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THIS ARTICLE FROM THE LIST BELOW (2020December11) WAS CHOSEN BY: BRYAN FAETH AS INTERESTING:

An  article is looking at the short-term oceanic effects of reduced global greenhouse gas emissions. While the current pandemic has caused a 9% reduction in GHGs, there is no direct correlation yet to any changes in average ocean acidity, which is largely driven by the carbon content in the oceans. This is in contrast to other direct, positive climate effects that have been seen since the onset of COVID-19 and has led Sutton et al. to conclude that while there are environmental improvements already happening at the global-scale, continued efforts will have to be made, in line with the Paris Agreement throughout the century, to keep our environmental systems in check.

Article: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-12/uoca-ioc121020.php

 

THIS ARTICLE FROM THE LIST BELOW (2020December11) WAS CHOSEN BY: BRYAN FAETH AS INTERESTING:

An article focuses on the "CO2 fertilization effect" of forests and agriculture. Findings over the past few decades show that less CO2 is being consumed by vegetation than previously thought – out of line with simulated model data. Although there are a few reasons for this, the largest of which seems to be in the accounting of nutrient and water availability. Tying back to climate change, the final note here is that if we continue overestimating the carbon sequestration potential of AFOLU, there will be a compounding effect on future GHG emission pathways.

Article: https://phys.org/news/2020-12-carbon-dioxide-earth-full.html

 

THIS ARTICLE FROM THE LIST BELOW (2020December11) WAS CHOSEN BY: BRYAN FAETH AS INTERESTING:

In this article, the results of a new trial are discussed, which utilizes 30,000 electromagnetic pulses to stimulate post-stroke brain activity in order to target depression. Positive results of this non-invasive treatment could work in conjunction with (or potentially replace) the conventional use of antidepressants and psychotherapy. 

Article: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-12/uosa-rss121020.php

Shorebirds wintering in Southeast Asia demonstrate trans-Himalayan flights
Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-77897-z
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Menneskeskabte materialer vejer nu mere end alt liv på Jorden
Beton, plast og andre materialer vejer nu mere end klodens planter, dyr og andre levende organismer.
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Scientists build whole functioning thymus from human cells
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and University College London have rebuilt a human thymus, an essential organ in the immune system, using human stem cells and a bioengineered scaffold. Their work is an important step towards being able to build artificial thymi which could be used as transplants.
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Flavors added to vaping devices can damage the heart
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The edible marine snail now contains a new species
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A surgeon's birthday may be a dicey day for older patients
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Shanghai Murmur
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Te-Ping Chen on the Search for Meaning in Shanghai
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Carbon dioxide feeds plants, but are Earth's plants getting full?
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Study identifies ways to limit arsenic contamination from mines
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Author Correction: Shift work influences the outcomes of Chlamydia infection and pathogenesis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79099-z
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Tiny fox bones are clues to human evolution
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New species of edible marine snail
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Squirrel Tables Are the New Bird Feeders
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Colonial history of the Marshall Islands limits their ability to save themselves from climate change
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New species of edible marine snail
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Scientists develop novel self-healing human-machine interactive hydrogel touch pad
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Scientists demonstrate laser direct mapping of attosecond electron dynamics
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Visualization of mechanical waves in a liquid medium
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Expression, diffusion and molecular interactions determine Wnt3 distribution
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Expression, diffusion and molecular interactions determine Wnt3 distribution
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How epigenetic switches control gene expression
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How epigenetic switches control gene expression
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Genetiska skillnader viktiga vid alzheimerdiagnos
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Can't smell or taste the bacon? It's probably a sign of COVID-19.
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AI needs to face up to its invisible-worker problem
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I Tested Positive for Covid-19. What Does That Really Mean?
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The FDA's Green Light for a Vaccine Might Tank Ongoing Trials
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'Beyond These Stars Other Tribulations of Love'
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Staten skruer ned på energisparekrav til sig selv
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Abortion and Contraception in the Middle Ages
Both were far more common than you might think — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Artificial intelligence improves control of powerful plasma accelerators
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GSK/Sanofi Covid vaccine delayed until end of next year
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Squirrel Tables Are the New Bird Feeders
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Arecibo's Collapse Sends Dire Warning to Other Aging Observatories
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Arecibo's Collapse Sends Dire Warning to Other Aging Observatories
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EU satser stort på chip- og halvlederteknologi: Danmark tøver
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America's Bipartisan COVID-19 Illiteracy
The United States has been overwhelmed by vectors of misinformation throughout the pandemic. But it's not just Donald Trump, many Republican state leaders, and several thousand COVID-19 deniers who have waged a war against scientific comprehension. America's virus illiteracy spans the partisan divide. In Florida, Republican Governor Ron DeSantis chirped about his state's superior performance and
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Därför misslyckas ofta megaprojekt
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River conservation by an Indigenous community
Nature, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03316-y Populations of river fish are threatened by pressures on land and water resources. Networks of reserves managed by Indigenous people at community level offer a way to conserve fish diversity and enhance yields of nearby fisheries.
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Podcast special: Ny teknologi gøder konspirationsteorier
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The grad student who found a fatal error that may affect lots of papers
A team of researchers in England has retracted a 2014 paper after a graduate student affiliated with the group found a fatal error while trying to replicate parts of the work — and which might affect similar studies by other scientists, as well. The article, "Perceptual load affects spatial tuning of neuronal populations in human … Continue reading
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Book Review: The Power of Chance in Shaping Life and Evolution
In "A Series of Fortunate Events," Sean B. Carroll explores the randomness at play in the development of life on Earth, from asteroid collisions to genetic mutations and viral diseases. Finding that "we live in a world of mistakes, governed by chance," Carroll asks, how do complex organisms arise at all?
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Shortages, jams and shutdowns: UK readies for Brexit 'no-deal' chaos
Food shortages, tailbacks and congested ports: as talks with Brussels remain unresolved three weeks before leaving the EU single market, the UK is preparing for a chaotic "no-deal".
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NBA 'bubble' reveals the ultimate home court advantage, study finds
Using the NBA's travel-less bubble as a natural experiment, a new statistical analysis suggests performance on the road depends on aligning the internal body clock with the new time zone and quality of sleep.
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Scientists publish open resource to help design 'greener' energy systems
Researchers have created a database of measurements from existing global power grid systems that will help develop new power systems capable of meeting changing demands, such as the move towards renewable energy sources.
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Artificial intelligence improves control of powerful plasma accelerators
Researchers have used AI to control beams for the next generation of smaller, cheaper accelerators for research, medical and industrial applications.
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Liver lymphatic drainage patterns follow segmental anatomy in a murine model
Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78727-y
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Silicon carbide formation from methane and silicon monoxide
Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79006-6
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A nomogram for estimating intracranial pressure using acute subdural hematoma thickness and midline shift
Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-77667-x
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Reduced vagal modulations of heart rate during overwintering in Antarctica
Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78722-3
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Controlling biodiversity impacts of future global hydropower reservoirs by strategic site selection
Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78444-6
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Hdac3 deletion in myeloid progenitor cells enhances bone healing in females and limits osteoclast fusion via Pmepa1
Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78364-5
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Synthetic biology 2020–2030: six commercially-available products that are changing our world
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20122-2 Synthetic biology will transform how we grow food, what we eat, and where we source materials and medicines. Here I have selected six products that are now on the market, highlighting the underlying technologies and projecting forward to the future that can be expected over the next ten years.
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Genomic epidemiology reveals transmission patterns and dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 in Aotearoa New Zealand
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20235-8 New Zealand implemented stringent COVID-19 control measures early after identification of its first case. Here, the authors perform whole genome sequencing of samples taken until 22 May 2020 and find high viral diversity indicative of multiple separate introductions and limited community transmission.
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Ubiquitination of RIPK1 regulates its activation mediated by TNFR1 and TLRs signaling in distinct manners
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19935-y RIPK1 is a critical kinase which mediates necroptosis, apoptosis and inflammation. Regulation of RIPK1 by ubiquitination is being intensively investigated. Here, the authors made knock-in RIPK1-K612R mice and demonstrate that this mutation alters the RIPK1 ubiquitinylation pattern and inhibits its prodeath k
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Single-nucleus RNA-seq identifies transcriptional heterogeneity in multinucleated skeletal myofibers
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20063-w Mammalian skeletal muscle is composed of multinucleated myofibers, containing hundreds of nuclei that coordinate cellular function. Here, the authors show that single-nucleus RNA-sequencing reveals rare and emergent myonuclear populations, and uncovers dynamic transcriptional heterogeneity in development and
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A meta-learning approach for genomic survival analysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20167-3 RNA-sequencing data from tumours can be used to predict the prognosis of patients. Here, the authors show that a neural network meta-learning approach can be useful for predicting prognosis from a small number of samples.
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Quantifying accuracy and heterogeneity in single-molecule super-resolution microscopy
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20056-9 Standard benchmarking of single-molecule localization microscopy cannot quantify nanoscale accuracy of arbitrary datasets. Here, the authors present Wasserstein-induced flux, a method using a chosen perturbation and knowledge of the imaging system to measure confidence of individual localizations.
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Multipurpose self-configuration of programmable photonic circuits
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19608-w Signal processors based on programmable photonic circuits will enable many future applications employing a common hardware platform. The authors present the architecture and two approaches to management automation to enable self-configuration and optimization of such photonic integrated circuits.
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SLAMF7 and IL-6R define distinct cytotoxic versus helper memory CD8+ T cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19002-6 We classically consider the T cell compartment divided into cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and multiple, different helper CD4+ T cell subsets. Here the authors demonstrate that distinct memory CD8+ T cell subsets phenotypically inhabit CD4+ T cell like populations including some with helper-like characteristics.
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What's on the GMO menu: fast-growing salmon and slow-swimming tuna
A genetically modified salmon will become the first GM food animal to go on sale in the US, according to its maker, AquaBounty, possibly launching an era of steaks and chops from creatures with modified DNA. In the US, a number of genetically modified animals have been approved or cleared for sale. There's the neon GloFish with added fluorescence, which you can find at a pet store. And there are
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Gene editing has made pigs immune to a deadly epidemic
When covid-19 began to race around the world, countries closed businesses and told people to stay home. Many thought that would be enough to stop the coronavirus. If we had paid more attention to pigs, we might have known better. When it comes to controlling airborne viruses, says Bill Christianson, "I think we fool ourselves on how effective we can be." Christianson is an epidemiologist and vete
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Alzheimer's Researchers Study a Rare Brain
A woman in Colombia with a rare genetic mutation recently made the ultimate donation to science.
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Psychedelics: The scientific renaissance of mind-altering drugs
Having been repressed in the 1960s for their ties to the counterculture, psychedelics are currently experiencing a scientific resurgence. In this video, Michael Pollan, Sam Harris, Jason Silva and Ben Goertzel discuss the history of psychedelics like LSD and psilocybin, acknowledge key figures including Timothy Leary and Albert Hoffman, share what the experience of therapeutic tripping can entail
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Britiske supermarkeder overvåger med ansigtsgenkendelse: Privacy-forkæmpere frygter konsekvenser
Privatlivsforkæmpere har udtalt kritik af den britiske supermarkedskæde Co-op, efter at kæden har indført ansigtsgenkendelse i 18 butikker.
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Hvornår bliver få til mange i fysiske systemer? Dansk forsker finder et svar
PLUS. Makroskopiske systemer har egenskaber, som ikke findes eller kan beskrives i systemer med få atomer. Men forløberen til de makroskopiske egenskaber kan allerede ses i systemer med færre end 12 atomer.
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Can the UK deliver on the Covid vaccine rollout? | Stephen Buranyi
The challenge of delivering vaccines on this scale are hard, but are firmly within the world of logistics, engineering, and politics Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK has become the first country to approve one of the coronavirus vaccines that the entire world has been desperately waiting for. And on Tuesday it delivered the first dose, to 90-year-old Margaret K
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Expert by Roger Kneebone review – the value of expertise
The pandemic has made the necessity of relying on experts evident to all … this is a rich exploration of lifelong learning Before the Brexit referendum in 2016, Michael Gove announced that Britain had had enough of experts , depicting them as out of touch and elitist. This anti-intellectualism became commonplace in the UK and the US, despite some notable Tory U-turns. With the unprecedented pub
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På kollisionskurs: Gigantisk isbjerg 50 km fra britisk pingvin-ø
Øen Sydgeorgien er hjem for mere end to millioner pingviner og sæler, i det sydlige Atlanterhav. Isbjerget er dobbelt så stort som øen.
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Stor anerkendelse til dansk diabetessygeplejerske
Diabetessygeplejerske Jytte Skovlund Roed fra Steno Diabetes Center Odense har modtaget international pris for sit mangeårige arbejde med patienter med diabetes.
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Scientists call for robust goal for species in Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework
Scientists urge that a clear, unambiguous goal for preventing human-induced species extinctions and stabilising populations must be front and centre in the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework—currently formulated draft iterations carry a serious risk of failure.
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Current pace of action on climate change is "unthinkable" state ex UN climate leaders
Justifiable pride can be taken in the incremental accomplishments of international climate change cooperation, but it is "unthinkable" to continue at the current pace. The global response to climate change is completely insufficient and leaves the world on a "road to hell".
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Scientists call for robust goal for species in Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework
Scientists urge that a clear, unambiguous goal for preventing human-induced species extinctions and stabilising populations must be front and centre in the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework—currently formulated draft iterations carry a serious risk of failure.
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Mineralet olivin trækker CO2 ud af luften: Kan potentielt løse vores klimakrise
Mineralet olivin er eminent til at trække CO2 ud af luften, når det skubbes op fra Jordens…
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EU leaders reach deal to cut emissions by at least 55% by end of decade
The 27 member states avoid deadlock after night-long discussions ahead of UN climate meeting European Union leaders have reached a hard-fought deal to cut the bloc's greenhouse gas emissions by at least 55% by the end of the decade compared with 1990 levels, avoiding a hugely embarrassing deadlock before a UN climate meeting this weekend. Following night-long discussions at their two-day summit i
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Hver anden ansøger får en flash glukosemåler i Fredericia, mens ingen får den i Aalborg
I Aalborg har ingen borgere opfyldt kravene til at få en bevilget en flash glukosemåler som hjælpemiddel, mens Fredericia bevilger måleren til 65 pct. af dem, der søger. Begge kommuner siger, at de følger Ankestyrelsens principafgørelse.
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Australia Scraps Covid-19 Vaccine That Produced H.I.V. False Positives
Of the dozens of coronavirus vaccines being tested worldwide, the one under development at the University of Queensland was the first to be abandoned.
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Climate change: 700-year history of wind recorded in island mud
Lake sediments on remote Marion Island tell the story of the Southern Hemisphere's westerlies.
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Ny metod läker skelettskador med konstgjort ben
Forskare vid Lunds universitet har i samarbete med kollegor i tyska Dresden, tagit fram ett sätt att kombinera benersättningsmedel och läkemedel med syftet att återbilda ben och läka allvarliga frakturer i exempelvis lår eller underben. Studien är gjord på råttor men forskarna menar att metoden i olika kombinationer snart blir klinisk vardag.
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Test your heart health by climbing stairs
Climbing four flights of stairs in less than a minute indicates good heart health, according to research presented at EACVI – Best of Imaging 2020, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). 'The stairs test is an easy way to check your heart health,' said study author Dr. Jesús Peteiro, a cardiologist at University Hospital A Coruña, Spain.
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Amazon community files lawsuit against Chinese firm over gas flaring
Indigenous Waorani from Ecuador's Amazon filed a lawsuit Thursday against state-owned Chinese oil company PetroOriental, accusing it of contaminating their ancestral lands by burning off natural gas from oil wells in a process known as flaring.
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Mass extinctions of land-dwelling animals occur in 27-million-year cycle
Mass extinctions of land-dwelling animals—including amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds—follow a cycle of about 27 million years, coinciding with previously reported mass extinctions of ocean life, according to a new analysis published in the journal Historical Biology.
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Mass extinctions of land-dwelling animals occur in 27-million-year cycle
Mass extinctions of land-dwelling animals—including amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds—follow a cycle of about 27 million years, coinciding with previously reported mass extinctions of ocean life, according to a new analysis published in the journal Historical Biology.
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Stort gennembrud: Danske forskere kan nu nå 'quantum advantage'
Forskere fra Københavns Universitet er nu så langt fremme med deres kvanteteknologi, at klassisk…
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EU leaders agree climate target, budget after wrangles
EU leaders on Friday agreed an ambitious target for cutting greenhouse gas emissions after unlocking the bloc's landmark budget and coronavirus recovery fund at a marathon summit.
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Window opens for Virgin Galactic test flight from spaceport
The window opens Friday for Virgin Galactic's first rocket-powered test flight from Spaceport America in southern New Mexico as the company prepares for commercial flights next year.
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Spacewatch: SpaceX Dragon resupply craft delivers cargo to ISS
New airlock and scientific experiments among cargo delivered to International Space Station The latest SpaceX Dragon resupply spacecraft has delivered a new airlock, new scientific experiments and other cargo to the International Space Station (ISS). Launched on a Falcon 9 rocket at 11:17 EST (16:17 GMT) on Sunday 6 December from Nasa's Kennedy space centre in Florida, the capsule docked with the
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Astronomers Just Found Cosmic 'Superhighways' For Fast Travel Through The Solar System
They can take objects from Jupiter to Neptune in decades.
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University of Queensland Covid vaccine: the government's pulled the plug so what happens now?
An order for 51m doses has been cancelled with researchers 'devastated' after a trial returned false positive HIV results Australia's Covid vaccines: everything you need to know Coronavirus live news Coronavirus map of the US: latest cases state by state The Australian government has terminated its agreement with Australian biotech company CSL Limited to supply 51m doses of a Covid-19 vaccine bei
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Masonic Medical Research Institute studies brown fat: Implications in obesity
The Lin Lab at the MMRI, quantified the number of brown fat cells present in newborn animals. For years, researchers have argued over whether brown fat continues to grow after birth. Dr. Lin and his team have become the first to prove that it does.
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Artificial visual system of record-low energy consumption for the next generation of AI
A joint research led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has built an ultralow-power consumption artificial visual system to mimic the human brain, which successfully performed data-intensive cognitive tasks. Their experiment results could provide a promising device system for the next generation of artificial intelligence (AI) applications.
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Screening for endocrine disruption in artificial zebrafish for long-term risk assessment
the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that the collaborative research team led by Dr. Young Jun Kim, leader of environmental safety at KIST Europe, and Professor Hyunjoon Kong from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign tried to develop the long-term toxicity and risks by cultivating organoids that mimic the liver of zebrafish.
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Young people embrace new model of teaching sexual consent, study finds
Sexual health charity Brook has adopted these latest research findings in its teaching methods
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Mass extinctions of land-dwelling animals occur in 27-million-year cycle
Mass extinctions of land-dwelling animals–including amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds–follow a cycle of about 27 million years, coinciding with previously reported mass extinctions of ocean life, according to a new analysis published in the journal Historical Biology .
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Sort boks skal åbne hospitalets mest lukkede rum
På Rigshospitalet har man installeret ny teknologi, der skal indsamle data fra operationsstuen til gavn for både patienter og læger. Black Box-projektet bruges til læring, og på sigt er målet at udvikle en algoritme, der kan øge patientsikkerheden og hjælpe kirurgerne på operationsstuen.
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Onkogynækolog: Black Box kan give uvurderlig læring
Et nyt system til digital dataindsamling under operationer giver mulighed for bedre uddannelse for både yngre og erfarne læger. Derfor havde Mikkel Rosendahl, teamleder for onkogynækologerne på Rigshospitalet, ingen betænkeligheder ved at sige ja til overvågning på operationsstuen.
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»Jeg skal nok komme mig, også hvis jeg aldrig får arbejde som radiolog igen«
For tre måneder siden ramte radiolog Mahican Gielens karriere et sort hul. Fyret fra jobbet som ledende overlæge prøver hun at nyde den uventede pause og se fremad, selvom hun stadig har svært ved at acceptere det skete.
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Højt fra Mettes røde top
Glædelig jul til Dagens Medicins læsere fra Niels Høiby.
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Ung læge blev slået af overlæge: Fagforening og ledelse tog det ikke alvorligt
Den yngre læge Andreas Thorsen oplevede at blive slået af en overlæge, da han var på vagt. Nu retter han hård kritik mod hospitalsledelsen og Yngre Læger for ikke at bakke ham op. Ifølge mobbeforsker har Andreas Thorsen været udsat for en 'dobbelt krænkelse', fordi hospitalsledelsen håndterede hans sag forkert.
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Debat: Yngre Læger svigtede mig, da jeg blev udsat for vold i lægeverdenen
Der var ikke megen hjælp at hente fra hverken min afdelingsleder eller min fagforening, da jeg på mit job som reservelæge blev slået i baghovedet af en overlæge. I stedet fik jeg at vide, at jeg skulle lære at tilgive og spurgt om, hvorfor jeg overhovedet ville gå videre med sagen.
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Formand for Yngre Læger: Danmark er et lille land
Helga Schultz, formand for Yngre Læger, afviser, at fagforeningen er med til at understøtte et system, hvor f.eks. en overlæge sanktionsfrit kan slå en yngre læge. Hun vil ikke kommentere på detaljerne i den konkrete sag, selvom Dagens Medicin har forelagt fagforeningen alle sagens detaljer.
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Mobbeforsker: Problematisk kultur gør det svært for læger at stå frem med krænkelser
På landets hospitaler hersker der tabuer, som kan få konsekvenser for patientsikkerheden, og en problematisk arbejdspladskultur, som gør det svært at sige fra over for krænkelser, mener mobbeforsker.
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Andreas Thorsen: Derfor sagde jeg op
Ifølge den 28-årige reservelæge ønskede han at finde en løsning, så han kunne blive i sin introduktionsstilling, efter at en overlæge havde slået ham. Manglende opbakning fra ledelsen og Yngre Læger førte til, at han ikke så anden udvej end at opsige sit job.
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Specielt unge diabetikere stresser over deres sygdom
En stor undersøgelse fra Steno Diabetes Center Odense viser, at rigtig mange unge er stressede over deres ­diabetessygdom. Samtidig er langt de fleste tilfredse med tilbuddet i regionens diabetesambulatorier.
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France tries caution and transparency to convince vaccine sceptics
French experience could provide a blueprint for other countries facing distrust over Covid jabs
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Kærlighed til bøger, Bob og Bruce
KULTURKANYLEN Hjemme hos Else Smith bugner reolerne af bøger, og hendes hang til gode tekster gennemsyrer også andre dele af hendes kulturforbrug. Og nå ja – så var der også den dag, hvor hun mødte Bruce Springsteen, og verden omkring hende forsvandt i nogle sekunder.
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Hvor meget skal man finde sig i?
Hvor meget skal man finde sig i for at få en karriere inden for de mest populære og prestigefyldte lægespecialer? Det spørgsmål rejser sig, når man læser den unge læge Andreas Thorsens modige fortælling.
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Sundhedsstyrelsen kører på frihjul i sagen om lavdosis CT
På basis af forløbet med sagen om lavdosis CT efterlades man med fornemmelsen af, at Sundhedsstyrelsen har optrådt mere som nyttige idioter for direktionen i Region Midt end som garant og varetager af borgernes og patienternes interesser.
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Er tiden kommet til indførelse af generisk ordination?
Debatten har kørt i mange år, og argumenterne imod generisk ordination er til at overse, skriver Mads Koch Hansen, lægelig rådgiver og ledelsescoach.
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Store kommunale forskelle i bevillingen af flash glukosemålere
Det er fuldstændig tilfældigt, hvordan kommunerne forvalter tildelingen af flash glukosemålere, og denne ulighed skal ændres, mener politisk chef i Diabetes­foreningen. Formand for endokrinologerne ser ikke lighed på området som en løsning i sig selv; det vigtigste er at få defineret det rigtige tilbud til de rette patienter.
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Opgør med fordomme og halvdøve ører: Læger skal være bedre til at lytte
NY BOG: 'Det du ikke ved får patienten ondt af' er titlen på overlæge Morten Sodemanns nye bog. Bogen er baseret på hans årelange erfaringer med en patientgruppe, de etniske minoritetspatienter, som typisk ender på hans bord, når alle andre specialister har opgivet at hjælpe.
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Diet modifications – including more wine and cheese – may help reduce cognitive decline
The foods we eat may have a direct impact on our cognitive acuity in our later years, according to new research. The study is the first of its kind to connect specific foods with cognitive decline. The findings show cheese protected against age-related cognitive problems and red wine was related to improvements in cognitive function.
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Electric 'knob' tunes chemical reaction rates in quantum gas
Building on their newfound ability to induce molecules in ultracold gases to interact with each other over long distances, researchers have used an electric 'knob' to influence molecular collisions and dramatically raise or lower chemical reaction rates.
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Internettets akilleshæl får tiltrængt kærlighed: Google og MANRS skruer op for RPKI-charmen
De seneste måneders ustabilitet hos de helt store cloudleverandører har umiddelbart fået Google op af stolen.
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Electric 'knob' tunes chemical reaction rates in quantum gas
Building on their newfound ability to induce molecules in ultracold gases to interact with each other over long distances, researchers have used an electric 'knob' to influence molecular collisions and dramatically raise or lower chemical reaction rates.
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Blocking protein restores strength, endurance in old mice
A single protein is a master regulator of mouse muscle function during aging, a new study finds. Blocking this protein increased muscle strength and endurance in old animals. It may play a role in age-related muscle weakening in humans.
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Single-crystal technology holds promise for next-generation lithium-ion batteries
Scientists have improved a promising battery technology, creating a single-crystal, nickel-rich cathode that is hardier and more efficient than before. It's one step toward improved lithium-ion batteries that are common in electric vehicles today. Increasing nickel content in the cathode is on the drawing board of lithium-ion battery makers largely because of its relatively low cost, wide availabi
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Single-crystal technology holds promise for next-generation lithium-ion batteries
Scientists have improved a promising battery technology, creating a single-crystal, nickel-rich cathode that is hardier and more efficient than before. It's one step toward improved lithium-ion batteries that are common in electric vehicles today. Increasing nickel content in the cathode is on the drawing board of lithium-ion battery makers largely because of its relatively low cost, wide availabi
11h
FDA panel backs Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine, paving way for emergency use in the United States
Despite a few misgivings,the advisory body said the vaccine's strong efficacy clearly made its benefits greater than its risks
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Opinion: We need to improve the welfare of life science trainees [Economic Sciences]
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to sweep across the globe, the media and the general public are turning to biomedical scientists in hopes of quick remedies. And while terms such as "contact tracing," "convalescent plasma," and "PCR testing" become part of our daily vocabulary, a new spotlight has been shone…
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Transforming task representations to perform novel tasks [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
An important aspect of intelligence is the ability to adapt to a novel task without any direct experience (zero shot), based on its relationship to previous tasks. Humans can exhibit this cognitive flexibility. By contrast, models that achieve superhuman performance in specific tasks often fail to adapt to even slight…
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Rapid hydrolysis of tertiary isoprene nitrate efficiently removes NOx from the atmosphere [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The formation of a suite of isoprene-derived hydroxy nitrate (IHN) isomers during the OH-initiated oxidation of isoprene affects both the concentration and distribution of nitrogen oxide free radicals (NOx). Experiments performed in an atmospheric simulation chamber suggest that the lifetime of the most abundant isomer, 1,2-IHN, is shortened significantly by…
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A data-driven approach to identify risk profiles and protective drugs in COVID-19 [Statistics]
As the COVID-19 pandemic is spreading around the world, increasing evidence highlights the role of cardiometabolic risk factors in determining the susceptibility to the disease. The fragmented data collected during the initial emergency limited the possibility of investigating the effect of highly correlated covariates and of modeling the interplay between…
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Distemper, extinction, and vaccination of the Amur tiger [Ecology]
Canine distemper virus (CDV) has recently emerged as an extinction threat for the endangered Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica). CDV is vaccine-preventable, and control strategies could require vaccination of domestic dogs and/or wildlife populations. However, vaccination of endangered wildlife remains controversial, which has led to a focus on interventions in…
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Australia abandons local Covid vaccine over HIV test concerns
Health department fears continuation of trials could damage public confidence in inoculation
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Embryonic development in a petri dish
By growing mouse stem cells in a special gel, a research team succeeded to grow structures similar to parts of an embryo. The trunk-like structures develop the precursors for neural, bone, cartilage and muscle tissues from cellular clumps within five days. This could allow the investigation of the effects of pharmacological agents more effectively in the future — and on a scale that would not be
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What caused the ice ages? Tiny ocean fossils offer key evidence
Since the discovery that atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations were lower during past ice ages, the cause has been a mystery. Now, fossils of ocean algae reveal that a weakening in upwelling in the Antarctic Ocean kept more CO2 in the deep ocean during the ice ages. This brings scientists closer to a complete explanation for the glacial cycle and suggests that upwelling will strengthen u
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Stigende mængder biogas presser det danske gasnet
PLUS. Et faldende gasforbrug og stigende mængder biogas medfører, at der fra næste år vil forekomme overskud af biogas visse steder i det lokale gasnet – og derfor må gasnettet udbygges
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Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 11. december
Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2020. Hver dag med nye præmier!
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BRAIN ORGANOIDS AND ITS ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS
We have already talked previously in this blog about stem cells, their applications in research and therapies, and how the field is advancing to produce organoids that resemble their 'original' counterparts more and more with every new discovery. However, we have not discussed the ethical implications that come with experimenting with human tissue. This is […]
12h
The chart that shows how we'll get back to normal
A covid-19 chart that's been shared thousands of times is dramatizing just how well vaccines against the disease can work and how we might get out of pandemic hell. Today, advisors to the US Food and Drug Administration voted in favor of emergency authorization for Pfizer's covid-19 shot, and the data in this chart is a big reason why. The graphic (below), released by Pfizer and its partner, BioN
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Climate change: Covid drives record emissions drop in 2020
The world has seen the biggest annual fall in CO2 emissions since World War Two, say researchers.
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Genetic differences important in Alzheimer's diagnosis
The two used methods for detecting amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease do not give unambiguous results, with the risk of incorrect or delayed care interventions. Now, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have found genetic explanations for the differences. The study is published in Molecular Psychiatry and may be important for more individual diagnostics and the development of futur
13h
Fra Mongo til Saldanha Bay: Historien om en succes
PLUS. Et spørgsmål fra tegneseriernes verden bragte forskerne bag udviklingen af SkyTEM over en forhindring og videre op i luften.
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Coronavirus live news: American FDA panel approves Pfizer vaccine as Biden advisor warns 'no Christmas parties'
Pfizer/BioNTech Covid vaccine approved by US panel; Israel abandons Covid-19 curfew plan ahead of Hanukkah; London has highest Covid-19 case rate in England Giuliani leaves hospital after receiving same drug cocktail as Trump Compromise lockdown struggles to subdue German second wave US records more than 3,000 Covid deaths a day for first time Rich countries leaving rest behind on vaccines, warns
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Current pace of action on climate change is "unthinkable" state ex UN climate leaders
Justifiable pride can be taken in the incremental accomplishments of international climate change cooperation, but it is "unthinkable" to continue at the current pace. The global response to climate change is completely insufficient and leaves the world on a "road to hell".
14h
COVID-19 lockdown causes unprecedented drop in global CO2 emissions in 2020
The global COVID-19 lockdowns caused fossil carbon dioxide emissions to decline by an estimated 2.4 billion tonnes in 2020 – a record drop according to researchers at Future Earth's Global Carbon Project. This and other findings are now available in the newly released Global Carbon Budget 2020.
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COVID lockdown causes record drop in CO2 emissions for 2020
The global COVID-19 lockdowns caused fossil carbon dioxide emissions to decline by an estimated 2.4 billion tonnes in 2020—a record drop according to researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA), University of Exeter and the Global Carbon Project.
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Dogs and owners may share resemblance in diabetes risk
Research shows people who have a dog with type 2 diabetes are 38% more at risk of having disease themselves It's said that dogs resemble their owners, but the similarities may also extend to their risk of diabetes, research suggests. The same cannot be said of cat owners and their companions, however. Previous studies had hinted that overweight owners tend to have porkier pets, possibly because o
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New treatment could spare early-stage rectal cancer patients life-altering side effects
A new and less invasive treatment developed by Cancer Research UK researchers is safer than standard major surgery for early-stage rectal cancer, giving patients a better quality of life with fewer life-altering side effects, results from a pilot study show.
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Diabetes in dogs may indicate elevated risk of type 2 diabetes in their owners
Owners of a dog with diabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than owners of a dog without diabetes. No shared risk of diabetes could be detected for cat owners and their cats. These novel findings, from a register-based study conducted at Uppsala University in collaboration with three other universities, have now been published in The BMJ .
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Is George's 'Marvellous Medicine' medically useful, dangerous, or both?
Increased time at home during the covid-19 pandemic may inspire budding scientists to search for a cure, but researchers in the Christmas issue of The BMJ warn of the potential toxicity of homemade potions.
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Quantitative approach on understanding how epigenetic switches control gene expression
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology decipher how to quantitatively assess the effects of specific epigenetic changes on the rate of transcription by developing a mathematical model. For this, they successfully generated reconstituted chromatin bearing histone modifications in vitro. Their study published in Nucleic Acids Research provides an accurate quantitative approach for understanding
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This Is Only Going to Get Worse
By nearly all measures, it has been a horrible week, a horrible month (10 days in), and a horrible year. The United States this week set records in all three metrics that gauge the pandemic's severity, with a total of 1.4 million new cases and 15,966 deaths. Yesterday, states and territories reported 3,088 deaths from COVID-19— a record no one wanted to see —and the average number of deaths per d
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Publisher Correction: Subducting carbon
Nature, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-3022-1
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Author Correction: Enteric neurons increase maternal food intake during reproduction
Nature, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-3013-2
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Author Correction: Virological assessment of hospitalized patients with COVID-2019
Nature, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2984-3
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Cracking down on soot pollution could save thousands of lives—but the EPA won't do it
Air pollution is more dangerous than you might think. (Pexels/) The Trump Administration continued its final sprint to lock in weakened or outdated environmental rules this week with the decision to maintain an air quality standard that many scientists say fails to protect the public. The decision re-establishes a limit defined in 2012 for fine particulate matter, better known as soot. Under the
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FDA advisory panel recommends approval of Pfizer Covid vaccine for emergency use
Recommendation signals formal FDA approval for Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine in the US could be imminent An advisory panel to the US Food and Drug Administration has recommended the emergency approval of a Covid-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNTech. The recommendation is expected to signal that the first approval of a Covid-19 vaccine for use in the US is imminent. That would mark a major milest
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The Vaccine Is Here. Now for the Hard Part.
In a historic moment during the darkest days of the COVID-19 pandemic, an FDA advisory committee voted today in favor of authorizing the first vaccine against COVID-19. The formal implementation of this recommendation, which would allow the vaccine to be given to anyone 16 or older, is expected to follow imminently. This marks the beginning of a new and hopeful phase in a crisis that has killed n
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F.D.A. Panel Gives Green Light to Pfizer's Covid Vaccine
The blessing of these experts means that the agency will likely OK the vaccine's use, paving the way for health care workers to begin getting shots next week.
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You'll Be Able to See the Northern Lights From the United States This Week
Golden Compass Great swathes of the northern US and Canada will have a breathtaking spectacle to look forward to this week: the Northern Lights are likely to be visible anywhere from Maine to Montana to Washington this week, according to SpaceWeather.com . The Weather Network predicts that the most visible auroras will occur over Thursday evening and the early morning hours of Friday. Solar Flare
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Best board games: Five things to consider
There are an overwhelming number of board games to choose from, so here are some of the best. (Galen Crout via Unsplash/) The humble board game is one of the great enduring forms of social icebreaker and low-stakes party activity thanks to its ability to instantly spur our innate drive to collaborate and compete. In spite of the rise of mobile and computer gaming and every subsequent technologica
16h
Bacteria release climate-damaging carbon from thawing permafrost
Around a quarter of the ground in the northern hemisphere is permanently frozen. These areas are estimated to contain about twice as much carbon as the world's current atmosphere. New research says that these permafrost soils are not only increasingly thawing out as the Earth becomes warmer, but also releasing that carbon, which accelerates the thawing.
16h
Researchers Synthesise a Psychedelic That Could Treat Depression Without Hallucinations
In mice, it had a similar antidepressant effect to ketamine.
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AAV capsid-promoter interactions in the non-human primate brain
The phenomenon of AAV capsid-promoter interaction recently seen in the rat central nervous system has now been shown to occur in the non-human primate brain. This interaction can directly determine cell-specific transgene expression
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Scientists look to meteorites for inspiration to achieve critical element-free magnet
The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Critical Materials Institute has developed a low-cost, high performance permanent magnet by drawing inspiration from an out-of-this-world source: iron-nickel alloys in meteorites. The magnet rivals widely used "Alnico" magnets in magnetic strength and has the potential to fill a strong demand for rare-earth- and cobalt-free magnets in the market.
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Restorative justice preferred among the Enga in Papua New Guinea
All human groups create systems for regulating cultural norms to maintain cooperation in society. Most large-scale populations employ a punitive judicial system where a third party doles out punishment. Yet, there's little evidence that this system achieves cooperation in a community. Advocates have long called for a more restorative justice system that repairs harm done to victims and reintegrate
16h
Which product categories and industries benefit most from social advertising
New research from a team of scientists at four leading universities has shed new light on the effectiveness of social advertising in specific product categories to learn which product categories tend to benefit more from social advertising, and which may not.
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EPA move creates hurdles for future air, climate rules
The Environmental Protection Agency announced final rule changes Wednesday that would make it harder for the incoming Biden administration to make new rules to protect the environment and public health by limiting the consideration of their costs and benefits.
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Study details first artificial intelligence tool to help labs rule-out COVID-19
Hospital-based laboratories and doctors at the front line of the COVID-19 pandemic might soon add artificial intelligence to their testing toolkit. A recent study describes the performance of Biocogniv's new AI-COVID™ software, which showed high accuracy in predicting the probability of COVID-19 infection using routine blood tests, which can help hospitals reduce the number of patients referred fo
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COVID-19 may also invade the central nervous system, cause neurological illnesses
COVID-19 is known primarily as a respiratory disease, with symptoms that include cough, shortness of breath, and, in severe cases, acute respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia. Now, Cleveland Clinic researchers note in a recent review that infection with the coronavirus may also affect the central nervous system and cause corresponding neurological disorders, including ischemic stroke, enceph
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Why Do We Dream? Science Offers a Few Possibilities
Dreaming might help us practice threatening situations in real life, or stimulate creative juices.
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Chemists modify hallucinogen to treat depression and addiction
For decades, people have reported that the psychedelic drug ibogaine seems to rid addicts of their cravings for drugs. In a new study, researchers created a variant of ibogaine that's less toxic and doesn't cause hallucinations. The results showed that the variant seemed to significantly lower depression and drug relapse rates in tests on mice. A new study suggests a modified version of the psych
17h
Which product categories and industries benefit most from social advertising
New research from a team of scientists at four leading universities has shed new light on the effectiveness of social advertising in specific product categories to learn which product categories tend to benefit more from social advertising, and which may not.
17h
Restorative justice preferred among the Enga in Papua New Guinea
Most large-scale populations employ a punitive judicial system. Advocates have long called for a more restorative justice system that repairs harm to victims and reintegrates wrongdoers into society. A study analyzing 10 years of court cases of the Enga of Papua New Guinea show that they overwhelmingly emphasize restorative justice, allowing both sides and community members share their story, the
17h
Antiepileptic drug reduces motor neuron excitability in ALS
The antiepileptic drug ezogabine reduced pathologic excitability of cortical and spinal motor neuron cells that are early signs of clinical dysfunction in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a study conducted by the Neurological Clinical Research Institute of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). In addition, the multi-site study involves the first clinical investigation
17h
Northern lights a 'big miss,' US space forecaster says
An initially promising U.S. forecast for the northern lights has gone bust.
17h
Artificial Chemist 2.0: Quantum dot R&D in less than an hour
A new technology, called Artificial Chemist 2.0, allows users to go from requesting a custom quantum dot to completing the relevant R&D and beginning manufacturing in less than an hour. The tech is completely autonomous, and uses artificial intelligence (AI) and automated robotic systems to perform multi-step chemical synthesis and analysis.
17h
Roadmap offers solutions for future of food, global ag innovation
To deflect future world food crises created by climate change and growing consumer demand, a Cornell University-led international team of economists, scientists and business experts has created a road map for global agricultural and food systems innovation, reform and sustainability.
17h
Nanocylinder vibrations help quantify polymer curing for 3-D printing
In a step toward making more accurate and uniform 3-D-printed parts such as personalized prosthetics and dental materials, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a method of measuring the rate at which microscopic regions of a liquid raw material harden into a solid plastic when exposed to light.
17h
Study shows supervisors who feel appreciated have better outlook at work
'Tis the season to be grateful, even for your boss, according to a recent University of Central Florida study that suggests when supervisors feel appreciated, it gives them a boost of energy and optimism. In the end, that's good for employees and the organization's bottom line.
17h
How commercial vessels could become tsunami early-warning systems
Scientists may have discovered a new ally in efforts to keep coastal communities in the Pacific Northwest safe from future tsunamis, according to a new study: Fleets of commercial shipping vessels.
17h
A genetic shortcut to help visualize proteins at work
One of biologists' most vexing tasks is figuring out how proteins, the molecules that carry the brunt of a cell's work, do their job. Each protein has a variety of knobs, folds, and clefts on its surface that dictate what it can do. Scientists can visualize these features fairly easily on individual proteins. But proteins don't act alone, and scientists also need to know the shape and composition—
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Researchers shed new light on mysteries behind the light emission of fireflies
A team of researchers from the NYU Abu Dhabi's (NYUAD) Smart Materials Lab (SML) led by Professor of Chemistry Panče Naumov has conducted a thorough review of the scientific literature surrounding the natural production of light, called bioluminescence, and developed conclusions that will help others in the field direct their research to uncover the mysteries behind this fascinating natural phenom
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Computational method provides faster high-resolution mass spectrometry imaging
A new computational mass spectrometry imaging method enables researchers to achieve high mass resolution and high spatial resolution for biological samples while providing data sets exponentially faster.
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A genetic shortcut to help visualize proteins at work
One of biologists' most vexing tasks is figuring out how proteins, the molecules that carry the brunt of a cell's work, do their job. Each protein has a variety of knobs, folds, and clefts on its surface that dictate what it can do. Scientists can visualize these features fairly easily on individual proteins. But proteins don't act alone, and scientists also need to know the shape and composition—
17h
Researchers shed new light on mysteries behind the light emission of fireflies
A team of researchers from the NYU Abu Dhabi's (NYUAD) Smart Materials Lab (SML) led by Professor of Chemistry Panče Naumov has conducted a thorough review of the scientific literature surrounding the natural production of light, called bioluminescence, and developed conclusions that will help others in the field direct their research to uncover the mysteries behind this fascinating natural phenom
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Researchers identify the physical mechanism that can kill bacteria with gold nanoparticles
Finding alternatives to antibiotics is one of the biggest challenges facing the research community. Bacteria are increasingly resistant to these drugs, and this resistance leads to the deaths of more than 25,000 around the world. Now, a multidisciplinary team of researchers from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili, the University of Grenoble (France), the University of Saarland (Germany) and RMIT Uni
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Researchers report role of quantum vibrations in electron transfer
Princeton Chemistry's Scholes Group is reporting evidence that quantum vibrations participate in electron transfer, establishing with ultrafast laser spectroscopy that the vibrations provide channels through which the reaction takes place.
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Hubble pins down weird exoplanet with far-flung orbit that behaves like the long-sought 'Planet Nine'
A planet in an unlikely orbit around a double star 336 light-years away may offer a clue to a mystery much closer to home: A hypothesized, distant body in our solar system dubbed "Planet Nine."
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Relics from Shakespeare's home shared in new virtual exhibition
Archaeological discoveries which shed light on the life and times of William Shakespeare are being showcased in a new free to access virtual exhibition.
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More Crabs!: Scientists Discover A Way To Help Dying Coral Reefs
For many reasons, including climate change, coral reefs are dying around the world. But scientists say some crabs eat coral-choking seaweed and algae and may help with restoring coral reefs.
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Hearing tones, elements through atomic music
With each atom assigned a tonal signature based on its spectral signature, music can be a powerful tool for helping students understand atomic structure.
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"Fun size" Cas9 nucleases hold promise for easier genome editing
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Russia and the US have described two new, compact Cas9 nucleases, the cutting components of CRISPR-Cas systems, that will potentially expand the Cas9 toolbox for genome editing. One of the two nucleases has been shown to work in human cells and thus can have biomedical applications. The paper was published in the journal Nucleic Acids Research.
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Low oxygen levels in lakes and reservoirs may accelerate global change
Ultimately, this study is crucial for how researchers, and the general public, think about how freshwater ecosystems produce greenhouse gases in the future. With low oxygen concentrations increasing in lakes and reservoirs across the world, these ecosystems will produce higher concentrations of methane in the future, leading to more global warming.
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New blended solar cells yield high power conversion efficiencies
Researchers have blended together various polymer and molecular semiconductors as photo-absorbers to create a solar cell with increased power efficiencies and electricity generation.
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What Science Says About Blue-Light-Blocking Glasses
Blue light gets a bad rap these days. Many people are turning to special glasses to protect their eyes from digital screens. But do they really work?
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The GOP Abandons Democracy
When Donald Trump was granted a coat of arms for his Scottish golf courses in 2012 (after a lengthy court battle, of course), he chose as its motto " Numquam concedere ": Never concede. He has not, even as it has become clear that he lost the presidential election by a wide margin. In the first few weeks after the election, anonymous Republicans and White House officials insisted that Trump's lac
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Hearing tones, elements through atomic music
With each atom assigned a tonal signature based on its spectral signature, music can be a powerful tool for helping students understand atomic structure.
17h
"Fun size" Cas9 nucleases hold promise for easier genome editing
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Russia and the US have described two new, compact Cas9 nucleases, the cutting components of CRISPR-Cas systems, that will potentially expand the Cas9 toolbox for genome editing. One of the two nucleases has been shown to work in human cells and thus can have biomedical applications. The paper was published in the journal Nucleic Acids Research.
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Physicists use antiferromagnetic rust to carry information over long distances at room temperature
Be it with smartphones, laptops, or mainframes: The transmission, processing, and storage of information is currently based on a single class of material—as it was in the early days of computer science about 60 years ago. A new class of magnetic materials, however, could raise information technology to a new level. Antiferromagnetic insulators enable computing speeds that are a thousand times fast
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Hyundai Is Buying Boston Dynamics for Almost $1 Billion
If you've ever seen a video of an unsettlingly lifelike robot, it was probably a Boston Dynamics machine. The company just started selling its first product, the Spot quadruped robot. Owner SoftBank apparently feels this is the best time to unload the company, which it purchased from Google in 2017. Now, Hyundai Motor Company is set to acquire Boston Dynamics for $921 million . The history of Bos
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Whose Brilliant Idea Was It to Bring Spiders to the Space Station?
Arachnauts In an unusual series of experiments, scientists on the International Space Station kept live spiders on the International Space Station in order to study how arachnids spin their webs in microgravity. The resulting research , published last week in the journal The Science of Nature shows that in the absence of gravity, spiders can instead orient their asymmetric webs around a light sou
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Eight masks that make great stocking stuffers
Mask up for any occasion. (UnderArmour/) Face masks are one of the best tools we have for fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, but they're not one-situation-fits-all. Just as I might prefer a hefty 28-ounce hammer to your trusty 16-ounce one, or holster that big banger for a pneumatic palm nailer in a tight spot, personal preference and lifestyle are important when making a choice. Of course, none of
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Artificial Chemist 2.0: quantum dot R&D in less than an hour
A new technology, called Artificial Chemist 2.0, allows users to go from requesting a custom quantum dot to completing the relevant R&D and beginning manufacturing in less than an hour. The tech is completely autonomous, and uses artificial intelligence and automated robotic systems to perform multi-step chemical synthesis and analysis.
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Roadmap offers solutions for future of food, global ag innovation
To deflect future world food crises created by climate change, a Cornell University-led international group has created a road map for global agricultural and food systems innovation.
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Germans want open communication of uncertainty in the coronavirus pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has once again highlighted the uncertainty inherent in science. The results of a Germany-wide study conducted by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Charite – Universitaetsmedizin Berlin show that most Germans want to be openly informed about this uncertainty. The results have now been published in the journal JAMA Network Open .
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Nanocylinder vibrations help quantify polymer curing for 3D printing
In a step toward making more accurate and uniform 3D-printed parts such as personalized prosthetics and dental materials, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a method of measuring the rate at which microscopic regions of a liquid raw material harden into a solid plastic when exposed to light.
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The psychology of causality
Like a parent being pestered with endless questions from a young child, most people will now and again find themselves following an infinite chain of cause and effect when considering what led to some particular event. And while many factors can contribute to an event, we often single out only a few as its causes. So how do we decide?
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Meal-based support can work for adults with anorexia
A new study of adults hospitalized for anorexia nervosa strengthens the case for making rapid weight gain a part of efforts for a comprehensive treatment plan, researchers report. The researchers analyzed data regarding 149 adult inpatients with anorexia nervosa in the Johns Hopkins Eating Disorders Program. The findings stand in contrast to long held beliefs that patients would not tolerate a fa
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Making cheaper, biocompatible E-skin electrodes
Materials scientists have improved electrical conductivity in a polymer electrode for E-skin applications. Their approach is simple and cheap, but further enhancements are needed for the polymer to become a viable alternative to more expensive gold electrodes.
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Symbiotic relationship between California oaks and mutualist fungi as a buffer for climate change
'Happy families are all alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.' So goes the first line of Leo Tolstoy's 'Anna Karenina.' Little did the Russian novelist know his famous opening line would one day be used to describe microbial communities, their health and their relationships to their hosts.
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New blended solar cells yield high power conversion efficiencies
Researchers have blended together various polymer and molecular semiconductors as photo-absorbers to create a solar cell with increased power efficiencies and electricity generation.
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Medicin mot endometrios kan bota vid svår pms
Behandling med så kallade progesteronreceptor-hämmare kan hjälpa kvinnor med den värsta sortens premenstruella besvär, pmds. Det visar en studie från Uppsala universitet, där varannan kvinna i studien blev botad från psykiska symptom som irritabilitet och depression. Det är väl känt sedan länge att menscykeln kan påverka kvinnors humör och välbefinnande. För majoriteten av kvinnor i reproduktiv å
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Earth's Harshest Ecosystems May Birth New Species Fastest
A genetic study of nearly 1,300 different birds suggests places with fewer species spit out new ones more frequently than biodiversity hotspots
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Researchers create roadmap for eliminating defects in health care value
A new paper states that the U.S. health care system spends in excess of $1.3 trillion annually on sub-optimal behavior and outlines a roadmap for reducing costs by eliminating defects in health care value. Researchers demonstrated that deploying a framework in which specific 'defects in value' were eliminated could not only save money but improve the overall care value proposition.
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How commercial vessels could become tsunami early-warning systems
If a tsunami formed along the Cascadia Subduction Zone off the coast of Oregon, residents might have just 20-30 minutes to get to safety. Scientists have proposed a new forecasting system that could provide seaside towns with critical early warnings.
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UCI, UCSD study: People more likely to pick up prescriptions via automated kiosks
Ever see long lines at the pharmacy counter and give up on a medication, or find that the drive is just a little too long? A study by the University of California, Irvine and UC San Diego found that patients using an automated kiosk in their workplace had better prescription pickup rates without sacrificing instruction from pharmacists.
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Sourdough starters give rise to a new line of yeast
Nature, Published online: 09 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03487-8 Artisanal baking practices nourished a strain of yeast that is distinct from industrial microbes.
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Climate Inequality Exists in U.S. Cities and Has Deep Racist Roots
Lower-income residents and people of color are more likely to live in the hottest neighborhoods — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Water on Mars not as widespread as previously thought, study finds
University of Arkansas scientists created planetwide maps of where water might be found on Mars. It is probably scarcer than previously thought, they concluded.
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Research examines impact of hurricanes on hospitalizations, medical providers
More older adults are hospitalized in the month following hurricanes while fewer primary care doctors, surgeons and specialists are available in some of their communities in the long term, according to a pair of University of Michigan studies.
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First presentation after Hayabusa2 mission return set for SPIE conference 14 December
As part of the opening plenary session at the SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation Digital Forum, Hitoshi Kuninaka, of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, will be discussing and responding to audience questions about the successful return of the Hayabusa2 capsule from its asteroid-sample mission, a second-time-in-history-success that marks exciting and innovating advances for the ast
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Self-collected saliva samples prove effective for diagnosing COVID-19
Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) have found that SARS-CoV-2 genetic material can be reliably detected in self-collected saliva samples at a rate similar to that of nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs. The rate of detection using saliva samples was similar across different testing platforms, and saliva samples remained stable for up to 24 hours when stored with ice pac
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Researchers identify the physical mechanism that can kill bacteria with gold nanoparticles
A multidisciplinary team of researchers have discovered that the mechanical deformation of bacteria is a toxic mechanism that can kill bacteria with gold nanoparticles. The results of this research are a breakthrough in researchers' understanding the antibacterial effects of nanoparticles and their efforts to find new materials with bactericide properties.
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Diet modifications – including more wine and cheese – may help reduce cognitive decline
The foods we eat may have a direct impact on our cognitive acuity in our later years, according to new Iowa State University research. The study is the first of its kind to connect specific foods with cognitive decline. The findings show cheese protected against age-related cognitive problems and red wine was related to improvements in cognitive function.
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Black churches are trusted messengers of COVID-19 information to their communities
U.S. public health officials have reported that Black communities are disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. As the number of COVID-19 cases across the U.S. surge, Mayo Clinic researchers are working closely with Black churches on disparities in emergency preparedness and providing access to culturally relevant, evidence-based health information. The early results of this research w
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When it comes to feeling pain, touch or an itch, location matters
When you touch a hot stove, your hand reflexively pulls away; if you miss a rung on a ladder, you instinctively catch yourself. Both motions take a fraction of a second and require no forethought. Now, researchers at the Salk Institute have mapped the physical organization of cells in the spinal cord that help mediate these and similar critical "sensorimotor reflexes."
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A genetic shortcut to help visualize proteins at work
A group at Gladstone Institutes and UC San Francisco (UCSF) has demonstrated that a large-scale and systematic genetic approach can indeed yield reliable and detailed information on the structure of protein complexes. Their findings are published in the journal Science.
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A potential therapy for one of the leading causes of heart disease
After 15 years of unrelenting work, a team of scientists from Gladstone Institutes has discovered a potential drug candidate for heart valve disease that works in both human cells and animals and is ready to move toward a clinical trial. Their findings were just published in the journal Science.
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Hubble identifies strange exoplanet that behaves like the long-sought "Planet Nine"
The 11-Jupiter-mass exoplanet called HD106906 b occupies an unlikely orbit around a double star 336 light-years away and it may be offering clues to something that might be much closer to home: a hypothesized distant member of our Solar System dubbed "Planet Nine." This is the first time that astronomers have been able to measure the motion of a massive Jupiter-like planet that is orbiting very fa
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ECB prepares for the next stage of coronavirus support
Monetary stimulus is necessary but cannot do all the work
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Fast superhighway through the Solar System discovered
Humanity could be making its way through the Solar System much faster thanks to the discovery of a new superhighway network among space manifolds . Don't get your engines roaring along this "celestial autobahn" just yet, but the researchers believe the new pathways can eventually be used by spacecraft to get to the outer reacher of our Solar System with relative haste. The celestial highway could
18h
The Latest on Coronavirus Mutations
For people looking for an accessible writeup on the coronavirus mutational landscape, I can recommend this Reuters article that came out today. It has a lot of good information in it, and a lot of very well-made graphics to show what's going on. Past blog posts on this subject are here , here , here , here , and here . And what's going on, of course, is that the virus is mutating. It's what virus
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COVID-19 found in the cornea: Are transplants a transmission risk?
A multi-institutional study finds that COVID-19 can be found in post-mortem corneal tissue, highlighting the importance of the donor screening process.
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There Was a Close Call at a Nuclear Power Plant Today
Close Call Finland's Olkiluoto nuclear power plant had a close call on Thursday. The Finnish newsroom Yle reports that the plant needed to perform an emergency shutdown after something went wrong with one of its two functioning reactors. Thankfully, the shutdown worked and there was no radiation leak — but it's a timely reminder that every nuclear plant has the capacity, however slim, for terribl
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Elsevier looking into "very serious concerns" after student calls out journal for fleet of Star Trek articles, other issues
An undergraduate student in the United Kingdom has taken to task the editors of a purportedly scholarly journal for having published more than 100 papers by a Maltese researcher with a deep affinity for Star Trek. In a Dec. 8, 2020, letter to the editors of Early Human Development (EHD), Hampton Gaddy, a BA student … Continue reading
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New algorithm will prevent misidentification of cancer cells
Researchers have developed a computer algorithm that can identify differences in cancer cell lines based on microscopic images, a unique development towards ending misidentification of cells in laboratories.
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Ferrets, cats and civets most susceptible to coronavirus infection after humans
An analysis of ten different species finds that humans — followed by ferrets and, to a lesser extent cats, civets and dogs — are the most susceptible animals to SARS-CoV-2 infection.
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'Electronic amoeba' finds approximate solution to traveling salesman problem in linear time
Researchers have, inspired by the efficient foraging behavior of a single-celled amoeba, developed an analog computer for finding a reliable and swift solution to the traveling salesman problem — a representative combinatorial optimization problem.
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Computational method provides faster high-resolution mass spectrometry imaging
Researchers at the Beckman Institute have developed a computational strategy that enables faster chemical and spatial characterization of tissues.
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Bosses need appreciation, too
'Tis the season to be grateful, even for your boss, according to a recent A new study suggests that when supervisors feel appreciated, it gives them a boost of energy and optimism. In the end, that's good for employees and the organization's bottom line.
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Princeton Chem reports role of quantum vibrations in electron transfer
Princeton Chemistry's Scholes Group is reporting evidence that quantum vibrations participate in electron transfer, establishing with ultrafast laser spectroscopy that the vibrations provide channels through which the reaction takes place. Seeking to establish an experimental proof for a highly contested topic – the role of vibrations in processes fundamental to solar energy conversion – Princeton
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Dartmouth researchers work to reduce child-directed food marketing on educational websites
A new article, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine by a by a team of researchers and advocates including Dartmouth faculty, asserts that current gaps in the regulation of commercial educational websites are exposing children to unhealthy food marketing. The group is working with major food companies and the USDA to limit these practices.
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Genomic analysis of early SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in Boston shows role of superspreading events
SARS-CoV-2 was introduced to the Boston area of Massachusetts many times in early 2020, according to a new analysis of virus genomes, but only a small number of importations – including one related to an international business conference – led to most cases there.
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The greening of the earth is approaching its limit
Vegetation has a key role in mitigating climate change because it reduces the excess CO2 that we humans emit into the atmosphere. Just as when sportsmen and women are doped with oxygen, plants also benefit from the large amounts of CO2 that accumulate in the atmosphere. If more CO2 is available, they photosynthesize and grow more, which is called the fertilizing effect of CO2.
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Single-crystal technology holds promise for next-generation lithium-ion batteries
Scientists have improved a promising battery technology, creating a single-crystal, nickel-rich cathode that is hardier and more efficient than before. It's one step toward improved lithium-ion batteries that are common in electric vehicles today. Increasing nickel content in the cathode is on the drawing board of lithium-ion battery makers largely because of its relatively low cost, wide availabi
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Blocking protein restores strength, endurance in old mice, Stanford study finds
A single protein is a master regulator of mouse muscle function during aging, a Stanford study finds. Blocking this protein increased muscle strength and endurance in old animals. It may play a role in age-related muscle weakening in humans.
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Using CRISPR, new technique makes it easy to map genetic networks
UC Berkeley scientists has developed an easy way to genetically profile a cell, including human cells, and rapidly determine all DNA sequences in the genome that regulate expression of a specific gene. This can help track down upstream genes that regulate disease genes, and potentially find new drug targets. The technique involves CRISPRing the entire genome while giving each CRISPR guide RNA a un
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What caused the ice ages? Tiny ocean fossils offer key evidence
Since the discovery that atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations were lower during past ice ages, the cause has been a mystery. Now, fossils of ocean algae reveal that a weakening in upwelling in the Antarctic Ocean kept more CO2 in the deep ocean during the ice ages. This brings scientists closer to a complete explanation for the glacial cycle and suggests that upwelling will strengthen u
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1300 species, 2400 genes, 21 museums, and 40 years
The tropics are a rich source of nature's biodiversity. However, due to limited sampling knowledge of tropical diversity is incomplete, making it difficult to uncover the mechanisms that drive and maintain such a high diversity. In a new study in Science , an international team of scientists study the species-level phylogeny of a major group of tropical birds revealing new species actually form fa
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Deadly, emergent cancer becoming endemic in Tasmanian devils, reducing extinction threat
An emergent transmissible cancer that once threatened Tasmanian devils with extinction appears to be transitioning to a state of endemism, researchers report.
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Carbon fertilization effects are declining worldwide, limiting their role in climate change mitigation
The widely observed carbon fertilization effects on plant photosynthesis worldwide are declining, researchers report in a new study.
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Evaluating accumulating evidence of how poverty influences mental health, and how to intervene
Why are people who live in poverty disproportionately affected by mental illness?
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Tasmanian devils may survive their own pandemic
Researchers have found strong evidence that a transmissible cancer that has decimated Tasmanian devil populations likely won't spell their doom. For the first time, a research team employed genomic tools of phylodynamics, typically used to track viruses, such as influenza and SARS-CoV-2 , to trace the Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease. The approach they pioneered has opened the door for applica
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Phase 1 trial assesses whether fecal microbiota transplant impacts cancer patients resistant to immu
In one of the first in-human studies to investigate whether modifying the gut microbiome by a fecal microbiota transplant could make cancer immunotherapy more effective, researchers analyzing this in ten cancer patients with refractory melanoma suggest the treatment can improve patient outcomes.
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Embryonic development in a petri dish
3D cell culturing technique could replace mouse embryos
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Perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells on the magic threshold of 30% efficiency
An HZB team has published a report in the journal Science on the development of its current world record of 29.15% efficiency for a tandem solar cell made of perovskite and silicon. The tandem cell provided stable performance for 300 hours – even without encapsulation. To accomplish this, the group headed by Prof. Steve Albrecht investigated physical processes at the interfaces to improve the tran
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The greening of the Earth is approaching its limit
When plants absorb this gas to grow, they remove it from the atmosphere and it is sequestered in their branches, trunk or roots. An article published today in Science shows that this fertilizing effect of CO2 is decreasing worldwide, according to the text co-directed by Professor Josep Peñuelas of the CSIC at CREAF and Professor Yongguan Zhang of the University of Nanjin, with the participation of
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Survey: Muslims and Jews report the most religious discrimination
Although people of all faiths report growing religious discrimination during the past few years, the phenomenon is most common among Jews and Muslims, according to a new survey. Jews and Muslims are also much more likely to become victims of violence because of their religious beliefs, the study shows. "…religious discrimination is alive and well." The researchers included samples of religious gr
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Season of the drought
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Corals catch fire
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Emergence to endemism
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Small NOD to big changes
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Taxing mental health
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Trunk formation in a dish
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Poverty, depression, and anxiety: Causal evidence and mechanisms
Why are people who live in poverty disproportionately affected by mental illness? We review the interdisciplinary evidence of the bidirectional causal relationship between poverty and common mental illnesses—depression and anxiety—and the underlying mechanisms. Research shows that mental illness reduces employment and therefore income, and that psychological interventions generate economic gains.
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News at a glance
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China's vaccine gambit
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Ensuring vaccine safety
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Angelika Amon (1967-2020)
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Season of the drought
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Emergence to endemism
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Small NOD to big changes
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Taxing mental health
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Alleviating side effects
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Recent global decline of CO2 fertilization effects on vegetation photosynthesis
The enhanced vegetation productivity driven by increased concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) [i.e., the CO 2 fertilization effect (CFE)] sustains an important negative feedback on climate warming, but the temporal dynamics of CFE remain unclear. Using multiple long-term satellite- and ground-based datasets, we showed that global CFE has declined across most terrestrial regions of the globe f
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Monolithic perovskite/silicon tandem solar cell with >29% efficiency by enhanced hole extraction
Tandem solar cells that pair silicon with a metal halide perovskite are a promising option for surpassing the single-cell efficiency limit. We report a monolithic perovskite/silicon tandem with a certified power conversion efficiency of 29.15%. The perovskite absorber, with a bandgap of 1.68 electron volts, remained phase-stable under illumination through a combination of fast hole extraction and
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Optically addressable molecular spins for quantum information processing
Spin-bearing molecules are promising building blocks for quantum technologies as they can be chemically tuned, assembled into scalable arrays, and readily incorporated into diverse device architectures. In molecular systems, optically addressing ground-state spins would enable a wide range of applications in quantum information science, as has been demonstrated for solid-state defects. However, t
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Reversible planar gliding and microcracking in a single-crystalline Ni-rich cathode
High-energy nickel (Ni)–rich cathode will play a key role in advanced lithium (Li)–ion batteries, but it suffers from moisture sensitivity, side reactions, and gas generation. Single-crystalline Ni-rich cathode has a great potential to address the challenges present in its polycrystalline counterpart by reducing phase boundaries and materials surfaces. However, synthesis of high-performance singl
19h
Protein condensates as aging Maxwell fluids
Protein condensates are complex fluids that can change their material properties with time. However, an appropriate rheological description of these fluids remains missing. We characterize the time-dependent material properties of in vitro protein condensates using laser tweezer–based active and microbead-based passive rheology. For different proteins, the condensates behave at all ages as viscoe
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Resonant collisional shielding of reactive molecules using electric fields
Full control of molecular interactions, including reactive losses, would open new frontiers in quantum science. We demonstrate extreme tunability of ultracold chemical reaction rates by inducing resonant dipolar interactions by means of an external electric field. We prepared fermionic potassium-rubidium molecules in their first excited rotational state and observed a modulation of the chemical r
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Stem-like CD8 T cells mediate response of adoptive cell immunotherapy against human cancer
Adoptive T cell therapy (ACT) using ex vivo–expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) can mediate complete regression of certain human cancers. The impact of TIL phenotypes on clinical success of TIL-ACT is currently unclear. Using high-dimensional analysis of human ACT products, we identified a memory-progenitor CD39-negative stem-like phenotype (CD39 – CD69 – ) associated with c
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Indian monsoon derailed by a North Atlantic wavetrain
The forecast of Indian monsoon droughts has been predicated on the notion of a season-long rainfall deficit linked to a warm equatorial Pacific. Here we show that nearly half of all droughts over the past century differ from this paradigm in that they (i) occur when Pacific temperatures are near-neutral and (ii) are subseasonal phenomena, characterized by an abrupt decline in late-season rainfall
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Preexisting and de novo humoral immunity to SARS-CoV-2 in humans
Zoonotic introduction of novel coronaviruses may encounter preexisting immunity in humans. Using diverse assays for antibodies recognizing SARS-CoV-2 proteins, we detected preexisting humoral immunity. SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein (S)–reactive antibodies were detectable using a flow cytometry–based method in SARS-CoV-2–uninfected individuals and were particularly prevalent in children and adoles
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The evolution of a tropical biodiversity hotspot
The tropics are the source of most biodiversity yet inadequate sampling obscures answers to fundamental questions about how this diversity evolves. We leveraged samples assembled over decades of fieldwork to study diversification of the largest tropical bird radiation, the suboscine passerines. Our phylogeny, estimated using data from 2389 genomic regions in 1940 individuals of 1287 species, reve
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Southern Ocean upwelling, Earths obliquity, and glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 change
Previous studies have suggested that during the late Pleistocene ice ages, surface-deep exchange was somehow weakened in the Southern Ocean's Antarctic Zone, which reduced the leakage of deeply sequestered carbon dioxide and thus contributed to the lower atmospheric carbon dioxide levels of the ice ages. Here, high-resolution diatom-bound nitrogen isotope measurements from the Indian sector of th
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Developmental clock and mechanism of de novo polarization of the mouse embryo
Embryo polarization is critical for mouse development; however, neither the regulatory clock nor the molecular trigger that it activates is known. Here, we show that the embryo polarization clock reflects the onset of zygotic genome activation, and we identify three factors required to trigger polarization. Advancing the timing of transcription factor AP-2 gamma (Tfap2c) and TEA domain transcript
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Response to Comment on "Forest microclimate dynamics drive plant responses to warming"
Schall and Heinrichs question our interpretation that the climatic debt in understory plant communities is locally modulated by canopy buffering. However, our results clearly show that the discrepancy between microclimate warming rates and thermophilization rates is highest in forests where canopy cover was reduced, which suggests that the need for communities to respond to warming is highest in
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Genetic interaction mapping informs integrative structure determination of protein complexes
Determining structures of protein complexes is crucial for understanding cellular functions. Here, we describe an integrative structure determination approach that relies on in vivo measurements of genetic interactions. We construct phenotypic profiles for point mutations crossed against gene deletions or exposed to environmental perturbations, followed by converting similarities between two prof
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Mouse embryonic stem cells self-organize into trunk-like structures with neural tube and somites
Post-implantation embryogenesis is a highly dynamic process comprising multiple lineage decisions and morphogenetic changes that are inaccessible to deep analysis in vivo. We found that pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) form aggregates that upon embedding in an extracellular matrix compound induce the formation of highly organized "trunk-like structures" (TLSs) comprising the neural
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CiBER-seq dissects genetic networks by quantitative CRISPRi profiling of expression phenotypes
To realize the promise of CRISPR-Cas9–based genetics, approaches are needed to quantify a specific, molecular phenotype across genome-wide libraries of genetic perturbations. We addressed this challenge by profiling transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational reporters using CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) with barcoded expression reporter sequencing (CiBER-seq). Our barcoding approach al
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A transmissible cancer shifts from emergence to endemism in Tasmanian devils
Emerging infectious diseases pose one of the greatest threats to human health and biodiversity. Phylodynamics is often used to infer epidemiological parameters essential for guiding intervention strategies for human viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2). Here, we applied phylodynamics to elucidate the epidemiological dynamics of Tasmanian devil facial tumor
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Comment on "Forest microclimate dynamics drive plant responses to warming"
Zellweger et al . (Reports, 15 May 2020, p. 772) claimed that a microclimatic debt, mainly controlled by canopy buffering, evolved in European forest understories. However, their analysis is based on circularity, as they explained the sum of three components by one of these components. The response of the understory to the thermal environment is generally weak.
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Tasmanian devils claw their way back from extinction
Genomes show spread of deadly, disfiguring facial cancer is slowing
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A New Drug for Peanut Allergies Is Offering Hope for Food Allergy Sufferers
The FDA's approval of Palforzia signals more treatments to come.
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Daily briefing: Human-made stuff outweighs all life on Earth
Nature, Published online: 10 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03548-y The mass of human-made things just exceeded the planet's total living biomass. Plus, the coolest molecules of the year and how children's immune systems evade COVID-19.
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Tasmanian devils may survive their own pandemic
Amid the global COVID-19 crisis, there is some good news about a wildlife pandemic—which may also help scientists better understand how other emerging diseases evolve.
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Team's electric 'knob' tunes chemical reaction rates in quantum gas
Building on their newfound ability to induce molecules in ultracold gases to interact with each other over long distances, JILA researchers have used an electric "knob" to influence molecular collisions and dramatically raise or lower chemical reaction rates.
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1300 species, 2400 genes, 21 museums, and 40 years: What it takes to address the tropical diversity paradox
Tropical regions contain many of the world's species and scientists consider them hotspots due to their immense biological diversity. However, due to limited sampling our knowledge of tropical diversity remains incomplete, making it difficult for researchers to answer the fundamental questions of the mechanisms that drive and maintain diversity.
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What caused the ice ages? Tiny ocean fossils offer key evidence
The last million years of Earth history have been characterized by frequent "glacial-interglacial cycles," large swings in climate that are linked to the growing and shrinking of massive, continent-spanning ice sheets. These cycles are triggered by subtle oscillations in Earth's orbit and rotation, but the orbital oscillations are too subtle to explain the large changes in climate.
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Using CRISPR, new technique makes it easy to map genetic networks
CRISPR-Cas9 makes it easy to knock out or tweak a single gene to determine its effect on an organism or cell, or even another gene. But what if you could perform several thousand experiments at once, using CRISPR to tweak every gene in the genome individually and quickly see the impact of each?
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Single-crystal technology holds promise for next-generation lithium-ion batteries
A promising technology under development by major battery makers has become even more attractive, thanks to researchers who have taken an unprecedented look at one key barrier to better, longer-lasting lithium-ion batteries.
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Embryonic development in a petri dish: 3-D cell culturing technique could replace mouse embryos
By growing mouse stem cells in a special gel, a Berlin research team succeeded in producing structures similar to parts of an embryo. The trunk-like structures develop the precursors for neural, bone, cartilage and muscle tissues from cellular clumps within five days. This could allow the investigation of the effects of pharmacological agents more effectively in the future—and on a scale that woul
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'Fun size' Cas9 nucleases hold promise for easier genome editing
Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Russia and the US have described two new, compact Cas9 nucleases, the cutting components of CRISPR-Cas systems, that will potentially expand the Cas9 toolbox for genome editing. In vitro studies and experiments in bacteria showed that these two nucleases are efficient at cleaving DNA, and the P. pneumotropica Cas9 nuclease is active in human cell
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Faster and more efficient information transfer
Physicists use antiferromagnetic rust to carry information over long distances at room temperature
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Tasmanian devils may survive their own pandemic
Amid the global COVID-19 crisis, there is some good news about a wildlife pandemic—which may also help scientists better understand how other emerging diseases evolve.
19h
1300 species, 2400 genes, 21 museums, and 40 years: What it takes to address the tropical diversity paradox
Tropical regions contain many of the world's species and scientists consider them hotspots due to their immense biological diversity. However, due to limited sampling our knowledge of tropical diversity remains incomplete, making it difficult for researchers to answer the fundamental questions of the mechanisms that drive and maintain diversity.
19h
Using CRISPR, new technique makes it easy to map genetic networks
CRISPR-Cas9 makes it easy to knock out or tweak a single gene to determine its effect on an organism or cell, or even another gene. But what if you could perform several thousand experiments at once, using CRISPR to tweak every gene in the genome individually and quickly see the impact of each?
19h
Embryonic development in a petri dish: 3-D cell culturing technique could replace mouse embryos
By growing mouse stem cells in a special gel, a Berlin research team succeeded in producing structures similar to parts of an embryo. The trunk-like structures develop the precursors for neural, bone, cartilage and muscle tissues from cellular clumps within five days. This could allow the investigation of the effects of pharmacological agents more effectively in the future—and on a scale that woul
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Amino acid recycling in cells: Autophagy helps cells adapt to changing conditions
Scientists have shown for the first time how specific metabolites produced by autophagy are utilized by a cell. They discovered that in budding yeast adapting to respiratory growth, autophagy — an intracellular recycling system — recycles the amino acid serine to trigger growth through mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism. This study shows how the recycling function of autophagy is crucial for ad
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Under wraps: X-rays reveal 1,900-year-old mummy's secrets
Researchers used powerful X-rays to see the preserved remains of an ancient Egyptian girl without disturbing the linen wrappings. The results of those tests point to a new way to study mummified specimens.
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A look at the sun's dusty environment
Scientists say that how dust moves and transforms around the sun may give them new insights to how Earth and its neighboring planets formed more than 4.5 billion years ago.
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One-two punch: Sea urchins stuck belly-up in low-oxygen hot water
Low oxygen seawater (hypoxia) may be more stressful to reef organisms than high water temperatures and ocean acidity, which are usually considered the most serious stressors associated with global change. Researchers test all three by flipping sea urchins.
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Human egg cells are imperfect surprisingly often
More than 7% of human oocytes contain at least one exchangeless chromosome pair, demonstrating a remarkably high level of meiotic recombination failure, finds a new study. The findings suggest that right from the get-go of human egg cell development, a striking proportion of oocytes are predestined to be chromosomally abnormal. But the frequency of exchangeless chromosomes is not affected by mater
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A gene from ancient bacteria helps ticks spread Lyme disease
One reason ticks spread Lyme disease so well goes back to a unique evolutionary event. Researchers discovered that an antibacterial enzyme in ticks, Dae2, protects them from bacteria found on human skin, while still allowing them to harbor Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. Ticks acquired the gene for this enzyme 40 million years ago from an unknown species of ancient ba
19h
How seaweed-munching crabs could help save coral reefs
Coral reefs are facing a steep decline today for many reasons, including climate change, overfishing, pollution, disease, and more. What's taking their place is lots and lots of seaweed. But researchers now have some encouraging news: native crabs can help to combat the seaweed and restore the reef.
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Inhaled vaccine induces fast, strong immune response in mice and non-human primates
Researchers demonstrate in a new study that a phage-based inhalation delivery system for vaccines generates potent antibody responses in mice and non-human primates, without causing lung damage. The findings suggest that a safe and effective lung delivery system could one day be used for vaccines and therapeutics against respiratory diseases.
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Getting the right grip: Designing soft and sensitive robotic fingers
To develop a more human-like robotic gripper, it is necessary to provide sensing capabilities to the fingers. However, conventional sensors compromise the mechanical properties of soft robots. Now, scientists have designed a 3D printable soft robotic finger containing a built-in sensor with adjustable stiffness. Their work represents a big step toward safer and more dexterous robotic handling, whi
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Cataloging nature's hidden arsenal: Viruses that infect bacteria
A new approach for studying phage-bacteria interactions will help scientists study the intricate offensive and defensive chemical tactics used by parasite and host. These microscopic battles have implications for medicine, agricultural research, and climate science.
19h
The Creator of Cyberpunk Game Says It's a "Warning" About the Actual Future
Take Warning The long-awaited game Cyberpunk 2077 has finally dropped, and gamers everywhere are ready to dive into an action-packed thriller set in a dystopian world with uneasy similarities to our own. Interestingly, the game is based on a series of Dungeons and Dragons-like tabletop board games, branded as Cyberpunk, that date back to the late 1980s, created by game designer Mike Pondsmith — w
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The Guardian view on treasure laws: time for reform | Editorial
Lockdown saw a surge in artefacts dug up by gardeners. How should such finds be handled? Reading, listening to birdsong: these were among the small pleasures that were snatched by some from the jaws of the pandemic this spring. So, it turns out, was accidental, domestic archaeology – a result of energetic lockdown gardening. The Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS), which is run by the British Museu
19h
Baby elephant dies suddenly, just before 2nd birthday
A baby elephant at a Syracuse zoo died from a virus just before his second birthday .
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Baby elephant dies suddenly, just before 2nd birthday
A baby elephant at a Syracuse zoo died from a virus just before his second birthday .
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Exoplanet around distant star resembles reputed 'Planet Nine' in our solar system
Astronomers think planets can exist in orbits far from their star, and propose a two-step process: interactions with the star or inner planets kick it out of the inner system, and then a passing star stabilizes the orbit to keep it bound. Such a scenario could explain the hypothesized "Planet Nine" in our solar system. Astronomers has now confirmed that one binary star system, HD 106906, has a pla
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NYUAD researchers shed new light on mysteries behind the light emission of fireflies
A team of researchers from the NYU Abu Dhabi's (NYUAD) Smart Materials Lab (SML) led by Professor of Chemistry Panče Naumov has conducted a thorough review of the scientific literature surrounding the natural production of light, called bioluminescence, and developed conclusions that will help others in the field direct their research to uncover the mysteries behind this fascinating natural phenom
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UMBC researchers use machine learning to develop more accurate COVID-19 diagnostic tool
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed a method of generating high-quality chest X-ray images that can be used to diagnose COVID-19 more accurately than current methods.
19h
Piglets vocally indicate preference for their piglet friends over human conspecifics
Like most mammals, pigs vocally express a lot of emotions such as joy, fear, frustration. To do this, they emit a whole battery of more or less high-pitched and more or less long vocalizations: barking, squeaking, screaming and grunting are all types of vocalizations that can be associated with positive or negative contexts. Grunts are the most used and yet the least understood. By deciphering the
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Piglets vocally indicate preference for their piglet friends over human conspecifics
Like most mammals, pigs vocally express a lot of emotions such as joy, fear, frustration. To do this, they emit a whole battery of more or less high-pitched and more or less long vocalizations: barking, squeaking, screaming and grunting are all types of vocalizations that can be associated with positive or negative contexts. Grunts are the most used and yet the least understood. By deciphering the
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SpaceX Starship Performs Amazing Flip Maneuver, Explodes on Hard Landing
SpaceX was forced to delay its recent Starship rocket launch, but the issue with the Raptor engines was sorted out in time for the second launch window yesterday (December 9th) afternoon. The launch itself went off without a hitch, sending the vessel up to 41,000 feet. That's a major milestone for the Starship, but the landing… well, that was more of a crash. SpaceX is still calling this one a wi
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'Dog kennel' satellite returns first ocean observations
The new Sentinel satellite to track global sea-level rise is in excellent shape, say space officials.
19h
How much does the way you speak reveal about you?
Listeners can extract a lot of information about a person from their acoustic speech signal. When researchers previously put this to the test, listeners were able to identify both race and regional dialects within the U.S. with moderate to high accuracy.
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European-US sea level tracking satellite sends 1st readings
A newly launched European-U.S. satellite designed to continue a decades-long record of tracking global sea levels has sent back its first measurements, NASA said Thursday.
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How damaging proteins form
Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease are both examples of amyloid diseases, where malfunctioning proteins accumulate to form fibrils and larger aggregates called amyloid plaques. In the journal Biophysical Chemistry researchers at the University of Leeds, UK, review progress in methods for studying crucial but fleeting intermediates in the formation of these fibrils.
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How damaging proteins form
Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease are both examples of amyloid diseases, where malfunctioning proteins accumulate to form fibrils and larger aggregates called amyloid plaques. In the journal Biophysical Chemistry researchers at the University of Leeds, UK, review progress in methods for studying crucial but fleeting intermediates in the formation of these fibrils.
20h
Natural environmental conditions facilitate the uptake of microplastics into living cells
The environment is polluted by microplastics worldwide. A research team at the University of Bayreuth has now discovered that microplastic particles find their way into living cells more easily if they were exposed to natural aquatic environments, i.e. fresh water and seawater. Biomolecules occurring in the water are deposited on the microplastic surfaces, which promote the internalization of the
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Hubble pins down weird exoplanet with far-flung orbit
A planet in an unlikely orbit around a double star 336 light-years away may offer a clue to a mystery much closer to home: a hypothesized, distant body in our solar system dubbed 'Planet Nine.'
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Researchers estimate nearly one-third of oaks are threatened with extinction
An estimated 31% of the world's oak species are threatened with extinction according to data compiled in a new report by The Morton Arboretum and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Global Tree Specialist Group, The Red List of Oaks 2020.
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How much does the way you speak reveal about you?
Listeners can extract a lot of information about a person from their acoustic speech signal. During the 179th ASA Meeting, Dec. 7-10, Tessa Bent, Emerson Wolff, and Jennifer Lentz will describe their study in which listeners were told to categorize 144 unique audio clips of monolingual English talkers into Midland, New York City, and Southern U.S. dialect regions, and Asian American, Black/African
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Hearing tones, elements through atomic music
With each atom assigned a tonal signature based on its spectral signature, music can be a powerful tool for helping students understand atomic structure. Jill Linz is working toward synthesizing unique tones for each element to create an acoustic version of the periodic table. She will discuss her progress and the potential applications of the project at the 179th ASA Meeting, Dec. 7-10.
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How loud is too loud? Identifying noise levels that deter older restaurant patrons
As restaurants get noisier, the increasing noise levels could deter older patrons, especially those with mild to severe hearing loss. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will discuss their work on investigating acceptable noise levels that won't cause restaurant visitors to stay away from certain establishments. Identifying acceptable noise levels helps establish truly
20h
Why do scientists care about worms?
I traveled to a marine research station on a picturesque Swedish fjord many times over the four years I worked on my Ph.D. What brought me back again and again? Buried in the mud off the west coast of Sweden lives a small orangey brown worm, which, to the untrained eye, looks entirely insignificant.
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France Says It's Working on Bionic Supersoldiers Because Everybody Else Is Doing It
Freedom Fries The French military is starting exploratory work on the development of bionic supersoldiers, which officials describe as a necessary part of keeping pace with the rest of the world. A military ethics committee gave its blessing to begin developing supersoldiers on Tuesday, according to The BBC , balancing the moral implications of augmenting and altering humanity with the desire to
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Why do scientists care about worms?
I traveled to a marine research station on a picturesque Swedish fjord many times over the four years I worked on my Ph.D. What brought me back again and again? Buried in the mud off the west coast of Sweden lives a small orangey brown worm, which, to the untrained eye, looks entirely insignificant.
20h
The stormy, fiery year when climate disasters wouldn't stop
Nature struck relentlessly in 2020 with record-breaking and deadly weather- and climate-related disasters.
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This is how we can design a more sustainable digital economy
The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored just how interconnected our world is. As the virus has spread, we have seen how none of us are immune, and how we need to work together to build and deploy solutions such as treatments and vaccines. We need to fight climate change with this same level of cooperation and commitment. Because while COVID will pass, the problems facing our environment are only ge
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2020 in Photos: Wrapping Up the Year
As the year comes to a close, it's time to take a look at some of the most memorable events and images of 2020. Events covered in this essay (the last of a three-part photo summary of the year) include the devastating wildfires in California, the passing of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the Nagorno-Karabakh War, the U.S. presidential election, the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, a
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Republicans Are Going Down a Dangerous Road
Republicans' tolerance, if not active support, for President Donald Trump's ongoing bid to overturn the 2020 election has crystallized a stark question: Does the GOP still qualify as a small- d democratic party—or is it morphing into something very different? Even with the Supreme Court still deciding whether to consider a last-ditch legal effort to invalidate the results from the key swing state
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A day at the beach helps model how sound moves through coastal areas
On a beach in North Carolina, researchers have been poking and prodding the sand to study how moisture levels affect sounds as they move across the environment.
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Why shielding businesses from coronavirus liability is a bad idea
Congress may be close to a deal on another coronavirus bailout, but Senate Republican demands for liability protections for businesses remain a major obstacle.
20h
Revolutionary superconducting magnet plate design and analysis
In the production of integrated circuits (computer chips), continuous innovation is essential to remain competitive. A major goal is to increase the productivity of photolithography machines, which is partly determined by their electromagnetic motors. Ph.D.-candidate Bart Koolmees, from the TU/e department of Mechanical Engineering, focused on developing a superconducting alternative for these mot
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Modeling the neighborhood boosts landslide prediction
A prediction model that considers multiple landslides over time in a given region may improve the accuracy of early warning systems.
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COVID-19 and other pandemics are the effects of our negative impact on the diversity of the total environment
There is increasing awareness that the COVID-19 pandemic is the consequence of environmental and societal crises. A new paper just published in the scientific journal Science of the Total Environment by international research fellows of the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research (KLI), an Austrian independent center for advanced studies in the life and sustainability sciences
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Researchers control multiple wavelengths of light from a single source
KAIST researchers have synthesized a collection of nanoparticles, known as carbon dots, capable of emitting multiple wavelengths of light from a single particle. Additionally, the team discovered that the dispersion of the carbon dots, or the interparticle distance between each dot, influences the properties of the light the carbon dots emit. The discovery will allow researchers to understand how
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Microbes buried at the bottom of the sea start flourishing after 80,000 years
In otherwise energetic deserts at the bottom of the sea, researchers have found oases where microbes can harvest energy. Remarkably, the microbes first have to be buried under starving conditions for 80,000 years. An international group of researchers, amongst them José Mogollón from the Insitute of Environmental Sciences (CML) at Leiden University, has published this finding in PNAS.
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'Electronic amoeba' finds approximate solution to traveling salesman problem in linear time
Researchers at Hokkaido University and Amoeba Energy in Japan have, inspired by the efficient foraging behavior of a single-celled amoeba, developed an analog computer for finding a reliable and swift solution to the traveling salesman problem—a representative combinatorial optimization problem.
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Microbes buried at the bottom of the sea start flourishing after 80,000 years
In otherwise energetic deserts at the bottom of the sea, researchers have found oases where microbes can harvest energy. Remarkably, the microbes first have to be buried under starving conditions for 80,000 years. An international group of researchers, amongst them José Mogollón from the Insitute of Environmental Sciences (CML) at Leiden University, has published this finding in PNAS.
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The Journal of Nuclear Medicine celebrates 60 years of research
The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM) has issued a special supplement commemorating six decades of leadership in the field of nuclear medicine, molecular imaging and therapy.The supplement features a collection of the most influential and frequently cited manuscripts in JNM's history, representing seminal discoveries and scientific contributions that shaped the future of medicine. Invited perspect
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How Elon Musk's Historic Launch Changes the Future of Space Exploration
This year, SpaceX launched the first privately owned capsule carrying NASA astronauts to the space station and back. NASA, as well as private companies, also made giant leaps for space travel in 2020.
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Low oxygen levels in lakes and reservoirs may accelerate global change
Because of land use and climate change, lakes and reservoirs globally are seeing large decreases in oxygen concentrations in their bottom waters. It is well-documented that low oxygen levels have detrimental effects on fish and water quality, but little is known about how these conditions will affect the concentration of carbon dioxide and methane in freshwaters.
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Ferrets, cats and civets most susceptible to coronavirus infection after humans
Humans, followed by ferrets and to a lesser extent cats, civets and dogs are the most susceptible animals to SARS-CoV-2 infection, according to an analysis of ten different species carried out by researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), based in Barcelona.
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Greta Thunberg dismisses 'empty words' in new climate crisis appeal – video
Greta Thunberg has warned the world is failing to tackle the climate emergency and is in a 'state of complete denial' nearly five years after the Paris agreement. Thunberg, 17, whose solo school strike in 2018 snowballed into a global youth movement , spoke out ahead of a UN event at which national leaders have been asked to increase their pledges on emissions cuts. In a video shared exclusively
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Ferrets, cats and civets most susceptible to coronavirus infection after humans
Humans, followed by ferrets and to a lesser extent cats, civets and dogs are the most susceptible animals to SARS-CoV-2 infection, according to an analysis of ten different species carried out by researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), based in Barcelona.
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This "Pill" Sprouts Needles to Inject Medicine Inside Your Body
In order to make the frequent injections associated with chronic illness a little more bearable, the biotech company Rani Therapeutics is developing a smart pill that injects patients from the inside instead. The robotic pill contains a time-release mechanism that triggers the growth of tiny spikes, made of sugar, that inject the medicine directly into the intestine, according to VentureBeat . It
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How your brain decides to put in effort
Researchers have clear visual evidence that a region of the human brain known as the ventral striatum kicks in during decision-making to weigh the costs versus the benefits of making a physical effort. The research gives the first detailed view of ventral striatum activity during three phases of effort-based decision-making—the anticipation of initiating an effort, the actual execution of the eff
20h
Atom-thin transistor uses half the voltage of common semiconductors, boosts current density
University at Buffalo researchers report a new, two-dimensional transistor made of graphene and molybdenum disulfide that needs less voltage and can handle more current than today's semiconductors.
20h
State-reported data underestimate the true impact of COVID-19 social distancing
While most studies have used government stay-at-home dates in their models, new research finds that individuals actually changed their behavior in reaction to the presence of COVID-19 in their state a median 12 days before a government lockdown. The research, appearing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine examines sociodemographic variables as well and finds that individual behavior acro
20h
Bacteria release climate-damaging carbon from thawing permafrost
Around a quarter of the ground in the northern hemisphere is permanently frozen. These areas are estimated to contain about twice as much carbon as the world's current atmosphere. New research says that these permafrost soils are not only increasingly thawing out as the Earth becomes warmer, but also releasing that carbon, which accelerates the thawing.
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Preschool program linked with better social and emotional skills years later
A preschool enrichment program developed at Penn State helps boost social and emotional skills that still have positive effects years later during middle and high school, according to a new study.
20h
Energy-efficient magnetic RAM: A new building block for spintronic technologies
Researchers demonstrate a new way to enhance the energy efficiency of the non-volatile magnetic memory.
20h
The Pattern Seekers — inside the mind of the most inventive humans
Simon Baron-Cohen makes a case for neurodiversity, arguing that autism confers advantages that we should value
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Skræmmevision går i opfyldelse før tid: Ekspert tror på 4000 smittede om en uge
PLUS. Da restriktioner i 38 kommuner blev meldt ud mandag, frygtede SSI 4000 tilfælde juleaften, hvis der ikke skete indgreb. Ifølge modelleringsekspert er det scenarie nu uundgåeligt.
21h
Otto Hutter obituary
Eminent physiologist who escaped the Nazis and demonstrated how the heartbeat is controlled In 1955 the physiologist Otto Hutter, who has died aged 96, was studying the pacemaker cells to be found in the heart. These produce the electrical impulses that fire the muscle's contractions. At the time it was not clear why these electrical impulses should fluctuate, but in a set of extraordinary photogr
21h
The immunomodulatory activity of a drug would improve the efficacy of immunotherapy in breast cancer
* The team of Eva González-Suarez, from the CNIO and IDIBELL, and the team of Christos Sotiriou, from the Jules Bordet Institute, demonstrate that a drug already used to treat osteoporosis promotes the infiltration of immune cells in breast tumours* These findings propose a new target to increase the antitumor immune response and make breast cancer more sensitive to immunotherapy
21h
Police investigators of online child abuse at risk of mental harm
Researchers at the University of Portsmouth and Solent University explored moral injury amongst child exploitation investigators and interviewed police officers from two Constabularies during a year-long study. The CREST (Centre for Research and Evidence on Security Threats) funded project asked questions relating to motivations for beginning the role, any personality changes, prior trauma, diffic
21h
Bad news for fake news: Rice research helps combat social media misinformation
Rice University researchers have discovered a more efficient way for social media companies to keep misinformation from spreading online through the use of probabilistic filters trained with artificial intelligence.
21h
Americans must be vigilant against anti-vax rumors in 'fractured media universe'
As the world watches how UK residents respond to COVID-19 vaccinations, three leading experts on the virus are urging Americans and the US government to be vigilant against anti-vaccination advocates and their 'rumors, misinformation, and conspiracy theories in a fractured media universe.'
21h
Lung ultrasounds could help determine COVID-19 outcome
Researchers have developed a method using ultrasound imaging to score a patient's lung health, which may help predict if a patient with COVID-19 will worsen. Using 14 points in the lungs, they looked for abnormalities and assigned each spot a score out of 3 based on its severity. Adding up all the points, the researchers found the total lung ultrasound score was higher for those who had a worsenin
21h
Young Ravens Rival Adult Chimps in a Big Test of General Intelligence
At just four months of age, the birds performed equally well as great apes on understanding numbers, following cues and many more tasks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 10. december
Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2020. Hver dag med nye præmier!
21h
PET imaging tracer proves effective for diagnosing and managing rare CNS B-cell lymphoma
Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 68Ga-pentixafor is an effective diagnostic tool for central nervous system (CNS) B-cell lymphoma, according to a proof-of-concept study published in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
21h
Regions in Europe at risk of nitrate leaching
Nutrient contamination of groundwater as a result of nitrogen-based fertilizers is a problem in many places in Europe. Scientists have shown that over a period of at least four months per year, nitrate can leach into the groundwater and surface water on about three-quarters of Europe's agricultural land. The proportion of areas at risk from nitrate leaching is thus almost twice as large as previou
21h
Natural antibiotics produced in wounds increase sleep and survival after injury
When wounded, our body sets off a complex immune response. As part of it, the wound produces small antimicrobial molecules to fight off the pathogens locally. Researchers have found that these natural antibiotics can also act as long-range molecular messengers.
21h
'Sparkling' clean water from nanodiamond-embedded membrane filters
Although most of the planet is covered by water, only a fraction of it is clean enough for humans to use. Therefore, it is important to recycle this resource whenever possible. Current purification techniques cannot adequately handle the very hot wastewater generated by some industries. But now, researchers have embedded amine-enhanced nanodiamond particles into membranes to address this challenge
21h
DeepLabCut-Live! real-time marker-less motion capture for animals
Behavioral scientists introduce DeepLabCut-Live!, a deep-learning tool that can enable real-time feedback studies on animal movement and posture. The software features 'maker-less' real-time motion capture, can interface with lab hardware for neurological analysis, and is now available open source for use by researchers.
21h
Neuropeptide discoveries could someday help defeat the dreaded cockroach
Cockroaches are notorious for their abilities to survive and reproduce, much to humanity's chagrin. In addition to scurrying around at night, feeding on human and pet food, and generating an offensive odor, the pests can transmit pathogens and cause allergic reactions. Now, researchers have identified neuropeptides produced by the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana) that could someday be ta
21h
Global Human-Made Stuff Now Outweighs All Living Biomass
Massive Shift According to a new study published in the prestigious journal Nature this week, the total mass of human-made materials now outweighs the entirety of the Earth's living biomass. "We find that Earth is exactly at the crossover point; in the year 2020 (±6), the anthropogenic mass, which has recently doubled roughly every 20 years, will surpass all global living biomass," the researcher
21h
DeepLabCut-Live! real-time marker-less motion capture for animals
Behavioral scientists introduce DeepLabCut-Live!, a deep-learning tool that can enable real-time feedback studies on animal movement and posture. The software features 'maker-less' real-time motion capture, can interface with lab hardware for neurological analysis, and is now available open source for use by researchers.
21h
Scientists urge UN to add 'neuro-rights' to Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Columbia University neuroscience professor Rafael Yuste is advocating for the UN to adopt "neuro-rights." Neurotechnology is a growing field that includes a range of technologies that influence higher brain activities. Ethicists fear that these technologies will be misused and abuses of privacy and even consciousness could follow. Out-of-body experiences recur throughout spiritual literature. Tho
21h
Cost information increases utility of decision aids for shared decision making
Cost information, when paired with information about clinical treatment options, greatly enhances the value of shared decision making, reported a FAIR Health brief released today. This was among the lessons learned from a FAIR Health initiative presenting patient decision aids for shared decision making in palliative care scenarios, as described in the brief Cost Information Enhances Shared Decisi
21h
Essential oral healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the need for consensus on the definition of essential oral healthcare. The article 'Pandemic considerations on essential oral healthcare' provides a layered model of essential oral healthcare, integrating urgent and basic oral healthcare, as well as advanced and specialist oral healthcare.
21h
Low oxygen levels in lakes and reservoirs may accelerate global change
Ultimately, this study is crucial for how researchers, and the general public, think about how freshwater ecosystems produce greenhouse gases in the future. With low oxygen concentrations increasing in lakes and reservoirs across the world, these ecosystems will produce higher concentrations of methane in the future, leading to more global warming.
21h
In your face: a compact RGB scanning projector for wearable displays and smart glasses
Scientists at the University of Fukui, Japan, have achieved remarkable progress in the development of an extremely compact RGB laser projector that can create a high definition (HD) projection image. Their device uses a waveguide-type coupler to produce perfectly aligned RGB output beams from three independent lasers and a microelectromechanical mirror to create high-resolution scanning images. Wi
21h
Testing memory over four weeks could predict Alzheimer's disease risk
New research suggests testing people's memory over four weeks could identify who is at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease before it has developed. Importantly, the trial found testing people's ability to retain memories for longer time periods could predict this more accurately than classic memory tests, which test memory over half an hour.
21h
Psychiatric disorders explain increased risk for self-harm in autism spectrum disorders
A population-based study revealed reasons behind elevated suicide risk, attempted suicides, and other self-harm, which require special health care, among adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorders. Comorbid disorders, especially non-affective psychoses and affective and anxiety disorders, explained the risk.
21h
Publisher Correction: Enabling "lithium-free" manufacturing of pure lithium metal solid-state batteries through in situ plating
Nature Communications, Published online: 10 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20374-y
21h
Young Ravens Rival Adult Chimps in a Big Test of General Intelligence
At just four months of age, the birds performed equally well as great apes on understanding numbers, following cues and many more tasks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Young Ravens Rival Adult Chimps in a Big Test of General Intelligence
At just four months of age, the birds performed equally well as great apes on understanding numbers, following cues and many more tasks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Young Ravens Rival Adult Chimps in a Big Test of General Intelligence
At just four months of age, the birds performed equally well as great apes on understanding numbers, following cues and many more tasks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
DMI forsætter gavebod: Giver gratis adgang til data om lyn og hav i realtid
PLUS. Lyndata, havtemperaturer og vandstandsmålinger kan øge sikkerheden og hjælpe med planlægning særligt inden for energibranchen og sejlads.
22h
From the heart: study shows impact of social media appeals from COVID-19 frontliners
Anyone who's on social media right now has probably seen them: Passionate pleas from health care workers, asking for the public to realize how bad the COVID-19 pandemic has gotten, and urging them to take steps to slow the spread of coronavirus.But do these first-person posts from the heart actually have any effect? A new study of simulated posts by emergency physicians and government officials su
22h
Ferrets, cats and civets most susceptible to coronavirus infection after humans
Humans, followed by ferrets and to a lesser extent cats, civets and dogs are the most susceptible animals to SARS-CoV-2 infection. The researchers calculated this by i) assessing the viral spike protein's affinity with variants of the ACE2 cell receptor across species and ii) analysing how efficient the coronavirus is at commandeering a cell's machinery once it has entered the cell.
22h
Quality suffers for audit offices that emphasize non-audit services, study shows
Regulators have expressed concerns that audit firms' emphasis on non-audit services (NAS) such as consulting could distract from an audit, and quality does suffer in certain cases, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.
22h
Study finds strong links between trust and social media use
A recent study finds a powerful correlation between the extent to which users trust Facebook, and the intensity of their Facebook use. The study also finds what contributes to that user trust.
22h
Bristol researchers publish significant step toward quantum advantage
Researchers from the University of Bristol and quantum start-up, Phasecraft, have achieved a milestone in quantum computing research, accelerating the journey from theory to research to reality.
22h
Scientific rigor in COVID-19 age
This Viewpoint discusses the need for scientific rigor in studies related to COVID-19 and presents study design recommendations and methodologies that should be incorporated to ensure that findings are reliable and reproducible.
22h
German public attitudes toward health communications regarding COVID-19
This survey study assessed attitudes of the German public regarding COVID-19 health communications with varying degrees of scientific uncertainty.
22h
Assessment of online tool to simulate effect of pooled testing for SARS-CoV-2
A diagnostic study, this describes an online tool created with actual SARS-CoV-2 virus copy number data to help policy makers understand how pooled testing compares with single-sample testing in different populations.
22h
Analyses of risk, racial disparity, outcomes among US patients with cancer, COVID-19 infection
This study investigated how patients with specific types of cancer are at risk for COVID-19 infection and its adverse outcomes and whether there are cancer-specific race disparities for COVID-19 infection.
22h
Risk factors associated with in-hospital mortality in us national sample of patients with COVID-19
Patients with COVID-19 who were treated in U.S. hospitals are described in this study that examines risks factors associated with in-hospital death.
22h
Mail-order medications often exposed to unsafe temperatures, study shows
Mail-order prescriptions shipped in standard bubble-padded envelopes during winter and summer months are likely to spend a substantial portion of time outside the recommended safe temperature range for most medications, according to research presented at the American Society for Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) Midyear Clinical Meeting and Exhibition.
22h
Lyme disease ticks produce antibiotic that protects them from human skin bacteria
Ticks live dangerous lives, spending most of their time questing for a host across wildly different habitats and seasons. Once they encounter a reptile, bird, or a mammal like us, they become intimately connected with it — and all of its bacteria and viruses — for days on end. Though ticks are notorious for transmitting pathogens such as the Lyme disease bacterium, how does their immune system k
22h
Health: Loneliness and social isolation associated with higher fall risk in elderly people
Elderly people living alone or without social contact may be more likely to fall in their homes or be admitted to hospital for a fall, suggests a study published in Scientific Reports.
22h
Animal behaviour: Cognitive performance of four-months-old ravens may parallel adult apes
By four months of age the cognitive performance of ravens in experimental tasks testing their understanding of the physical world and how they interact with other ravens may be similar to those of adult great apes, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.
22h
How seaweed-munching crabs could help save coral reefs
Coral reefs are facing a steep decline today for many reasons, including climate change, overfishing, pollution, disease, and more. What's taking their place is lots and lots of seaweed. But researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on December 10 now have some encouraging news: native crabs can help to combat the seaweed and restore the reef.
22h
Inhaled vaccine induces fast, strong immune response in mice and non-human primates
Researchers demonstrate in a study publishing December 10 in the journal Med that a phage-based inhalation delivery system for vaccines generates potent antibody responses in mice and non-human primates, without causing lung damage. The findings suggest that a safe and effective lung delivery system could one day be used for vaccines and therapeutics against respiratory diseases.
22h
A day at the beach helps model how sound moves through coastal areas
At a North Carolina beach, researchers have been poking and prodding the sand to study how moisture levels affect sounds as they move across the environment. Over short distances, even moderately wet sand reflects sound more like water does than as a solid surface does. Faith Cobb and her team are looking into if the same is true for long-range sound propagation. Their findings will be presented a
22h
A gene from ancient bacteria helps ticks spread Lyme disease
One reason ticks spread Lyme disease so well goes back to a unique evolutionary event. Researchers reporting in the journal Cell on December 10, 2020 discovered that an antibacterial enzyme in ticks, Dae2, protects them from bacteria found on human skin, while still allowing them to harbor Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. Ticks acquired the gene for this enzyme 40 mill
22h
Human egg cells are imperfect surprisingly often
More than 7% of human oocytes contain at least one exchangeless chromosome pair, demonstrating a remarkably high level of meiotic recombination failure, finds a study appearing December 10 in the American Journal of Human Genetics . The findings suggest that right from the get-go of human egg cell development, a striking proportion of oocytes are predestined to be chromosomally abnormal. But the f
22h
Packaging Error Mixes Up Antidepressant and Erectile Drugs
If you have a prescription for either the erectile dysfunction drug sildenafil — the active ingredient in Viagra — or the antidepressant trazodone that was distributed by AvKare, you might want to take a very close look at what you're taking. That's because 100mg tablets of both drugs were accidentally packaged together, according to CNN , meaning there's a chance that patients who were prescribe
22h
Lunar Gold Rush Could Create Conflict on the Ground if We Don't Act Now—New Research
When it comes to the moon, everyone wants the same things. Not in the sense of having shared goals, but in the sense that all players target the same strategic sites—state agencies and the private sector alike. That's because, whether you want to do science or make money, you will need things such as water and light. Many countries and private companies have ambitious plans to explore or mine the
22h
Community assembly trajectory of invertebrates in deadwood: Convergence after divergence
Natural forests contain a large amount of deadwood, which is a key contributor to biodiversity. Deadwood provides habitats and resources for a huge variety of organisms including invertebrates. The habitats and resources change during decomposition by microbial and invertebrate decomposers, and this in turn can influence the associated organisms. Although there are many invertebrates in deadwood,
22h
'Exciting biology' reveals central event of evolution of rhizobial endosymbiosis
Legumes, unlike most land plants, can form a root nodule symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. The anatomy of the nodule in legume plants was described in the 17th century, and nodule cells were found to host endosymbiotic rhizobia for nitrogen fixation in the 19th century.
22h
Diseases like Alzheimer's happen in 2 phases
Degenerative diseases happen in two distinct phases, according to new research. The researchers conducted countless experiments over more than a decade, and they've summarized all they've learned in a simple diagram they hope may change how doctors perceive and treat degenerative diseases as varied as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and muscle atrophy. The study in Molecular Psychiatry proposes that ve
22h
Female job seekers using less feminine language less likely to get hired, study finds
Women applying to jobs in male-dominated fields often try to overcome sexism by altering their cover letters to sound less feminine. But that practice might actually be hurting their chances of landing a job, a new study out of U of T Mississauga reveals.
22h
Scientists improve gridded precipitation dataset for Tibetan Plateau
An accurate gridded precipitation dataset is essential for a better understanding of climate change, and hydrological and ecological processes on the Tibetan Plateau. However, the precipitation observation network in this region is sparse. The observed precipitation is susceptible to complex meteorological and orographic conditions, limiting the accuracy of the gridded precipitation dataset. The v
22h
Community assembly trajectory of invertebrates in deadwood: Convergence after divergence
Natural forests contain a large amount of deadwood, which is a key contributor to biodiversity. Deadwood provides habitats and resources for a huge variety of organisms including invertebrates. The habitats and resources change during decomposition by microbial and invertebrate decomposers, and this in turn can influence the associated organisms. Although there are many invertebrates in deadwood,
22h
'Exciting biology' reveals central event of evolution of rhizobial endosymbiosis
Legumes, unlike most land plants, can form a root nodule symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. The anatomy of the nodule in legume plants was described in the 17th century, and nodule cells were found to host endosymbiotic rhizobia for nitrogen fixation in the 19th century.
22h
Amino acid recycling in cells: Autophagy helps cells adapt to changing conditions
Cells must utilize nutrient resources as efficiently as possible in order to ensure survival. This involves an intricate balance between the synthesis and degradation of cellular components, the latter of which can be used to liberate metabolites from unneeded components during periods of stress. Autophagy is a key intracellular degradation pathway that is triggered under such conditions. Autophag
22h
Brain Matters #3: Brain Inspired Technology and Architectures
What an engaging episode of Brain Matters! Steve Furber, who has built the largest neuromorphic super-computer in the world in Manchester, introduced the origins of bio-inspired computing, which go back a lot longer than you might expect. Rainer Goebel talked about the work being done in the Human Brain Project's "Adaptive networks for cognitive architectures: from advanced learning to neurorobot
22h
Six magic accessories every beginner needs
Melt all the brains with these six simple pieces. (Travis Rathbone/) 1. Magic carpet The 21.5-by-13-inch padded Vanishing Inc. Deluxe Close-Up Pad provides a comfortable surface for practicing and performing routines. The textured synthetic wool deadens noise that could betray sleight-of-hand movements in some close-up tricks. 2. Bar trick By palming half of the multicolored Magic Makers Sizzle S
22h
Amino acid recycling in cells: Autophagy helps cells adapt to changing conditions
Cells must utilize nutrient resources as efficiently as possible in order to ensure survival. This involves an intricate balance between the synthesis and degradation of cellular components, the latter of which can be used to liberate metabolites from unneeded components during periods of stress. Autophagy is a key intracellular degradation pathway that is triggered under such conditions. Autophag
22h
Reactive Video playback that you control with your body
An international team of researchers from Lancaster University, Stanford University and FXPAL, have created a system that dynamically adapts to mirror the position of the viewer's body and matches the speed of video playback to the viewer's movements.
22h
Robots could replace real therapy dogs
Robotic animals could be the 'pawfect' replacement for our real-life furry friends, a new study published today by the University of Portsmouth has found.
22h
FEFU scientists suggest using neuromodulation to treat patients with spinal cord injuries
Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) together with leading international experts suggest reconsidering the existing treatment protocol for severe spasticity, one of the main complications after spinal cord injury with partial spinal cord disruption. Spasticity aggravates a patient's state and dramatically reduces the prospects of rehabilitation. The new treatment protocol has been
22h
New algorithm will prevent misidentification of cancer cells
Researchers from the University of Kent have developed a computer algorithm that can identify differences in cancer cell lines based on microscopic images, a unique development towards ending misidentification of cells in laboratories.
22h
NUS researchers finds best combination of available therapies against COVID-19
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have utilised a ground-breaking AI platform to find an optimal combination of available therapies against COVID-19. The research team identified the drug combination from over 530,000 possibilities within two weeks, cutting down the number of tests typically needed by hundreds of thousands.
22h
Obstructive sleep apnoea puts a strain on the heart, too
Longer nocturnal respiratory events in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) cause higher immediate heart rate variability, and greater changes in beat-to-beat intervals are associated with reduced daytime alertness, according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland.
22h
Designed a tool that will automate device programming in the IoT
UOC researchers develop new solutions to boost Industry 4.0 development
22h
Cognitive performance of four-months-old ravens may parallel adult apes
By four months of age the cognitive performance of ravens in experimental tasks testing their understanding of the physical world and how they interact with other ravens may be similar to those of adult great apes, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.
22h
Researchers publish significant step toward quantum advantage
The team, led by Bristol researcher and Phasecraft co-founder, Dr. Ashley Montanaro, has discovered algorithms and analysis which significantly lessen the quantum hardware capability needed to solve problems which go beyond the realm of classical computing, even supercomputers.
22h
Cognitive performance of four-months-old ravens may parallel adult apes
By four months of age the cognitive performance of ravens in experimental tasks testing their understanding of the physical world and how they interact with other ravens may be similar to those of adult great apes, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.
22h
How seaweed-munching crabs could help save coral reefs
Coral reefs are facing a steep decline today for many reasons, including climate change, overfishing, pollution, disease, and more. What's taking their place is lots and lots of seaweed. But researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on December 10 now have some encouraging news: native crabs can help to combat the seaweed and restore the reef.
22h
Lyme disease ticks produce antibiotic that protects them from human skin bacteria
Ticks live dangerous lives, spending most of their time questing for a host across wildly different habitats and seasons. Once they encounter a reptile, bird, or a mammal like us, they become intimately connected with it—and all of its bacteria and viruses—for days on end. Though ticks are notorious for transmitting pathogens such as the Lyme disease bacterium, how does their immune system keep th
22h
SpaceX's Starship SN8 Prototype Soars on Epic Test Launch, with Explosive Landing
Despite its "rapid unplanned disassembly," the company's highest-yet flight of its next-generation rocket was a success — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
How seaweed-munching crabs could help save coral reefs
Coral reefs are facing a steep decline today for many reasons, including climate change, overfishing, pollution, disease, and more. What's taking their place is lots and lots of seaweed. But researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on December 10 now have some encouraging news: native crabs can help to combat the seaweed and restore the reef.
22h
Lyme disease ticks produce antibiotic that protects them from human skin bacteria
Ticks live dangerous lives, spending most of their time questing for a host across wildly different habitats and seasons. Once they encounter a reptile, bird, or a mammal like us, they become intimately connected with it—and all of its bacteria and viruses—for days on end. Though ticks are notorious for transmitting pathogens such as the Lyme disease bacterium, how does their immune system keep th
22h
Turkey: Europe's top destination for… trash
Tonnes of plastic packaging destined for recycling from popular British supermarkets like Sainsbury's and French frozen food retailer Picard is instead ending up being dumped illegally in Turkey as the country has become the top destination for European waste.
22h
Super-loudhailers are becoming louder still
That is good for warfare. Perhaps less good for civilians
22h
A failed study shows a promising treatment for blindness
A story of gene therapy and happy accidents
22h
Bees defend their hives against hornets with animal dung
They seem to be engaging in a form of chemical warfare
22h
Elon Musk's latest rocket launch is a successful failure
It crashed. But the data collected will help improve the next attempt
22h
Politics this week
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22h
KAL's cartoon
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22h
Business this week
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22h
A balancing act: Improved water treatment technique using 'energy matching'
Today, a large number of people worldwide suffer from shortage of fresh drinking water, especially in remote rural regions, causing a significant threat to human life and society. While techniques such as membrane distillation and reverse osmosis have been used to treat saline water and alleviate the situation, they suffer from limitations like low productivity, high cost and high energy consumpti
22h
A biased evaluation of employees' performance can be useful for employers
In assessing an employee's performance, employers often listen to his immediate supervisor or colleagues, and these opinions can be highly subjective. Sergey Stepanov, an economist from HSE University, has shown that biased evaluations can actually benefit employers. An article substantiating this finding was published in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization.
22h
Energy-efficient magnetic RAM: A new building block for spintronic technologies
Researchers at Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) and Seoul National University in South Korea have demonstrated a new way to enhance the energy efficiency of a non-volatile magnetic memory device called SOT-MRAM. Published in Advanced Materials, this finding opens up a new window of exciting opportunities for future energy-efficient magnetic memories based on spintronics.
22h
Study: Teacher performance measures may penalize Black educators
By not adjusting for school and classroom factors outside the control of educators, classroom observation scores for Black teachers in Chicago Public Schools unfairly penalize them for being more likely to teach in schools in low-income neighborhoods with students who are academically disadvantaged, according to a study published today in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, a peer-reviewed
22h
New and unexplored dimension in the study of protein-protein interactions
Many proteins are required to maintain the structure, and to preserve the genetic integrity, of DNA. Sliding clamps are proteins that increase the efficiency of DNA replication. Without these proteins, cells would not be able to carry out continuous DNA synthesis, and organisms, from bacteria to humans, would not survive.
22h
Social media provides SMEs with tools to mitigate internationalisation-related threats
For SMEs seeking to enter the international markets, social media is a tool for overcoming liabilities connected to their smallness, newness and foreignness, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. According to the study, SMEs use social media to become embedded within various strategic and emerging international networks they deem important for their operations.
22h
Tiny bubbles on electrodes key to speeding up chemical processes
New Curtin University-led research has shown the formation of bubbles on electrodes, usually thought to be a hindrance, can be beneficial, with deliberately added bubbles, or oil droplets, able to accelerate processes such as the removal of pollutants such as hydrocarbons from contaminated water and the production of chlorine.
22h
Why monkeys (and humans) are wired for fairness | Sarah Brosnan
Fairness matters … to both people and primates. Sharing priceless footage of capuchin monkeys responding to perceived injustice, primatologist Sarah Brosnan explores why humans and monkeys evolved to care about equality — and emphasizes the connection between a healthy, cooperative society and everyone getting their fair share.
22h
China launches gamma ray–hunting satellites to trace sources of gravitational waves
Satellite pair will monitor heavens for light shows that might accompany black hole mergers
22h
New and unexplored dimension in the study of protein-protein interactions
Many proteins are required to maintain the structure, and to preserve the genetic integrity, of DNA. Sliding clamps are proteins that increase the efficiency of DNA replication. Without these proteins, cells would not be able to carry out continuous DNA synthesis, and organisms, from bacteria to humans, would not survive.
22h
How the Slowest Computer Programs Illuminate Math's Fundamental Limits
Programmers normally want to minimize the time their code takes to execute. But in 1962, the Hungarian mathematician Tibor Radó posed the opposite problem. He asked: How long can a simple computer program possibly run before it terminates? Radó nicknamed these maximally inefficient but still functional programs "busy beavers." Finding these programs has been a fiendishly diverting puzzle for prog
22h
One-two punch: Sea urchins stuck belly-up in low-oxygen hot water
As oceans warm and become more acidic and oxygen-poor, Smithsonian researchers asked how marine life on a Caribbean coral reef copes with changing conditions.
22h
Quality suffers for audit offices that emphasize non-audit services, study shows
Regulators have expressed concerns that audit firms' emphasis on non-audit services (NAS) such as consulting could distract from an audit, and quality does suffer in certain cases, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.
22h
Study finds strong links between trust and social media use
A recent study finds a powerful correlation between the extent to which users trust Facebook, and the intensity of their Facebook use. The study also finds what contributes to that user trust.
22h
Bacteria release climate-damaging carbon from thawing permafrost
A new study based on scientific sampling of a rusty carbon sink at a permafrost peatland at Sweden has revealed that iron minerals fail to trap organic carbon, a vast source of CO2 and methane not included in global warming forecasts.
22h
Verdens største anlæg til CO2-fangst opføres på Island
Selskabet Climeworks er i gang med at bygge et direct air capture-værk, der årligt skal filtrere 4.000 ton CO2 direkte ud af luften.
22h
One-two punch: Sea urchins stuck belly-up in low-oxygen hot water
As oceans warm and become more acidic and oxygen-poor, Smithsonian researchers asked how marine life on a Caribbean coral reef copes with changing conditions.
22h
Bio-inspired lanthanide-transition metal cluster for efficient overall water splitting
A bio-inspired lanthanide-transition metal cluster as oxygen-evolving center anchored on P-doped graphitic carbon nitrides for efficient photocatalytic overall water splitting was demonstrated. Mechanistic investigation shows synergistic effects of lanthanide ion and variable-valence Co ions in the oxygen-evolving reaction. This work not only prepares a synthetic model of bio-inspired oxygen-evolv
22h
Getting the right grip: Designing soft and sensitive robotic fingers
To develop a more human-like robotic gripper, it is necessary to provide sensing capabilities to the fingers. However, conventional sensors compromise the mechanical properties of soft robots. Now, scientists at Ritsumeikan University, Japan, design a 3D printable soft robotic finger containing a built-in sensor with adjustable stiffness. Their work represents a big step toward safer and more dext
22h
A biased evaluation of employees' performance can be useful for employers
In assessing an employee's performance, employers often listen to his immediate supervisor or colleagues, and these opinions can be highly subjective. Sergey Stepanov, an economist from HSE University, has shown that biased evaluations can actually benefit employers. An article substantiating this finding was published in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization.
22h
Amino acid recycling in cells: Autophagy helps cells adapt to changing conditions
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), Japan, have shown for the first time how specific metabolites produced by autophagy are utilized by a cell. They discovered that in budding yeast adapting to respiratory growth, autophagy–an intracellular recycling system–recycles the amino acid serine to trigger growth through mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism. This study shows how the
22h
"Electronic amoeba" finds approximate solution to traveling salesman problem in linear time
Researchers at Hokkaido University and Amoeba Energy in Japan have, inspired by the efficient foraging behavior of a single-celled amoeba, developed an analog computer for finding a reliable and swift solution to the traveling salesman problem — a representative combinatorial optimization problem.
22h
Leo Fondet henter ny direktør for hudforskningscenter i Sverige
Liv Eidsmo fra Karolinska Institutet er udnævnt til professor på Københavns Universitet og direktør for LEO Foundation Skin Immunology Research Center.
22h
Portable projectors that bring the big screen to you
Stream anywhere you are. (Amazon/) Sometimes a small screen just won't cut it when it comes to watching your favorite films or tuning into live events. A portable projector is a great way to expand your display beyond the limits of a television or laptop. They are surprisingly easy to use and super compact, so you don't have to worry about all the space you would have to sacrifice to invest in a
23h
Ten Exquisite Creatures That Once Roamed the Earth
From Smithsonian Books, comes a magnificent tome to highlight evolution's greatest hits
23h
If You Didn't Vote for Trump, Your Vote Is Fraudulent
Updated at 1:52 p.m. ET on December 10, 2020. Armed protesters gathered outside the home of Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson Saturday night, demanding that she overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election in her state. "We will not stand down, we will not stop, we will continue to rise up, we will continue to take this election back for the president that actually won it by a
23h
Why failing hearts love hard workouts
High-intensity interval training strengthens the heart even more than moderate exercise does. Now researchers have found several answers to what makes hard workouts so effective.
23h
Beta-blockers display anti-inflammatory effects in advanced liver disease
Beta-blockers are used to prevent internal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Researchers from MedUni Vienna have now shown that Beta-blockers also have beneficial effects on systemic inflammation and this translates into improved clinical outcomes.
23h
Energy-efficient magnetic RAM: A new building block for spintronic technologies
Researchers demonstrate a new way to enhance the energy efficiency of the non-volatile magnetic memory.
23h
Tiny bubbles on electrodes key to speeding up chemical processes
New Curtin University-led research has shown the formation of bubbles on electrodes, usually thought to be a hindrance, can be beneficial, with deliberately added bubbles, or oil droplets, able to accelerate processes such as the removal of pollutants such as hydrocarbons from contaminated water and the production of chlorine.
23h
Rapid lateral flow immunoassay developed for fluorescence detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA
Scientists from the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology have developed a novel amplification-free rapid SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid detection platform based on hybrid capture fluorescence immunoassay (HC-FIA).
23h
Social media provides SMEs with tools to mitigate internationalisation-related threats
For SMEs seeking to enter the international markets, social media is a tool for overcoming liabilities connected to their smallness, newness and foreignness, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.
23h
Calibrating kidney function for cancer patients
A new model to evaluate kidney function can help clinicians find the right balance between treating cancer and avoiding chemotherapy's dangerous side effects.
23h
Immunotherapy improves responses w/o reducing quality of life in early breast cancer
Adding an immune checkpoint inhibitor to the standard chemotherapy regimen for patients with early-stage breast cancer places no greater burden on patients' ability to perform day-to-day activities than chemotherapy alone, new research by Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center investigators shows.
23h
Researchers demonstrate nondestructive mid-infrared imaging using entangled photons
Researchers have shown that entangled photons can be used to improve the penetration depth of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in highly scattering materials. The method represents a way to perform OCT with mid-infrared wavelengths and could be useful for non-destructive testing and analysis of materials such as ceramics and paint samples.
23h
COP26: Ellie Goulding and Emma Watson join call for climate talks change
A letter has been signed by singer Ellie Goulding and Hollywood stars Emma Watson and Emma Thompson.
23h
How I started a journal for postdoctoral researchers
Nature, Published online: 10 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03498-5 I wasn't getting enough experience at reviewing articles, so I took an unusual step — and learnt much more than I expected, says Theo van den Broek.
23h
Researchers demonstrate nondestructive mid-infrared imaging using entangled photons
Researchers have shown that entangled photons can be used to improve the penetration depth of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in highly scattering materials. The method represents a way to perform OCT with mid-infrared wavelengths and could be useful for non-destructive testing and analysis of materials such as ceramics and paint samples.
23h
SpaceX's Starship flies, belly flops, and bursts into flames
For SpaceX's rocket scientists, Mars got a few miles closer yesterday. The company's flagship spacecraft rose to new heights, executed a controlled freefall back toward the ground, and exploded on impact. Company executives dream of SpaceX becoming a one-stop-shop for anyone interested in shuttling people or cargo to and from the nearby parts of the solar system. But to do so, they need a spacecr
23h
Melatonin: finally, a supplement that actually boosts memory
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) showed that melatonin's metabolite AMK can enhance the formation of long-term memories in mice. Memory of objects were tested after treatment with melatonin or two of its metabolites. Older mice that normally performed poorly on the memory task showed improvements as dosage increased. The metabolite AMK was found to be the most important as
23h
Global emissions are down by an unprecedented 7%—but don't start celebrating just yet
Global emissions are expected to decline by about 7% in 2020 (or 2.4 billion tons of carbon dioxide) compared to 2019—an unprecedented drop due to the slowdown in economic activity associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.
4min
Search for invisible axion dark matter with a multiple-cell cavity
Despite its vanishingly tiny mass, the existence of the axion, once proven, may point to new physics beyond the Standard Model. Theorized to explain a fundamental symmetry problem in the strong nuclear force associated with the matter-antimatter imbalance in our universe, this hypothetical particle also makes an attractive dark matter candidate. Though axions would exist in vast enough numbers to
4min
Black holes gain new powers when they spin fast enough
General relativity is a profoundly complex mathematical theory, but its description of black holes is amazingly simple. A stable black hole can be described by just three properties: its mass, its electric charge and its rotation or spin. Since black holes aren't likely to have much charge, it really takes just two properties. If you know a black hole's mass and spin, you know all there is to know
4min
Hundreds of fish examined to detect parasitic transmission
Researchers of the SAIGAS (Service for the Analysis, Research and Management of Wild Animals) Group of the Faculty of Veterinarian Sciences of the CEU Cardenal Herrera (CEU UCH) University of Valencia recently published the results of project Parapez-2 in order to assess the transmission of parasitism among farmed and wild fish in fish farms of the Canary Islands and the Valencia region. The proje
10min
Sustainability in a pandemic
A new perspective to be published in the International Journal of Sustainable Development suggests that the current sustainable development framework is strong enough to face long-term global challenges including poverty and climate change and even, emergent diseases, such as the current COVID-19 pandemic.
10min
The truth about much 'casual' work: It's really about permanent insecurity
The federal government's industrial relations "reform" bill offers a new definition of "casual" employment that creates more problems than it solves.
10min
Genetic research reveals the origin, diversity and colonization history of the invasive 'tramp slug'
Invasive species often cause serious economic problems, but they can also serve as a useful test-bed for theories of natural, slower range expansions. Based on analyses of genetic variation, Senckenberg researchers and an Australian colleague have investigated the origin, routes of colonization, and rate of spread of the invasive slug Deroceras invadens. Their results can be compared against histo
10min
Genetic research reveals the origin, diversity and colonization history of the invasive 'tramp slug'
Invasive species often cause serious economic problems, but they can also serve as a useful test-bed for theories of natural, slower range expansions. Based on analyses of genetic variation, Senckenberg researchers and an Australian colleague have investigated the origin, routes of colonization, and rate of spread of the invasive slug Deroceras invadens. Their results can be compared against histo
11min
Artificial intelligence improves control of powerful plasma accelerators
Researchers have used AI to control beams for the next generation of smaller, cheaper accelerators for research, medical and industrial applications.
13min
Test your heart health by climbing stairs
Climbing four flights of stairs in less than a minute indicates good heart health, according to new research.
13min
Scientists build whole functioning thymus from human cells
Researchers have rebuilt a human thymus, an essential organ in the immune system, using human stem cells and a bioengineered scaffold. Their work is an important step towards being able to build artificial thymi which could be used as transplants.
13min