Search Posts

Nyheder2020december12

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

Phys.org
Snow leopard at Kentucky zoo tests positive for coronavirus
A snow leopard at a Kentucky zoo is the first in the U.S. to test positive for the coronavirus, federal officials announced Friday.
6d
Five years on, signs that Paris climate accord is working
The forecast for global warming is looking a little less bleak in the long term, but not so rosy in the short term.
6d
Snow leopard at Kentucky zoo tests positive for coronavirus
A snow leopard at a Kentucky zoo is the first in the U.S. to test positive for the coronavirus, federal officials announced Friday.
6d
2 reasons fake COVID info is hard to fight
A new study highlights two reasons misinformation about COVID-19 is so difficult to tackle on social media. First, most people consider themselves above average at spotting misinformation. And, second, misinformation often triggers negative emotions that resonate with people. The findings may help communicators share accurate information more effectively. "This study gives us more insight into ho
6d
How AI could make therapeutic decision-making for breast cancer more accurate, affordable
Deep learning-enabled breast cancer technology could make breast cancer therapy decisions more accurate, affordable and accessible. For newly diagnosed breast cancer, estrogen receptor status (ERS) is a key molecular marker used for prognosis and treatment decisions. This is an expensive, time-consuming process. Here we show that machine learning can determine molecular marker status. Our approach
6d
Sea star listed as critically endangered following research
The iconic sunflower sea star has been listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature following a groundbreaking population study led by Oregon State University and The Nature Conservancy.
6d
Sea star listed as critically endangered following research
The iconic sunflower sea star has been listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature following a groundbreaking population study led by Oregon State University and The Nature Conservancy.
6d
6d
Viviendas asequibles en riesgo de inundaciones costeras
Recursos Relacionados Resumen de este informe Artículo científico detrás de este informe La herramienta impresa RESUMEN EJECUTIVO Un nuevo análisis realizado por científicos de Climate Central y publicado en Environmental Research Letters destaca las implicaciones sobre la equidad del aumento del nivel del mar en la primera evaluación nacional de riesgo a la oferta de viviendas asequibles del paí
6d
A matter of balance: asymmetric divisions are crucial to form a functional retina
Researchers at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência and the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, Germany, have discovered that in the developing retina, and important part of the central nervous system, the divisions leading to the first differentiating neurons are asymmetric and that this asymmetry is necessary to generate the correct types of neurons in the righ
6d
Space Agencies Acknowledge That Asteroids Could Host Life
Welcome Wagon Space agencies are preparing for the possibility, however farfetched, that the numerous asteroid and Mars sample return missions slated for the next few years might reveal traces of extraterrestrial life . Specifically, organizations including NASA, its Japanese counterpart JAXA, and the European Space Agency (ESA) are collaborating on high-tech facilities that will allow them to se
6d
The pressure sensor of the Venus flytrap
All plant cells can be made to react by touch or injury. The carnivorous Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) has highly sensitive organs for this purpose: sensory hairs that register even the weakest mechanical stimuli, amplify them and convert them into electrical signals that then spread quickly through the plant tissue.
6d
The pressure sensor of the Venus flytrap
All plant cells can be made to react by touch or injury. The carnivorous Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) has highly sensitive organs for this purpose: sensory hairs that register even the weakest mechanical stimuli, amplify them and convert them into electrical signals that then spread quickly through the plant tissue.
6d
Chemo may not benefit all postmenopausal women with breast cancer
Some postmenopausal women with breast cancer do not benefit from chemotherapy when it's added to hormone therapy, according to initial results of a clinical trial. The findings apply to postmenopausal women with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancer that has spread to a limited number of lymph nodes, and whose recurrence risk is rel
6d
High-speed model for the fight against SARS-CoV2
To contain the SARS-CoV2 coronavirus and slow the spread of infections and the rising death toll, researchers and health professionals around the world are rapidly developing vaccines and medical drugs. But before these can be tested in human clinical trials, they must first be thoroughly tested in animals. Mice are particularly well suited as model organisms because they are small and reproduce q
6d
New Theory Throws Out Einstein's Theory of General Relativity
A pair of professors fr0m North Carolina State University are proposing an entirely new model of physics that could rewrite the way we think about matter. Their extremely ambitious proposal, as outlined in an essay for The Conversation , does away with particles or waves, both fundamental building blocks of matter, and suggests instead that all the physical stuff in the universe is made up of "fr
6d
Hydrogel controls cell growth outside the body
Chemists at Radboud University discovered a unique material in 2013. From a synthetic polymer named polyisocyanopeptide (PIC), they made a gel that behaves similar to the matrix that surrounds the cells in your body. The material exhibits a special property that is not found in other materials: it gels on heating and returns to a liquid solution as it is cooled. With this special combination of pr
6d
High-speed model for the fight against SARS-CoV2
To contain the SARS-CoV2 coronavirus and slow the spread of infections and the rising death toll, researchers and health professionals around the world are rapidly developing vaccines and medical drugs. But before these can be tested in human clinical trials, they must first be thoroughly tested in animals. Mice are particularly well suited as model organisms because they are small and reproduce q
6d
Fan mussel larval dispersal is decisive for the future of an endangered species
Fan mussel populations—the biggest bivalve mussel in the Mediterranean—are endangered due to the severe parasitosis caused by the protozoan Haplospridium pinnae since 2016. Now, a study published in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science reveals the fan mussel would express a certain natural ability to recover thanks to the dispersal in the marine environment of larvae from populations which are
6d
The secret behind male ornaments
In many species, males have eye-catching characteristics. Although often impractical, they are beneficial in finding a mate. Scientists have now mapped the genetic bases of such a male ornament in a fish.
6d
Using water fleas, researchers investigate adaptive evolution
Researchers from The University of Texas at Arlington resurrected the preserved eggs of a shrimp-like crustacean to examine long-standing questions about adaptive evolution, reporting the results in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.
6d
Five steps for networking during a pandemic
Nature, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03567-9 Here's how to build your professional support team when you can't meet others in person.
6d
New computational method validates images without 'ground truth'
A realtor sends a prospective homebuyer a blurry photograph of a house taken from across the street. The homebuyer can compare it to the real thing—look at the picture, then look at the real house—and see that the bay window is actually two windows close together, the flowers out front are plastic and what looked like a door is actually a hole in the wall.
6d
Warming amplified in mountain environments in the Last Interglacial
Speleothems turned out to be a great stroke of luck: dripstones from two caves in the Swiss Alps provide for the first time a continuous reconstruction of temperatures during the Last Interglacial period. Paul Wilcox from the Department of Geology has now published a study showing that high alpine regions were affected by stronger temperature increases than lower altitudes.
6d
Fan mussel larval dispersal is decisive for the future of an endangered species
Fan mussel populations—the biggest bivalve mussel in the Mediterranean—are endangered due to the severe parasitosis caused by the protozoan Haplospridium pinnae since 2016. Now, a study published in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science reveals the fan mussel would express a certain natural ability to recover thanks to the dispersal in the marine environment of larvae from populations which are
6d
Bacteria can travel from one continent to another in atmospheric dust particles
Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR) have discovered that some microorganisms, such as bacteria, can travel from one continent to another 'hidden' in atmospheric dust.
6d
The secret behind male ornaments
In many species, males have eye-catching characteristics. Although often impractical, they are beneficial in finding a mate. Scientists have now mapped the genetic bases of such a male ornament in a fish.
6d
Hydrogel controls cell growth outside the body
Chemists at Radboud University discovered a unique material in 2013. From a synthetic polymer named polyisocyanopeptide (PIC), they made a gel that behaves similar to the matrix that surrounds the cells in your body. The material exhibits a special property that is not found in other materials: it gels on heating and returns to a liquid solution as it is cooled. With this special combination of pr
6d
Tanzania farmers distrust fertilizer quality, are less willing to pay for it
Smallholder farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa use fertilizer well below recommended rates, contributing to consistently low agricultural productivity. Farmers in Tanzania and Kenya, for example, apply just 13 kilograms of fertilizer per hectare, compared with 165 to 175 kilograms in India and Brazil. Low use directly affects cereal yields, which average 1.2 to 1.7 metric tons per hectare, compared to
6d
Using water fleas, researchers investigate adaptive evolution
Researchers from The University of Texas at Arlington resurrected the preserved eggs of a shrimp-like crustacean to examine long-standing questions about adaptive evolution, reporting the results in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.
6d
Watch roots from different plants compete for prime real estate underground
Mathematical modeling and greenhouse studies show complex interactions keep roots productive
6d
Researchers find a better way to design metal alloys
A system developed by MIT researchers uses machine learning to analyze boundaries between crystal grains, allowing for the selection of desired properties in a new metal alloy.
6d
Sea star listed as critically endangered following research by Oregon State University
The iconic sunflower sea star has been listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature following a groundbreaking population study led by Oregon State University and The Nature Conservancy.
6d
Cooked Veggies Are Often More Nutritious Than Raw. Here's Why
Though uncooked foods have their advantages, high temperatures usually enhance them.
6d
Images like this one could help reveal the Sun's inner workings
The sunspot was taken in the wavelength of 530 nanometers – in the greenish-yellow part of the visible spectrum–. Researchers modified it to show up red and orange to the naked eye. (NSO/AURA/NSF/) Humans have long dreamt about looking directly at the Sun, even though it's extremely dangerous for our peepers. Our nearest star is the centerpiece of religious and cultural traditions all over the wo
6d
Negative reviews boost sales
Aleksei Smirnov, Assistant Professor, HSE University Faculty of Economic Sciences, and Egor Starkov, Assistant Professor, University of Copenhagen, have constructed a mathematical model that explains why it is advantageous for sellers not to delete negative reviews of their products. A study detailing this conclusion has been accepted for publication in The American Economic Journal: Microeconomic
6d
What makes hard workouts so effective
High-intensity interval training strengthens the heart even more than moderate exercise does. Now researchers have found several answers to what makes hard workouts so effective.
6d
Brains work harder while processing descriptions of motion in other languages
Different languages describe motion differently, according to distinct lexical rules. And though we may not consciously notice those rules, we follow them — and researchers have found they affect how our brains perceive and process descriptions of physical movement.
6d
Hawai'i researchers kept the data flowing during crisis response on Kilauea
The summer 2018 eruption of Kilauea Volcano on the Island of Hawai'i was one of the most significant in the volcano's history, collapsing a large portion of the summit caldera, erupting massively from its flank and triggering a magnitude 6.9 earthquake in the process. Through it all, scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory were installing new geophysical stations, processing data and making
6d
Carolina Sandhills Salamander: New species added to species-rich North Carolina
Already possessing more salamander species than any other state in the country with 63, North Carolina has just added one more to make it 64. The aptly named Carolina Sandhills Salamander (Eurycea arenicola) is found in association with springs, seepages and small blackwater streams of the Sandhills region of North Carolina.
6d
Male weeds may hold key to their own demise
Scientists are getting closer to finding the genes for maleness in waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, two of the most troublesome agricultural weeds in the U.S.
6d
Carolina Sandhills Salamander: New species added to species-rich North Carolina
Already possessing more salamander species than any other state in the country with 63, North Carolina has just added one more to make it 64. The aptly named Carolina Sandhills Salamander (Eurycea arenicola) is found in association with springs, seepages and small blackwater streams of the Sandhills region of North Carolina.
6d
Male weeds may hold key to their own demise
Scientists are getting closer to finding the genes for maleness in waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, two of the most troublesome agricultural weeds in the U.S.
6d
Shining a light on what's really happening in perovskite solar cells
Researchers used electron spin resonance spectroscopy to follow the internal deterioration mechanism of perovskite solar cells while they were in operation. They showed correlation between changes in the spin states and the performance of the solar cells. It is hoped that the findings will provide a useful starting point for the continued development of perovskite solar cells and ultimately contri
6d
Pfizer's Covid Vaccine and Allergies: How Concerned Should You Be?
British health officials recommended that people with severe allergy reactions not be given the vaccine. Such reactions to vaccines are rare, even in people who have allergies to food or bee stings.
6d
High-tech fixes for the food system could have unintended consequences
Protein derived from organic waste to feed livestock could decrease demand for soybean meal. This could lead to less deforestation caused by soy farming. But decreased production of soybean, which is also used to produce oil for food products, could increase demand for palm oil. This could clear more forests for oil palm plantations.
6d
New model could explain icy blast from Jupiter's moon
A new model could explain hypothesized icy eruptions coming from Jupiter's moon Europa. On Europa, powerful eruptions may spew into space, raising questions among hopeful astrobiologists on Earth: What would blast out from miles-high plumes ? Could they contain signs of extraterrestrial life? And where in Europa would they originate? The new explanation now points to a source closer to the frozen
6d
MGB study finds majority of COVID-19 patients died in hospital
Brigham researchers found that 95.5 percent of individuals who died with a diagnosis of COVID-19 in the MGB health system between February 18 and May 18, 2020 did so in the hospital. To better characterize the intensity of end-of-life care and promote discussions about at-home care, the researchers analyzed specific death settings, determining that roughly 40% of hospital deaths occurred in the IC
6d
Researchers rank various mask protection, modifications against COVID-19
Some people still refuse to wear a mask during a viral pandemic. So UNC School of Medicine scientists, in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency, researched the protectiveness of various kinds of consumer-grade and modified masks, assuming the mask wearer was exposed to the virus, like when we interact with an unmasked infected person.
6d
High-tech fixes for the food system could have unintended consequences
In a new analysis published in The Lancet Planetary Health, a team of scientists examines how technologies to fix the food system can have unanticipated impacts on global development goals.
6d
Sounds, smells could sway our self-image
A lemony scent and light sounds could change the way you feel about yourself. Previously, researchers have shown that visual and tactile stimulation can change a person's perception of their own body weight. Research being presented by Giada Brianza at the 179th ASA Meeting, has found our hearing and sense of smell can also change how we feel about our self-image, which could help improve healthy
6d
Toyota Making Electric Car With "Game-Changing" Solid State Battery
Solid State Japanese carmaker Toyota is set to unveil what the media is calling a "game-changing" solid state battery as soon as next year, Japanese financial newspaper Nikkei reports . Such tech could allow electric cars of the future to drive over 300 miles on one charge and completely recharge in just ten minutes. Toyota, currently ranked as the largest automaker in the world, is set to unveil
6d
Norman Abramson, Pioneer Behind Wireless Networks, Dies at 88
His ALOHAnet, designed a half-century ago in Hawaii, was a precursor to the technology used in today's smartphones and home WiFi networks.
6d
Researchers adapt cell phone camera for SARS-CoV-2 detection
Researchers have developed an assay that can detect the presence of SARS-CoV-2 in a nasal swab using a device attached to an ordinary smartphone. Although more research is needed before such a test can be rolled out, the results are promising and ultimately may be applicable to screening more broadly for other viruses.
6d
Gut microbiota plays a role in brain function and mood regulation
Depression is a mental disorder that affects more than 264 million people of all ages worldwide. Understanding its mechanisms is vital for the development of effective therapeutic strategies. Scientists recently conducted a study showing that an imbalance in the gut bacterial community can cause a reduction in some metabolites, resulting in depressive-like behaviors. These findings show that a hea
6d
'The robot made me do it': Robots encourage risk-taking behavior in people
New research has shown robots can encourage humans to take greater risks in a simulated gambling scenario than they would if there was nothing to influence their behaviors. Increasing our understanding of whether robots can affect risk-taking could have clear ethical, practical and policy implications, which this study set out to explore.
6d
The pressure sensor of the venus flytrap
The display of a smartphone reacts to finger pressure. The carnivorous Venus flytrap, on the other hand, even notices when a lightweight like a fly lands on it. Special genes make this possible.
6d
Promising treatment for premenstrual dysphoric disorder, PMDD
The mental symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder improve following treatment with a progesterone receptor modulator. The mechanism of action of the study drug provides insights into the potential molecular mechanisms underlying this disorder and its treatment.
6d
Five-minute EEG recordings: A key to the symptoms of Parkinson's
Pathological changes related to the disability of Parkinson's patients can already be detected in signals from the scalp without the need to open the skull.
6d
New online COVID-19 mortality risk calculator could help determine who should get vaccines first
A new online calculator for estimating individual and community-level risk of dying from COVID-19 has been developed by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
6d
Tanzania farmers distrust fertilizer quality, are less willing to pay for it
Smallholder farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa use fertilizer well below recommended rates, contributing to consistently low agricultural productivity. A new study from the University of Illinois finds farmers have misconceptions about fertilizer quality and suggests those misconceptions are a major reason for low application rates.
6d
Baricitinib plus Remdesivir shows promise for treating COVID-19
The combination of baricitinib, an anti-inflammatory drug, and remdesivir, an antiviral, reduced time to recovery for people hospitalized with COVID-19, according to clinical trial results published in The New England Journal of Medicine. The study was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.
6d
Using water fleas, UTA researchers investigate adaptive evolution
Researchers from The University of Texas at Arlington resurrected the preserved eggs of a shrimp-like crustacean to examine long-standing questions about adaptive evolution, reporting the results in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.
6d
Oregon researchers find that like adults, children by age 3 prefer seeing fractal patterns
By the time children are 3 years old they already have an adult-like preference for visual fractal patterns commonly seen in nature, according to University of Oregon researchers.
6d
Financial distress negatively impacts well-being, satisfaction of breast cancer patients
Financial toxicity among breast cancer patients is independently associated with worse psychological well-being following a mastectomy or lumpectomy operation. However, even small improvements in financial pressure associated with treatment-related costs can lead to better mental well-being and higher patient satisfaction with breast reconstruction.
6d
Pre-existing flu immunity impacts antibody quality following infection and vaccination
New research by scientists at the University of Chicago suggests a person's antibody response to influenza viruses is dramatically shaped by their pre-existing immunity, and that the quality of this response differs in individuals who are vaccinated or naturally infected. Their results highlight the importance of receiving the annual flu vaccine to induce the most protective immune response.
6d
Gene could help predict response to cervical cancer treatment
UCLA researchers have identified a potential diagnostic marker that could help predict how likely someone with cervical cancer is to respond to the standard treatment of chemotherapy and radiation.
6d
Low blood pressure during hemodialysis may indicate peripheral vascular disease
Using a large nationwide registry of patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis, this study published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases found that higher frequency of low blood pressure episodes during hemodialysis was associated with a higher incidence of diagnosed peripheral arterial disease.
6d
Ungdomsdepression ökar risken för 66 sjukdomar
Deprimerade barn och tonåringar löper högre risk att drabbas av en rad sjukdomar senare i livet . Det visar en stor observationsstudie av forskare vid Karolinska Institutet. Resultaten i studien kan delvis förklaras av andra psykiatriska tillstånd, som ångest och missbruk. Men visar ändå vikten av att uppmärksamma följder av depression i unga år, menar forskarna bakom studien. – Barn och ungdomar
6d
Protein found in fingertip 'capsules' may be critical to our sense of touch
People without usherin can't feel small texture differences
6d
Hard-hit Nursing Homes Prepare for New Covid-19 Vaccine
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is expected to soon authorize emergency use of a Covid-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNTech. Following recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the first wave will go to health care workers and nursing home residents.
6d
The Hollow Earth Theory Isn't So Funny Anymore
Owen Egerton's 2017 book Hollow used the theory to tell its story. Now that conspiracies are everywhere, he's reconsidering that move.
6d
Study: Militarization of police does not reduce crime
The United States Department of Defense gifts surplus military equipment and clothing to local police departments. The militarization of police coincides with a significant loss of trust in law enforcement from the American public. Militarized police departments are more likely to interact violently with their communities. Watching coverage of protests in American streets, many of us have been sh
6d
Genetic mechanisms of critical illness in Covid-19
Nature, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03065-y
6d
Lockdown taught me the value of reading the manual
Nature, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03566-w After his lab shut down, Shubham Tanwar turned to his reading list to banish 'why doesn't my experiment work' frustration.
6d
Itsy-Bitsy 3-D Spider Web Is as Strong as Human-Made Materials
Lobster pot spiders spin their webs with a superior thread — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6d
Negative reviews boost sales
Aleksei Smirnov, Assistant Professor, HSE University Faculty of Economic Sciences, and Egor Starkov, Assistant Professor, University of Copenhagen, have constructed a mathematical model that explains why it is advantageous for sellers not to delete negative reviews of their products. A study detailing this conclusion has been accepted for publication in The American Economic Journal: Microeconomic
6d
Persistence of Zika virus in the brain causes long-term problems in mice
The Zika virus can remain in mouse brain for extended periods, leading to long-term neurological and behavioral consequences, according to a new study.
6d
Itsy-Bitsy 3-D Spider Web Is as Strong as Human-Made Materials
Lobster pot spiders spin their webs with a superior thread — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6d
Blocking a Single Protein Makes Aging Mice Way Stronger and Healthier
In a stunning mouse experiment, scientists found that inhibiting just a single protein made elderly mice as strong and fit as younger mice in their prime. A team of Stanford researchers found that a single protein, 15-PDGH, plays a large role in the loss of muscle that occurs as an animal ages . According to their research , which they published yesterday in the top-tier journal Science , blockin
6d
Amazon's Judgy Wearable Tells You If You Sound "Condescending"
Fresh Lip It's perhaps the most invasive and judgmental piece of technology we've ever seen on the market — and, fittingly, it's also a thinly veiled attempt to cash in on any data Amazon can get its hands on. The tech giant's new wearable, called Halo Band, literally listens to your every word, and it tells you if your voice is too "overbearing" or "irritated," as The Washington Post reports . T
6d
Carolina Sandhills Salamander: New species added to species-rich North Carolina
Already possessing more salamander species than any other state in the country with 63, North Carolina has just added one more to make it 64. The aptly named Carolina Sandhills Salamander (Eurycea arenicola) is found in association with springs, seepages and small blackwater streams of the Sandhills region of North Carolina.
6d
Male weeds may hold key to their own demise
Scientists are getting closer to finding the genes for maleness in waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, two of the most troublesome agricultural weeds in the US. Finding the genes could enable new 'genetic control' methods for the weeds, which, in many places, no longer respond to herbicides.
6d
Därför får du inte narkolepsi av coronavaccinet
Många är tveksamma till att ta vaccinet mot covid-19. Minnet från svininfluensavaccineringen då barn och unga fick narkolepsi skrämmer. Men enligt forskare är det helt uteslutet att coronovaccinet skulle orsaka den biverkningen.
6d
The Books Briefing: What Stories About Immigration Reveal About America
When he decided to write a memoir, the journalist Jose Antonio Vargas faced an overwhelming challenge: crafting a story that was particular to him while knowing that some might believe it represented a much broader narrative about immigration. In Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen , he makes clear that he speaks only for himself. But he also fills the book with reporting on the many c
6d
Virtual therapy: The 'new normal' after COVID-19
The expansion of telepsychiatry may outlast the COVID-19 pandemic that caused it. When the stay-at-home order took effect in West Virginia, James Berry–a clinician with the WVU School of Medicine–was part of the team that moved the Chestnut Ridge Center's therapy sessions online.
6d
Development of the first biohybrid artificial retina built with silk fibroin and retinal cells.
An international research led by the Complutense University of Madrid has taken a further step to solve Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD)-derived blidness problem with the development of the first biohybrid artificial retina built with silk fibroin and retinal cells.
6d
From publication bias to lost in information
In BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine , IQWiG researchers call for a central, public and worldwide portal for clinical trials
6d
Strong social support decreases mental health problems in young adults
Early adulthood, a transitional life stage marked by major changes in social roles and responsibilities, can bring with it an increase of mental health problems.
6d
"The machine as extension of the body"
Combining neuroscience and robotic research has gained impressive results in the rehabilitation of paraplegic patients. A research team led by Prof. Gordon Cheng from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) was able to show that exoskeleton training not only helped patients to walk, but also stimulated their healing process. With these findings in mind, Prof. Cheng wants to take the fusion of rob
6d
Virtual therapy: The 'new normal' after COVID-19
The expansion of telepsychiatry may outlast the COVID-19 pandemic that caused it. When the stay-at-home order took effect in West Virginia, James Berry–a clinician with the WVU School of Medicine–was part of the team that moved the Chestnut Ridge Center's therapy sessions online.
6d
Fewer than 2 percent of OB-GYN doctors can prescribe life-saving opioid treatment
Examining country-wide data, the researchers hoped to gauge how many obstetrician-gynecologists have their waiver to prescribe buprenorphine
6d
Genes could be key to new COVID-19 treatments, study finds
Potential treatments for Covid-19 have been identified after the discovery of five genes associated with the most severe form of the disease.
6d
New tool for watching and controlling neural activity
An interdisciplinary team of scientists has created a new molecular tool to help us better understand the cellular basis of behavior.
6d
Pitt scientists identify genetic risks of rare inflammatory disease
A group of international collaborators led by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh identified new genetic associations that can predict individual susceptibility to Takayasu arteritis.
6d
A Wider Variety of Vaccine Platforms Report
Well, it's definitely been a Vaccine Week around here, but it's understandable. And we'll finish off the week with a look at some types that we haven't seen report yet. The news is. . .mixed. First off is a preliminary report on the inactivated virus vaccine from Sinopharm – more specifically, their China National Biotec Group division, and even more specifically CNBG's Beijing Institute of Biolo
6d
State and federal officials want to break up Facebook. What does that mean for you?
Mark Zuckerberg has testified in front of college multiple times since 2018. (C-SPAN/) It's hard to reconcile just how big Facebook really is as a company and what kind of influence it—and its subsidiaries—have across the globe. During an earnings call earlier this year, Facebook claimed that 3.14 billion people use at least one of its core apps every month, up from 2.99 billion in the previous q
6d
Saving Corpse Flowers From Being Inbred to Extinction
To preserve corpse flowers and other rare plants, botanic gardens are borrowing studbooks, an approach used by zoos and horse breeders.
6d
You've Never Seen The Moon Like This Before, But It's a Real Image
Imagine if it looked like this with the naked eye!
6d
Dansk klimapolitik satser stort på fangst og lagring af CO2
PLUS. 3,5 mia. kroner er afsat til udvikling af CO2-fangst og -lagring frem mod 2030, men virksomheder efterlyser en klar strategi.
6d
Spørg Fagfolket: Hvor gammelt er mennesket designet til at blive?
En læser vil gerne vide, hvor længe menneskekroppen kan holde. Professor på KU har set på forskningen.
6d
Mass extinctions happen every 27 million years
Mass extinctions of animals that live on land happen on a 27-million-year cycle, according to new research. The cycle of mass extinctions of land-dwellers—including amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds—coincide with previously reported mass extinctions of ocean life, the researchers report. The study also finds that these mass extinctions align with major asteroid impacts and devastating volc
6d
Artificial intelligence helps scientists develop new general models in ecology
In ecology, millions of species interact in billions of different ways between them and with their environment. Ecosystems often seem chaotic, or at least overwhelming for someone trying to understand them and make predictions for the future.
6d
Coronavirus: UK scientists identify drugs that may help severe cases
Breakthrough comes via Edinburgh study that spotted five genes linked to serious illness Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists have identified a collection of drugs with the potential to benefit tens of thousands of patients who are admitted to intensive care with life-threatening coronavirus infections. The breakthrough emerged from a major study of critically
6d
Muscle cell secrets
A muscle fiber consists of just one cell, but many nuclei. A team at the MDC led by Professor Carmen Birchmeier has now shown just how varied these nuclei are. The study, which has been published in Nature Communications, can help us better understand muscle diseases such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
6d
Evolution of tropical biodiversity hotspots
Researchers argue that tropical species form faster in harsh species-poor areas but accumulate in climatically moderate areas to form hotspots of species diversity. Drawing on decades of expeditions and research in the tropics and the scientists' own knowledge and sampling of tropical bird diversity, the team assembled a large and complete phylogenomic dataset for a detailed investigation of tropi
6d
Newly discovered toxin-antitoxin system abundant in one-cell organisms
Bacteria are always hungry, according to Thomas Wood, Biotechnology Endowed Chair and professor of chemical engineering in the Penn State College of Engineering. If you gave a single bacterium all the food it wanted, it would obtain the mass of the Earth in about two days.
6d
tRNA fragments are involved in poststroke immune reactions
Following a stroke, the immune system triggers an inflammatory reaction that can either overshoot or turn into an immune deficiency. Now, a team of researchers – among them scientists from Goethe University Frankfurt, Germany – has shown that tRNA fragments play a role in this immune reaction. Fragments of tRNAs, which transport amino acids during protein synthesis ('transfer RNA'), were long mere
6d
Faraday fabrics? MXene-coated fabric could contain electronic interference in wearable devices
Researchers at Drexel University's College of Engineering have reported that fabric coated with a conductive, two-dimensional material called MXene, is highly effective at blocking electromagnetic waves and potentially harmful radiation. The discovery is a key development for efforts to weave technological capabilities into clothing and accessories.
6d
Physicists observe the emergence of collective behaviour
Phase transitions describe dramatic changes in properties of a macroscopic system—like the transition from a liquid to a gas. Starting from individual ultracold atoms, Heidelberg University physicists were able to observe the emergence of such a transition with an increasing number of particles. The research work was carried out in the field of quantum physics under the direction of Prof. Dr. Seli
6d
Scientists discover genes involved in a compound in lichens with antiviral activity
An international study led by researchers from the Faculty of Pharmacy at the Complutense University of Madrid has identified a series of biosynthetic genes involved in the production of usnic acid in lichen, a compound showing antiviral, antioxidant, neuroprotective, antibacterial and anticancer activity.
6d
Researchers find why 'lab-made' proteins have unusually high temperature stability
Bioengineers have found why proteins that are designed from scratch tend to be more tolerant to high temperatures than proteins found in nature.
6d
Paris Agreement: five years on, it's time to fix carbon trading
With the election of Joe Biden, the US is set to rejoin the Paris Agreement. The country's commitment, made in 2015, to restrain temperature rises to 2°C as part of an international effort is again endorsed, at least on paper.
6d
Artificial intelligence helps scientists develop new general models in ecology
In ecology, millions of species interact in billions of different ways between them and with their environment. Ecosystems often seem chaotic, or at least overwhelming for someone trying to understand them and make predictions for the future.
6d
Scientists discover genes involved in a compound in lichens with antiviral activity
An international study led by researchers from the Faculty of Pharmacy at the Complutense University of Madrid has identified a series of biosynthetic genes involved in the production of usnic acid in lichen, a compound showing antiviral, antioxidant, neuroprotective, antibacterial and anticancer activity.
6d
Researchers find why 'lab-made' proteins have unusually high temperature stability
Bioengineers have found why proteins that are designed from scratch tend to be more tolerant to high temperatures than proteins found in nature.
6d
A strategy for supporting and listening to others | Jeremy Brewer
As a police officer, Jeremy Brewer interacts with individuals experiencing trauma and loss on a daily basis. Giving us a peek into this little-discussed aspect of the job, Brewer shares thoughtful insights on why respecting people's space is sometimes more important than trying to fix an unfixable moment — and explains how you can use this approach to support someone when they need you the most.
6d
Scientists say farewell to Daya Bay site, proceed with final data analysis
The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment collaboration—which made a precise measurement of an important neutrino property eight years ago, setting the stage for a new round of experiments and discoveries about these hard-to-study particles—has finished taking data. Though the experiment is formally shutting down, the collaboration will continue to analyze its complete dataset to improve upon the p
6d
Oxford Covid vaccine to be combined with Sputnik jab for trial
UK and Russian scientists to explore whether vaccines given together improves efficacy Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage UK and Russian scientists are to test whether combining shots of the Oxford/AstraZeneca and Sputnik V coronavirus vaccines could result in better protection than two doses of the same one. Trials will start by the end of the year, the Russian Direct
6d
New computational method validates images without 'ground truth'
Researchers from the McKelvey School of Engineering have developed a computational method that allows them to determine not if an entire imaging picture is accurate, but if any given point on the image is probable, based on the assumptions built into the model.
6d
Faraday fabrics?
Researchers at Drexel University's College of Engineering have reported that fabric coated with a conductive, two-dimensional material called MXene, is highly effective at blocking electromagnetic waves and potentially harmful radiation. The discovery is a key development for efforts to weave technological capabilities into clothing and accessories.
6d
Two, six, many
Phase transitions describe dramatic changes in properties of a macroscopic system – like the transition from a liquid to a gas. Starting from individual ultracold atoms, Heidelberg University physicists under the direction of Prof. Dr Selim Jochim were able to observe the emergence of such a transition with an increasing number of particles.
6d
A protein has been identified as a potential therapeutic target for leishmaniasis vaccines
According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), leishmaniasis causes between 20,000 and 30,000 deaths a year, and there is currently no vaccine for humans. A research team led by the Complutense University of Madrid has described the mechanism by which the Leishmania parasite avoids detection: through the SHP-1 protein, which is responsible for basic cellular functions. The finding positions thi
6d
Gut microbiota plays a role in brain function and mood regulation
Depression is a mental disorder that affects more than 264 million people of all ages worldwide. Understanding its mechanisms is vital for the development of effective therapeutic strategies. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, Inserm and the CNRS recently conducted a study showing that an imbalance in the gut bacterial community can cause a reduction in some metabolites, resulting in depressive
6d
Scientists found out genes involved in a compound in lichens with antiviral activity
Lichens are of great importance both ecologically and as a biological model. These organisms produce a wide range of secondary metabolites, including usnic acid, a compound with unknown biological function but which in-vitro studies have found to present antiviral, neuroprotective and anti-cancer activity. An international research team led by the Complutense University of Madrid has identified th
6d
The Next Six Months Will Be Vaccine Purgatory
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . With the FDA's emergency authorization of the first COVID-19 vaccine imminent , the biggest and most complex vaccination campaign in the nation's history is gearing into action. Planes are ferrying vaccines around the country, hospitals are readying ultracold freezers, and
6d
Exoplanet around distant star resembles reputed 'Planet Nine' in our solar system
Astronomers think planets can exist in orbits far from their star, and propose a two-step process: interactions with the star or inner planets kick it out of the inner system, and then a passing star stabilizes the orbit to keep it bound. Such a scenario could explain the hypothesized 'Planet Nine' in our solar system. Astronomers has now confirmed that one binary star system, HD 106906, has a pla
6d
Hydrogels with fine-toothed molecular combs may make enduring glucose-monitoring implants
Scientists reported they have designed a hydrogel membrane that may be used to house optical glucose sensing materials, toward building a biosensor for monitoring sugar levels in diabetics.
6d
Festive treat for stargazers as Geminid meteors peak
Stargazers across the northern hemisphere could see as many as 70 meteors an hour this coming Sunday, as the Geminids meteor shower reaches its peak. Prospects for what should be this year's best display of meteors are particularly good, as there will be no Moon in the sky to interfere with the view.
6d
Record resolution in X-ray microscopy
Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland and other institutions in Paris, Hamburg and Basel, have succeeded in setting a new record in X-ray microscopy. With improved diffractive lenses and more precise sample positioning, they were able to achieve spatial resolution in the single-digit nanometre scale. This new dimension in
6d
Potential extreme condition history detector—recoverable PL achieved in pyrochlore
Photoluminescence (PL) is light emission from a substance after the absorption of photons stimulated by temperature, electricity, pressure, or chemistry doping. An international team of scientists led by Dr. Wenge Yang from Center for High Pressure Science &Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR) presents a strong tricolor PL achieved in non-PL pyrochlore Ho2Sn2O7 through high pressure treatment. In
6d
Novel cathode design significantly improves performance of next-generation battery
A team led by Cheong Ying Chan Professor of Engineering and Environment Prof. ZHAO Tianshou, Chair Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Director of HKUST Energy Institute, has proposed a novel cathode design concept for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery that substantially improves the performance of this kind of promising next-generation battery.
6d
Development of unique Australian COVID-19 vaccine halted
Unexpected immune response to HIV protein fragment in vaccine produced antibodies that could confuse screening tests for the AIDS virus
6d
Russia probes mystery seal die-off
Russian authorities said Friday they were investigating the mysterious death of nearly 300 endangered seals that had been discovered washed up on the shores of the Caspian Sea.
6d
Russia probes mystery seal die-off
Russian authorities said Friday they were investigating the mysterious death of nearly 300 endangered seals that had been discovered washed up on the shores of the Caspian Sea.
6d
Experimental COVID Vaccine Was Giving False Positives For HIV
An experimental COVID-19 vaccine developed in Australia produced false positive test results for HIV in some trial participants, The New York Times reports . "I'm sure a lot of people are very embarrassed by it," John Moore, immunologist at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York who was not involved in the development of the vaccine, told the newspaper. "It's not great to be associated with a
6d
The Friend COVID-19 Took From Me
Installments of The Friendship Files typically feature a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. But this week she speaks with just one person whose friend passed away from COVID-19 earlier this year. In this interview, Mary-Ann Ortiz-Luis shares the history of her friendship with Baby Herrera, whom she
6d
Majority of pregnant women who tested positive for COVID-19 were asymptomatic, study finds
Illustrates how pandemic disproportionally impacted vulnerable populations and underserved communities
6d
The secret behind male ornaments
In many species all over the animal kingdom, males have eye-catching characteristics. Although often impractical, they are beneficial in finding a mate. Scientists have now mapped the genetic bases of such a male ornament in a fish.
6d
VRK1: a protein that reduces the survival of patients with neuroblastoma
Researchers have characterised the function of VRK1 in neuroblastoma tumour cells and have determined that this protein is essential for tumour cell growth and proliferation. "By studying the expression of this protein in tumours, we were able to identify a priori patients where tumour progression is going to be worse, even in groups where current tools do not predict that behaviour," notes Franci
6d
The Protein Society announces 2022 appointment of Protein Science Editor-in-chief
The Protein Society is thrilled to announce the appointment of John Kuriyan, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley as Editor-in-Chief of Protein Science, effective January 1, 2022. He will succeed outgoing editor Dr. Brian Matthews, who has served in this role since 2005 and provided continuous outstanding service to our society and the broader community.
6d
New analysis method for predicting the risks and effects of immunotherapy
In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University have been able to show differences in how Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody drug, interacts with the blood of healthy individuals compared to patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. This has awakened hopes that this analysis method could pave the way for important breakthroughs in immunotherapy research and treatment.
6d
God sömn minskar risk för demens
Sömnstörningar, redan så tidigt som i medelåldern, ökar risken för demens senare i livet. Dagens 70-åringar sover bättre än 70-åringar för trettio år sedan och kan alltså löpa mindre risk att drabbas av demenssjukdomar. De äldsta åldersgrupperna tillhör den del av befolkningen som växer snabbast i världen. Det är därför viktigt att förstå de förändringar som förknippas med både normalt och sjukli
6d
US authorization of first COVID vaccine marks new phase in safety monitoring
Nature, Published online: 11 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03542-4 The FDA has issued an emergency-use authorization for the Pfizer–BioNTech vaccine. Regulators are gearing up to look for side effects.
6d
Violent space weather could limit life on nearby exoplanets
Artist's impression of flare from our neighboring star Proxima Centauri ejecting material onto a nearby planet. (Mark Myers/OzGrav/) Earth regularly endures highly charged belches from our Sun, sometimes even prompting a dancing curtain of ever-changing color known as aurora. But could similar violent eruptions in other solar systems make far-off worlds inhospitable to life? Earlier this year, as
6d
Tiny four-bit computers are now all you need to train AI
Deep learning is an inefficient energy hog . It requires massive amounts of data and abundant computational resources, which explodes its electricity consumption. In the last few years, the overall research trend has made the problem worse. Models of gargantuan proportions—trained on billions of data points for several days—are in vogue, and likely won't be going away any time soon. Some research
6d
Near-atomic-scale analysis of frozen water
Advances in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can allow cryo-imaging of biological and biochemical systems in liquid form, however, such approaches do not possess advanced analytical capabilities. In a new report now published on Science Advances, A. A. El-Zoka and an international team of researchers in Germany, Canada, France, and the U.K., used atom probe tomography to analyze frozen liqui
6d
Researchers find a better way to design metal alloys
Advanced metal alloys are essential in key parts of modern life, from cars to satellites, from construction materials to electronics. But creating new alloys for specific uses, with optimized strength, hardness, corrosion resistance, conductivity, and so on, has been limited by researchers' fuzzy understanding of what happens at the boundaries between the tiny crystalline grains that make up most
6d
Characterizing the time-dependent material properties of protein condensates
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Germany and Austria has developed a way to characterize the time-dependent material properties of certain protein condensates. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes using laser-tweezer-based techniques to better understand time-dependent material properties associated with protein condensates. Huaiying Zha
6d
Fan mussel larval dispersal for the future of an endangered species
Fan mussel populations -the biggest bivalve mussel in the Mediterranean- are endangered due to the severe parasitosis caused by the protozoan Haplospridium pinnae since 2016. Now, a study published in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science reveals the fan mussel would express a certain natural ability to recover thanks to the dispersal in the marine environment of larvae from populations which ar
6d
The pressure sensor of the venus flytrap
The display of a smartphone reacts to finger pressure. The carnivorous Venus flytrap, on the other hand, even notices when a lightweight like a fly lands on it. Special genes make this possible.
6d
Trapping nanoparticles with optical tweezers
In new research published in EPJ E, Janine Emile and Olivier Emile at the University of Rennes, France, demonstrate a novel tweezer design, which enabled them to trap fluorescent particles just 200 nanometres across for the first time.
6d
Last Interglacial: warming amplified in mountain environments
Speleothems turned out to be a great stroke of luck: dripstones from two caves in the Swiss Alps provide for the first time a continuous reconstruction of temperatures during the Last Interglacial period. Paul Wilcox from the Department of Geology has now published a study showing that high alpine regions were affected by stronger temperature increases than lower altitudes.
6d
Novel cathode design significantly improves performance of next-generation battery
A research team at HKUST has proposed a novel cathode design concept for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery that substantially improves the performance of this kind of promising next-generation battery.
6d
Europe's Biggest Vertical Farm Will Be Powered by Wind and Planted by Robots
From cultured meat to plant-based foods to robotic kitchen assistants , tech seems to be infiltrating every corner of our food system. And it's a good thing, because we're sorely in need of ways to make more and better-quality food using fewer resources. One rapidly-spreading technology that's doing just that is vertical farming , which uses LED lights and a heavily-controlled indoor environment
6d
Earth Isn't the Only Ocean World in the Solar System
Watery worlds like Ceres — a dwarf planet in the asteroid belt — hint that our solar system is wetter than we thought. And where there's water, there might be life.
6d
Water on Mars not as widespread as previously thought
Scientists created planetwide maps of where water might be found on Mars. It is probably scarcer than previously thought, they concluded.
6d
Hunting out hidden hydrogen: Novel holey nanosheets for detecting hydrogen gas leaks
Although touted as the best clean energy carrier, the explosive nature of hydrogen (H2) warrants highly sensitive gas sensors for detecting H2 leaks. Currently used gas sensors either require high operating temperatures or have low sensitivity. Now, scientists have designed a novel sensor using holey 2D zinc oxide nanosheets, which has high sensitivity and fast response time, and has the potential
6d
Ability to predict C-diff mortality nearly doubled with new guidelines
Updated national guidelines for treating infections caused by the deadly superbug Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) have been examined and approved.
6d
Within a hair's breadth — forensic identification of single dyed hair strand now possible
A single strand of hair in a crime scene contains many clues that can help identify a perpetrator. In a recent study, scientists have combined two modern techniques, called surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence, to distinguish between different colors in individual hair strands. Both these techniques are almost non-destructive and can be conducted with portable devices, making
6d
These Nine Women Should Have Key Roles in the New Administration
They're extraordinarily accomplished, and they could form a powerful "Science Squad" to help Joe Biden and Kamala Harris repair the damage done over the past four years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6d
Solar Orbiter: Turning pictures into physics
Solar Orbiter's latest results show that the mission is making the first direct connections between events at the solar surface and what's happening in interplanetary space around the spacecraft. It is also giving us new insights into solar 'campfires," space weather and disintegrating comets.
6d
Newly discovered toxin-antitoxin system abundant in one-cell organisms
Bacteria are always hungry, according to Thomas Wood, Biotechnology Endowed Chair and professor of chemical engineering in the Penn State College of Engineering. If you gave a single bacterium all the food it wanted, it would obtain the mass of the Earth in about two days.
6d
Combined approach for probing interfacial electrochemistry in greater detail
Using a two-pronged approach that will help to understand and design more-efficient energy storage systems, RIKEN electrochemists have explored the distribution of electrical charges at the interface between the electrode and electrolyte.
6d
A common type of oscillating motion surprisingly mimics the wave behavior of light
An unexpected mathematical connection between a special kind of mechanical motion and the behavior of light has been uncovered by three RIKEN physicists1. This strange link could help physicists to design future particle accelerators as well as investigate hot ionized gases known as plasmas.
6d
Newly discovered toxin-antitoxin system abundant in one-cell organisms
Bacteria are always hungry, according to Thomas Wood, Biotechnology Endowed Chair and professor of chemical engineering in the Penn State College of Engineering. If you gave a single bacterium all the food it wanted, it would obtain the mass of the Earth in about two days.
6d
Britisk kæmpefabrik skal årligt producere 300.000 batterier til elbiler
I løbet af næste år opstarter konstruktionen af kæmpefabrik, der vil fylde en kvart kvadratkilometer i Nordøstengland. Fabrikken, der forventes at skulle beskæftige 5.000 ansatte, skal producere batterier til den britiske bilindustri.
6d
Scientists build whole functioning thymus from human cells
Researchers have rebuilt a human thymus, an essential organ in the immune system, using human stem cells and a bioengineered scaffold. Their work is an important step towards being able to build artificial thymi which could be used as transplants.
6d
Within a hair's breadth — forensic identification of single dyed hair strand now possible
A single strand of hair in a crime scene contains many clues that can help identify a perpetrator. In a recent study, scientists have combined two modern techniques, called surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence, to distinguish between different colors in individual hair strands. Both these techniques are almost non-destructive and can be conducted with portable devices, making
6d
New study could offer helping hand for picky parrots
New research has shown just how picky the iconic superb parrot is about the types of tree hollows they nest in, with the discovery potentially key to protecting the threatened species.
6d
New study could offer helping hand for picky parrots
New research has shown just how picky the iconic superb parrot is about the types of tree hollows they nest in, with the discovery potentially key to protecting the threatened species.
6d
Impacts of COVID-19 emissions reductions remain murky in the oceans
As the COVID-19 pandemic took hold in the first half of 2020, humans around the world stopped moving and making, resulting in a 9% drop in the greenhouse gas emissions at the root of climate change.
6d
'The robot made me do it': Robots encourage risk-taking behaviour in people
New research has shown robots can encourage humans to take greater risks in a simulated gambling scenario than they would if there was nothing to influence their behaviours. Increasing our understanding of whether robots can affect risk-taking could have clear ethical, practiCal and policy implications, which this study set out to explore.
6d
New insights into Glioblastoma invasiveness
Researchers from the NORLUX Neuro-Oncology Laboratory at the LIH Department of Oncology (DONC) explored the molecular mechanisms responsible for the ability of Glioblastoma (GBM) to infiltrate and spread to healthy brain tissue. They brought forward the novel role of protein ZFAND3 in promoting the transcription of several genes that stimulate the invasion of GBM cells in the surrounding parenchym
6d
Potential extreme condition history detector – recoverable PL achieved in pyrochlore
Photoluminescence (PL) is light emission from a substance after the absorption of photons stimulated by temperature, electricity, pressure, or chemistry doping. An international team of scientists led by Dr. Wenge Yang from Center for High Pressure Science &Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR) presents a strong tricolor PL achieved in non-PL pyrochlore Ho2Sn2O7 through high pressure treatment. In
6d
Record resolution in X-ray microscopy
Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland and other institutions in Paris, Hamburg and Basel, have succeeded in setting a new record in X-ray microscopy. With improved diffractive lenses and more precise sample positioning, they were able to achieve spatial resolution in the single-digit nanometre scale.
6d
New report finds global health research infrastructure imperiled by COVID-19
A new report released today from the non-profit Global Health Technologies Coalition (GHTC) finds that The strong foundation of global health research and development (R&D) that greatly accelerated the development of COVID-19 innovations is now being weakened by pandemic pressures that are diverting funding and expertise away from other dangerous diseases and putting clinical trials and scientific
6d
Double element co-doped carbon quantum dots enhance photocatalytic efficiency
In a paper published in NANO , researchers from Nanjing Tech University proposed a theory which attributes the photocatalytic efficiency enhancement of Phosphorus and Nitrogen co-doped CQDs (PNCQDs)/TiO 2 nanosheets composite photocatalyst to the quantum wells of PNCQDs.
6d
These Non-Lethal Methods Encouraged by Science Can Keep Wolves From Killing Livestock
Experts say old, repurposed techniques and new technologies may be better than bullets at curbing attacks by the predators
6d

Leave a Reply