cognitive impairment and demonstrate lower IQ scores, suggesting a pattern of multiple organ inj
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Ny bilaftale: Fossilbiler stiger i afgift – mindre og mellemstore elbiler går fri
Regeringen går med ny aftale med støttepartierne i Folketinget efter 1 mio. grønne biler i 2030 – det er højere end Eldrup-kommissionen, men på linje med Klimarådet.
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Talking to babies may change their brains
Engaging in "conversations" with adults may help infant brains develop, especially those areas involved in language comprehension, according to a new study. In the new study, researchers assessed the brain function of sleeping babies, aged five to eight months old, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans. They also outfitted these San Francisco Bay Area infants with a special, we
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A stellar history of modern astronomy | Emily Levesque
Astronomers once gazed upon the night sky and counted every star in the galaxy by hand. The process has evolved since then, but the thirst for celestial knowledge remains the same. Join astrophysicist Emily Levesque for an anecdote-rich jaunt through the technological history of photographing the cosmos and learn about the one constant that makes it all work: human curiosity.
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With no pedals, Specialized's ultralight kid's bike makes learning to ride easy
The Hotwalk Carbon weighs 4.6 pounds. (Specialized /) The coronavirus pandemic has spurred a well-documented surge in bike buying. By one measurement, retail sales of bicycles are up 68 percent this year as of October, compared to 2019, according to NPD , a market research firm. Sales of kid's bikes did something similar, the group estimates: They're up by 63 percent. In the midst of this boom, t
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Optimising laser-driven electron acceleration
The interaction between lasers and matter is at the forefront of new investigations into fundamental physics as well as forming a potential bedrock for new technological innovations. One of the initiatives spearheading this investigation is the Extreme Light Infrastructure Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) project. Here the project's High-Power Laser System (HPLS)—the world's most powerful laser—is just on
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Unprecedented 3-D view inside Animal Mummies
X-ray scans of ancient Egyptian cat, bird and snake mummies show details never seen before — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NIH researchers link cases of ALS and FTD to a Huntington's disease-associated mutation
A study led by researchers at the National Institutes of Health has made a surprising connection between frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), two disorders of the nervous system, and the genetic mutation normally understood to cause Huntington's disease. This large, international project, which included a collaboration between the National Institute of Neurologica
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Detecting solar neutrinos with the Borexino experiment
A paper published in EPJ C by a team of authors including XueFeng Ding, Postdoc Associate of Physics at Princeton University, United States, documents the attempts of the Borexino experiment to measure low-energy neutrinos from the sun's carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle for the first time.
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Identifying markers of COVID-19 infection using blood tests
This study identifies the values for six biochemical biomarkers that indicate a patient may be infected with SARS-COV-2 (COVID-19). The key novelty of this study lies in the fact that it was carried out using a blood test and can provide a determination in about 60 minutes.
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Biological diversity evokes happiness
A high biodiversity in our vicinity is as important for life satisfaction as our income, scientists from Senckenberg, the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), and Kiel University found. All across Europe, the individual enjoyment of life correlates with the number of surrounding bird species. An additional 10% of bird species therefore increases the Europeans' life satisfact
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Electrons falling flat: Germanium falls into a 2D arrangement on zirconium diboride
Scientists have recently revealed, both theoretically and experimentally, that germanium atoms can arrange themselves into a 2D 'bitriangular' lattice on zirconium diboride thin films grown on germanium single crystals to form a 'flat band material' with an embedded 'kagome' lattice. The result provides experimental support to a theoretical prediction of flat bands emerging from trivial atomic geo
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Mimicking the effect of exercise with gene therapy
Gene therapy is the most effective method to be able to provide health benefits you normally gain through physical exercise. This means of "training" could be helpful for folks who can't exercise in the usual ways.
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Using a video game to understand the origin of emotions
A number of studies have sought to connect given emotions, such as fear or pleasure, to specific areas of the brain, but without success. A research team from the University of Geneva analyzed volunteers while they were playing a video game that had been specially developed to arouse different emotions. The results, show that different emotional components recruit several neural networks in parall
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Ionic defect landscape in perovskite solar cells revealed
Joint research work between Chemnitz University of Technology and Technische Universität Dresden under Chemnitz leadership reveals ionic defect landscape in metal halide perovskites — publication in renowned journal Nature Communications
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This Is the World's Biggest Drone
Absolute Unit Alabama-based startup Aevum has unveiled a fully autonomous drone designed to release satellite-launching rockets in midair — and it's an absolute monster. The Ravn X Autonomous Launch Vehicle is a mammoth 80-foot aircraft with a wingspan of 60 feet. The 18 feet tall behemoth weighs in at 55,000 pounds, which makes it the world's largest Unmanned Aircraft by mass, according to The H
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Meet Tasi, a Little Bird with a Big Purpose
A 4-year-old Guam rail is a marvel, considering that just a few decades ago his species nearly disappeared
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Fern leaves improve immunity and support growth in carp
According to a biologist from RUDN University, fern leaves powder has a positive effect on the immune system, antimicrobial activity, and growth of carps. Based on this data, fish farms can breed big and healthy fish without using any chemical additives. An article about the work was published in the Fish & Shellfish Immunology journal.
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Reversible stickiness in dental cement is something to smile about
Everyone who has had tooth cavities filled knows that the best dental materials stay where the dentist puts them. The adhesion of currently available dental materials to tooth surfaces continues to improve, but what about short-term treatments that are not supposed to adhere indefinitely? TMDU researchers have developed a method of making dental materials easier to remove; their findings are publi
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Characterising complex flows in 2-D bubble swarms
When swarms of bubbles are driven upwards through a fluid by their buoyancy, they can generate complex flow patterns in their wake. Named 'pseudo-turbulence,' these patterns are characterized by a universal mathematical relationship between the energy of flows of different sizes, and the frequency of their occurrence. This relationship has now been widely observed through 3-D simulations, but it i
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Fern leaves improve immunity and support growth in carp
According to a biologist from RUDN University, fern leaves powder has a positive effect on the immune system, antimicrobial activity, and growth of carps. Based on this data, fish farms can breed big and healthy fish without using any chemical additives. An article about the work was published in the Fish & Shellfish Immunology journal.
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Unprecedented 3-D view inside Animal Mummies
X-ray scans of ancient Egyptian cat, bird and snake mummies show details never seen before — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Findings about cilia on cells of the vessel wall may be relevant for diabetes treatment
A new study from Karolinska Institutet and the Helmholtz Diabetes Research Center shows that primary cilia, hair-like protrusions on endothelial cells inside vessels, play an important role in the blood supply and delivery of glucose to the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreatic islets. The findings are published in eLife and may be relevant for transplantation therapies in diabetes, as fo
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Optimising laser-driven electron acceleration
In a new paper published in the EPJ D , Etele Molnár, ELI-NP, Bucharest, and co-authors study and review the characteristics of electron acceleration in a vacuum caused by the highest-power laser pulses achievable today looking for the key to maximum net energy gain.
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Research confirms crucial monitoring assessment is effective for patients with COVID-19
A combined research team from the Universities of Portsmouth and Bournemouth and Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust has shown that an assessment score used to measure a patient's severity of illness can be applied to patients with Covid-19 without modification.
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The Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of having another heart attack
A clinical study with 1,002 patients with heart disease shows the advantages of a Mediterranean diet compared to a low-fat diet.
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Radicals seem to be good for the brain
Scientists of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) report in the journal Cell Stem Cell that reactive oxygen molecules, also known as 'free radicals.' are important for the brain's ability to adapt — at least in mice.
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'Off switch' during error-prone cell cycle phase may fix CRISPR's unwanted changes problem
Turning off gene-editing until it reaches cell cycle phases where more accurate repairs are likely to happen offers a promising fix to CRISPR-Cas9's problem with unwanted genetic changes.
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COVID-19 in Victorian schools and childcare mainly driven by community transmission
COVID-19 cases in schools, early childhood education centers and childcare are mainly driven by community transmission. Off-site learning should therefore be a last resort, a new Australian report has found.
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Battery of tests: Scientists figure out how to track what happens inside batteries
The new method could be the key to designing more efficient batteries for specific uses, like electric cars and airplanes.
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Young adult and teen cancer cases rose 30% in 40 years
Cases of young adults and teens with cancer have risen 30% during the last four decades, with kidney cancer rising at the greatest rate, researchers report. They say the findings show a need for further research into screening, diagnosis, and treatment to address the growing trend in this age group. "Adolescents and young adults are a distinct cancer population." Nicholas Zaorsky, assistant profe
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How salt water on Mars could give astronauts a breather
Nature, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03430-x Water locked away in Martian sediments could be split into the gases needed by humans and their machines.
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A sugary coating tells cells it's time to make blood
Nature, Published online: 03 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03431-w Sugars 'write' a signal that helps embryonic cells to transition to a vital new job.
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Hiring foreign nurses does not hurt US nursing jobs, study shows
An aging U.S. population is rapidly increasing the demand for nursing care. The number of U.S. citizens aged 65 and over is expected to almost double from 43.1 million in 2012 to 87.5 million by 2050, while the workforce is shrinking. The COVID-19 pandemic has further exacerbated the need for health care professionals.
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Mass incarceration results in significant increases in industrial emissions, study finds
Mass incarceration is as much an environmental problem as it is a social one, according to a new Portland State University study that finds increases in incarceration are significantly associated with increases in industrial emissions.
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Chinese photonic quantum computer demonstrates quantum supremacy
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has built and tested a photonic quantum computer that demonstrates quantum supremacy. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their computer, which they call Jiuzhang, and how well it performed while conducting Gaussian boson sampling.
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California winds ease but fire danger remains high
Powerful winds that pushed wildfires through Southern California, burning several homes and injuring two firefighters, began easing but forecasters warned that the fire danger remained Friday.
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Ingen är immun mot global uppvärmning
Klimatförändringarna dödar många människor, skadar hälsan för fler och påverkar försörjningen för ännu fler. Det handlar inte om någon diffus framtid, utan sker just nu, konstaterar forskarna bakom den årliga sammanställningen Lancet Countdown om hur klimatet förändras. – Läget är sådant att vi inte har förmånen att kunna tackla enbart en kris i taget. Vi måste ha förmågan att begränsa covid-19 o
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Reversible stickiness is something to smile about
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have developed a cross-linker for curing dental cement that can be degraded with UV light. The polyrotaxane cross-linker contains an o-nitrobenzyl ester group that is unstable under UV irradiation. The adhesion strength of a polymer block fixed to bovine dentin with cement stabilized using the cross-linker was significantly reduced after
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Characterising complex flows in 2D bubble swarms
Research published in EPJ E shows that in 2D simulated fluids, upward-flowing swarms of bubbles, a mathematical relationship describing the nature of flows in their wake, previously thought to be universal, actually changes within larger-scale flows in less viscous fluids.
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Gestational age linked to ADHD in children with Down syndrome
A new study by the UC Davis MIND Institute finds a connection between gestational age and ADHD in children with Down syndrome. An earlier gestational age is linked to higher ADHD symptoms later in childhood.
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Electrical spin filtering the key to ultra-fast, energy-efficient spintronics
A new UNSW study is a step towards even-faster, more energy-efficient 'spintronic' technology – an exciting, beyond-CMOS technology. The new study applies 'spin-filtering' to separate spin orientation, allowing generation and detection of spin via electrical (rather than magnetic) means, because electric fields are a lot less energetically costly to generate than magnetic fields.
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Making green drugs: Tapping into nature without tapping it out
Roland Kersten made his way down the aisle of the local supermarket, selecting different varieties of potato. This was one of the easier collection trips that a researcher in Whitehead Institute Member Jing-Ke Weng's lab has made to gather different plant species for investigation. Kersten, then a postdoc in Weng's lab, has also collected specimens on the coasts of California and Panama. Lab membe
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Video: Gaia's stellar motion for the next 1.6 million years
The stars are constantly moving across the sky. Known as proper motion, this motion is imperceptible to the unaided eye but is being measured with increasing precision by Gaia. This animation shows the proper motions of 40 000 stars, all located within 100 parsecs (326 light years) of the Solar System. The animation begins with the stars in their current positions; the brightness of each dot repre
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Simplifying long-range quantum interactions in many-body systems
Calculations for certain quantum systems whose parts interact over long distances will be much easier to perform thanks to the work of a RIKEN physicist and his collaborator, who have extended an assumption that holds for materials with short-range interactions.
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Making green drugs: Tapping into nature without tapping it out
Roland Kersten made his way down the aisle of the local supermarket, selecting different varieties of potato. This was one of the easier collection trips that a researcher in Whitehead Institute Member Jing-Ke Weng's lab has made to gather different plant species for investigation. Kersten, then a postdoc in Weng's lab, has also collected specimens on the coasts of California and Panama. Lab membe
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DNA nanobots build themselves: How can we help them grow the right way?
UNSW researchers have overcome a major design challenge on the path to controlling the dimensions of so-called DNA nanobots—structures that assemble themselves from DNA components.
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Scientific literature on oxidative reactions analysed
The ASYMCAT research group, from the Department of Organic Chemistry of the University of Valencia (UV), has gathered in a review article all the information on asymmetric Mannich oxidative reactions, a set of chemical reactions that make it possible to obtain relevant compounds in the design of a broad set of drugs. The review, which has been published in the journal Advanced Synthesis & Catalysi
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Molecules convert visible light into ultraviolet light with record efficiency
Light-powered processes from hydrogen production to air purification could see a boost in performance under ambient light thanks to a new material system that can directly convert visible light into ultraviolet light with an efficiency that doubles previous records.
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China Just Powered Up Its "Artificial Sun" Fusion Reactor
Artificial Sun China has successfully powered up its "artificial sun" nuclear fusion reactor for the first time, according to Agence France Presse . The reactor, which is the country's largest, could one day generate power without running the risk of a nuclear meltdown — or emitting greenhouse gases — by fusing atoms together rather than breaking them apart. The technical challenges, though, are
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Peanut treatment lowers risk of severe allergic reactions in preschoolers, study finds
A new study demonstrates that exposing children to a small, regular dose of an allergen (in this case, peanuts) in a real-world setting (outside of a clinical trial) is effective in reducing the risk of allergic reactions.
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Electrons falling flat: Germanium falls into a 2-D arrangement on zirconium diboride
Scientists have recently revealed, both theoretically and experimentally, that germanium atoms can arrange themselves into a 2-D "bi-triangular" lattice on zirconium diboride thin films grown on germanium single crystals to form a "flat band material" with an embedded "kagome" lattice. The result provides experimental support to a theoretical prediction of flat bands emerging from trivial atomic g
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Two very different colleges share how they kept COVID-19 off campus
The University of Missouri has close to 30,000 students and many hundreds of faculty and campus staff. But so far, they've managed to stave off a major COVID-19 outbreak. (Sepavone/Deposit Photos/) Colleges have been a major site of COVID-19 spread throughout the pandemic. Some universities moved online for the fall semester to avoid the damage. Others tried and failed to make in-person instructi
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Experts question claimed accuracy of Covid-19 saliva tests
Two members of the Royal Statistical Society say UK government's figures rely on spiked lab tests and not real world tests Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Saliva tests for Covid-19, which are being introduced for NHS workers as part of the government's mass testing programme, pick up only 13% of people with low levels of the virus and not 91%, as the official assessm
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Not All Sunshine and Rainbows: Waymo's Self-Driving Cars Take on Inclement Weather
How do you train self-driving software to safely pilot a vehicle through city streets? There are a few options; the first that probably springs to mind for most people is to spend countless hours actually driving around on city streets (with a safety driver behind the wheel). There's also the virtual route —it's far easier to run thousands of hours of simulations on computers than it is to drive
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America's Oldest City Is Not Where You'd Expect
Step aside Roanoke, Jamestown and Plymouth — St. Augustine was here first, and it's survived more than 450 years. Here's the history of this place.
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Researchers find 'missing link'
Otago researchers have found the "missing link between stress and infertility".
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β-AR agonist therapy puts the brakes on oral cancer progression
Oral cancer has a high mortality rate that is mainly attributed to metastasis. Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) screened a panel of small chemical compounds for their ability to inhibit metastasis in oral cancer, identifying β2?AR-agonist isoxsuprine as a potential candidate. Treatment of various oral cancer cells with isoxsuprine suppressed their motility, while tumor s
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Älgarnas arvsmassa kartlagd
Naturhistoriska riksmuseet har kartlagt älgens arvsmassa och därigenom kunnat spåra Sveriges älgar tillbaka till små grupper som under istiden levde längs isens kant i Mellaneuropa. Älgen har stor genetisk mångfald och endast låg grad av inavel. För första gången har älgens hela dna-sekvens analyserats, och det skapar möjligheter till vidare studier om älgens evolution och bevarande. Dna från älg
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Biological diversity evokes human happiness
Under the current pandemic conditions, activities out in nature are a popular pastime. The beneficial effects of a diverse nature on people's mental health have already been documented by studies on a smaller scale. Scientists of the Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung, the iDiv, and the University of Kiel now examined for the first time whether a diverse nature also increases human well-b
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California appears to be in for a dry, warm winter
December typically marks the onset of winter, but you'd never know it by looking at California.
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Anti-gravity: How a boat can float upside down
Here on Earth, everything is subject to gravity—it makes objects fall to the ground and rivers flow from higher ground to the sea. We know what would happen without it, thanks to images of astronauts floating around their spaceship. But could we design an anti-gravity machine, something that would make objects fall upwards, oceans levitate, and boats float upside down?
23h
Biological diversity evokes human happiness
Under the current pandemic conditions, activities out in nature are a popular pastime. The beneficial effects of a diverse nature on people's mental health have already been documented by studies on a smaller scale. Scientists of the Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung, the iDiv, and the University of Kiel now examined for the first time whether a diverse nature also increases human well-b
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Could a Blood Test Show if a Covid-19 Vaccine Works?
A new monkey study offers a ray of hope for speeding up clinical trials of Covid-19 vaccines.
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Molecules convert visible light into ultraviolet light with record efficiency
Researchers from Kyushu University have doubled efficiency records for the conversion of visible light into ultraviolet light using triplet-triplet annihilation, achieving 20% efficiency at high light intensities while also greatly improving efficiency even under weak ambient light. Such upconversion systems are promising for boosting the performance of light-powered reactions under light already
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Mass incarceration results in significant increases in industrial emissions, study finds
Mass incarceration is as much an environmental problem as it is a social one, according to a new Portland State University study that finds increases in incarceration are significantly associated with increases in industrial emissions.
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Can we improve our health with doses of safe, live microbes on a daily basis?
A group of scientists recently published a review paper in The Journal of Nutrition, covering evidence to date on the link between live dietary microbes and human health.
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Research identifies nanoscale effect of water and mineral content on bone
Researchers conducted the first study of the effect of water and mineral content on collagen fibrils, the essence of bone material, which will aid the development of synthetic materials to mimic bone.
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Hidden network of enzymes accounts for loss of brain synapses in Alzheimer's
A new study on Alzheimer's disease by Scripps Research scientists has revealed a previously unknown biochemical cascade in the brain that leads to the destruction of synapses, the connections between nerve cells that are responsible for memory and cognition.
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Study highlights strategies for boosting accuracy of personal genetic risk scores
As the consumer genetics industry rapidly expands, more and more people are turning to DNA-based services to learn their risk of developing a wide range of diseases. However, the risk scores from these genetic tests are not always as precise as they could be, according to a new study from Scripps Research. The scientists examine many approaches to calculating the scores and recommend that personal
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Researchers discover how bean plants fend off famished foes
A team led by scientists at the University of Washington and the University of California, San Diego has discovered that cowpeas — a type of bean plant — harbor receptors on the surface of their cells that can detect a compound in caterpillar saliva and initiate anti-herbivore defenses.
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The Books Briefing: Reimagining Womanhood
"Well-behaved women seldom make history," a phrase coined by the historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich in 1976, has since become a feminist rallying cry. One of the spheres in which women have been "misbehaving"—and exploring the different facets and effects of their behavior—is literature. The eminent left-wing poet turned public figure Adrienne Rich showed women, who were diminished by patriarchy an
23h
Thank Goodness for the Independence of America's Judiciary
Former Chief Justice William Rehnquist would be proud. In the weeks since the election, the president has waged a baseless legal battle to overturn its legitimate results, and federal- and state-court judges have acted admirably, faithfully, and impartially, discharging all the duties of their office despite intense public pressure from Donald Trump and his supporters. Rehnquist once referred to
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Author Correction: Variational Hilbert Quantitative Phase Imaging
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-77491-3
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Dåligt självförtroende i relationen triggar pappadepression
Att bli förälder innebär ofta stor lycka, men inte alltid. Föräldraskapet innebär också utmaningar, stress, och är för vissa människor en trigger för depression. En ny studie visar att manlig förlossningsdepression är vanligare hos män som är otrygga i sin parrelation. Depression drabbar så många som cirka 10-12 procent av de nyblivna mammorna, och minst 8 procent av de nyblivna papporna. Talar m
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Researchers observe what could be the first hints of dark bosons
Extremely light and weakly interacting particles may play a crucial role in cosmology and in the ongoing search for dark matter. Unfortunately, however, these particles have so far proved very difficult to detect using existing high-energy colliders. Researchers worldwide have thus been trying to develop alternative technologies and methods that could enable the detection of these particles.
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Nanoparticle jamming at the water-oil interface
The online cover of Science Advances this week features the assembly of nanoparticle surfactants at a solid-liquid interface using advanced microscopy techniques such as laser scanning confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Materials scientists had explored the assembly of solids at a liquid interface for decades to understand ore (a complex and stable chemical compound) purification, em
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Chinese researchers claim to have achieved quantum supremacy
Quantum computer is capable of performing calculations trillions of times faster than rivals, say scientists
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Bionic Eye Tech Learns Its ABCs
An experiment stimulates monkeys' brains to generate shape perceptions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Baby's first breath triggers life-saving changes in the brain
A new discovery reveals how something amazing happens when a baby takes a first breath. The finding could shed light on sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
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Hiring foreign nurses does not hurt US nursing jobs, study shows
An aging US population is rapidly increasing the demand for nursing care. The COVID-19 pandemic has further exacerbated the need for health care professionals. One strategy to meet rising health care needs is to hire foreign nurses to fill the gaps. Opponents of immigration have asserted that the influx of foreign nurses has resulted in unemployment and lower wages for domestic nurses. However, a
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Hubble captures fading of the stingray nebula
Astronomers have caught a rare glimpse of a rapidly fading shroud of gas around an aging star. Archival data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveal that the nebula Hen 3-1357, nicknamed the Stingray nebula, has faded precipitously over just the past two decades. Witnessing such a swift rate of change in a planetary nebula is exceedingly without precedent, researchers say.
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Bionic Eye Tech Learns Its ABCs
An experiment stimulates monkeys' brains to generate shape perceptions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Zealand erklærer klimanødsituation
Premierminister, Jacinda Ardern, kalder klimaforandringer for en af vores tids største udfordringer og appellerer til hastige ændringer
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Ingeniørernes lønudvikling går næsten fri af coronasmitten
PLUS. Foråret bød på udskudte lønforhandlinger og stop for allerede aftalte stigninger. Alligevel opnår privatansatte ingeniører en lønstigning, der ligger blot et procentpoint under resultatet fra sidste år.
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The Importance of Good Pipetting Practices
Good pipetting practices ease researcher burdens and boost data reproducibility.
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Our Ancestors' Chipped Teeth Are Taking Scientists Further Back in Time Than Ever Before
Researchers salvage ancient proteins to learn more about human ancestors.
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The 8 most exciting sports and outdoor products of 2020
The year's most important developments in the world of sports and outdoors. (Big Agnes/) Customization, comfort, inclusivity, and environmental awareness are the buzzwords we kept coming back to for this year's top sports and outdoor innovations. Outdoor activities and adventures should be accessible to everyone, and that means the necessary equipment should work for everyone, too—while keeping t
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Pieter Roelfsema Presents Research on Brain Prosthesis for the Blind in Brain Matters Episode 2
European Research is one step closer to a brain prosthesis for the blind. The advance by Pieter Roelfsema's team at NIN is making news around the world. Watch Pieter Roelfsema discuss his work in this clip from the Human Brain Project-EBRAINS webinar series 'Brain Matters.' Read more: https://ebrains.eu/news/closer-to-prosthesis-for-blind/ Register here for updates on Brain Matters: https://www.h
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The Ascent of Elliot Page
The Oscar-nominated Umbrella Academy star came out as trans this week—a huge moment for the actor and everyone watching his rise.
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Apple's Covid Response Was Extremely Apple
Plus: A patented pizza box, polarization on Parler, and a sad update.
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5 Sanitizers to Blast the Feces Off Your Toothbrush
A device that cleans toothbrushes with UV light is something you probably want. Trust us.
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To gauge chemical exposure, check children's guts?
Evaluating a child's gut microbiome could be a way to measure their chemical exposure, research indicates. Researchers have completed the most comprehensive study to date on how a class of persistent pollutants called semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are associated with the gut microbiome in human children. The results show that certain SVOCs are correlated with the abundance of bacterial
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Kronik: Prioriter din tid, og få udbytte af ny teknologi
Mange små og mellemstore virksomheder risikerer at komme endnu længere bagud, hvis de ikke prioriterer at bruge tid på at sætte sig ind i de nyeste teknologiske udviklinger.
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Human reproductive technologies like sperm freezing and IVF could be used to save threatened species
More and more threatened species are relying on captive breeding to avoid extinction. Some species on the brink only exist in captivity, and others depend on captive breeding for their recovery before they're released to the wild.
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Human reproductive technologies like sperm freezing and IVF could be used to save threatened species
More and more threatened species are relying on captive breeding to avoid extinction. Some species on the brink only exist in captivity, and others depend on captive breeding for their recovery before they're released to the wild.
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The Horse Flu Epidemic That Brought 19th-Century America to a Stop
An equine influenza in 1872 laid bare how essential horses were to the economy
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More frequently sheared sheep are happier mothers
More frequently sheared pregnant sheep are more active, have lower stress levels and produce lambs with finer wool, according to University of Queensland research.
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Threatened Species Index of Australia shows staggering loss of threatened native plants over 20 years
In just over two decades (1995-2017) numbers of Australian threatened plants have decreased by more than 70% on average.
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STEM superstars call for more gender and cultural diversity
They specialize in different science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) subjects but all have one thing in common—they're all STEM superstars.
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More frequently sheared sheep are happier mothers
More frequently sheared pregnant sheep are more active, have lower stress levels and produce lambs with finer wool, according to University of Queensland research.
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Threatened Species Index of Australia shows staggering loss of threatened native plants over 20 years
In just over two decades (1995-2017) numbers of Australian threatened plants have decreased by more than 70% on average.
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'Birthplace of vaccination' museum in UK at risk after Covid closure
Former Gloucestershire home of 'father of immunology' Edward Jenner too small for safe social distancing measures Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The future of a museum that tells the astonishing story of the British "father of immunology" is hanging in the balance because it has been forced to close throughout the Covid crisis and faces uncertainty over how it will
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Polymer researcher's latest development results in novel cup that withstands boiling liquids
A University of Akron (UA) professor's latest development in bioplastics has the potential to make important strides in sustainability for future plastics.
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A Faraday Cage For Your WiFi
It can be amusing when there are multiple layers of fraud in a single scam, but it's still a scam. With the holiday shopping season upon us, there are lots of products out there exploiting fear, pseudoscience, and scientific ignorance. The "Large WiFi Router Guard" now available from Amazon is a great example. Let's unpack how silly this product is. The seller claims that the router guard, "Block
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Mix your own delicious herbal tea using leftover spices
So many tea options. (Kristy Mucci/) This story was originally featured on Saveur . When you spend a lot of time testing recipes, you end up with lots of fun new ingredients piled up in your kitchen. My spice drawer overflows with things I needed to use only once, and I do my best to put them to use in other ways. People talk about using up scraps of food (and that's really important), but spices
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Wuhan virologist says more bat coronaviruses capable of crossing over
Close relatives of Covid-19 virus likely to be circulating in nature beyond China, says Dr Shi Zhengli Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Bats in the frontier regions of south and south-west China harbour other coronaviruses that already have the capacity to cross over to humans, a prominent Chinese scientist has said. Dr Shi Zhengli of the Wuhan Institute of Virology s
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How The Tumult of 2020 Will Shape the Future of Ride Sharing
This week, we talk about the new legal and social realities that Lyft, Uber, the scooter companies, and bike-share companies will face once the pandemic ends.
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'Off switch' during error-prone cell cycle phase may fix CRISPR problem
A group of researchers developed a promising fix to CRISPR-Cas9's problem with unwanted genetic changes using a method that allows them to turn off gene-editing until it reaches key cell cycle phases where more accurate repairs are likely to happen.
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Electrical spin filtering the key to ultra-fast, energy-efficient spintronics
Spin-filtering could be the key to faster, more energy-efficient switching in future spintronic technology, allowing the detection of spin by electrical rather than magnetic means.
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Half of surveyed renters suffered mental health decline during COVID-19
Australian renters have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19 facing income loss, the inability to pay rent, tenure insecurity and eviction risk and a new AHURI publication provides a stark analysis of the impacts of these unprecedented challenges.
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Lab study of droplet dynamics advances 3-D printing
A team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists has simulated the droplet ejection process in an emerging metal 3-D printing technique called "Liquid Metal Jetting" (LMJ), a critical aspect to the continued advancement of liquid metal printing technologies.
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How can cities become healthier, greener, and more equitable in the future?
When COVID-19 brought cities across the world to a halt this spring, there was speculation that the pandemic would spell the end of urban areas. While massive suburban flight has yet to happen, renewed lockdowns across Europe and rising cases in the U.S. make it clear that the ongoing public health crisis is far from over and its many impacts are not yet fully realized.
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'Off switch' during error-prone cell cycle phase may fix CRISPR problem
A group of researchers developed a promising fix to CRISPR-Cas9's problem with unwanted genetic changes using a method that allows them to turn off gene-editing until it reaches key cell cycle phases where more accurate repairs are likely to happen.
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New DNA modification 'signature' discovered in zebrafish
Researchers have revealed a previously unknown DNA modification in zebrafish – one of human's distant evolutionary cousins.
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Research leads to better modeling of hypersonic flow
Designing a thermal protection system to keep astronauts and cargo safe requires an understanding at the molecular level of the complicated physics going on in the gas that flows around the vehicle. Recent research added new knowledge about the physical phenomena that occur as atoms vibrate, rotate, and collide in this extreme environment.
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Gaia space telescope measured the acceleration of the Solar System
The Gaia space telescope has measured the acceleration of the Solar System when it orbits the center of our Milky Way galaxy. The Solar System motion relative to the stars agrees with the results by Finnish astronomers in the 19th century.
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Ancient migration was choice, not chance
The degree of intentionality behind ancient ocean migrations, such as that to the Ryukyu Islands between Taiwan and mainland Japan, has been widely debated. Researchers used satellite-tracked buoys to simulate ancient wayward drifters and found that the vast majority failed to make the contested crossing. They concluded that Paleolithic people 35,000-30,000 years ago must therefore have made the j
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Robot fleet dives for climate answers in 'marine snow'
Sailing from Hobart, twenty researchers hope to capture the most detailed picture yet of how marine life in the Southern Ocean captures and stores carbon from the atmosphere.
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The helix of life: New study shows how 'our' RNA stably binds to artificial nucleic acids
Xeno nucleic acids are essential for the development of nucleic acid-based drugs. To be effective, they need to be able to stably bind to natural RNA (a cellular single-stranded version of the DNA, which is essential for all body processes). However, it is unclear how, if at all, RNA hybridizes with these xeno nucleic acids. A new study sheds light on this mechanism, opening doors to the developme
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Blackcurrants are favorable for glucose metabolism
Blackcurrants have a beneficial effect on post-meal glucose response, and the required portion size is much smaller than previously thought, a new study shows.
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Coasts drown as coral reefs collapse under warming and acidification
The coastal protection coral reefs currently provide will start eroding by the end of the century, as the world continues to warm and the oceans acidify. The rate of erosion of calcium carbonate on coral reefs will overtake the rate of accretion on the majority of present-day reefs by the end of the century.
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Amphibian die-offs worsened malaria outbreaks in Central America
The global collapse of frogs and other amphibians due to the amphibian chytrid fungus exacerbated malaria outbreaks in Costa Rica and Panama during the 1990s and 2000s, according to new research. The findings provide the first evidence that amphibian population declines have directly affected human health and show how preserving biodiversity can benefit humans as well as local ecosystems.
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Study: Network model for implicit measures of attitudes
Our attitudes are composed of an interacting constellation of feelings, beliefs, and behaviors, and these elements can be in conflict with each other. For instance, a person might believe in principles like justice and equality while simultaneously harboring negative feelings toward a minority group.
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Australia-bound asteroid sample may reveal life's origins
A Japanese space mission will deliver samples collected from asteroid Ryugu in a capsule to the outback desert of Woomera in South Australia this Sunday morning.
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Tenants with a disability at greater risk during COVID
New findings released today by the University of South Australia paint an alarming picture for people with a disability who are renting in the private sector.
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Phytolith reveals seasonal drought conditions of tropical East Asia during the last 60,000 years
Whether or not millennium-scale climate events had occurred in the tropical continent of East Asia during the last glacial period has been a long-term puzzle. In addition, whether those events were affected by the high-latitude atmospheric conditions in the northern hemisphere, or driven by low-latitude oceanic conditions, remains uncertain.
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The 10 most exceptional personal care products from 2020
The year's most important developments in the world of personal care. (unspun/) It hasn't been an easy year by any stretch, but many of us have found solace in creature comforts. Right on cue, companies have been eager to sate our warm-and-fuzzy cravings with offers of softer clothes, deeper sleep, and products designed to create a cozier home. But the marketing around such spaces—cosmetics, skin
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NAD: Is nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide a super supplement or all hype?
NAD, or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, probably needs no introduction. Together with its primary alter-egos NADH, NADP and NADPH, our private suite of pyridine-based nucleotides serve as hydride donors in some 400 enzymatic reactions throughout the body. Beyond these signature dehydrogenase, hydroxylase and reductase reactions, other members of the larger NAD ecosystem function in receptor sig
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NAD: Is nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide a super supplement or all hype?
NAD, or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, probably needs no introduction. Together with its primary alter-egos NADH, NADP and NADPH, our private suite of pyridine-based nucleotides serve as hydride donors in some 400 enzymatic reactions throughout the body. Beyond these signature dehydrogenase, hydroxylase and reductase reactions, other members of the larger NAD ecosystem function in receptor sig
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How to cool more efficiently: Environmentally friendly refrigeration processes
In the journal Applied Physics Reviews, an international research team from the University of Barcelona, the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), and TU Darmstadt report on possibilities for implementing more efficient and environmentally friendly refrigeration processes. For this purpose, they investigated the effects of simultaneously exposing certain alloys to magnetic fields and mechan
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Researchers create ingredients to produce food by 3-D printing
It is already possible to produce food with a 3-D printer, potentially delivering products that suit consumer preferences regarding taste, texture, cost, convenience and nutrition. In the near future, it will be possible to produce food with personalized shapes, textures, flavors and colors considered attractive and healthy for children and the elderly, for example.
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Researchers create ingredients to produce food by 3-D printing
It is already possible to produce food with a 3-D printer, potentially delivering products that suit consumer preferences regarding taste, texture, cost, convenience and nutrition. In the near future, it will be possible to produce food with personalized shapes, textures, flavors and colors considered attractive and healthy for children and the elderly, for example.
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Denmark to end North Sea oil and gas production by 2050
Denmark, the EU's biggest oil producer post-Brexit, said Friday it will halt all North Sea oil and gas production and exploration by 2050 in line with its bid to become an energy transition role model.
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Author Correction: Pretreatment-Integration for Milk Protein Removal and Device-Facilitated Immunochromatographic Assay for 17 Items
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78536-3
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The Future of Work: 'Collaborative Configurations of Minds,' by Lettie Prell
"No longer were we merely the created machine called Artificial Intelligence. We became Alternative Intelligence."
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For the Second Time Ever, an Asteroid Sample Returns to Earth
The Japanese Hayabusa2 mission to asteroid Ryugu marks a major milestone this weekend with the return of pristine space rock.
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A Member of the 'Squad' Takes on Cryptocurrency
US Representative Rashida Tlaib, a progressive first-term lawmaker, has cosponsored a bill requiring stablecoins like Facebook's Libra to be issued by banks.
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Among Us and a Resurgence of Narrative-Free Games
In the midst of a pandemic, we're all suffering from narrative exhaustion right now.
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Who Is My Doctor? Some Hospital Patients Never Know
Anyone who's been hospitalized has probably asked this question—and probably never found out — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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PODCAST: Pladespillerens Rolls Royce får nyt liv. UV-C-lys renser luften for corona
Tre opfindelser er ugens tema i Transformator. Bang & Olufsen indtager den cirkulære økonomi med renoverede Beogram 4000C. Kortbølget ultraviolet lys i ventilationssystemer skal få bugt med coronavirus. Sejlere smører chili på bunden for at få alger og rurer til at holde sig væk.
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This Robot Can Rap–Really
Deep-learning robot Shimon writes and rhymes in real time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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This Robot Can Rap–Really
Deep-learning robot Shimon writes and rhymes in real time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Datatilsynet: Alt for let at få adgang til data om Zoos årskortholdere
Zoologisk Have i København får alvorlig kritik af Datatilsynet i en sag, hvor det har været alt for let for uvedkommende at få adgang til årskortholderes persondata.
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China turns on nuclear-powered 'artificial sun'
China successfully powered up its "artificial sun" nuclear fusion reactor for the first time, state media reported Friday, marking a great advance in the country's nuclear power research capabilities.
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Stor risiko for at Nordsjællands Hospital går over budget
PLUS. En ny gennemgang af risici i det 4,6 mia. kr. dyre byggeprojekt Nyt Hospital Nordsjælland viser, at der er 'en stor risiko for overskridelse af budgetrammen for byggeriet'. Det kan blive nødvendigt at slække på kvalitet eller størrelse, hvis budgettet skal holdes.
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Hotet från virus som muterat i djur
Både influensavirus och coronavirus kan lätt mutera när de hoppar mellan olika djurarter. När de förändras slingrar de sig undan människans immunförsvar, och utgör helt nya hot. Minkar och människor, grisar och gräsänder. När virus hoppar mellan arter blandas de och riskerar att mutera. Under hösten har smittade danska minkar skapat rubriker världen över, samtidigt kan coronavirus hos grisar i Ki
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Bedövning minskar risk för framtida tandläkarskräck
Smärta är en av de vanligaste orsakerna till tandvårdsrädsla och därför är det viktigt att förebygga smärta hos barn med till exempel lokalbedövning. Barn hanterar också smärtan bättre om de förbereds på att det kan göra ont efter behandlingen visar en studie från Malmö universitet. Barn måste ges tid och få ett bra omhändertagande av tandvården menar forskaren Henrik Berlin som har studerat hur
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Salmon are dying off and your car tires might be to blame
Scientists found that a number of coho salmon died while swimming through urban waterways in the Pacific Northwest. (CREDIT: John R. McMillan, NOAA Fisheries/NWFSC/) Every fall, coho salmon undertake an epic journey from the ocean back to the freshwater streams and creeks where they were born so they can reproduce and then die shortly after. For several decades, though, scientists have observed t
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Covid vaccine tracker: How do the leading jabs compare?
After a year of breakneck research and development several experimental inoculations are on the cusp of regulatory approval
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B&O med bud på cirkulær økonomi: Genopliver 40 år gamle pladespillere
PLUS. Bang & Olufsen har taget 95 pensionsmodne pladespillere tilbage og restaureret dem. Selv med en stykpris på 75.000 kroner blev de udsolgt på ingen tid. »Jeg ser som en validering af, at det kan lade sig gøre at skabe et eftertragtet marked for gensolgte pladespillere,« siger produktchef i B&O Mad…
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Bad, Medicine: Journal publishes doubly-brutal retraction notice
A journal has retracted a paper it published earlier this year for pretty much every sin under the sun, scoring an own-goal in the process. The article, "Effects and safety of tanreqing injection on viral pneumonia: A protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis," was led by Yue Qiu, of the Beijing University of Chinese Medicine … Continue reading
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Stoichiometry of irreversible ligand binding to a one-dimensional lattice
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-77896-0
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High-performance hybrid modeling chemical reactors using differential evolution based fuzzy inference system
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78277-3
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Longitudinal analysis of total serum IgE levels with allergen sensitization and atopic diseases in early childhood
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78272-8
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Risk prediction model of gestational diabetes mellitus based on nomogram in a Chinese population cohort study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78164-x
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Increasing prosocial behavior and decreasing selfishness in the lab and everyday life
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78251-z
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Comparing cefotaxime and ceftriaxone in combating meningitis through nose-to-brain delivery using bio/chemoinformatics tools
Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78327-w
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A plant immune receptor: It takes four to tango
A collaborative study on a plant intracellular immune receptor from researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ) not only shows how an important resistance protein is activated during pathogen infection but also reveals some common operational principles with immunity proteins from humans.
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A plant immune receptor: It takes four to tango
A collaborative study on a plant intracellular immune receptor from researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ) not only shows how an important resistance protein is activated during pathogen infection but also reveals some common operational principles with immunity proteins from humans.
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Udenfor den hvide verden: Utraditionelle måder at indfri lægeløftet på
Langt de fleste læger ender med at arbejde i det traditionelle sundhedsvæsen. Men der er andre måder at bruge sin medicinske uddannelse til at opfylde lægeløftet på. Dagens Medicin sætter i en ny serie 'Udenfor den hvide verden' fokus på læger med et arbejdsliv, der afviger fra den kliniske norm.
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Ökad ensamhet och stress när gymnasieskolorna stängde
Ensamhet, bristande motivation och stress. Det blev några effekter för sistaårseleverna när gymnasieskolorna övergick till distansundervisning i våras. Det framkommer i en ny studie genomförd av forskare vid Göteborgs universitet. Den 3 december, beslöt Folkhälsomyndigheten och regeringen att gymnasieskolorna återigen ska övergå till fjärr- eller distansundervisning. I en nyligen publicerad studi
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Book Review: The Hidden Costs of Medical Implants
After a mishap with her implanted defibrillator, Katherine E. Standefer launched an investigation to uncover the origin of the medical device. What she found, recounted in her memoir, "Lightning Flowers," leads Standefer to an indictment of industries that poison the earth and people alike.
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Rikke er koncernlæge for 28.000 medarbejdere
For mange læger er karrieren en lang, lige vej, når først specialevalget er truffet. Men sådan behøver det ikke at være. Rikke Wallentin var på specialesporet, da hun besluttede sig for at gøre noget helt andet og blive koncernlæge i Danfoss.
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Evidence of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 in cats and dogs from households in Italy
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20097-0 SARS-CoV-2 can infect cats and dogs, but the extent to which pets are infected in households remains unclear. Here, Patterson et al. test 919 companion animals in northern Italy and find that some dogs and cats from COVID-19 positive households can test positive for COVID-19 neutralizing antibodies, with dog
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Split-pulse X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy with seeded X-rays from X-ray laser to study atomic-level dynamics
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20036-z Here the authors study atomic scale dynamics in water by using X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. They use a split-and-delay optics with self-seeding of X-rays to generate pulses of enough energy and controlled time delay between two X-ray pulses.
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Novel kind of decagonal ordering in Al74Cr15Fe11
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20077-4 The description of quasicrystal structures by only one repeating unit is desirable. Here the authors experimentally identify a quasi-unit-cell corresponding to a Lück decagon to describe the randomly ordered structure of a decagonal quasicrystalline phase.
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Small molecule inhibition of Dynamin-dependent endocytosis targets multiple niche signals and impairs leukemia stem cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20091-6 The tumour microenvironment provides signals to support leukaemic stem cells (LSC) maintenance and chemoresistance. Here, the authors show that disrupting niche-associated signalling by inhibiting receptor-mediated endocytosis with a dynamin GTPase inhibitor overcomes chemoresistance of LSC.
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Structure and dynamics of an α-fucosidase reveal a mechanism for highly efficient IgG transfucosylation
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20044-z AlfC transfucosidase is used to modulate fucosylation of glycans decorating monoclonal antibodies. Herein, structural and biophysical characterization reveals the enzymatic mechanism of AlfC and a blueprint for the design of AlfC mutants with novel specificities and functions.
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Nonlinear mechanics of lamin filaments and the meshwork topology build an emergent nuclear lamina
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20049-8 Mechanical strength of in situ assembled nuclear lamin filaments arranged in a 3D meshwork is unclear. Here, using mechanical, structural and simulation tools, the authors report the hierarchical organization of the lamin meshwork that imparts strength and toughness to lamin filaments at par with silk and Ke
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Stabilization of ε-iron carbide as high-temperature catalyst under realistic Fischer–Tropsch synthesis conditions
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20068-5 ε-Fe2C has been identified as the highly active phase for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS), but is stable only at low-temperature. Here, the authors show that ε-Fe2C phase can be stabilized even at ~ 573 K by being encapsulated inside graphene layers, and retains high activity in FTS.
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Systematic comparison of sea urchin and sea star developmental gene regulatory networks explains how novelty is incorporated in early development
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20023-4 It is unclear how a gene regulatory network (GRN) incorporates novelty whilst still maintaining overall stability. Here, the authors provide a comprehensive GRN for endomesoderm specification in the sea star from zygote stage to gastrulation, showing conserved network kernels stabilize evolutionary changes i
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Nedsänkta röntgenstrålar avslöjar föroreningar i havet
Med hjälp av en specialbyggd cylinder som innehåller röntgenutrustning och en detektor kan tungmetaller i havet numera upptäckas i realtid. Teknik utvecklad av doktoranden Siwen An på Mittuniversitetet, kan identifiera exakt vilka ämnen som finns på havsbottnen. – Direkt när jag sänker ner min cylinder i vattnet börjar röntgentuben bestråla bottenslammet och tack vare den inbyggda detektorn analy
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Correlates of protection against SARS-CoV-2 in rhesus macaques
Nature, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03041-6
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How to write a superb literature review
Nature, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03422-x Nature speaks to old hands and first timers about the work they did to make their reviews sing.
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Green energy transition: Early and steady wins the race
Researchers from Aarhus University and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have modelled the decarbonisation of the sector-coupled European energy system using uninterrupted high-res hourly data for every European and Scandinavian country and network interconnectivity. The research has now been published in Nature Communications and the results are clear: To reach climate-neutrality by 2050 we need
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Business can make a big difference in ending Covid
Employers have an important role to play in advancing vaccine literacy and uptake
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Lars Henrik Jensen er ny ledende overlæge på onkologisk afdeling i Vejle
Efter grundige overvejelser om tabet af patientkontakt overfor at være fuldtidsleder, har Lars Henrik Jensen besluttet sig for at at tage springet til at blive ledende overlæge på onkologisk afdeling i Vejle.
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The coming war on the hidden algorithms that trap people in poverty
Miriam was only 21 when she met Nick. She was a photographer, fresh out of college, waiting tables. He was 16 years her senior and a local business owner who had worked in finance. He was charming and charismatic; he took her out on fancy dates and paid for everything. She quickly fell into his orbit. It began with one credit card. At the time, it was the only one she had. Nick would max it out w
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Jens-Ulrik Stæhr Jensen tiltræder som professor i lungemedicin
Jens-Ulrik Stæhr Jensen, overlæge og klinisk forskningslektor på Herlev og Gentofte Hospital, er ny professor i lungemedicin ved Institut for Klinisk Medicin på Københavns Universitet. Han tiltrådte stillingen 1. december.
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This Unusual Bird Superpower Goes Back to the Dinosaur Extinction
Kiwis, ibises and sandpipers share this sensory power with birds that lived millions of years ago.
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Could a Blood Test Show if a Covid-19 Vaccine Works?
A new monkey study offers a ray of hope for speeding up clinical trials of Covid-19 vaccines.
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UK vows 68 percent emissions cut by end of decade
Britain will aim to cut its greenhouse gas emissions by more than two-thirds this decade, in what the government on Thursday said would be the fastest reduction of any major economy.
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Using AI to "improve" hiring, law enforcement, or security worries me
Here's what scares me the most about AI, it would discriminate heavily. A hiring AI would quickly learn correlations between race, age, gender, and disabilities unless programed to avoid doing so, even with this programming an AI would still learn tricks of indirectly descriminating such as looking at education, accent, or handwriting. And managers wouldn't exactly be rushing to prevent a AI from
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EU Aims to Have 30 Million Electric Cars on the Road by 2030 | Bloomberg
submitted by /u/DragonGod2718 [link] [comments]
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As Pressures Mount, Poland's Once-Mighty Coal Industry Is in Retreat
submitted by /u/StuckInABadDream [link] [comments]
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How Amazon Drone Delivery Will Work
submitted by /u/beaucepower [link] [comments]
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South Korea's Universal Basic Income Experiment to Boost the Economy | WSJ
submitted by /u/monkfreedom [link] [comments]
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Light-based Quantum Computer Exceeds Fastest Classical Supercomputers
submitted by /u/19dronin [link] [comments]
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Brain implants in monkeys offer hope for restoring vision in blind people
submitted by /u/Parrakeet1200 [link] [comments]
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Self-driving robotaxis are taking off in China
submitted by /u/SillyCubensis [link] [comments]
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Japan set to ban sales of new petrol cars in mid-2030s: reports
submitted by /u/altmorty [link] [comments]
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Coronavirus: Vaccination 'could become routine from 2022'
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
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Ecuador finds nest of huge, endangered sea turtle
Conservationists in Ecuador have found a nest of endangered leatherback sea turtles, a whopper of a species that can weigh up to a tonne and be three meters (10 feet) long.
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Ecuador finds nest of huge, endangered sea turtle
Conservationists in Ecuador have found a nest of endangered leatherback sea turtles, a whopper of a species that can weigh up to a tonne and be three meters (10 feet) long.
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Pacific Islands Forum to hold virtual climate summit
Pacific island leaders will hold a virtual summit next week to demand urgent worldwide action on climate change ahead of UN-brokered talks on the issue.
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NASA buying Moon dust for $1
The US space agency NASA awarded contracts to four companies on Thursday to collect lunar samples for $1 to $15,000, rock-bottom prices that are intended to set a precedent for future exploitation of space resources by the private sector.
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Trash tracking satellites help Indonesia tackle marine waste
Every year, pounding rains wash away mountains of plastic waste from the streets of Jakarta, with some of it ending up as far away as Bali's beaches. So scientists are turning to satellites to trace the rubbish and figure out how to tackle the problem.
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Miljøskader ved klapning kan minimeres – men det er ikke gratis
PLUS. I udlandet tages der langt mere hensyn til havnatur ved dumpning af giftigt havneslam, og ifølge DHI kan det også gøres herhjemme. Men Miljøstyrelsen har ingen planer om at begrænse klapning til f.eks. de tidspunkter, hvor strømmen spreder det giftige slam mindst muligt.
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Personer over 70 år med forhøjet kolesterol har øget risiko for blodpropper
Et nyt studie fra Herlev og Gentofte Hospital viser, at når personer i alderen 70 til 100 år har forhøjet kolesteroltal, øger det deres risiko for at få en blodprop i hjernen eller hjertet. Resultatet er overraskende klart og bør føre til revidering af guidelines, siger forskere.
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California monolith pops up after finds in Utah, Romania
Days after the discovery and swift disappearance of two shining metal monoliths half a world apart, another towering structure has popped up and then quickly vanished, this time from the pinnacle of a trail in California.
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UK coronavirus live: Alok Sharma rejects criticism of Covid vaccine's rapid approval
Latest updates: minister defends the UK regulator's 'absolutely meticulous' approach to the Covid vaccine amid criticism of its swift approval Alok Sharma defends UK's rapid approval of Covid vaccine Fauci apologises for implied criticism of speedy UK vaccine approval Mother separated from breast-fed baby for days in hospital Coronavirus global updates – live See all our coronavirus coverage 11.0
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Tapping overlooked marketing data to drive business growth
Researchers from University of Houston, Columbia University, Emory University, and University of Connecticut published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that reviews factors that contribute to the disconnect between the data companies create and the productive use of that data.
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Chemists get peek at novel fluorescence in carbon nanotubes
That carbon nanotubes fluoresce is no longer a surprise. Finding a second level of fluorescence is surprising and potentially useful.
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Scientists took a rare chance to prove we can quantify biodiversity by 'testing the water'
Organisms excrete DNA in their surroundings through metabolic waste, sloughed skin cells or gametes, and this genetic material is referred to as environmental DNA (eDNA).
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Advancing gene editing with new CRISPR/Cas9 variant
Using a new variant to repair DNA will improve both safety and effectiveness of the much-touted CRISPR-Cas9 tool in genetic research, Michigan Medicine researchers say.
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New DNA modification 'signature' discovered in zebrafish
Researchers at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research have uncovered a new form of DNA modification in the genome of zebrafish, a vertebrate animal that shares an evolutionary ancestor with humans ~400 million years ago.
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Special delivery: Japan space probe to bring asteroid dust to Earth
Call it a special delivery: after six years in space, Japan's Hayabusa-2 probe is heading home, but only to drop off its rare asteroid samples before starting a new mission.
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Scientists took a rare chance to prove we can quantify biodiversity by 'testing the water'
Organisms excrete DNA in their surroundings through metabolic waste, sloughed skin cells or gametes, and this genetic material is referred to as environmental DNA (eDNA).
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Advancing gene editing with new CRISPR/Cas9 variant
Using a new variant to repair DNA will improve both safety and effectiveness of the much-touted CRISPR-Cas9 tool in genetic research, Michigan Medicine researchers say.
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New DNA modification 'signature' discovered in zebrafish
Researchers at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research have uncovered a new form of DNA modification in the genome of zebrafish, a vertebrate animal that shares an evolutionary ancestor with humans ~400 million years ago.
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The Human Cosmos by Jo Marchant review – learn from the stars
From Palaeolithic paintings to astrophysics … a glittering history takes in explorers, aliens and a world vanishing from view Twenty thousand years ago, in a cave in France, Palaeolithic humans painted a great bull with a collection of seven dots above his shoulder. Scholars are divided over the meaning of such paintings, but at the start of this book Jo Marchant makes a convincing and picturesqu
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What's the point of lab-grown meat when we can simply eat more vegetables? | Jenny Kleeman
The corporate race for cultured protein rests on a view of human beings as greedy and incapable of change The stuff of science fiction has landed on our plates. Meat grown in a lab, instead of inside the body of an animal, has been approved for sale for the first time. The Singapore Food Agency has given regulatory approval to Eat Just's "chicken bites", grown from the cells of a chicken that's s
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Flere end 9 ud af 10 med knæprotese er over 50 år
Inden for området for knæproteser arbejdes der med metalløsninger, som skal få knoglerne i knæet til at vokse ekstra godt fast i implantatet. Selvom implantater – trods alt – har en begrænset levetid, er det forventningen, at 75 pct. af dem holder i mere end 20 år.
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There's an ecosystem beneath your feet—and it needs protection, new report says
Global review on soil biodiversity calls for protecting often overlooked subterranean life
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Nordsøens pumper stopper om 30 år: Så skal der CO2 i undergrunden
I 2050 er det slut med at udvinde olie i Nordsøen. I fremtiden skal felterne bruges til at lagre CO2, lød det efter en bred aftale i Folketinget.
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Flere stærekasser og klip i kortet på vej
PLUS. Kommission foreslår automatisk hastighedskontrol og hastighedsregulering i kommunerne. Transportministeren lover handling og vil ikke udelukke nogen forslag.
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Alok Sharma defends UK's rapid approval of Covid vaccine
Minister says MHRA, which approved coronavirus jab, is 'gold standard of regulation' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK business secretary, Alok Sharma, has defended the UK's "absolutely meticulous" approach to the coronavirus vaccine amid global criticism of its rapid approval by regulators. Sharma said the UK should be "very proud" of becoming the first western
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Midler til eksperimentel prostatakræftkirurgi glæder faglige aktører
En prioritering af prostatakræft fra Sundheds- og Ældreministeriets side glæder både patientforening og lægefagligt selskab. Behandlingen kan gavne mange patienter, men det er vigtigt, at patienter går ind til det på et oplyst grundlag, siger læge.
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Photos of the Week: Taxi Ornament, Russky Bridge, Turning Torso
Aquarium dining in Singapore, the damaged Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, starlings over Rome, increasing COVID-19 cases worldwide, a drive-through Santa experience in Los Angeles, an aggressive woodpecker in New York City, Christmas lights in London, snowmaking in Switzerland, and much more
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Are dogs susceptible to illusions?
​ https://preview.redd.it/rgqsm8e0j0361.png?width=940&format=png&auto=webp&s=aec1c05e26244c683501dde7cea9f6241cd6e50a submitted by /u/HunterTDC [link] [comments]
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Scientists took a rare chance to prove we can quantify biodiversity by 'testing the water'
While extraction of DNA from water samples provides a convenient and non-invasive way to study aquatic biodiversity, reliable evidence that this approach is accurate enough to estimate the number of fish per species and their biomass in natural habitats, is still lacking. A new study, published in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal Metabarcoding and Metagenomics, demonstrates the high precisio
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Tapping overlooked marketing data to drive business growth
Overlooked data sources offer considerable opportunity to support companies' growth.
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Thermal stability analysis technique for EV batteries to detect risk of fire or explosion
Recently, there have been a number of electric vehicle (EV) battery fire incidents. Unlike the batteries used in small mobile devices, such as smartphones, the battery pack of an EV is composed of hundreds of battery cells, and any instability can cause major casualties and property damage. Amid various efforts to pinpoint the cause of battery fires, Korean researchers have developed a new analysi
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Pediatric ER saw steep drop in asthma visits during spring COVID-19 lockdown
A new study published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society discusses a steep drop off from prior years in asthma-related emergency department (ED) visits at Boston Children's Hospital during the spring 2020 COVID-19 surge and lockdown.
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Kate Ardern on how thinking local has helped Wigan fight Covid
'How we interact is critical when it comes to managing a pandemic. It's not just about straight science,' says the public health official
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Grønne aktivister om oliestop: Det er en stor sejr for klimakampen
Et flertal i Folketinget har sat stopdato for oliejagten i Nordsøen.
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Ny forskning: Ögonapparat kan ge synskadade viss syn
Elektrisk stimulering i hjärnan kan hjälpa synskadade att se enklare former. Det visar en ny studie på apor.
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Lægemiddelstyrelsen om corona-vacciner: Risikoen for bivirkninger om et år er meget lille
Det er meget sjældent, der opstår bivirkninger efter seks uger.
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On the critical exponent for $k$-primitive sets
A set of positive integers is primitive (or 1-primitive) if no member divides another. Erd\H{o}s proved in 1935 that the weighted sum $\sum1/(n \log n)$ for $n$ ranging over a primitive set $A$ is universally bounded over all choices for $A$. In 1988 he asked if this universal bound is attained by the set of prime numbers. One source of difficulty in this conjecture is that $\sum n^{-\lambda}$ ove
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Gitanjali Rao: Time magazine names teenage inventor its first 'kid of the year'
The 15-year-old scientist has used technology to address contaminated drinking water, opioid addiction and cyberbullying A 15-year-old scientist and inventor has been named as Time magazine's first "kid of the year". Gitanjali Rao, from Denver, Colorado, has invented new technologies across a range of fields, including a device that can identify lead in drinking water, and an app and Chrome exten
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What social distancing does to a fish brain
Researchers have discovered a brain molecule that functions as a 'thermometer' for the presence of others in an animal's environment. Zebrafish 'feel' the presence of others via mechanosensation and water movements — which turns the brain hormone on.
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Efter digitalt kørekort: Sundhedskortet i ny app til 10 millioner kroner
Digitaliseringsstyrelsen lancerede i slutningen af november en digital udgave af kørekortet i en app fra virksomheden Visma. Appen blev kritiseret for at være for dyr – og nu viser det sig, at det gule sundhedskort kommer i en separat app til et tocifret millionbeløb fra samme leverandør.
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Nasa to pay company $1 to collect rocks from moon
The US space agency has awarded two American and one Japanese firm contracts to pick up lunar soil.
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After six years and 6bn km, Japan's Hayabusa2 prepares to bring home cargo of asteroid dust
Japanese craft collected dust from the asteroid Ryugu that scientists hope could shed light on the origins of life The last time Hayabusa2 was seen with the naked eye, Barack Obama was president of the United States and Brexit was a distant Europhobe fantasy. Six years and three days after its groundbreaking mission began, the Japanese spacecraft will drop a capsule onto the Australian outback ca
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Face masks considerably reduce COVID-19 cases in Germany [Statistics]
We use the synthetic control method to analyze the effect of face masks on the spread of COVID-19 in Germany. Our identification approach exploits regional variation in the point in time when wearing of face masks became mandatory in public transport and shops. Depending on the region we consider, we…
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Profile of Haig H. Kazazian Jr. [Profiles]
When geneticist Haig H. Kazazian Jr. was 16, he overheard a conversation between his father and a family friend. "What do you think? Is he going to be a doctor?" asked his father. "I think he'll be a scientist," replied the friend. Kazazian went on to become both. Trained in…
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Multiple origins of obligate nematode and insect symbionts by a clade of bacteria closely related to plant pathogens [Evolution]
Obligate symbioses involving intracellular bacteria have transformed eukaryotic life, from providing aerobic respiration and photosynthesis to enabling colonization of previously inaccessible niches, such as feeding on xylem and phloem, and surviving in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. A major challenge in the study of obligate symbioses is to understand how they arise….
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A dual role for {alpha}-synuclein in facilitation and depression of dopamine release from substantia nigra neurons in vivo [Neuroscience]
α-Synuclein is expressed at high levels at presynaptic terminals, but defining its role in the regulation of neurotransmission under physiologically relevant conditions has proven elusive. We report that, in vivo, α-synuclein is responsible for the facilitation of dopamine release triggered by action potential bursts separated by short intervals (seconds) and…
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Directionality of light absorption and emission in representative fluorescent proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Fluorescent molecules are like antennas: The rate at which they absorb light depends on their orientation with respect to the incoming light wave, and the apparent intensity of their emission depends on their orientation with respect to the observer. However, the directions along which the most important fluorescent molecules in…
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Coexpressed subunits of dual genetic origin define a conserved supercomplex mediating essential protein import into chloroplasts [Plant Biology]
In photosynthetic eukaryotes, thousands of proteins are translated in the cytosol and imported into the chloroplast through the concerted action of two translocons—termed TOC and TIC—located in the outer and inner membranes of the chloroplast envelope, respectively. The degree to which the molecular composition of the TOC and TIC complexes…
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Hierarchical routing in carbon metabolism favors iron-scavenging strategy in iron-deficient soil Pseudomonas species [Environmental Sciences]
High-affinity iron (Fe) scavenging compounds, or siderophores, are widely employed by soil bacteria to survive scarcity in bioavailable Fe. Siderophore biosynthesis relies on cellular carbon metabolism, despite reported decrease in both carbon uptake and Fe-containing metabolic proteins in Fe-deficient cells. Given this paradox, the metabolic network required to sustain the…
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A unified neurocomputational bilateral model of spoken language production in healthy participants and recovery in poststroke aphasia [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Understanding the processes underlying normal, impaired, and recovered language performance has been a long-standing goal for cognitive and clinical neuroscience. Many verbally described hypotheses about language lateralization and recovery have been generated. However, they have not been considered within a single, unified, and implemented computational framework, and the literatures on…
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Observation of spontaneous ferromagnetism in a two-dimensional electron system [Applied Physical Sciences]
What are the ground states of an interacting, low-density electron system? In the absence of disorder, it has long been expected that as the electron density is lowered, the exchange energy gained by aligning the electron spins should exceed the enhancement in the kinetic (Fermi) energy, leading to a (Bloch)…
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COVID-19 lockdown induces disease-mitigating structural changes in mobility networks [Social Sciences]
In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic many countries implemented containment measures to reduce disease transmission. Studies using digital data sources show that the mobility of individuals was effectively reduced in multiple countries. However, it remains unclear whether these reductions caused deeper structural changes in mobility networks and how such…
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Multiscale integration of environmental stimuli in plant tropism produces complex behaviors [Plant Biology]
Plant tropism refers to the directed movement of an organ or organism in response to external stimuli. Typically, these stimuli induce hormone transport that triggers cell growth or deformation. In turn, these local cellular changes create mechanical forces on the plant tissue that are balanced by an overall deformation of…
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Thymectomy and myasthenia gravis [Commentaries]
Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a disorder of the neuromuscular junction mediated by the actions of autoantibodies directed against one of several proteins expressed on the postjunction muscle membrane. For the large majority of MG patients the target for the autoantibodies is the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) (1) that interacts with acetylcholine,…
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Virksomheder undrer sig: 5G-innovation kortsluttes i Danmark
PLUS. Med en misforstået frekvenspolitik stækker regeringen danske virksomheders muligheder for at udvikle innovative 5G-løsninger, lyder kritikken fra virksomheder og eksperter.
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Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 4. december
Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2020. Hver dag med nye præmier!
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US virus cases top 200,000 as California prepares stay-at-home order
Most populous state braces for new restrictions as daily deaths reach 2,700 nationwide
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New Zealand Covid minister urges patience in wait for vaccine approval
Chris Hipkins says it is understandable that other countries in much worse situations have fast-tracked approval Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage New Zealand's Covid-19 minister has called for patience in the country's vaccine roll-out programme, saying he was unlikely to follow the UK in using emergency provisions to fast-track approval. Covid-19 minister Chris Hipki
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The Atlantic Daily: Pandemic Data Are Weird Right Now
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox GO NAKAMURA / GETTY / THE ATLANTIC This spring, we first met bad. This winter, we're set to meet worse. "Grim" remains the key descriptor: Our friends at the COVID Tracking Project see a pandemic t
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What's killing killer whales?
Pathology reports on more than 50 killer whales stranded over nearly a decade in the northeast Pacific and Hawaii show that orcas face a variety of mortal threats — many stemming from human interactions.
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Leaving so soon? Unusual planetary nebula fades mere decades after it arrived
The tiny Stingray Nebula unexpectedly appeared in the 1980s is by far the youngest planetary nebula in our sky. But a team of astronomers recently analyzed a more recent image of the nebula, taken in 2016 by Hubble, and found that it has faded significantly and changed shape over the course of just 20 years. If dimming continues at current rates, in 20 or 30 years the Stingray Nebula will be barel
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Leaf microbiomes are a neighborhood affair in northern forests
Leaf microbiomes of sugar maple trees vary across the species' range, changing in accordance with the types of trees in the surrounding 'neighborhood.'
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Titanium atom that exists in two places at once in crystal to blame for unusual phenomenon
Bombarding a crystal with neutrons reveals a quantum quirk that frustrates heat transfer.
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A Prominent AI Ethics Researcher Says Google Fired Her
Timnit Gebru is a leader among those examining the societal impacts of the technology. She had also criticized the company's diversity efforts.
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Drinking linked to a decline in brain health from cradle to grave
The evidence for the harmful effects of alcohol on brain health is compelling, but now experts have pin-pointed three key time periods in life when the effects of alcohol are likely to be at their greatest.
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Supercomputer simulations could unlock mystery of Moon's formation
Astronomers have taken a step towards understanding how the Moon might have formed out of a giant collision between the early Earth and another massive object 4.5 billion years ago.
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People with rare autoimmune diseases at increased risk of dying during COVID-19 pandemic
A new study, led by experts from the University of Nottingham, has shown that people with rare autoimmune rheumatic diseases are at a greater risk of dying at a younger age during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Increased school choice linked to better mental health for students
Allowing families to choose schools that are more suited to their children may play a key role in improving student mental health, including reducing adolescent suicide rates, suggests new research published in the peer-reviewed journal School Effectiveness and School Improvement.
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Household-grown food leads to improved health for children
Children grow taller in rural households where their mothers are supported to grow their own food – according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA). The research, which looked at households in low- and middle-income countries, showed growing their own food helped mothers to prevent stunting, wasting and underweight in their children. Their children's food was more varied, meanin
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Definition of treasure trove to be recast to protect UK's rare artefacts
Recent finds have not met criteria as they are made from bronze, not precious metals The government plans to change the official definition of "treasure" to cover more rare and precious archaeological finds so that such artefacts can be saved for the nation rather than sold to private collectors. Under the 1996 Treasure Act, objects are designated as treasure trove if found to be more than 300 ye
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Supercomputer simulations could unlock mystery of Moon's formation
Astronomers have taken a step towards understanding how the Moon might have formed out of a giant collision between the early Earth and another massive object 4.5 billion years ago.
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Author Correction: Fasting-mimicking diet and hormone therapy induce breast cancer regression
Nature, Published online: 04 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2957-6
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Study finds metformin reduced COVID-19 death risks in women
University of Minnesota Medical School and UnitedHealth Group researchers found that metformin was associated with significantly reduced COVID-19 death risks in women in one of the world's largest observational studies of COVID-19 patients.
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Daily data from COVID app predicts local incidence and prevalence of virus
Published today in The Lancet Public Health, a study by researchers at King's College London research team detail the modelling behind the ZOE COVID Symptom Study App.
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Coronavirus live news: Biden to ask Americans to wear masks for 100 days as global deaths pass 1.5m
Biden will ask Americans to wear masks for his first 100 days in office; Italy approves Christmas restrictions; Iran's cases top 1m European and US experts question UK's fast-track of vaccine Public trust vital for Covid-19 vaccine programmes says WHO Swedes' support for anti-lockdown stance slips amid rising deaths Cyberspies target Covid vaccine 'cold chain' distribution network 12.24am GMT Bri
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Girl Is Born in Tennessee From Embryo Frozen for 27 Years
The birth of Molly Gibson using an embryo from 1992 broke a record set by her sister, Emma, in 2017. The embryos were donated when the girls' mother was herself a toddler.
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Marine mammals' adaptations to low oxygen offer new perspective on COVID-19
Humans are vulnerable to rapid damage in a wide range of tissues when oxygen levels drop due to the effects on the lungs and cardiovascular system of infection with the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. A new article explores how the diving physiology of marine mammals can help us understand the effects of COVID-19.
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How to buy carbon offsets that actually make a difference
New trees sequester carbon like crazy. (Binyamin Mellish/Pexels/) Despite the fact that many of us stopped commuting and skipped the airport due to the pandemic, our carbon footprints didn't disappear this year. Perhaps you went on a long road trip for vacation, or drove to avoid public transit or flying (I drove almost 10,000 miles this year, despite working from my bedroom). And then there's th
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Covid: 1.5 million dead globally as vaccination schemes set to begin
More than 10,000 people have died on average every day in the past week, according to latest figures Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage At least 1.5 million lives across the globe have been lost to Covid-19, according to a tally of cases maintained by Johns Hopkins University, as vaccinations look set to be rolled out in a handful of nations this month. Reuters reported
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Fisheries in a flask? Loose DNA in seawater offers a new measure of marine populations
New studies of environmental DNA approach a long-sought goal: measuring abundance of marine fish
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Climate change: UK aim of 68% emissions cut a 'colossal challenge'
The "ambitious" target for 2030 would see the UK move faster than any major economy, the PM says.
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A leading AI ethics researcher says she's been fired from Google
On December 2, the AI research community was shocked to learn that Timnit Gebru had been fired from her post at Google. Gebru, one of the leading voices in responsible AI research, is known among other things for coauthoring groundbreaking work that revealed the discriminatory nature of facial recognition , cofounding the Black in AI affinity group, and relentlessly advocating for diversity in th
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Puerto Rico: The moment the Arecibo Observatory telescope collapsed
Video shows one of the world's largest telescopes at Puerto Rico's Arecibo Observatory crashing down.
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Amazon rainforest rock art 'depicts giant Ice Age creatures'
Researchers say the paintings in modern-day Colombia are believed to be about 12,000 years old.
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A 'Magical Bug' Exposed Any iPhone in a Hacker's Wi-Fi Range
A Google researcher found flaws in Apple's AWDL protocol that would have allowed for a complete device takeover.
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Pandemic Data Are Stalling Out
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . As expected, our picture of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States in the past week is muddied by incomplete and delayed data, the result of the Thanksgiving holiday and long weekend. Although cases, tests, and deaths appear to have declined, we believe this is largely
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This 'brine electrolyzer' can mine oxygen, hydrogen from water on Mars
Mars explorers will need more oxygen and hydrogen than they can carry to the Red Planet. Martian water may be able to provide these elements, but it is extremely salty water. The new method can pull oxygen and hydrogen for breathing and fuel from Martian brine. When people finally get to Mars, there are a two things they're going to need lots of: oxygen and fuel. (Drinking water, too, but that's
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Researchers Call For Rebuilding Collapsed SETI Observatory
Crushed Dreams Researchers working at the Arecibo Observatory, which collapsed earlier this month, are calling for the massive radio telescope to be rebuilt, NBC News reports . On Tuesday morning, the 900-ton platform suspended above the delicate 1,000 foot dish came crashing down following several support cables snapping under the weight in October and November . A Tragedy For many in the scient
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Advancing gene editing with new CRISPR/Cas9 variant
Researchers report the ability to improve safety and efficacy using a CRISPR-Cas9 variant known as miCas9.
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New review confirms disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Black, Hispanic populations
Black and Hispanic populations are disproportionately affected by COVID-19, according to a systematic review published this week. The disparities were likely related to minority populations being at higher risk of exposure to the coronavirus as opposed to underlying health conditions or other factors, according to the review led by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University and the VA Portl
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What will 'psychedelic therapy' look like when it's legalized?
In November, Oregon voted to legalize psilocybin therapy. Psilocybin is already being used in clinical research settings, but it remains a controlled substance on the federal level. At the 2020 Web Summit, two experts in the field of psychedelic research and therapy shed light on what the future of psilocybin therapy might look like. For millennia, humans have been using psychedelic drugs for med
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Obama, Clinton, and Bush Say They'll All Take COVID-19 Vaccine
Three former U.S. Presidents have all volunteered to be vaccinated against COVID-19 on camera in order to bolster confidence in the vaccine. Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama all agreed to take part, CNN reports , in an attempt to create a bipartisan message encouraging widespread inoculation against the coronavirus. To many, the idea of encouraging people to vaccinate themselves aga
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Google Ousts Top AI Ethicist
Censorship Allegations One of Google's top AI ethicists says she's out at the company — in part, she says, because the tech giant was censoring her research. OneZero reports that Timnit Gebru, who had been the technical co-lead of Google's Ethical Artificial Intelligence Team, says her employment was abruptly cut off — along with her access to her company email address — after a tense email excha
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3D protein modeling suggests why COVID-19 infects some animals, but not others
Some animals are more susceptible to COVID-19 infection than others, and new research suggests this may be due to distinctive structural features of a protein found on the surface of animal cells.
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Oral drug blocks SARS-CoV-2 transmission, researchers find
Treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection with a new antiviral drug, MK-4482/EIDD-2801 or Molnupiravir, completely suppresses virus transmission within 24 hours, researchers have discovered.
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What makes certain groups more vulnerable to COVID-19?
What makes the elderly and people with underlying conditions more vulnerable to COVID-19? According to a new study, clues can be found in the proteins involved in initiating infection, as the virus binds to host cells of different animals. Greater cellular oxidation with aging and sickness may explain why seniors and people with chronic illness get infected more often and more severely.
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Puerto Rico's Arecibo Observatory 'not closing' after collapse
Puerto Rico's Arecibo Observatory could still have a future after its vast telescope dramatically collapsed this week, US officials said Thursday.
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Low-dose CT for lung cancer screening: benefit outweighs potential harm
An earlier initial diagnosis can reduce lung cancer mortality in heavy (ex-)smokers. The benefit outweighs the risk of harm from misdiagnosis or overdiagnosis.
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Chemists get peek at novel fluorescence
Rice University chemists find a second level of fluorescence in single-walled carbon nanotubes. The phenomenon may be useful in solar energy and optoelectronic applications.
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