Search Posts

Nyheder2020december17

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

Crowdfunding can affect consumer product choices—especially when the products do good
When it comes to introducing new products to the market, crowdfunding has become a hugely popular way for sellers to attract customers.
1d
The 16 facial expressions most common to emotional situations worldwide
Whether at a birthday party in Brazil, a funeral in Kenya or protests in Hong Kong, humans all use variations of the same facial expressions in similar social contexts, such as smiles, frowns, grimaces and scowls, a new study from the University of California, Berkeley, shows.
1d
COVID-19 spread increases when UV levels decrease
Natural variations in ultraviolet radiation influence the spread of COVID-19, but the influence is modest compared to preventive measures such as physical distancing, mask wearing, and quarantine, according to new research.
1d
Teaching artificial intelligence to adapt
Getting computers to 'think' like humans is the holy grail of artificial intelligence, but human brains turn out to be tough acts to follow. Now, researchers have used a computational model of brain activity to simulate this process more accurately than ever before. The new model mimics how the brain's prefrontal cortex uses a phenomenon known as 'gating' to control the flow of information between
1d
Carbon capture's next top model
Creating accurate, detailed models is key to scaling up carbon capture technology. A recent article examines and compares the various modeling approaches for hollow fiber membrane contactors (HFMCs), a type of carbon capture technology. The group analyzed over 150 cited studies of multiple modeling approaches to help researchers choose the technique best suited to their research.
1d
Information transport in antiferromagnets via pseudospin-magnons
A team of researchers has discovered an exciting method for controlling spin carried by quantized spin wave excitations in antiferromagnetic insulators.
1d
New use for an old drug: How does ketamine combat depression?
A group of proteins called 4E-BPs, involved in memory formation, is the key to unlocking the antidepressant effect of ketamine in the brain, according to researchers. The discovery could lead to better and safer treatments for certain patients suffering from major depression.
1d
Effects of organohalogen pollution are coded in gene expression profiles of Baltic salmon
Researchers have measured hepatic organohalogen (OHC) concentrations and gene expression profiles in Atlantic salmon collected from three areas in the Baltic Sea. The results showed that OHCs and gene expression profiles were individually grouped in three areas and the covariation of the two datasets provided by a multivariate method was significantly similar. This suggests that the gene expressio
1d
Biodiversity collections, vital for pandemic preparedness, face drop in specimen deposits
While the importance of natural history museums to human health has never been higher, in recent years the number of specimens being deposited in biodiversity collections actually has been declining.
1d
Invention may get quadcopters to move faster
Researchers believe a new hinge is the key to get load-bearing, large, Army quadrotors to climb a few dozen feet in seconds.
1d
Some neurons target tiny cerebral blood vessel dilation
Neurons control blood flow in tiny vessels in the brain, but researchers know little about this relationship. Now a team of Penn State engineers has found a connection between nitric oxide expressing neurons and changes in arterial diameters in mice, which may shed light on brain function and aging.
1d
The bull's eye: New modified stem cells can deliver drugs specifically to tumor cells
Targeting drugs to cancer tissues is a major challenge in cancer treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known for their ability to find and target tumor cells in the body, but using MSCs for drug delivery has been tricky, because upon loading with drugs, MSCs lose their viability and migratory ability. Now, researchers have successfully modified MSCs to deliver large quantities of anti-cance
1d
An atlas of S. pneumoniae and host gene expression during colonization and disease
The bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx and can cause pneumonia. Then, it can spread to the bloodstream and cause organ damage. To understand how this pathogen adapts to different locations in the body, and also how the host responds to the microbe, researchers have measured bacterial and host gene expression at five different sites in a mouse model — the nasopharynx, lung
1d
Maternal diet during lactation shapes functional abilities of milk bacteria
The mother's diet while breastfeeding can shape the profile of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO), a type of complex carbohydrate in the mother's milk. Changing the HMOs, which are food and fodder for healthy microbes, in turn modifies the functional abilities of the milk microbiome.
1d
New guideline supports behavioral, psychological treatments for insomnia
A new clinical practice guideline establishing recommendations for the use of behavioral and psychological treatments for chronic insomnia disorder in adults has been published.
1d
A non-destructive method for analyzing Ancient Egyptian embalming materials
Ancient Egyptian mummies have many tales to tell, but unlocking their secrets without destroying delicate remains is challenging. Now, researchers have found a non-destructive way to analyze bitumen — the compound that gives mummies their dark color — in Ancient Egyptian embalming materials. The method provides clues to the bitumen's geographic origin and, in one experiment, revealed that a mumm
1d
Biden to Pick Brenda Mallory to Run the Council on Environmental Quality
The office, the Council on Environmental Quality, is expected to have an expanded focus on environmental justice under Ms. Mallory, an environmental lawyer.
1d
Leaked Meeting: Facebook Working on Device to Read Your Brain
Mind Meld Facebook might be one of the last companies you want reading your mind, but that won't stop the social media giant from trying. In a leaked company meeting on Tuesday, Facebook Chief Technology Officer Mike Schroepfer highlighted recent progress on the company's neural interface tech, BuzzFeed News reports . The ultimate goal, ostensibly, isn't to harvest our thoughts as yet another for
1d
Potential treatment approach kills lymphoma while sparing healthy cells
Scientists at Scripps Research have demonstrated a promising new strategy for treating lymphomas, a group of cancers that begin in infection-fighting cells of the immune system called lymphocytes.
1d
How the spread of the internet is changing migration
The spread of the Internet is shaping migration in profound ways. A McGill-led study of over 150 countries links Internet penetration with migration intentions and behaviours, suggesting that digital connectivity plays a key role in migration decisions and actively supports the migration process.
1d
A no-meat diet everywhere will not solve the climate crisis
Scientists argue Authors further argue that a singular focus on negative livestock-related environmental impacts ignores the critical but more positive role livestock play in ecosystem services, income and asset provision or insurance in low- and middle-income countries. It also overlooks more systemic questions about how animals are raised.
1d
Harvard Data Science Review explores reproducibility and replicability in science
The replication crisis potentially threatens to undermine the public's trust in science. A new, twelve-article feature in the open access Harvard Data Science Review provides an interdisciplinary perspective on this crucial issue.
1d
Oral hormone therapy shown to significantly alter metabolome of menopausal women
Groundbreaking research led by a team of scientists including a University of Massachusetts Amherst biostatistician shows that oral hormone therapy (HT) significantly alters the metabolome of postmenopausal women. This finding, which examined blood specimens from the landmark Women's Health Initiative (WHI) study, may help explain the disease risks and protective effects associated with different
1d
New tech turns space urine into plant fertilizer
Long-distance space travel will require self-sufficient, sustainable living in tightly enclosed environments. Basic human needs such as growing food and dealing with water have yet to be fully addressed by research. Scientists from Tokyo University have developed a way to convert human urine into ammonia fertilizer for growing food. In science fiction they have it all figured out: Former inhabita
1d
A non-destructive method for analyzing Ancient Egyptian embalming materials
Ancient Egyptian mummies have many tales to tell, but unlocking their secrets without destroying delicate remains is challenging. Now, researchers have found a non-destructive way to analyze bitumen — the compound that gives mummies their dark color — in Ancient Egyptian embalming materials. The method provides clues to the bitumen's geographic origin and, in one experiment, revealed that a mumm
1d
The 16 Best Albums of 2020
Did pandemic shutdowns make music sound different ? Without concerts, parties, and (for many people) commutes, some of the best venues for enjoying the art form vanished. But isolation and panic gave music a more urgent job to do: help people survive. Here are the albums that made 2020 bearable. Follow along on Spotify . Toby Hay, Morning/Evening Raga Back in March, way, way back, when everyone w
1d
1d
Researcher identifies gene teams working in subregions of brain
You must first understand how something works normally before you can figure out why it's broken. A researcher has now identified six mini gene co-expression networks for a normally functioning brain. That will allow researchers to test each of the gene teams to see if gene pairs are changing in brain tumors or people with intellectual disabilities.
1d
Colorful, magnetic Janus balls could help foil counterfeiters
Counterfeiters who sell knockoffs of popular shoes, handbags and other items are becoming increasingly sophisticated, forcing manufacturers to find new technologies to stay one step ahead. Now, researchers have developed tiny 'Janus balls' that show their colored side under a magnetic field. These microparticles could be useful in inks for anti-counterfeiting tags, which could be verified with an
1d
Successful pilot integrates PrEP and syringe exchange services
A new study shows that implementing PrEP distribution within a community-based syringe services program gets the medication into the hands of women who inject drugs — a population disproportionately impacted by HIV.
1d
COVID-19 spread increases when UV levels decrease
Natural variations in ultraviolet radiation influence the spread of COVID-19, but the influence is modest compared to preventive measures such as physical distancing, mask wearing, and quarantine, according to new research from Harvard University.
1d
Why obesity can weaken the body's tumour-fighting defences
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03591-9 Changes triggered by obesity help to give tumour cells the upper hand in the struggle for nutrients.
1d
Chemists tie an 'endless' knot — one of the most complex ever made
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03579-5 Long atomic strings that are woven together create a structure with symbolic power for adherents of Buddhism.
1d
Can Joe Biden rebuild the ravaged US Environmental Protection Agency?
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03585-7 Scientists reveal further details about the damage sustained under Trump — and the challenges for Biden in restoring science's standing at the agency.
1d
Journal expresses concern — we think — about papers by Surgisphere founder
More than six months after two of the world's leading medical journals retracted papers on COVID-19 based on suspect data from a questionable company, a journal says it has cleared a raft of articles by the controversial founder of the firm. Or, has it? Vascular, a SAGE title, says it has investigated all papers in … Continue reading
1d
Unique prediction of 'modified gravity' challenges dark matter
An international group of scientists, including Case Western Reserve University Astronomy Chair Stacy McGaugh, has published research contending that modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) — a rival idea to the popular dark matter hypothesis–more accurately predicts a galactic phenomenon that appears to defy the classic rules of gravity.
1d
CAN risk in diabetes reduced with intensive control of blood glucose and blood pressure
Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN), a frequent but underdiagnosed complication of diabetes that can be life-threatening. Researchers found that intensive glycemic control reduced CAN risk by 17%, while intensive blood pressure control reduced risks by 22%.
1d
India Is Building a Green Energy "Megapark" the Size of Singapore
Going Green India just laid the foundations for what officials are claiming will be the world's largest renewable energy park. The gigantic project, in the Kutch region of western Gujarat, will cover an area of 180,000 acres — an area roughly the size of Singapore, as Agence France-Presse reports . Once finished, the park will produce 30 gigawatts of electricity from both wind turbines and solar
1d
Peering into the Cell
Researchers visualize the beautiful inner world of cells!
1d
Turning sweat against itself with a metal-free antiperspirant
Body odor is an unpleasant smell, produced when bacteria living on the skin break down the proteins in sweat. To avoid stinking, some people apply antiperspirants that clog sweat ducts with foreign materials, such as metals, to slow perspiration. As a step toward a more natural solution, researchers have turned sweat against itself using an evaporation-based approach in which the salts in sweat cr
1d
Carbon capture's next top model
Creating accurate, detailed models is key to scaling up carbon capture technology. A recent paper led by the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering examines and compares the various modeling approaches for hollow fiber membrane contactors (HFMCs), a type of carbon capture technology. The group analyzed over 150 cited studies of multiple modeling approaches to help researchers choos
1d
Turning sweat against itself with a metal-free antiperspirant
Body odor is an unpleasant smell, produced when bacteria living on the skin break down the proteins in sweat. To avoid stinking, some people apply antiperspirants that clog sweat ducts with foreign materials, such as metals, to slow perspiration. As a step toward a more natural solution, researchers have turned sweat against itself using an evaporation-based approach in which the salts in sweat cr
1d
China just brought moon rocks back to Earth for the first time in its history
China's Chang'e 5 mission successfully delivered samples of lunar rock and dust to Earth on December 17. It marks the first time in 44 years that moon rocks have been brought back to our planet, since the Soviet Union's Luna 24 mission in 1976. It's also the first time China has ever pulled off a sample return mission. How it happened: The sample capsule landed in Inner Mongolia at a little after
1d
What's Killing Killer Whales? Autopsies Reveal a Role for Humans
Stephen Raverty of the Ministry of Agriculture in Canada and Joseph Gaydos of UC Davis speak with The Scientist about their recent study assessing the causes of orca deaths.
1d
7 gifts to take the stress out of stress-cleaning
Tidy up your whole dang life. (Amazon/PopSci/) We all cope with stress in different ways—especially in a pandemic, when many of us are spending more time cooped up inside than we'd like. I personally find solace in meticulously and vigorously cleaning up my living space. It keeps my hands busy, my home organized, and my mind off of the outside world. With these fun gadgets and must-have staples t
1d
Best air purifier: Fight allergens, smoke, and germs for cleaner indoor air
Here are some of the best air purifiers you can get for any room. (Coway/) The air we breathe is filled with tiny particles of every shape and size. Some are invisible to the naked eye, and others can be seen with bright light. But all of the components of these particles—dust, dander, pollen, mold, viruses, and more—can add up to dirtier indoor air. The United States Environmental Protection Age
1d
Crowdfunding can affect consumer product choices — especially when the products do good
A new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business shows that people will pay far more for social good items when they're crowdfunded.
1d
Monitor groundwater along river corridors
Spend time in any of the world's great forests and you'll start seeing the trees as immense pillars holding the heavens aloft while firmly anchored in the earth. It's as much fact as sentiment. Trees really do link the ground to the sky by exchanging energy and matter between the soil and the atmosphere.
1d
Despite decrease in recent years, rate of sledding-related injuries still concerning
A new study found that 220,488 patients were treated in U.S. emergency departments for injuries related to sledding from 2008 through 2017. Nearly 70% of these patients were children age 19 years and younger.
1d
Characterizing cold fusion in 2D models
Researchers show theoretically how cold fusion driven by muon capture would unfold within 2D systems, without any need for approximations.
1d
New salmonella proteins discovered
Only one small protein needs to be missing and salmonellae are no longer infectious. This was discovered in a study in which the pathogens were re-analysed using bioinformatics.
1d
Eight Proteins Turn Mouse Stem Cells into Egglike Cells
The identification of the transcription factors that elicit oocyte growth will aid reproductive biology research and might help women with fertility issues, scientists say.
1d
Impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on rural America [Social Sciences]
Despite considerable social scientific attention to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on urbanized areas, very little research has examined its impact on rural populations. Yet rural communities—which make up tens of millions of people from diverse backgrounds in the United States—are among the nation's most vulnerable populations and may…
1d
Jose Mario Molina: Life and legacy of a man who helped to save Earth's ozone layer [Retrospectives]
On October 7, 2020, history entrusted us with a moment of profound significance where we rejoiced to see two distinguished women—Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna—be honored with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, while we also reckoned with the shattering loss of a much respected and honored academic, a humble and…
1d
Cornell Scientists Find Radio Signal Coming From an Exoplanet
Signal Boost A team of Cornell University scientists has found what they believe to be the first radio signature emitted by a planet outside of our solar system. Knowing what that sounds like, let's be clear: It's probably not aliens. However, according to research slated for publication in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics , picking up on radio signatures from an exoplanet is a valuable tool
1d
Is a racially-biased algorithm delaying health care for one million Black people?
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03419-6 Sweeping calculation suggests it could be — but how to fix the problem is unclear.
1d
Vaping could nearly triple the chance of smoking in teens
A new study offers strong evidence that kids who use e-cigarettes are more likely to take up smoking or smokeless tobacco, researchers say. Teen boys who vaped were almost three times as likely to start smoking as other teen boys with similar risk profiles and more than two times as likely to try smokeless tobacco, the study from The Ohio State University found.
1d
TGen identifies gene that could explain disparity in COVID-19 effects
TGen identified a genetic target that could help explain the tremendous variation in how sick those infected with COVID-19 become. Led by Nicholas Schork, Ph.D., Director of TGen's Quantitative Medicine and Systems Biology Division, researchers identified miR1307 by comparing the genetic elements of SARS-Cov-2 with seven other human coronaviruses, and the genomes of coronavirus strains known to in
1d
Teaching artificial intelligence to adapt
Getting computers to 'think' like humans is the holy grail of artificial intelligence, but human brains turn out to be tough acts to follow. Now, Salk researchers have used a computational model of brain activity to simulate this process more accurately than ever before. The new model mimics how the brain's prefrontal cortex uses a phenomenon known as 'gating' to control the flow of information be
1d
The 16 facial expressions most common to emotional situations worldwide
Whether at a birthday party in Brazil, a funeral in Kenya or protests in Hong Kong, humans all use variations of the same facial expressions in similar social contexts, according to a new study from the University of California, Berkeley. The findings confirm the universality of human emotional expression across geographic and cultural boundaries at a time when nativism is on the rise.
1d
Red tide found off Florida's southwest coast; birds sick
Red tide is back in the waters off of Florida's southwest coast, making birds sick and killing fish, according to a state environmental agency update on Wednesday.
1d
Chinese spacecraft carrying rocks and soil from the moon returns safely
Unmanned Chang'e-5 probe returns to Earth after first mission in four decades to collect lunar samples An unmanned Chinese spacecraft carrying rocks and soil from the moon returned safely to Earth early on Thursday (local time) in the first mission in four decades to collect lunar samples, the Xinhua news agency said. The capsule carrying the samples collected by the Chang'e-5 space probe landed
1d
The journey of a death mask of German playwright Frank Wedekind
A death mask of the German writer Frank Wedekind has unexpectedly reappeared after decades abroad. It was recently returned to Germany by the previous owner in New Zealand over 100 years since Wedekind's death. "The mask not only had a long journey to New Zealand and back, but it also tells an extraordinary history of exile," said Professor Ariane Martin, head of the Editions- und Forschungsstelle
1d
Data models point to a potentially diverse metabolic menu at Enceladus
Using data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, scientists at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) modeled chemical processes in the subsurface ocean of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The studies indicate the possibility that a varied metabolic menu could support a potentially diverse microbial community in the liquid water ocean beneath the moon's icy facade.
1d
Atmospheric pollution and COVID-19 spread in Italy
The spread of SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus responsible for the current pandemic outbreak, has been speculated to be linked to short-term and long-term atmospheric pollutants exposure, mainly particulate matters (PMs). It is in fact possible for people living in highly industrialized areas, therefore exposed to higher pollution levels, to show more severe symptoms. Further studies have pointed out t
1d
Seismic hazard assessment of Campotosto, Italy
Between 1997 and 2017, central Italy was struck by several seismic sequences that cumulatively claimed more than 600 victims, besides producing widespread destruction in historical towns and damage to vital infrastructures. Based on the integration of geological and seismological datasets, this new study published in the Geological Society of America Bulletin provides a 4-D, high-resolution image
1d
How much greenhouse gas emission comes from tropical deforestation and peatland loss?
Land use and land-use change are thought to be responsible for about 23% of human-caused greenhouse gas emissions. But nailing down this number with certainty has been hampered by a lack of data in many key regions of the tropics where forests are being replaced by agriculture and where other activities are degrading forests.
1d
Red tide found off Florida's southwest coast; birds sick
Red tide is back in the waters off of Florida's southwest coast, making birds sick and killing fish, according to a state environmental agency update on Wednesday.
1d
New combined process for 3D printing
Chemists have developed a way to integrate liquids directly into materials during the 3D printing process. This allows, for example, active medical agents to be incorporated into pharmaceutical products or luminous liquids to be integrated into materials, which allow monitoring of damage.
1d
Physicists solve geometrical puzzle in electromagnetism
A team of scientists have solved the longstanding problem of how electrons move together as a group inside cylindrical nanoparticles.
1d
Mandatory Biodiversity Net Gain may not deliver the desired outcomes for nature
England's proposed mandatory Biodiversity Net Gain requirement for new developments might not deliver on promises to increase biodiversity, according to new research.
1d
How hope can make you happier with your lot in life
New research finds that that having hope for the future can make you happier with your lot – and protect you from risky behaviors such as drinking and gambling.
1d
Bill Gates Invests in Hydrogen-Powered Airplane Startup
Taking Off Hydrogen-powered plane startup ZeroAvia just added some heavy hitters to its roster of financial backers. The company closed its Series A funding round, in which investors including Bill Gates' Breakthrough Energy Ventures and Amazon's Climate Pledge Fund gave a total of $21.4 million, Bloomberg reports . In addition, the U.K. government invested $16.6 million — all money that the comp
1d
China lands its Moon rocks in Inner Mongolia
Chang'e-5's Moon samples, first since the 1970s, will improve age dating in the Solar System
1d
Female language style promotes visibility and influence online
A female-typical language style promotes the popularity of talks in the digital context and turns out to be an underappreciated but highly effective tool for social influence. This was shown by UZH psychologists in an international study in which they analyzed 1,100 TED Talks.
1d
Patients with COVID-19 and obesity have poor outcomes not driven by inflammation
Obesity is associated with poor COVID-19 outcomes but a new study suggests this is not due to increased inflammation, but instead may be driven by respiratory issues or other factors.
1d
Many Americans reported economic hardships even early in the COVID-19 pandemic
Significant proportions of US respondents were experiencing economic hardships even early in the COVID-19 pandemic, with Hispanic citizens being particularly affected, according to research by Shatakshee Dhongde at the Georgia Institute of Technology, U.S., publishing in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on December 16, 2020.
1d
Two-year study details dynamics of Huntington's disease markers in patients
A new two-year longitudinal study reveals how two proteins linked to Huntington's disease – an incurable neurodegenerative disorder – change over time in patients and in as-yet asymptomatic people who carry a mutation that causes the condition.
1d
Talking like a woman in TED Talks is associated with more popularity
Talking like a woman at online TED Talks is being "uniquely rewarded" with more views according to researchers, who say female language style is an "underappreciated but highly effective tool for social influence". The researchers wanted to find out which was more predictive of TED Talk impact: a more instrumental and complex male-typical language style or a simpler and more personally engaging fe
1d
Expect fewer, but more destructive landfalling tropical cyclones
A study based on new high-resolution supercomputer simulations, published in this week's issue of the journal Science Advances , reveals that global warming will intensify landfalling tropical cyclones of category 3 or higher in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, while suppressing the formation of weaker events.
1d
Secret of Australia's volcanoes revealed
New research from the University of Sydney proposes a theory that explains not only Australia's volcanic coast, but provides a framework for other incidences of intraplate volcanism in China, the US and the Caribbean.
1d
Look Back at the 2020 Year in Volcanoes
They might not have made the headlines in 2020, but there was plenty of eruptions around the planet this year.
1d
Jack Steinberger, Nobel Winner in Physics, Dies at 99
Dr. Steinberger shared the prize in 1988 for expanding understanding of the neutrino, a staggeringly ubiquitous subatomic particle.
1d
New Scan Finds Prostate Cancer Cells Hiding in the Body
The test seems likely to improve the diagnosis and treatment of a disease that kills 33,000 American men each year.
1d
Spatiotemporal cellular movement and fate decisions during first pharyngeal arch morphogenesis
Cranial neural crest (CNC) cells contribute to different cell types during embryonic development. It is unknown whether postmigratory CNC cells undergo dynamic cellular movement and how the process of cell fate decision occurs within the first pharyngeal arch (FPA). Our investigations demonstrate notable heterogeneity within the CNC cells, refine the patterning domains, and identify progenitor ce
1d
Femtosecond quantification of void evolution during rapid material failure
Understanding high-velocity impact, and the subsequent high strain rate material deformation and potential catastrophic failure, is of critical importance across a range of scientific and engineering disciplines that include astrophysics, materials science, and aerospace engineering. The deformation and failure mechanisms are not thoroughly understood, given the challenges of experimentally quant
1d
Rewritable color nanoprints in antimony trisulfide films
Materials that exhibit large and rapid switching of their optical properties in the visible spectrum hold the key to color-changing devices. Antimony trisulfide (Sb 2 S 3 ) is a chalcogenide material that exhibits large refractive index changes of ~1 between crystalline and amorphous states. However, little is known about its ability to endure multiple switching cycles, its capacity for recording
1d
The nuclear DICER-circular RNA complex drives the deregulation of the glioblastoma cell microRNAome
The assortment of cellular microRNAs ("microRNAome") is a vital readout of cellular homeostasis, but the mechanisms that regulate the microRNAome are poorly understood. The microRNAome of glioblastoma is substantially down-regulated in comparison to the normal brain. Here, we find malfunction of the posttranscriptional maturation of the glioblastoma microRNAome and link it to aberrant nuclear loc
1d
Self-assembly-based posttranslational protein oscillators
Recent advances in synthetic posttranslational protein circuits are substantially impacting the landscape of cellular engineering and offer several advantages compared to traditional gene circuits. However, engineering dynamic phenomena such as oscillations in protein-level circuits remains an outstanding challenge. Few examples of biological posttranslational oscillators are known, necessitating
1d
De novo synthesis and salvage pathway coordinately regulate polyamine homeostasis and determine T cell proliferation and function
Robust and effective T cell–mediated immune responses require proper allocation of metabolic resources through metabolic pathways to sustain the energetically costly immune response. As an essential class of polycationic metabolites ubiquitously present in all living organisms, the polyamine pool is tightly regulated by biosynthesis and salvage pathway. We demonstrated that arginine is a major ca
1d
Metasurface enabled quantum edge detection
Metasurfaces consisting of engineered dielectric or metallic structures provide unique solutions to realize exotic phenomena including negative refraction, achromatic focusing, electromagnetic cloaking, and so on. The intersection of metasurface and quantum optics may lead to new opportunities but is much less explored. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate that a polarization-entangled
1d
An ultrahigh-resolution soft x-ray microscope for quantitative analysis of chemically heterogeneous nanomaterials
The analysis of chemical states and morphology in nanomaterials is central to many areas of science. We address this need with an ultrahigh-resolution scanning transmission soft x-ray microscope. Our instrument provides multiple analysis tools in a compact assembly and can achieve few-nanometer spatial resolution and high chemical sensitivity via x-ray ptychography and conventional scanning micro
1d
S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase links methionine metabolism to the circadian clock and chromatin remodeling
Circadian gene expression driven by transcription activators CLOCK and BMAL1 is intimately associated with dynamic chromatin remodeling. However, how cellular metabolism directs circadian chromatin remodeling is virtually unexplored. We report that the S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) hydrolyzing enzyme adenosylhomocysteinase (AHCY) cyclically associates to CLOCK-BMAL1 at chromatin sites and promotes
1d
The structure and global distribution of the endoplasmic reticulum network are actively regulated by lysosomes
The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises morphologically and functionally distinct domains: sheets and interconnected tubules. These domains undergo dynamic reshaping in response to changes in the cellular environment. However, the mechanisms behind this rapid remodeling are largely unknown. Here, we report that ER remodeling is actively driven by lysosomes, following lysosome repositioning in re
1d
An activity-dependent local transport regulation via degradation and synthesis of KIF17 underlying cognitive flexibility
Synaptic weight changes among postsynaptic densities within a single dendrite are regulated by the balance between localized protein degradation and synthesis. However, the molecular mechanism via these opposing regulatory processes is still elusive. Here, we showed that the molecular motor KIF17 was locally degraded and synthesized in an N -methyl–aspartate receptor (NMDAR)–mediated activity–de
1d
Organic monolayers disrupt plastic flow in metals
Adsorbed films often influence mechanical behavior of surfaces, leading to well-known mechanochemical phenomena such as liquid metal embrittlement and environment-assisted cracking. Here, we demonstrate a mechanochemical phenomenon wherein adsorbed long-chain organic monolayers disrupt large-strain plastic deformation in metals. Using high-speed in situ imaging and post facto analysis, we show th
1d
Intraplate volcanism triggered by bursts in slab flux
Long-lived, widespread intraplate volcanism without age progression is one of the most controversial features of plate tectonics. Previously proposed edge-driven convection, asthenospheric shear, and lithospheric detachment fail to explain the ~5000-km-wide intraplate volcanic province from eastern Australia to Zealandia. We model the subducted slab volume over 100 million years and find that sla
1d
Modeling the breakup of tabular icebergs
Nearly half of the freshwater flux from the Antarctic Ice Sheet into the Southern Ocean occurs in the form of large tabular icebergs that calve off the continent's ice shelves. However, because of difficulties in adequately simulating their breakup, large Antarctic icebergs to date have either not been represented in models or represented but with no breakup scheme such that they consistently sur
1d
External oxidant-compatible phosphorus(III)-directed site-selective C-H carbonylation
The first development of an external oxidant-compatible system involving a phosphorus(III)-directed C–H functionalization has been uncovered. An efficient C–H esterification of indoles with CO and alcohols has been reported in which the high reactivity and the exclusive C7-selectivity derives from the selection of a P(III)–directing group and the utilization of benzoquinone as an external oxidant
1d
Chemical anti-corrosion strategy for stable inverted perovskite solar cells
One big challenge for long-lived inverted perovskite solar cells (PSCs) is that commonly used metal electrodes react with perovskite layer, inducing electrode corrosion and device degradation. Motivated by the idea of metal anticorrosion, here, we propose a chemical anticorrosion strategy to fabricate stable inverted PSCs through introducing a typical organic corrosion inhibitor of benzotriazole
1d
From code to market: Network of developers and correlated returns of cryptocurrencies
"Code is law" is the founding principle of cryptocurrencies. The security, transferability, availability, and other properties of crypto-assets are determined by the code through which they are created. If code is open source, as is customary for cryptocurrencies, this would prevent manipulations and grant transparency to users and traders. However, this approach considers cryptocurrencies as iso
1d
Reduced tropical cyclone densities and ocean effects due to anthropogenic greenhouse warming
Tropical cyclones (TCs) are extreme storms that form over warm tropical oceans. Along their tracks, TCs mix up cold water, which can further affect their intensity. Because of the adoption of lower-resolution ocean models, previous modeling studies on the TC response to greenhouse warming underestimated such oceanic feedbacks. To address the robustness of TC projections in the presence of mesosca
1d
Virus detection using nanoparticles and deep neural network-enabled smartphone system
Emerging and reemerging infections present an ever-increasing challenge to global health. Here, we report a nanoparticle-enabled smartphone (NES) system for rapid and sensitive virus detection. The virus is captured on a microchip and labeled with specifically designed platinum nanoprobes to induce gas bubble formation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The formed bubbles are controlled to mak
1d
Ultrafast solid-liquid intercalation enabled by targeted microwave energy delivery
In chemical reactions, the breaking and formation of chemical bonds usually need external energy to overcome the activation barriers. Conventional energy delivery transfers energy from heating sources via various media, hence losing efficiency and inducing side reactions. In contrast, microwave (MW) heating is known to be highly energy efficient through dipole interaction with polar media, but ho
1d
A coating from nature
For almost a century, petrochemical-based monomers like acrylates have been widely used as the basis for coatings, resins, and paints. The development of sustainable alternatives, integrating the principles of green chemistry in starting material, synthesis process, and product function, offers tremendous challenges for science and society. Here, we report on alkoxybutenolides as a bio-based alte
1d
Light-dependent photoreceptor orientation in mouse retina
Almost a century ago, Stiles and Crawford reported that the human eye is more sensitive to light entering through the pupil center than through its periphery (Stiles-Crawford effect). This psychophysical phenomenon, later found to correlate with photoreceptor orientation toward the pupil, was dynamically phototropic, adjustable within days to an eccentrically displaced pupil. For decades, this ph
1d
Lamellar cells in Pacinian and Meissner corpuscles are touch sensors
The skin covering the human palm and other specialized tactile organs contains a high density of mechanosensory corpuscles tuned to detect transient pressure and vibration. These corpuscles comprise a sensory afferent neuron surrounded by lamellar cells. The neuronal afferent is thought to be the mechanical sensor, whereas the function of lamellar cells is unknown. We show that lamellar cells wit
1d
Astronomers detect possible radio emission from exoplanet
By monitoring the cosmos with a radio telescope array, an international team of scientists has detected radio bursts emanating from the constellation Boötes. The signal could be the first radio emission collected from a planet beyond our solar system.
1d
White Suburbanites Won't Be Enough in Georgia
Georgia Democrats are in a door-knocking, lit-dropping frenzy. Many of them are focused on turning out voters in the upper-middle-class neighborhoods of suburban Atlanta—the voters who helped flip the state to Joe Biden in November, and who are widely considered the key group for Democrats to reach. But not Ben Davidson. Ben Davidson is hitting the apartments. The 34-year-old sales manager, one o
1d
Food Industry-Backed Research Gives Results Funders Want, New Analysis Shows
More than half of these studies yielded outcomes favorable to company products compared to less than 10 percent lacking such support — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
Green chemistry creates coatings from nature
Organic chemists from the University of Groningen and the Dutch multinational company AkzoNobel, a major global producer of paints and coatings, developed a process that allows them to turn biomass into a high-quality coating using light, oxygen and UV light. This process combines a renewable source with green chemistry and could replace petrochemical-based monomers such as acrylates, which are cu
1d
New study redefines understanding of where icebergs put meltwater into the Southern Ocean
Some icebergs that break off of Antarctica are massive—the size of New York City—but previously these floating cities of freshwater were largely ignored in climate models. A new study by scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) has provided the first-of-its-kind model for how these icebergs de
1d
Secret of Australia's volcanoes revealed in new study
Australia's east coast is littered with the remnants of hundreds of volcanoes—the most recent just a few thousand years old—and scientists have been at a loss to explain why so many eruptions have occurred over the past 80 million years.
1d
Driving force behind cellular 'protein factories' identified
Researchers have identified the driving force behind a cellular process linked to neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and motor neurone disease.
1d
Training methods based on punishment compromise dog welfare, study finds
Dogs trained using aversive stimuli, which involve punishments for incorrect behavior, show evidence of higher stress levels compared to dogs trained with reward-based methods, according to a study publishing December 16 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ana Catarina Vieira de Castro from the Universidade do Porto, Portugal, and colleagues.
1d
Many Americans reported economic hardships even early in the COVID-19 pandemic
Significant proportions of U.S. respondents were experiencing economic hardships even early in the COVID-19 pandemic, with Hispanic citizens being particularly affected, according to research by Shatakshee Dhongde at the Georgia Institute of Technology, U.S., publishing in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on December 16, 2020.
1d
Talking like a woman in TED Talks is associated with more popularity
Talking like a woman at online TED Talks is being "uniquely rewarded" with more views according to researchers, who say female language style is an "underappreciated but highly effective tool for social influence".
1d
Expect fewer, but more destructive landfalling tropical cyclones
A study based on new high-resolution supercomputer simulations, published in this week's issue of the journal Science Advances, reveals that global warming will intensify landfalling tropical cyclones of category 3 or higher in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, while suppressing the formation of weaker events.
1d
COVID-19 testing scientists are the unsung heroes of the pandemic
It takes more than doctors and nurses to keep us safe and healthy. (Pexels/) Rodney E. Rohde is a Professor of Clinical Laboratory Science, Texas State University. This story originally featured on The Conversation . Who do you think performs your medical laboratory tests for COVID-19 or any other test? If you answered "my doctor" or "my nurse" or a robot, you would be completely wrong. To put it
1d
Driving force behind cellular 'protein factories' identified
Researchers have identified the driving force behind a cellular process linked to neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and motor neurone disease.
1d
Training methods based on punishment compromise dog welfare, study finds
Dogs trained using aversive stimuli, which involve punishments for incorrect behavior, show evidence of higher stress levels compared to dogs trained with reward-based methods, according to a study publishing December 16 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ana Catarina Vieira de Castro from the Universidade do Porto, Portugal, and colleagues.
1d
SwRI models point to a potentially diverse metabolic menu at Enceladus
Using data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, scientists at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) modeled chemical processes in the subsurface ocean of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The studies indicate the possibility that a varied metabolic menu could support a potentially diverse microbial community in the liquid water ocean beneath the moon's icy facade.
1d
New in the Hastings Center Report, November-December 2020
Appealing to patient autonomy, bioethicists argue for making oral contraceptives, HIV-prevention medicines, statins, and many other prescription drugs available over the counter.
1d
Atmospheric pollution and COVID-19 spread in Italy
A careful analysis focused on the possible connection between a low air quality index and COVID-19 spread in Italy in the first quarter of 2020. A study led by the CMCC Foundation highlights the potential short-term correlation between exposure to three well-known atmospheric pollutants (PM2.5, PM10 and NO2) and COVID-19 incidence, mortality and lethality rates.
1d
Pandemic fears driving firearm purchases
Stress related to the coronavirus pandemic and the uncertainty of what the future holds is motivating people to purchase firearms, a trend that may be more prevalent in those who already own firearms, according to a Rutgers study.
1d
New use for an old drug: How does ketamine combat depression?
A group of proteins called 4E-BPs, involved in memory formation, is the key to unlocking the antidepressant effect of ketamine in the brain, according to researchers from three Canadian universities. The discovery could lead to better and safer treatments for certain patients suffering from major depression.
1d
How many scientists are LGBTQ? Federal survey delays frustrate researchers
Scientists call for National Science Foundation's workforce surveys to tally sexual and gender minorities
1d
Food Industry-Backed Research Gives Results Funders Want, New Analysis Shows
More than half of these studies yielded outcomes favorable to company products compared to less than 10 percent lacking such support — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
The Guardian view on Johnson and Covid rules: a habit of complacency | Editorial
The prime minister's obvious dislike of prescriptive social regulations dilutes his authority when asking people to comply There is a fine line between optimism and complacency that Boris Johnson has often crossed during the coronavirus pandemic. In July, when lifting the first national lockdown, the prime minister held out the prospect of "a significant return to normality" in time for Christmas
1d
The postdoc career journeys that date back to kindergarten
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03111-9 Julie Gould explores professional identity and motivation by asking five researchers how they keep a childhood love of science alive, despite the setbacks.
1d
Some states may lack facilities for administering COVID-19 vaccine to residents
As the biggest vaccination effort in US history gets underway, several states may not have a sufficient number of facilities in some areas to administer the COVID-19 vaccine to all residents who want it. Researchers with the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy and the nonprofit West Health Policy Center found that more than a third (35%) of US counties have two or fewer vaccination facilit
1d
How much greenhouse gas emission comes from tropical deforestation and peatland loss?
New research papers provide better data for tropical countries on how land conversion — in this case, the removal of tropical forests and peatland for agriculture — leads to increased greenhouse gas emissions.
1d
Maternal diet during lactation shapes functional abilities of milk bacteria
The mother's diet while breastfeeding can shape the profile of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO), a type of complex carbohydrate in the mother's milk. Changing the HMOs, which are food and fodder for healthy microbes, in turn modifies the functional abilities of the milk microbiome.
1d
Watch a swarm of drones fly through heavy forest—while staying in formation
Approach could speed up search and rescue missions and forest surveys
1d
Vävnadsvänliga mikroelektroder avslöjar hur hjärnan fungerar
För att studera hur hjärnan fungerar och utveckla nya tekniker för behandling av neurologiska sjukdomar har forskare vid Lunds universitet utvecklat vävnadsvänliga och flexibla mikroelektroder som är ungefär en tiondel så tjocka som ett hårstrå. Hjärnan är den mest komplicerade struktur vi känner till och den ligger bakom vår intelligens, kreativitet, tankar, minnen, känslor och våra sinnesintryc
1d
Chinese craft returns to Earth with Moon rocks
An unmanned Chinese spacecraft carrying rocks and soil from the Moon returned safely to Earth early Thursday, completing another chapter in China's effort to become a space superpower.
1d
2020: The Year in Volcanic Activity
This has been a relatively average year for the world's active volcanoes. Out of an estimated 1,500 active volcanoes, about 50 erupt every year, spewing steam, ash, toxic gases, and lava. In 2020, erupting volcanoes included Taal Volcano in the Philippines, La Cumbre in the Galapagos, Mount Shishaldin in Alaska, Pacaya Volcano in Guatemala, Mount Semeru and Mount Sinabung in Indonesia, Piton de l
1d
Prague zoo's month-old Sumatran orangutan finally has a name
He's called Pustakawan, or Kawi, if you wish.
1d
Prague zoo's month-old Sumatran orangutan finally has a name
He's called Pustakawan, or Kawi, if you wish.
1d
Messenger RNA gave us a COVID-19 vaccine. Will it treat diseases, too?
Targeting mRNA to organs and minimizing side effects still pose challenges to drug development
1d
China Just Brought the First Moon Rocks Back to Earth Since 1976
Touch Down China's Chang'e-5 mission has officially returned with the first new samples collected from the Moon's surface in almost half a century. The spacecraft touched down in the Siziwang district of Inner Mongolia around 1pm Eastern time, and search teams have likely already found it. Thermal camera footage shown by state media TV network CCTV appears to show the capsule sitting in an otherw
1d
UC Study: Suicide watch more important now than ever
The study, conducted at UC's Center for Prevention Science, found that between 2015 to 2018, there was a 16% increase in suicide ideation, an 18.6% increase in suicide planning, and an 11.6% increase in suicide attempts. Additionally, significant increases in each behavior were found in African Americans, younger adults, sexual minorities, and individuals who reported past-year drug use. Among the
1d
An atlas of S. pneumoniae and host gene expression during colonization and disease
The bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx and can cause pneumonia. Then, it can spread to the bloodstream and cause organ damage. To understand how this pathogen adapts to different locations in the body, and also how the host responds to the microbe, researchers have measured bacterial and host gene expression at five different sites in a mouse model — the nasopharynx, lung
1d
Aging journal fills knowledge gaps on race, mental health
A new special issue of the journal Innovation in Aging , titled "Race and Mental Health Among Older Adults: Within- and Between-Group Comparisons," is expressly devoted to much-needed research on aging and mental health within racial and ethnic minority populations (e.g., African Americans, Latinx, and Asian Americans, as well as subgroups within these larger pan-ethnic categories).
1d
New guideline supports behavioral, psychological treatments for insomnia
The American Academy of Sleep Medicine has published a new clinical practice guideline establishing recommendations for the use of behavioral and psychological treatments for chronic insomnia disorder in adults.
1d
Seismic Hazard Assessment: Campotosto, Italy
Between 1997 and 2017, central Italy was struck by several seismic sequences that cumulatively claimed more than 600 victims, besides producing widespread destruction in historical towns and damage to vital infrastructures. Based on the integration of geological and seismological datasets, this new study published in the Geological Society of America Bulletin provides a 4D, high-resolution image o
1d
New screening platform leads to discovery of next-generation prodrugs for type 1 diabetes
Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Broad Institute teamed up to design next-generation β-cell-targeting proliferators: zinc-binding prodrugs (ZnPD). To achieve this, the researchers engineered a new screening platform, the Disque Platform, to better represent β-cells in the lab. Utilizing the Disque Platform, researchers identified a ZnPD drug which exhibited a 2.4-fold increase i
1d
World's space achievements a bright spot in stressful 2020
Astronauts blasted into orbit from the U.S. for the first time in nearly a decade, three countries sent spacecraft hurtling toward Mars, and robotic explorers grabbed rocks from the moon and gravel from an asteroid for return to Earth.
1d
More than 1 million barriers on Europe's rivers: study
More than 1.2 million barriers criss-cross Europe's rivers—nearly twice as many as previously thought—threatening some of the world's most diverse ecosystems, new research showed Wednesday.
1d
High savings rates and the unequal recovery
Longer-term growth will need a shift from consumption to investment
1d
Stars are dying all across the galaxy—why don't we see them?
The Kepler supernova was spotted in 1604. Four centuries later, material from the explosion is still expanding outward at more than 20 million miles per hour. (NASA/CXC/Univ of Texas at Arlington/M. Millard et al./) On July 4, 1054, a star in the constellation Taurus exploded. Some 6,500 light years away, the inhabitants of a canyon in what would, centuries later, be known as New Mexico took noti
1d
Canadian will join Moon mission for first time in 2023
A Canadian astronaut will take part in a lunar mission for the first time in 2023, as part of the NASA-led Artemis project, the minister for innovation, science and industry announced Wednesday.
1d
Information transport in antiferromagnets via pseudospin-magnons
A team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich, the Walther-Meissner-Institute of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities, and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim has discovered an exciting method for controlling spin carried by quantized spin wave excitations in antiferromagnetic insulators.
1d
Surgeons Who Operate on Their Birthday Appear to Kill Way More Patients
If you're scheduling a surgery and you somehow find out that the operation will land on your surgeon's birthday, perhaps consider postponing. That's because there's a noticeable increase in patient deaths after surgeons perform an operation on their birthday, according to research published last week in the British Medical Journal . Whether it's because they're distracted by upcoming evening cele
1d
Study uses remote sensing to monitor groundwater along river corridors in the Southwest
Spend time in any of the world's great forests and you'll start seeing the trees as immense pillars holding the heavens aloft while firmly anchored in the earth. It's as much fact as sentiment. Trees really do link the ground to the sky by exchanging energy and matter between the soil and the atmosphere. Researchers believe that understanding this connection could provide both a wealth of scientif
1d
Ignoring CDC guidelines leads to fear, anger among employees
Companies worldwide are facing unprecedented challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic, from modifying operations to keeping employees safe and informed. But not all businesses have followed the recommended safety protocols set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This mixed messaging could have a significant impact on employee trust, loyalty and overall commitment, according to a stud
1d
Book: Dickens used 'Christmas Carol' to attack inequality
Charles Dickens meant for A Christmas Carol to serve as a scathing indictment of wealth concentration and neglect of the poor, argues Dan Shaviro. In Dickens's story, Ebeneezer Scrooge learns kindness and charity after receiving visits from three spirits. But beyond its heartwarming varnish lies a much more specific message, says Shaviro , a law professor and tax expert at New York University. In
1d
Reply to: Beta human papillomaviruses and skin cancer
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-3024-z
1d
Beta human papillomaviruses and skin cancer
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-3023-0
1d
Mapping routine measles vaccination in low- and middle-income countries
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03043-4 Although progress in the coverage of routine measles vaccination in children in low- and middle-income countries was made during 2000–2019, many countries remain far from the goal of 80% coverage in all districts by 2019.
1d
Small-molecule inhibitors of human mitochondrial DNA transcription
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03048-z Inhibitors of mitochondrial transcription that target human mitochondrial RNA polymerase provide a chemical biology tool for studying the role of mitochondrial DNA expression in a wide range of pathologies.
1d
Fat1 deletion promotes hybrid EMT state, tumour stemness and metastasis
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03046-1 In mouse and human squamous cell carcinoma, loss of function of FAT1 promotes tumour initiation, malignant progression and metastasis through the activation of a hybrid epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition phenotype.
1d
Entanglement on an optical atomic-clock transition
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-3006-1 A many-atom state of trapped 171Yb atoms that are entangled on an optical atomic-clock transition overcomes the standard quantum limit, providing a proof-of-principle demonstration towards entanglement-based optical atomic clocks.
1d
Self-assembly of a layered two-dimensional molecularly woven fabric
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-3019-9 An anion and metal ion template is used to form woven polymer patches that are joined together by polymerization into a fully woven, two-dimensional, molecular patchwork.
1d
Tuning the Chern number in quantum anomalous Hall insulators
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-3020-3 The number of edge channels in quantum anomalous Hall insulators is controlled by varying either the magnetic dopant concentration or the interior spacer layer thickness, yielding Chern numbers up to 5.
1d
Cortical response selectivity derives from strength in numbers of synapses
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03044-3 Live neuron imaging and electron microscopy reconstruction shows that the selectivity of cortical neuron responses to visual stimuli arises from the total number of synapses activated rather than being dominated by a small number of strong synaptic inputs.
1d
Half-minute-scale atomic coherence and high relative stability in a tweezer clock
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-3009-y A tweezer clock containing about 150 88Sr atoms achieves trapping and optical excited-state lifetimes exceeding 40 seconds, and shows relative fractional frequency stability similar to that of leading atomic clocks.
1d
Sorting nexin 5 mediates virus-induced autophagy and immunity
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03056-z Genome-wide siRNA screens identify an essential function for sorting nexin 5 in virus-induced autophagy and immunity mediated via class III phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase complex 1.
1d
Antidepressant actions of ketamine engage cell-specific translation via eIF4E
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03047-0 The antidepressant-like effects of ketamine in mice depend on the expression of specific eIF4E-binding proteins in excitatory and inhibitory neurons.
1d
Anti-tumour immunity induces aberrant peptide presentation in melanoma
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03054-1 Tryptophan depletion in melanoma cells after prolonged treatment with interferon-γ (IFNγ) results in ribosomal frameshifting and the production of aberrant peptides that can be presented to T cells and induce an immune response.
1d
Maximizing US nitrate removal through wetland protection and restoration
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03042-5 Analysis of US continental wetland inventory data combined with model simulations indicate that a spatially targeted 10% increase in wetland area could double wetland nitrogen removal.
1d
Topological superconductivity in a van der Waals heterostructure
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2989-y A van der Waals structure based on a two-dimensional magnet and layered superconductor offers a potential system in which topological superconductivity could be easily tuned and integrated into devices.
1d
More than one million barriers fragment Europe's rivers
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-3005-2 Validated barrier inventories and modelling indicate that Europe's rivers are fragmented by more than one million barriers, such as dams, weirs and fords, causing major impacts on biodiversity.
1d
Spin transport in a tunable Heisenberg model realized with ultracold atoms
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-3033-y Spin transport far from equilibrium is studied in a Heisenberg model with adjustable anisotropy realized with coupled ultracold 7Li atoms, and different dynamical regimes are found for positive and negative anisotropies.
1d
Measuring DNA mechanics on the genome scale
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03052-3 A high-throughput, chromosome-wide analysis of DNA looping reveals its contribution to the organization of chromatin, and provides insight into how nucleosomes are deposited and organised de novo.
1d
European rivers are fragmented by many more barriers than had been recorded
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03440-9 An atlas of European river barriers has been made, by curating and correcting existing records, and by surveying 2,700 kilometres of waterways. It reveals that rivers are fragmented by an amazing number of obstructions.
1d
Could you prevent a pandemic? A very 2020 video game
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03594-6 A video game provides players with insights into pandemic responses, and our annual festive fun.
1d
Quantum engineering for optical clocks
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03510-y Atomic clocks known as optical clocks are more accurate and stable than current timekeepers. Two quantum-engineering approaches could improve the performance of optical clocks even further and extend their applications.
1d
How to rebuild the US Environmental Protection Agency
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03539-z Joe Biden must take charge of repairing the EPA — and safeguard it in perpetuity.
1d
AI weighs in on debate about universal facial expressions
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03509-5 An analysis of more than 6 million YouTube videos finds that people around the world make similar facial expressions in similar social contexts. The study brings data science to the debate about the universality of emotion categories.
1d
Precise mapping reveals gaps in global measles vaccination coverage
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03391-1 Precise maps of routine first-dose measles vaccinations show slowing progress around the world between 2010 and 2019, and large gaps in coverage in many places. Many countries are unlikely to achieve global 2020 coverage targets.
1d
Sixteen facial expressions occur in similar contexts worldwide
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-3037-7 An analysis of 16 types of facial expression in thousands of contexts in millions of videos revealed fine-grained patterns in human facial expression that are preserved across the modern world.
1d
Creation of bladder assembloids mimicking tissue regeneration and cancer
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-3034-x Multilayer 3D reconstitution of bladder stem cells with stromal cells enables recapitulation of the architecture and molecular functions of bladder tissue.
1d
Capping pores of alphavirus nsP1 gate membranous viral replication factories
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-3036-8 Cryo-electron microscopy structures of non-structural protein 1 (nsP1) of chikungunya virus reveal the mechanisms that underpin the association of viral replication machinery with virus-induced membranous organelles within host cells.
1d
Reconstitution of the oocyte transcriptional network with transcription factors
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-3027-9 Eight transcription factors are identified that, when overexpressed, are sufficient to grow oocyte-like cells from mouse pluripotent stem cells.
1d
Experts question idea Christmas lockdown would fuel rule-breaking
UK politicians concerned that cancelling current plans could lead to reduced compliance in the future Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Behavioural experts and government advisers have challenged the idea that tightening rules at Christmas would reduce compliance and fuel rule-breaking. Provided the government explained the rationale for any change in the rules, and di
1d
King of the cave: New centipede on top of the food chain in the sulfur-soaked Movile
Deemed to never see the light of the day, a new species of endemic, troglobiont centipede was discovered by an international team of scientists in the Romanian cave Movile: a unique underground ecosystem, where the oxygen in the air might be half of the amount of what we're used to, yet sulfur abounds; and where the animal life only exists because of chemosynthetic bacteria feeding on carbon dioxi
1d
Hare camo backfires as winters get less snowy
Mountain hares in Scotland that rely on camouflage to escape predators are becoming increasing mismatched to their surroundings due to less snowy winters, a new study shows. Mountain hares are one of several species that molt from a dark coat in summer to a white coat in winter to maintain camouflage against snowy landscapes. But due to climate change, the duration of snow cover is decreasing—cre
1d
King of the cave: New centipede on top of the food chain in the sulfur-soaked Movile
Deemed to never see the light of the day, a new species of endemic, troglobiont centipede was discovered by an international team of scientists in the Romanian cave Movile: a unique underground ecosystem, where the oxygen in the air might be half of the amount of what we're used to, yet sulfur abounds; and where the animal life only exists because of chemosynthetic bacteria feeding on carbon dioxi
1d
A Mathematician's Unanticipated Journey Through the Physical World
The outline of Lauren Williams ' mathematical career was present very early on in her life. "Ever since I was a kid, I've always loved patterns," said Williams. "I enjoyed being given a sequence of numbers and having to find the pattern and predict the next number." But while many kids are enchanted by patterns, few end up following them as far, or to such unexpected places, as Williams has. As a
1d
Whole genomes map pathways of chimpanzee and bonobo divergence
Chimpanzees and bonobos are sister species that diverged around 1.8 million years ago as the Congo River formed a geographic boundary and they evolved in separate environments. Now, a whole-genome comparison of bonobos and chimpanzees reveals the gene pathways associated with the striking differences between the two species' diets, sociality and sexual behaviors.
1d
The bull's eye: New modified stem cells can deliver drugs specifically to tumor cells
Targeting drugs to cancer tissues is a major challenge in cancer treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known for their ability to find and target tumor cells in the body, but using MSCs for drug delivery has been tricky, because upon loading with drugs, MSCs lose their viability and migratory ability. Now, researchers from Tokyo University of Science have successfully modified MSCs to deliv
1d
Ignoring CDC guidelines leads to fear, anger among employees
Companies not following the recommended safety protocols set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the COVID-19 pandemic could have a significant impact on employee trust, loyalty and overall commitment, according to a new study.
1d
Some neurons target tiny cerebral blood vessel dilation
Neurons control blood flow in tiny vessels in the brain, but researchers know little about this relationship. Now a team of Penn State engineers has found a connection between nitric oxide expressing neurons and changes in arterial diameters in mice, which may shed light on brain function and aging.
1d
Connections determine everything
A team of scientists, with the first author from the HSE University, were investigating which factors are the most important for the upper limb motor recovery after a stroke. The study is published in Stroke, the world's leading journal for cerebrovascular pathology.
1d
Whole genomes map pathways of chimpanzee and bonobo divergence
Chimpanzees and bonobos are sister species that diverged around 1.8 million years ago as the Congo River formed a geographic boundary and they evolved in separate environments. Now, a whole-genome comparison of bonobos and chimpanzees reveals the gene pathways associated with the striking differences between the two species' diets, sociality and sexual behaviors.
1d
A pair of lonely planet-like objects born like stars
An international research team led by the University of Bern has discovered an exotic binary system composed of two young planet-like objects, orbiting around each other from a very large distance. Although these objects look like giant exoplanets, they formed in the same way as stars, proving that the mechanisms driving star formation can produce rogue worlds in unusual systems deprived of a Sun.
1d
Colorful, magnetic Janus balls could help foil counterfeiters
Counterfeiters who sell knockoffs of popular shoes, handbags and other items are becoming increasingly sophisticated, forcing manufacturers to find new technologies to stay one step ahead. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed tiny "Janus balls" that show their colored side under a magnetic field. These microparticles could be useful in inks for anti-counterfeiting tags, which coul
1d
Infrastructure key to balancing climate and economic goals in developing countries
Developing nations have an opportunity to avoid long-term dependence on fossil fuel-burning infrastructure as they move toward economic stability, even if they are slow to cut carbon emissions, say the authors of a new article. Countries with low per capita incomes can keep their contributions to global warming to 0.3 degrees Celsius with careful foresight and planning, urge scientists.
1d
These DNA locations shape the human face
New research connects specific genetic signals with specific areas of the human face. The researchers can see the signals of normal facial features in the genome, and also hope their work can shed light on craniofacial malformations such as cleft lip and palate. "The face tells the outside world about your identity, who you are related to, where your ancestors come from, and even your health," sa
1d
Biodiversity collections, vital for pandemic preparedness, face drop in specimen deposits
When you imagine a visit to a natural history museum, the first thing that springs to mind could be dinosaur bones or taxidermized animals.
1d
Giving cells an appetite for viruses
A team led by UT Southwestern researchers has identified a key gene necessary for cells to consume and destroy viruses. The findings, reported online today in Nature, could lead to ways to manipulate this process to improve the immune system's ability to combat viral infections, such as those fueling the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
1d
Biodiversity collections, vital for pandemic preparedness, face drop in specimen deposits
When you imagine a visit to a natural history museum, the first thing that springs to mind could be dinosaur bones or taxidermized animals.
1d
Turning sweat against itself with a metal-free antiperspirant
Body odor is an unpleasant smell, produced when bacteria living on the skin break down the proteins in sweat. To avoid stinking, some people apply antiperspirants that clog sweat ducts with foreign materials, such as metals, to slow perspiration. As a step toward a more natural solution, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have turned sweat against itself using an evaporati
1d
A non-destructive method for analyzing Ancient Egyptian embalming materials
Ancient Egyptian mummies have many tales to tell, but unlocking their secrets without destroying delicate remains is challenging. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Analytical Chemistry have found a non-destructive way to analyze bitumen—the compound that gives mummies their dark color—in Ancient Egyptian embalming materials. The method provides clues to the bitumen's geographic origin and, in one
1d
Giving cells an appetite for viruses
A team led by UT Southwestern researchers has identified a key gene necessary for cells to consume and destroy viruses. The findings, reported online today in Nature, could lead to ways to manipulate this process to improve the immune system's ability to combat viral infections, such as those fueling the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
1d
COVID-19 turned parents into proxy educators; new research examines the stress it caused
When the emerging COVID-19 pandemic caused most U.S. schools to close and transition to distance learning last spring, many parents were forced into new roles as proxy educators for their children. A study published today in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association, finds that roughly 51 percent of all parents surveyed in March and April had
1d
The DNA regions in our brain that contribute to making us human
With only 1% difference, the human and chimpanzee protein-coding genomes are remarkably similar. Understanding the biological features that make us human is part of a fascinating and intensely debated line of research. Researchers at the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and the University of Lausanne have developed a new approach to pinpoint, for the first time, adaptive human-specific change
1d
The DNA regions in our brain that contribute to making us human
With only 1% difference, the human and chimpanzee protein-coding genomes are remarkably similar. Understanding the biological features that make us human is part of a fascinating and intensely debated line of research. Researchers at the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and the University of Lausanne have developed a new approach to pinpoint, for the first time, adaptive human-specific change
1d
Mandatory Biodiversity Net Gain may not deliver the desired outcomes for nature
England's proposed mandatory Biodiversity Net Gain requirement for new developments might not deliver on promises to increase biodiversity, according to research being presented at British Ecological Society's Festival of Ecology.
1d
Health Care Worker Had Serious Allergic Reaction After Pfizer's Covid Vaccine
One of the workers, who did not have a history of allergies, remained in the hospital on Wednesday night. Some reactions to the vaccine were also reported last week in Britain.
1d
Researchers develop new combined process for 3-D printing
Chemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a way to integrate liquids directly into materials during the 3-D printing process. This allows, for example, active medical agents to be incorporated into pharmaceutical products or luminous liquids to be integrated into materials, which allow monitoring of damage. The study was published in Advanced Materials Technologies
1d
Mandatory Biodiversity Net Gain may not deliver the desired outcomes for nature
England's proposed mandatory Biodiversity Net Gain requirement for new developments might not deliver on promises to increase biodiversity, according to research being presented at British Ecological Society's Festival of Ecology.
1d
Buildings-related carbon dioxide emissions hit record high: UN
Emissions from the operation of buildings hit their highest-ever level in 2019, moving the sector further away from fulfilling its huge potential to slow climate change and contribute significantly to the goals of the Paris Agreement, according to a new report released today.
1d
COVID patterns
Scientists, policymakers and healthcare workers are eager to discern to what extent COVID-19 may be seasonal. Understanding this aspect of the disease could guide our response to the pandemic.
1d
LOOP technique for I&D of abscesses in adults is safe, effective alternative to I&D with packing
LOOP technique for incision and drainage (I&D) of abscesses in adults is a safe and effective alternative to the traditional I & D with packing and may offer an alternative to the standard regimen in the treatment of uncomplicated skin abscesses in pediatric patients.
1d
Information transport in antiferromagnets via pseudospin-magnons
A team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities (BAdW), and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim has discovered an exciting method for controlling spin carried by quantized spin wave excitations in antiferromagnetic insulators.
1d
Cancer: Tumor driver promoting EMT, metastasis and resistance to therapy
Publication in Nature: researchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB) identify, for the first time, the functions of FAT1, one of the most frequently mutated cancer gene drivers. They uncover that FAT1 mutations promotes invasive features, metastasis and resistance to commonly used anti-cancer drugs, and discover new therapy for FAT1 mutated cancers.
1d
Blocking DNA repair enzyme could help treat certain cancers
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have found a new way to prevent some tumours from repairing their own DNA, a function that is essential for cancer cell survival. This discovery could lead to much needed new treatments for certain types of the disease.
1d
A well-rooted study
Spend time in any of the world's great forests and you'll start seeing the trees as immense pillars holding the heavens aloft while firmly anchored in the earth. It's as much fact as sentiment. Trees really do link the ground to the sky by exchanging energy and matter between the soil and the atmosphere.
1d
Whole genomes map pathways of chimpanzee and bonobo divergence
Chimpanzees and bonobos are sister species that diverged around 1.8 million years ago as the Congo River formed a geographic boundary and they evolved in separate environments. Now, a whole-genome comparison of bonobos and chimpanzees reveals the gene pathways associated with the striking differences between the two species' diets, sociality and sexual behaviors.
1d
Neutralizing antibodies protect against severe COVID-19
Scientists at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, publishing in the journal Cell, show that the potency of neutralizing antibodies which developed in COVID-19 patients was significantly reduced in those with severe or fatal disease compared to patients with milder infections.
1d
BAME babies at highest risk of Vitamin D deficiency
A third of all babies and half of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) babies are vitamin D deficient, a large study of 3000 newborn's in the West Midlands has shown.
1d
Defense Experts Call on Biden to Ready Military for Climate Change
Some leaders want the military to use its purchasing power to invest in clean energy technology and solutions to mitigate climate impacts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
Fossilized lightning bolts reveal when ancient storms struck
New geological dating system could show when glaciers retreated
1d
Humoural Theory: Inside the Strange Pseudoscience That Dominated Western Medicine for 2,000 Years
For centuries, the bleeding edge of medical practice involved leeches, lancets and draining perfectly good blood from already-ailing patients. Was there ever a scientific method to this madness? Sort of.
1d
Air Pollution Might Age Skin, But Is Anti-Pollution Skincare the Fix?
The claims of some expensive creams and lotions may be rooted in science, but the products don't necessarily deliver solutions.
1d
Bigger and better 'tweezer clock' is super stable
Physicists have boosted the signal power of their atomic 'tweezer clock' and measured its performance in part for the first time, demonstrating high stability close to the best of the latest generation of atomic clocks.
1d
New type of atomic clock keeps time even more precisely
A newly-designed atomic clock uses entangled atoms to keep time even more precisely than its state-of-the-art counterparts. The design could help scientists detect dark matter and study gravity's effect on time.
1d
Oh so simple: Eight genes enough to convert mouse stem cells into oocyte-like cells
By activating just eight genes for transcription factors, researchers have directly converted mouse stem cells into oocyte-like cells that mature and can even be fertilized like egg cells. In addition to giving new insight into egg cell development, the research may lead to a simple route for generating large amounts of oocyte cytoplasm for use in reproductive biology and medicine.
1d
When dinosaurs disappeared, forests thrived
To understand how specific ecosystems were affected by a large asteroid impact that led to the mass extinction of dinosaurs, a team of scientists has analyzed the microscopic remains of plants from this period. They found that local plant communities and ecosystems experienced a long-term shift towards fewer aquatic plants and an increase in terrestrial plants, including trees such as birches and
1d
A pair of lonely planet-like objects born like stars
An international research team has discovered an exotic binary system composed of two young planet-like objects, orbiting around each other from a very large distance. Although these objects look like giant exoplanets, they formed in the same way as stars, proving that the mechanisms driving star formation can produce rogue worlds in unusual systems deprived of a Sun.
1d
The UK May Outlaw Scalping With Bots
Bot Scalpers It's nearly impossible to buy a Xbox Series X or PlayStation 5 right now, nevermind sought-after GPUs like NVIDA's GeForce RTX 3080 . And that's in large part due to automated bots sucking up available inventories almost instantaneously, before any human is able to enter their credit card information. Resellers in control of those bots then hike up the prices considerably, selling th
1d
Invention may get Army quadcopters to move faster
Researchers believe a new hinge is the key to get load-bearing, large, Army quadrotors to climb a few dozen feet in seconds
1d
Additional analyses of pridopidine for HD
Positive results from additional analyses of PRIDE-HD and Open-HART trials with pridopidine published in peer-reviewed journal, The Journal of Huntington's Disease . Exploratory additional efficacy data show pridopidine (45 mg bid) to be first drug to exert a significant and clinically meaningful beneficial effect on Total Functional Capacity. Results from Open-HART trial demonstrate potential dur
1d
Astronomers detect possible radio emission from exoplanet
By monitoring the cosmos with a radio telescope array, a Cornell University-led international team of scientists has detected radio bursts emanating from the constellation Boötes. The signal could be the first radio emission collected from a planet beyond our solar system.
1d
Colorful, magnetic Janus balls could help foil counterfeiters (video)
Counterfeiters who sell knockoffs of popular shoes, handbags and other items are becoming increasingly sophisticated, forcing manufacturers to find new technologies to stay one step ahead. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed tiny "Janus balls" that show their colored side under a magnetic field. These microparticles could be useful in inks for anti-counterfeiting tags, which coul
1d
Clemson researcher identifies gene teams working in subregions of brain
You must first understand how something works normally before you can figure out why it's broken. Clemson University researcher Yuqing "Iris" Hang has identified six mini gene co-expression networks for a normally functioning brain. That will allow researchers to test each of the gene teams to see if gene pairs are changing in brain tumors or people with intellectual disabilities.
1d
King of the Cave: New centipede on top of the food chain in the sulphurous-soaked Movile
A new species of endemic, troglobiont centipede was discovered by an international team of scientists in the Romanian cave Movile: a unique underground ecosystem, isolated several millions years ago during the Neogene, whose animal life only exists because of the chemosynthetic bacteria. As the largest Movile's inhabitant, the new species can easily be crowned as the 'king' of this 'hellish' ecosy
1d
Så återvinns värdefull zink ur aska
Aska från förbränning innehåller stora mängder värdefulla metaller som zink. Med en metod, utvecklad av forskare vid Chalmers, kan nu en del av metallen utvinnas, vilket leder till minskade miljöföroreningar, mindre deponi och färre transporter. När vårt avfall förbränns avges rökgaser som bland annat renas genom att små partiklar av så kallad flygaska skiljs ut. Varje år produceras miljoner ton
1d
Bigger and better 'tweezer clock' is super stable
Physicists have boosted the signal power of their atomic 'tweezer clock' and measured its performance in part for the first time, demonstrating high stability close to the best of the latest generation of atomic clocks.
1d
Mars' Crust Structure Is Like a Layer Cake, NASA Scientists Say
Onion Joke For the first time in human history, earthling scientists have analyzed first-hand data gathered firsthand about the internal structure of a planet other than their own. Thanks to data taken by NASA's InSight Mars lander, we now know that the Red Planet likely has a three-layered crust made of different types of rock stacked on each other like a cake, according to Nature News . It's a
1d
Biodiversity collections, vital for pandemic preparedness, face drop in specimen deposits
While the importance of natural history museums to human health has never been higher, in recent years the number of specimens being deposited in biodiversity collections actually has been declining.
1d
A non-destructive method for analyzing Ancient Egyptian embalming materials
Ancient Egyptian mummies have many tales to tell, but unlocking their secrets without destroying delicate remains is challenging. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Analytical Chemistry have found a non-destructive way to analyze bitumen — the compound that gives mummies their dark color — in Ancient Egyptian embalming materials. The method provides clues to the bitumen's geographic origin and,
1d
New theranostic approach reduces tumor volume and increases survival in NET study
A pair of copper radionuclides that target the somatostatin receptor overexpressed in neuroendocrine tumors has proven successful in identifying tumors and improving survival. According to new research published in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine , the imaging agent 64Cu-CuSarTate produced high-quality positron emission tomography (PET) images in a mouse model of neuroendocri
1d
Turning sweat against itself with a metal-free antiperspirant
Body odor is an unpleasant smell, produced when bacteria living on the skin break down the proteins in sweat. To avoid stinking, some people apply antiperspirants that clog sweat ducts with foreign materials, such as metals, to slow perspiration. As a step toward a more natural solution, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have turned sweat against itself using an evaporati
1d
Tom Cruise Melts Down at "Mission Impossible" Crew For Not Following COVID Rules
Superstar Tom Cruise has had enough of crew members breaking COVID-19 guidelines on the set for the upcoming blockbuster "Mission: Impossible 7." In a video obtained by UK tabloid The Sun , Cruise can be heard excoriating the film's crew for failing to maintain a safe distance distance. "If I see you do it again you're fucking gone," Cruise can be heard saying in the leaked recording. "We are the
1d
How and when to shoot with Apple's hidden new photo format
Presets like the one from Mastin Labs used here take better to raw images. (Stan Horaczek /) This week, Apple introduced iOS 14.3. Tucked in with its typical array of bug fixes and new features, the company rolled out its new ProRAW photo format for the iPhone 12 Pro and Pro Max . It's not on by default —you'll have to go into Settings > Camera > Formats > Apple ProRAW to enable it—but it could o
1d
Hur påverkar minskade utsläpp hälsa och klimat?
Jag och flera i min bekantskapskrets har noterat att luften blev klarare denna vår, bland annat i Mälardalen. Det måste väl bero på mindre utsläpp på grund av pandemin. Vilka utsläpp är det som har minskat och hur påverkar detta folkhälsa och klimat?/Per Kihlgren
1d
The human helpers of SARS-CoV-2
Proteins are the functional units of the cell and enable the virus to enter the host cell or help the virus to replicate. Scientists have examined the corresponding genes of the helper proteins in a large study.
1d
China's Chang'e-5 mission returns Moon samples
A capsule lands in Inner Mongolia with the first lunar rock to be brought to Earth in 44 years.
1d
A pair of lonely planet-like objects born like stars
An international research team led by the University of Bern has discovered an exotic binary system composed of two young planet-like objects, orbiting around each other from a very large distance. Although these objects look like giant exoplanets, they formed in the same way as stars, proving that the mechanisms driving star formation can produce rogue worlds in unusual systems deprived of a Sun.
1d
When dinosaurs disappeared, forests thrived
To understand how specific ecosystems were affected by the meteorite impact that led to the mass extinction of dinosaurs, a team of McGill scientists has analyzed the microscopic remains of plants from this period. They found that local plant communities and ecosystems experienced a long-term shift towards fewer aquatic plants and an increase in terrestrial plants, including trees such as birches
1d
Researchers identify predictors of timely enrollment in treatment for opioid use disorder
Frequent doctor visits were associated with timely treatment, while prior overdose, alcohol use disorder and back problems predicted non-enrollment, study finds.
1d
Study highlights stark inequality in survival after cardiac surgery between paying and NHS patients
A new study has revealed paying patients are 20 per cent less likely to die or develop major complications, such as reintervention or stroke, after cardiac surgery than NHS patients – findings researchers say cannot be explained by socioeconomic factors alone.
1d
International study reveals the effects of COVID-19 on the experience of public transport
A team of European researchers working on a project about public transport as public space have recently completed a study on the perception and use of public transport during the first wave of COVID-19.
1d
Despite decrease in recent years, rate of sledding-related injuries still concerning
A new study conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital found that 220,488 patients were treated in U.S. emergency departments for injuries related to sledding from 2008 through 2017. Nearly 70% of these patients were children age 19 years and younger.
1d
Elite soccer players help define normal heart measures in competitive athletes
Analyses of professional soccer players' heart test results provide insights on athletes' cardiac structure and function. The hearts of elite soccer players frequently exhibit electrical and structural patterns that are above guideline-defined normal ranges.
1d
Two thirds of people with lupus would take COVID-19 vaccine, shows LRA survey
Two out of three people with lupus (64%) are willing to take a COVID-19 vaccine if it is free and determined safe by scientists according to results of a survey conducted by the Lupus Research Alliance (LRA).
1d
Giving cells an appetite for viruses
A team led by UT Southwestern researchers has identified a key gene necessary for cells to consume and destroy viruses. The findings, reported online today in Nature, could lead to ways to manipulate this process to improve the immune system's ability to combat viral infections, such as those fueling the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
1d
UV exposure, risk of melanoma in skin of color
The association between ultraviolet (UV) light exposure and the risk of melanoma in individuals with skin of color was examined with a review of the results of 13 studies.
1d
All-cause excess mortality, COVID-19-related mortality among us adults
Researchers used publicly available data to examine all-cause excess mortality (the gap between observed and expected deaths) and COVID-19-related mortality during the early period of the pandemic among adults ages 25 to 44.
1d
Suicide risk among patients with Parkinson disease
Researchers investigated whether Parkinson disease was associated with an increased risk of suicide among a large group of patients in Taiwan.
1d
Suicide mortality in Maryland during COVID-19 pandemic
Differences in suicide deaths by race/ethnicity during the COVID-19 pandemic in Maryland were analyzed in this observational study.
1d
New scientific study: Children falling behind on measles vaccinations
While the world witnessed impressive progress in immunizing children against measles between 2000 and 2010, the last 10 years have seen such efforts stalling in low- and middle-income nations, according to a new scientific study.
1d
Traffic light system helps reduce clinical uncertainty, improve treatment decisions
A new study has found one in four clinical decisions made by physicians falls short of best practices, but when physicians reviewed a simple traffic light system prior to making a clinical decision, uncertainty was reduced by 70 per cent and treatment decisions improved.
1d
New type of atomic clock keeps time even more precisely
An MIT-designed atomic clock uses entangled atoms to keep time even more precisely than its state-of-the-art counterparts. The design could help scientists detect dark matter and study gravity's effect on time.
1d
Ultracold atoms reveal a new type of quantum magnetic behavior
An MIT experiment with ultracold atoms reveals new quantum magnetic behavior that may help in design of spintronic devices and magnetic materials.
1d
Novel principle for cancer treatment shows promising effect
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in the journal Nature that they have developed novel first-in-class inhibitors that compromise mitochondrial function in cancer cells. Treatment with the inhibitors stopped cancer cells from proliferating and reduced tumor growth in mice, without significantly affecting healthy cells.
1d
Quantum insulators create multilane highways for electrons
A team of researchers from Penn State has experimentally realized a quantum phenomenon in a multilayered insulator, essentially producing a multilane highway for the transport of electrons that could increase the speed and efficiency of information transfer without energy loss.
1d
Oh so simple: Eight genes enough to convert mouse stem cells into oocyte-like cells
By activating just eight genes for transcription factors, researchers at Kyushu University have directly converted mouse stem cells into oocyte-like cells that mature and can even be fertilized like egg cells. In addition to giving new insight into egg cell development, the research may lead to a simple route for generating large amounts of oocyte cytoplasm for use in reproductive biology and medi
1d
JILA's bigger and better 'tweezer clock' is super stable
JILA physicists have boosted the signal power of their atomic 'tweezer clock' and measured its performance in part for the first time, demonstrating high stability close to the best of the latest generation of atomic clocks.
1d
RNA molecules are masters of their own destiny
A new paper suggests that RNA molecules are responsible for regulating their own formation through a feedback loop. Too few RNA molecules, and the cell initiates transcription to create more. Then, at a certain threshold, too many RNA molecules cause transcription to draw to a halt.
1d
Your body image can be influenced by smells and sounds
Researchers find that there are smells that make us feel thinner and lighter, and other smells that do the opposite. The sounds of our footsteps can have a similar effect. The researchers suggest that sensory stimuli play a part in our self-image and may be subject to beneficial manipulation. Who we see in the mirror is more than a matter of lighting or angle. Our self-image is a subjective inter
1d
Flammekastende drone udsletter hvepseboer i Kina
»Nu behøver vi ikke bekymre os om at blive stukket af en hveps,« lyder det fra en lokal nær den kinesiske by Chongqing.
1d
How the First Life on Earth Survived Its Biggest Threat–Water
Living things depend on water, but it breaks down DNA and other key molecules. So how did the earliest cells deal with the water paradox? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
Characterising cold fusion in 2-D models
Progress towards 'cold fusion,' where nuclear fusion can occur at close to room temperatures, has now been at a standstill for decades. However, an increasing number of studies are now proposing that the reaction could be triggered more easily through a mechanism involving muons—elementary particles with the same charge as electrons, but with around 200 times their mass. Through a study published
1d
Study of dune dynamics will help scientists understand the topography of Mars
Barchans are crescent-shaped sand dunes whose two horns face in the direction of the fluid flow. They appear in different environments, such as inside water pipes or on river beds, where they take the form of ten-centimeter ripples, and deserts, where they can exceed 100 meters, and the surface of Mars, where they can be a kilometer in length or more. If their size varies greatly, so does the time
1d
RNA molecules are masters of their own destiny
At any given moment in the human body, in about 30 trillion cells, DNA is being "read" into molecules of messenger RNA, the intermediary step between DNA and proteins, in a process called transcription.
1d
Long Covid alarm as 21% report symptoms after five weeks
Official UK data suggests nearly 10% still have symptoms 12 weeks after infection Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A fifth of people still have coronavirus symptoms five weeks after being infected, with half of them continuing to experience problems for at least 12 weeks, official data suggests, as concerns grow about the scale and impact of "long Covid". Previous est
1d
New type of atomic clock could help scientists detect dark matter and study gravity's effect on time
Atomic clocks are the most precise timekeepers in the world. These exquisite instruments use lasers to measure the vibrations of atoms, which oscillate at a constant frequency, like many microscopic pendulums swinging in sync. The best atomic clocks in the world keep time with such precision that, if they had been running since the beginning of the universe, they would only be off by about half a
1d
Quantum insulators create multilane highways for electrons
New energy-efficient electronic devices may be possible thanks to research that demonstrates the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect—where an electrical current does not lose energy as it flows along the edges of the material—over a broader range of conditions. A team of researchers from Penn State has experimentally realized the QAH effect in a multilayered insulator, essentially producing a mult
1d
RNA molecules are masters of their own destiny
At any given moment in the human body, in about 30 trillion cells, DNA is being "read" into molecules of messenger RNA, the intermediary step between DNA and proteins, in a process called transcription.
1d
Ultracold atoms reveal a new type of quantum magnetic behavior
A new study illuminates surprising choreography among spinning atoms. In a paper appearing in the journal Nature, researchers from MIT and Harvard University reveal how magnetic forces at the quantum, atomic scale affect how atoms orient their spins.
1d
Team's bigger and better 'tweezer clock' is super stable
JILA physicists have boosted the signal power of their atomic "tweezer clock" and measured its performance in part for the first time, demonstrating high stability close to the best of the latest generation of atomic clocks.
1d
Eight genes enough to convert mouse stem cells into oocyte-like cells
In a new study published in the journal Nature, researchers in Japan report that activating just eight genes for producing gene-controlling proteins is enough to convert mouse stem cells directly into oocyte-like cells that mature and can even be fertilized like egg cells.
1d
Who counts as a speaker of a language? | Anna Babel
Backed by research and personal anecdotes, Spanish professor Anna Babel reveals the intricate relationship between language and culture, showing how social categories and underlying biases influence the way we hear, regard and, ultimately, judge each other. A talk that will leave you questioning your assumptions about what it really means to speak a language.
1d
Study uncovers two phases of infection in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia
To analyze SARS-CoV-2 at the tissue level, scientists examined lung specimens from 24 patients who succumbed to COVID-19. The analyses revealed two phases of infection in the patients: an early phase defined by high levels of virus in the lungs, and a later phase in which the virus is no longer present, but the damage to the lungs is too severe for recovery.
1d
China Moon Mission Brings Lunar Rocks to Earth, and New Competition to Space
The Chang'e-5 mission's success highlights the progress of China's space program, and growing rivalry with the United States.
1d
New study links cadmium to more severe flu, pneumonia infections
High levels of cadmium, a chemical found in cigarettes and in contaminated vegetables, are associated with higher death rates in patients with influenza or pneumonia — and may increase the severity of COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses, according to a new study.
1d
Sound engineers have better ways to trick listeners' ears
That will improve those listeners' experiences
1d
Wheat absorbs phosphorus from desert dust
After 12 millennia, a common crop still springs surprises
1d
Eight genes enough to convert mouse stem cells into oocyte-like cells
In a new study published in the journal Nature, researchers in Japan report that activating just eight genes for producing gene-controlling proteins is enough to convert mouse stem cells directly into oocyte-like cells that mature and can even be fertilized like egg cells.
1d
The world this year
[no content]
1d
KAL's cartoon
[no content]
1d
British American Tobacco wins approval to test Covid vaccine on humans
Treatment grown on tobacco plants gets US backing for clinical study Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage British American Tobacco has moved a step closer to producing a vaccine for coronavirus using tobacco plants , as it won approval in the US to begin testing on humans. The company behind cigarette brands including Lucky Strike, Rothmans and Benson & Hedges said the US
1d
Towards a circular economy: European manufacturers tend not to report on their actions
After analyzing the data from 226 large manufacturing companies from the European Union, a team of researchers from Lithuania, Poland and Sweden have drawn a conclusion that many organizations do not mention circular economy principles in their environmental reporting. In their reports, the organizations mostly refer to the effective use of primary flows and minimizing waste. However, the other pr
1d
Graduate student's BADASS code has astronomical benefits
An astro-statistics course University of California, Riverside, graduate student Remington O. Sexton took three years ago taught him techniques that led him to develop free, open-source code benefiting astronomers everywhere.
1d
Study focuses on evolutionary determinism and convergence in marine fishes
The stickleback is a well-studied system in freshwater lakes, but the evolution of convergent morphotypes that occupy different positions in the water column in marine environments is less clear. An international group of scientists led by researchers at the University of Oklahoma decided to test the extent to which independent transitions from bottom to midwater habitats in marine fish species fr
1d
Scientists precisely predict intricate evolutions of multiple-period patterns in bilayers
Surface instability of compliant film/substrate bilayers has raised considerable interests due to its broad applications such as wrinkle-driven surface renewal and antifouling, shape-morphing for camouflaging skins, and micro/nano-scale surface patterning control. However, it is still a challenge to precisely predict and continuously trace secondary bifurcation transitions in the nonlinear post-bu
1d
Study focuses on evolutionary determinism and convergence in marine fishes
The stickleback is a well-studied system in freshwater lakes, but the evolution of convergent morphotypes that occupy different positions in the water column in marine environments is less clear. An international group of scientists led by researchers at the University of Oklahoma decided to test the extent to which independent transitions from bottom to midwater habitats in marine fish species fr
1d
Study of dune dynamics will help scientists understand the topography of Mars
Researchers at the University of Campinas conducted more than 120 experiments with dunes of up to 10 cm that interact for a few minutes, obtaining a model valid for dunes on the surface of Mars that are many miles long and take more than a thousand years to interact
1d
Novel biomarkers predict the development of incident heart failure
Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital have discovered several new biomarkers that are associated with incident heart failure. In a new study, several inflammatory biomarkers and cell energy metabolites were linked to an increased risk of incident heart failure.
1d
Molecules derived from omega-3 can regenerate inflamed periodontal tissue
An in vitro study by a Brazilian researcher shows that maresin and resolvin synthesized from fatty acid stimulate periodontal ligament stem cells even in the presence of inflammation
1d
Patients don't receive recommended follow-up care after weight loss surgery
New research shows that patients don't receive the recommended follow-up care from their GPs after weight loss surgery – potentially leading to serious health consequences.
1d
Most-distant galaxy helps elucidate the early universe
New work from an international team of astronomers improves our understanding of the most-distant known astrophysical object– GN-z11, a galaxy 13.4 billion light-years from Earth.
1d
Infrastructure key to balancing climate and economic goals in developing countries
Developing nations have an opportunity to avoid long-term dependence on fossil fuel-burning infrastructure as they move toward economic stability, even if they are slow to cut carbon emissions, say the authors of a new paper. Countries with low per capita incomes can keep their contributions to global warming to 0.3 degrees Celsius with careful foresight and planning, urge Carnegie's Lei Duan and
1d
The Scientist?'s LabTalk – Episode 4???
The Past, Present, and Future of Gene Therapy: How to Scale-up Successfully
1d
New insights into Fragile X syndrome and the fetal brain
Researchers have revealed further insight into the fetal development of our brain and the potential causes of Fragile X syndrome (FSX).
1d
How the First Life on Earth Survived Its Biggest Threat–Water
Living things depend on water, but it breaks down DNA and other key molecules. So how did the earliest cells deal with the water paradox? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
How hope can make you happier with your lot
New research finds that that having hope for the future can make you happier with your lot – and protect you from risky behaviours such as drinking and gambling.
1d
The human helpers of SARS-CoV-2
Proteins are the functional units of the cell and enable the virus to enter the host cell or help the virus to replicate. Scientists from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin and from the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), along with colleagues from the United Kingdom, Germany and the United States, have examined the corresponding genes of the helper proteins in a large study.
1d
Researchers develop new combined process for 3D printing
Chemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a way to integrate liquids directly into materials during the 3D printing process. This allows, for example, active medical agents to be incorporated into pharmaceutical products or luminous liquids to be integrated into materials, which allow monitoring of damage. The study was published in "Advanced Materials Technologies
1d
How to stop infections caused by carbapenemase-producing bacteria
The authors aimed to evaluate in vivo the efficacy of imipenem plus meropenem in an experimental murine model of sepsis caused by clinical isolates of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii. The results of this study show that the combination of imipenem plus meropenem could be effective in the treatment of infections caused by strains of carbapenemase-producing A. baumannii (OXA-23 and OXA-58).
1d
Mandatory Biodiversity Net Gain may not deliver the desired outcomes for nature
England's proposed mandatory Biodiversity Net Gain requirement for new developments might not deliver on promises to increase biodiversity, according to research being presented at British Ecological Society's Festival of Ecology.
1d
Characterising cold fusion in 2D models
Through a study published in EPJ D, researchers show theoretically how cold fusion driven by muon capture would unfold within 2D systems, without any need for approximations.
1d
Fishing alters fish behaviour and features in exploited ecosystems
Not all specimens of the same species are the same: there is a marked variability within the same population and sometimes these morphological differences are translated into a different behaviour.
1d
Physicists solve geometrical puzzle in electromagnetism
A team of scientists have solved the longstanding problem of how electrons move together as a group inside cylindrical nanoparticles.
1d
Towards circular economy: European manufacturers tend not to report on their actions
After analysing the data from 226 large manufacturing companies from the European Union, a team of researchers from Lithuania, Poland and Sweden have drawn a conclusion that organisations almost do not mention circular economy principles in their environmental reporting. In their reports, the organisations mostly refer to the effective use of primary flows and minimising waste.
1d
How a very 'sociable' protein can hold clues about Alzheimer's origin
An international team of scientists led by the ESRF, the European Synchrotron, have found how the ECSIT protein dictates the behavior of proteins linked to the energy activity in mitochondria, which is largely affected in Alzheimer's disease. Their results are published today in Angewandte Chemie.
1d
How a very 'sociable' protein can hold clues about Alzheimer's origin
An international team of scientists led by the ESRF, the European Synchrotron, have found how the ECSIT protein dictates the behavior of proteins linked to the energy activity in mitochondria, which is largely affected in Alzheimer's disease. Their results are published today in Angewandte Chemie.
1d
Building a self-driving car that people can trust
Over the past year, we've seen a rise in robotaxis and autonomous vehicle use. Companies such as Waymo, Cruise, and Baidu have all made strong headway as industry pioneers. In China specifically, 2020 headlines regularly featured major autonomous vehicle announcements, such as the public launch of Baidu Apollo robotaxi services in the cities of Beijing, Changsha, and Cangzhou. But despite the inc
1d
Guess which states saw the most election disinformation in 2020
On November 3, Tina Barton ran into a problem. It was Election Day in the US and Barton, a Republican, was city clerk for Rochester Hills, Michigan, a conservative-leaning community near Detroit. As her team was uploading voting results, a technical issue resulted in the double counting of some votes. The error wasn't initially realized, but within 24 hours, it was noticed and reported to Oakland
1d
The pandemic led to a record drop in carbon emissions
Emissions slowed this year, but not nearly enough. (Troy Squillaci/Pexels/) When COVID-19 lockdowns were at their peak earlier this year, data from several countries showed that those restrictions had an unintentional benefit: clearing the air. In China, Europe, and the US, researchers reported huge drops in air pollutants . At the time, it wasn't clear what that meant for global carbon emissions
1d
Modulating cells' chloride channels
Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) researchers gain deeper insight into a cell membrane channel, with potential implications for drug development.
1d
Flexible and powerful electronics
A team of researchers led by the University of Tsukuba has developed a method for optimizing the electrical properties of carbon-based conductors by turning them into an ionic gel. This work may open the way for cheap, highly efficient sensors that can be printed on flexible surfaces.
1d
Ensuring a proper body plan
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have shown that the enzyme lysine demethylase 7a helps ensure the ordered axial development of the mouse embryo by modulating Hox genes which specify positional characteristics along the head-to-tail axis. Their findings suggest that the enzyme modulates Hox gene activation by regulating the repressive histone mark H3K9me2, an epigenetic modification of t
1d
New salmonella proteins discovered
Only one small protein needs to be missing and salmonellae are no longer infectious. This was discovered in a study in which the pathogens were re-analysed using bioinformatics.
1d
How a very "sociable" protein can hold clues about Alzheimer's origin
An international team of scientists led by the ESRF, the European Synchrotron, have found how the ECSIT protein dictates the behaviour of proteins linked to the energy activity in mitochondria, which is largely affected in Alzheimer's disease. Their results are published today in Angewandte Chemie .
1d
Effects of organohalogen pollution are coded in gene expression profiles of Baltic salmon
Researchers of Ehime University and the University of Helsinki measured hepatic organohalogen (OHC) concentrations and gene expression profiles in Atlantic salmon collected from three areas in the Baltic Sea. The results showed that OHCs and gene expression profiles were individually grouped in three areas and the covariation of the two datasets provided by a multivariate method was significantly
1d
OU-led study focuses on evolutionary determinism and convergence in marine fishes
The stickleback is a well-studied system in freshwater lakes, but the evolution of convergent morphotypes that occupy different positions in the water column in marine environments is less clear. An international group of scientists led by researchers at the University of Oklahoma decided to test the extent to which independent transitions from bottom to midwater habitats in marine fish species fr
1d
Three pillars of mental health: Good sleep, exercise, raw fruits and veggies
Getting good quality sleep, exercising, and eating more raw fruits and vegetables predicts better mental health and well-being in young adults, a study has found.
1d
Lipid identified in human breast milk may play important role in early childhood weight
A lipid metabolite called 12,13-diHOME is in human breast milk. The authors of the study propose that 12,13-diHOME, as well as linked pathway metabolites from breast milk, have a protective effect against obesity development in offspring. They also suggest that a single bout of maternal exercise may boost levels of the metabolite in breast milk and that may translate into benefits for offspring in
1d
The DNA regions in our brain that contribute to make us human
With only 1 percent difference, the human and chimpanzee protein-coding genomes are remarkably similar. Understanding the biological features that make us human is part of a fascinating and intensely debated line of research. Researchers have developed a new approach to pinpoint adaptive human-specific changes in the way genes are regulated in the brain.
1d
Babbler bird falls into climate change trap
Animals can fall into an 'ecological trap' by altering their behavior in the 'wrong direction' in response to climate change, researchers say.
1d
East Africa fears second wave – of locust swarms
Good breeding conditions mean millions of people are now threatened in the Horn of Africa and Yemen.
1d
EU kaster sig ind i kampen om nye satellitter til bredbånd
EU-Kommissionen vil være uafhængige af den teknologiske krig mellem Kina og USA. Europa bør derfor have eget netværk af satellitter til bredbånd i yderområder og som platform for kvantebaseret kryptering.
1d
Algorithms for Love: Japan Will Soon Launch an AI Dating Service
Every year for the last 13 years, Japan's population has shrunk. The country has one of the lowest birth rates in the world, and not enough babies are being born to replace an aging population; Japan also has the highest proportion of people over 65 of any country in the world. The reasons for the baby bust aren't totally clear, but some contributing factors could include economic insecurity , wo
1d
For Black and Brown Kidney Patients, Higher Hurdles to Care
Minority patients are diagnosed later, stay on dialysis longer, and are added to transplant lists less quickly. Why? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
'Diversity' is too shallow for real racial justice
What do Americans, particularly white Americans, mean by the term diversity? For much of the past two decades, associate professor of sociology Sarah Mayorga has worked to find out. For her book, Behind the White Picket Fence: Power and Privilege in a Multiethnic Neighborhood (UNC Press, 2014), Mayorga spent 18 months interviewing residents in the supposedly "integrated" neighborhood in Creekridg
1d
The skin microbiome
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03523-7 The skin supports a diverse community of microorganisms that train and support the immune system, and fend off pathogenic threats.
1d
The skin microbiome: a healthy bacterial balance
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03578-6 An interconnected microbial ecosystem might be key to maintaining dermatological well-being.
1d
Reproductive health
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03529-1 Advances in contraception further the sustainable-development goal of family planning.
1d
The skin microbiome and its relationship with the human body explained
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03524-6 The gut is not the only part of the human body that hosts an important microbiome. The surface of the skin is home to a sprawling and complex microbial ecosystem, which interacts with the immune system and influences dermatological health.
1d
The drug that could save the lives of many women
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03535-3 Misoprostol can prevent and treat postpartum haemorrhage. But because it can also cause abortions, availability of the cheap medication is often tightly restricted.
1d
Strengthening society with contraception
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03530-8 Access to affordable birth control can improve the social and economic status of women and their communities, especially in low-income countries.
1d
Research round-up: reproductive health
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03538-0 Sperm communication, surprises in abortion statistics and other highlights from clinical trials and laboratory studies.
1d
Why is long-lasting birth control struggling to catch on?
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03533-5 'Set and forget' devices are the most effective forms of birth control available. But few people choose to use them.
1d
How much should having a baby cost?
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03536-2 Access to fertility treatments is limited by the cost in both high- and low-income countries. But new technologies and attitudes aim to fix that.
1d
Religion is not a barrier to family planning
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03531-7 Shareen Joshi explains that faith-based organizations around the world are working with governments and secular institutions to promote birth control.
1d
Stopping sperm at the source
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03534-4 The development of male contraceptives has slowed in the past decade, but some preliminary studies are showing promise.
1d
Equal opportunities begin with contraception
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03537-1 Martha Bailey says providing free access to birth control for everyone would go a long way towards the creation of a fairer and more equitable society.
1d
Better birth control
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03532-6 Innovative forms of contraception could offer more choice for controlling fertility.
1d
Child services targets poor families for biased reasons
A shift starting in the late 1960s has targeted poor families with unnecessary investigations and child removals at the expense of services, argues Mical Raz. Black children are removed from their families at much greater rates than any other race or ethnicity in this country. At the same time, the sheer number of all child abuse investigations in the US is staggering: experts estimate that by ag
1d
Mångfald i svensk reklamfilm – mest för syns skull
Mångfalden har visserligen ökat i svensk reklamfilm men "icke-vita" har ofta bakgrundsroller utan repliker. Personer med asiatiskt utseende förekommer mest sällan, och i de få fall de är med, interagerar de obetydligt med den vita majoriteten. I studien kallas icke-vita för "POC" ("person of colour"). Det saknas konsensus för ett motsvarande begrepp på svenska. – Inom kritisk rasteori är icke-vit
1d
Low-intensity exercise during adolescence may prevent schizophrenia
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that low-intensity exercise, which is associated with improved mental function, has a protective effect against symptoms of schizophrenia in adolescent mice. These findings may facilitate the development of exercise programs to help prevent schizophrenia in humans.
1d
Report identifies critical gaps and research opportunities for improved cancer care
A new report finds that despite progress in the decline of cancer mortality, there are still critical gaps including the need to develop better tools and explore research opportunities that would lead to limiting cancer as a major health concern.
1d
Graduate student's BADASS code has astronomical benefits
An astro-statistics course UC Riverside graduate student Remington Sexton took three years ago taught him techniques that led him to develop free, open-source code benefiting astronomers everywhere. Called BADASS, the code is unique in that it provides a way for astronomers to fit the stellar motions of stars simultaneously with many other components, is written in a popular programming language,
1d
New insights into Fragile X syndrome and the fetal brain
Researchers at Tohoku University have revealed further insight into the fetal development of our brain and the potential causes of Fragile X syndrome (FSX).
1d
Capella delivers super sharp satellite radar pictures
US start-up Capella is in the vanguard of companies changing the way satellites see the Earth.
1d
To make shots hurt less, make the right face
Either a sincere smile or grimace can reduce the pain of a needle injection by as much as 40%, according to a new study. A genuine, or Duchenne, smile—one that elevates the corners of the mouth and creates crow's feet around the eyes—can also significantly blunt the stressful, needle-related physiological response by lowering the heart rate. "When facing distress or pleasure, humans make remarkab
1d
Extracting precious zinc from waste ash
Incineration of solid waste produces millions of tons of waste fly ash in Europe each year, that most commonly ends up in landfill. But this ash often contains significant amounts of precious metals, such as zinc. A unique method can now help extract these precious metals, potentially leading to reductions in environmental pollution, landfill and transport.
1d
A new method for the functionalization of graphene
A research team has demonstrated a novel process to modify the structure and properties of graphene, a one atom thick carbon.
1d
Evapotranspiration in an arid environment
Evapotranspiration is an important process in the water cycle because it is responsible for 15% of the atmosphere's water vapor. Without that input of water vapor, clouds could not form, and precipitation would never fall. It is the process by which water is transferred from the land to the atmosphere by evaporation from the soil and other surfaces and by transpiration from plants.
1d
Oceanographers have an explanation for the Arctic's puzzling ocean turbulence
: Their study suggests waters will become more turbulent as Arctic loses summertime ice.
1d
Type of sugar used to sweeten sheep milk kefir may improve consumer acceptance
The study of human emotions can be used to gauge the sensory acceptance of dairy products. A possible route to increase worldwide consumption of sheep milk kefir may be to improve its sensory acceptance, which can be a determining factor for its inclusion in daily diets. Scientists studied the effects of kefir sweetened with five different sugars on sensory acceptance and emotional profile in regu
1d
Device mimics life's first steps in outer space
A new device promises insight into how the building blocks of life form in outer space. It mimics how molecules come together in the freezing darkness of interstellar space.
1d
'Chaotic' way to create insectlike gaits for robots
Researchers are embracing chaos and nonlinear physics to create insectlike gaits for tiny robots — complete with a locomotion controller to provide a brain-machine interface. Biology and physics are permeated by universal phenomena fundamentally grounded in nonlinear physics, and it inspired the researchers' work. The group now describes using a system of three nonlinear differential equations as
1d
New, ultrastable tetrahedral
Researchers have designed and built a new chemical tool inspired by natural metal-containing enzymes in living organisms. The product, a tetrahedral 'chiral zinc', maintains its shape for years, providing a new structure with exciting possibilities for manufacturing pharmaceuticals and optical electronics.
1d
Genome sequencing paves the way for more sustainable herring fishery
An international team of scientists has used whole genome sequencing to characterize 53 herring populations from the Atlantic Ocean and the Baltic Sea. They have developed genetic markers that make it possible to better monitor herring populations and avoid overfishing.
1d
Delayed Arctic ice advance tracked back to atmospheric conditions near Alaska months prior
Experts recently discovered that atmospheric conditions near Alaska can affect sea ice conditions in the Arctic Ocean months later. The team used various data, including ship-based data from 2018, to uncover how a single atmospheric event over the northern Pacific Ocean caused significantly delayed sea ice formation in the Pacific Arctic region.
1d
Nearly half of young drivers are resuming driving just weeks after sustaining a concussion
Researchers found that nearly half of adolescents who sought specialty care for a concussion were back to driving when asked approximately two weeks after the injury, even though few had returned to exercise and sports.
1d
Scientists warn of likely massive oil spill endangering the Red Sea, region's health
A new study is calling for action to remove the oil from a decaying and inactive tanker in the Red Sea that holds approximately one million barrels of oil – four times the amount of oil contained in the Exxon Valdez, the tanker that had a disastrous environmental oil spill in 1989 – before its current seepage turns into a massive oil spill into the sea.
1d
Mummified baboons shine new light on the lost land of Punt
Ancient Punt was a major trading partner of Egyptians for at least 1,100 years. It was an important source of luxury goods, including incense, gold, and living baboons. Located somewhere in the southern Red Sea region in either Africa or Arabia, scholars have debated its geographic location for more than 150 years. A new study tracing the geographic origins of Egyptian mummified baboons provides n
1d
'Chaotic' way to create insectlike gaits for robots
Researchers are embracing chaos and nonlinear physics to create insectlike gaits for tiny robots — complete with a locomotion controller to provide a brain-machine interface. Biology and physics are permeated by universal phenomena fundamentally grounded in nonlinear physics, and it inspired the researchers' work. The group now describes using a system of three nonlinear differential equations as
1d
New, ultrastable tetrahedral
Researchers have designed and built a new chemical tool inspired by natural metal-containing enzymes in living organisms. The product, a tetrahedral 'chiral zinc', maintains its shape for years, providing a new structure with exciting possibilities for manufacturing pharmaceuticals and optical electronics.
1d
COVID-19 turned parents into proxy educators; new research examines the stress it caused
When the emerging COVID-19 pandemic caused most U.S. schools to close and transition to distance learning last spring, many parents were forced into new roles as proxy educators for their children. A study published today in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association, finds that roughly 51 percent of all parents surveyed in March and April had
1d
Just what the doctor ordered: Mental health and wellness apps
Kaiser Permanente physicians and therapists now have the ability to refer their patients to evidenced-based mental health and wellness apps through the organization's electronic health record system. With a simple referral to an app, Kaiser Permanente patients can begin using it on their own or under the guidance of a clinician — at no cost.
1d
Discriminatory policies threaten care for transgender, gender diverse individuals
The Endocrine Society and the Pediatric Endocrine Society oppose legislative efforts to block transgender and gender diverse individuals from accessing gender-affirming medical and surgical care, the two medical societies said in a joint policy perspective published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
1d
Buildings-related CO2 emissions hit record high: UN
Emissions from the operation of buildings hit their highest-ever level in 2019, moving the sector further away from fulfilling its huge potential to slow climate change and contribute significantly to the goals of the Paris Agreement, according to a new UN-backed report.The 2020 Global Status Report for Buildings and Construction found that building construction emissions and operational emissions
1d
Reversible superoxide-peroxide conversion drives high-capacity potassium-metal batte
Boosting the energy density is a universal topic for energy storage devices, especially for the low-price potassium-ion battery (KIB) technology, in which the limited specific capacities of cathode seriously hinder its development. Regarded as an attractive capacity-boosting strategy, triggering the O-related anionic redox activity has not been realized within sealed KIB system. Herein, the revers
1d
Scientists precisely predict intricate evolutions of multiple-period patterns in bilayers
Surface instability of compliant film/substrate bilayers has raised considerable interests due to its broad applications, yet it is still a challenge to precisely predict and continuously trace secondary bifurcation transitions in the nonlinear post-buckling region. Now researchers at Fudan University develop lattice models to precisely capture the nonlinear morphology evolution with multiple mode
1d
A New Satellite Can Peer Inside Buildings, Day or Night
A few months ago, a company called Capella Space launched a satellite capable of taking clear radar images of anywhere in the world, with incredible resolution — even through the walls of some buildings. And unlike most of the huge array of surveillance and observational satellites orbiting the Earth, its satellite Capella 2 can snap a clear picture during night or day, rain or shine. "It turns o
1d
Ella Adoo-Kissi-Debrah: Air pollution a factor in girl's death, inquest finds
Ella Adoo-Kissi-Debrah was "living on a knife edge" before her fatal asthma attack, the inquest heard.
1d
Mountain hares in Scotland are failing to adapt to climate change, making them more vulnerable to predators
A team of researchers from the U.S. and the U.K. has found that mountain hares in Scotland have not been changing their molt times in response to climate change. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of mountain hares in Scotland.
1d
Mountain hares in Scotland are failing to adapt to climate change, making them more vulnerable to predators
A team of researchers from the U.S. and the U.K. has found that mountain hares in Scotland have not been changing their molt times in response to climate change. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of mountain hares in Scotland.
1d
Danske forskeres inhalationsbehandling af Covid-19 består test i dyr
En ny behandling mod Covid-19, der er udviklet af danske forskere, har netop bestået en test i dyr….
1d
Neutralizing the pathological effects of extracellular histones with small polyanions
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20231-y Histones, proteins that bind DNA, are toxic for pathogens outside cells but can also cause multi-organ damage as seen in sepsis. Here the authors develop small negatively charged molecules that can be used as histone antidotes, and show that they improve the phenotype in mouse models with histone-related pat
1d
How NASA Scrambled to Save OSIRIS-REx From Leaky Disaster
The $800 million craft successfully collected precious asteroid material from a near-Earth asteroid. Then it started spilling regolith into space.
1d
Orwell's Animal Farm Sticks a Bit Too Close to the Book
Kudos to developer The Dairymen for tackling the classic parable, but a narrative focus means that players suffer the same lack of freedom as the game's characters.
1d
Giant pulses detected in the pulsar PSR J1047−6709
Using the Parkes radio telescope, Chinese astronomers have investigated an isolated pulsar known as PSR J1047−6709 and detected dozens of giant pulses during the bright state of this source. The finding is reported in a paper published December 10 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
1d
Long-term permafrost record details Arctic thaw
Frozen Arctic soils are set to release vast amounts of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere as they continue to thaw in coming decades. Despite concerns that this will fuel future global warming, the scale and speed of this important climate process remain uncertain. To help address this knowledge gap, ESA-funded researchers have developed and released a new permafrost dataset—the longest, satellite
1d
Miljonregn över pandemiforskning: "Måste vara bättre förberedda"
I regeringens forskningsproposition satsas nästan en halv miljard kronor på pandemiforskning – något som välkomnas av forskare.
1d
Celestial objects you can spot from your backyard
Thirty, flirty, and thriving. (Space Telescope Science Institute/) Back in April, the Hubble Space Telescope celebrated its 30th birthday . It blasted off from Florida aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery on April 24, 1990 and changed the way we view the skies forever. In the decades since, the telescope has spotted local moons, distant planets, and far-off galaxies. To celebrate the scope's third
1d
Researchers expose power of enzyme on key immune cells
Communication, serendipity and an enzyme called DOT1L have all combined to produce some exciting findings into the immune system's B cells and T cells by two groups of Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) scientists. These could result in further studies into a target for asthma and allergies, and fundamental work exploring the formation of immunity itself.
1d
Proenkephalin (penKid®) included in the ADQI consensus statements publication as functional kidney biomarker for the management of AKI patients
The Acute Disease Quality Initiative (ADQI) recommends the use of novel biomarkers for AKI management, including functional biomarkers as penKid®.
1d
The DNA regions in our brain that contribute to make us human
With only 1% difference, the human and chimpanzee protein-coding genomes are remarkably similar. Understanding the biological features that make us human is part of a fascinating and intensely debated line of research. Researchers at the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and the University of Lausanne have developed a new approach to pinpoint, for the first time, adaptive human-specific change
1d
Lipid identified in human breast milk may play important role in early childhood weight
A lipid metabolite called 12,13-diHOME is in human breast milk. The authors of the study propose that 12,13-diHOME, as well as linked pathway metabolites from breast milk, have a protective effect against obesity development in offspring. They also suggest that a single bout of maternal exercise may boost levels of the metabolite in breast milk and that may translate into benefits for offspring in
1d
Otago study identifies 'three pillars' of good mental health for young adults
Getting good quality sleep, exercising, and eating more raw fruits and vegetables predicts better mental health and well-being in young adults, a University of Otago study has found.
1d
Women face higher risk of death or heart failure following a heart attack: study
Women face a 20 per cent higher risk than men of dying or having heart failure during the five years following a heart attack, according to a new study from University of Alberta cardiology researchers.
1d
Dartmouth-led research featured in national journal focused on health system performance
New findings published by Dartmouth researchers and featured in a special issue of Health Services Research , are helping to generate new insights and knowledge about the prevalence, roles, and impact of integrated health systems.
1d
Researchers use origami to solve space travel challenge
Researchers have used the ancient Japanese art of paper folding to possibly solve a key challenge for outer space travel – how to store and move fuel to rocket engines. The researchers have developed an origami-inspired, folded plastic fuel bladder that doesn't crack at super cold temperatures and could someday be used to store and pump fuel.
1d
Science Also Reckoned With Race This Year: How'd They Do?
As communities across the nation marched for justice, academics took a close look at their own biases.
1d
Two bacterial co-cultures enhance microbe co-degradation of dicarboximide fungicides
Dicarboximide fungicides dimethachlon, iprodione and procymidone have been widely used worldwide to control plant diseases in recent decades. Due to widespread and inappropriate application of these fungicides, their residues are often found in water, soil and farm products, posing risks to the environment, wildlife and human beings.
1d
Fishing alters fish behavior and features in exploited ecosystems
Not all individuals of the same species are identical: There is a marked variability within the same population, and sometimes, these morphological differences are translated into a different behavior. A study by the UB shows that fishing alters resource distribution and therefore the behavior of two typologies of the same fish species, Labrus bergylta. These results, published in the journal Mari
1d
How to stop infections caused by carbapenemase-producing bacteria
In 2017, the World Health Organization published a list of pathogens for which new drugs are urgently needed. Acinetobacter baumannii was ranked in the critical priority group along with other Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteria. Specifically, A. baumannii is responsible for more than 10% of hospital infections, often severe, such as pne
1d
Two bacterial co-cultures enhance microbe co-degradation of dicarboximide fungicides
Dicarboximide fungicides dimethachlon, iprodione and procymidone have been widely used worldwide to control plant diseases in recent decades. Due to widespread and inappropriate application of these fungicides, their residues are often found in water, soil and farm products, posing risks to the environment, wildlife and human beings.
1d
Alligators
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03595-5 Trouble in the orchard.
1d
Fishing alters fish behavior and features in exploited ecosystems
Not all individuals of the same species are identical: There is a marked variability within the same population, and sometimes, these morphological differences are translated into a different behavior. A study by the UB shows that fishing alters resource distribution and therefore the behavior of two typologies of the same fish species, Labrus bergylta. These results, published in the journal Mari
1d
How to stop infections caused by carbapenemase-producing bacteria
In 2017, the World Health Organization published a list of pathogens for which new drugs are urgently needed. Acinetobacter baumannii was ranked in the critical priority group along with other Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteria. Specifically, A. baumannii is responsible for more than 10% of hospital infections, often severe, such as pne
1d
Simultaneously measuring absolute and relative delay of laser pulses
Recently, researchers from the Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (SIOM) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have made new progress in the timing measurement and control of ultrashort laser pulses.
1d
Can social networks help us be more creative?
The algorithms that social media platforms use to recommend who we should "follow" are designed to steer us to people who likely share the same ideas and interests.
1d
Analysis of ancient teeth reveal clues about how sociopolitical systems grow
Scientific analysis of the distinct eating habits of two societies in northern Peru 6,000 years ago has allowed a team of Vanderbilt researchers to draw new conclusions about how complex sociopolitical structures took shape in ancient Andean societies.
1d
Researchers design new molecules that boost fuel efficiency
Researchers from Trinity and TOTAL have designed, synthesized and tested new additives that increase fuel efficiency.
1d
When dinosaurs disappeared, forests thrived
It's known that the primary cause of the mass extinction of dinosaurs, about 66 million years ago, was a meteorite impact. But the exact mechanisms that linked the meteorite impact to mass extinction remain unclear, though climactic changes are thought to have played a part.
1d
Physicists solve geometrical puzzle in electromagnetism
A team of scientists have solved the longstanding problem of how electrons move together as a group inside cylindrical nanoparticles.
1d
Missing 5,000-year-old piece of Great Pyramid puzzle discovered in cigar box in Aberdeen
A chance discovery at the University of Aberdeen could shed new light on the Great Pyramid with museum staff uncovering a lost artifact—one of only three objects ever recovered from inside the Wonder of the Ancient World.
1d
Researchers isolate bacterial strain that shows extremely high tolerance to selenite
Recently, a research team led by Prof. WU Lifang from the Institute of Intelligent Machines of the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) isolated a bacterial strain with extreme tolerance to selenite. They also discovered in vivo sulfite reductase-mediated selenite reduction for the first time.
1d
Populations of the threatened black rail may rebound—but don't expect to see one
A bird that since John James Audubon's time has scurried under the radar of all but the most attentive ornithologists, conservationists and naturalists has received protection from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
1d
Smaller-than-average male tree crickets found to boost the sound level of their chirps using baffles
A trio of researchers at the Indian Institute of Science has found that undersized tree crickets make up for their inability to produce loud chirps by creating baffles to increase their volume. In their paper, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Rittik Deb, Sambita Modak, and Rohini Balakrishnan describe their study of tree crickets both in the wild and in their lab.
1d
Waterbird numbers and wetland areas declining despite temporary relief: aerial survey
Eastern Australia's wetlands and waterbirds have partially recovered from the drought—but long-term trends remain concerning, an aerial survey by UNSW researchers has revealed.
1d
Researchers isolate bacterial strain that shows extremely high tolerance to selenite
Recently, a research team led by Prof. WU Lifang from the Institute of Intelligent Machines of the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) isolated a bacterial strain with extreme tolerance to selenite. They also discovered in vivo sulfite reductase-mediated selenite reduction for the first time.
1d
Populations of the threatened black rail may rebound—but don't expect to see one
A bird that since John James Audubon's time has scurried under the radar of all but the most attentive ornithologists, conservationists and naturalists has received protection from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
1d
Smaller-than-average male tree crickets found to boost the sound level of their chirps using baffles
A trio of researchers at the Indian Institute of Science has found that undersized tree crickets make up for their inability to produce loud chirps by creating baffles to increase their volume. In their paper, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Rittik Deb, Sambita Modak, and Rohini Balakrishnan describe their study of tree crickets both in the wild and in their lab.
1d
Waterbird numbers and wetland areas declining despite temporary relief: aerial survey
Eastern Australia's wetlands and waterbirds have partially recovered from the drought—but long-term trends remain concerning, an aerial survey by UNSW researchers has revealed.
1d
Nye betonprøver fra højhus: Søjler har kun halv styrke
PLUS. Søjler i Njals Tårn har omtrent den halve styrke af kravet på 50 MPa. Rådgivere sår tvivl om Bach Gruppens løsning på problemet.
1d
2020 a bad year in many respects, but what about global carbon emissions?
The Global Carbon Project recently published the Global Carbon Budget 2020, giving world leaders access to data on atmospheric carbon concentrations, emissions and trends. Illinois atmospheric scientist Atul Jain was part of an international team of scientists that contributed data to the report. Jain talked about the carbon budget and this year's findings with News Bureau physical sciences editor
1d
Plant diversity in Germany on the decline
In the last 60 years, plant diversity across Germany decreased by an average of 15% in over 70% of the more than 2000 species examined. This most comprehensive analysis of plant data from Germany ever conducted involved researchers from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the universities of Jena, Halle and Rostock, the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ)
1d
World's earliest python identified from 47 million-year-old fossil remains
Together with his colleague Hussam Zaher of the University in São Paulo, Senckenberg scientist Krister Smith described the world's oldest known fossils of a python. The almost completely preserved snakes with a length around one meter were discovered in the UNESCO World Heritage Site "Messel Pit" and are about 47 million years old. The new python species, Messelopython freyi, was named in honor of
1d
New salmonella proteins discovered
Salmonella are bacteria that can cause food poisoning with severe diarrhea. If they penetrate from the intestine into the blood system, this can lead to sepsis, life-threatening inflammatory reactions in the entire organism. Since salmonellae are also becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics, new approaches are being sought to combat them.
1d
Plant diversity in Germany on the decline
In the last 60 years, plant diversity across Germany decreased by an average of 15% in over 70% of the more than 2000 species examined. This most comprehensive analysis of plant data from Germany ever conducted involved researchers from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the universities of Jena, Halle and Rostock, the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ)
1d
New salmonella proteins discovered
Salmonella are bacteria that can cause food poisoning with severe diarrhea. If they penetrate from the intestine into the blood system, this can lead to sepsis, life-threatening inflammatory reactions in the entire organism. Since salmonellae are also becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics, new approaches are being sought to combat them.
1d
Properly developed body plan of mouse embryos ensured by lysine demethylase 7a enzyme
The body plan of an organism, crafted over millennia of evolutionary trial and error, is so exquisitely fine-tuned that even a subtle deviation can be detrimental to individual survival and reproductive success. Now, researchers at the University of Tsukuba have elucidated the workings of an enzyme, lysine demethylase 7a (kdm7a), that facilitates appropriate development of the mouse embryo from ti
1d
Larry David and the Game Theory of Anonymous Donations – Facts So Romantic
What's intriguing about anonymous giving, and other behaviors apparently designed to obscure good traits and acts, like modesty, is that it's "hard to reconcile with standard evolutionary accounts of pro-social behavior." Photograph by David Hume Kennerly / Getty In a Curb Your Enthusiasm episode from 2007, Larry David and his wife Cheryl and their friends attend a ceremony to celebrate his publi
1d
Properly developed body plan of mouse embryos ensured by lysine demethylase 7a enzyme
The body plan of an organism, crafted over millennia of evolutionary trial and error, is so exquisitely fine-tuned that even a subtle deviation can be detrimental to individual survival and reproductive success. Now, researchers at the University of Tsukuba have elucidated the workings of an enzyme, lysine demethylase 7a (kdm7a), that facilitates appropriate development of the mouse embryo from ti
1d
Researchers design transistors based on ionic gel made of a conductive polymer
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have created a new carbon-based electrical device, π-ion gel transistors (PIGTs) by using an ionic gel made of a conductive polymer. This work may lead to cheaper and more reliable flexible printable electronics.
1d
A tropical fish evolved to endure rising temperatures – but it may not be fast enough to survive climate change
The climate is changing, and heatwaves are becoming more common and intense as a result. For the Great Barrier Reef, the world's largest structure of living tissue, the consequences are clear. The reef suffered its third mass coral bleaching event in five years in 2020, caused by prolonged periods with high water temperatures. Conservation scientists recently downgraded the ecosystem's condition t
1d
A Brief History of Human Challenge Trials
For more than two centuries, scientists have been intentionally infecting patients with dangerous diseases in order to learn more
1d
A tropical fish evolved to endure rising temperatures – but it may not be fast enough to survive climate change
The climate is changing, and heatwaves are becoming more common and intense as a result. For the Great Barrier Reef, the world's largest structure of living tissue, the consequences are clear. The reef suffered its third mass coral bleaching event in five years in 2020, caused by prolonged periods with high water temperatures. Conservation scientists recently downgraded the ecosystem's condition t
1d
Scientists publish the first human psychological aging clock using artificial intelligence
Scientists at Deep Longevity published the first set of psychomarkers of aging developed using deep learning to track the changes in human psychology and assess the effectiveness of interventions, life events, and external events. The new PsychoAge and SubjAge aging clocks were linked to mortality risk.
1d
High-brightness source of coherent light spanning from the UV to THz
An international team of scientists reports on a novel technique for a high-brightness coherent and few-cycle duration source spanning 7 optical octaves from the UV to the THz.
1d
Trump's Last Stand Is a Lost Cause
In the next few days, President Donald Trump will have to make a decision about what to do with the National Defense Authorization Act. It's a clunky name for a straightforward bill—it dictates how the military budget is spent—and it used to be what was known as "must-pass" legislation, because no Congress would dare fail to fund the troops, and no president would dare veto it. But Trump has repe
1d
An Enormous Bird Has a Real-Estate Problem
T he mist hung heavy on the Kinabatangan River on the July morning I looked for helmeted hornbills, one of the most elusive and endangered birds in the world. Everything was wet from days of afternoon thunderstorms and late-night drizzles. The air smelled green and fresh, but with an underlying note of decay. The river, swollen by the unseasonably heavy rains, flowed swiftly and quietly. In any o
1d
COVID-19 preprint data rapidly influenced critical care practice
In a new research letter, researchers examine whether preprint data on the use of the corticosteroid dexamethasone influenced clinical practice in treating COVID-19 critical care patients throughout Australia.
1d
An unexpected role for the brain's immune cells
A team has uncovered that microglial cells constantly survey the brain to prevent spontaneous seizures. These findings could offer a new way to intervene in Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and autism.
1d
Behavioral strategies to promote a national COVID-19 vaccine program
National efforts to develop a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine at 'warp speed' will likely yield a safe and effective vaccine by early 2021. However, this important milestone is only the first step in an equally important challenge: getting a majority of the U.S. public vaccinated.
1d
Homeopathy Declining in Germany
Homeopathy is on the decline in Germany and elsewhere, partly due to the dedicated action of skeptics. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
1d
Cops Are Getting a New Tool For Family-Tree Sleuthing
Verogen's push into public crime labs with genetic genealogy may help solve more cold cases, but it raises concerns about DNA data collection.
1d
Trump Could Torpedo a Bill to Boost Funding for AI
The National Defense Authorization Act would increase US investment by $6.4 billion over 5 years. But the president could veto it over other provisions.
1d
»Vi er klar til at køre den her coronavirus helt ud over kanten og langt ind i helvede«
Almen praksis ventes at spille en nøglerolle i vaccinationen af landets ældre og sårbare borgere, som står forrest i vaccinekøen. Måske allerede i juledagene. »Vi er klar til at give den en skalle,« lyder det fra Bolette Friderichsen, medlem af DSAM's coronataskforce.
1d
Get rid of the remote controls you don't need. Here's how.
Just imagine if this could control all of your devices. (Erik Mclean / Unsplash/) Between my TV, sound bar, Roku, and Blu-ray player, it feels like I need an end table solely dedicated to remote controls. When I head to friends' houses, it's worse, and I've even seen tables covered with remotes for devices they don't even own anymore. If that is your case, then it's time to end this madness and c
1d
Wealthier, Whiter Areas Are More Likely to Get Help After Fires, Data Show
New research offers further signs that racial and economic inequality leave some Americans more exposed to the worsening effects of climate change.
1d
Farewell to Europe's Horizon 2020
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03516-6 Although imperfect, the world's biggest funding scheme got a lot right.
1d
A Federal Law That Protects Competition but Permits Hate and Harassment Online Must Be Revised
Fixing a flawed Internet free speech regulation requires input from more than just tech giants such as Facebook and Twitter — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
Author Correction: Developmental and reproductive response of Brachmia macroscopa (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) to three host plants
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78822-0
1d
Wales imposes fresh Covid lockdown rules from Christmas Eve
Drakeford announces closure of non-essential shops and gyms and two-household limit on festive gatherings Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Fresh lockdown measures are to be imposed in Wales beginning on Christmas Eve, the first minister, Mark Drakeford, has announced. All non-essential shops, plus leisure and fitness centres and close-contact services, will shut at th
1d
Syge frøer og truede delfiner: Her er nogle af de arter, der i år uddøde eller kom tæt på
Alle ferskvandsdelfiner er nu truede. Til gengæld er bisonen kommet stærkt tilbage.
1d
What do people really think about immigration to Australia? We analysed their internet usage to find out
Many opinion polls on migration in Australia have limited sample sizes, such as the Essential poll, which often interviews around 1,000 people.
1d
Australia-first research reveals staggering loss of threatened plants over 20 years
When it comes to threatened species, charismatic animals usually get the most attention. But many of Australia's plants are also in grave danger of extinction, and in many cases, the problem is getting worse.
1d
Australia-first research reveals staggering loss of threatened plants over 20 years
When it comes to threatened species, charismatic animals usually get the most attention. But many of Australia's plants are also in grave danger of extinction, and in many cases, the problem is getting worse.
1d
Where does the Earth's heat come from?
Earth generates heat. The deeper you go, the higher the temperature. At 25km down, temperatures rise as high as 750°C; at the core, it is said to be 4,000°C. Humans have been making use of hot springs as far back as antiquity, and today we use geothermal technology to heat our apartments. Volcanic eruptions, geysers and earthquakes are all signs of the Earth's internal powerhouse.
1d
From molecule to medicine via machine learning
It typically takes many years of experiments to develop a new medicine. Although vaccines to protect against disease from the novel coronavirus are starting to reach clinics around the world, patients and doctors will still need treatments to manage COVID-19 symptoms for some time.
1d
Effects of organohalogen pollution are coded in hepatic gene expression profiles of Baltic salmon
Researchers of Ehime University and the University of Helsinki measured hepatic organohalogen (OHC) concentrations and gene expression profiles in Atlantic salmon collected from three areas in the Baltic Sea. The results showed that OHCs and gene expression profiles were individually grouped in three areas and the covariation of the two datasets provided by a multivariate method was significantly
1d
Modulating cells' chloride channels
Laboratory cell experiments and computer simulations have revealed molecular mechanisms regulating a protein channel responsible for transporting chloride and other charged molecules across cell membranes. The findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
1d
The Gollum snakehead gets its own fish family
As part of an international team, Senckenberg scientist Ralf Britz described a new bony fish family. These fishes, which live in subterranean, water-bearing rock formations, were only recently discovered in Southern India. Using computer-tomographic, molecular-genetic, and morphological methods, they were now assigned to a new family. In addition, the researchers' analysis revealed that the new fa
1d
From molecule to medicine via machine learning
It typically takes many years of experiments to develop a new medicine. Although vaccines to protect against disease from the novel coronavirus are starting to reach clinics around the world, patients and doctors will still need treatments to manage COVID-19 symptoms for some time.
1d
Effects of organohalogen pollution are coded in hepatic gene expression profiles of Baltic salmon
Researchers of Ehime University and the University of Helsinki measured hepatic organohalogen (OHC) concentrations and gene expression profiles in Atlantic salmon collected from three areas in the Baltic Sea. The results showed that OHCs and gene expression profiles were individually grouped in three areas and the covariation of the two datasets provided by a multivariate method was significantly
1d
Modulating cells' chloride channels
Laboratory cell experiments and computer simulations have revealed molecular mechanisms regulating a protein channel responsible for transporting chloride and other charged molecules across cell membranes. The findings were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
1d
How rail accidents with hazardous materials affect people's property values
A decade ago, U.S. crude oil was not transported by rail in the United States—not one drop. After an unprecedented expansion of domestic energy production, the use of trains became more common.
1d
Big but affordable effort needed for America to reach net-zero emissions by 2050, study shows
With a massive, nationwide effort the United States could reach net-zero emissions of greenhouse gases by 2050 using existing technology and at costs aligned with historical spending on energy, according to a study led by Princeton University researchers.
1d
The Gollum snakehead gets its own fish family
As part of an international team, Senckenberg scientist Ralf Britz described a new bony fish family. These fishes, which live in subterranean, water-bearing rock formations, were only recently discovered in Southern India. Using computer-tomographic, molecular-genetic, and morphological methods, they were now assigned to a new family. In addition, the researchers' analysis revealed that the new fa
1d
Dark storm on neptune reverses direction, possibly shedding a fragment
Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope watched a mysterious dark vortex on Neptune abruptly steer away from a likely death on the giant blue planet.
1d
Extracting precious zinc from waste ash
Incineration of solid waste produces millions of tons of waste fly ash in Europe annually; most ends up in landfill. But this ash often contains significant amounts of precious metals such as zinc. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed a method to extract these precious metals, potentially leading to reductions in environmental pollution, landfill and transport.
1d
Kangaroos can intentionally communicate with humans, research reveals
Animals that have never been domesticated, such as kangaroos, can intentionally communicate with humans, challenging the notion that this behavior is usually restricted to domesticated animals like dogs, horses or goats, according to a first-of-its-kind study from the University of Roehampton and the University of Sydney.
1d
Kangaroos can intentionally communicate with humans, research reveals
Animals that have never been domesticated, such as kangaroos, can intentionally communicate with humans, challenging the notion that this behavior is usually restricted to domesticated animals like dogs, horses or goats, according to a first-of-its-kind study from the University of Roehampton and the University of Sydney.
1d
A new method for the functionalization of graphene
An international research team involving Professor Federico Rosei of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has demonstrated a novel process to modify the structure and properties of graphene. This chemical reaction, known as photocycloaddition, modifies the bonds between atoms using ultraviolet light. The results of the study were recently published in the prestigious journal N
1d
New permafrost thermal stability map better describes the permafrost on the Tibetan Plateau
The Tibetan Plateau (TP), which is sometimes called "Earth's third pole," is the highest and most extensive plateau in the world. TP is well known as the "Asian water tower," as it is the largest permafrost region among middle- and low-latitude regions in the world. The average temperature of permafrost on the TP is approximately -2 C, this warm permafrost is more sensitive to climate change and h
1d
The key to future election security starts with a roll of the dice
We're now six weeks past Election Day, and electors in every state followed the will of the voters and confirmed the victory of Joe Biden. But while the Electoral College made the results official, President Donald Trump is continuing to protest them, despite having lost dozens of court cases within the past month. In any case, Congress is slated to complete the process of electing Biden on Janua
1d
Ny masteruddannelse skal styrke udbredelsen af personlig medicin
Fem danske universiteter er gået sammen om en ny masteruddannelse i personlig medicin. Det kræver mere uddannelse at understøtte paradigmeskiftet mod mere personaliseret behandling, siger studieleder.
1d
Ny corona-variants smittehast bekymrer: Vil kræve kraftigere restriktioner ifølge ekspert
PLUS. SSI vil ikke bekræfte om varianten, som pludselig blev dominerende i dele af England, er kommet til Danmark. Direktør henviser til pressemøde senere.
1d
Have Yourself a Million Little Christmases
Jimbo Livaditis has sold Christmas trees through wartime and peace, recessions and booms, disasters both local and national, and the rapid advancement of fake-tree technology. He has been in the business his whole life, spending his childhood Decembers running around the parking lot of his family's Atlanta ice-cream shop, where his dad—the eponymous Big John of Big John's Christmas Trees—had star
1d
Region Syddanmark lukker sin sidste regionsklinik
Den lægeklinik, der i efteråret 2018 åbnede på Sydvestjysk Sygehus for at afhjælpe lægemanglen i Esbjerg, skal nu lukke. Patienterne sendes videre til praktiserende læger i nærområdet.
1d
The Future of Social Media Is All Talk
From Clubhouse to Discord to Twitter, 2020 was all about giving people a voice online. Literally.
1d
The Best Pop Culture That Got Us Through 2020
These 48 movies, TV shows, albums, Twitter feeds, songs, podcasts, and books helped us get through this wildly unprecedented year.
1d
24 Gifts We Love From BIPOC-Owned Businesses
These household gifts are perfect for anyone on your list.
1d
The First Americans Are Being Vaccinated. Now, the Hard Part
State and local officials are scrambling to figure out how to inoculate millions—after health care workers and the elderly—against the novel coronavirus.
1d
Sikkerhedsbrud på ITU: CPR-numre på 400 personer var tilgængelige i fem år
Et sikkerhedsbrud på ITU har gjort 400 menneskers personoplysninger tilgængelige i fem år. Rektor kalder sagen uacceptabel og undskylder.
1d
What Happens if an AI Gets Bored?
In theory, it could become self-destructive—or even sadistic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
Covid exposed a 'racial health gap' in America. Here are four ways to close it | Tamra Burns Loeb and Dorothy Chin
Medical professionals need to understand that communities have different environmental conditions and vulnerabilities The Covid-19 pandemic has exposed the reality that health in the US has glaring racial inequities . Since March, people of color have been more likely to get sick and more likely to die from Covid-19 because they have been living and working in social conditions that worsen their
1d
Physicists Achieve Best-Ever Measurement of Fine-Structure Constant
Three times more precise than the previous record-holding determination, the result closely agrees with theoretical predictions but could still reveal pathways to new physics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
The Top Retractions of 2020
The Retraction Watch team takes a look at the most important publishing mistakes this year.
1d
T Cells: A New Hope for Lasting Protection against SARS-CoV-2
Alessandro Sette and Shane Crotty discuss the T cell response to SARS-CoV-2 and the implications for vaccine design and robust immune memory.
1d
Global rekord-hedetur: Vi oplever nu vejr, som er utænkeligt uden mennesket
Ekstreme orkaner, et glohedt Sibirien og rasende skovbrande var blandt vejrhændelserne i 2020, der er på vej mod rekord helt uden El Niño.
1d
Physicists Achieve Best-Ever Measurement of Fine-Structure Constant
Three times more precise than the previous record-holding determination, the result closely agrees with theoretical predictions but could still reveal pathways to new physics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
We're Never Going Back to the 1950s
T wenty years ago , the sociologist Robert Putnam in Bowling Alone used the decline of bowling leagues since the middle of the 20th century to symbolize America's declining social engagement. This year, he published a sequel of sorts, The Upswing , in which he identified more stray threads of our social unraveling: in lower marriage rates, church attendance, and trust in government; in falling me
1d
An app could catch 98.5% of all Covid-19 infections. Why isn't it available? | Adrienne Matei
These inventions could help our coronavirus crisis now. But delays mean they may not be adopted until the worst of the pandemic is behind us The world wasn't prepared for the Covid-19 pandemic – and it still isn't. Critical shortages of personal protective equipment and ventilators continue to put medical professionals and patients at unnecessary risk. Meanwhile, long wait times for test results
1d
Plant diversity in Germany on the decline
In the last 60 years, plant diversity across Germany decreased by an average of 15 percent in over 70 percent of the more than 2000 species examined. This most comprehensive analysis of plant data from Germany ever conducted involved researchers from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the universities of Jena, Halle and Rostock, the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental R
1d
Coronavirus and public holidays: what the data say
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03545-1 With the festive season ahead, Nature examines what is known about the risks of COVID spread, and how researchers will spend their time off.
1d
How a torrent of COVID science changed research publishing — in seven charts
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03564-y A flood of coronavirus research swept websites and journals this year. It changed how and what scientists study, a Nature analysis shows.
1d
Barrträd vintergröna tack vare fotosyntetisk kortslutning
Hur kan barrträd, som gran och tall, ha kvar sina barr över vintern när nästan alla andra träd fäller sina blad? Forskning från bland annat Umeå universitet visar att det verkar vara ett slags kortslutning av fotosyntesapparaten som gör att barren kan klara sig över vintern. Den gröna växtens klorofyll absorberar ljus också på vintern, men energin kan inte användas till fotosyntes eftersom biokem
1d
The Most American Religion
Photographs by Michael Friberg Image above: The Oquirrh Mountain Temple sits about 20 miles south of Temple Square in Salt Lake City, where the Church is based. This article was published online on December 16, 2020. T o meet with the prophet during a plague, certain protocols must be followed. It's a gray spring morning in Salt Lake City, and downtown Temple Square is deserted, giving the place
1d
Celia Milstein obituary
My friend Celia Milstein, who has died aged 92, was among those who contributed to the invention of monoclonal antibodies, which led to the Nobel prize for medicine of 1984, won by her husband, César Milstein , with Georges Kohler and Niels Jerne. Monoclonal antibodies are used in both treatment and diagnosis of diseases, including cancers, and are being trialled against Covid-19. Celia was born
1d
Geoengineers inch closer to Sun-dimming balloon test
Flight in Sweden would set stage for release of small amounts of chalky dust
1d
Dual-functional ultraviolet photodetector with graphene electrodes on AlGaN/GaN heterostructure
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79135-y
1d
Whole blood mRNA expression-based targets to discriminate active tuberculosis from latent infection and other pulmonary diseases
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78793-2
1d
Curated findings and implications in duplex ultrasound interrogation of the scrotum or varicoceles
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78619-1
1d
Attosecond streaking using a rescattered electron in an intense laser field
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79034-2
1d
Metronomic photodynamic therapy using an implantable LED device and orally administered 5-aminolevulinic acid
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79067-7
1d
Broadband dielectric spectroscopy for monitoring temperature-dependent chloride ion motion in BiOCl plates
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79018-2
1d
Hemocompatibility of new magnetically-levitated centrifugal pump technology compared to the CentriMag adult pump
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78709-0
1d
Glutamatergic projections from homeostatic to hedonic brain nuclei regulate intake of highly palatable food
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78897-9
1d
'Caught in the act': Veterinary researcher caught fabricating gene data, resigns from university job
A research technician at Washington State University resigned after his colleagues caught him fabricating data earlier this year, Retraction Watch has learned. Ryan Evanoff was working in veterinary microbiology at the Pullman campus when members of the department discovered that he had been falsifying sequencing data in gene studies. According to Robert Mealey, the chair … Continue reading
1d
A single dose of recombinant VSV-∆G-spike vaccine provides protection against SARS-CoV-2 challenge
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20228-7 Here, the authors generate a replication-competent VSV based vaccine expressing SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and show protection in the hamster model with one dose. Analysis of the antibody response in mice shows induction of neutralizing antibodies and suggests a desirable Th1-biased response to the vaccine.
1d
Eosinophils improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19297-5 Blood eosinophil (EOS) counts may serve as risk factors for human coronary heart diseases. Here the authors show that increased circulating and myocardial EOS after myocardial infarction play a cardioprotective role by reducing cardiomyocyte death, cardiac fibroblast activation and fibrosis, and endothelium
1d
Single-electron operations in a foundry-fabricated array of quantum dots
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20280-3 Semiconductor spin-qubits with CMOS compatible architectures could benefit from the industrial capacity of the semiconductor industry. Here, the authors make the first steps in demonstrating this by showing single electron operations within a two-dimensional array of foundry-fabricated quantum dots.
1d
Prolyl isomerization controls activation kinetics of a cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20104-4 SthK, a cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel from Spirochaeta thermophila activates slowly upon cAMP increase. Here, authors investigate cAMP-induced activation in purified SthK channels using stopped-flow assays and enzymatic catalysis and reveal that the cis/trans conformation of a conserved proline in the
1d
FUT2–ABO epistasis increases the risk of early childhood asthma and Streptococcus pneumoniae respiratory illnesses
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19814-6 Genetic variants discovered through genome-wide association studies for asthma together account for a small portion of the heritability. Here, the authors identify a possible epistatic relationship between coding variants in FUT2 and ABO, especially pronounced in severe and early onset asthma.
1d
Genetic architecture of host proteins involved in SARS-CoV-2 infection
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19996-z Finding effective treatments for COVID-19 depends upon understanding genetic regulation of proteins involved in SARS-CoV-2 infection and host response. Here, the authors identify genetic variants linked to expression of such proteins, data which could lead to the discovery of therapeutic targets.
1d
The EU must learn from the anti-expert narrative that drove Brexit
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03540-6 The sentiment that underpinned the Brexit referendum's success is not limited to the United Kingdom.
1d
Ny vagtlægeordning på Ærø
Ærøs praktiserende læger skal ikke længere arbejde på skift som vagtlæger efter almindelig åbningstid. I stedet etableres der en vagtlægeordning på sygehuset i Ærøskøbing.
1d
Johnson defies calls to 'cancel Christmas', urging small gatherings
Devolved nations advise much less social contact over festive season
1d
Babbler bird falls into climate change trap
Animals can fall into an 'ecological trap' by altering their behavior in the 'wrong direction' in response to climate change, researchers say.
1d
Black women have the highest risk of pregnancy-related heart problems in the US
Significant racial disparities exist in heart-related complications among pregnant and postpartum women in the United States.Despite improvements in recent years, Black women have the highest risk of pregnancy-related heart problems.Clinicians treating pregnant women should be aware of the heart risks associated with pregnancy and should closely monitor women who are at increased risk.
1d
"I started crying": Inside Timnit Gebru's last days at Google—and what happens next
By now, we've all heard some version of the story. On December 2, after a protracted disagreement over the release of a research paper, Google forced out its ethical AI co-lead, Timnit Gebru . The paper was on the risks of large language models , AI models trained on staggering amounts of text data, which are a line of research core to Google's business. Gebru, a leading voice in AI ethics, was o
1d
What Impact Can Having An Older Sister Have On A Child's Development?
A new study suggests kids in poor countries benefit hugely from having older sisters — who are more likely than brothers or even mothers — to engage in stimulating play.
1d
Distant Cousins Of Food Crops Deserve Respect And Protection
Scientists are calling for efforts to protect hundreds of wild plants in the United States that are related to native foods such as cranberries and chili peppers. (Image credit: Lisa Cox/USFWS)
1d
Svært at placere ansvaret, når AI slår ihjel
PLUS. Hvem har ansvaret, når kunstig intelligens laver ulykker? Brugeren, producenten… eller staten?
1d
Heathrow wins court battle to build third runway
In a blow to campaigners, judges say ministers' decision to approve the runway was legitimate.
1d
Why moral people tolerate immoral behavior
The problem with having a compass as the symbolic representation of morality is that due north is not a fixed point. Liane Young, Boston College associate professor and director of the Morality Lab, explains how context, bias, and tribal affiliation influence us enormously when we pass moral judgments. Moral instinct is tainted by cognitive bias. Humans evolved to be more lenient to their in-grou
1d
'If we don't do it, who will?': a year on the frontline of Covid-19
Key workers and survivors from four countries reveal the fear and uncertainty that has upended daily life – and how the past 12 months have changed their world Show your support for rigorous, independent Guardian journalism Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Marcio Maranhão , 50 Thoracic surgeon , Parque dos Atletas field hospital I've never experienced anything like th
1d
Babbler bird falls into climate change trap
Animals can fall into an "ecological trap" by altering their behavior in the "wrong direction" in response to climate change, researchers say.
1d
For the Poor and Disenfranchised, Higher Hurdles to Transplants
Black and Hispanic kidney failure patients are often slower to be diagnosed, and they face a tougher path to transplants than their White counterparts — even though they are disproportionately burdened by kidney disease overall. And while some disparities are being rectified, hurdles to equitable care remain.
1d
From Voter Fraud to Vaccine Lies: Misinformation Peddlers Shift Gears
Election-related falsehoods have subsided, but misleading claims about the coronavirus vaccines are surging — often spread by the same people.
1d
'Like a Hand Grasping': Trump Appointees Describe the Crushing of the C.D.C.
Kyle McGowan, a former chief of staff at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and his deputy, Amanda Campbell, go public on the Trump administration's manipulation of the agency.
1d
Babbler bird falls into climate change trap
Animals can fall into an "ecological trap" by altering their behavior in the "wrong direction" in response to climate change, researchers say.
1d
Author Correction: ADRML: anticancer drug response prediction using manifold learning
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-77486-0
1d
Publisher Correction: Daily mapping of Australian Plague Locust abundance
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 December 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79011-9
1d
2020 emissions: precedent-setting or bucking the trend?
For a few moments in late April of 2020, oil—normally the lifeblood of the world economy—became more expensive to store than to pay someone to take it away.
1d
Massutdöenden sker i cykler
Ingen vet exakt hur många massutdöenden som har ägt rum på vår jord. Forskarna har ganska bra koll på de fem största som har inträffat under de senaste 500 miljoner åren – och kanske befinner vi oss nu på randen till ett sjätte, orsakat av människans rovdrift på planeten. Utöver dessa stora massutdöenden har ett antal mindre ägt rum, vars antal varierar beroende på hur begreppet definieras.
1d
Lab-grown meat to make historic debut at Singapore restaurant
Lab-grown chicken meat will make its debut at a Singapore restaurant in a culinary first this weekend after the company behind the product announced its inaugural sale Wednesday.
1d
Fijians told to seek shelter as super cyclone closes in
Fijians living in the path of an approaching super cyclone were told to hunker down at home or flee to emergency shelters immediately on Wednesday, as authorities warned the storm has the potential to uproot buildings and cause mass destruction.
1d
China prepares for return of lunar probe with moon samples
Chinese ground crews are standing by for the return of a lunar probe bringing back the first fresh samples of rock and debris from the moon in more than 45 years.
1d
Excitement over Biden's pick to lead US health agency
Nature, Published online: 16 December 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03517-5 The latest science news, in brief.
1d
Researchers turn DNA detectives to aid rhino poaching prosecutions with forensic evidence
Researchers at the Wildlife Institute of India (WII), have, for the first time, used unique DNA markers to provide forensic evidence for alleged poaching cases involving the Indian rhino.
1d
Researchers turn DNA detectives to aid rhino poaching prosecutions with forensic evidence
Researchers at the Wildlife Institute of India (WII), have, for the first time, used unique DNA markers to provide forensic evidence for alleged poaching cases involving the Indian rhino.
1d
Male bats with high testosterone levels have large forearm crusts when females are fertile
Males may put a lot of effort into attracting females. Male peacocks flaunt eye-catching trains, but male bats, because they are active at night, may rely on females' sense of smell to draw them in. Three years ago, Victoria Flores, a predoctoral fellow at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama, discovered that male fringed-lipped bats often have a sweet-smelling, crusty subs
1d
Male bats with high testosterone levels have large forearm crusts when females are fertile
Males may put a lot of effort into attracting females. Male peacocks flaunt eye-catching trains, but male bats, because they are active at night, may rely on females' sense of smell to draw them in. Three years ago, Victoria Flores, a predoctoral fellow at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama, discovered that male fringed-lipped bats often have a sweet-smelling, crusty subs
1d
Tepary beans—a versatile and sustainable native crop
Agriculture accounts for more than a third of water use in the United States. In drier parts of the country, like the southwestern U.S., that fraction can be much higher. For example, more than 75% of New Mexico's water use is for agriculture.
1d
Tepary beans—a versatile and sustainable native crop
Agriculture accounts for more than a third of water use in the United States. In drier parts of the country, like the southwestern U.S., that fraction can be much higher. For example, more than 75% of New Mexico's water use is for agriculture.
1d
Microbes in dental plaque look more like relatives in soil than those on the tongue
From the perspective of A. Murat Eren, Ph.D., the mouth is the perfect place to study microbial communities. "Not only is it the beginning of the GI tract, but it's also a very special and small environment that's microbially diverse enough that we can really start to answer interesting questions about microbiomes and their evolution," said Eren, an assistant professor in the Department of Medicin
1d
Microbes in dental plaque look more like relatives in soil than those on the tongue
From the perspective of A. Murat Eren, Ph.D., the mouth is the perfect place to study microbial communities. "Not only is it the beginning of the GI tract, but it's also a very special and small environment that's microbially diverse enough that we can really start to answer interesting questions about microbiomes and their evolution," said Eren, an assistant professor in the Department of Medicin
1d
The phantom chorus: birdsong boosts human well-being in protected areas
If you thought your morning hike was contributing to your wellbeing, a new study shows that you're right, especially if our avian friends were singing while you strolled.
1d
The phantom chorus: birdsong boosts human well-being in protected areas
If you thought your morning hike was contributing to your wellbeing, a new study shows that you're right, especially if our avian friends were singing while you strolled.
1d
New research highlights impacts of weedkiller on wildlife
Prolonged exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of the weedkiller Roundup causes significant harm to keystone species according to new research at the University of Birmingham.
1d
New research highlights impacts of weedkiller on wildlife
Prolonged exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of the weedkiller Roundup causes significant harm to keystone species according to new research at the University of Birmingham.
1d
Lost artefact from Great Pyramid of Giza found in cigar box in Aberdeen
Wooden fragment from at least 3000BC discovered by chance by Egyptian university researcher A lost artefact from the Great Pyramid of Giza, one of only three objects ever recovered from inside the last remaining wonder of the ancient world, has been found in a chance discovery at the University of Aberdeen. Curatorial assistant Abeer Eladany, originally from Egypt, was reviewing items in the univ
1d
Incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma is increasing in younger adults
Esophageal adenocarcinoma is occurring more frequently in adults under age 50, and these younger adults are more likely to be diagnosed at advanced stages.
1d
How we think about trauma is vital to how we move on from it | James Greig
The world has wised up to how our past affects our present. But I know that labelling ourselves as 'traumatised' holds us back Trauma as a medical phenomenon has its roots in the late 19th century, when it was known as "railway spine", a condition suffered by survivors of railway accidents (a new phenomenon at the time) and believed to be caused by microscopic lesions in the body. It arose in tan
1d
Forskare svarar på frågor om coronavaccin
Har du frågor om de nya coronavaccinerna? Lyssna då på Farshid Jalalvand, expert inom bakteriologi och vaccinutveckling och Jonas Björk, professor i epidemiologi, som svarar på frågor om kommande coronavaccin.
1d
FDA approves first over-the-counter Covid-19 test
Self-testing kit developed by Australia's Ellume provides results in 20 minutes
1d
BioNTech set to become first foreign jab to enter China market
Vaccine to face competition from homegrown producers including Sinovac and Sinopharm
1d
Mountain hares at risk as winter coats fail to camouflage in snowless Scottish Highlands
Mountain hares in Scotland failing to adapt to climate change, leaving them more vulnerable to predators When snow begins to fall, mountain hares melt into the landscape by shedding their dark fur and becoming a brilliant – but camouflaged – white. But mountain hares in Scotland are failing to adapt to a dramatic increase in snowless days, with their white fur on dark mountainsides leaving them n
1d
Shackleton's sledge and flag from south pole expedition to stay in UK
National Heritage Memorial Fund bid successful after items from Nimrod trek sold to overseas buyer A sledge and flag that shine light on one of Britain's greatest adventure stories – Ernest Shackleton's Nimrod expedition to the south pole – have been kept in the UK. It was announced on Wednesday that the National Heritage Memorial Fund had provided a £204,700 grant to help buy objects which would
1d
COVID-19 cuts into college students' drinking
When college campuses closed in the spring due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the quantity of alcohol consumed by students decreased significantly if they went from living with peers to living with parents, according to a new report in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs .
1d
When You Live Next to an Autocracy
Bundled against Mongolia's frigid late November air, thousands clamored to see and hear the Dalai Lama four years ago, their boots crunching against a dusting of snow at the Gandantegchinlen monastery in Ulaanbaatar. Mongolia's officials insisted then, in 2016, that the visit was strictly religious, and had nothing to do with politics: The country has connections to Tibetan Buddhism that reach ba
1d
1d
Plantwatch: holly, ivy and how warmer weather boosts Christmas plants
These evergreens are thriving due to climate change but can smother other woodland species The holly and ivy decorations should be looking lush this Christmas thanks to climate change boosting the growth of these plants. In a study 15 years ago, holly was found spreading further north in Europe than ever before. The plant had pushed northwards by 80 miles (130km) in more than 60 years and was see
1d
1d
In pandemic, people are turning to nature – especially women
One of the first studies on our relationship with nature during COVID finds significant increases in outdoor activity, especially among women. Women were 1.7 (gardening) to 2.9 (walking) times more likely to report increasing their activity compared to men. In general, outdoor activities seeing the largest increases were: watching wildlife, gardening, photos or art in nature, relaxing alone outsid
1d
A new method for the functionalization of graphene
An international research team involving Professor Federico Rosei of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) has demonstrated a novel process to modify the structure and properties of graphene, a one atom thick carbon.
1d
Extracting precious zinc from waste ash
Incineration of solid waste produces millions of tonnes of waste fly ash in Europe each year, that most commonly ends up in landfill. But this ash often contains significant amounts of precious metals, such as zinc. A unique method developed by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, can now help extract these precious metals, potentially leading to reductions in environmental po
1d
Energy transition at the crossroads: New topical issue in Russian Journal of Economics
A new issue of the Russian Journal of Economics gets a set of profound messages across, summarized as: "transition matters, transition goes, yet transition is not a simple, unified march towards a Green future". The special journal issue comprises seven articles, authored by researchers from six countries and two continents. They address the issues underlying the energy transition: imminent and ne
1d
Aroma diffuser and plastic bag offer inexpensive method to test fit of face masks at home
Researchers have developed a way to use a simple home aroma diffuser to test whether N95 and other types of sealing masks, such as KN95 and FFP2 masks, are properly fitted, a result which could be used to help protect healthcare workers and the public from contracting or transmitting COVID-19.
1d
Semiconductor material analysis made possible with artificial intelligence
Researchers in South Korea have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that can analyze magnetic systems in an instant. The Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) reported that the collaborative research team led by Dr. Heeyong Kwon and Dr. Junwoo Choi from Spin Convergence Research Center and Professor Changyeon Won from Kyung Hee University developed a technique for estimating
1d
New research could lead to better eyewitness recall in criminal investigations
A team of researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, explore ways to potentially improve the recall of eyewitnesses in a new paper in the Journal of Cognitive Psychology.
1d
Tepary beans — a versatile and sustainable native crop
This drought and heat tolerant crop can provide nutrition, even when grown in harsh environments.
1d
Adverse childhood experiences are linked to justice system contact
A new paper released by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health reports a strong association between a high number of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and contact with the U.S. justice system. Analyzing data from eleven studies, the researchers found that results were consistent across multiple types of justice system contact and across diverse geographic regions of the country.
1d
New study links cadmium to more severe flu, pneumonia infections
High levels of cadmium, a chemical found in cigarettes and in contaminated vegetables, are associated with higher death rates in patients with influenza or pneumonia–and may increase the severity of COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses, according to a new study.
1d
African American youth who receive positive messages about their racial group may perform better in school
Youth of color represent over half of the school-aged population (kindergarten through twelfth grade) in public schools in the United States. This creates a need for evidence-driven approaches that address the pervasive Black-White achievement gap. A new longitudinal study shows that African American youth who receive positive messages about their racial group in school achieved better school grad
1d
1d
FT People of the Year: BioNTech's Ugur Sahin and Ozlem Tureci
By developing a Covid vaccine in less than a year, the couple achieved a remarkable scientific and business success
1d
SGLT-1/2-hæmmeren sotagliflozin har hjertebeskyttende effekt
Sotagliflozin er i Europa kun godkendt til behandling af personer med type 1-diabetes. Men SGLT-1/2-­hæmmeren bør måske også godkendes til behandling af type 2-diabetes. I hvert fald viser to store studier, at sotagliflozin har hjertebeskyttende effekt hos denne patientgruppe og derved kan redde menneskeliv. ­Bivirkningsprofilen bekymrer dog dansk overlæge.
1d
1d
An avocado a day keeps your gut microbes happy, study shows
Eating avocado as part of your daily diet can help improve gut health, a new study shows. Avocados are a healthy food that is high in dietary fiber and monounsaturated fat. However, it was not clear how avocados impact the microbes in the gastrointestinal system or 'gut.'
1d
Poverty linked to higher risk of COVID-19 death, study suggests
People in the poorest areas are more likely to be affected by severe COVID-19 — and to die from the disease — than those in more affluent districts, according to a study of critical care units.
1d
Valideringsfejl i kæmpe kommune-system: Borgere kunne se hinandens biblioteksdata
En fejl i kommunernes fælles bibliotekssystem, der er baseret på Cicero-softwaren fra Systematic, har gjort det muligt for borgere at se hinandens biblioteksdata på selvbetjeningsterminaler. Mindst en kommune har meldt sagen til Datatilsynet.
1d
Asia plays the long game on Covid vaccine rollout
Having reined in virus with social controls, many countries wait for west to act as jab guinea pig
1d
The Atlantic Daily: 3 Reasons Facebook Is Dangerous
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . ADAM MAIDA The social web is broken. And not just a little, or just recently, argues my colleague Adrienne LaFrance, who has been writing about media and technology for more than 15 years. Centra
1d
Firma skaber debat med ny rapport: Vores biodiesel er et bæredygtigt alternativ
PLUS. Økonomisk og CO2-mæssigt kan biodiesel være et godt alternativ til fossil diesel frem mod 2030, viser ny analyse, som imidlertid har mangler i regnskabet for arealanvendelse. Energieksperter afviser derfor, at dansk bioolie anvendes i transportsektoren.
1d
Vind med Ingeniørens julekalender: 16. december
Vær med i Ingeniørens julekalender 2020. Hver dag med nye præmier!
1d
An ever more perfect dataset?
Do you remember when global warming was small enough for people to care about the details of how climate scientists put together records of global temperature history? Seems like a long time ago… Nonetheless, it's worth a quick post to discuss the latest updates in HadCRUT (the data product put together by the UK's Hadley Centre and the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia). Th
1d
'What's that Skip?' Researchers say kangaroos can communicate with people
Study shows animals with no long history of domestication show patterns of interaction with humans similar to that of dogs or horses The classic TV show Skippy, about a child speaking with a highly intelligent kangaroo, might not be as fictional as we once thought, according to Australian and UK researchers. A study from the University of Sydney and the University of Roehampton in London suggests
1d
Rapid Covid-19 home test developed in Australia approved for emergency use in US
FDA approves Brisbane-based company Ellume's product, the first at-home coronavirus test that does not require a prescription A rapid, over-the-counter Covid-19 test developed by Australian firm Ellume has been given emergency approval in the United States. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the Brisbane-based company's 20-minute Covid-19 Home Test on Tuesday as the US battles the
1d
1d
Microbes in dental plaque look more like relatives in soil than those on the tongue
A new study out of UChicago and the Marine Biological Laboratory used state-of-the-art sequencing technology to deep-screen the genomes of microbes known as TM7 present in the mouth. This approach determined that TM7 species living on the tongue more closely resembled those found in the GI tract, while TM7 species in dental plaque more closely resembled environmental species, providing a hint at h
1d
Biden's Climate Team Begins to Take Shape
The president-elect is expected to pick Gina McCarthy, a former E.P.A. chief, as White House climate coordinator. Jennifer Granholm, a former Michigan governor, is said to be his choice for the Energy Department.
1d
1d